The Archive

for Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Volume 1 (2007-2010)

William R. Caraher University of North Dakota

The Archive This document represents an archive of the posts prepared for the Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Blog. There are no images and links to other sites and embedded content no longer functions. This is a static archive. The original context for these posts was the web which is a dynamic space. As a result, I have made no effort to reproduce or capture the network that these blog posts relied upon for significance or meaning. The links preserved in the posts, however, may provide a kind of breadcrumbs from a future researcher. The Internet Archive captured three images of my blog in 2007 (October 16, November 12, December 24). There are no images in the archive of the blog. The blog began in the spring of 2007 and continued until the end of 2010. It consists of 857 posts and 455 comments. During its time live at typepad.com, it received well over 110,000 views and had an average of over 80 page views a day. These are miniscule numbers in the broader world of the internet, but they do show that the blog had a consistent audience and grew steadily over its life. As of this writing, an online version of this archive exists (http://mediterraneanworldarchive.wordpress.com/) but I am not active curating this web site. There are broken links that will remain broken and links to media that the current hosting service will not support.

Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Archive: Volume 1 by William R. Caraher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Archive: Volume 1 by William R. Caraher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: varia-and-quick-hits CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 12/17/2010 06:22:26 AM ----BODY: <p>Here are some varia and quick hits on a cold Friday morning (with just a threat of flurries)!</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Generations2010/Overview/Findings.aspx">More interesting internet observations from Pew</a>.  Apparently no one blogs reads blog anymore (and no one told me?).  As always Pew gives us some food for thought on generational differences in web usage. </li> <li>As I think about ways to re-imagine this blog, I keep coming across the idea of "mindcasting".  <a href="http://jayrosen.tumblr.com/post/110043432/mindcasting-defining-the-formspreading-the-meme">Here is a very useful definition</a>.  Typically, the term describes how academics or professionals use Twitter, but I think that it adapts well to a blog use.</li> <li>Some Corinthian-American friends have set up a company to sell Corinthian Olive Oil in the US.  <a href="http://www.agrosoliveoil.net/">Check it out</a>! </li> <li>I haven't read <a href="http://mediactive.com/introduction/">Mediactive yet</a>, but it is on my genuinely overwhelming Christmas break reading list.</li> <li><a href="http://artsbeat.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/12/13/scan-it-yourself-andother-thoughts-about-the-google-digitizing-settlement/">More DIY Book Scanning</a>, Dan Reetz, former(?) NDSU student and renegade book scanner, has garnered more press coverage this past week.  He's a real bright guy with a firm grasp on common sense.  It's good to see people talking about his ideas.  <a href="http://www.danreetz.com/blog/2010/12/06/the-why-in-diy-book-scanningin-nyls-review/">More here too</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/The-Pleasure-of-Seeingthe/125381">This tongue-in-cheek post at the</a><em><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/The-Pleasure-of-Seeing-the/125381"> Chronicle</a></em> about celebrating student failure has caused a bit of a fuss.  <a href="http://castingoutnines.wordpress.com/2010/12/13/student-failure-andstudent-humanity/">And it lead to this response</a>. </li> <li><a href="http://nowviskie.org/2010/digital-humanities-down-under-state-ofplay-why-you-care/">Some thoughts on Digital Humanities in Australia and New Zealand</a> with a shoutout to the University of Sydney's Archaeological Computing Lab.  I worked with some exceedingly competent folks from the lab on the island of Kythera (where I met my lovely wife)!</li> <li><a href="http://www.personal.psu.edu/bxb11/blogs/brett_bixler_eportfolio/2010/12/the-gamification-of-america.html">Some interesting thoughts on the gamification of learning</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://mashupbreakdown.com/">The actual mashups are just ok, but the visualizations are really amazing</a> (via Crystal Alberts).</li>

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Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Archive: Volume 1 by William R. Caraher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

<li><a href="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/40664462/ns/business-going_green/">When you don't make your sales figures, you get sent to Fargo</a>.  This is postironic.</li> <li><a href="http://projects.nytimes.com/census/2010/explorer?hp">This is a fantastic way to visualize the census</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">If you haven't stopped by Teaching Thursday, you should</a>! We're celebrating out 100th post!</li> <li>What I'm reading: P. Sarris, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/economy-and-society-in-the-age-ofjustinian/oclc/72519630">Economy and Society in the Age of Justinian</a></em>. (Cambridge 2006). R. H. McGuire and R. Paynter, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/archaeology-of-inequality/oclc/22347782">The Archaeology of Inequality</a></em>. (Blackwell 1991).</li> <li>What I'm listening to: Alvin Youngbood Hart, <em>Big Mama's Door</em>.</li> </ul> <p>One more thing!  If you are going to be any where in South Florida in January, you owe it yourself to head up to Ft. Myers and check out the 3rd Annual Surf &amp; Sound Festival.  It's going to be huge and it's produced by Fritz Caraher!</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20147e0ca0569970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="450" height="578" /></p> <ul> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Thursday: More on Student Resistance STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-thursday-more-on-student-resistance CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 12/16/2010 07:20:27 AM ----BODY: <p>I continue to think a bit about new models for understanding student engagement with the learning environment.  Over the last few weeks, I have been reading more on everyday forms of resistance, and this has added a different perspective to my notes on resistance and teaching as articulated <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/te aching-thursday-grading-and-resistance.html">here </a>and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/05/gr

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ading-detroit-and-student-resistence.html">here</a>. These forms of resistance typically lack articulated political or social goals, often rely upon anonymity, deception or ambiguity, and tend to be deeply embedded in everyday life.  At the same time, they are the products of power differences and mark out clear efforts on the part of less powerful to establish a identity and agency in relation to the dominant group. Classic examples of this kind of behavior are slow work, gossip, poor communication, and other actions that tread the fine line between outright defiance and actions easily confused with laziness.</p> <p>Anyone who has taught recognizes some resistance in students.  My previous musings on using historical and anthropological definitions of resistance to understand student behavior tended to see student behavior in a far more systematic way. Models of resistance that suggest behavior rooted in practice may have a better applicability for describing, predicting, and (gasp!) maybe even validating student behavior.</p> <p>These models may also point to some root causes of resistance.  Many of the scholars who study resistance in everyday life tend to see resistance as a key component to class struggle. While it is difficult to understand the studentteacher relationship in terms of traditional definitions of class, it would be profoundly naive to deny the role that class plays in the structure of the American university.  With the post-war boom in enrollments the student body has become more diverse in terms of race, ethnicity, religion, gender, and, indeed, class. The traditional humanities had strong ties to traditions of elite education and values that have not entirely translated to a more diverse student body with more diverse goals and expectations.</p> <p>Resistance in the classroom, particularly the subtle forms, may well represent the long conflict between democratized higher education and the core elite values that continues to guide many aspects of the humanities.</p> <p>My post today is intentionally short to encourage you to head over to<a href="http://teachingthursday.org/"> Teaching Thursday</a> and celebrate with us our 100th post at that blog!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More in Inequality in Justinian's Corinth STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: wysiwyg ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-in-inequality-in-justinians-corinth CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 12/15/2010 06:58:23 AM ----BODY:

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Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Archive: Volume 1 by William R. Caraher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

<p>I&#39;ve begun work on revising <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/am bivalent-landscapes-of-the-6th-century-at-corinth-in-contrast.html">my Corinth in Contrast paper</a> which I delivered in Austin in the fall at a conference of the same name (for a nice overview of the conference check out David Pettegrew&#39;s Corinthian Matters blog posts <a href="http://corinthianmatters.com/2010/10/04/inequalities-in-corinth/">here </a>and&#0160;<a href="http://corinthianmatters.com/2010/10/07/more-corinth-incontrast/">here</a> and <a href="http://corinthianmatters.com/2010/10/13/paulscorinthians-in-contrast-and-context/">here</a>). &#0160;The conference focused on inequality among the Corinthians, and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/am bivalent-landscapes-of-the-6th-century-at-corinth-in-contrast.html">my paper</a> emphasized the role that political and ecclesiastical tensions may have played in creating regimes of power in the region. &#0160;To do so, I focused on various methods of asserting political and ecclesiastical power in the landscape and then sought to establish spaces of resistances within these methods. &#0160;In particular, I focused on the differences between subtle, nonmonumental, and &quot;marginal&quot; activities, and dominant forms of political and religious power. &#0160;I tried to emphasize that various less structured forms of expression many not have conformed to a narrow view of &quot;resistance&quot; typified by violence and concerted political actions, but rather to a kind of resistance rooted in the concept of practice. In other words, I am looking for archaeological evidence that represents far more subtle forms of agency than traditional definitions of resistance. &#0160;Good examples of forms of resistance rooted in practice are graffiti, systematic tax evasion, feigned ignorance, gossip, and other techniques that are difficult to punish, protected by a degree of anonymity, and accessible to almost any group within society.</p>! <p>While most of these practices are unlikely to leave an archaeological trace (although an archaeology of gossip is interesting!), it is notable that the 6th century Corinthia witnessed a systematic and monumental campaign to impose imperial authority across the region. &#0160;The goals of this effort are difficult to imagine outside of a pattern of resistance. &#0160;The ecclesiastical tensions between the Emperor and various bishops of the province of Achaia who may have resisted imperial authority by remaining loyal to the papacy in Rome, provides a potential geopolitical justification of resistance. &#0160;Moreover, we know that such political and theological conflicts could manifest themselves in popular resistance. &#0160;Most famously:</p>! <blockquote>! <p>&quot;If you ask for your change, someone philosophizes to you in the Begotten and the Unbegotten. If you ask for the price of bread, you are told, &quot;The Father is greater and the Son inferior.&quot; If you ask, &quot;Is the bath ready?&quot; someone answers, &quot;The Sone was created from nothing.&quot;</p>! <p>Gregory of Nyssa, <em>De Deitate Filii et Spiritus Sancti </em>(trans. T.E. Gregory, <em><a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=jJU40HJKeDoC&amp;lpg=PP1&amp;ots=0B94xLkT OA&amp;dq=Gregory%20Vox%20Populi&amp;pg=PA3#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">Vox Populi</a></em> (Columbus 1979), 3.<span style="line-height: 0px;">Ôªø</span></p>! </blockquote>! <p>While the popular violence associated with theological disputes is well known, it suggests that seeming technicalities in theological language could evoke deep passions among everyday denizens of the Late Roman world. Such

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Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Archive: Volume 1 by William R. Caraher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

passion could, of course, manifest itself in more subtle ways as well as the better documented episodes of riotous violence.&#0160; Some of the everyday practices of resistance during the era of iconoclasm are suggestive.</p>! <p>This is a long introduction to some rather more mundane observations!</p>! <p>One of the least satisfactory sections of my paper had to deal with the role of imperial power on the bodies of Corinthians. &#0160; In the first draft of this paper, I imagined the impact of the imperial building policies on the Corinthian labor force. Workers from the local area would have undoubtedly contributed to the construction of the Lechaion Basilica (as well as the other 6th century churches in the area), the repairs to the Hexamilion wall and city wall of Corinth, and various other construction projects datable to the 6th century. &#0160;I suggested that some sense of identity for these workers derives from the presence of informally inscribed fish in the exterior wall plaster of many of these buildings. &#0160;It may be that this sign marked out the work of a local guild or as smaller work team and allowed the laborers to locate themselves amidst the monumental space of the 6th century Corinthia.</p>! <p>Over the past few weeks, I have the distinct pleasure of re-reading parts of Michael Given&#39;s 2004, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/archaeology-of-thecolonized/oclc/53846484">The Archaeology of the Colonized</a></em> (Routledge). Chapter six of this book is entitled &quot;The Dominated Body&quot; and Given makes several interesting observations about the place of the body is broadly construed &quot;colonial regimes&quot;. &#0160;In particular, Given draws a case study from Roman Egypt where a &quot;highly elaborate tax system&quot; contributed to practices designed to dominate the body of Egyptian famers. &#0160;The center piece of his argument is a vivid fictional narrative of a visit by a family to local granary where their tax in kind was measured and certified.</p>! <p>This narrative reminded me of the famous(ish) passage in Procopius&#39;s <em>Buildings</em> 4.2.14 which describes the building of granaries throughout Greece. These granaries served to provision the soldiers that the emperor stationed there. This passages finds a complement in the <em>Secret Histories</em> 26.31-33 where Procopius tells us that the Emperor Justinian required the cities of Greece to fund the newly stationed soldiers in Greece, and this contingency deprived even Athens of public buildings and entertainments. &#0160;There is no reason to take these passages at face value, but, on the other hand, it is clear that Justinian had an active interest in reorganizing the logistical infrastructure of the empire with an eye toward providing supplies for his soldiers. &#0160;The presence of granaries in Greece would have visibly linked imperial policy with the collection of agricultural taxes from the local residents. &#0160;Some residents, then, would have to experience the act of delivering their crops into the imperial hands; in short, individual labor became imperial policy.</p>! <p>Another observation that Given offered regarding the impact of imperial policy on the body was the effect of walls on movement throughout the Egyptian countryside. He argued that many of the walls were not formal fortifications necessary, but sand fences (at best) or, in other cases, just informal markers. Both Procopius&#39; text and archaeological evidence from the Corinthia have noted Justinian&#39;s interest in wall construction and repair. &#0160;Specifically, Justinian appears to have repaired the massive Hexamilion wall and probably the wall of the city of Corinth itself. &#0160;These two walls would have dominated passage across the Isthmus. &#0160;The individual would have had to pass through spaced marked out and defined by the non-local presence of the Emperor.</p>!

