USE OF DIFFERENT WIRE SPLICES IN ELECTRICAL JOBS 1.

Western union short tie A wire splice widely used or applied inside to building. This splice is applied only to small solid wire. 2. Western union long tie A splice which is similar to a western union short tie, only that the number of twist at the center and at both end are more compare to a short tie. 3. Duplex Wire Splice A wire splice used in joining wires in parallel. 4. Britannia This splice in applied in both inside and outside the building to big solid wire where twisting is difficult. 5. Scarfed Splice A splice similar in appearance with that of Britannia only that its end is hidden. 6. Ordinary wrapped cable splice A splice used in joining through conductors that are stranded. This kind of splice is applied in the absence of the connectors. 7. Plain tap or tee join This is mostly used in outside work for joining a tap wire to a through conductor. 8. Small aerial tap join A join mostly used in location where wires are subjected to considerable movement. 9. Knotted or loop tap join This is mostly used for tapping a temporary wiring or lightning system where soldering is not applied. 10. Ordinary cable tap join This is generally used where large stranded wires are tap to a main or through conductor. 11. Wrapped tap or tee join This is used in large solid conduct where it is found difficult to wrap the large tap wire around the main wire. 12. Split cable tap or tee join This is most frequently used where small stranded wire or cable are tap to a through conductor. 13. Ordinary cross joint This is used where two tap conductors are to extend away from the branch conductor in opposite direction. 14. Double wrapped cross join This is used in the same manner and reason as the ordinary cross join with the advantage of being stronger. 15. Rat Tail join A wire splice mostly used in outlet and junction boxes. 16. Through Fixture Join This is used where fixture leads are connected to branch wire at an immediate point. 17. Terminating Fixture This is used where fixture leads are joining to the end of the branch or conductor. 18. Underwriters knot In making up a drop cord, tie an underwriters knot at the top so that the weight is supported not by the copper conductors where they are connected to the terminals, but by the knot.

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