P. 1
Open Mobile eBook

Open Mobile eBook

|Views: 90|Likes:
Published by shaimaamohammad7221

More info:

Published by: shaimaamohammad7221 on Dec 07, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/27/2013

pdf

text

original

Nextgeneration networks: IMS, LTE, etc

The network can be viewed as the core network and the access
network. The core network is the heart of the network and
performs functions, such as switching, and the access network
connects the device to the core network. The core network is
implementing IP technology through an initiative called IMS (IP
multimedia subsystem). The access network is evolving through an
initiative called LTE (long‐term evolution).

The impact of nextgeneration networks

IMS  IP Multimedia Subsystem

IMS brings an IP core to the telecoms network. This is needed
since the rest of the global ecosystem has already migrated to the
IP protocol. However, IMS is controversial in its philosophy since it
violates the principle that ‘all packets are created (commercially)
equal’. In other words, inbuilt within IMS is the functionality to
differentially charge for IP. Telecom operators have been
enthusiastic about IMS. Vendors have also been enthusiastic
about it in order to sell to the operators. The rest of the
ecosystem has given IMS a lukewarm response – especially device
manufacturers and the customers. There is really no need for IMS
from a customer standpoint. And IMS can be (with some
justification) seen as a ‘walled garden at the packet level’.

141

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

In terms of its deployment – IMS provides a value proposition to
the operator since it reduces the operating expenses by having an
all IP core. In that sense, IMS is successful and useful. However, its
utility in the applications domain is far less clear. In other words,
IMS may well remain an IP core technology. There have been
attempts to create a service layer around IMS by creating an SDP
(software delivery platform) layer on top of it, but these initiatives
have not really taken off. Meanwhile, the telecoms industry
continues to promote IMS applications (i.e. applications that are
tightly coupled to the core network).

Typically, the list for IMS applications goes something like this:

● presence

● video sharing

● push to talk

● VoIP

● SIP‐IM

● list management

The question is: what do we need IMS for beyond the IP core?
What applications are possible? And further – why cannot they be
done by the Web? (i.e. where is the value proposition end‐to‐end
for IMS if the Web can do most of what IMS can do – but for free?

142

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

IMS claims to provide QOS (quality of service) for a cost. This is in
the operator’s interest but not in the customer’s interest as we
discuss later. Most telecoms applications are person‐to‐person
(e.g. SMS). Here, IMS has some issues at the application layer.

The problems with P2P (person‐to‐person) IMS applications are:

1 Lack of a value proposition: many of these
applications can be done by non‐IMS means on the
Web. So, why would we need IMS for them (say for
IM)?

2 No endtoend: many of the IMS applications
promoted need IMS on both ends of the network
AND need IMS devices at both ends (i.e. customers
need IMS devices). This is not visible at the moment
and not likely to be globally viable in the near future.
In other words, if person A sends an IMS‐optimised
message to person B, then both their respective
operators need IMS and they both need to have IMS‐
capable devices.

3 Devices: no support from devices and customers.

143

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

4 Merged services  same problem  bigger scale:
some IMS applications are based on merged services
(e.g. the ability to make a phone call at the same
time as we view a video clip). Again the P2P device
problems apply (i.e. the ability for the entire end‐to‐
end communications channel to support advanced
features). So, this is also a non‐starter unless other
issues are resolved (e.g. partnerships with other
vendors).

We have a precedent here in MMS (multimedia messaging
service, also called photo messaging). P2P MMS did not really take
off because it has exactly the same problem for IMS applications
(in a simpler form). Among these: you need network and device
support at both ends, the user experience needs to be seamless,
the charging needs to be transparent, etc.

Much of the industry took an ostrich‐like view to this problem;
somehow they hoped that all operators would simultaneously
upgrade and all devices would be quickly capable of supporting
IMS (and devices will be operator ‘locked down’ so other means
like WiFi connectivity are not possible). Hopes were also high that
people would use the IMS‐enabled rich media service. For that
matter, to use video calling we strictly don’t need IMS at all.

144

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

Services like QIK114

can achieve the same results without

impacting the network.