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<p>Making this all the more conspicuous is Justinian&#39;s used inscriptions tinged with ritually-charged utterances at gates to make political or theological statements. &#0160;So as Corinthian (and other) bodies passed through spaces marked out by imperial power, the walls themselves literally shouted out politically charged religious sentiments. &#0160;We know from other sites in the Mediterranean that roads, walls, and gates were common places for inscribed acclamations; in other words, places where bodies regularly passed were excellent places to commemorate other kinds of ritualized activities. &#0160;Ritual acclamations whether spontaneous or staged, then, further imbued these spaces with embodied knowledge.</p>! <p>As I work to revise my initially clumsy study of power differences across the Corinthian landscape, I am focusing more attention on the way in which imperial power sought to project authority into the landscape. &#0160;By critiquing the methods of projecting power, I think I am getting closer to understanding the conditions with create the kind of power differences that produce various kinds of inequality.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Academic Organizations and the Web: 10 Suggestions STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: academic-organizations-and-the-web-10-suggestions CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Web/Tech DATE: 12/14/2010 06:35:15 AM ----BODY: <p>This past week, I offered to prepare a short advisory document to an academic organization that was planning to increase its web presence.  I think that academic organizations do well to model their sites and the people who are asked to maintain them along the lines of established academic institutions and develop "officers", missions statements, and policies.  I think that we should also follow the basic academic method of being collaborative and deliberate, results will be better as well.  Even a single author blog is in some way collaborative as it relies on colleagues and collaborators to link to or to twitter posts.  Being deliberate is deeply ingrained in the most conservative traditions of academic life.</p> <p>With some slight modifications to protect the innocent, here it is:</p> <p>1.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Audience. The most important thing about any website it to have a clear idea of an audience.  For example, my Archaeological of the Mediterranean World site appeals generally to academics interested in Mediterranean archaeology, ancient and Byzantine history, and

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technology. So while most of the content (see below) on my site counts as a kind of “<a href="http://jayrosen.tumblr.com/post/110043432/mindcasting-definingthe-form-spreading-the-meme">mindcasting</a>”, I do try to mindcast on things of interest to a notional audience.</p> <p>2.<span style="white-space: pre;"> "</span>Content is King". For a website to “work” people have to work it into their everyday life. To do this, the site needs to be updated regularly (at least weekly)  with new content so people want to come back and check it out. The best way to keep a site updated regularly is to develop a group of dedicated contributors.  The era of the static website full of "resources" is over.</p> <p>3.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Contributors. If the website is going to thrive it has to have some regularly updated content. This does not have to be daily, but it needs in some way to be regular. To maintain a regular flow of content, you need to have multiple contributors.  A good editor can drum up contributors and provide content when needed, but it is essential to have a core group of people willing to work to produce significant web content.  (I think that there is a small, but rather a committed community already producing good quality content for the web, and we should be able to leverage this community).  My general feeling is that no section of the website will remain up-to-date and interesting without at least a few contributors.  Moreover, having a few contributors will prevent a section of the site from becoming a single editors soapbox.</p> <p>4.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>An Editor.  The best websites have an editor or a group of designated editors who are responsible for content in particular areas of the site. The editors responsibilities might include soliciting new content, maintaining basic information on their section of the site, and establishing policies.  Also naming some an “editor” confers a certain amount of academic and intellectual prestige to these positions (and makes it easier for a mid-career faculty member to claim this work as  part of “national service” or whatever.).   We might also consider bringing in, say, one or two other editors (a “Blog Editor,” perhaps, or even a “Features Editor”).  The advantage of giving these individuals real editorial control over their sections is that they can be gatekeepers for the content coming onto the web, ensure its quality, maintain the content, publicize the content, et c.  Moreover, multiple contributors are also more likely to invoke some positive discussion.</p> <p>5.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Mission statement.  Since this will be something of an official site, we should probably come up with some kind of simple, broad mission statement that will help us create policies for the kind of material that we include on our site. For example, do we intend the site to be a scholarly resource or do we want to try to cater to a academic interests?  Or do we want to do both. In any event, a mission statement will help us think about our audience and the types of things that we value.</p> <p>6.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Policies. I know that this will seem overwrought, but as someone with a public web presence, I have been overwhelmed by a range of strange propositions that I get to feature material on my little blog.  Having a policy of what kinds of material you will or won’t allow will make the editors’ jobs much easier.  For example, will you let people post advertisements for their book on the site?  Will we let people submit job ads?  Will we advertise summer programs?  You can imagine.</p> <p>7.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Design. The nicest website sites have some common design elements.  If the plan is to use an institutional server (rather than a commercial service) to host the site as the central hub for a web site that would then would push traffic to various externally hosted

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Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Archive: Volume 1 by William R. Caraher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

pages, then it would be great to have some kind of common design for these external pages (and include cues on the Princeton page).</p> <p>8.<span style="white-space: pre;"> Software</span>. Blogs are great.  This is not just because I am a blogger, but the ease of updating a blog makes them great for regularly updated content.  Moreover, many of the good blog services (e.g. wordpress.com hosts Wordpress software on their servers) or software (e.g. Wordpress is free to download and relatively easy to set up on an institution's servers) allow you to create static pages as well as blog pages.  They are also equipped with an RSS feed et c. making them really easy to update and edit by people with almost no technical knowledge.</p> <p>9.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Social Media. If we are serious about developing a web presence for our organization we need to consider having an integrated social media component.  Social media sites like Twitter and Facebook work well to connect potential readers to the web site and serve as a key method for pushing content to a wider audience. In general, social media services are fairly easy to maintain and manage.  That being said, like the website itself, content drives traffic.  If we don’t maintain social media, then we won’t reap its benefits.</p> <p>10.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Take our time. One thing I’ve seen other places do is to rush out a web presence before they have developed content, policies, or even a kind of editorial or institutional support. The results have been pretty dodgy and have not held up well.  Taking time to develop how a website will work and who will be responsible for what parts of the site will produce the best quality results.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Some New Thoughts on the Roman Economy STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: some-new-thoughts-on-the-roman-economy CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Books DATE: 12/13/2010 07:35:29 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the weekend, I finally found a few hours to sit down with the relatively recent edited volume <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/quantifying-theroman-economy-methods-and-problems/oclc/316430292">Quantifying the Roman Economy: Methods and Problems</a></em> edited by A. Bowman and A. Wilson (Oxford 2009).  The book brings together a number of different perspectives on the Roman economy in a broad response to later chapters of the Scheidel, Morris, and Saller edited <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/cambridge-economic-

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Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Archive: Volume 1 by William R. Caraher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

history-of-the-greco-roman-world/oclc/144219734">Cambridge Economic History of the Greco-Roman World</a></em> (Cambridge 2007).  In my reading, the books stands in contrast to a recent work edited by M. Mundell Mango on Byzantine Trade (which<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/12/mo re-byzantine-archaeology-byzantine-trade.html"> I discuss here</a>).  Whereas Mundell Mango theorizes that it is possible to understand trade in the Byzantine world without necessarily appealing to wider considerations of the ancient economy, the authors in <em>Quantifying the Roman Economy </em>take the opposite approach and embed trade of all kinds within a theoretical and material critique of the Roman economy.</p> <p>While I won't review the entire book, I did want to point out some of its highlight to my loyal readers.</p> <p>1. Bowman and Wilson's introduction is among the best short summaries of the state of research in the Roman economy.  Their considerations range from discussions of economic integration to survey of the potential of ancient economic growth and decline. They conclude their survey by focusing attention on four vital areas for analysis: demography and settlement, the agrarian economy, production and trade, and mining and metals. They argue that at present there exists sufficient evidence to support sustained analysis of these issues and that these issues can form the basis for an integrated view of the Roman economy.</p> <p>2. Field Survey and Demography. Intensive pedestrian survey represents an important approach for establishing Roman settlement patterns, and these settlement patterns play a vital role in the organization of the Roman economy. In particular, the relationship between rural producers and urban dwellers structures the relationship between the primary production of food and centralized administrative, political, and population centers across the Roman Empire.  As Jongman, Fentress, Mattingly, and Lo Cascio point out, the percentage of people living in both cities and in the countryside remains hotly contested.  As a result, it is difficult to evaluate even the minimum and maximum productivity of the countryside required to sustain an urban population who is not engaged in primary agricultural production.</p> <p>3. Peopling the Countryside. Elizabeth Fentress and David Mattingly provide valuable defenses of survey archaeology and its ability to shed light not only the structure of ancient settlement but ancient demography. Fentress argues on the basis of her intensive survey work on the island of Jerba and in the Albenga Valley that careful sampling of the landscape can provide a rough estimate of both the kinds and the distribution of sites in the countryside during the Roman period. The types of sites, ranging from urban areas to small villages and isolated farms, could then form the basis for basic demography. To summarize complex and nuanced study, Fentress argues that far fewer people lived in the countryside on Jerba than we might expect considering the potential density of urban settlement: 11% in single farms, 20% in villages, 20% in villas, and an impressive 49% in towns.  She was then able to argue that the urban centers on Jerba (which is not a particularly fertile place) relied on imported grain.</p> <p>In his response to the Fentress article, David Mattingly rightly offers a bit of caution by cleverly invoking Donald Rumsfeld's category of "unknown unknowns" in intensive survey.  For Mattingly, the unknown unknowns are those sites that do not manifest themselves in survey but may have a significant impact on how we understand ancient demography and settlement structure.  Of course, Jerba with its light soils and relative geomorphological stability was less likely to produce the kinds of unknown unknowns than the more dynamic landscape of, say, the Rhone valley, but nevertheless, Mattingly is correct in reminding us that survey is better at demonstrating presence than absence.</p>

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<p>4. Trade. Andrew Wilson's summary of pressing issues with regard to Roman trade is another very useful contribution to any discussion of trade in the Mediterranean. He offers valuable critiques of evidence for trade ranging from shipwrecks to amphora and marble.  In his study of shipwrecks, he uses <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/07/mo re-lakka-skoutara.html">aoristic analysis</a> to create a more nuanced reading of Parker's classic summary of shipwrecks by century.  He shows that by plotting the possible date of "long-dated" Roman period (150 BC - AD 400) shipwreck by decade rather than by midpoint, it becomes possible to argue for a later peak in maritime commerce than Parker had estimated.  In short, distributing the possible dates for long-dated shipwrecks helps to mitigate against a chronological pattern of trade biased by certain standard dating conventions.</p> <p>Later in the same article, Wilson provides another useful model for understanding Roman period trade when he compares the production of certain classes of pottery (e.g. African Red Slip) to its frequency elsewhere in the Mediterranean. While such analysis is not particularly novel or innovative, he establishes quite clearly how the relationship between production and distribution is not fixed.  Pottery supply represents only one aspect of the distribution of ceramics in the Mediterranean, and the quantitative gap between patterns of supply and distribution provide a useful basis for considerations of trading patterns as well as the vagaries of taste across the Mediterranean basin.</p> <p>William Harris and Michael Fulford offer responses to Wilson's contribution that expand the variables under consideration in his article to include the relationship between settlements in the Roman world and how the differences between overland and maritime trade and urban and ex-urban settlement types can significantly influence the distribution of material.</p> <p>_______</p> <p>As my brief summary of this books probably makes clear, I liked this book and think it is the best single volume summary of the pressing issues and potential for using quantitative data to understand the Roman economy.  As the availability of quantitative data from survey projects, excavations, and summary publications increases, scholars will need more robust models and approaches for producing synthetic analyses of trade, settlement structure, demography, and economic growth or decline.  Despite the typical caveats surrounding the use of any quantitative data from antiquity, this volume has continued the optimistic trend begun with the <em>Cambridge Economic History.</em></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0

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BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia-1 CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 12/10/2010 09:11:34 AM ----BODY: <p>It's a cold and clear winter day for some quick hits and varia.</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.google.com/intl/en/press/zeitgeist2010/">This is a pretty cool way to see how the world used Google</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2010/Twitter-Update2010.aspx">This looks to be a pretty interesting report on who uses Twitter</a>.</li> <li>Along similar lines, <a href="http://www.poynter.org/how-tos/newsgatheringstorytelling/writing-tools/109176/why-no-dumping-is-a-good-motto-for-writing-onsocial-networks/">this is an interesting little blog post on how to write on Twitter</a>.</li> <li>And <a href="http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/314 9/2718">here is a</a><em><a href="http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/314 9/2718"> First Monday</a></em><a href="http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/314 9/2718"> article on learning and social media technologie</a>s, and here is a <em><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/New-Social-Software-Triesto/125542/">Chronicle</a></em><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/New-SocialSoftware-Tries-to/125542/"> article in another company trying to integrate social media software and teaching</a>.</li> <li>At <a href="http://firstmonday.org/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/314 9/2718"><em>Teaching Thursday</em>, we had a not tech related blog post on the ethics of test making and cheating</a>.</li> <li>Tuesday was December 7th.  Pearl Harbor Day.  And <a href="http://historymatters.gmu.edu/d/5166/">here is FDR's famous speech</a>.</li> <li>What I am listening to: Jay-Z, <em>The Black Album</em>.</li> <li>What I am reading: James C. Scott, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/weapons-of-the-weak-everyday-forms-ofpeasant-resistance/oclc/13557344">Weapons of the Weak: Everyday forms of Peasant Resistance</a></em>. (Yale 1985).</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Thursday: Test Writing and Cheating STATUS: Publish

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ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-thursday-test-writing-and-cheating CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 12/09/2010 06:18:03 AM ----BODY: <p>I could try to put together some kind of blog for today (and rest assured, good reader, that a blog post is brewing), but <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/12/09/test-banks-cheating-and-the-moralresponsibility-of-instructors/">Mick Beltz has already put together a far more interesting blog post </a>than I could muster.  He responds to recent discussions of cheating at the University of Central Florida, and without getting into detail, sets out three basic lessons to keep in mind while preparing your end of the semester exams:</p> <blockquote> <p>1. There is an optimal level of cheating on every assignment (and it isn't zero).</p> <p>2. Grades and assignments have only instrumental value, not inherent value.</p> <p>3. Cheating is not (just) a student problem, it is also an instructor problem.</p> </blockquote> <p>The post is really smart, thoughtful, and thought provoking.  In fact, it's so good, <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/12/09/test-banks-cheatingand-the-moral-responsibility-of-instructors/">I'm going to link to it again</a>.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More Indigenous Archaeology and Cyprus STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-indigenous-archaeology-and-cyprus CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Cyprus DATE: 12/08/2010 07:11:35 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the past few years, I've been musing about the relationship between indigenous archaeological practices and nationalism in the Greece.  Recently,

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however, I have begun to think a bit more seriously about these practices in Cyprus.  This past weekend, I read over parts of the <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/hagiographicacypria/oclc/185472022">Laudatio Barnabae </a></em>inspired in part by Paul Dilly's recent article in the <em>Journal of Roman Archaeology</em> (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/11/ic ons-and-space-and-dreams-in-late-antiquity.html">which I discuss here</a>).</p> <p>The great thing about this short, apparently 6th century text, is that it explicitly located the discovery of St. Barnabas' body (Barnabas was the companion of St. Paul) with the tensions between Cyprus and the episcopal see of Antioch in the time between the Church of Cyprus received independence at the Council of Ephesus and the rule of Peter the Fuller at Antioch.  Peter the Fuller was markedly anti-Chalcedonian and have friends in imperial places.  According to the <em>Laudatio</em> he also coveted regaining control over Cyprus. St. Barnabas intervened to avert this by appearing to the Bishop Anthemius in several visions the last of which directed the Bishop to the Saint's body, in a cave near Salamis holding an autograph of the Gospel of Matthew.  The authority of this discovery and the gift of the Gospel book to the Emperor Zeno ensured the continued independence of the Church of Cyprus. We know that Zeno also elevated the bishop of the island to Metropolitan status.</p> <p>The role of <em>inventio</em>, or the discovery of a lost sacred object, in this text is important.  The tie between a discovered object and sanctity would have echoed with stories surrounding the foundation of the monastery on Stavrovouni which overlooks the city of Larnaka.  By the 15th century, this monastery was associated with a fragment of the True Cross delivered by Contanstine's mother, St. Helen, on her return to Constantinople from the Holy Land where she had excavated (quite literally) the remains of Christ's cross.</p> <p>In <a href="http://www.jstor.org/pss/1259503">a famous article (for some!)</a>, David Reese describes how Cypriots and some early travelers saw the bones of the extinct pygmy hippopotami and other mega fauna as the bones of saints (or even dragons!).  The discovery of large animal bones in caves seems to have led to their association with saints presumably on the basis of various <em>inventio</em> accounts like the <em>Laudatio Barnabae</em>. This phenomena was recorded (with varying degrees of condescension) throughout the late 19th and<a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.14697998.1902.tb08223.x/abstract"> early 20th centuries</a>.</p> <p>In more recent times, as I have noted on <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/04/mo re-archaeolog.html">this blog a few years back</a>, both Peter Megaw and Vassos Karageorghis have encountered similar kinds of archaeological practices.  According to <a href="http://www.jstor.org/stable/626538">Megaw (</a><em><a href="http://www.jstor.org/stable/626538">JHS</a></em><a href="http://www.jstor.org/stable/626538"> 66 (1946), 52)</a>, local farmers praying for rain excavated parts of the ruined Panayia Skyra church to appease the Virgin. Karageorghis, <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/153885421">in his autobiography</a>, recounts a story of a priest who approached him while director of the Department of Antiquties and asked for help locating the tomb of St. Auxibius.</p> <p>The practice of looking for origins in an archaeological context and using these origins to define the community is not particularly remarkable and almost to be expected in a place like Cyprus where in the modern era nationalism has had such tragic consequences. What is notable, to me at least, is the possible roots of these practices in the 6th century where the archaeological practices

