Prediction Minilesson

Name: Josie Lutton Grade Level: 1st Content: Communication Arts Lesson: Use of predicting to help comprehension Content Objective(s): After reading part of the book, students will be able to make a prediction using information from the text by writing their own ending to the story. GLE: R1G1c During reading and read-alouds, develop and utilize, with assistance, strategies to predict and check using cueing systems: meaning, structure, and visual information. Modifications: Materials/Media/Resources: Steig, W. (1969). Sylvester and the magic pebble. New York, NY: Scholastic Inc. Anticipatory Set: Has anyone ever made a wish? What have you wished for? Did it come true? Today we are going to read a story called Sylvester and the Magic Pebble. Instructional Input: Today we are going to be talking about making predictions. A prediction is a thoughtful “guess” based on what you’ve read up to that point. We will use the words and the pictures to help us make a thoughtful guess about what is going to happen next in the story. Predictions are important because they make you want to keep reading. After you guess what is going to happen next, you want to read and find out if your prediction was correct. Modeling/Demonstrating: Begin reading the story to the class, stopping after the first page. After reading this much of the story, we know that Sylvester likes and collects pebbles. I do not know what is going to happen next, but knowing that he like pebbles, I might predict that Sylvester will find a pebble. I ask myself, is that a good prediction, does it make sense with what I have read so far? Yes, it does because Sylvester collects pebbles, so it is possible that he will look for them and find one. Write my prediction on the board in sentence form. Write, I predict that Sylvester will find a pebble, because he collects pebbles. Keep reading until page 2. My prediction was correct, he did find a pebble. Continue reading through page 3. Can we predict why the rain stopped so suddenly? The rain might have stopped because the sun came out. I ask myself, is that a good prediction? Does my prediction make sense with what I have read so far or the pictures on the pages? Yes, the picture shows a bright, shining sun, so it is possible that the sun made the rain cease. Write my prediction on the board in sentence form using the same format. (I predict that…….because ………) I predict that the rain stopped suddenly, because the sun came out.

Guided Practice: Read to page 5 where he decides to go home and show his parents. Make a prediction about what will happen next in the story? Write your prediction in the format that I showed you. Share your predictions with your shoulder partner. Make sure that your partner’s prediction makes sense with the story. Walk around while reading and listening to the students predictions. Choose a student to share their prediction with the class. Will you share your prediction with the class? “I predict that when he goes home his parents won’t believe him, so he will make it rain and stop raining, because he has worried that they won’t believe him and he already knows the weather is one thing that he can change.” That is a very possible prediction. Continue reading the story. Stop after page 7 when Sylvester turned himself into a rock. Make a prediction about what will happen next in the story. Write your prediction and share it with your partner. Walk around, listening and checking every students predictions. Model an appropriate prediction for the class by having a student share theirs. “I predict that the lion will take the pebble because now he knows that it is magic.” That is a very possible prediction. The lion watched the donkey wish himself into the rock when he was holding the pebble, so he might take the pebble for himself. Checking for Understanding: I will listen and watch closely as students write and talk about their predictions with their partners. They should be able to form a prediction that makes sense with the story and write it using the form I supplied. They must be able to back up their prediction using the cueing systems: meaning, structure, and visual information. Independent Practice: Continue reading and stop after page 25 when Sylvester’s parents decide to go on a picnic and sit on Sylvester. Make a prediction about how the story will end. What will happen next? Use the this sentence: I predict_______ because_______. Finish reading the end of the story. Discuss how the real ending compared with the students predicted endings. How did your ending compare with the real ending? Was it confirmed or unconfirmed? Closure: Today we learned how to make predictions in a story, based on what we have already read and the illustrations. Then, we compared our predictions with the real text. Making predictions is a very important reading skill that helps us use the text we have already read to think about what is going to happen next. Making predictions causes us, as readers, to want to finish reading the story, so we can compare and contrast our predictions with the real situations in the book. Evaluation/Assessment:

Student’s endings to the story will be graded using a rubric to see if their predictions were possible. Students will visualize, clarify, and make educated predictions based on passage Making Predictions Basic 1 pts Clarifying Able to make a clear prediction of what will happen next in the story. Prediction Can make a prediction based on details from the passage

Proficient 2 pts

Advanced 3 pts

Basic
Is not able to give a clear prediction of what will happen next in the text.

Proficient
Is able to give a prediction of what will happen next in the text.

Advanced
Is able to give a clear and well-written prediction of what will happen next in the text.

Basic

Proficient

Advanced

Student did not make a Prediction is Prediction is prediction or acceptable, but there acceptable and based prediction was not are not details from on details from the based on details from the passage to passage. Prediction is the passage. The support the based on characters prediction is off topic. prediction. motivation and/or characters history.

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