There have been some attempts to address the issue of IMS
interconnectivity – for instance, by initiatives like IPX network115
and RCS116

, but for most part, we see IMS to be mainly a core
network initiative and not impacting the applications domain in
the near future.

LTE

Unlike IMS (core network evolution), LTE (access network
evolution) has had a much greater commercial impact mainly due
to its simplicity, especially because we don’t need point‐to‐point
connections (i.e. we simply need a connection between the device
and the core network). To improve matters further, HSDPA117
(which is covered by LTE standards) has had direct commercial
success in the form of mobile broadband and the devices for LTE
could be laptops or sub‐notebooks in addition to typical mobile
devices.

For the most part, the access telecoms networks are evolving into
a terminology called LTE (long‐term evolution). The term ‘LTE’ was
first used in the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP)
standardization group for the study of the evolution of the 3G

114

www.qik.com

115

http://www.gsmworld.com/technology/index.shtml

116

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rich_Communication_Suite

117

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HSDPA

145

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

radio network. In this book, we use the term LTE and LTE services
in a more global scope and include the evolution of the core
network, applications and the re‐integration of fixed and mobile
access networks to enable a wide variety of new services that
benefit from anytime, anywhere Internet access to interact with
Internet, and home, network‐based services, information and
content. All the IP characteristics of LTE lend themselves to certain
unique applications from the access network standpoint.

In the short‐ to medium‐term, they will lead to many more
applications like mobile broadband and a greater adoption of IP.

Telecoms services: IMS, LTE and MMS and the endtoend
principle

As we have seen from some of the previous examples, the
telecoms industry has made many attempts to tie services to the
network but with limited success because it ignored the end‐to‐
end principle118

.

As we have said before, the endtoend principle is one of the
central design principles of the Internet. The principle states that,

whenever possible, communications protocol operations should be
defined to occur at the end‐points of a communications system, or
as close as possible to the resource being controlled. According to
the end‐to‐end principle, protocol features are only justified in the
lower layers of a system if they are a performance optimization.

118

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/End‐to‐end_principle

146

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

Hence, Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) retransmission for
reliability is still justified, but efforts to improve TCP reliability
should stop after peak performance has been reached. Most
features in the lowest level of a communications system have costs
for all higher‐layer clients, even if those clients do not need the
features, and are redundant if the clients have to re‐implement the
features on an end‐to‐end basis. (Adapted from Wikipedia.)

Unlike IMS services, LTE services have succeeded because they do
not violate this principle. When we talk of services we cannot
ignore the Web and the open mindset (i.e. if something is free on
the Web, then under what circumstances can it be paid for on
mobile? Currently, in the mobile ecosystem, value is being
abstracted up the stack rapidly (through mechanisms like Cell ID
databases, etc). By that, we mean that functions are being
decoupled from the network and are implemented at higher levels
of the stack in an ‘imperfect’ way. Consequently, it is important to
think of what functionality cannot be abstracted at higher levels of
the stack.

Traditional views of telecoms services include voicemail, SMS,
MMS, video calling, m‐commerce, etc. Many of them violate the
end‐to‐end principle. Learning from the mistakes of IMS services,
it is not possible to translate core network elements to a
communication service and it is also difficult to charge for IP
traffic. Even so, there are business models based on CAPEX

147

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

reduction (capital expense reduction), network capacity
utilization, but these cannot be services for the end‐user.

Competing with the Web almost always predicates a ‘walled
garden’ approach to recoup investment (i.e. the need to somehow
restrict the user to recoup costs). Walled gardens are also a losing
battle; they will at best work as a cost savings model (and not for
creation of new services).

Services like MMS and video calling illustrate the problem – very
high pricing, unpredictable pricing, unclear user experience (e.g.
capability of devices), not global, not roaming, etc.

In contrast, access network services, such as LTE / HSDPA, have
got off to a good start.

Some more thoughts about LTE services:

● LTE coverage will be in pockets of areas, so, point‐to‐
point services will not be possible again.

● LTE has no inherent voice capability. So, voice will be
Voice‐over IP (VoIP).

● Initial use cases will be ‘like HSDPA’ but with some
extra features.