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of the Bishop Anthemius played a role in a prominent narrative of the island's autonomy.  In recent times, objects associated with the arrival of the Greeks (mostly during the Late Bronze Age) have taken on the same kind of sacred status as the objects discovered by their earlier predecessors.  The discovery of these objects is grounded, of course, in a faith in scientific archaeology rather than divine revelation, but it is hard to imagine that the basic impulse driving these practices and the narratives that they produce is different.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Hellenistic Fortifications on Vayia: A Working Paper STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: hellenistic-fortifications-on-vayia-a-working-paper CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 12/07/2010 06:12:04 AM ----BODY: <p>I have long advocated for an increase use of working papers in the field of Mediterranean archaeology.  Circulating pre-publication drafts of articles is already a common practice and the presentation of sites and finds in an efficient and prompt way has long stood as an ethical obligation for archaeologists.</p> <p>In that spirit, I am presenting as a working paper my preliminary analysis of the fortifications from the site of Vigla on Cyprus.  This is a working draft so the research, analysis, and interpretation should be regarded as provisional.  The basic description of the fortification on the hill of Vigla is accurate and should not undergo significant modification.</p> <p>The analysis presented below is the work of the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">Pyla-</a><em><a href="http://www.pkap.org/">Koutsopetria</a></em><a href="http://www.pkap.org/"> Archaeological Project</a>, but at present, all issues are the product of my analysis of their hard work.</p> <p><a style="margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sansserif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; display: block; text-decoration: underline;" title="View Vigla Description and Analysis December Working 2010 on Scribd" href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/44826683/Vigla-Description-and-AnalysisDecember-Working-2010">Vigla Description and Analysis December Working 2010</a>

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<object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" width="100%" height="600"> <param name="movie" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" /> <param name="wmode" value="opaque" /> <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="document_id=44826683&amp;access_key=keykvu8hdreotlts70cc6w&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" /> <embed id="doc_146824793926072" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="100%" height="600" src="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf?document_id=44826683&amp;access _key=key-kvu8hdreotlts70cc6w&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" name="doc_146824793926072" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" wmode="opaque" bgcolor="#ffffff"></embed> </object> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Clothes make the Professional: Archaeological Boots STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: clothes-make-the-professional-archaeological-boots CATEGORY: Academia CATEGORY: Archaeology DATE: 12/06/2010 06:47:47 AM ----BODY: <p>This past week, I've been preparing to teach P. Novick's <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/that-noble-dream-the-objectivity-questionand-the-american-historical-profession/oclc/17441827">That Noble Dream</a></em> (Cambridge 1988) and P. Menand's <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/marketplace-of-ideas/oclc/286488147">The Marketplace of Ideas</a></em> (New York 2010).  Both these books foreground the process of professionalization in a university context.  In a recent spat over the character of academic offices, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/08/ma king-the-professional-office.html">I argued that </a>we ought to model our offices on the creative space of highly flexible technology start up companies rather than the antiseptic space of anonymous, highly bureaucratized companies (some of which are now faltering).  This idea did not meet with much acceptance

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especially as the link between university culture and corporate culture is wellknown.</p> <p>This brings me to what academics should wear. Over my time as  teacher I've found myself increasingly adopting a more and more professional dress code especially on the days that I teach in the classroom.  When I am writing in my office, I tend to dress more casually and comfortably.  In this way, I publicly divide creative time (writing) from corporate time (teaching).  (This is not to suggest that these two do not overlap).</p> <p>I also have another professional persona and that is as a field archaeologist.  In the media, at least, archaeologists are known for distinctive clothing, but even Indiana Jones dressed in a more professional "corporate" way when in the classroom (bow tie and the requisite tweed).  C. Holtorf has written on this very topic in some interesting ways <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=J7PXgXuVXOgC&amp;lpg=PA7&amp;ots=X9ZASdiT _w&amp;dq=David%20Webb%20archaeologist&amp;pg=PA69#v=onepage&amp;q=David%20Webb% 20archaeologist&amp;f=false">here </a>and <a href="http://traumwerk.stanford.edu:3455/populararchaeology/49">here</a>.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20148c67461be970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="182" height="277" /></p> <p>I prefer to "rock the neck beard" in the field to mark out my departure from "corporate" world of classroom. I typically imagine my rather unkempt appearance as an reference to the archaeologist as artisan.  The neck beard represents the both a layer of additional protection against the sun, the unpleasant nature of shaving and then sweating, and distracted air of someone deeply engaged in their work.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Neckbeard.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20148c67461cc970c -pi" border="0" alt="Neckbeard.jpg" width="450" height="337" /></p> <p>The boundaries between my various professional identities or avatars (casual creative writer, stuffy company man teacher, and archaeologist as artisan) can be fairly rigid. I will occasionally wear a NASCAR hat while walking across campus in my teaching attire, but never in the classroom.  I will also sometimes wear my teaching clothes on days when I have a series of "important" committee meetings or other responsibilities.  The one thing that I almost always wear (at least from October to April) are my boots.</p> <p>Boots are the most vital component of an archaeologist wardrobe.  Without a rugged pair of boots, an archaeologist is, at best, another weekend warrior whose engagement with the realities of the out-of-doors stops at the wellgroomed trail or the end of a manicured lawn.  Boots make the archaeology.</p> <p>My wife introduced my to Blundstone boots almost 10 years ago and since then, I have never been without a pair.  I wear them on campus, in teaching clothes, in my creative clothes, while walking home and while doing anything outdoors.  (Ironically, I don't always wear them while doing actual archaeology. I prefer low-top boots and nylon to the traditional Blundstone, hightop, leather.)  I have found that my boots last about 3 years, but I don't care for them properly.  The walks home through the freezing snow and the super dry environment in campus buildings tend to make the leather dry out.  I shuffle my feet and walk incautiously scuffing the tips on obstacles.  I have a pronation in one of my feet and that stretches the leather in an unnatural way usually resulting in it pulling a bit away from the sole.  A few times a year, after considerable harassment, I will polish the boots and put some leather treatment on them.  If I pass through the Minneapolis airport, I'll stop at the shoe shine place, but

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that's mostly to banter about the Timberwolves and, as they say, to pass the time.  (The men at the shoeshine stand can always identify the Blundstone's and usually chide me for not taking better care of them!).</p> <p>This past week, I got my new pair of Blundstone's!  They replace my old pair as the link between my professional avatar as a teacher and my professional avatar as an archaeologist.  The old boots get retired into more rugged duty and less high profile tasks (shoveling snow, mowing the lawn, et c.) and the new boots make their debut this morning on a casual writing day.  The old boots are inscribed with three years of activities from long walks with the wife through our small town to cold winter mornings spent shoveling out the car.  They also preserve the marks of innumerable professional lectures, classroom successes and failures, and afternoons in the library, archives, or hunched over my lap top. Coats of water, snow, polish, and conditioner have changed their color.  My idiosyncratic stride has etched deep wrinkles across the soft leather.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="RetiringBoots.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20147e06b0b3f970b -pi" border="0" alt="RetiringBoots.jpg" width="450" height="301" /></p> <p>The new boots are stiff and unforgiving at present undoubtedly aware of the fate of their predecessors and hoping to hold off the inevitable.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Amalia EMAIL: amalia.stankavage@gmail.com IP: 75.42.158.81 URL: http://blog.amaliadillin.com DATE: 12/06/2010 11:49:12 AM Ha! This was a great post, Bill! I am wishing your boots all the best in their struggle against time and wear. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Susan Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.205.189 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/susancaraher DATE: 12/06/2010 03:34:51 PM These boots are made for walkin', and teachin', and committee meetings, and a little archaeology, and mowing and .... well you get the idea. They're Blunnies! ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 98.111.177.94

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URL: DATE: 12/06/2010 07:21:19 PM Oh man. I'm now totally worries: are we doubles? Although we never discussed this, I'm a Blundstone guy, in fact, so committed I might have to tell some stories on my blog. Question: Do your Blundstones ever start making a creaking sound? usually one of the two? And I've been thinking of Fred Astaire's tap dancing shoes, having intense conversations with a colleague about Zizek and pyschoanalysis!!! I must also send you this amazing chapter by Fredrick Jameson about modernism to postmodernism based on the analysis of shoes, from Heidegger and van Gogh to Andy Warhol. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: R. H. Cline EMAIL: rangar.cline@ou.edu IP: 209.30.230.206 URL: DATE: 12/07/2010 03:24:03 PM Interesting topics. On professional and corporate attire in academia, I would add that there are a number of subtle differences between what is acceptable formal wear for academics, and what is acceptable as formal wear in the world of finance, say. Take the image of Indiana Jones' suit, for example. The earth tones, striped shirt, and subdued tie distinguish him from the G-men who wear more "corporate" looking suits early in the film. The film reflects some of the distinctions that continue to exist in academic formal wear. For example, few academics teach in blue suits (although they often wear them for interviews), whereas the blue suit is a standard uniform in the world of banking and finance. Academic formal(for men, at least) often consists of non-matching pants and blazer, or suits in gray or earth-tones. Or, any of the above mixed with denim (just to show that you are not too corporate). In other words, academic formal wear takes elements of the corporate wardrobe in order to communicate professionalism but presents them in a way that is intended to look uncorporate. I think the origins of this aesthetic may be rooted in the class biases of the past, when professors did not wish to be associated with those who had to earn their money (i.e. the corporate world) but rather those who had the leisure to pursue their careers because of family wealth. And, I think, even today crossing the line into what could be taken for actual corporate attire can be a faux-pas in some academic settings -- revealing that one is not authentically academic, or something. For instance, I apparently crossed this line one day and was told (with a sneer) by a colleague in the natural sciences that I looked like a banker. Ouch! -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 12/03/2010 06:32:44 AM ----BODY:

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<p>As we wait for the snow to arrive, a little gaggle of quick hits and varia to keep you entertained for the weekend:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://wordswithoutborders.org/article/from-dream-diary/">My friend and colleague Elizabeth Harris's translation of part of her friend and colleague Marco Candida's </a><em><a href="http://wordswithoutborders.org/article/fromdream-diary/">Dream Diary</a></em>.  Allusions to dreams and excavations.</li> <li>A great new post on <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://mercury6.spacelog.org/page/-00:00:00:20/">A play by ply of the Mercury 6 mission</a>.</li> <li>Two great blog posts from Duke University's HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Advanced Collaboratory) website: <a href="http://www.hastac.org/blogs/cathy-davidson/why-doesnt-anyone-payattention-anymore">Why Doesn't Anyone Pay Attention Anymore?</a> and <a href="http://www.hastac.org/blogs/ernesto-priego/your-brain-computers-somenotes-twitter-open-research-community">Your Brain on Computers: Some Notes on Twitter as an Open Research Community</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.complex.com/CELEBRITIES/Cover-Story/kanye-west-projectrunaway">Kanye West's creative process</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.alfiekohn.org/teaching/tcooa.htm">The text of Alfie Kohn's "The Costs of Overemphasizing Achievement"</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.handmaps.org/connect.php">The Hand Drawn Map Association</a> (via Kostis Kourelis).  This group must be an affiliate of the <em>Village Green Preservation Society</em>.</li> <li><a href="http://chronicle.com/blogs/innovations/wired-to-read/27928">Did learning to read really mess us up</a>?</li> <li>A "conversation" between <a href="http://phdiva.blogspot.com/2010/11/blogsand-cultural-property-propaganda.html">Dorothy King </a>and <a href="http://lootingmatters.blogspot.com/2010/11/rss-subscriptions-and-culturalproperty.html">David Gill</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://tenured-radical.blogspot.com/2010/11/why-job-market-is-lotlike-pbs-newshour.html">Your graduate students should learn to Skype</a>.</li> <li>Two more blogs from Kostis: Dry Light (and this post on <a href="http://stathatos.blogspot.com/2010/11/washing-clothes-in-kastalianspring.html">Washing Clothes in the Kastalian Spring</a> at Delphi) and <a href="http://fieldnotesphilly.wordpress.com/">Field Notes from the Preservation Alliance for Greater Philadelphia</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://publishingperspectives.com/2010/11/neal-stephensonsmongoliad-revolutionizing-storytelling/">This is a pretty interesting idea for story telling</a>.  I wonder how it would translate to an academic work?</li> <li>How important is the name of your Twitter feed?  <a href="http://www.brisbanetimes.com.au/digital-life/digital-lifenews/australiabound-ashes-twitter-mixup-sees-babysitter-hit-for-six-2010112918dkf.html">Just ask TheAshes</a>!</li> <li>Two nice arguments for liberal arts eduction: <a href="http://collegenews.org/x10611.xml">One here</a> (which might be expected) and <a href="http://genomebiology.com/2010/11/10/138">one here</a> (which might not be).</li> <li>Transcripts from the <a href="http://www.undwritersconference.org/WCVirtual_Library.html">UND Writers Conference Virtual Reading Room</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.simetric.co.uk/si_materials.htm">Mass of material chart</a>.</li>

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<li>What I am reading: G. Hall, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/digitize-this-book-the-politics-of-newmedia-or-why-we-need-open-access-now/oclc/222249169">Digitize This Book!</a></em> (Minneapolis 2008) and A. Bowman and A. Wilson, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/quantifying-the-roman-economy-methods-andproblems/oclc/316430292">Quantifying the Roman Economy</a></em>. (Oxford 2009).</li> <li>What I am listening to: Kanye West, <em>My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy </em>and The Go Team, <em>Thunder, Lightening, Strike</em>.</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Thursday: Propositions for the Study of History STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-thursday-propositions-for-the-study-of-history CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 12/02/2010 07:07:24 AM ----BODY: <p>A series of Parisian park-bench, NoDak hipster, propositions for the study of history.  These were prepared for an introduction to my Graduate Historiography class next semester.  They are meant to be points of departure for broader discussions into the links between historical epistemology, social responsibility, method, and practice.</p> <p>Propositions for the Study of History</p> <p>1.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>History is a form of social activism.</p> <p>2.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Reading, writing, presenting, and teaching history requires thought.</p> <p>3.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Historical thinking is both the product of the texts (of various kinds) and how we read texts (of various kinds).</p> <p>4.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Texts (sources) are socially constructed.</p> <p>5.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>The historian uses various tools to interpret sources.</p> <p>6.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>These tools are socially constructed.  Some would say that they have a kind of agency.  Most would say that tools exert an influence on the work that they do.</p> <p>7.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>One of the historians’ tools is method (which we sometimes call theory).</p>

