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WALLOPS STATION HANDBOOK

6 April 1964

T ABLE OF CONTENTS

Section

CHAPTER I. GENERAL INFORMATION

I NTRO DUCTION ..

GENERAL

MISSION

Page

2

RANGE USE 3

Authorization III .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3

Lead Range Concept ••••••••••••••••••••••• 3

Range Safety .... .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 3

II

RANGE CAPABILITY •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

III

ORGANIZATION OF WALLOPS STATION '" ," .' .

FLIGHT TEST DIVISION •• , •••••• , •••••••• " .

Program Management and liaison Branch ." '" .

Range Instrumentation Branch •• '.' .' , •••••

Vehicle Preparation and launching Branch ••••••• + •

RANGE ENGINEERING DIVISION •••••••••••••••• Planning and Reporting Office ••••••••••••••••• Anal ysis and Computation Branch ••••••••••••••• Experimental Faci I ities Branch ••••••••••••••••• Instrumentation Development Branch •••••••••••••

Range Safety Branch •••••••••••••••••••••••

Instrument Service and Cal ibration Laboratory ••••.••

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT DIVISION •••••••••

Security Office " 110 ..

Publ ic Information Office ••••••••••••••••••••

Fiscal Branch ..

Management Services Branch

. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

Personne I Branch •••••••••••••• _ ••••••••• .,

Procurement and S uppl y Branch ••••••••••••••••

5

15

15

15 15 18 19

20 21 21 21 22 24 25

25 25 25 25 26 26 26

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

Section Page

TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION •••••••••••••••• 27

S afery 0 ffi ce ..4o............................................. 27

Support Service Planning Office. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 28

Range Support Branch ••••••••••••••••••••• 28

Fac:ilities Operations Brcnch • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 29

Damage Control Branch •••••••••••••••••••• 31

IV

DESCRIPTION OF WALLOPS STATION ••••••••••••••••

GEOGRAPHY "........................ 33

CLIMATE I! 'iii II- !II II lit !i '. i iii iii I, ii Ii iI. 33

WALLOPS STATION FACILITIES ••••••••••••••••• 36

Main Base 36

Wallops Mainland " .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 46

Wallops 151 and 49

Downrange Stations • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 68

Bermuda " " . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 68

v

ADMINISTRATION AND LOGISTICS •••••••••••••••••

GE NERAL .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. 69

MAILING AND SHIPPING DATA. . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 69

Mail. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 69

S hippi ng .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 69

TELEPHONE SERVICE •••••••••••••••••••••••• 71

TELETYPE SERVICE •••••••••••••••••••••••• • • 71

RAD I 0 !l. III .. • ill! !II • .. II' .. 'l1li If II .. I!!! II'. !I II .' !iii II .1 !I Ii ~ i! !!iii ... iii.. iii 72

EMERGE NCY L1STI NGS ••••••• ' •• " •• , ••• '" •• ,., " .•. ' 72

TRANSPORTATlON "" '. ~ ••••• ~ •• ,., •. '" ...... ' •• , • • • 72

To and From Wallops Station ' ••• ' ••• ' ••••••• ~ •. " 72

Local T ransportat ion ••• ,..... ,., • . '" • • • • • •• , • • " 73

ii

33

69

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

Section Page

VISITOR CONTROL ••••••••••••••••••••••••• 74

Guard System 74

Security Clearance ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 74

Classified Material 75

OFFICE SPACE •••• ' •• '0 ••• ' • ,', •• '0 '0 •• '0' •• '0' •• + •• '. • 75

TRANSIENT HOUSING .' •• '" •• " •• + ••••••••• '0 '0' 7,6

CAFETERIAS • "0 • ' •••••••• ~ ••••••••• ' 0 • '0 ••••• ' 76

MEDICAL FACILITIES .' •• '0'0 •••• '0' .' ••• ', ' ••• '0 .', • • 76

CHAPTER II. WALLOPS STATION FACILITIES

INTRODUCTION ...... ~ • '0 .' • '. ~ •• , ••• ' ••• ' ••• ", .' • '0 .' • '0 77

VEHICLE/PAYLOAD HANDLJNG, CHECKOUT, AND

LAUNCH FACILITIES ..... '0 •• '0;; •• ,0 .' •• ' •• '0 •• ,0 •••• ' ••

II

GE NERAL • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 77'

VEHICLE/PAYLOAD HANDLING FACILITIES. • • • • • • • • 78

S cope of Operations •••••••••••••••••••••• 78

Special Handl ing '" .. .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 79

Handl ing Equipment •••••••••••••••••••••• 79

VEHICLE/PAYLOAD CHECKOUT FACILITIES ••••••••• 80

S cope of Operations •••••••••••••••••••••• 80

Blockhouses .. • .. .. • .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. • • • .. .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. 80

Assembly Shops 81

Special Storage Areas ••••••••••••••••••••• 85

Dynamic Balance Facility. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 87

Inspection Foe if i ty ••••••••••••••••••••••• 91

Igniter and Rocket Motor Facil ity • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 92

VEHICLE/PAYLOAD LAUNCH FACILITIES. • • • • • • • • • • 92

Scope of Operations •••••••••••••••••••••• 92

iii

Section

III

IV

iv

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

Page

Launch Area No. 1 Launch Area No. 2 Launch Area No. 3 Launch Area No. 4 Launch Area No. 5

92 96 100 105 106

RADAR SYSTEM FACILITIES , •••••• , ••••••• " • 0 ••• " • ,0 •

109

GENERAL ••• '" •• " •• ' •••••. '" •••••• ,"' •• '.' .• ,"' • '. • 109

RADAR REQU I REME NTS •• " ••••.••••••• ' ••• '. • . • • 109

RADAR SYSTEMS ••• '. '.' •• '", •••••• ' ... ,', •• ,', ••• ' .' • '.' • 109

Radar Set AN/SPS-12 •••••.••••••.••. " •.• ". 1 10

Radar Sets AN/MPS-19 •••••••. '" ••••••••. ' • • 113

Mod II Radar •• ' • " ••• , ••••• ' •••• ., •• ~ ••• ' •• ,', • 115

Radar Set AN/FPS -16 •• '. ' •• ' ••• ' ••• , •• ' , •• ' • • • • 119

NASA Long-Range, S-Band Radar (Spandar) ••••••• 124

Radar Set AN/FPQ-6" • " ", •• " • " '" . " " • " ," • •• • • 129

Doppler Radar tII ".. 135

TELEMETRY SYSTEM FACILITIES " •••.•• , ••••• , ••••• , ••

139

GENERAL •• ' ' •• ' ••• ' ' ••• , ••• ' • '.' ~ • ,', ••. " •• • '39

TELEMETRY REQUIREMENTS .' •.•••• ~ • 0 ,_ ,0 ..... '. " •• '" 139

TELEMETRY SYSTEMS ••••• , ••••• , ' •• ' '. 139

PDM/FM Telemetry Facilities •••••••••••••••• 141

FM/FM Tel emetry Faci I ities ••••••••••••.•••. 141

FM/ AM Telemetry Facil Hies .' •• ~ '.' • , •• ' • • • 142

X-Band Telemetry Facilities ••••••••••••••••• 142

TELEMETRY EQUIPMENT ••.•• • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • 145

Rece i vers 145

Antenna 5 ystems • . • • • • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 152

Antenna Control Systems ••••••••••••••••••• 156

Preamplifiers 162

Tape Recorders 164

Rea I Time Readout Displ ays • • • • • • • • • • • . • • . • • • 171

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

Section

Page

v

COMMUNICATION AND RANGE CONTROL FACILITIES •••

175

GENERAL •.•..•.•••..•..•.. ,.. • • .. . • . . • . . . • 175

COMMUNICATION REQUIREMENTS. • •• • • • • • • .•. • • 175

COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS ••••••••••••••••• 175

Operational Intercommunications System •••••••• 175

Radio Communications Systems •••••••••••••• 181

Communications Control System ••••• • • • • • • • • • 187

Telephone System ••••••••••• • • • • • • • • • • • • 190

Teletype Facilities •••••••••••••••.•••••• 191

Scorno Telephone System. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 192

Paging and Countdown System •••••••• • • • • • • • 197

Closed-Circuit Television System •• • • • • • • • • • • • 193

Command Destruct System •.•••• ~ • • • • . • • • • • 197

Traffic and Pad Warning System ••• • • • • • • • • . • . 200

VI

PHOTOGRAPHIC AND OPTICAL FACILITI ES ••••...•..••••

201

GE NERAl ... iI oI!i ,Ii iii oIIi ,III 11111 <III • oI!j ,., 11 ,.; II iI" • I; ~ II ~ Il1o II • iii Ii .. III! II' II! :Il 201

CAMERA NElWORKS. .. • • • • . • .• • • • • . • • • • • • • .• • • 201

Tracking Camera Network ••.••.••.•.••••.••.•• 201 .

Fixed Camera Network " '. • .• • • • .. • • 201

Special Camera Networks .•.••.••••• ' • • • • • • • • 202

OPTICAL COVERAGE •••••••••••••• • • • • • • • • . 217

Mobile T -5 Tracking Telescope •••••••••••••• 217

IGOR Tracking Telescope. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 219

Short Range Optical Tracker (SOT) • • • • • • • • • • • • 219

Intermediate Focal Length Optical Tracker (IFLOT). • 221

MISCELLANEOUS • . • • . • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 224

Astrodome Shelters •••••••••••••••••••••• 224

Photographic Equipment •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 224

vi

Section

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

Page

VII DATA HANDLING AND DATA PROCESSING FACILITIES. • • • 227

GENERAL " .. " ill ill .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 227

DATA HANDLING AND PROCESSING REQUIREMENTS. • 227

DATA HANDLING AND PROCESSING SYSTEMS •••••• 227

Range Programming and Timing ••••••••••••••• 227

Radar Instrumentation ••••••••••••••••••••• 232

Data Reduction Systems •••••••••••••••.•••• 247

VIII METEOROLOGICAL SUPPORT FACILITIES ••••••••••••• 251

IX

GE NERAL l1li III III " III 251

METEOROLOGICAL MEASUREMENlS . • • • • • • • • • • • • • 251

Wi nd Data III l1li III III • .. .. 254

Temperature Data •••••••••••••••••• • • • • • • 257

Pressure Data III .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. • .. • .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. III • .. .. 257

Humidity Data " .. III III .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 258

Cloud Ceiling Data. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 258

METEOROLOGICAL DATA ACQUISITION EQUIPMENT. • 258

Anemometers " .. " .;. " • .. .. .. .. .. .. • • .. .. • 258

Raw i nsond e ..".. .. • • .. .. • .. .. • .. .. • .. ... .. • • .. • • .. III .. .. 259

Ceilometer AN/GMQ-2 ••••••••••••••••••• 264

Ceiling Light Projector DCE-16 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 265

Thermoscreen .... III ..... III III •• " .... III .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. • .. 265

Other Meteorological Data-Gathering Instruments • • • 265

DOWNRANGE SYSTEM FACILITIES •••••••••••.••••••

267

GENERAL" III III III .. .. .. .. • .. • .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. 267

DOW NRANGE REQU IREME NTS ••••••••••••••.•• 267

DOW NRAN GE SYS TEMS •••••••••••••••••••••• 267

US NS Range Recoverer. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 267

Dougherty Downrange Site ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 276

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

Section Page

Sandbridge Downrange Site (0 ptrack III) ••••••••• 277

Coquina Beach Downrange Site (Optrack I) • • • • • • • • 277

Bermuda Downrange Facilities ••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • 279

x

SUPPORTING SERVICE FACILITIES ••••••••••••••••••.

281

GENERAL. . • .. . • .. • .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . .. .. . .. . 281

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT SERVICES. • • • • • • • • 281

Publ i c Information ••••••••••••••••••••••• 281

Fiscal Management .. . . .. . .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. 281

Management Servi ces • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 281

Personnel Services.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. 281

Procurement and Supply • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 282

Security .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. . .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. . .. .. .. .. .. 282

TECHNICAL SERVICE FACILITIES •••••••••••••••• 282

Safety 282

Damage Control Foci I ities • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 282

Planning Services .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 283

Range Support and Facilities Operations ••••••••• 283

XI

MISCELLANEOUS FACILITIES •••••••••••••••••••••.

293

GE NE RAL • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 293,

FREQUENCY MONITORING AND INTERFERENCE

CONTROL SYSTEM ••••••••••••••••••••••••• 293

IONOSPHERE SOUNDING STATION ••••••••••••• 2,96

TIROS GROUND COMMAND AND DATA ACQUISITION

FACILITY .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. • .. 298

MIT LINCOLN LABORATORY •••••••••••••••••• 299

INSTRUMENT SERVICE AND CALIBRATION LABORATORY 299

vii

viii

TABLE OF CONTENTS [Contlnued]

Section Page

LENDING SYSTEM INSTRUMENTATION VANS. • • • • • • 301

Mobile Telemetry Vans. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 301

CHAPTER III. SAFETY

INTRODUCTION

• III • • • • • • • • • • .. • • • .. • • .

303

II

SAFETY ORGANIZATION OF WALLOPS STATION ••••••••

303

GENERAL III III .. .. • .. .. • .. .. 303

EXECUTIVE SAFETY COMMITTEE. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 304

OPE RATIONAL HANDLI NG • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 304

SUPERVISORS' SAFETY COMMITTEE. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 304

SUBCOMMITTEES ., •. " ••• ' •• ' ••••••••••• "' ••• ' • • 305

RANGE SAFETY COMMITTEE •••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • . • 305

RANGE SAFETY BRANCH. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 305

GROUND AND FLIGHT SAFETY SECTION •••••••••• 306

WALLOPS STATION SAFETY OFFICER

306

EMPLOYEES AND SUPERVISORS •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • . 306

III

RANGE SAFETY ..

309

GENERAL.. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. • ... .. • . .. .. • • .. 309

ORGANIZATION FOR RANGE SAFETY •••••••••••• 309

Range Safety Committee • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 309

Range Safety Branch •••••••••••••••••••••• 310

Section

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

GROU ND SAFETY •• '" .• '" •. ", •• " •• '.' •••• ' • " •• >0' ••

Ground Safety Plan •••••••••••••••••••.••.

Implementation • '.' •• ,', •• ,', •• ,', ••••.•••.•. ' •• '.' ••

EXPLOSIVES HANDLING AND STORAGE •••••.•• " •• General Approach to Explosives Safety •••••••••••

Definitions ..

Description of Facil ities •••••••••••••••••••• General Pol icies and Procedures ••••••••••••••• Storage and Storage Areas •.••.•••••••••••••• Motor Ve h i cI e Transportation ••••••••••••• ••• Rai I Transportation •.••••••.•••••••••••.••

Air Transportation ..

Procedure in Event of Electrical Storm ••••••••••• Explosives Destruction and Disposal,,, •• ' .•• ' ••• '" •• Explosive Materials Characteristics ••••••••••.•• Nonexplosives and New Explosives •••••••••••.•

OPERATIONAL HANDLI NG .•••••.••••••••••••• General Approach to Operational Handl ing Safety ••• Description of Facil ities •••••••••••••••••••• General Policies and Procedures .•••••••••••••• General Restrictions in Operating Areas ••••••••.

Rocket Motor Hazards ••••••••••••••••••• ••

Rocket Motor Assembly Precautions ••••••••••••• Transportation to Ready Storage or launcher •••••••

Ready Storage ..

Precautions for Other Explosive Operations •••••••• Procedure in Event of E lectri cal Storm •••••••••••

Fire Procedures ..