● The role of devices is key. Unlike IMS which had little
support from device vendors, LTE does have support
from devices vendors.

148

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

● While there continues to be much obsession with
peak data rates: 100Mbps downlink, 50Mbps uplink,
etc; data speeds are relative and they don’t really
matter commercially (will people pay for data speeds
in itself and can they be guaranteed?). Data rates
cannot be guaranteed. So, data rates are a red
herring for LTE. However, the network engineers and
the vendors will continue to market LTE on network
capabilities alone.

Some other useful features of LTE include orientation towards
real‐time interaction and towards non‐phone devices (e.g.
Amazon Kindle). While ‘LTE services’ (e.g. IMS services) are a
contradiction due to decoupling of the network and services , LTE
could enable the creation of a whole new type of Internet service
based on real‐time and universal connectivity.

In addition, LTE has some obvious infrastructure advantages:
fewer network nodes, IP‐only backhaul and integration to an IP
core network architecture, etc. In its full incarnation, unlike
HSDPA, the LTE device now has an IP address (leading possibly to
an uptake of IPV6).

If we consider LTE from a network operator standpoint, people
are consuming more data, but not necessarily paying more (due to
fixed rate pricing). So, profits can come by reducing the cost of
transmission (x cents/Mb) to carry data. This cost reduction to
carry data can come about by a number of means, for example,

149

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

femtocells119

, WiFi, but also by taking a next capacity ‘step up’ via
LTE. Hence, whichever way we look at it, LTE is important from a
network operator standpoint as a means to make money.

LTE will help drive adoption of Mobile VoIP. New video
applications, such as QIK, may benefit. ‘Third party paid data’ (i.e.
the content provider, advertiser, venue owner, etc) that pick up
connectivity charges for free mobile broadband, similar to
conferences offering free WiFi, will also be a potential business
model.

LTE is also suited to Amazon Kindle (type) services and initial
drivers will be PCs and non‐phone devices. LTE could complement
social networking by handling the constant Internet background
noise (e.g. constant e‐mail checking, status updates, location
information, etc. and the management and optimization of ‘keep
alive’ functions).

From the perspective of devices, they could be the gateway to
new services and tight integration to Web services and the
telecoms network. In doing so, the mobile network operator will
be able to offer an enhanced version of the service for which the
customers are likely to pay a premium version.

Similarly, home gateways, for example, Orb120

and Leaf

Networks121

may also be a part of LTE. In general, operators will

119

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Femtocell

120

http://www.orb.com/

121

http://www.leafnetworks.net/

150

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

seek to extend the LTE network into the home thus providing a
converged service. This strategy is different from the existing
Fixed to Mobile Convergence (FMC) since FMC traditionally
focussed on voice convergence – and, in contrast, LTE is based on
data convergence.

HSUPA122

(High speed uplink packet access) which enhances uplink
of data (as opposed to HSDPA which focuses on downlink of data)
may also be a model, as the creation of content from phones
increases.

WiMax123

is a strong driver (i.e. the fact that there is now a
credible option to LTE, which will coexist).

The possibilities for LTE services include:

New services based on enhanced capacity of the network

As the network capability increases, new services are possible –
especially with new devices which are either non‐phone devices
and/or are used to integrate with the network.

LTE services could include:

● video streaming

● audio streaming

● home gateway

122

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High‐Speed_Uplink_Packet_Access

123

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/WiMAX

151

Open Mobile

© Copyright Futuretext Limited

● device‐driven (deep integration – services e.g. keep
alives, social network integration)

● non‐phone device‐driven (Kindle)

● HSDPA – laptops

● home gateway‐based services: e.g. switch on heating
on the way home

● real‐time devices (reduced latency, faster switching
to enable power saving mode).

New role of devices to handle rich content and social networks

Devices will be able to provide extra services to social networks by
providing extra features such as rapid updates and handle other
traffic which is ‘bursty’ in nature.

Services unique to LTE and core networks

Unified communications based on extending the network to the
home (home gateways, femtocells124

) and beyond voice.

Thus, LTE offers possibilities for a number of new services which
could provide revenue to mobile network operators.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->