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<p>8.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Theory is not a single thing: it is a blanket term for method, methodology, epistemology, historiography, ideology, and even procedure that makes historical thinking possible.</p> <p>9.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Many theoretical positions require a historian to make clear how they approach a text or a historical problem.</p> <p>10.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>By making obvious the relationship between texts and the act of “doing history” we make our work as historians visible and open to critique.</p> <p>11.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>To many people, the more that history is critiqued (as a method), the more it appears to be either common sense or wrong headed.</p> <p>12.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Skepticism of the historical methods undermines the basic disciplinary structure of the field.</p> <p>13.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Most people in the world do not value the work of historians even though they should.  This is our fault.</p> <p>14.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Skepticism toward the historical method may lead to the end of history as a discipline.</p> <p>15.<span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>People will continue to study the past.</p> <p>For the real<a href="http://teachingthursday.org/"> Teaching Thursday post, go here</a>.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More Byzantine Archaeology: Byzantine Trade STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-byzantine-archaeology-byzantine-trade CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Byzantium DATE: 12/01/2010 07:09:59 AM ----BODY: <p>As the end of the semester approaches, I forced myself to find time to peruse the new (2009) volume entitled <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/byzantine-trade-4th-12th-centuries-thearchaeology-of-local-regional-and-international-exchange-papers-of-the-thirtyeighth-spring-symposium-of-byzantine-studies-st-johns-college-university-ofoxford-march-2004/oclc/244293201">Byzantine Trade, 4th-12th centuries </a></em>edited by M. Mundell Mango.  It is a pretty neat and diverse collection of papers that touch on trade from the beginning of Late Antiquity to 4th Crusade.  The papers range from discussions of amphoras, shipwrecks, and pottery to studies on the location and organization of manufacturing.  I'll

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admit upfront that I did not read all the papers in the volume so I hardly feel qualified to give a comprehensive review, but the articles that I did read were good.</p> <p>Perhaps the most interesting part of the volume is the editors effort to locate the papers in relation to other recent scholarly works on trade and the economy in the Late Antique and Byzantine Mediterranean.  She takes particular aim at the recent A. Laiou edited<em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/economic-history-of-byzantium-from-theseventh-through-the-fifteenth-century/oclc/47050456"> Economic History of Byzantium</a></em> which Mundell Mango points out continued problematic periodization schemes by beginning its analysis at the 7th century and thereby "failing to analyze at the same level the preceding period of formation that links Byzantium to the ancient world." (4).</p> <p>More importantly, perhaps, she noted that this volume sought to separate trade from discussions of the economy.  When I first read this, it blew my mind, but as I thought more carefully about it, I began to understand her point.  On some level, our theorizing about the ancient economy has dictated the kinds of questions that we have asked from our material and the kinds of analyses that we have conducted.  For example, most rural survey projects take as a point of departure M. Finley's ideas of the relationship between the (consumer) city and the (producer) countryside.  Our work at Pyla-Koutsopetria, for example, is explicitly informed by the ideas advanced in Horden and Purcell's <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/corrupting-sea-a-study-of-mediterraneanhistory/oclc/42692026">Corrupting Sea </a></em>and their idea that the ancient Mediterranean economy was dominated by semi-autonomous micro-regions. By separating trade from larger economic theorizing, there is a chance that we can produce a far less structured body of data that has the potential to reveal new patterns or organization that do more than challenge or confirm the growing body of economic theorizing.  In fact, Sean Kingsley's unstructured datasets (that is to say, a data set made of individual records without any methodological relationship to one another) of Late Antique and Byzantine shipwrecks could present just the kind of evidence necessary to create new models of how trade actually occurred in the ancient and Medieval Mediterranean (31-36).  Of course, this kind of optimistic empiricism is difficult to come by in practice (and even more difficult to fund!), although one can imagine a time soon when the results of the various survey projects in the Eastern Mediterranean could offer a similar kind of unstructured data for analysis. It is interesting to observe, however, that most of the papers in this volume fall quickly back on longstanding</p> <p>P. Armstrong's article, "Trade in the east Mediterranean in the 8th century", for example, continues the work of pushing the date of Cypriot Red Slip pottery later demonstrating that trade in this common Eastern Mediterranean table ware continued into the 8th century (157-178).  (Moreover, she reminds us that despite its name, CRS (or perhaps better Late Roman D Ware) may not all originate on the island of Cyprus!).  Armstrong's article complements a shorter piece by I. Dimopoulos which looks at the trade in Byzantine red wares in the 11th and 13th century.  Both of these articles provide (as well as O. Karagiorgou's  short offering on "Mapping trade by the amphora" (37-58)) continue the discussion of the relationship between the Late Roman and Byzantine economy on archaeological grounds. To my mind, these discussions are rooted in certain basic expectations regarding the economy, specifically, the notion that the Late Roman economy faltered over the course of the 7th-9th century. This basic assumption suggests that the economy is tied to administrative structures and practices like the <em>annona</em> trade and the political control of the Mediterranean basin.  Demonstrating the certain kinds of trade continued even

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as the political power of the Roman state abated does little to separate the idea of trade from larger questions of economic integration or administrative and political control.</p> <p>I was drawn to this book while thinking about <a href="http://kourelis.blogspot.com/2010/06/theory-and-method-inbyzantine.html">my own venture into the study of Byzantine archaeology</a> and it struck me that the approach advocated here is explicitly anti-theoretical (if one understands the economy as a more intensively theorized version of the practice of trade).  The results are interesting and useful, but it barely scratches the surface of what Byzantine archaeologists are currently doing in the field.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: What to do with a blog, when you're done using it STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: what-to-do-with-a-blog-when-youre-done-using-it CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 11/30/2010 06:56:51 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the past month or so, I've decided to shutter this blog. I don't think that I'll stop blogging, but I'll probably move to another platform or try to find better way to integrate social media into my daily observations.  My reasons for shuttering this blog are not entirely clear to me, but I guess they reflect a combination of things:</p> <p>1. Now that my tenure portfolio is in the pipeline, I've lost the visceral feeling of risk that comes with blogging while an untenured, assistant professor.</p> <p>2. This blog is unattractive and I do not have the energy to redesign it.</p> <p>3. I have this vague feeling that a blog should have a life span.  I feel like blogs should come to an end at some point or to have some form of organization dictated by time.  After all, a blog is a time driven genre or medium.  Posts are organized chronologically like its early predecessor "the log".  One of my favorite blogs on the web, <a href="http://digitalhistoryhacks.blogspot.com/">Digital History Hacks sits on the web in archive form</a>.</p> <p>4. I want a new challenge.  I think my readership on this blog has pretty much leveled off at a bit more than 100 page views a day.  I run close to 1000 page views a week.  This far exceeded my original goals for my blog and now that I have reached these goals, I just have this feeling that I should change up what I'm doing, go somewhere new.</p>

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<p>5. My other blogs run on Wordpress.  As dedicated readers of this blog know, I have a few other online projects that generally run on Wordpress (<a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>, <a href="http://punkarchaeology.wordpress.com/">Punk Archaeology</a>) and I have come to like the Wordpress interface.  So maybe I'll start up this blog again in some fashion on Wordpress.</p> <p>This is not to say that I'm going to stop blogging today or that this is some kind of dramatic farewell post.  I'll keep blogging here until the end of the year.</p> <p>The bigger issue is what to do with the content here.  This blog runs on Typepad.  I chose this years ago without much critical thought. It's a paid blogging service and the service and uptime has been great.  The downside is that, when I stop paying, they stop hosting.  I am not sure that it's viable to pull everything on this blog down (images, links, text) and even if I did do this, I am sure that there are dead links throughout that would do very little good.  Moreover, I was pretty careless with regard to organizing where supporting files live scattering them over a range of locations on the web with different lifespans and maintenance parameters.</p> <p>Another alternative is just to grab all the text and put it into a single text file.  Typepad does this more or less automatically.  With all the mark up, this file runs to about 900 pages of text with full mark up. While this text based archive would obviously lose the actual hyperlinks  between posts and to the wider web, it would preserve the mark up for these links making it possible for someone to reconstruct parts of the blog.  We have an excellent <a href="http://library.und.edu/Collections/UA/home.php">University Archive </a>here on campus.  I think I'll offer them the text of my blog for their collection.  The <a href="http://www.archive.org/">Internet Archive </a>has captured several snap shots of my blog (<a href="http://web.archive.org/web/20080113225544/http://mediterraneanworld.typepa d.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/">January 13, 2008</a>; <a href="http://web.archive.org/web/20071212174707/http://mediterraneanworld.typepa d.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/">December 12, 2007</a>; <a href="http://web.archive.org/web/20071110183326/http://mediterraneanworld.typepa d.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/">November 10, 2007</a>; <a href="http://web.archive.org/web/20071028120043/http://mediterraneanworld.typepa d.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/">October 28, 2007</a>).  It's pretty cool to know that some of my work is in the Internet Archive.  Just to be clear, it's not that I think that my blog is so revolutionary or brilliant that it deserves a place in the history of the internet, but I am enough of a historian to realize that preservation of historical artifacts of all kinds is a voluntary process.</p> <p>I guess I could also make an effort to import relevant posts to Wordpress or whatever service I plan to use in the future, but this seems like a time consuming and painful process.</p> <p>So, I have a month to figure out what to do.  As per usual, any tips, insights, advice, suggestions, and insults are welcome in the comments.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS:

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----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Susan Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.205.189 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/susancaraher DATE: 11/30/2010 09:56:21 AM I'd hate to see it disappear. There is too much work, too many ideas and lots of great feedback from readers. While I understand all the points you make, I feel rather nostalgic about it. And besides, the design is now old skool. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Daniel Sauerwein EMAIL: daniel.sauerwein@und.edu IP: 134.129.205.185 URL: http://civilwarhistory.wordpress.com DATE: 11/30/2010 01:05:39 PM With Wordpress, you should be able to import your posts into a new blog that could serve as an "archive" of this blog. I would suggest that route, though I do wish you luck in your decision, which actually gives me some thoughts. Have you given any thought to setting up a group blog on our department? That could give you the new direction you are looking for, as well as introduce more of us to blogging and the world to what we do as a department. Just a thought. Hope to see you around the next couple days. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 76.99.56.171 URL: DATE: 11/30/2010 02:29:40 PM Oh man!!! Since you got me started on blogging, now I'm terrified. Looking forward to see where you go (so that I might follow...) -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Local Knowledge and Universal Goals STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: wysiwyg ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: local-knowledge-and-universal-goals CATEGORY: Academia DATE: 11/29/2010 06:51:13 AM ----BODY: <p>My wife works in marketing and external relations at <a href="http://www.und.edu/dept/grad/">The Graduate School</a> here at the University of North Dakota, and we regularly discuss the ways that universities sell themselves both to a local and global community. &#0160;This happens to coincide with some of my own research interests which explore the tension

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between institutions with universalizing aspirations (the emperor or, better still, the church) and local practices and traditions. A local saint for example represents a hyper local manifestation of the power of the universal church. &#0160;For a university, a local class or tradition is the manifestation of global expectations of what a &quot;university&quot; education means. &#0160;Schools have always sought to maintain an identity that made them both access to longstanding &quot;stakeholders&quot; and, at the same time, appealing to people who will only acquire familiarity with the place and its traditions when they arrive there.</p>! <p>With the expansion of online and distance teaching the relationship between local (and spatial) sense of community and the wider world becomes even more attenuated. &#0160;<a href="http://www.phoenix.edu/about_us/uopx-ontelevision.html">A recent group of University of Phoenix commercials</a>, for example, students show students in the most generic of locations (non-spaces, in fact) airports, on trains, at home, or in commuter traffic rather than surrounded by iconic buildings (the intensely local and ubiquitous &quot;old main&quot;), the stadium or other campus scenes.</p>! <p>All this is a long introduction of a billboard that I walk by almost every day on my way home:</p>! <p><img alt="PARKULocalKnowledge.jpg" border="0" height="269" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013489987615970c -pi" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="PARKULocalKnowledge.jpg" width="450" /></p>! <p>The billboard advertises <a href="http://www.park.edu/">Park University</a>, which has a &quot;campus&quot; at the Grand Forks Air Force Base. &#0160;From what I can gather Park has an agreement with the Air Force to provide college courses on base which they also open to the wider community. &#0160;Other than Park being competition for local tuition dollars, I don&#39;t know of anything wrong with them and they certainly do not have the reputation of a for-profit university like the University of Phoenix. In fact, I am pretty sure that Park is non-profit university.</p>! <p>Back to local knowledge, Park clearly endeavored to show its &quot;local&quot; nature by featuring in a prominent way what would appear to be a local phone number on its billboard. &#0160;The number looks local because it does not have an area code or the dreaded 1-800 in front of it (which every American knows to be the area code for &quot;outsourced to India&quot;). &#0160;Unfortunately, local numbers here in the Grand Cities (like other major metropolitan areas (e.g. New York City)) always feature an area code. &#0160;Since we are on the North Dakota - Minnesota border local numbers typically are typically proceeded by a 701 or 218 area code. &#0160;A &quot;local&quot; will almost always starts their number with their area code.</p>! <p>Non-local universities are not a particularly jarring feature of the American higher education landscape these days, they only become jarring when they try to be local and fail.</p>! <p><strong>UPDATE:</strong> By the way, I corresponded a bit with the Park University folks and one of them kindly pointed out that John Gillette of our Gillette Hall (and widely regarded as one of the founders of rural sociology) was a Park University graduate in 1895.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT:

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----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: BrianB EMAIL: elucidarian@gmail.com IP: 134.129.193.245 URL: DATE: 11/29/2010 11:32:38 AM What a coincidence. I just noticed that billboard for the first time this morning, and also took a moment afterward to consider the marketing involved. I got caught up contemplating the temporal question of how a woman is visualized in a given time period and whether this particular image was meant to represent the modern, education-seeking female. Building on your own observations, is this a good sign for Grand Forks' vitality that outside enterprises see us as a market valuable enough to invest? Is it resultant of North Dakota's status as a state that has weathered the economic storm? ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 98.111.177.94 URL: DATE: 11/29/2010 10:50:52 PM Fabulous ruminations and documentation of ephemera. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Archaeology of Thanksgiving Dinner STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: archaeology-of-thanksgiving-dinner CATEGORY: Archaeology DATE: 11/26/2010 07:09:25 AM ----BODY: <p>Two green ceramic baking dishes.<br />One white ceramic backing dish with handles.<br />Two metal "baking pans". <br />Ceramic leaf-shaped serving dish with ceramic, acorn-shaped, bowl with lid. <br />One silver salad bowl.<br />One pie pan.<br />One small, ceramic bowl with lid.</p> <p>3 stainless steel and 2 silver serving spoons.  Two brass candle stick holders. 1 bottle glass Prosecco bottle.</p> <p>Two ceramic plates. 4 forks, 2 knives, 2 spoons. 2 inexpensive glass champagne flutes. 2 glass drinking "glasses".</p> <p>Four chairs and table (probably pine).  White fabric table cloth.</p> <p><img style="float: left;" title="Thanksgiving.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348987ad15970c -pi" border="0" alt="Thanksgiving.jpg" width="401" height="600" /></p> -----

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EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: George Walsh and the Founding of UND STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: george-walsh-and-the-founding-of-und CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes CATEGORY: North Dakotiana DATE: 11/24/2010 06:56:09 AM ----BODY: <p>Despite the inclement weather the University of North Dakota is scheduled to unveil a strange kind of monument today: a bust of George Walsh (<a href="http://www2.und.nodak.edu/our/news/story.php?id=3296">here's the genuinely bizarre press release</a>).  Walsh is one of the "founding fathers" of eastern North Dakota and was responsible for the siting of the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks.  His interest in the locating of the University was largely economic, and he used his political power (and audacity) in the provincial legislature to beat out Jamestown and other competing sites for the location of the school. Walsh was a relative of Captian Alexander Griggs who ran the local steamboat line and himself owned the local paper, the <em>Plainsdealer</em>, and served as the president of the town council when Grand Forks was founded in 1878.  <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walsh_County,_North_Dakota">Walsh county </a>is named in his honor.</p> <p>Once the university was founded, Walsh ensured that the school continued to receive appropriations from the state legislature throughout the late 19th century.  Moreover, he served as the first secretary of the board of regents for UND. (It is fun to imagine that he recorded the minutes of the first meetings <a href="http://www.library.und.edu/Collections/BoardofRegents/Images/Volume1/p3.jp g">in his elegant hand</a>). More importantly, perhaps, he penned the first history of the founding of the University which President Webster Merrifield incorporated into the first "Founder's Day" celebration at the University's 21st birthday in 1904 (<a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/university-of-thenorthern-plains-a-history-of-the-university-of-north-dakota-18831958/oclc/1107281">Geiger</a>, 178).</p> <p>From a historical standpoint, then, Walsh followed the tradition of writing himself into the history of the university at the moment where the young school was most intent on creating new "invented traditions".  This is not to discredit Walsh's contribution to the founding of the university, but to place the creating myth of the school within its proper context.</p>

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<p>Here is <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/university-of-the-northernplains-a-history-of-the-university-of-north-dakota-1883-1958/oclc/1107281">Louis Geiger's definitive description</a> (followed in <a href="http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/184384/">this recent oped in the </a><em><a href="http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/184384/">Grand Forks Herald</a></em> (the rival newspaper to George Walsh's long defunct <em>Plaindealer</em>):</p> <blockquote> <p>"... Walsh was deeply involved in the complicated intrigues and politics of the crucial legislative session of 1883 at Yankton where so much of the present educational and institutional pattern of both Dakotas was set.  Ordway had fired the opening gun in his annual message, in which he recommended the establishment of territorial institutions in the north. The next step, which had been prearranged, was to split the southern dedication, which was in overwhelming majoring in both houses - ten to three in the Council. With the approval of Ordway and the northern crowd, J.O.B. Scobey of Brookings was quickly elected president of the Council.  The South Dakota break was further exploited when Walsh after some talk of removing the capital to an entirely new town site on the open prairie, introduced a bill to move it from Yankton to Huron, also in the south.</p> <p>In late January, while Walsh was held up by a blizzard in St. Paul, where he had gone on a short business trip, the South Dakota group attempted to re-form their lines by making overturns to S. G. Roberts and Jonston Nickeus, the representative from Fargo and Jamestown, who were not satisfied with the plans for the north.  They introduced their own set of bills appropriating a half a million dollars for institutions, most of them in the south.  Walsh hastily returned and pulled together his wavering northern colleagues, apparently by accepting a proposal that they draw lots for the university, agricultural college, and the insane asylum and penitentiary. (He wrote years later: "I took the University, Jamestown the insane asylum and Fargo took the agricultural college.  The penitentiary went to Bismarck.").  He then counterattacked by promising the north's support for establishment of an agricultural college at Brookings, Scobey's town, and for appropriations to launch the Dakota University established at Vermillion in 1862 and the normals established by the 1881 Assembly at Spearfish and Madison.</p> <p>With his lines partially re-formed, Walsh managed to bury the South Dakota institutional bills in the appropriations committee, of which he was chairman.  Fearing that his still restive northern colleagues might yet walk off with the prize, he hastily introduced into the legislative hopper some blank sheets of paper inscribed "a bill for an Act Locating the University of North Dakota at Grand Forks, N.D., and Providing Government thereto."  In the two days required for first and second readings, which were by title only, Walsh prepared the bill modeled on the University of Wisconsin act and substituted it for the dummy when it was routinely referred to his appropriations committee. As he put it: "No one would be any wiser, and no harm would be done by anyone, and I would get my bill ahead of Fargo or Jamestown, which I succeeded in doing. The Jamestown member was very much disappointed."</p> <p><a href="http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/184384/">Geiger</a>, 1819.</p> </blockquote> <p>What is interesting to me is that Walsh's bust - situated outside of the administrative building - will be one of the few monuments to a specific individual on campus here (aside from names on buildings).  On historical

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grounds, it is curious that he'd be chosen. While there is no doubt that his energies helped the university survive its formative years, one could easily argue that personalities like President's Webster Merrifield or Frank McVey or even John C. West had a more transformative influence on the institution as a place of higher learning.</p> <p>In contrast, Walsh's unique contribution seems to have been acts of arguably rather self-serving political cunning, and the opportunity to write himself into the history of a university at the moment when it was looking to establish a set of traditions around which to forge an identity.  It is perhaps not coincidental that Walsh's lonely bust is being dedicated at a time when the University continues to seek an identity and forge distinct traditions in the competitive world of higher education.  In fact, it's hard not to think that the decision to commemorate this little known founder of the University suggests a gentle touch of irony from that least ironic of institutions: the University administration.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Tuesday: More Teaching with Twitter STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-tuesday-more-teaching-with-twitter CATEGORY: Teaching CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 11/23/2010 07:48:07 AM ----BODY: <p>Readers of this blog know that I've been experimenting with Twitter in the classroom both online and as live backchannel while I am lecturing live.  <a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.13652729.2010.00387.x/abstract">The </a><em><a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.13652729.2010.00387.x/abstract">Journal of Computer Assisted Learning</a></em><a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.13652729.2010.00387.x/abstract"> has recently published one of the first academic articles on using Twitter in the classroom: R. Junco, G. Heiberger, and E. Loken "The effect of Twitter on college engagement and grades"</a>.   The article argues basically, that Twitter improves student engagement (following the definition for engagement developed by the National Survey of Student Engagement) and, in turn, improves grades.  Their data comes from a large (125 student) group of students enrolled in seven sections of a introductory level seminar for a pre-health professional program.  The class met one day a week for an hour, focused in part on T. Kidder's <em>Mountains beyond Mountains</em>,

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and centered, apparently, on discussion. They also established a control group who did not use Twitter but the customizable social network service Ning to communicate.  Twitter used in a number of ways including prompting students to consider discussion questions before class, organizing study groups, and engaging a panel of upperclassmen, public health majors. It appears that the faculty leaders prompted all uses of Twitter, although they do say that subsequent use of Twitter occurred without prompting.</p> <p>They gird their argument with relatively careful controls and statistics. They also record qualitative data including several sample conversations between the faculty moderator of the Twitter feed and the students. These examples demonstrated how the faculty member prompted participation in Twitter discussion.  The article shows that students not only were significantly (from a statistical viewpoint) more engaged (and there were no pre-existing variations in engagement between the groups).  They also showed that the semester GPA for students who used Twitter was significantly higher (.5!!) than among those in the control group.  Even accounting for the relatively small size of the sample, these differences are remarkable.</p> <p>While the experiments did attempt to control for basic variables and appear to have a sufficient degree of internal rigor, one variable did not appear in their discussion.  Nowhere do they discuss <em>how </em>the students access Twitter. In my (completely unscientific) experience, students require a significant level of technological engagement in their everyday life (smart phones, laptops, active engagement in existing social media and online communities) to grasp the potential benefits of a service like Twitter.  While the authors do cite a recent report that 94% of students use social networking site and, at one school, as many as 85% use Facebook, they offer little in the way of explanation for how students use these services.  My expectation would be that students do not see all social media in the same way (and this tends to be backed up by the work of social media researchers like <a href="http://www.zephoria.org/thoughts/">danah boyd</a>), and have markedly different patterns of engagement with a service like Twitter when compared to Facebook, email, or the informal networks produced through sms messages.</p> <p>While I do not have quantitative (or even systematic qualitative) data to back my point, I can offer some informal observations derived from experiences.  I made an effort to use Twitter in a class that met one a week similar to the class studied in the survey.  My class was a lecture class with 140+ students rather than the more intimate discussion sections, but I actually think this would be a more fertile environment for a social media service like Twitter to produce functioning sub-communities within the larger and relatively impersonal lecture.  I reckoned that this class would require students to check their Twitter account and participate in various activities at least twice a week.  To do this, since Twitter is a stand alone site, it would require the student to log into Twitter as a separate place from Facebook, Blackboard, or other course management software.  This is something that many of us do as part of our daily routine at our desks, on our laptops, or on our smart phones, but for many of my students, the deep and regular engagement with technology is not really part of their world.  Moreover, there was a significant investment in becoming comfortable with the technical language of Twitter, which, while not difficult, is unfamiliar and intimidating to students who only follow well-trod paths on the internet (from Facebook to email to Blackboard and to content driven sites like ESPN, CNN, or (for most students) Wikipedia).  In other words, Twitter is unfamiliar in part because most of the web is unfamiliar to students whose use of the internet is largely passive or limited.  As a result, many students simply lurked on Twitter; those who participated regularly only engaged when explicitly prompted with points (and then only in a very

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superficial way).  In short, students struggled to understand the advantages to Twitter for keeping them in touch with their classmates and faculty when not in class.</p> <p>The notion of students are digital natives and that Twitter provides a familiar way to extend the classroom into the space occupied by students in their everyday lives rests upon problematic assumptions.  Students' engagement with the internet and with technology tends to occur in a much more limited or particular way than many of these studies imagine.  The assumption that "social media" represents a cohesive body of technology and applications for most students appears to me to be problematic.  Twitter for an undergraduate is foreign while Facebook is familiar.</p> <p>Despite these difficulties, this study provides a good foundation for future study on how to leverage common technology to improve student engagement.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Archaeology and Byzantium STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: archaeology-and-byzantium CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Byzantium DATE: 11/22/2010 07:18:35 AM ----BODY: <p>This weekend I spent a little time with the Liz James edited <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/companion-to-byzantium/oclc/226356116">A Companion to Byzantium</a></em>. (Blackwell 2010).  The scope of the book and the quality of articles (and contributors) is pretty impressive.  The focus on the range of Byzantine literature is both gratifying since so much of the discussion of Byzantine literature has tended to occur in languages other than English and timely since there seems to be growing interest in Byzantine texts other than hagiography.  The bibliography runs to over 70 pages and this alone warrants the perusing of this volume.</p> <p>The section on Byzantine archaeology, however, is disappointing.  First, it is less than 10 pages and one page is half-blank and other other features a photograph of a conserved amphora. So, in all Byzantine archaeology received 8 pages of text in a 400+ page volume. The discussion focuses briefly on villages, towns, fortifications, and churches with short discussions of nationalism and a superficial presentation of different "archaeological approaches."  For their length, the sections are decent, but the decisions to focus on this little handful of areas is difficult to understand.  For example, the chapter left out any sustained discussion of ceramic typologies and chronologies (a favorite of

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many of Byzantine archaeologist colleagues), scientific approaches (e.g. dendrochronology, physical anthropology, et c.) which have made such a significant impact on the field, intensive pedestrian survey on the regional level (which in Greece has begun to produce significant changes in how we understand Byzantine settlement), the archaeology of ethnicity (which is obviously central to discussions of ethnic change, modern nation building, and historical perceptions of Byzantium in the West), and the relationship of Byzantine archaeology to careful work on the Medieval, typically Crusader, eastern Mediterranean.  Some of these oversights can be attributed to the "late" date for the start of Byzantium; the author chose to begin the Byzantine period in archaeology in the second half of the 6th century.  While this dating falls within the conventional periodization for the start of the Byzantine period, it is not explained in terms of archaeological evidence.  In fact, it is increasingly clear that many of the trends that characterize Byzantine material culture (for example, ceramic types, construction styles, and settlement) tend in many parts of the Eastern Mediterranean to persist from the 4th to even the early 7th century (depending on local economic, religious, and political contingencies).</p> <p>To be fair, the chapter on Byzantine archaeology is complemented by a nice chapter by Peter Sarris on "Economics, Trade, and 'Feudalism'" which pays particular attention to the circulation of currency and the practical significance of identifying Byzantine coins in archaeological contexts.  Despite this contribution, the neglect of archaeology in this volume is remarkable.  Of course, it is always easy to say that no volume can even contain everything that every scholar deems central to the study of a particular period. But, on the other hand, the argument for including a robust discussion of Byzantine archaeology in a volume of this scope is hardly a reach.</p> <p>Few areas of Byzantine studies have seen the vitality of Byzantine archaeology over the past several decades especially when it is considered under the wider banner of Medieval and Post-Medieval archaeology in the Eastern Mediterranean.  As a little advertisement for myself (this is my blog!), it just so happens that Kostis Kourelis and I are working on<a href="http://kourelis.blogspot.com/2010/06/theory-and-method-in-byzantine.html"> an edited volume right now </a>that will bring together some of the most recent contributions to the archaeological study of Byzantium, and we hope that it will contribute to the archaeology of Byzantium taking a more prominent place in the future of Byzantine studies.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: First Snow Winter 2010 STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: first-snow-winter-2010

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CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes DATE: 11/21/2010 11:58:19 AM ----BODY: <p>In keeping with an irregularly held Archaeology of the Mediterranean World tradition, here are pictures from the first significant snow of the year.  The pictures are courtesy of my lovely wife:</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Snow1.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348968808d970c -pi" border="0" alt="Snow1.JPG" width="450" height="301" /></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Snow2.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348968809c970c -pi" border="0" alt="Snow2.JPG" width="450" height="301" /></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Snow3.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134896880a3970c -pi" border="0" alt="Snow3.JPG" width="450" height="301" /></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia-1 CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 11/19/2010 09:24:04 AM ----BODY: <p>It's not the cold, it's the wind.  Some quick hits and varia on a windy Friday:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/17/arts/17digital.html?_r=2&amp;hpw">The New York Times on digital humanities</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/16/education/16clickers.html?_r=3&amp;src=m e&amp;ref=general">The New York Times on clickers and other digital tools in the traditional classroom</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cj6ho1-G6tw">Danny MacAskill's newest video is incredible</a>. First, it approaches Scotland from a vaguely

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historical perspective and, then, the riding and stunts and skills are amazing.</li> <li>The video of abandoned and soon to be demolished Six Flags Amusement park outside of New Orleans is pretty much viral.  <a href="http://savageminds.org/2010/11/15/collage-for-nola-ruin/">A blog post over at Savage Minds puts in an a provocative context</a>. </li> <li><a href="http://www.placehacking.co.uk/2010/10/05/urban-explorers-videoarticle/">The Place Hacking blog has an interesting video and article on the culture of urban explorers</a>.  It's brilliant that Geography Compass allows video articles.</li> <li><a href="http://bloggingpompeii.blogspot.com/2010/11/dealing-with-decay2.html">Eric Poehler responded to these thoughts from an ancient perspective on the Blogging Pompeii blog</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://aal.au.dk/en/klasark/studies/summerschool2011">Late Antique Summer School in Constantinople</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.samothrace.emory.edu/">Emory University's Samothrace project </a>website is nice. </li> <li><a href="http://www.fubiz.net/2010/11/15/apple-destroyed-products/">Smashed Apple products</a>.</li> <li>What I'm reading: R. Bagnall, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/administration-of-the-ptolemaic-possessionsoutside-egypt/oclc/2663313">The Administration of the Ptolemaic Possessions Outside Egypt</a></em>. (Leiden 1976).  M. M. Mango ed., <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/byzantine-trade-4th-12th-centuries-thearchaeology-of-local-regional-and-international-exchange-papers-of-the-thirtyeighth-spring-symposium-of-byzantine-studies-st-johns-college-university-ofoxford-march-2004/oclc/244293201">Byzantine Trade, 4th-12th Centuries</a></em>. (Burlington 2009).</li> <li>What I'm listening to: Scott H. Biram, <em>Graveyard Shift </em>and John Legend and the Roots, <em>Wake Up!</em> </li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Diana Wright EMAIL: dianagwright@comcast.net IP: 76.104.194.177 URL: http://surprisedbytime.blogspot.com DATE: 11/19/2010 10:45:00 AM Hi, Bill -- check the Eric Poehler link. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Icons and Space (and Dreams) in Late Antiquity STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0

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ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: icons-and-space-and-dreams-in-late-antiquity CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 11/18/2010 07:10:05 AM ----BODY: <p>This week I received my annual copy of the <em>Journal of Roman Archaeology</em>.  It always arrives in the mid-fall when the weather has just begun to turn, and it gives me a good excuse to curl up in a comfortable chair and review the archaeology of the Roman world.  This year's volume included a nice article by Paul Dilley entitled "Christian icon practice in apocryphal literature: the consecration and the conversion of synagogues into churches" JRA 23 (2010), 285-302 (notice no hyperlink!).</p> <p>The article focuses less on the conversion of synagogues to churches and more on the role of icons in creating sacred space. Dilley draws his evidence from the oft-neglected body of apocyphal literature from Late Antiquity. These texts are typically ascribed to a Biblical figure or major bishop, but tend to be later, and generally speaking popular texts that often sought to give a contemporary tradition an august pedigree.  So when the use of icons to sanctify places begins to appear in these texts, there is real reason to think that this represents a shift in practice in the era in which they were written.  A classic example of the role of these apocryphal texts in legitimizing practices is the 6th century <em>Laudatio Barnabae </em>from Cyprus.  This text describes the discovery of Paul's companion, Barnabas's body, on Cyprus about a century earlier.  The story features the Bishop Anthemius of Salamais who has a series of dreams that lead him to the place where Barnabas was buried.  When he exhumes the body, he finds it clutching a copy of the Gospel of Matthew.  Ultimately this text comes to explain the construction of the church dedicated to St. Barnabas in Salamis, as well as explain the special privileges that the church of Cyprus held which emerged over the course of the later 5th century. Barnabas's apostolic pedigree, the timely appearance of his body, and the presence of an autograph of the Gospel of Matthew, all helped to legitimize the church of Cyprus as an autonomous apostolic foundation.</p> <p>Dilley highlights a series of similar stories which place relics or icons at the center of the founding of churches.  He also stresses that these foundation stories often include important liturgical elements which suggests that the stories do more than simply legitimize the founding of the church as a building, but link the founding of a church to annual rites celebrated to commemorate the event.  So the stories of the <em>inventio </em>(the discovery) of a relic, icon, or the body of a saint, has key liturgical elements that are reinforced through the rituals of commemoration in which the text plays a key role.  Processions, acclamations (<em>kyrie eleison</em>!), and the key role of the clergy all mark these texts as liturgical as well as simply devotional or "historical" texts.</p> <p>The role of liturgy in the discovery of icons or relics is something that scholars have not necessarily fully realized.  In fact, some scholars have followed <a href="http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&amp;source=web&amp;cd=1&amp;ved=0CBcQFjAA&a mp;url=http%3A%2F%2Fdis.fatih.edu.tr%2Fstore%2Fdocs%2F741256Fxb9ksyF.pdf&amp;rct =j&amp;q=Dark%20Age%20Controversy%20Brown&amp;ei=cCLlTLrjIJHtngeoczEDQ&amp;usg=AFQjCNHSEJCFQU6ObwIHUbzpOQ29J_Cl6Q&amp;sig2=I5TWxixTV9IfPzGC03Rsjg ">Peter Brown's lead (.pdf)</a> and seen icons as almost anti-clerical in that they allow for access to holiness outside of the control of the institutional

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Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Archive: Volume 1 by William R. Caraher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

church and the clergy.  In other words, there are ways that the veneration of icons and relics represent paths to holiness that end-run the clergy.  Dilley, however, has argued that stories in seemingly popular apocryphal literature not only commemorate the key role of icons and relics in creating sacred, liturgical space, but also embed this tradition within liturgical practices that tie the deeply personal holiness of the icon to the institutional holiness of the church.</p> <p>As for the conversion of synagogues, I'll admit to being less compelled by the final pages of Dilley's article where he offers a very basic typology for the archaeological evidence relating to the conversion of synagogues to churches, but does not really bring it back to his far more provocative and exciting arguments about icons, liturgy, and the creation of Christian sacred space.  That being said, he makes a good point that the presence of icons in buildings newly converted to Churches - like the synagogue at Cagliara on Sardinia, the synagogue at Lydda, and the Pantheon in Rome - seems to be a key aspect in their consecration for Christian use by the 7th century.  This reminds me of a Coptic church I visited for Easter Vigil in Columbus, Ohio. The church had been converted from a Jehovah's Witness Kingdom Hall to a Coptic church. While the unabashedly Protestant architecture of the building remained, the presence of Coptic icons on almost every flat surface marked out the repurposing of the space.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Peer Review, Scholarship, and Blogs STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: peer-review-scholarship-and-blogs CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 11/17/2010 07:33:26 AM ----BODY: <p>The conversation continues on the relationship between blogging and published scholarship. Increasingly, the central issue tends to be peer review.  Blogs are not peer reviewed; academic publications are. This dichotomy is important and represents the core generic difference between working papers and the final publications of result.  Unfortunately, these ideas have been twisted somehow (and I fear that scholars in the humanities have been responsible for this) to mean that only peer reviewed works have value and blogs and other informal types of "correspondence" (in the broadest sense) are not valuable, a waste of precious academic time and creativity, and, at very worst, a contribution of the glut of uncritical opinion that clutters the internet and threatens to crowd out

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Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Archive: Volume 1 by William R. Caraher is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

careful, reasoned, thought.  (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/10/mo re-on-academic-blogging.html">For more on these perspectives see here</a>.)</p> <p>Just this week, Michael O'Malley wrote a provocative blog post on the value of peer review entitled <a href="http://theaporetic.com/?p=896">Googling Peer Review, Part Two</a> on his <a href="http://theaporetic.com/">Aporetic Blog</a>.  He suggests that good or unorthodox work does not necessarily benefit from peer review and, in some case, might be good and unorthodox <em>despite </em>the peer review process.</p> <p>I am not sufficiently brilliant to write good and unorthodox works.  At the same time, I am not completely sold in the universal value of peer review. While I'll be the first to admit that peer review has significantly helped several of my published articles, I'll also concede that most of the central ideas in my articles were unaffected by peer review (well, except those ideas that died in the peer review process, never to be heard from again!).  Most of the critiques offered by various peer reviewers focused on the clarity of our argument, provided references that we had overlooked, or identified different implications for our conclusions.  These were all helpful and meaningful contributions to our work, but ultimately none of these reviews changed the basic content of our contributions.</p> <p>I'll admit that the argument that I am making here comes on the heels of a particularly pleasant and uncontroversial peer review process for an article that, at its core, is little more than a glorified archaeological site report.  But it may be that this kind of article is the least deserving of peer review.  The formal publication of the article slowed down the circulation of information to colleagues and added little significant academic value to the basic results of our field work.  In fact, peer review strengthened our interpretative conclusions, but hardly made them unassailable.</p> <p>So at least some of the issue is not peer review per se, but the nature of genre in academic writing.  As O'Malley's post points out many of the most significant works of scholarship in the last 70 years were not peer reviewed in a traditional sense (and the same could also be said of  many of the least significant works as well).  The works identified by O'Malley tend to occupy unconventional academic genres which are least likely to benefit from traditional peer review; even today works like M. Foucault's <em>Discipline and Punish </em>upset traditional disciplinary critiques, and E. P. Thompson's <em>Making of the English Working Class</em> stands apart from nearly any work of history writing up until that time (or since).  In a more modest way, data driven archaeological reports fit into this category as well.  There is little that a peer review can provide a scholar aside from reminders of archaeological conventions and advanced copy editing.</p> <p>To prove my point, I can offer as a case study a recent publication of mine.  Over the past two years, I blogged most of the content that appeared ultimately in our peer reviewed publication that appeared this past week.  I've appended a copy of our final article at end of this blogpost.  Of course, some of the final product reflects the hard work of the <em>Hesperia</em> editorial team who in many ways serve as another level of peer review because nearly all of them are practicing archaeologists with advanced graduate training the field. So, I am fudging a bit with this example.</p> <p>Here are links to my various blog posts, conference papers, and working papers that led up to the final publication our work.  These received no formal peer review:</p> <p>July 20, 2008: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/07/th e-corinthian.html">The Corinthian Countryside: The Site of Ano Vayia</a> <br

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/>July 23, 2008: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/07/ne w-research-on.html">New Research on the Corinthian Countryside: Vayia Microregion<br /></a>August 5, 2008: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/08/th e-corinthian.html">The Corinthian Countryside: Distributional Data from the Site of Ano Vayia</a><br />August 12, 2008: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/08/th e-corinthia-1.html">The Corinthian Countryside: The Lychnari Tower</a><br />August 19, 2008: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/08/th e-corinthia-2.html">The Corinthian Countryside: The Passes of the Eastern Corinthia</a><br />August 25, 2008: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/08/th e-corinthia-3.html">The Corinthian Countryside: Classical Vayia</a><br />September 1, 2008: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/09/th e-corinthian.html">The Corinthian Countryside: History and Archaeology</a><br />September 8, 2008: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/09/th e-corinthia-1.html">The Corinthian Countryside: Some More Contemporary Thoughts</a><br />January 12, 2009: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/01/th ree-new-sites-in-the-eastern-corinthia.html">Three New Sites in the Eastern Corinthia</a> (W. Caraher and D. Pettegrew)<br />July 27, 2009: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/07/vi ewsheds-in-the-eastern-corinthia.html">Viewsheds in the Eastern Corinthia</a><br />August 10, 2009: <a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/WorkingPapers/Caraher_Pettegrew _Towers_Fortifications_Working.pdf">Working Paper: Towers and Foritfication at Vayia in the Southeast Corinthia (Caraher, Pettegrew, S. James)</a></p> <p>The final publication:</p> <p><a title="View Caraher Pettegrew James VayiaOffprint 2010 on Scribd" href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/42994192/Caraher-Pettegrew-James-VayiaOffprint2010" style="margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sansserif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -xsystem-font: none; display: block; text-decoration: underline;">Caraher Pettegrew James VayiaOffprint 2010</a> <object id="doc_936682604688997" name="doc_936682604688997" height="450" width="100%" type="application/xshockwave-flash" data="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" style="outline:none;" > <param name="movie" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf"> <param name="wmode" value="opaque"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff"> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"> <param name="FlashVars" value="document_id=42994192&access_key=key2wh8n3ocguqb9va13k&page=1&viewMode=list"> <embed id="doc_936682604688997" name="doc_936682604688997" src="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf?document_id=42994192&access_key =key-2wh8n3ocguqb9va13k&page=1&viewMode=list" type="application/x-shockwaveflash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" height="600" width="100%" wmode="opaque" bgcolor="#ffffff"></embed> </object></p> ----EXTENDED BODY:

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----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Historical Figures in Social Media STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: historical-figures-in-social-media CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 11/16/2010 07:20:06 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the last year I have become more and more committed to various social media applications, and over the last six months, I am completely obsessed with Twitter. (Facebook, not so much, but not for any ideological or practical reasons; I just prefer Twitter run through Hootsuite).  Recently I have been enamored with the spate of historical figures on Twitter.  The first that I recognized was the brilliant <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/CryForByzantium">Cry for Byzantium </a>which sent out creative Tweets in the name of various Byzantine Emperors who have particular interests in politics, military campaigns, diplomacy, and palace intrigue.  The blog is run by the author Sean Munger who explains the set up for <a href="http://cryforbyzantium.blog.com/">Cry for Byzantium on his blog</a>. At present he has over 550 followers and has sent out over 2000 Tweets!</p> <p>Since then I've also begun to follow <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/iTweetus">iTweetus</a>, who is a Roman soldier on campaign in England during the winter of 72/73 AD.  His feed is curated by <a href="http://www.tulliehouse.co.uk/roman-frontier-gallery">the Roman Frontier Gallery at Tullie House in Carlisle</a>.  Tweetus is poetic and has a keen eye for the rugged landscape and the worsening weather.  I hope he survives the winter. At present iTweetus has made 53 tweets (he's on campaign for heaven sake and who knows what the Roman mobile phone coverage is like at the borders of empire!) and has 495 followers.</p> <p>Finally, <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/iherodotus">iHerodotus</a> has begun to push out tweets from his great work on the Persian Wars.  He has 172 followers and has pushed out 95 tweets.  <a href="http://bestlatin.blogspot.com/2009/06/twitter-ivlivscaesar.html">Laura Gibbs has been tweeting </a><a href="http://twitter.com/#!/IVLIVSCAESAR">Plutarch's </a><em><a href="http://twitter.com/#!/IVLIVSCAESAR">Life of Julius Caesar</a></em> since the summer. She has over 100 followers and has made over 1000 tweets. Various authors whose works are being tweet are aggregated into several lists like <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/MarkKohut/classic-writers-words">Classic Writer's Words</a>.</p> <p>The idea that these real or fictional ancient figures are part of my "social network" certainly stretches the notion of a social network and its virtual

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existence to a new place.  To be sure, Herodotus or even the Byzantine Emperor's do not respond to my Tweets as a colleague might, but at the same time their stories and personalities emerge over the course of their twitter feeds.  Like college classmates or rarely seen acquaintances, the names of historical figures and the text of classic literature roll out across my twitter feed sharing space with various automated tweets from tech-bloggers, various companies, CNN, athletic teams, et c.</p> <p>My social media space, then, extends the notions of the social to include a wide range of products, services, individuals, and texts. Or, to see it another way, my social media space represents the commodification of personal relationships as much as the personalization of products and services. I am not sure how historical figures fit into a network of commodified social relations, except by observing that historical figures have always contributed to the production of social capital.  If Twitter, Facebook, and other social media services provide new ways to visualize and deploy the diverse range of social capital, then there is no reason why historical figures, texts, and other works of so-called "high culture" should not appear.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Christians in Roman Space STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: christians-in-roman-space CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: Late Antiquity CATEGORY: Religion DATE: 11/15/2010 07:22:31 AM ----BODY: <p>On the strength of a <em><a href="http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2010/2010-1065.html">BMCR</a></em><a href="http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2010/2010-10-65.html"> review</a>, I spent the last few days reading Laura Salah Nasrallah's <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/christian-responses-to-roman-art-andarchitecture-the-second-century-church-amid-the-spaces-ofempire/oclc/417444878"><em>Christian Responses to Roman Art and Architecture</em></a>. (Cambridge 2010).  The book juxtaposes the works of several 2nd c. Christian "apologists" (Tatian, Justin, Athenagoras, and Clement of Alexandria) and the space of the Roman empire.  To do this, she parallels the texts with specific places within the Roman world (e.g. the Sebasteion at Aphrodisias or the Trajans forum) or specific works of art (e.g. statues of Commodus as Herakles or the Aphrodite of Knidos).  Both the texts, the space,