Procedures in Event of an Accident

LIQUID PROPELLANTS HANDLING, STORAGE, AND

OPERATIONS •••••••••••• ' •• ~ ••• '.' ••. ' ••••••• '

Description of Facil ities •••••••••.•••••••••• General Policies and Procedures .•••••••••••••• Protective Clothing and Breathing Apparatus ••••••• Storage and Storage Handl ing •••••••••••••••• Operational Handl ing •••••••••••••••••••••

Transportation ..

Page

311 311 312

313 313 314 319 328 331 356 372 375 376 376 378 383

385 385 386 392 393 394 398 402 402 402 404 405 405

405 406 412 413 415 424 425

ix

x

Section

IV

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

Static Electricity •••••••••••••••••••••••••

Personnel Contamination and First Aid •••••••••••

Fire Procedures •••• II ..

Procedure in Event of Electrical Storm ••••••••••• Personnel Physical Considerations •••••••••••••• Liquid Propellants Characteristics and Hazards •••••• Characteristics and Hazards of Other Liquids •••••••

PAD SAFETY II II ..

Defi nitions ..

Respons ibil it ies

.. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

Procedures. " .. • .. .. • • • • • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. ..

Work Practices

.. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. . .. ..

RADIATION HAZARDS ••

Biological Aspects ..

Precaut ions ..

RADIOLOGICAL SAFETY ••••••••••••••••••••••

Pol icy ..

Employees ..

Standards for Radiation Protection

.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

FLIGHT SAFETY ~ .• '" • '.' '. , ••• ," .0 ' ••• ' •• ' •• ' ••• ' •••• '.,

Definitions ••••

.. .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..

FI ight Safety PI an .

Implementation .

INDUSTRIAL SAFETY ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••

GE NERAL .

SAFETY RULES AND POLICIES .... ' •••••••••••

Genera I Gu ide lines

Operation, Maintenance, and Install ation Practices •• Acc idents and In juries •••••••••••••••••••••

FIRST AID ~ • ~ • Wounds. ' .•

Page

430 430 434 436 436 437 439

444 445 448 450 456

459 459 460

461 461 461 462

464 464 465 466

475

475

475 475 476 483

489 489

TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued)

Section Page

Fractures, Sprains, and Strains. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 489

Burns, Sunburn, and Heat Exheustion ' • • • • • • • • • • • • 489

CHAPTER IV. RANGE USERS INFORMATION

INTRODUCTION •••••••••••••••• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 491

II

RANGE SAFETY POLICIES ••••••••••••••••••••••••

491

GENERAL II .. .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. 491

SHIPPING OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

492

PYROTECHNIC CIRCUIT RESTRICTIONS

. .. . .. . . . .. .. . ..

492

ELECTRICAL POWER CONSIDERATIONS

• .. • • .. .. .. .. It .. ..

493

R-F CHECKS ........ .. .. .. . .. .. .. • .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. 493

RADIATION HAZARDS •••••••••••••••••••••.• 493

FLIGHT SAFETY. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 493

FLIGHT TERMINATION. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 494

III

AUTHORIZATION AND LIAISON PROCEDURES ••••.•••••

495

AUTHORIZATION FOR RANGE USE. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 495

National Aeronauti cs and Space Administration • • • • • 495

Other Prospective Users • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 495

Uni ted States Air Force Pro jects • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 495

SCHEDULING .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. . .. .. .. ,496

RANGE CLEARANCE AGREEMENTS • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 496

OPERATIONAL CHANNEL OF COMMUNICATIONS. • • • 497

Prel iminary Work II .. • .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 497

xi

xii

TABLE OF CONTENTS {Continued}

Section Page

Pre I aunch Activities •••••••••••••••••••••• 498

Countdown Operations • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 498

IV

TECHNICAL DATA REQUIREMENTS .

499

PRELIMINARY DISCUSSIONS ••••••••••••••••••• 499

GENERAL PROGRAM DESCRIPTION •••••••••••••• 499

T est Description .•••••••••••••• ., • • • • . • • • • 499

Payload Description •••••••••••••••••••••• 499

Vehicle Description •••••••••••••••••••••• 500

Safety Information •.••••••••••••••••••••• 500

LONG-RANGE PLANNING AND SCHEDULING DATA. • 500

Format for Payload Description Document. • • • • • • • • 500

Format for Vehicle Description Document. • • • • • • • • 513

INFORMATION CHANGES •••••••••••••••••••• 526

TEST PREPARATION DATA • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 527

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS ••••••••••••••••••••••• 527

CHANGE ORDERS •••••••••••••••••••••••••• 527

TECHNICAL INFORMATION TIME SCHEDULE •••••••• 527

SHIPPING INFORMATfON • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 528

Figure

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS

CHAPTER I. GENERAL INFORMATION

Page

1. Wallops Island, Aerial View •••••••••••••••••••• Frontispiece

2. National Aeronautics and Space Administration

3. 4. 5. 6., 7.,

8~, '9.

10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15,. 16. 17. 18,.

19. 20.

21 • 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

Organization Chart . " " " " "

Wallops Range Outl ine Map •••••••••••••••••••••• Scout Space Probe Vehicle •••••••••••••••••••••••

Trai I blazer II ., .... " .... " ... " .. """ ........ "" .. " .... " .... """

Little Joe Booster "" " .... " .. " " " .. " .. " " .. " " " " " " .. "

Two -5 tage S hotput " .. " ........ "" .. "" .. "" .. "" ,,",, ....

Nike-Apache Sounding Rocket ••••••••••••••••••••• Aerobee 150A Sounding Rocket •••••••••••••••••••• Journeyman Sounding Rocket •••••••••••••••••••••• Wallops Station Organ ization Chart ••••••.•••••••••• Wallops Station, Overall Site Map ••••••••••••••.••• Wallops Station Wind Roses (All Speeds Inclusive) •••••••• Wallops Station, Frequency of Total Cloud Amount in Tenths •• Main Base, Data on Ceil ings (in Feet) •••••••••••••••• Wallops Station, Main Base Map •••••••••••••••••••• Wallops Station, Mainland Map •••••••••••••••••••• Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet 1 of 4) ••••••••••••

Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet 2 of 4) ••••••••••••

Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet 3 of 4) •••••••••••• Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet 4 of 4) •••••••••••• Wallops Island, Launch Areas No.1 and 2 ••••••••••••• Wallops Island, Launch Areas No.3, 4, and 5 ••••••••••

CHAPTER II. WALLOPS STATION FACILITIES

Blockhouse No.1, Exterior View ••••••••••••••.•••• Blockhouse No.2, Exterior View ••••••••••••••••••• Brockhouse No.3, Exterior View ••••••••••••••••••• Assembly Shop No.1, Exterior View •••• , •• ,', •.••••• , •. Assembly Shop No.3, Exterior View •••• ' •• ~ •••••• '. ;0 • Assembly Shop No.6, Exterior View •••• , ••••••••• " •• Dynamic Balance Facility, Exterior View •••••••••••••• Horizontal Balancing Machine No.1 ••• " ••••••••• "' ••

4 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 16 34 37 38 38 41 48 51 57 64 65 66 67

82 82 82 84 84 84 88 88

xiii

xiv

Figure

29. 30. 3l. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61.

62. 63. 64. 65. 66.

--_'-- .

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (Continued)

Vertical Balancing Machine No.1, •• ' ••••••• , ••• , ••••• '. Inspection and Storage Building M-15, Aerial View •••••••

Launch Area No. 1 iii iI!i ~ ._ '" ...... ' .. " 'Ii • ill ,ill l1li1 • 1III III • • III ., • II 18, II ill

Sounding Rocket Facility, Aerial View • ' ••• '. • • •• • ••••• Sounding Rocket Facil ity, Interior View • , ••.• '" .••••••••

Launch Area No .. 2 i + ~ Ii!! '" Ii 'i .iF , .. .ii It it ji ,~ II!!I • I~ III .. • I.' • • • • • III

I-Beam Launcher, Pad 2C ••••• ' •• ' •• ' ...... ,', •• ' •••. '., •• Hasp Launcher, Launch Area No.2, •• , ••• , •••••••••• ' ••

Launch Area No.3 tit • • • • .. • .

Scout Launcher, Pad 3A ..

Scout launcher, Pad 38 .'. , •• ' •• '" •• ' ~ ••• ~ •• " .' • " .

Launch Area No.4 ... _ Ito ji. t •• 15' if '. III iI .. ,~ ~, .ill 1111 .... ~ .' tI ' If ~ '*, it:

Launch Area No.5,. ~ III! iI !II 1111 .. i ... ' i i! !II' !I' i ,iii ~I iii • ,iii iI lili " ..

Tubular Launcher, Launch Area No.5 •••••••••••••••• Radar Set AN/SPS-12, Operator's Position • ' .••••..••..• ,. , Radar Set AN/SPS-12, Block Diagram ••••••••••••••••• Radar Set AN/MPS-19, Block Diagram ••••••••••••••••

MOD II Radar Control Room •••••••••••••••••••••••

Radar Set AN/FPS-16, Control Console •••••••••••••••• NASA Long-Range, S-Band Radar (SPANDAR) •.•• ' ••••••• S PAND AR Control Consol e • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •••••

Radar Set A N/F PQ -6 .

Radar Set AN/FPQ -6, Block Diagram ••••••••••••••••• Radar Set AN/FPQ-6, Operator's Console •••••••••••••• Model lOA Velocimeter, Block Diagram ••••••••••••••• Telemetry Building N-162, Aerial View •••. '" ••.••••••. ' PDM/FM Tel erne try 5 ystem, Block Diagram •..•••.•••••.• FM/FM Telemetry System, Block Diagram .... ' ••• ,. '" '" .• '" , .• FM/ AM Telemetry System, Block Diagram •••••••••••••• X-Band Telemetry Receiving System, Block Diagram •••••••• Telemetry High-Gain Receiving Antenna •••••••••••••.• 136-Mc Auto-Track System, Block Diagram ••••••••••••• Automatic Gimbaled Antenna Vectoring Equipment,

Block Diagram ..

Wallops Station Range Control Center ••••••••••••••••• Range Control Center Floor Plan •••••••••••••••••••• Operational Intercommunications System, Block Diagram ••••• Operational Intercommunications System, Typical Application •• Communications Receiver Room •••••••••••••••••••••

Page

90 91 93 94 95 96 97 98

101 102 104 106 107 108 110 112 114 116 121 126 128 130 132 134 136 140 141 142 143 144 153 157

159 176 177 179 180 182

Figure

67. 68. 69. 70. 7l. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77.

78.

79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99.

100.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (Continued)

Communications Control System, Block Diagram •••••••••• Communications Control System, Operctor ' s Console ••••••• SCAMA Telephone Positions, Block Diagram ' ••• , ••• ' ••••• ' • Closed-Circuit Television System, Block Diagram ••••••••• Radio Transmitting Set AN/FRW-2, Block Diagram ••••••••• Mobile T -5 Tracking Telescope with Cover and Trailer ••.•••• Intercept Ground Optical Recorder (IGOR) Tracking Telescope. IFLOT Trailer and Telescope ••••••••••••••••••••••• Astrodome Shel ter at South End of Wallops Island ••.••••••• Wallops Station Time Code Formats ••••••••••••••••••• Timing and Programming System, Fixed and Doppler,

Page

188 189 193 195 199 218 220 222 225 228

Block Diagram " .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. 230

Magnetic Tape Format, Digital Data Recording System

(AN/FPS-16, SPANDAR, and Mod II Radars) •••••.••• Real Time Analog Data Presentation System, Block Diagram ••• Definition of Radar Coordinates ••••••••••••••••••••• FPQ-6 Recording System, Block Diagram •••••••••••••••

FPQ -6 Data Format " .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. " ..

Doppler Tape Format (One Data Sample) ••••••••••••••• Digital Data Processor, Block Diagram •••••••••••••••• Real Time Impact Prediction System, Block Diagram •••••••• MI LGO T ransmi tted Data, Card Format •••••••••••••••• IBM 650 Data Processing System • ~ •• ' ••• '" " •• " .••••••• Meteorological Facility, Exterior View •••••••••••••••• 300-Foot Meteorological Tower ••••••••••••••••••••• 250-Foot Meteorological Tower ••••••••••••••••••••• Meteorological Wind Data System; Block Diagram ••••••••• Rowin Set AN/GMD-l B, Functional Diagram ••••••••••• Rawinsonde System AN/GMD-2, Block Diagram •••••••••• Rowin Readout and Data Reduction Station ••••••••••••••

US NS Range Recoverer " " " " ..

US NS Range Recoverer, Tel emetry Stations ••••• •••••••• USNS Range Recoverer Telemetry Equipment, Block Diagram •• Frequency Monitoring and Interference Control Station " •••• Ionosphere Sounding Faci I ity •••••••••••••••••••••••

MIT Radar Focir ity " .. "" " " " ..

234 236 238 241 242 244 245 246 247 248 252 255 256 257 260 261 262 269 271 273 294 297 300

xv

xvi

Figure

101. 102. 103. 104. 105. 106.

LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS (Continued)

CHAPTER III. SAFETY

Range Safety Implementation, Block Diagram •••••••••••• Main Base Explosives Handling and Storage Areas •••••••••• Ready Service Locker E -3 .. • • . . . . • • . . . • . . • . . . . • • . ...

Building A-41, Explosives Handling and Storage Area A ••••• Magazine M-9, Explosives Handling and Storage Area B ••••• Magazine Identification, Explosives Handling and Storage

Page

308 321 322 322 324

325 325 326 327 328 329 361 369 373 388 390 391 407 408 409 410 411 431 432

107. Magazine Identification, Explosives Handling and Storage

Area B . • . • • • • . • • .. .. .. .. . .. . .. .. . .. .. • .. .. . • • .. . .. .. .. • 324

108. 109. 110. 111. 112. 1l3. 114. 115. 116. 117. 118. 119. 120. 121. 122. 123. 124. 125. 126.

127. 128. 129.

Liqu id Prope II ant Bu j I ding ••••••••••••••• ••••••••• Emergency Shower at liquid Propellant Storage Area •••••.• Emergency Eye Bath at Liquid Propellant Storage Area ••••••• Combination Emergency Shower and Eye Bath in Sounding

Rocket Tower Room •••••• ' ••••• '.' •• ' ••. '" •. " ., .• ,', , ,433

Area C .. . . .. .. . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . .. .. .. .. .. .....

Typical Magazine, Explosives Handling and Storage Area C ••• Magazine B-10, Explosives Handling and Storage Area D •.••• Magazine B-45, Explosives Handl ing and Storage Area D ••••• Magazine E-2, Explosives Handling and Storage Area E •••••• Ready Storage Building E-80 .••.•.••..•.....••..•.• Department of Defense Form 626, Front ••• • • • • • • • • • • • .• Main Base Explosives Truck Routes •••••••••••••••••.• Department of Defense Form 836 ••.••.••.••••••.•••.

Assembl y S hop No.. 4 ..

Sounding Rocket Facility ••..•.•..•..••........... I gn iter and Rocket Motor Shops ••••.••••••••••.••. ~ • liquid Propellant Storage Area Building Identification •••••• Hydrogen Peroxide Building •.••••••••••••.••••••••• Anil ine and Furfuryl Alcohol Building •••••••••••••.•••

Nitric Acid Shed .

CHAPTER IV. RANGE USERS INFORMATION

Channel of Communications During Prel iminary Work ••••••• Channel of Communications During Prelaunch Activities ••••• Channel of Communications During Countdown Operations ••••

497 498 498

Table

LIST OF TABLES

CHAPTER 1. GENERAL INFORMATION

1 2 3

Typical Test Vehicle Configurations ••••••••••••••••••• Wallops Station Climatic Data 1945-1958 •••••••••••••••• Wallops Station Badge System •••••••••••••••••••••••

CHAPTER II. WALLOPS STATION FACILITIES

4 5 6 7 8 9

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

Wallops Station Special Storage Areas

Dynamic Balancing Equipment ••••••••••••••••••••••• Sounding Rocket Vehicle Launcher Characteristics •••••••••• Scout Vehicle Tower/Launcher Characteristics, Pad 3A ••••••• Scout Vehicle Tower/Launcher Characteristics, Pad 3B ••••••• Radar Set AN/SPS -12, Technical Characteristics .•••••••••• Radar Set AN/MPS-19, Technical Characteri"stics •••••••••• MOD II Radar, Technical Characteristics •••••••••••••••• Radar Set AN/FPS-16, Technical Characteristics ••••••••••• SPANDAR, Technical Characteristics ••••.••••••••••••• Radar Set AN/FPQ-6, Technical Characteristics ••••••••••• Model lOA Velocimeter, Technical Characteristics ••••••••• X-Band Telemetry System Characteristics •••••••••••••••• FM/AM, FM/FM, and PDM/FM Telemetry Receiver

Characteristi cs .

18 19 20 21 22 23 24

FM/FM, PDM/FM, and PCM/FM Receiver Characteristics ••••• Tel emetry Antenna Characteristics ••••••••••••••••••••• Telemetry Antenna Control Characteristics ••••••••••••••• Telemetry Preampl ifier Characteristics •••••••••••••• 0 •• ' Telemetry Tape Recorder Characteristi cs ., •• ', •• ' ••• ' ...... ~ Telemetry Real Time Display Characteristics •••••••••••••• Operational Intercommunications Instruments, Technical

Characteristics ..

25 26 27 28 29

Radio Communications System, Technical Characteristics ••••• Communications Control System, Technical Characteristics ••••• Paging and Countdown System, Technical Characteristics •••••• Closed-Circuit Television System, Technical Characteristics •••• Radio Transmitting Set AN/FRW-2, Audio-Frequency Coder

Frequencies !II!' 110 ,~ ~ 'II!! .II! IIII! '!I. 'II 1.1 ... .II IIII! !II • II! III ,.' • !II II i!I .1 '.' • !II II 'II llil iI

Page

6 35 75

85 89 93

100 103 111 na 117 120 125 13.1 137 143

145 150 154 156 162 164 171

178 181 188 192 194

198

xvii

Table

45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63

xviii

LIST OF TABLES (Continued)

30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40

Radio Transmitting Set AN/FRW-2, Technical Characteristics •••

Tracking Camera Stations ••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Fastax Camera, T echn i cal Characteristics •••••••••••••••• Milliken and Cinerama Cameras, Technical Characteristics •••• Camera Technical Characteristics •••••••••••••••••••••

Optrack Camera Lists ..

Optrack Camera Characteristics •••••••••••••••••••••• Research Telescope No.2, Technical Characteristics •••••••• Mobile T -5 Telescope, Technical Characteristics ••••••••••• Short Range Optical Tracker (SOT), Technical Characteristics ••• Intermediate Focal Length Optical Tracker (IFLOT), Technical

Characteristics .. ., III ..

41 42

Wallops Station Time Code Characteristics ••••••••••••••• Digital Data Recording System ZA-26503, Technical

Page

198 203 207 208 209 214 214 216 217 221

223 229

43 Digital Data Recording System ZA-26500, Technical

Characteristics III ...........• _ ,. .. .. .. 233

Characteristics .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. 235

44 Digital Data Recording System ZA-26505, Technical

Characteristics II

Radar Data System Accuracies •••••••••••••••••••••••

Weather Teletype Characteristics •••••••••••••••••••••

Wallops Station Anemometers ••••••••••••••••••••••••

Rawin Set AN/GMD-1B, Technical Characteristics ••••••••• Ceilometer AN/GMQ-2, Technical Characteristics •••••.•.• Ceiling Light Projector DCE-16, Technical Characteristics ••••• US NS Range Recoverer Sh ip Characteristi cs •.•••••••••••• US NS Range Recoverer Tel emetry Characteristics ••••..••••• US NS Range Recoverer Communications Characteristics ••••••• Dougherty IGOR Tracking Telescope, Technical Characteristics •• Coquina Telemetry Characteristics •••••••••••••••••••• Mechanical and Optical Shop Facilities ••••••••••••••••• Electronic Instrument Shop Facilities ••••••••••••••••••• Machine Shop Facilities •••••••••••••••••••••••••••

Welding Shop Facilities ••••••.•••••..••••••••••••.

Sheet Metal Shop Facilities ••••••••••••••••••••••••• Mobile Special Purpose Cranes •••••••••••••••••••••• Ionosphere Sounding Station Capabil ities •.•••••••••••••• Mobile Telemetry Vans, Technical Characteristics ••••••••••

237 239 251 258 261 264 265 268 268 274 276 277 283 285 286 289 290 292 297 301

LIST OF TABLES (Continued)

Table

Page

CHAPTER III. SAFETY

64 Magazine and Locker Compatibil ity Group Designations ••••••• 332

65 Compatibil ity Groups of Common Wallops Station Explosives •••• 334

66 Magazine Materials and Personnel Limits •• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 335

67 Quantity-Distance Classifications of Common Wallops Station

Explosives ..•... III • • • • • • • • • • • • • • .. • • .. • • .. • • • •• 338

68 Propellant Grain Weights of Rocket Motors Commonly Used at

Wallops Station 339

69 Main Base Magazine, Inhabited Building, and Runway

Distances (i n Feet) •• ". ' ••• ' •• '.' 0 • ", •• ", •• ", .' •• ' •• ",0' 341

70 Wallops Island Magazine, Inhabited Building, and Intraline

Distances (in Feet) . '" '" " ' •• 0 , •• , •• ,,,. " •• '. ,,, ••• ' .' • '" •• 343

71 Floor Dimensions of Wallops Station Magazines ''' •• , ••• '.' •• ~ •• 343

72 Dimensional Information for Typical Wallops Station Rocket Motors. 344

73 Fire Symbols of Wal lops Station Magazines • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 348

74 Fire Symbols of Common Wallops Station Explosives •.•••••••• 348

75 Typical Storage Temperature Limits for Wallops Station

Rocket Motors III .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. .. .. .. .. • .. .. • • .. 354

76 ICC Classification of Common Wallops Station Explosives. • • • • •• 362

77 ICC Classification of Common Wallops Station Rocket Motors •••• 363

78 Compatibility for Motor Vehicle Transportation of Common Wallops

Station Explosives and Dangerous Materials. • • . • • • • • • • • 364

79 Recommended Protective Clothing and Breathing Apparatus. • • • • • 414

80 Liquid Propellant Storage and Personnel Limits ••••••••••••• 417

81 Separations for Liquid Propellant Quantity-Distance Calculations. • 417

82 Weights of Liquid Propellants. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 418

83 Sounding Rocket Facil ity Warning System • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 455

84 Minimum Distances Separating Mobile Transmitters and

Pyrotechni c Devi ces III III • • • • .. • • • • • 457

85 Industrial Safety Equipment Available at Wallops Station • • • • • •• 482

CHAPTER IV. RANGE USERS INFORMATION

86 Information Time Schedules. • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • 527

xix

CHAPTER I

GENERAL INFORMATION

SECTION I

INTRODUCTION

GENERAL

Wallops Station, a facility of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, consists of three separate areas on the Atlantic Coast of the Delmarva Peninsula: the Main Base, the Wallops Island launching site, and the Wallops Mainland. Figure 1 is an aerial view of the Wallops Island site.

Wallops station, the only range facil ity completely owned and operated by NASA, is an operational base for launching vehicles as part of scientific experiments. The rocket-borne experiments launched from the Wallops Island Range are planned by scientists and engineers in the laboratories and research centers of NASA, other Government agencies, colleges and universities, and the worldwide scientific community. At Wallops Station, experimental payloads are checked and prepared for fl ight by mating them to appropriate launch vehicles. Wallops Station personnel assist the teams of experimenters in these functions and, if necessary, develop special types of instrumentation and equipment needed to complement a payload. However, the basic mission of Wallops Station is to prepare, assemble, and launch an experimental payload; position it correctly in space at the right veloci tyj track it; and acquire meaningful data.

Wallops Station is not a missile range for testing and developing military vehicles. Some of the vehicles used as boosters were developed by, and are obtained from, the Department of Defense because they are reliable and relatively inexpensive. These standard vehicles, such as the Nike, Sergeant, and the Honest John boosters, and others developed for NASA, are used in various combinations at Wallops Station simply as a means of propel I ing experimental payloads into the desired environment. 'nformation;s obtained about the atmosphere and space, aeronautics and the characteristics of aerospace fI ight, and the instrumentation and concepts that are used in the transmission and collectian of scientific data.

Wallops Station is not a new facility. A launch site was established on Wallops Island in 1945 by the langley Research Center, which was then a field station of NASAls predecessor agency, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). Designated the Pi lotless Aircraft Research Station, the Wallops Island

r (

GENERAL INFORMATION

site was assigned the early mission of using wind tunnel and laboratory investigations to obtain aerodynamic data at transonic and low supersonic speeds, as part of the nation's effort to penetrate the sound barrier of fl ight. When the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was established by Congress in 1958, the Langley Research Center and other NACA and research facilities were absorbed in that organization. At that time the Pilotless Aircraft Research Station became a separate entity, Wallops Station, operating directly under NASA Headquarters in Washington, D. C. (See figure 2.)

Since 1945 Wallops Station has launched more than 5000 research vehicles, using from one to seven rocket stages, in the quest for scientific information on the flight characteristics of airplanes, launch vehicles, and spacecraft, and to increase the nation's knowledge of the upper atmosphere and the space environment. Some 300 experiments are sent aloft each year. The information obtained is freely distributed to the world scientific community.

MISSION

The assigned mission of Wallops Station has been establ ished by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as follows:

(1 ) To make all necessary arrangements for and to conduct tests of rocket propelled test vehicles by other NASA faci I ities or headquarters.

(2) To develop supporting or specialized instrumentation necessary in the conduct of tests.

(3) To develop and construct necessary launching facilities to be used in the conduct of rocket tests.

(4) To develop and provide necessary tracking and data acquisition facilities for use in the conduct of rocket tests.

(5) To supervise recovery operations as necessary to recover vehicles tested at Wallops Station.

(6) To perform necessary development work in order to make minor modifications in vehicles under test at Wallops Station.

(7) To make special arrangements for use of test facilities by other

groups •

2.

INTRODUCTION

(8) To perform tracking as directed by NASA Headquarters on vehicles launched at other test sites.

(9) To exercise such procurement and contract administration authority as may be delegated by the Director, Office of Business Administration.

(l0) To provide the necessary administrative and management support as required for carrying out the assigned programs.

RANGE USE

AUTHOR IZATI ON

NASA programs or NASA sponsored research programs normally do not need authorization to use the Wallops Station facility; however, they should inform this Station of their plans as far in advance as possible. Non-NASA range users should contact the Director, Wallops Station to request authorization. U. S. Air Force or their contractors must request authorization through the Air Force System Command Liaison Office at Langley Air Force Base, Hampton, Virginia.

LEAD RANGE CONCEPT

Under the Lead Range Concept, Wallops Station will make the necessary arrangements to obtain all downrange support required for any mission that originates from this Stctlen ,

RANGE SAFETY

Wallops Station is responsible for fl ight and ground safety on experiments conducted at this Station. Range users will be required to conform with Station safety regulations; therefore they should make themselves cognizant of the regulations early during their planning stages.

3

GENERAL INFORMATION

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SECTION II

RANGE CAPABILITY

Wallops Station maintains an instrumented test range consisting of integrated mainland and island facilities for conducting tests using rocket propelled test vehicles. All vehicles launched at Wallops Station use the Atlantic Ocean as the test range. The actual range area, as defined by azimuth and elevation for a given test, is limited only by safety considerations. Since the rocket vehicles used to conduct the majority of tests are proven types, performance data are available which allow trajectories and impact areas to be predicted. Thus, the range area used for a given test is flexible and can generally be tailored to meet the requirements of that test. (See figure 3.)

Since a great variety of tests using various sizes and types of vehicles designed to accompl ish a variety of experimental objectives are be ing accompl ished at present, the capabil ities of Wallops Station are also flexible. In general, tests conducted at Wallops Station may be classified according to the following broad areas:

(1) Aeronautical Research

(2) Components and Systems Development

(3) Sounding Rockets

(4) Assistance to other Agencies and Scientific Groups

(5) Small Scientific Satellites

(6) International Programs

Table 1 lists a few examples of test vehicle configurations used for these areas of research, while figures 4 through 10 illustrate a few such vehicles.

---_ -

- - -----.- __ -~

GENERAL INFORMATION

Table 1. Typical Test Vehicle Configurations

SOUNDING:
JOURNEYMAN (ARGO 0-8)
AEROBEE 300A (SPAROBEE)
NI KE SMOKE ROCKET
JAVELIN (ARGO 04)
VIPER/FALCON
NIKE/APACHE
AEROBEE 150A
STRONG ARM
NIKE/CAJUN
ASTROBEE
SHOTPUT
I ARCAS
EXOS
I AEROSPACE RESEARCH: I
CASTOR plus two RECRUITS/LANCE/LANCE/yARDBIRD/r55
HONEST JOHN/NIKE/LANCE/T40jT55/5" Sphere
HONEST JOHN/NIKE/NIKE/RECRUIT/T55
Various Air Drops and Air Launches
HONEST JOHN/NIKE/GOSLING
HONEST JOHN/NIKE/NIKE
POLLUX plus two RECRUITS
HONEST JOHN/NIKE
NIKE/NIKE/RECRUIT
NIKE/NIKE/CAJUN I
TRAI LBLAZER II
NIKE/CAJUN
LITTLE JOE
GOSLING
CAJUN
RAM
-
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I SCOUT RANGE CAPABILITY

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GENERAL INFORMATION

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RANGE CAPABILITY

Figure 5. Trailblazer II

9

GENERAL INFORMATION

Figure 6. little Joe Booster

10

RANGE CAPABILITY

Figure 7. Two-Stage Shotput

11

GENERAL INFORMATION

Figure 8. Nike-Apache Sounding Rocket

12

RANGE CAPABILITY

13

Figure 9. Aerobee 150A Sounding Rocket

GENERAL INFORMATION

14

SECTION III

ORGANIZATION OF WALLOPS 5T AllON

GENERAL

The assigned areas of responsibility for all phases of operation are indicated on the Wallops Station Organization Chart, figure 11. The Wallops Station organization employs four major divisions, each responsible for specific and clearly defined duties, and each reporting to the Office of the Director. Overall areas of division responsibil ity are indicated by the functional titles, FI ight Test Division, Range Engineering Division, Administrative Management Division, and Technical Services Division. The specific responsibil ities of each division are described in the following paragraphs, which also outline the functional organization within each division and the branch and section functions that are essential for successful overall operation.

FLIGHT TEST DIVISION

The Flight Test Division is responsible for the management and direction of those engineering, technical, and supporting skills necessary to plan, coordinate, direct, and perform aerospace flight test operations. This Division has the responsibility for oerospoce project engineering, scheduling of range operations and down range operations, and techni cally managing satell ite data-acquisition ground systerns. It operates and maintains all range instrumentation systems; receives,

inspects, tests, prepares, and launches liquid and solid propellant vehicles; and furnishes assistance in range operations as requested by outside groups, both national and international. There are three branches in the FI ight Test Division: the Program Management and liaison Branch, the Range Instrumentation Branch, and the Vehicle Preparation and Launching Branch.

PROGRAM MANAGEMENT AND LIAISON BRANCH

The Program Management and liaison Branch assigns a Range Project Engineer for each aerospace experiment at Wallops Station; schedules and directs all fl jght test operations; coordinates with the U.S. Navy, Federal Aviation Agency, U.S. Air Force and others concerning airspace and impact areas; is responsible for liaison with U.S. Navy for surveillance aircraft, downrange telemetry ships, and recovery craft; technically manages satellite data-acquisition ground facilities; and plans and directs recovery missions. Using the Lead Range Concept, it coordinates with

15

GENERAL INFORMATION

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ORGANIZATION

other ranges and tracking facil ities to plan and direct all missions originating from Wallops Station. There are two Project Engineering sections and three Operational Offi ces in this Branch: the Sate II ites, Probes, and Reentry Projects Section, the Sounding and Aerodynamic Rockets Projects Section, the Scheduling and Range Clearance Office, the Satellite Ground Station Management Office, and the Recovery and Special Projects Office.

Satellites, Probes, and Reentry Projects Section

The Satell ites, Probes, and Reentry Projects Section performs pro ject engineering during _the planning, preparation, and launching of satell ites, space probes, and re-entry physics experiments; provides technical direction and coordination between the range user and the range; maintains technical I iaison with outside facilities participating in experiments; plans, coordinates, and directs downrange operations; and coordinates all activities while the project is on the range.

Sounding and Aerodynamic Rockets Projects Section

When a test project is scheduled for experimental aerodynamic or sounding rocket tests, the Project Engineering during the planning, preparation, and launching operations is performed by the Sounding and Aerodynamic Rockets Projects Section. Operational responsibilities for these tests, except for the differences in test vehicles, are the same as those described for the Satell ites, Probes, and Reentry Projects Section. Both sections are responsible for countdown preparation and precountdown briefing.

Scheduling and Range Clearance Office

All Wallops flight test operations are scheduled in this office. It effects coordination with the U.S. Navy, Federal Aviation Agency, U.S. Air Force, and others for use of airspace and impact areas; negotiates and maintains agreements for the above coordination; arranges for use of U.S. Navy surveillance aircraft, downrange telemetry ships, and recovery craft.

Satell ite Ground Station Management Office

The Satellite Ground Station Management Office performs technical planning and coordination for the operation of Wallops satell ite data acquisition ground facilities. It is responsible for the direction of several diverse groups of technical specialists, the planning of additions to and modification of existing facilities to accommodate changing satell ite data acquisition requirements, and the collection, review, editing, and transmission of pertinent data to the various agencies concerned.

17

GENERAL INFORMATION

Recovery and Special Projects Office

This office plans and appl ies recovery techniques as required for each specific recovery mission; determines the number of craft needed and how each should be equipped; prepares operational plans, trains crews, and directs recovery operations. It keeps the Wallops ship equipped with all available recovery aids; advises payload designers during their recovery package planning stages; performs Project Engineering during the planning, preparation, and conduction of special aerospace projects other than normal rocket-propelled experiments.

RANGE INSTRUMENTATION BRANCH

The Range Instrumentation Branch maintains and operates all range instrumentation, such as search and tracking radars, telemetry receiving stations, tracking cameras, and photo-theodol ites; provides a detailed weather analysis and forecasting service for the range and range users; installs and maintains all station radio transm itters and receivers, operational intercommunication network equ ipment, and specialized electronic range equipment; maintains a laboratory for processing film and photographic records and performing photographic reproduction; and provides technical assistance to range users and other branches and divisions of the Station. There are five sections in this Branch: the Communications Section, Telemetry Section, Photographic Section, Radar Section, and Meteorology Section.

Communications Section

Communications Section personnel install and maintain all radio communications equipment, operational intercommunication units, tone keying equipment, timing and programming systems, closed-circuit television network, command destruct transmitters and receivers, sarah recovery equipment, and special circuits needed

for individual projects. They operate the communications console at the control center, timing and programming equipment, photo-theodol ite recording system, and special monitoring equipment.

Telemetry Section

The Telemetry Section maintains and operates telemetry ground receiving stations located in permanent buildings, in mobile II downrange II telemeter vans,

and aboard the Wallops instrumentation ship. This Section installs and performs operational checkouts of on-board telemeter transmitter systems, forms and processes the necessary battery power supplies, assists engineering personnel in changing and modifying existing telemeter equipment for new project operations, supports the

Tiros ground receiving station by furnishing high-gain antenna services, and operates and maintains a complete sound-range and recording station.

18

ORGANIZATION

Photographic Section

Photographic Section personnel plan all still and motion-picture photography required to support station activities and projects, including aerial, time-andmotion studies, instrumentation, rocket fl ight testing, documentary, and other special ized photography of a research and development nature. These personnel maintain and operate the photographic laboratory for processing and reproducing all still and motion-picture film and sensitized paper records, and maintain files and store negatives, fiI m records, and pertinent information.

Radar Section

The Radar Section maintains and operates all tracking and surveillance radars employed at Wallops Station as well as mobile radars used downrange and by international programs. It prepares computers, plotting boards, digital recording equipment, dial data panels, and antenna boresight cameras for project operations;

assists engineering personnel in modifying and adding to the existing radar complexes; and performs prel iminary and final checkouts of radar beacons used in launch veh i cI es a nd aboard recovery craft.

Meteorology Section

The Meteorology Section provides weather analysis and forecasts for downrange areas as well as local areas; evaluates statistical or cI imatological data; maintains and operates all meteorological instrumentation; obtains atmospheric ballistic measurements for launching; performs preflight checkouts of electronic payloads; prepares small meteorological rockets for launching; develops improved procedures and techniques for special ized forecasting and obtaining atmospheric measurements; and maintains files of pertinent information and records.

VEHICLE PREPARATION AND LAUNCHING BRANCH

The Vehicle Preparation and Launching Branch is responsible for the following: the receipt, inspection, storage, transfer, and shipment of rocket motor, pyrotechnics, and hardware; the storage and transfer of I iquid propellants; the modification, vibrational test, and static and dynamic balancing of vehicle components and payloads; the assembly, checkout, preparation, and launch of all I iquid- and sol id-propellant rocket vehicles; ground safety; the readiness of blockhouse and blockhouse systems; monitoring operations relative to handling, preparation, and launch of rocket vehicles; and the provision of technical assistance and training to foreign and domestic groups. There are four sections in this Branch: Assembly and Launch Section A, Assembly and Launch Section B, Assembly and Launch Section C, and Vehicle Systems Monitoring Section.

19

GE NERAL INFORMATION

Assembly and Launch Section {A}

Assembly and Launch Section A is responsible for the inspection, modification, checkout, assembly, erection, preparation, and launching of research vehicles at the Sounding Rocket Facility; the checkout of payload and related instrumentation in coordination with payload scientists and the Range Instrumentation Branch; the transfer and stowoge of I iquid rocket propellants; the operational readiness of the launch facil ity, including the blockhouse and its systems; and safety in Launch Area No.1.

Assembly and Launch Section (B)

Assembly and Launch Section B is responsible for the inspection, modification, checkout, assembly, erection, preparation and launching of single cnd multistage research vehicles; the checkout of payload and related instrumentation in coordination with responsible scientists and the Range Instrumentation Branch; the operational readiness of the launch facility, including the blockhouse and its systems; safety in the launch area; and training of foreign and domestic personnel.

Assembly and Launch Section (C)

This Section has the responsibil ity for the inspection, checkout, assembl y, erection, preparation, and launching of multistage research vehicles; the checkout of payload and related instrumentation in coordination with responsible scientists and the Range Instrumentation Branch; the operational readiness of the launch facility; static and dynamic balancing of vehicle components and payloads; and safety

in the launch area.

Vehicle Systems Monitoring Section

The Vehicle Systems Monitoring Section receives, inspects, stores, transfers, and ships rocket motors, pyrotechnics, and hardware; monitors vehicle systems checkout, assembly, launch, and ground safety, including both Wallops Station and contract operations; acquires and modifies ground-support and handling equipment for alf sections; and provides technical advisory and engineering services to other sections.

RANGE ENGINEERING DIVISION

The Range Engineering Division is responsible for the engineering and supporting skills required to plan, develop, and monitor all facilities, standards, instrumentation systems, data processing, and range safety techniques for conducting the

20

ORGANIZATION

assigned missions of Wallops Station. The organizational groups in the six functional branches and facil ities of the Range Engineering Division are described in the order of their arrangement on the Wallops Station Organization Chart, figure 11.

PLANNING AND REPORTING OFFICE

The Range Engineering Planning and Reporting Office is responsible for longrange planning for Station faci! ities, equipment, and techniques; for Station status forecasts; for coordination with NASA organizations and other Government agencies and for the preparation of the annual Station techn ical budget.

ANALYSIS AND COMPUTATION BRANCH

c~.:'",,, This branch is charged with the development of mathematical processes and

procedures to determine the flight characteristics of rocket vehicles by theoretical and operational computations. The theoretical and operational functions are handled separately in the Analysis and Computation Branch by the Applied Mathemati cs Section and the Data Processing and Computing Section.

Appl ied Mathematics Section

The Appl ied Mathematics Section develops procedures through theoretical studies to further the application of mathematical techniques in the solution of problems encountered in range and rocket analytics. This section formulates mathematical approaches for the efficient conversion of experimental data to the quantities and forms required; analyzes and interprets raw and final computed data for significance and/or accuracy, and programs computer-oriented problems.

Data Processing and Computing Section

The Data Processing and Computing Section is responsible for prefl ight, realtime, and postflight data handl ing and the operation of the equipments involved in these processes. Included in these functions are the scheduling and operation of computing and cllled data-handling equipment, the extraction and preparation of computer input data, the development of programming techniques, and the evaluotion of overall data system performance.

EXPERIMENTAL FACILITIES BRANCH

The Experimental Foci! ities Branch suppl ies engineering and design services for the development of research and supporting facilities. The services include planning, estimating, preparing budgetary material, designing or supervising the

21

GENERAL INFORMATION

design, furnishing the technical engineering and estimates required for negotiating contracts, supervising and inspecting the construction of all facilities and equipment required by construction programs, and all other work necessary for the al teration, repair, and modernization of existing facil ities. The Branch is divided into three sections: the Electrical Systems Section, Facil Hies Engineering Section, and Mechanical Systems Section.

Electrical Systems Section

The Electrical Systems Section plans, designs, engineers, and coordinates contracts for facil ities requiring electrical equipment, power conversion and distribution, industrial power equipment, and ground check equipment for tracking and launching installations. The Section onalyzes electric power requirements and negotiates power contracts; monitors the performance of the electrical engineering phases of focil ity operations; plans the maintenance and extensian of the Station's electrical system; administers design and construction contracts in the electrical field; furnishes budgetary information for future facil ities; and gives technical advice to other range organizations.

Facilities Engineering Section

Duties of the Facilities Engineering group include designing, engineering, and implementing real estate development, facility construction, and uti! ity installation; providing plant engineering services for the overall Station; preparing estimates for budgetary purposes; schedul ing and expediting construction projects; technically administering and supervising construction contracts; and furnishing technical advice concerning range facilities.

Mechanical Systems Section

This Section plans, designs, engineers, and implements the development of the mechanical systems, equipment, and structures associated with station facilities, launching and handling equipment, special preflight testing apparatus, and dataacquisition equipment; prepares specifications and furnishes technical assistance for negotiating and administering contracts for mechanical systems, equipment, and structures; and furnishes technical advice to other Station organizations and range users •

INSTRUMENTATION DEVELOPMENT BRANCH

The Instrumentation Development Branch is responsible for planning, for preparing budgetary estimates, and for preparing specifications for technically

22

ORGANIZATION

negotiating and administering contracts deal ing with acceptance tests on and the monitoring of the effectiveness of range instrumentation systems and techniques.

The Branch establishes and monitors meteorological procedures and techniques; identifies new equipment applications derived from Station operations; insures the qual ity of data obtained from instrumentation; and furnishes technical assistance to various other Station organizations and range users. The Instrumentation Development Branch is composed of the following: the Aeronomy and Appl ications Office, Communications and Control Section, Data Systems Section, Radar Systems Section, and Telemetry and Optics Section.

Aeronomy and Appl ications Office

The Aeronomy and Appl ications Office establ ishes procedures and techniques, and develops standards for the acquisition and use of meteorological data at Wallops Station, in addition to monitoring the quality of these data. This Office advises other organizations and range users as to the ovaiJabil ity and use of meteorological data and equipment for activities to be conducted by the Station. Weather Bureau personnel provide under contract, operational meteorological services, which include range atmospheric measurements, basic data reduction for ball istic appl leetions and cI imate analysis, weather forecasting, and briefing. It is responsible for direct retrieval from the operating personnel and contractors, patents, progress reports, and review of special reports, for innovations with industrial potential.

Communications and Control Section

The Communications and Control Section plans, develops, and implements communications and control systems and equipment; monitors the effectiveness of Station communications and control equipment and techniques; coordinates frequencies with other NASA organizations and Department of Defense activities; estab-

I ishes I iaison with commercial telephone companies; manages the use of telephone equipment and the cable plant at this Station; and advises range users and other Wallops Station personnel on communications and control problems.

Data Systems Section

The Data Systems Section plans and develops new systems, equipment, and techniques for the handl ing, transmission, processing, and display of analog and digital data for real-time applications and postflight analysis; monitors the engineering effectiveness of data systems and equipment; and furnishes technical advice to other range organizations and range users concerning data systems.

23

GENERAL INFORMATION

Radar Systems Section

The Radar Systems Section plans, develop;" establishes, and monitors radar and related systems for Wallops Station; establ ishes techniques for the maximum

util ization of these systems and their data outputs; and advises other Station organizations and range users regarding radar and related system capabil ities.

Telemetry and Optics Section

The Telemetry and Optics Section plans and develops new equipment and facilities and establishes techniques and standards for telemetry and optical systems; monitors the performance of these systems to determine engineering effectiveness; and furnishes technical advice to other Station organizations and range users regarding telemetry and optical capabilities.

RANGE SAFE TV BRANCH

The Range Safety Branch plans, coordinates, and administrates the development and implementation of range safety policies; prepares flight and ground safety procedures necessary for conducting all launches and tests for Wallops Station; and anal yzes prefl i ght and postflight data to insure that each operation meets flight and ground safety standards and requirements. The Range Safety Branch has two sections reporting to it: the Ground and Flight Safety Section and the Vehicle Analysis Section.

Ground and Flight Safety Section

This Section assembles, prepares, and publ ishes vehicle range safety plans, and plans and coordinates all safety aspects of launch operations, including realtime computer programs and displays, range clearance and range safety I imitations, assembly and pad area procedures, and wind weighting performance records for each vehicle launched.

Vehicle Analysis Section

The Vehicle Analysis Section evaluates prelaunch data to determine that all aspects of a planned launch, including flight dynamics, flight and fluid mechanics, electronics, and hazardous materials, conform to existing Station regulations, and that current state-of-the-art techniques consistent with safety and performance requ irements are used.

24

ORGANIZATION

INSTRUMENT SERVICE AND CALIBRATION LABORATORY

The Instrument Service and Cal ibration Laboratory is responsible for: servicing and calibrating all types of electrical, mechanical, and optical instruments; maintaining laboratory standards for the accurate adjustment of test instruments required by the various range facilities; and monitoring and recording radiofrequency radiations for calibration, postflight analysis, and interference control.

ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGEMENT DIVISION

The Administrative Management Division is fully responsible for planning and directing the administrative and business operations necessary to support range development and operations at Wallops Station. These functions include the specific responsibil ity for the management and internal control of the six organizational branches and facilities established for security services, public information, fiscal operations, management services, personnel administration, and procurement and supply. The branches and facil ities of the Administrative Management Division are described in the order of their arrangement on the Wallops Station Organization Chart, figure 11.

SECURITY OFFICE

The security program for Wallops Station is planned, organized, and administered by the Administrative Management Security Office. This Office develops and effects pol ides and procedures to assure the proper handl ing and control of classified material; assesses, evaluates, and proves clearances for Station personnel; establishes physical security safeguards; supervises the Wallops Station guard force; coordinates classified policies with Station contractors; and investigates potential violations of Federal Statutes.

PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE

The Public Information Offi ce plans, conducts, and coordinates all publ ic affairs activities at Wallops Stnfion , These functions include tours and orientation for foreign dignitaries and the general public, arrangements for foreign dignitaries to give talks in local communities, the distribution of educational material, the preparation and del ivery of speeches before local civic or technical groups, and the preparation and editing of material for release to local and national news agencies.

FISCAL BRANCH

This Branch is responsible for the direction and execution of all financial

25

GENERAL INFORMATION

accounting, auditing, and related work performed in connection with funds for which this Station is held accountable. Two sections report to the Fiscal Branch: the Audit Voucher Section and Accounting Section.

Audit Voucher Section

Responsibilities of the Audit Voucher group include the processing of travel orders and civil ian payrolls; the auditing and payment of travel vouchers, purchase orders, contracts, dealers' bills, and supporting papers resulting from the procurement transactions of the Station; and the maintenance of supporting records and controls.

Accounting Section

The Accounting Section maintains records of, and reports to higher authority on, the expenditure, obligation, and commitment of all monies allotted the Station. It distributes allotment expenditures to the appl icable Job Order by means of the Job Order Cost System; maintains records and controls of fiscal accounts; and ascertains the proper balance of all records by means of the General Ledger, using data-processing equipment to facil itate the proper maintenance of fiscal and other administrative reports and records.

MANAGEMENT SERVICES BRANCH

The Management Services Branch plans, administers, and executes the Station's management services program. It operates and coordinates the centralized administrative services, including the mail and files, and is responsible for managing the specialized technical files, reception, communications, housing, library, messenger services, printing, and records.

PERSONNEL BRANCH

This Branch has the responsibility for the planning, direction, and execution of the personnel program, including the following functions: employment and placement, classification and wage administration, training, examinations, management-employee relations, and health services.

PROCUREMENT AND SUPPLY BRANCH

This branch is responsible for planning, administration, and execution of functions for the procurement of suppl ies, equipment, and services in support of the Wallops Station scientific, technical, and construction programs; property management activities, including property accountabil ity, util ization, and disposal; and

26

ORGANIZATION

the receiving, inspecting, accepting, storage, and issue of suppl ies and equipment. There are three sections in the Procurement and Supply Branch: the Contracts Section, Purchase Section, and Property and Supply Section.

Contracts Section

The Contracts Section is responsible for the negotiation, contracting, and administration of all construction, architect-engineering, general and technical services, and the installation and modificotion of all major and minor electrical, mechanical, and electronic systems. The negotiation of leases and agreements also is the responsibil ity of this Section.

I.

Purchase Section

The responsibil ities of the Purchase Section include the planning and directing of the purchase functions for the procurement of rna jor equipment by formal advertisement; the purchasing of minor equipment, stock, operating suppl ies, and fuels by negotiation; administering small business functlonsj expediting; and maintaining bidder I ists and contractor experience data for all procurement functions.

Property and Supply Section

This Section plans and directs the property and supply functions for receiving, handl ing, storing, issuing, uti! ization, survey, disposal, and accountabil ity of all suppl ies, materials, equipment, and property.

TECHNICAL SERVICES DIVISION

The Technical Services Division is responsible for the planning, direction, and coordination of trade and logistic services in support of Wallops Station missions. These services include the direction of technical and trade skills to support space vehicle launchings, the operation and maintenance of plant facilities, damage control safeguords during Fuel ing and launching operations, personnel and property protection during hazardous operations and fire or storm disasters, and industrial safety programs. The organizational branches of the Technical Services Division are described in the order of their arrangement on the Wollops Station Organization Chart, figure 11.

SAFETY OFFICE

The Safety Office of the Technical Services Division is responsible for the

27

GENERAL INFORMATION

Wallops Station safety program for personnel and equipment. The functions of this Office include safety inspection, accident investigation, safety records, formal reports, accident analysis, and procurement and issue of safety equipment. This Office performs regular inspections to verify conditions and operating procfices in compl iance with sound safety procedures, and it performs investigations to advise personnel, supervisors, and safety committees on new safety equipment and safety techniques.

SUPPORT SERVICE PLANNING OFFICE

The Support Service Planning Office assists the Chief of the Technical Services Division and the Heads of the Branches in the scheduling, programming, coordinating, and expediting of support service requirements for the preparation and launching of space vehicles. The duties of this Office inel ude the collection, assembl ing, monitoring, and analyzing of data concerned with work schedules, equipment needs, equipment utilization, manpower needs, maintenance service contracts, budget coordination, and airport operation and maintenance.

RANGE SU PPORT BRANCH

The Range Support Branch is responsible for organizing, planning, and coordinating the skills and services of personnel for the following functions: supporting space launching activities by the construction and assembly of electronic, electromechanical, and optical prototypes, including miniature and subminiature instrumentation; maintaining tracking antennas, space launchers, and associated equipment in a state of readiness; the handl ing, rigging, and operation of equipment for the delicate mating of rocket motors, spacecraft, and payloads in the assembl y of space vehicles; and the machining, fabrication, modification, and alteration of vehicle components, launch fittings, range equipment, and other noncommercial items. This Branch provides I iaison between range users and Branch sections, and plans for future types of work and work loads.

Experimental Instrument Construction Section

This Section fabricates, constructs, machines, and assembles prototypes of electronic, electromechanical, and optical devices; modifies, tests, and troubleshoots electron ic equipment; constructs instrumentation for min iature and subm in i ature devices; and does plating and metal finishing with chemicals.

Space Launch Support Section

This Section modifies, 01 igns, assembles, services, and repairs space vehicle

28

.----~ - - -- - ... -

ORGANIZATION

launchers and associated equipment, and plans, schedules, and coordinates these functions. It performs mechanical servicing and maintenance of tracking antennas, crane and rigging operations for the precise and delicate placement of rocket motors, capsules, and payloads in the space vehicle assembly. The Space Launch Support Section services, repairs, and overhauls vehicle-positioning trailers; hydraul ic, pneumatic, deluge, and I iquid fuel pumping systems; and high-pressure hel ium compressors, I ines, and receivers.

Metal Trades Section

The Metal Trades Section does the machining, sheetmetal, welding and heat treating for the fabrication, manufacture, modification, and alteration of space vehicle components,\ launcher fittings, and range equipment, and devises techniques and processes for these functions. It machines and fabricates noncommercial parts for mechanical, handling, and utility equipment.

FACILITIES OPERATIONS BRANCH

This Branch is responsible for planning and coordinating the work and skills of personnel that operate, maintain, repair, and modify el ectrical, heating, airconditioning, water plant, sewage, service air, and aircraft and automotive fueling equipment. It provides for the maintenance and repair of buildings, roads, and automotive, handling, and construction equipment; and logistic services for shipments involving rocket motors, space vehicles and components, tracking equipment, supplies and materials from aircraft, and railway and motor freight. The Facilities Operations Branch maintains liaison with all organizational segments, using the services of the sections within the Branch to keep abreast of the effectiveness of services, future work loads, equipment needs, and the planning required to meet future objectives.

Building Trades and logistics Section

This Section repairs and maintains buildings and structures; specific duties include cabinet making, carpentry, painting, masonry, glazing, and miscellaneous building trade work. The Section repairs and maintains roads, constructs enclosures for flight vehicles while on the pad to protect them against the weather, operates and maintains cradles and dollies, builds special crates and boxes for the shipment of vehicle components and del icate instrumentation equipment, appl ies the desired finish on fI ight vehicles and rocket motors to facilitate optical tracking and identification, and stencils and hand paints signs. The Building Trades and logistics Section provides riggers and operating personnel for I ight- and heavy-duty trailers, trucks, vans, forkl ifts, crane trucks, towmotors for on -station cartage and handl i n9,

29

------ ---------"I

GENERAL INFORMATION

loading and unloading shipments of small and large rocket motors, equipment, machinery and supplies via aircraft, railway, or motor freight.

E lectri cal Service Section

The Electrical Service Section maintains, repairs, and makes alterations to electrical power transmission lines, to poles and hardware, and to transformer substation, regulator, load center, and related equipment. This Section installs, maintains, and services telephones and intercommunication systems, including terminations, cabl ing, and tie-cable pressure equipment; balances loads at each facility to prevent overloads; performs temporary and permanent hookups for power requirements at launch areas for instrument trailers, firing, and instrument circuits; maintains and troubleshoots various types of servo systems and mechanical, electrical, and electronic devices and control systems; performs electrical installation, modification, and construction work of all types when it is impractical for the work to be contracted; and it operates battery-charging equipment.

Equipment Maintenance Section

The Equipment Maintenance Section maintains a preventive maintenance program for inspecting and servicing automotive, truck, heavy duty, end specialpurpose vehicle equipment; operates and maintains fuel farm systems; fuels aircraft; distributes information regarding the proper operation, repair, care, and lubrication of vehicles and equipment; services, repairs, and overhauls portable and vehicular equipment; maintains and operates construction and heavy duty equipment for moving, loading, and unloading shipments of large machinery, equipment, and freight; operates and maintains service air systems; installs, repairs, olters, and replaces water, air, oil, and steam lines within buildings; installs, operates and maintains conditioning systems not covered by contract; and performs structural and maintenance welding within the cognizance of the Facilities Operations Branch.

Util ities : Operations Section

The Util ities Operations Section provides operators and establ ishes operating shifts to supply heat, water, and sewage disposal for Launching Range and Main Base facil ities. The Section maintains high- and low-pressure steam plants; hotwater plants; sewage disposal plants; steam, water, and sewage distribution lines; and related equipment. This unit performs laboratory analysis and provides necessary treatment and purification to water and sewage to maintain good health standards.

30

ORGANIZATION

DAMAGE CONTROL BRANCH

The Damage Control Branch is responsible for planning and organizing the skills, equipment, and foci! ities of Wallops Station to prevent or minimize personnel and property damage resulting from hazardous operations pecul iar to the handl ing and launching of space vehicles and airport operations. The Branch provides plans for maximum protection against possible personnel and property damage resulting from fires, explosions, storms, or other manmade or natural disasters. Three groups report to the Damage Control Branch: the Fire Inspection Unit, and Damage Control Sections No. 1 and No.2.

Fire Inspection Unit

The Fire Inspection Unit plans and executes a fire-protection program designed to prevent and reduce damage caused by fires. The Unit inspects the condition, placement, and adequacy of firefightingequipment, including hydrants, extinguishers, blankets, automatic sprinklers, and detection equipment, and maintains records and reports of inspections, fires, and equipment.

Damage Control Sections No. 1 and No. 2

These Sections make plans for and organize, train, and equip other Wallops Station sections to provide protection to plant, personnel, and property and to overt or minimize, where possible, damage resulting from Fires, explosions, accidents, injuries, storms, or other manmade or natural disasters.

31

SECTION IV

DESCRIPTION

OF WALLOPS STATION

i GEOGRAPHY I

Wallops Station is located on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, along the Atlantic Coast of the Delmarva Peninsula, approximately 40 miles southeast of Salisbury, Maryland. The three areas of Wallops Station are the Main Base, Wallops Island (approximately 7 miles southeast of the Main Base), and the Wallops Mainland (a half-mile strip connected to Wallops Island by a causeway and bridge over two miles of marsh and inland waterway). An overall site map of Wallops Station is shown in figure 12.

The Main Base houses the administrative offices, the technical service support shops, and such facilities as the range control center, rocket storage and inspection facilities, a prototype Gemini tracking station for engineering and training purposes,

I the main telemetry building, and one of the three Tiros weather satellite command

! and data-acquisition stations.

Wallops Island, approximately six miles long and one-half mile in width at

its widest point, contains the launch sites, assembly shops, blockhouses, rocket storage buildings, dynamic balancing facilities, and related facilities (located for the most part on the southern hal f of the Island).

The Wallops t.Aainland, located west of the island, provides sites for the longrange radar and optical tracking installations, and serves as a terminal junction

between Wallops Island and the Main Base. '

CLIMATE

Wallops Station, along v/ith more than half of the U. S. south of 40° N, has

a climate technically known as a "humid temperate climate with hot summers and

no distinct dry season." From October through N\arch, the air over Wallops Station is predominantly continental, which means that the air mass before reaching Wallops Station had developed and traveled over a large land mass and therefore contained a relatively low moisture content. From April through September, the air over Wallops Station is more maritime. Because of the circulation of the Bermuda high cell (which reaches its peak during late summer), the air mass reaching Wallops Station is developed over an extensive water surface and has the basic maritime qual ity of high moisture content at low levels.

33

GENERAL INFORMATION

34

DESCRIPTION

The average annual precipitation is 37.03 inches with a maximum of 44.44 inches in 1957. The maximum monthly precipitation was 9.84 inches during August 1958 and the maximum amount in one day was 2.5 inches on August 25, 1958. The average minimum temperature is 58° F with a mean maximum of 63° F and a mean minimum of 53° F. The extreme maximum temperature since 1946 is 98° F recorded in July 1952 and the extreme minimum temperature since 1946 is -60 F recorded in January 1961 •

The prevailing wind direction is southerly during the summer and northwesterly during the winter. The average wind speed is 10 knots. The highest wind recorded is over 100 knots in gusts during Hurricane Donna in the fall of 1960. The information given in figure 13 was compiled from data observed at Wallops Main Base during the period from March 1945 to June 1957. The data do not properly reflect the sea-breeze phenomenon as it occurs on the Island. In general, the sea breeze adds an on-shore component to the pre-existing vector wind.

A local study reveals that during the summer and fall sea breezes generally occur during the hours 1000 to 1200 EST, while during the spring they occur mostly near the hour of 1700 ESTi during winter they occur least frequently and then about the noon hour. Cloud cover varies from month to month: being at a minimum in August and at a maximum in January (see figure 14). Data on ceilings· for the Main Base are shown in figure 15. Average monthly precipitation, temperarure,

and surface wind figures for the Wallops Station area are I isted in table 2. The temperature data were extracted from records of observoflons made by the U. S. Navy at the present Wallops Station Main Base. Observations were made hourly on a 24-hour schedule for the period from March 1945 to June 1957.

*Lowest altitude at which 0.6 or more of the sky is obscured by cloud or other obscuring phenomena.

Table 2. Wallops Station Climatic Data 1945-1958

Ext :xt Mean Mean * Mean Mean
Month High Low High Low Mean Surf Precip
Temp Temp Temp' Temp Temp Wind In.
OF OF OF OF OF Knots
January 73 3 44 35 40 11. 1 2.76
February 76 11 46 36 I 41 11.7 5.31 35

GENERAL INFORMATION

Table 2. Wallops Station Climatic Data 1945-1958 (Continued)

I I
Ext Ext Mean Mean * Mean Mean
Month High Low High Low Mean Surf Precip
Temp Temp Temp Temp Temp Wind In.
of of of of of Knots
March 84 17 51 41 , 46 11.8 2.78 I
April I 89 28 59 49 54 11.8 2.49
May 96 34 68 57 63 10.5 2.52
I
June 97 45 77 67 72 9.9 2.90
July I 98 55 82 72 rr 9. 1 4.01
I
August 97 54 80 70 75 8.9 3.38
September 93 41 75 65 70 I 9.9 2.77
~
October 89 32 67 56 62 10.3 2.52
November 84 19 55 45 50 10.3 3.14
December 71 12 46 37 I 42 I 10.1 2.45
* Average of Mean High and Mean Low
- WALLOPS STATION FACILITIES

The facilities located at the Main Base, the Wallops Mainland, and the Wallops Island areas of Wallops Station are described briefly under the heading of the area concerned.

MAIN BASE

Figure 16 is a map of the Wallops Station Main Base area. Explosives handl ing and storage areas, magazines, servi ce lockers, and simi! ar faci I ities are indi cated by reversed callouts; i.e., white index numbers on block backgrounds, on this map (and figure 18). The Main Base facilities are as follows:

36

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DESCRIPTION

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GENERAL INFORMATION

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(1) Main Gate

The main gate is the only gate in use at the Main Base area, and guards are on duty on a 24-hour basis.

(2) Telemetry Building

This building contains telemetry equipment for range operations, certain facilities for range users, the Tiros Weather Satellite Command and Data Acquisition Station, and the Sound Range Recording Station.

(3) High-Gain Telemetry Antenna

The high-gain telemetry antenna was designed specially for Wallops Station and is equivalent in performance to a 60-foot parabolic dish when operated at telemetry frequencies (220-260 mc) .

(4) Special Projects Building

This building is used for special projects and operations, such as Project Gemini.

(5) Ready-Service Locker Area

This area is used for the temporary storage of small quantities of minor-hazard explosives.

(6) Service Station

This station provides normal service and minor repair facilities

for NASA and other authorized Government vehicles. Regular gasoline is available for such vehicles.

(7) Range Center

This large building contains the Wallops Station range control and evaluation facilities, offices of the Flight Test Division, and large inert rocket assembly and test areas. Facilities located here include the Range Control Center; range surveillance radar equipment; programming, timing, and communications control facilities; radar data display equipment; and the Wallops Weather Station operated on contract by the U. S. Weather Bureau.

39

GENERAL INFORMATION

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---._ - -- -- -_ - _._

GENERAL INFORMATION

(8) BuildingF-l60

Building F-160 houses a fully equipped first aid and emergency treatment facility, the range engineering instrument service and calibration laboratory, and the Experimental Instrument Construction Section. A registered nurse is on duty during working hours or as required. Medical service is provided by contract with the U. S. Public Health Service.

(9) Cafeteria and Photographic Laboratory

The Main Base cafeteria is open weekdays for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Photographic Laboratory facilitIes include processing, printing, editing, copying, enlarging, dry mounting, oscillogram processing, and projecting services.

(10) Post Office

The post office is located across the street from the cafeteria.

(11) Central Heating Plant

The central heating plant is the heating utility for all facilities on the tv\ain Base.

(12) Control Tower

The airport control tower is located just south of the east-west runway. This tower is inactive and not manned.

(13) Damage Control Station No.1

This station is the headquarters of Damage Control Section No.1.

(14) Hangar 0-1

This hangar is located adjacent to the control tower just south of the east-west runway. It is used for temporary storage and for special projects.

(15) Dormitories

The dormitories are located in Buildings F-4 and F-5 across the street from the Wallops Station Administration Building. Rooms are available for male Government employees at nominal fees.

42

DESCRIPTION

(16) Water Plant

Water for the Main Base area is obtained from 14 wells with a total gross pumping capacity of 900,000 gallons per day at 54 to 57 psi static pressure.

(17) Administration Building

The Wallops Station Administration Building houses the offices of the Station Director and those of the Division Chiefs for the Flight Test Division, the Administrative Management Division, and the Technical Services Division. The Security Office, Public Information Office, Personnel Branch, and Management Services Branch also are located in the Administration Building.

(18) Conference Building

Bui Iding F-3 is used for conferences and staff meetings.

(19) Technical Services Area

This area, located just south of the east-west runway and west of the Administration Building, includes most of the support shops for Wallops Station. Located here are the following:

Machine Shop Plumbing Shop Carpenter Shop Garage

Optical Instrument Shop Refrigeration and

Air-Conditioner Shop

Metal Fabricating Shop Metal Plating Shop Electronic Instrument Shop Mechanical InstrumentShop Laborers and Rigging Shop Aero-Launch Machine Shop

Welding Shop Electrical Shop Paint Shop Warehouse Stockroom

All technical services at Wallops Station are performed from specially equipped work trucks that are sent out 'rom the Technical Services area at the Main Base.

(20) Explosives Handling and Storage Area C

This area contains small magazines used for the storage of rocket motors and explosives.

43

GENERAL INFORMATION

(21) Sewage Disposal Plant

This utility serves the entire Wallops Station area.

(22) Explosives Handling and Storage Area B

This area includes. six large magazines used for the storage of large rocket motors. Each magazine can be heated to maintain a minimum temperature of 70° F.

(23) Explosives Handl iog and Storage Area A

This area contains an apron and building located just north of the east-west runway and is used primarily for loading and unloading explosives to anti from aircraft.

(24) Aircraft Fuel Storage

This area is used to store and dispense 115/145 octane aviation gasoline, limited quantities of JP4 jet fuel, and military grade 1100 lube oil. Fueling services may be obtained by special arrangement.

{25} Property and Supply Building

This building houses all personnel engaged in the support of property and supply services, including property accountability, property control, material handling, shipping and receiving, stock control, and storage and stockroom operations.

(26) Fiscal Building

This building houses the Fiscal Branch and also the reproduction staff of the Management Services Branch of the Administrative Management Division.

(27) Procurement Building

This building houses all personnel engaged in procurement operations and also the Head and Assistant Head of the Procurement and $uppl y Branch.

44

DESCRIPTION

(28) Range Engineering Building

Building E-108 contains offices and experimental work spaces used by personnel of the Range Engineering Division.

(29) Communications Shop

The Communications Shop is used for the maintenance, repair, and storage of communications equipment.

(30) Boresight Tower

Boresight Tower N-166 is used for checking the orientation of all telemetry tracking antennas in the N-162 area.

(31) Kennedy Antenna

This antenna acquires and tracks satellite beacons in the frequency

range of 136 rnc .

(32) Air-to-Ground Vans

Air-to-ground vans N-162 contain X-band telemetry equipment (converted from Nike-Ajax radar) and equipment to receive standard Wallops telemetry frequenc ies .

(33) Vehicle Storage Shed

Vehicle storage shed M-18 is for storing mobile rocket motor hand I ing equipment.

(34) Inspection and Storage Building

Inspection and storage building M-15 is used for visual and radiographic inspection of rocket motors, igniters, and pyrotechnics, and for temperature-controlled storage for large sol id-propellant rocket motors.

(35) Heater Plant

Heater plant M-17 is a central heating utility for the Main Base.

45

GENERAL INFORMATION

(36) Rocket Motor Storage Shed

Rocket motor storage shed M-16 is used for the storage of large rocket motors at ambient temperatures 6

(37) Communications Receiver Site

This site contains the communications receivers that are controlled remotely from the communi cations console at the Range Control Center.

(38) Employee Development Center

Building E-105 houses the library and classrooms used for employee training and development programs.

(39) Transient Office Building

Bui Iding E-106 provides temporary office space for range user

personnel.

(40) Ionosphere Sound i ng Fac iii ty

This site contains the instrumentation and equipment of an ionosphere sounding facil ity operated under contract by the U. S. Bureau of Standards.

WALLOPS MAINLAND

Figure 17 is a map of the Wallops Mainland Area. The facilities represented by the callouts on the map are as fol lows:

(1) NASA Long-Range Radar (SPANDAR)

The NASA Long-Range Radar is a high-gain, S-band, conicalSCan tracking radar employing a 60-foot antenna reflector on a 95-foot mount.

(2) Mark-51 Tracker

This unit is used for target acquisition for the NASA Long-Range

Radar.

46

DESCRIPTION

(3) MIT lincoln laboratories Field Site

This site houses two experimental radars and tracking telescope, which are operated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology lincoln Laboratories.

(4) Wallops Island Gate

This is a guard station covering the only road entrance to the Mainland and Island areas. The guard force is instructed to admit vehicles only if they have proper passes and personnel only with proper badges. Authorized personnel may obtain the necessary posses and badges at the Receptionist's Office, Building F-6, on the Main Base. The normal guard shift at this entrance operates on a 24-hour basis.

(5) Mainland Terminal Building

This is a cable terminal building which is part of the cable plant interconnecting the three Wallops Station areas.

(6) TV Camera Station No. 3

Closed-circuit television camera station No.3 is located on the roof of the Mainland terminal building. Video data from the camera are relayed to the Range Center by microwave relay.

(7) Transmitter and Standby Power Building

This building houses radio communication transmitting equipment and the standby power facility for the Wallops Island area.

(8) AN/FPQ-6 Radar

This long-range, high-precision tracking radar has a range capabil ity of 32,000 miles with an accuracy of ±2 yards. Its parabol ic reflector antenna is 29 feet in diameter.

(9) Meteorological Theodolite Site No.3

This foe iI i ty is used to house a pibal theadal i te, wh i ch tracks balloons to obtain wind direction and velocity data.

47

GENERAL INFORMATION

(1) NASA Long-Range Radar (SPANDAR) (2) Mark 51 Tracker

(3) MIT Lincoln Laboratories Field Site (4) Pass and Gate House

(5) Mainland Terminal Building (6) TV Camera Station No.3

-~-

TO WALLOPS ISLAND

(7) Transmitter Bldg and Standby Power (8) AN/FPQ-6 Radar

(9) Meteorological Theodol ite Site 3 (10) Telescope Tower

(11) Boresight Tower

(12) Observation Stands

Figure 17. Wallops Station, Mainland Map

48

DESCRIPTION

(10) Telescope Tower

-

The telescope tower at this location is operated by MIT •

(11) Boresight Tower

The Wallops Mainland boresight tower is used by the Mainland radars for cal ibrating data systems before and after a project operation.

(12) Observation Stands

These stands provide a plece for the general publ ic to view experiments launched from Wallops Island.

WALLOPS ISLAND

A map of Wallops Island is shown in figure 18, sheets 1 through 4. Letternumber combinations are building numbers of the facilities represented by callouts on the map. The facilities are as foil ows:

Sheet 1 - Co II outs (1) through (24)

(1) Ionosphere Station and Trai ler Pad (A-5)

The Ionosphere Station is operated and maintained as an experimental facility by the National Bureau of Standards. The trailer pad is used for mobile van facil ities.

(2) Camera Station No. 1 (A-30)

Camera Station No.1 is a 50-foot tower located approximately 2500 feet south of Launch Area No.2. It conta i ns an IFLOT mount, a 12-foot astrodome, and associated cameras equipped with long focal length lenses.

(3) Liquid Propellant Storage Area (A-1S, 20, 25)

A fenced-in area contains three isolated I iquid propellant storage sheds. Two sheds are of the enclosed Butler-type construction, one for storage of H202 and the second for anil ine and furfuryl alcohol. The third shed, roofed only, is used for the storage of inhibited red fuming nitric acid. Firefighting stations and personne I eye baths and deluge showers are provided at each storage shed.

49

GENERAL INFORMATION

Legend for Figure 18, Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet 1 of 4)

Index Numerical Alphabetical Index
No. legend legend No.
(1 ) Ionosphere Station and Trailer , Assembly Shop No.1 (8-15) (20}
Pad (A-5) <: Blockhouse No. 1 (A-65) (8)
(2) Camera Station No. 1 (A-30) ''; Blockhouse No. 2 (8-30) (24)
(3) liquid Propellant Storage Area Boresight Tower and Shed (8-5) (9)
(A-15, 20, 25) Camera Station No.1 (A-30) (2)
(4) Meteorological Theodolite Camera Station No. 2 (A-35) (16)
Site No.1 Dovap Station No. 1 (A-10) (15)
(5) Liquid Propellant Building (A-50) EquipmentBuilding (A-60) (17)
(6) Sounding Rocket Tower and Explosives Handling and Storage
Foci! ity (A-55) Area D (12)
(7) South Boat Basin Igniter and Rocket Motor
~ (8) Blockhouse No. 1 (A-65) Facility (B-40) (22)
(9) Boresight Tower and Shed (8-5) Ionosphere Station and Trailer
(10) Magazine No. B-10 Pad (A-5) (1)
(11) Meteorological Tower No.1 launch Area No. 1 (A-70) (18)
(250 Feet) (8-85) Launch Area No. 2 (8-35) (23)
(12) Explosives Handling and Storage liqu id Propellant Building (A-50) (5)
Area D liquid Propellant Storage Area
(13) Magazine No. 8-25 (A-15, 20, 25) (3)
(14) Magazine No. B-45 Magazine No. B-l0 (10)
(15) Dovap Station No.1 (A-l0) Magazine No. B-25 (13)
(16) Camero Station No. 2 (A-35) Magazine No. B-45 (14)
(17) Equipment Building (A-60) Meteorological Theodolite
(18) launch Area No. 1 (A-70) Site No.1 (4)
(19) TV Camera Station No. 1 Meteorological Tower No.
(20) Assembly Shop No.1 (8-15) (250 Feet) (8-85) (11)
(21) Ready Booster Storage Building Ready Booster Storage Building
No.1 (B-2O) No.1 (8-20) (21)
(22) Igniter and Rocket Motor Sounding Rocket Tower and
Facility (8-40) Fae i I ity (A-55) (6)
"v (23) launch Area No.2 (B-35) South Boat Basin (7)
(24) Blockhouse No.2 (8-30) TV Camera Station No. 1 (19)
0 Warning Light ~ Siren '_
* Warning Flasher o Warning Light & Siren 50

DESCRIPTION

Figure 18. Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet J of 4)

51

GENERAL INFORMATION

(4) Meteorological Theodolite Site No.1

This site, used in conjunction with Meteorological Theodolite Sites No.2 and 3, provides optical wind direction data, using released balloons, from 250 feet above ground level to altitudes ranging from 2000 to 5000 feet.

(5) Liquid Propellant Building (A-50)

Liquid propellants for sounding rockets launched from the sounding rocket tower are handled, pumped, and stored in this two-section Butler building. One section contains a ready storage tank and pumping equipment for storage and mixing of aniline and furfuryl alcohol rocket fuel. The other section contains similar equipment for the fuel oxidizer (red fuming nitric acid). Both sections have personnel- and buildi ng-deluge systems. Concrete walls are used between sections and on the side of the bui Iding facing the rocket tower.

(6) Sounding Rocket Tower and Foci I ity (A-55)

The sounding rocket tower is an enclosed vertical rail tower used for sounding rocket final vehicle preparation and launching. The entire tower is adjusted to the required launch elevation and azimuth angles. The remainder of the facility is used for the assembly and checkout of the sounding rockets prior to launching.

(7) South Boat Basin

The south boat basin is used for docking small water craft.

(8) Blockhouse No. 1 (A-65)

Blockhouse No. \ contains control equipment for sounding rockets launched from both the sounding rocket tower and small sounding rocket launchers located on the concrete launch pad immediately east of the building. Camera Station No.3 is located on the roof of this building.

