The Advertiser (Adelaide, SA : 1889-1931), Thursday 17 October 1929, page 19

a had become Junior, who wealthy man from an investment in the Burra mines, bought the acre in North Ade-

GHOSTS OF EARLY
ADELAIDE
STORY OF THE "GREY LADY"

i

I

lalde.

which

had

i

orieinally

been

Gouger's, and built the house, which was eventually to be the first building the occupied by Nursing Sisters of the Calvary Hospital. In 1860 he added to the premises considerably. He died
in

Italy

in

1565.

STounghusband's

Spooks of Graham's Castle

The (Most

Archbishop
Rev.
the

of

Adelaide in

Dr.

Spence)

laying
for the

foundation-stone

of Nursing Sisters Hospital, North Calvary Adelaide, recalled perhaps the only excursions into the realms the
of

a son of 6ir Dominic daughter married of South Aus Daly, the then Governor tralia, and the Catholic only Roman hadSir the State Governor has Dominic died in Adelaide during his office. term of The son of Miss Young husband succeeded to t!se property, and visiting Adelaide from his residence in Europe about 35 years ago, apparently sold it. He returned to Europe and killed in an was accident in Paris. nouse then The be Younghusband came the of the widow property and of Mr. Johi daughter of Baker, who Morialta, pre

sented

it to the

Roman

Catholic

Church

for

the

the The the

in supernatural known history of Adelaide. in Archbishop, describing

conditions

Nursing
work,
quartets

under Sisters carried said they took

which out
up

the
first

their
their

first old

of the Nursing Sisters. William did junior, Younghusband, stint his money not ;n his building borne. It bad a huge ballroom, and was bunt of plastered limestone. Every wooden fitting In the place was solid window archi cedar—doors, frames, and floors. traves, skirting boards, Not a that cedar was particularly valuable time. wood at the There exten were
uses

the

house
been
to

in the basement which had presented
Church

of

the

toe

for

hospital pur

To poses. the other discom forts of the base ment cellars was added the story a of lady grey ghost which was

supposed
haunt of the

to

that pan building. her However, particular cellar sealed had been was up, and she never at seen, least, by the Sui ters. Whether the the ghost

of cedar forest available in Wales and Queensland, and it was a common at that period thin? for Albury wines to be packed in huge cedar cases, holding four dozen bottles. The were cases frequently used at a later period as It But clothes chests. was the magnitude in Trtiich the timber it in was used that gave the Young its atmosnhere husband of lavish home A remarkable iron fence sur espense. rounded the entire The house a^-re. easily the finest in Adelaide, and was ud to 30 years ago thsre was not an other building close to it. The unusual. building itself was It was of one storey, but the superstruc was ture raised the eight feet from ground by a waited basement It was in this basement that v.ere located the first Sisters quarters of the Nursing to by the Archbishop. referred
areas

sive New

South

The The

"Grey

Lady*

Appears

Archbishop to ferred
a

re

was

first cousin seven or merely a cousin times removed, of the supernatural, her is closely allied with some of the story most interesting features in early Adelaide history.

Mrs.
The
acre on

Conger's
which
was

Burial

the

Calvary

Hos

originally owned by Robert Gouger, the first Colonial Sec retary of South Australia. He built his home there. also owned Gouger land in the city of to-day, near the now street which bears his name, site, and that built a upon too. he On that block the bodies house. ol his wife and'ehild were buried. Their remains in 1838 were transferred to the West-terrace Cemetery. The burial of Gouger's wife on bis property near the have present Gouger-street, may of the formed the foundation story of the "Grey Lady of North Adelaide." About 1847, William Youngnusband, a had become Junior, who wealthy

pital

stands

provided for a hunt admirable accommodacion ing, or perhaps, to be more accurate, haunting ground for any conscientious And ghostto the apparent:? popular mind it wos a point ~f boner that a building, so peculiar in its architec ture, and dominating as it did the en tire city, should have the further dis tinctive feature of possessing a ghost. The story^became wildly current
I

walled-in

excavation

about merit
was a

60 to

years

ago.

that

in

the

base-

of the Younghusband
be

home

there

seen a lady sitting in grey of North Old residents Ade laide fully bear out the story, as they heard it in their young days. Nobody to have seems taken the trouble, though, to ask how she could be seen of through the solid walls the base

chair.

ment.