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and the works of art themselves fall significantly outside my area of expertise.  The approach, on the other hand, which assumes that texts are no more or nor less products of the same culture that produced understandable spaces and statues within the Roman world represents a significant interest to me.</p> <p>In particular, I was intrigued by how Nasrallah used these texts as evidence for Christian response to the built environment of the Roman world.  Of course, this response was, to a certain extent, constructed by the author's decision to juxtapose particular texts with particular environments (see the BMCR review for this observation), but, at the same time, the move to compare texts and monuments in a way that shed light on critical readings of built space was, to me at least, novel.  The alienated (or at least conflicted) posture of figures like Tatian when positioned opposite the imperial rhetoric of the Sebasteion is particular striking and reminds me of John Clarke's more speculative approach to the reading of Trajan's column in his <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/art-in-the-lives-of-ordinary-romans-visualrepresentation-and-non-elite-viewers-in-italy-100-bc-ad-315/oclc/51172352">Art in the lives of Ordinary Romans</a></em> (Berkeley 2003) or some of the essays in J. Elsner's <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/roman-eyes-visualitysubjectivity-in-art-text/oclc/71266643">Roman Eyes</a></em> (Princeton 2007).</p> <p>My impression is that Nasrallah's use of texts was a convenient concession to traditional practices in art and architectural history and archaeology of the Classical World that continues to imagine texts as the point of departure for rigorous analysis of meaning and space.  When pushed a step further to deal exclusively with built environments in places uninformed by robust textual sources, the assumption that spaces can accommodate a wide range of viewers (including those bent on resisting, subverting, or even co-opting "intended messages") becomes decidedly more foggy.  As the <a href="http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2010/2010-10-65.html"><em>BMCR</em> review</a> noted, even Nasrallah moves cautiously in many cases when she enters into relationship between the act of reading a text and the act of reading a space or monument; the author is more willing to leave the texts juxtaposed than to bring out opportunities for mutual critique.</p> <p>In <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/am bivalent-landscapes-of-the-6th-century-at-corinth-in-contrast.html">my recent work on the monumental spaces of Justinianic Corinth</a> (it is, on my blog, all about me, of course), I've had to confront a similar tension not between texts, but between monuments.  I shared Nasrallah's assumption that it is possible to recover the resistance and critique of the built environment through juxtaposing different types of texts; for Corinth, however, these texts are not the literary (or even really epigraphical kind), but other roughly contemporary monuments.  Like Nasrallah and her authors, I have done what I can to understand the act of building as a response to particular (and maybe recoverable) activities within the physical environment. But this reading of the relationship between buildings captures only one response within a monumentalized discourse in the landscape. The ongoing dialog between experiences across the landscape continuously reinscribed monumental places with meanings and presented opportunities for resistance. The decision whether to resist, to critique, or to accept the meanings produced through the productive juxtaposition of places in the landscape returns agency to the viewer and undermines the power traditionally located in imperialist policies.</p> <p>Nasrallah's book provides a model for discerning the act of viewing within the Roman empire by expanding the notion of place to include texts which she demonstrates function according to a similar logic as monuments in the

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landscape.  By resisting the urge to offer definitive or rigid relationships between various more or less contemporary spaces within the ancient world, she resists the temptation to extend a valuable analysis of ways of viewing to specific acts of viewing.  In doing so, she both unpacks the act of viewing (and responding to) ancient art and architecture, and allows it to persist as an essentially ambiguous phenomenon resistant to even our most deeply positivist desire to essentialize.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 11/12/2010 09:20:42 AM ----BODY: <p>It's cold today, but sunny.  In other words, it's a perfect fall day for quick hits and varia:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2010/11/i-am-a-bloggerno-longer/66223/">Marc Ambinder on why he no longer blogs</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://twitter.com/#!/iHerodotus">Herodotus is now tweeting here</a>. <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/itweetus">A Roman soldier invading Britain tweets here</a>.</li> <li>Yale published its 900+ page<em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/anthology-of-rap/oclc/601348010"> Anthology of Rap</a></em> this week.  <a href="http://www.slate.com/id/2272926/">Check out the Slate review</a> and <a href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/therecord/2010/11/04/131063935/listening-to-theanthology-of-rap">what NPR has to say</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/Audio-Tech-TherapyWired/125229/">Universities and technologies according Kevin Kelly of </a><em><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/Audio-Tech-Therapy-Wired/125229/">Wired </a></em><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/Audio-Tech-TherapyWired/125229/">fame</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://app.mobilehistorycleveland.org/">Cleveland Historical now has a App complements</a> of <a href="http://csudigitalhumanities.org/">The Center for Public History and Digital Humanities at Cleveland State University</a>.  How cool is that?</li> <li><a href="http://www.ucl.ac.uk/dh/courses/mamsc">University College, London now has a one year MA/MSc in Digital Humanities</a>.</li>

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<li><a href="http://jobs.uiowa.edu/faculty/view/58610">Classics, Religion, and Digital Humanities job at Iowa</a>.</li> <li>I used <a href="http://www.zamzar.com/">Zamzar </a>to convert a paper that a student submitted as a .wps file to something that a computer made in the 21st century could read.  It worked just as advertised.</li> <li><a href="http://www.life.com/image/ugc1142761/in-gallery/51881/jfkunpublished-never-seen-photos">Some unpublished photos of JFK, now published</a>.</li> <li>I was on the front page of the <a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/">American School of Classical Studies</a> webpage this past week thanks to my friends at <em><a href="http://www.atypon-link.com/ASCS/loi/hesp">Hesperia</a></em>.</li> </ul> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="ASCSAHomePage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5cb44f7970b -pi" border="0" alt="ASCSAHomePage.jpg" width="400" height="235" /></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.shirky.com/weblog/2010/11/the-times-paywall-andnewsletter-economics/">Clay Shirky's rather unfavorable assessment of the Times of London's pay wall experiment</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.formula1.com/">The last Formula 1 race of the year is this weekend. Let's see if Mark Weber can pull it off</a>.</li> <li>What I'm listening to: Scott H. Biram, Lo-Fi Mojo.</li> <li>What I'm reading: David Harvey,<a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/spaces-of-hope/oclc/43755292"> Spaces of Hope</a>. (Berkeley 2000).</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Archaeology and QR Codes STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: archaeology-and-qr-codes CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 11/11/2010 07:42:32 AM ----BODY: <p>My wife recently attended a conference on marketing and higher education hosted in part by Google. There as a low buzz about QR codes at the conference. For those who don't know, QR codes are funny-looking, square bar codes, and QR stands for "quick read". They are designed to be read by little applications on a mobile phone that use the phone's camera like a bar code reader.  QR codes

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are most frequently used to display a URL (a web address), but they can contain a number, a v-card, or even instruction to send a tweet to a twitter account.  Over the past year, QR codes have moved into mainstream marketing, appeared in popular culture (e.g. <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=frv6FOt1BNI">a Kyle Minogue video</a>!), and have even attracted <a href="http://www.rcet.org/geohistorian/">the interest of academics</a>.</p> <p>I've been thinking about QR codes for<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/fr iday-varia-and-quick-hits-2.html"> six months now</a>. Yesterday, I had a great chat yesterday with a colleague from our Working Group in Digital and New Media, and we began bandying about ways to use QR codes on campus to install art, historical information, subversive (in a polite North Dakota way) messages, and challenges to the barrier between the internet and real space on campus.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; border: 0px initial initial;" title="QR_Code.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5c3027e970b -pi" border="0" alt="QR_Code.jpg" width="450" height="450" /></p> <p>After the conversation, I struggled a bit to understand what made using QR codes unique or interesting.  On the one hand, I understood that they are a gimmick and fad, but that didn't bother me.  I like gimmicks and fads. (After all, I love the interwebs!). Finally, after I mulled over this discussion ever more, I realized that I like QR codes because they are archaeological.  Here's how I am thinking about them:</p> <p>1. They are mysterious and demand action.  Like an archaeological artifact (imagine a sherd of pottery), QR codes beg to be understood or contextualized.  They demand action on the part of the viewer or, at least, the viewer who recognizes a QR code as something to be deciphered.  Just as an archaeologist is almost compelled to figure out the context for an artifact (and anyone who has ever walked across an archaeological site or any complex landscape with an archaeologist knows how powerful disciplinary training can be!), people "in the know" feel compelled to scan and understand a QR code.  In fact, if you don't read the code, the QR code is meaningless.</p> <p>2. Codes are objects. The form of a QR code communicates meaning. Like most archaeological objects, a QR code does not communicate in an explicitly textual way (except in the sense that all objects can be read as types of texts).  Within the discourse of archaeology and, presumably, QR code-ology, the form of the object prompts the action required to understand it. Archaeologists are obsessed with the materiality of objects - shape, texture, size, weight -  and recognize that to produce meaning, it is necessary to compare one object to another to create a context for archaeological material and, ultimately, to create meaning. QR codes have the same material character. Codes are things which must be understood in a non-textual way and placed within a particular context to produce meaning.  Only people familiar with the code and who recognize the action required will understand the message.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="ArchObject.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5c3028b970b -pi" border="0" alt="ArchObject.jpg" width="450" height="300" /></p> <p>3. The are mobile.  Like many artifacts in an archaeological context, a QR code is mobile meaning that there is tension between its present physical context and its the meaning embedded (by the code's creator) in its form.  In archaeology we like to think about formation processes; these are the processes that led to an object being discovered by an archaeologist in a particular place or condition.  Formation processes recognize our environment as constantly changing and almost infinitely mutable. A QR code printed on a sheet of paper,

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or a sticker, or t-shirt can travel from one place to the next while still retaining a formal link to another context.  Even if a QR code is designed for a particular place and time, because they are material and mobile, they will travel and endure.</p> <p>4. Codes provide a link between the real and the virtual.  As a historian I spend much of my time in a "virtual" environment girded about by the rules of my discipline and embedded deep within my imagination. The past is something that obeys particular rules and, in a particular sense, does not exist except within my imagination.  At the same time, as an archaeologist, I am constantly challenged to recognize the past as real by the physical nature of archaeological artifacts.  QR Codes can bridge this same gap between the virtual world of the internet and the physical world of the code itself.  The real world context of the code creates a physical point of departure into the virtual world of the internet.  In short, the code locates the internet in physical space.</p> <p>QR codes are easy to generate through any number of sites on the internet. (<a href="http://2d-code.co.uk/qr-code-generators/">Here's a basic list</a>.)  And most mobile phones have QR code reader applications available for them.  Phones with better browsers, of course, provide access to far more robust content.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Shawn EMAIL: shawn_graham@carleton.ca IP: 134.117.115.102 URL: http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com DATE: 11/11/2010 12:10:32 PM Hi Bill, They are quite cool, aren't they? They are like a portal point between worlds your point 4. They could link between material culture and the virtual reality created by archaeologists and historians as they 'create' the past... I'm introducing them to my digital history students in the next few weeks... a few years ago, I tried imagining how I might use them in teaching practice; so an opportunity to put into practice! <a href="http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com/2007/11/20/the-past-presentaugmented-historical-reality-a-lesson-plansketch/">http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com/2007/11/20/the-past-presentaugmented-historical-reality-a-lesson-plan-sketch/</a> ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Vincent EMAIL: vincent@talkingpyramids.com IP: 118.210.229.150

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URL: http://www.talkingpyramids.com DATE: 11/11/2010 03:25:04 PM What ever happened to Sema codes? It seems there's been a battle between Sema and QR codes over the past couple of years, much like in the old days of Betacord vs VHS. Many companies were using Sema codes a few years ago and it seems they were going to be huge. Then along came QR codes and as they gained in popularity Sema codes seem to have fallen by the wayside. Are Sema codes the betacord of our day? -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Vigla at Pyla-Koutsopetria STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: vigla-at-pyla-koutsopetria CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 11/10/2010 07:33:20 AM ----BODY: <p>This past week, I've started to write up a formal description and analysis of the fortification on Vigla at the site of Pyla-Koutsopetria on Cyprus.  While we were not able to date the walls precisely, despite excavating several sections, it seems most likely that fortifications date to the Hellenistic period.  The settlement at the site appears to date earlier with Iron Age and Classical material present.  Moreover, excavations in 2008 revealed that the fortification wall cut through an earlier building at the site.</p> <p>The site itself does not appear in any textual sources for the island, and it clearly lacked any documented civic status.  As a result, Vigla represents another example of a rural fortified site that stands outside the main narrative of the island's history.  From the start, we have speculated that the site at Vigla could be a mercenary garrison camp, built quickly for a particular group of Ptolemeic mercenaries stationed on the island during the 3rd or 4th century BC.  The site could also represent a refuge for a local population whose position so near the coast would have exposed them to possible attach during the unsettled Hellenistic period. Scholars have offered similar explanations for similar rural fortifications from Greece.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488dbc1da970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="450" height="326" /></p> <p>The body of rural fortifications in Cyprus is far smaller.  Claire Balandier in her dissertation (and a series of articles in the <em>RDAC</em> in 2000, 2002, and 2003 and <a href="http://www.persee.fr/web/revues/home/prescript/article/dha_07557256_2002_num_28_1_2501">elsewhere</a>) has collected evidence for just a handful of rural fortification on the same scale of the fortifications at Vigla.  The most notable among these rural fortified sites is Paleocastro on the Kormakiti peninsula in Kyrenia district (in the North).  The Italians documented the site over several campaigns in the late 1960s and early 1970s as

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part of a project focusing on the landscape of the Kormakiti peninsula near Ayia Irini (the fortification at Paleocastro might be associated with the ancient anchorage of <a href="http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus:text:1999.04.0006:ent ry=melabron&amp;highlight=melabron">Melabron</a>).  Work was interrupted by the invasion of 1974, but preliminary results were published, including a good plan, is <em>RIASA</em> 19/20 (1972/73), 7-120.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Paleocastro.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5bbbcaf970b -pi" border="0" alt="Paleocastro.jpg" width="450" height="366" /></p> <p style="text-align: left;">The site is  larger than the fortified area of Vigla, but situated in a similar way.  The fortified settlement stands on a slight rise over the coast and has a gate on its inland side protected by towers.  Vigla stands on a more prominent height (<a href="http://www.gigapan.org/gigapans/59224/">check out Vigla in gigapan</a>), overlooks a likely ancient harbor, and is accessed through its more highly fortified inland side.  The settlement at Paleocastro shows signs of Archaic or Classical origins and then disappears by the 2nd century AD.  The fortification wall appear to be Hellenistic.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Stay tuned for more work to document, contextualize, and understand Vigla.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Byzantine Pottery from Sagalassos STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: byzantine-pottery-from-sagalassos CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 11/09/2010 07:31:08 AM ----BODY: <p>I was pretty surprise to see an article entitled "<a href="http://www.atyponlink.com/ASCS/doi/abs/10.2972/hesp.79.3.423">Middle-Late Byzantine Pottery from Sagalassos: Typo-Chronology and Sociocultural Interpretation</a>" in the very recent <em>Hesperia</em> (A.K. Vionis, J. Poblome, B. De Cupere, M. Waelkens, <em>Hesperia </em>79 (2010), 423-464).  It's not so much that the subject matter is late, but that the site of Sagalassos is a Belgian project in Turkey rather than an American project in Greece.  As some of my more observant friends pointed out, Hesperia has published the results of project from Albania,