(9) Boresight Tower and Shed (8-5)

This is a lOO-foot guyed triangular steel structure that supports the test signal horn and telescope targets used for collimating the radiating elements and reflector of an AN!FPS-16 antenna to the mechanical axis of the cntennc , The shed is provided for the test signal generator.

52

DESCRIPTION

(10) Magazine No. B-l0

Magazine No. B-10 is a large reinforced-concrete, earthcovered bui Iding used for storage of uncrated medium- to large-type rocket motors. An overhead rail chain fall, extending from the inside to out beyond the loading dock, provides for the easy handl ing of the larger motors.

(11) Meteorological Tower No.1 (250 Feet) (8-85)

This 250-foot steel tower supports wind-direction, temperature, and pressure sensors at 50-foot levels on each of its sides. The wind-direction sensors are high-response instruments with distance constants of approximately 5 feet. Information is recorded in analog form at the Island tv\eteorological Facility and transmitted in digital form to the Main Base Range Control Center.

(12) Explosives Handl ing and Storage Area D

This is a fenced area containing three large magazines and three operations buildings.

(13) Magazine No. B-25

This magazine, of reinforced concrete and earth covered, is used primarily for storing crated Nike motors and other small- to medium-sized rocket motors, such as Arcas and Recruit.

(14) Magazine No. B-45

This reinforced-concrete, earth-covered magazine is divided into three cells for the separate storage of squibs, igniters, and black powder.

(15) Dovap Station No.1 (A-l0)

Dovap (Doppler Velocity and Position) Station No.1 is an experimental single-station Dovap facility at the south end of the Island.

(16) Camera Station No.2 (A-35)

Camera Station No.2, located approximately 2500 feet south of Launch Area No.2, contains an SOTS mount, a lO-foot astrodome, and associated cameras.

53

GENERAL INFORMATION

(17) Equipment Building (A-60)

This building contains a·5000-psi compressor for charging tanks contained in the rockets launched from the sounding rocket facility.

(lS) Launch Area No. 1 (A-70)

This launch area consists of a concrete launch pad, Blockhouse No.1, the sounding rocket tower and facil ity, a Nike-Ajax rail launcher, and three fixed camera stations. This area is used primarily for handling and launching sounding rockets. (See figure 19.)

(19) N Camera Station No.

This camera station is a rail-enclosed' platform with mounting stanchion and a steerable, long-focal-Iength, closed-circuit television camera located on the roof of Assemb I y 5 hop No.1. The camera is used for pad surve i Ilance of Launch Areas No. 1 and 2, and as the 9O-degree leg of the range safety TV skyscreen for test vehicles launched from Launch Areas No.3, 4, and 5.

(20) Assembly Shop No.1 (B-l5)

Assembly Shop No.1 is a reinforced-concrete building containing eight bays specifically designed for the assembly and checkout of test vehicles to be launched. Two of the bays are shielded to permit the checkout of telemetry transmitting equipment without interference. One bay contains equipment which is used to determine vehicle moment of inertia and center of gravity.

(21) Ready Booster Storage Building No. 1 (8-20)

This shed is used for the storage of boosters that are ready for pad ,assembly and launching.

(22) Igniter and Rocket Motor Faci I ity (B-40)

This facil ity consists of a concrete building divided into two sections: One section is used for the preparation and modification of igniters, and the other section is used as a work area for cutting or reshaping propellant grains used in some small motors. Both sections have special conducting and grounded concrete floors. Electrical tools are not used. Radiant heat is provided.

54

DESCRIPTION

(23) launch Area No. 2 (B-35)

Launch Area No.2 is a concrete pad with several launch locations as follows: Pad 2A consists of a Nike-Ajax rail launcher and a tubular boom launcher capable of accommodating an XM-33 boosted multistage vehicle. Pad 2B consists of several small launchers, such as Arcas, Loki, 2.75-inch FFAR, etc, and two new universal launchers capable of accommodating three-stage vehicles of the Nike-Nike-Recruit configuration. Pad 2C consists of an I-beam launcher which accommodates vehicles of various sizes, including a five-stage vehicle with an Honest John as the first stage.

(24) Blockhouse No.2 (B-30)

Blockhouse No.2 contains vehicle checkout equipment, and an automati c programmer for Launch Area No.2. I t is used as a structure for personnel protection and the checkout of test vehicles •

. ,'

Sheet 2 - Ca II outs (:is) through (64)

(25) AN/FPS-16 Radar Building (B-55)

This two-story structure is designed specifically to house the AN/FPS-16 Radar.

(26) Island Radar Control Building (B-60)

A multipurpose facility, this building contains the AFMTC Mod.

II Radar (a modified SCR-584 Radar), two MPS-19 radars (one in the range tracking network, the other for Weather Bureau use), plotting boards, and other instrumentation. Camera Station No.4 is located on a 25-foot tower at the rear of this bui Iding.

(27) IFLOT Director Platform

This platform houses the IFLOT (Intermediate Focal Length Optical Tracker) used in support of launch activities.

(28) Dehumidified Storage and Assembly Shop No. 2 (C-15)

The dehumidified storage area of this building is used to store mobile doppler radar equipment and other humidity- and temperature-sensitive equipment, such as photographic instruments. Assembly Shop No.2 is used primarily for assembly and checkout operations for inert payloads which must be done adjacent to Launch Areas No. 1 and 2.

55

GENERAL INFORMATION

Legend for Figure 18, Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet 2 of 4)
Index Numerical Alphabetical Index
No. Legend Legend No.
(25) AN/FPS-16 Radar Building (B-55) AN/FPS-16 Radar Building (B-55) (25)
(26) Island Radar Control Building (B-60) Assembly Shop No.3 (0-65) (38)
(27) IFLOT Director Platform Assembly Shop No.4 (0-15) (39)
(28) Dehumidified Storage and Assembly Assembly Shop No. 5 (D-40) (43)
Shop No.2 (C-15) Assembly Shop No.6 (0-55) (44)
(29) Emergency Power Plant (C-20) ~ Balloon Inflation Shelter (C-145) (47)
(30) Island Compressed Air Facility Blockhouse No.3 (0-20) (58)
(31) Paint Shop (C-30) Cafeteria Building (C-70) (52)
(32) Water Plant and Pump House (C-4O) Camera Station No.5 (C-60) (51)
(33) Heating Plant (C-50) Ceilometer Detector (49)
(34) Meteorological Theodolite Site No.3 Ceilometer Projector (55)
(35) Island Terminal Building (C-75) Damage Control Station (C-35) (46)
(36) Microwave Tower Dehumidified Storage and Assembly Shop
(37) Launch Area No. 3 (pad 3A) No.2 (C-I5) (28)
(38) Assembly Shop No.3 (0-65) Deluge Pump Station (D-25) (41)
(39) Assembl y Shop No. 4 (D-I5) Emergency Power Plant (C-20) (29)
(40) Heavy Equipment Storage Area General Services Building (C-55) (48)
(41) Del uge Pump Station (D-25) Heating Plant (e-50) (33)
(42) Meteorological Tower No.2 (300 Feet) Heavy Equipment Storage Area (40)
(43) Assembly Shop No.5 (D-40) IFLOT Director Platform (27)
(44) Assembly Shop No.6 (D-55) Island Compressed Air Facility (30)
(45) Service Station (C-5) Island Radar Control Building (B-60) (26)
(46) Damage Control Station (C-35) Island Terminal Building (C-75) (35)
(47) Bolloon Inflation Sheher (C-145) Launch Area No. 3 {pad 3A} (37)
(48) General Services Building (C-55) Launch Area No. 3 {pad 3B} (56)
(49) Ceilometer Detector Launch Area No.3 Terminal Building (57)
(SO) Rawi n Station No. 2 (C-65) launch Area No. 4 (0-30) (61)
(51) Camera Station No.5 (C-60) Launch Area No.4 Terminal Building (60)
(52) Cafeteria Building (C-70) Launch Area No. 5 (0-45) (64)
(53) Meteorological Facility (C-85) Launch Area No.5 Terminal Building (63)
(54) Meteorological Theodolite Site No.2 Meteorological Facility (C-85) (53)
(55) Ceilometer Projector Meteorological Theodolite Site No.2 (54)
(56) Launch Area No. 3 (pad 38) Meteorological Theodolite Site No.3 (34)
"-.,(57) Launch Area No.3 Terminal Building Meteorological Tower No.2 (300 Feet) (42)
(58) Blockhouse No.3 (D-20) Microwave Tower (36)
(59) TV Camera Station No. 2 North Launch Area Wind Sensor Site
(60) Launch Area No.4 Terminal Building (100 Feet) (D-75) (62)
(61) Launch Area No. 4 CD -30) Paint Shop (C-30) (31)
(62) North Launch Area Wind Sensor Site Rawin Station No.2 (C-65) (50)
(100 Feet) (0-75) Service Station (C-5) (45)
(63) Launch Area No.5 Terminal Building TV Camera Station No. 2 (59)
(64) Launch Area No.5 (D-45) Water Plant and Pump House (C-40) (32)
0 Warning light ~ Siren
* Warning Flasher o Warning Light & Siren 56

DESCRIPTION

Figure 18. Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet 2 of 4)

57

-------~I

GENERAL INFORMATION

{29} Emergency Power Plant (C-2O)

This structure is a large, steel Quonset building containing one 800-kw diesel-powered generator.

(30) Island Compressed Air Facil ity

Compressed air for pneumatic tools and other applications is produced by compressors and stored in two spherical air tanks in this building.

(31) Paint Shop (C-30)

This foci I ity is used for the storage and distr lbuflon of all paints and painting suppl ies on the Island.

(32) Water Plant and Pump House (C-40)

This facility consists of two small concrete buildings, one containing a water-treatment plant, filter, and softener, and the other housing a 3-hp water pump.

(33) Heatj ng Plant (C-50)

Two oil-fired, medium-sized steam boilers used as a central steam plant for some of the Island bui ldi ngs are contai ned in this bui Idi ng.

(34) Meteorological Theodolite Site No.3

Meteorological Theodolite Site No.3, used in conjunction with Sites No.1 and 2, provides optical wind direction data, using released balloons, from 250 feet above ground level to altitudes ranging from 2000 to Sooo feet.

(35) Island Terminal Building (C-75)

This Facility is a concrete-block type structure used For housing termination equipment of the intrastation coble plant. The main tie-cable between Wallops Main Base and the Island terminates here. The building also is used to house the microwave equipment of the dosed-circuit te\evision system.

r

(36) Mi crowave Tower

The microwave tower supports the receiving and transmitting

58

DESCRIPTION

antennas of the closed-eircuit television system microwave equipment.

(37) Launch Area No. 3 (pad 3A)

This complex contains a horizontal-type launcher with a movable shelter that covers the launcher in the horizontal position. A terminal building houses a winch, a remote peroxide fueling unit, a wiring terminal room, and heating and air-conditioning plants for the launcher shelter. (See figure 20.)

(38) Assembly Shop No.3 (0-65)

This building is designed specifically to provide focilities for the assembly of Scout vehicles for launch area No.3.

(39) Assembly Shop No.4 (0-15)

Assembly Shop No.4 is a large building used for the storage of Scout vehicle ground support equipment and as a service building for launch area No.3.

(40) Heavy Equipment Storage Area

This area is a 160- by 3OO-foot concrete parking space for trucks, trailers, cranes, hoists, and vehicle-handling equipment.

(41) Deluge Pump Station (0-25)

This facil ity contains two 125-hp pumps used to provide pressure for the de I uge ~ater system of Launch Areas No. 3 and 5. I t uses sa It water obtained from a basin with an inlet, dredged from a nearby waterway.

(42) Me'teorological Tower No.2 (300 Feet) (0-80)

Meteorological Tower No.2 is a 300-foot, guyed, steel tower used to support wind-direction, wind-speed, and temperature-sensing units at 50- foot I eve Is.

(43) Assembly Shop No.5 (0-40)

This shop is a large Butler building used for the assembly of mul tistage research veh i cles.

59

GENERAL INFORMATION

(44) Assembly Shop No.6 (D-55)

Assembly Shop No.6 is a large Butler building used for the assembly of large multistage vehicles. Motor al ignment checks and measurements of center of gravity and moment of inertia also are made here.

(45) Service Station (C-5)

The Island service station is maintained for normal service and minor repair of NASA and other authorized Government vehicles. Gasoline dispensed at this station is regular gasoline only.

(46) Damage Control- Station (C-35)

This large building is divided into two sections: a damage control station which includes a fire station and rescue equipment, and various range launcher and equipment service shops.

(47) Balloon Inflation Shelter (C-145)

This facility is used for the inflation of meteorological wind data

balloons.

(48) General Services Building (C-55)

This facility is a one-level building which contains a first aid station, a conference room, and general office spaces that can be assigned on a temporary basis for various test projects.

(49) Cei I ometer Detector

This facil ity is the detector unit of the meteorological ceilometer system by which the height of cloud formations above ground level is computed during dayl ight or darkness.

(50) Rawin Station No.2 (C-65)

This station uses an AN/GMD-l B Rawinsonde Equipment which can be modified, if necessary, to an AN/GMD-2 configuration. The modification requires approximately 4 hours.

60

OESCRI PTI ON

(51) Camera Station No.5 (C-60)

Camera Station No.5 is located approximately 2000 feet north of Launch Area No.2. This facility contains an SOTS mount, a 10-foot astrodome, and associated tracking cameras.

(52) Cafeteria Building (C-70)

This building contains the Island cafeteria where breakfast and lunch are served Monday through Friday. It also has rooms that can be used for temporary office space.

(53) Meteorological Facil ity (C-85)

Island surface weather observations are taken and recorded at this site, and radiosondes, chaff balloons, and other balloon-borne payloads are launched at a special balloon inflation facility in the west end of the building, A Rawin Set AN/GMD-l S, mounted atop this part of the building, can be converted if necessary to an AN/GMD-2 configuration in approximately 4 hours. An electronic meteorological equipment maintenance shop in the east end also is used to prepare meteorological rocket payloads for firing. The meteorological Facility is operated on contract by U. S. Weather Bureau personnel.

(54) Meteorological Theodolite Site No.2

Meteorological Theodolite Site No.2, used in conjunction with Sites No.1 and 3, provides optical wind directiOn data, using released balloons, from 250 feet to altitudes ranging from 2000 to 5000 feet.

(55) Ceilometer Projector

(56) Launch Area No. 3 (pad 3B)

This facility is the projector unit of the cloud-coverage lowerlevel detecting system used to compute the cloud ceiling height from ground level.

Pad 38 contains a concrete launching pad, a pad terminal building, an equipment barrier and other ground support equipment, and a Scout launch tower.

61

----- -_ -- -------""

GENERAL INFORMATION

(57) Launch Area No.3 Terminal Building (0-10)

(61) Launch Area No. 4 (0-30)

This facil ity is a reinforced-concrete structure located on the north edge of launch pad No~ 3. It contains termination equipment for the power, communication, and control cables required for the checkout and launch of a rocket from this launch area.

(58) Blockhouse No. 3 (D-20)

This blockhouse is a hemispherical, two-story concrete structure housing control equipment used during large rocket launchings from launch Areas No.3, 4, and 5 .

{5Ci? TV Camera Station No. 2

This station consists of a platform and stanchion with a steerable, long-focal-Iength, closed-clrcult television camera located atop the dome of Blockhouse No.3. The camera is used for pad surveillance of Launch Areas No.3, 4, and 5; and the 90-degree leg of the closed-circuit television skyscreen is used for rocket launch i ngs from Launch Areas No. 1 and 2.