Apparently
that
it

what

had

had

been

Gouger

had

had

known his wife

happened, was that Robert buried on his
one

In from property. exchange fearful resident to another, who had by the Younghusband pass house

to at

National Library of Australia

http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article29629485

by the Younghusband pass at house night, that piece of Gouger's property must have become as the site regarded of Mrs. Gouger's burying-place. and not in city. the land the No to seems body have asked, elthtr, why Mrs. Gouger should haunt that or any other house, but the story grew, and was known up to 29 years ago. when the Nursing Sisters took over the property from the Baker family. When the old house was to give nulled down place to the present modern structure of Calvary Hosnital. the story gained another lease of Ufa. The mention of It by the Archbishop has been the first for many years. The additional story of the "haunted" part of the basement having been sealed up to prevent wan any further derings on the Dart of the ghost, which the ArchbishoD also mentioned, mav find an explanation in the nos sibility of a nart of the excavation filled at some to hi having been time rtrenath eive additional to the ageing foundation?
Adelaide been has not Adelaide's only ghost, al though the spook part of the history of the city seems con to have been fined to the northern suburbs. it was "Graham's as Castle," popu larly known, was second Adelaide's haunted of the house. The builder "Castle" was of the a colonist early set He business up in Ade days. laide with a stock far better than that of the and usual trader-colonist, pros He wel! in pered. did so business of the lucky few one that he was who were a in to position such a invest £400 mine. sum as in the original Burra In 1849 £16.000 per he was drawing as the fruits of his speculation. year Graham his "Castle" at Prospect built village, but he did not live in it for long. His mother, marrying a se very in the cond time, he returned early fifties to Europe, accompanied his by was a wife, who sister of a wealthy Adelaide family. Broker's Story residence —s; After Mrs. Graham's her Arfars-.s Mvs. second marriacp she became the —various well-known p?on!r made iheir home. Mr. G. E. Old "Castle" William-streot. liani. broker, of Kin? well remembers the jrhostly reputation a of boy. and he was the house when for in residence there was his family The some family years prior to 1866.
The

none

long.
matter
i

It
even

was

an

extremely

difficult

for the get servants keep them. house, let ; After the Oldham family left the pre mises several other peonle took up their "disHe" finally, the residence, and, College. became a part of Whinham The families shortly before tbe Whin ham also found occupation of the house To the it impossible to keep servants. Oldham Mr. heard ghostly conditions complained of by .his mother's servants,
to alone there
I

noises

had at

been

added

strange

and

eerie

nights.

1
j
! I '

Avoided

By

Neighbors

Graham's -Grey Lady"

Ghost
of

North

j

;

j

and knocking Weird rumblings, noises iu the walls of the service rooms "Castle" terrified the stalls, and the it became after nobody's residence was wide the people of the berth by given a ultiwas "Castle" The neighborhood. Castle and Graham taken down. mately The streets perpetuate its memories. they explanation of the noises, when down the were tracked by eventually the building, contractors who broke up walls being was of the simplest. The old colonial, were extremely thick. The the servants' noises which had disturbed were basement caused much so by rabof bits playing in the walls. Instead of echo Hip. noises had been the chosts i!ic merry

|

; j

; j j

i

gambcli?gs

of

the

offspring

small boys escaped pets. i A sidelight on the terror inspired by the 'Castle" ghosts in the neighborhood was also unearthed by the wreckers in an 1880. Hidden in the grounds was
some

ol

illicit

left the

house

that

year

and

moved

to

maintains Oldhsm that he recollects quite distinctly that one dusk, he entered evening, about the house and walked up the stairs. On the landing of the first floor be

MitCham.

i

Mr.

Be in a black dress. ran her and into her was That not there. was not so strange, as at the time she out night, his driving. Another was 15 yean was about stepbrother, who stand saw his stepmother his senior, the in bis room. in "Nothing ing that ever world would persuade me
saw

«-niio^

his mother to out but she room,

it

was

not

my

mother

I

"

saw,

Mr.

Oldhatn

affirms.

maintained at servants stoutly The was the time that the house haunted, ever them and of 6tayed very none difficult was an extremely It long.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful