P. 1
Icelandic Language

Icelandic Language

|Views: 398|Likes:
Published by Tania Kardash

More info:

Published by: Tania Kardash on Dec 07, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/10/2013

pdf

text

original

THE ICELANDIC LANGUAGE

BY

STEFÁN KARLSSON

TRANSLATED BY

RORY MCTURK

VIKING SOCIETY FOR NORTHERN RESEARCH

UNIVERSITY COLLEGE LONDON

2004

© 2004 Stefán Karlsson

ISBN: 0 903521 61 X

Printed by Short Run Press Limited, Exeter

Preface

‘Tungan’, the work translated here, first appeared as a chapter in Íslensk
fijó›menning
, vol. VI (Reykjavík: fijó›saga, 1989), 1–54, and has since
been republished, with minor alterations and additions (including the
numbering of sections and subsections) in Stafkrókar (2000; see Biblio-
graphy), 19–75. The present translation incorporates the changes made in
the 2000 version, even though my work on it was mainly done in 1997–99.
Stefán Karlsson kindly gave me an offprint of ‘Tungan’ in September
1995. The idea of translating it first occurred to me in the spring of 1997,
and I am grateful to Örnólfur Thorsson, who was Visiting Fellow in Ice-
landic Studies at the University of Leeds in 1996–97, for help and advice
in the early stages of my work on the translation. I had completed about
half of it (to the end of section 1, ‘The language itself’) by the summer of
1998, and translated the remainder during my year as Visiting Professor
at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, in 1998–99. The translation
has since been read in draft by Richard Perkins, Peter Foote, Desmond
Slay, Michael Barnes, Peter Orton, and finally Stefán himself, to all of
whom I am deeply grateful for their comments and suggestions. I am
particularly grateful to Stefán for his acceptance and support of the idea
of publishing this work of his in English, and for the thoroughness with
which he read and commented on the translation. My thanks are also due
to Andrew Wawn, whose recognition of the value of ‘Tungan’ for teaching
purposes encouraged me to bring my work on it to completion, and to Anthony
Faulkes for the care with which he has prepared the translation for the press.
In its original form this work was, of course, intended for Icelandic
readers, in whom knowledge of the pronunciation of Modern Icelandic
could easily be assumed. With this in mind I have given in the text a
minimal amount of additional information about Icelandic pronunciation,
most especially in subsection 1.2.1, where Stefán compares the vowel
sounds of Old Icelandic with those of Modern Icelandic. I have slightly
reduced and reordered the information given in subsections 1.1.1–3, and
have added English translations of words and phrases in languages other
than English that are referred to in the text; I have also parsed Icelandic
words where it seemed to me helpful to do so. What is offered here is,
however, a translation rather than an adaptation; I have not otherwise
ventured to alter Stefán’s treatment of his material in any way, and only
hope, indeed, that I have represented it with reasonable accuracy. Any
errors of translation are, of course, entirely my responsibility.

R. MCT.
Leeds, April 2004

Abbreviations

acc.

accusative

adj., adjs

adjective(s)

adv.

adverb

comp.

comparative

dat.

dative

f.

feminine

gen.

genitive

indic.

indicative

inf.

infinitive

m.

masculine

ModIcel.

Modern Icelandic

n.

neuter

nom.

nominative

OldIcel.

Old Icelandic

pers.

person

pl.

plural

poss.

possessive

pp.

past participle

pres.

present

pret.

preterite

sg.

singular

subj.

subjunctive

Note: In the numbered extracts printed at the foot of pages 38–63 with facing
translations, and illustrating different stages in the history of Icelandic and its
spelling, the following editorial practices have been adopted: italics indicate
expansion of abbreviations, pointed brackets ‹ › mark off letters that have been
supplied in cases of omission, and the asterisk * marks words in which errors of
other kinds have been emended. The oblique strokes in extracts 10 and 12, on the
other hand, correspond to punctuation marks in the original texts.

Contents

Introduction...........................................................................................7

1. The language itself.............................................................................8

2. Orthography.....................................................................................39

3. One language...................................................................................64

Bibliography........................................................................................67

General index.......................................................................................75

Index of words and phrases.................................................................79

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->