(60) launch Area No.4 Terminal Building (0-35)

This terminal building is a reinforced-concrete structure used for launch area communication and power terminations, battery-charging equipment, and control cables required for the checkout and launch of a vehicle from Launch Area No.4.

Launch Area No.4 contains a concrete launching pod with a Little Joe launcher and terminal building. This area also includes a tubular NikeAjax rail launcher and four fixed camera stations. (See figure 20.)

(62) North Launch Area Wind Sensor Site (100 Feet) (0-75)

This site contains a 100-foot pole mounting high response wind

sensors.

62

l

DESCRIPTION

(63) launch Area No.5 Terminal Building (0-50)

.

This reinforced-concrete building, located on the south edge of

the launch pad, is used for battery-charging equipment, launcher control equipment, power terminations, communications terminations, and control cables required for the checkout and launch of a vehicle from launch Area No.5.

(64) launch Area No. 5 (D-45)

launch Area No.5 includes a large concrete launching pad with one tubular boom-type launcher and a pad terminal building. This area has seven fixed camera locations. The launcher is used for multistage vehicles such as the D58 Trailblazer II, Shotput, and Ram. (See figure 20.)

Sheet 3 - Callouts (65) through (67)

(65) Explosives Handling and Storage Area E

This area includes a magazine and various other storage structures all located north of launch Area No.5.

(66) Magazine No. 5XT3 r:tv -224)

This magazine is a medium-sized, corrugated-steel, igloo-type, earth-covered structure used for the storage of medium-sized rocket motors.

(67) Ready Booster Storage Building No.2

Ready Booster Storage Building No.2 is used for overflow storage of boosters ready for pad assembly and launching.

Sheet 4 - Callouts (68) through (73)

(68) Dynamic Balance Facility

This facility is used to perform horizontal and vertical dynamic balancing of rocket motors and payloads. limited vibration equipment also is available.

(69) North Water Tank and Pump House

This facility contains a gasoline-engine-driven pump and an elevated 50,OOO-gallon steel tank.

63

r

GENERAL INFORMATION

(65) Explosives Handling and Storage Area E

(66) Magazine No. 5XT3 (W-224)

(67) Ready Booster Storage Bldg. No.2

® Warning Light

~ VVarning Flasher

..... VVarning Flasher and Siren

*

e

r~-

J;tJ,

Figure 18. Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet 3 of 4)

64

DESCRIPTION

-

(68) Dynamic Balance Facility (E-45, E-50, E-55) (69) North Water Tank and Pump House

(70) Ready Service Locker (W-1B2)

(71) Rocket Motor Ready Storage

(72) North Boot Basin and Dock Area {73) Old Coast Guard Station

(74) Easy Tower

Figure lB. Wallops Station, Island Map (Sheet 4 of 4)

65

GENERAL INFORMATION

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67

GENERAL INFORMATION

(70) Ready Serv i ce Locker ~ -182)

This locker is used for the storage of blasting caps.

(71) Rocket Motor Ready Storage (E -80)

The Rocket Motor Ready Storage Building is used for the storage of rocket motors ready for pad assembly and launching.

(72) North Boat Basin and Dock Area

The north boat basin and dock area was originally used to land heavy equipment on Wallops Island; however, since the Island causeway has been in use this area is used only for special projects.

(73) Old Coast Guard Station.

This station, once manned by the predecessors of the U. S. Coast Guard (the U. S. life Saving Service), is now used only for occasional storage.

(74) Easy Tower

The tower at this location is now used only infrequently as an observation post. It was once the watch tower of the former Life Saving Station on Wallops Island.

DOWNRANGE STATIONS

Wallops Station downrange support is provided-by installations at Dougherty, Sandbridge, and Miona, Virginia, the USNS Range Recoverer, and a facility at Coquina Beach, North Carolina. The IGOR {Intercept Ground Optical Recorder} tracking telescope is installed at the Dougherty site, about 14 miles downrange from Wallops Island.

BERMUDA

The NASA Tracking Station located at Bermuda is available for I imited support of Wallops Station activities.

68

SECTION V

ADMINISTRATION AND LOGISnCS

GENERAL

Wallops Station is located in a rural area where commercial sources of material and/or services are limited. In general, unless the availability of services and materials has been definitely established, the range user should assume that he must be self-sufficient. The following paragraphs describe the administrative and logistic services that are available at Wallops Station, including addresses, transportation, visitor control, and others. Certain foci! lrles, such as transient housing, are available only for Government employees, while other facilities, such as the cafeterias, may be used by both range user and contractor personnel.

MAILING AND SHIPPING DATA

MAIL

The United States Post Office Department maintains a branch office on the Main Base of Wallops Station. The Post Office serves the Main Base area, Wallops Mainland, and Wallops Island. The correct mailing address is as follows:

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Wallops Station

Wallops Island, Virginia Zip Code 23337

Special arrangements may be made with the Post Office for range users or contractors on extended duty at Wallops Station to receive their mail at a designated location at the Station.

SHIPPING

Freight shipments ito Wallops Station by motor freight or express are delivered directly to the Station. Shipments by rail, however, must be picked up at the nearest rail terminal, located at lecato, Virginia, approximately 7 miles from Wallops Main Base and 10 miles from Wallops Island.

The proper shipping addresses for Wallops Station are as follows:

69

GENERAL INFORMATION

Motor Freight:

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Wallops Station

Wallops Island, Virginia

Rail Freight and Express:

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Wallops Station

Lecato, Virginia

Air Express and Air Freight:

Notional Aeronautics and Space Administration Wallops Station

(Name of Freight Terminal)

Call Wallops Station upon arrival for further instructions,

The nearest air terminal is Sal isbury, Maryland, al"ld is served by Allegheny Airlines, Shipments by air to this terminal may be made by using the address, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Wallops Station, Salisbury Wicomico Airport, Salisbury, Maryland, and the shipment should be marked to be held for pickup, depending on the urgency of the requirements. However, this airport has only limited service and most shipments should be directed to the National Airport, Washington, D. C" or Friendship Airport, Baltimore, Maryland, depending upon the best service from the shipping point. Shipments by air can also be made directly to the Wallops Station airfield, using charter aircraft, by making prior arrangements with the station for the use of the airfield. Loading and unloading facilities are available.

Contractor Shipments

All incoming shipments to station contractors should be marked showing the contractor's name, the Project Officer, and the project nome or number. Delivery and receipt are the responsibility of the shipper, carrier, and contractor, unless a different method is set forth in the contract or by mutual agreement with the contractor and the Government.

All outgoing sh ipments from station contractors are the contractor's complete respons ib i I ity, unless other arrangements are mode in the manner described above.

70

ADMINISTRATION AND LOGISTICS

Government Shipments

.'

All incoming shipments shall be addressed ih accordance with the method of shipment as described above, and marked with the Government contract or order number.

All shipments are received by Shipping and Receiving in Building F-7, and are forwarded to the user by the best available transportation. For large shipments or rush shipments, the user is contacted for disposition instructions.

All outgoing shipments are sent to Shipping and Receiving in Building F-7.

Packing, crating, and marking will be arranged by the shipper with Shipping and Receiving personnel. The method of shipment is determined by Shipping and Receiving personnel, depending upon the urgency of the shipment.

Further information relative to outgoing and incoming shipments can be obtained by calling Wallops Main Base Extension 427.

TELEPHONE SERVICE

A PBX-Dial-Exchange service telephone system provides service for inside and outside telephones at Wallops Station. Seven tie-lines and up to 20 outside trunk lines are available, and the special SCAMA (switching conference and monitoring arrangement) network parallels the normal communications system for greater flexibility during a mission. Ten perch-In conference lines are available, and the Range Control Center contains a nine-position pushbutton conference bridge, selectable from the control consoles. Wallops Station also connects into an interdepartmental dial system which permits dial telephoning to any Government agency in Washington, D. C., and the Federal Telecommunications System which permits direct dialing through the FTS Network to Government agencies at many major cities throughout the Continental United States.

The main exchange for Wallops Station is os fol Jows:

Temperanceville, Virginia Area Code 703

VAlley 4-3411

.-

TELETYPE SERVICE

There are presently two private-line, single-service teletypewriters and one TLX International Telex Service teletypewriter in service at the Wallops Station

71

GENERAL INFORMATION

Administration Building. In addition to the administrative facilities, two National Weather Circuits are operated by Meteorological Personnel, and two combination voice/facsimile/data circuits are in use at the Tiros Receiving Station.

The administrative teletype exchanges are as follows:

TLX 703-824~519 (Unattended service nights and hoi idays) NS 983 {Unattended service nights and hoi idays}

RADIO

Standard Wallops Station frequency allocations are available upon request.

EMERGENCY LISTINGS

The names, titles, and home telephone numbers for Wallops Station key personnel are as follows:

Robert L. Krieger, Director, Temperanceville, Virginia: VAlley 4-4691

John C. Palmer, Chief Flight Test Division, Pocomoke City, Maryland:

Pocomoke 739

Abraham D. Spinak, Chief, Range Engineering Division, Pocomoke City, Maryland: Pocomoke 984

Joseph E. Robbins, Chief, Administrative Management Division, Onancock, Virginia: SUnset 7-3836

William E. Grant, Chief, Technical Services Division, Temperanceville, Virginia: VAlley 4-4542

TRANSPORTATION

TO AND FROM WALLOPS STATION

The travel office, located in the Fiscal Building, is available for service to travelers for reservations, informatian on schedules, and other information. The following is a listing of various means of travel to and from Wallops Station:

72

ADMINISTRATION AND LOGISTICS

(1) The only commercial air terminal in the Wallops Station area is located in Salisbury, Maryland, 44 miles north of the Station. This air terminal is serviced by Allegheny Airlines from Washington, D. C. and points north.

(2) Commercial bus service in the Wallops Station area is by Greyhound and Carolina Trailways, Inc. The nearest bus terminal to Wallops Station is located at "T's" Corner, Oak Hall, Virginia, 4 miles west of the station at the junction of US-13 and State Route 175.

(3) Wallops Station may be reached by private automobile by using US-13 to "T's" Corner, Oak Hall, Virginia. The station is located on State Route 175,4 miles east of "T's" Corner. It is 15 miles south of Pocomoke City, Maryland, and 60 miles north of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge Tunnel.

(4) A NASA shuttle airplane from Washington, D. c. and Langley Field, Virginia is scheduled into Wallops Station Monday through Friday for the use of government personnel. Reservations for fl ights must be made through the travel office.

(5) Wallops Station has excellent runways and parking facilities for aircraft. Personnel having official business with the station may land at Wallops Station airfield upon making prior arrangements via telephone or TWX.

NOTE:

THE CONTROL TOWER AT WALLOPS STATION IS USED ONLY FOR OBSERVATION. CONTACT WITH WALLOPS STATION FROM THE AIR MUST BE ARRANGED PRIOR TO ARRIVAL.

(6) Charter aircraft transporting personnel having official business with the Station may land at Wallops Station upon making prior arrangements via telephone or TWX.

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION

Shuttle buses are operated at Wallops Station during business hours between Wallops Island and the Main Base. These buses leave both points every 20 minutes. The point of pickup or departure on Wallops Island is the General Services Building; stops at the Main Base include the Range Center, the Communications Receiver Site, Special Projects Building, Cafeteria, Building F-160, the Property and Supply Building, Technical Services area, Administration Building, and the Main Gate.

In addition, a shuttle bus runs every 20 minutes north and south on Wallops Island, servicing all work areas.

73

GENERAL INFORMATION

Wallops Station does not operate a motor pool for local transportation; however, special trips via shuttle bus can be arranged on an availability basis. Also, local taxi service is available. Shuttle bus arrangements must be made with the Receptionist at the Administration Building on the Main Base. Automobile rental service is available at Pocomoke City, Maryland, or at Sal isbury, Maryland.

VISITOR CONTROL

All prospective visitors to Wallops Station are advised to make arrangements with the person they wish to see well in advance of their visit. This will enable Wallops Station personnel to plan their time accordingly Of, if necessary, to set up an alternate date. Visitors must stop and be recognized at the Guard Station before entering or before leaving the Station.

GUARD SYSTEM

A Guard Force is on duty at Wallops Station at all times with the responsibility for visitor control at Wallops Island and the Main Base area, fire protection, proper storage of classified material, protection against theft and vandal ism, and other assigned duties. Guards also are on duty at launch areas during firing operations to insure compliance with the Station badge system. Additional guard service may be authorized and scheduled by the Security Officer. Authorized personnel arriving after regular duty hours who want to enter Wallops Island or other areas must make prior arrangements with the Receptionist and Guards at the Wallops Island gates. Automobile passes and area badges are issued to visitors on official business only by the Receptionist at the Main Base Administration Building. The badges of various colors, denoting certain restrictions, are issued for use at Wallops Station as a method of safety control. The Receptionist maintains a record and follow-up procedure on badges, and visitors should return any badges issued them to the Receptionist or the Guard at the gate upon completing their visit. Wallops Station Guards also issue special red and white temporary bcdges, good for one trip onl y, in the event of an emergency or for the del ivery of material. Table 3 lists

the various badges in use at Wallops Station and the significance of each badge.

SECURITY CLEARANCES

Security clearances normally are unnecessary for visitors at Wallops Station; however, it is the visitor's responsibility to furnish proof of identity prior to or upon arrival at the Station. If access to classified material is anticipated, then proof of security clearance must be forwarded to the Security Office well in advance of the intended visit.

74

ADMINISTRATION AND LOGISTICS

Table 3. Wallops Station Badge System

Badge Color Significance
Orange Wearer may remain IN the assigned Launch
Area as duties require.
Yellow Wearer may remain in the VICINITY of the
assigned Launch Area as duties require (e.g.,
radar personne I) • I
I
I
Green Wearer must VACATE the Launch Area when
I directed prior to launching.
Tan Wearer may NOT enter any Launch Area when
explosives are in that area.
White Wearer must remain in the group at all times
(Tour) and must VACATE the Launch Area when
directed to by the Guide.
I
Blue and White Wearer may NOT enter any Launch Area, un-
(Contractor) less he is under escort or specifically directed
to do so.
Red and White Same as the blue and white badge, but good for
(Temporary) one trip only. CLASSIFIED MATERIAL

Individuals having custody or control of classified material are personalty responsible to insure that this material ;5 seen and handled only by persons having proper security clearance and then only on a "need-to-know" basis.

OFFICE SPACE

Office space is available for projects when required. The available offices vary in size and location, with most of them being located in the Main Base area.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

TRANSIENT HOUSING

Transient housing is not available. Wallops Station maintains two Dormitories which are available at nominal rates to visiting male Government personnel. Other personne I must make arrangements at local hotels or motels in the vicinity.

CAFETERIAS

Cafeterias are available at both the Island and the Main Base of Wallops Station. Breakfast, lunch, and evening meals are served at the Main Base Cafeteria during regular working days only: breakfast and lunch only are served at the Island Cafeteria Monday through Friday. However, during after-hour tests, the Island Cafeteria may serve anevening meal and remain open for coffee and light snacks.

MEDICAL FACILITIES

The nearest fully equipped hospitals in the Wallops Station area are located in Salisbury, Maryland and Ncssowoddox, Virginia. Medical service is provided to employees of the Station by contract with the United States Public Health Service. A fully equipped first aid and emergency treatment facility is in operation at Building F-160 at the Main Base and Building C-55 at Wallops Island. A registered nurse is on duty at each facility during working hours and a medical doctor is on standby duty at all times. A medical doctor is on duty during hazardous operations, such as the transfer of highly volatile liquid fuels, and one day a week to conduct periodic physical examinations of Station employees.

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