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so maybe this should not have caught be so off guard.  But it did and it indicates to me that<em> Hesperia</em> is continuing to expand its purview to include the wider world of Mediterranean archaeology. Hooray!</p> <p>The article on the Middle-Late Byzantine material from Sagalassos is pretty cool as well.  The main focus of the article is on a series of 12th-13th century layers from the Alexander Hill at the site of Sagalassos.  Over three seasons of excavation, the excavators uncovered the remains of a "heavily burned" destruction layer containing the remains of a short-lived occupation containing a significant and robust quantity of 12th-13th century Byzantine pottery.  This layer appears to represent the final phase of activity on this dramatic hill overlooking the ancient site of Sagalassos.  Early occupation on the hill included a 5th-6th century basilica that was almost completely removed and a later "refuge" of some description with a fortification wall and a substantial cistern.  Apparently the church was almost completely dismantled for the construction of the later refuge. The final destruction layer, which seems to represent the final layer of occupation, may represent an effort to dismantle the refuge to prevent it from being used again.</p> <p>While the site history of the Alexander Hill is pretty interesting (particularly the dismantling of the church), the real meat of the article is in the analysis of the ceramic assemblage from the final layer.  While I would like to have understood the sampling method the produced the assemblage, the authors nevertheless conduct a rigorous and thorough examination of the material and take into account both "common ware" (which we would call medium coarse, coarse, and kitchen/cooking ware in chronotype terminology) and glazed table wares (fine and and semi-fine wares in our terminology).  Some of the glazed wares were repaired indicating that the objects had significant value to their owners.  The presence of repaired pots in an assemblage associated with the destruction of the site, however, suggests (to me at least) that these vessels were either discarded by the last occupants of the refuge or brought to the site by work crews commissioned to destroy or salvage the remains of the site. I wish the article had made considered more thoroughly the formation processes at play in the creation of the assemblage from the burned layer including the possible nature of activities at the final occupation phase of the site.  If these materials were left by work crews (like the material associated with the final phase of <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/08/ko urion-and-aba.html">activity at Kourion</a>), then the diet, ceramics used, and social standing of the individuals could suggest a different assemblage from that left behind by a family.</p> <p>Despite the origin of the pottery in a layer associated with the site's destruction and short term occupation, they regard the material as sufficient diverse to qualify as a use assemblage and, therefore, suitable for making larger arguments for the nature of Byzantine cooking practices, diet, and the circulation of Byzantine glazed pottery and utility ware forms.  This was all supported by residue analysis of individual vessels and the quantitative analysis of the entire assemblage.  Apparently the individuals at Sagalassos ate more beef and game than their Late Roman predecessors (who preferred lamb and goat).  Pretty neat stuff.</p> <p>The article places the material from the assemblage at Sagalassos in the context of the Byzantine Eastern Mediterranean and it will be really useful as we look to document a site with a similar history at Polis in Cyprus.  The material present at Sagalassos has comparanda both on Cyprus and, unsurprisingly, at Corinth in Greece where the study of Byzantine pottery has long held pride of place.  The careful publication of an assemblage from a site like Sagalassos expands the base of evidence for the further study of Byzantine

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pottery.  The appearance of an article like this in <em>Hesperia </em>should show scholars that there are high-quality journals prepared and willing to publish similar papers.</p> <p>P.S. Lest you think that I'm just a blogger, you'll notice that David Pettegrew, Sarah James, and I also have an article in this volume: "<a href="http://www.atypon-link.com/ASCS/doi/abs/10.2972/hesp.79.3.385">Towers and Fortifications at Vayia in the Southeast Corinthia</a>," <em>Hesperia</em> 79 (2010), 385-415.<em> </em></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Artifact Level Analysis and Places of History STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: artifact-level-analysis-and-places-of-history CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: David Pettegrew CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 11/08/2010 07:40:58 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the last few weeks, I've been working with <a href="http://corinthianmatters.com/">David Pettegrew</a> to finish writing the analysis of the survey data from the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">PylaKoutsopetria Archaeological Project</a> (PKAP).  Followers of this blog know that this work is a long a term project and involves challenges both on the level of analysis but also organization and description.  In other words, we've been working to figure out both how to interpret our survey results, but also how do we organize and describe this data in way that is useful to scholars who are likely to ask different questions from the one's that our survey set out to consider.</p> <p>The biggest challenge is moving from the highly granular, artifact level analysis of individual groups of pot sherds to the level of historical time and space.  After all, very few important things happened in the space of a pot sherd or in a time framed absolutely by the life-span or production cycle of an individual vessel.  It is essential to aggregate sherds, space, and time in order to produce historical arguments.  The chronological ranges for artifacts through time depend, in particular, on our understanding of ceramic typologies based on the fabric, shape, and in some cases decoration.  These the chronology assigned to these various typologies are not necessarily meaningful in a historical sense and can be quite individualize to particular objects.</p>

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<p>In other words, artifact level analysis is separate from the process of interpreting artifacts across the survey area as chronologically and historically meaningful groups.  Part of the interpretive process involves grouping artifacts together into more or less contemporary groups of object.  This process involves judgement on our part and cannot be applied in the same way across the entire assemblage.</p> <p>As an example, our analysis of material representing activity across our site from the Classical to Hellenistic (BC 475 to BC 100) periods involves artifacts dated to at least 8 different, overlapping chronological ranges: ArchaicClassical, Archaic-Hellenistic, Classical, Classical-Hellenistic, ClassicalRoman, Hellenistic, Hellenistic-Early Roman, and Protogeometric-Hellenistic.  In contrast, our analysis of activities on our site from the Roman period involves artifacts dated to three chronological ranges: Roman, Early Roman, and Late Roman.  Our ceramicist established the date ranges for individual artifacts largely based upon dates established through stratigraphic excavation and completely independent from our interpretation of the site as a whole.  It is common for individual classes of artifacts to receive have different chronological ranges. A sherd from a cooking ware pot might represent a vessel-type produced over a 500 year periods (say, any time during the Classical-Hellenistic period), whereas a fragment of fine ware might derive from a vessel produced during a 4 or 5 decade span of time (say, the early 4th century).  Each of the objects receives a different date and chronological range when documented in the survey area. As a very general rule, utility wares tend to be produced over longer spans of time than fine and table wares, but this has no necessary impact on how and when they were used.</p> <p>The process of interpreting the artifacts documented by our ceramicist involves us aggregating these objects into chronologically, functionally, and spatially meaningful groups.  Past human activities took place in particular spaces and made use of object produced at different times and for different functions. To produce a picture of what happened in the past at our site that has meaning within these human terms, it is necessary to group together material with different date ranges into assemblages that have meaning in human terms.</p> <p>For example, here are various maps showing some of the periods aggregated to produce our analysis of the Classical to Hellenistic period at our site:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488cdb24f970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="400" height="400" />Archaic-Classical Period</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488cdb25d970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="400" height="400" />Classical Period</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5ad9dbb970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="400" height="400" />ClassicalHellenistic Period</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5ad9ddc970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="400" height="400" />Classical-Roman Period</p>

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<p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488cdb27f970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="400" height="400" />Hellenistic Period</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5ad9df1970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="400" height="400" />Hellenistic-Early Roman Period</p> <p style="text-align: left;">To understand trends at our site from Classical to Hellenistic period, the data contained in each of these maps must be analyzed together.  Occupants at our site may have used coarse ware datable only to the Classical-Roman period alongside table wares dated more narrowly to the Classical period.  The Classical period table ware may have represented a households investment in public display, the same household may have stored their agricultural wealth in a series of amphoras that have forms and fabrics used for over 500 years.  To establish the potential spatial relationship between these two activities in an archaeological setting, it is necessary to plot artifacts assigned to different chronological ranges across our site in order to produce assemblages that reflect historical activities.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">This task is central to the analysis of artifact level survey data and is the key interpretive move in mediating between the results of archaeological work and historical events in the past.  Our goal as we work to prepare this kind of analysis for publication is to keep this interpretative move as transparent as possible.  Transparency, while sometimes tedious for the reader, opens our analysis for critique on both evidentiary and methodological grounds and reinforced the idea that archaeologists <em>produce</em> the landscape that they interpret.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 11/05/2010 09:24:02 AM ----BODY: <p>A lovely fall day here in Grand Forks, so here are a little gaggle of quick hits and varia:</p> <ul>

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<li>This is <a href="http://chronicle.com/article/Advising-theStruggling/125198/">a pretty nice little piece about advising graduate students</a>.</li> <li>This is <a href="http://interactive.nfb.ca/#/outmywindow/">a great interactive video project on life in the Global Highrise</a>.</li> <li>The <a href="http://nsse.iub.edu/html/annual_results.cfm">2010 National Survey of Student Engagement is out</a>.</li> <li>A <a href="http://projectinfolit.org/">nice report on how students evaluate research information</a>.</li> <li>The <a href="http://case.typepad.com/case_social_media/2010/10/northdakota.html">Univer sity of North Dakota and social media: A Soft Yes</a>.</li> <li>More<a href="http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology_and_learning/social_media_a nd_the_department"> social media at the departmental level</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.educause.edu/EDUCAUSE+Review/EDUCAUSEReviewMagazineVolume45/Str eamsofContentLimitedAttenti/213923">Even more on social media</a>.</li> <li>This is <a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/australia-v-sri-lanka2010/engine/current/match/446958.html">pretty depressing cricket</a> (at least from an Australian standpoint).</li> <li>What I'm reading: Laura Salah Nasrallah, <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/christian-responses-to-roman-art-andarchitecture-the-second-century-church-amid-the-spaces-ofempire/oclc/417444878"><em>Christian Responses to Roman Art and Culture</em></a>. Cambridge 2010 (via Dimitri Nakassis)</li> <li>What I'm listening to: Clinic, <em>Bubblegum</em> (via Kostis Kourelis)</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Thursday: The (Teaching) Revolution will not be Blogged STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: the-teaching-revolution-will-not-be-blogged CATEGORY: Teaching CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 11/04/2010 07:29:11 AM ----BODY: <p><em>X-posted to <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>.</em></p>

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<p><em>This blog post is an effort to understand the fairly lackadaisical interest in participating in the Teaching Thursday blog among my colleagues at the University of North Dakota.  It got me thinking about the nature of teaching conversations and whether they are suitable to a blog.</em></p> <p>Anyone who follows the happenings on the internets is probably familiar with Malcolm Gladwell's recent article in the October 4 <em>New Yorker</em>: "<a href="http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2010/10/04/101004fa_fact_gladwell?curre ntPage=1">Small Changer: Why the Revolution will not be Tweeted</a>".  In this article, he argued that the connections produced by such social media sites like Twitter and Facebook are "weak ties" which are unlikely to hold up to the kind of social pressures that real revolutionary action will both require and endure.  He begins his article with the students who participated in the revolutionary Greenboro sit-in of 1960 and noted that the four participants had deep social connections as roommates at North Carolina A &amp; T or as friends from highschool. These social connections, characterized by regular physical proximity to one another and a significant body of shared experiences, enabled these four brave students to have the confidence to imagine radical ideas and to maintain their resolve in the face of adversity.</p> <p>Other pundits, like Clay Shirky, have challenged the idea that such dedication is necessary to generate revolutionary change.  Shirky, particularly in his most recent book <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/cognitivesurplus-creativity-and-generosity-in-a-connected-age/oclc/466335766">Cognitive Surplus</a></em>, has argued that the internet and social media sites become conduits funneling myriad rivulets of surplus energies together making the great deluge of internet knowledge possible (manifest in sites like Wikipedia and The YouTubes).</p> <p>These two positions intersect with the mission of this blog.  The idea for this blog was to capture the hundreds of short (and long!), thoughtful, creative, conversations about teaching that go on weekly across campus into a central place.  The hope was that the blog could become an alternative source for stimulation for busy colleagues who missed <a href="http://webapp.und.edu/dept/oid/programsEvents/onTeachingLunchSeminars.php" >a great program offered by our Office of Instructional Development</a> or were not in the hallway at the second two colleagues were unpacking a tricky issue or did not have a moment to read the newest book that presents a new solution to the latest problem. Over the last three months, I extended this effort to Twitter once again trying to funnel energy and ideas from across campus into a single conduit.</p> <p>Follow us on Twitter at <a href="http://twitter.com/#!/OIDatUND">OIDatUND</a>!</p> <p>So far, the blog has had its moments, but they have been few and far between.  Over the last three months, I've been promised many, many blog posts, but always "in the spring semester" when, of course, the songbirds return, the snow melts, and other obligations drift away on the first warm, scented breeze.  I expect that some of these posts will come to enliven our blog, but even these contributions (which I know will be excellent), do not really represent even a fraction of the exciting conversations I have had about teaching.  Of course, we are all busy, all of the time, and finding time to write is a challenge.</p> <p>Having read Gladwell's article, I began to wonder whether the experiences of teaching actually resist blogging as a medium for communication. Perhaps this is because so much teaching on campus represents spontaneous responses to spontaneous issues.  Could it be that our day-to-day teaching activities - a troubled student, a particularly bad classroom experience, or a brilliantly successful assignment - all exist within such a complex matrix of variables that communicating how something succeeded or failed in writing would be either a

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monumental task unsuited to the limited medium of blogging or somehow impossible to articulate in a useful, generalized way?</p> <p>In saying this, I do not mean to suggest that understanding how to become a better teacher is impossible through public reflection -- obviously the research conducted by various academic departments in teaching and learning have both real practical value and a robust disciplinary tradition -- but to wonder whether many of us on campus do not think about teaching in a way that lends itself to even the modest structure of a blog post.  Teaching is an emotional experience full of frustration and excitement as we join the struggle to achieve goals that, in most case, are very difficult to articulate.  Of course, we can all enumerate formal learning objectives, classroom goals, content expectations, and the like, but I wonder whether these are the things that really motivate us as teachers.  For me, teaching is about realizing goals that extend far beyond the classroom.  These goals are resistant to clear quantitative or even qualitative evaluation and they often exist at the fringes of my ability of articulate them in a rational way at all.</p> <p>In short, maybe this blogging experiment reveals the limitations of media dependent on the kinds of "weak ties" that Gladwell assigns to Facebook friends and Twitter colleagues.  Face-to-face meetings, intimate seminars, conversations over strong beverages, and hallway insights depend upon the strong ties of shared experience to have value.  Extracted from that context, everything seems mundane and hardly stuff that matters.  The teaching revolution will not be blogged.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Book Reviews and the Blog: A Case Study STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: book-reviews-and-the-blog-a-case-study CATEGORY: Books CATEGORY: Late Antiquity CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 11/03/2010 06:31:10 AM ----BODY: <p>About 10 months ago, I blogged about Ann Marie Yasin's new(ish) book, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/saints-and-church-spaces-in-the-lateantique-mediterranean-architecture-cult-andcommunity/oclc/422764940&amp;referer=brief_results">Saints and Church Spaces in the Late Antique Mediterranean</a></em>.  I offered a quick review of it, mostly centered on a series of hastily composed observations.</p>!

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<p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/02/sa ints-and-church-spaces.html">Here's a link to that quick review</a>.</p>! <p>This summer, I was asked to review the book for real, in a print journal, one that appears in paper, and goes to libraries.  This is the first time that I was asked to review for real something I had already reviewed in the old blog.</p>! <p>Here's that review:</p>! <p><a style="margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sansserif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; display: block; text-decoration: underline;" title="View Yasin Review Oct2010 on Scribd" href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/40841124/Yasin-Review-Oct2010">Yasin Review Oct2010</a> ! <object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" width="100%" height="600">! <param name="movie" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" />! <param name="wmode" value="opaque" />! <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" />! <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" />! <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" />! <param name="FlashVars" value="document_id=40841124&amp;access_key=key217qla75xbrm3huuol9r&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" /> <embed id="doc_588026590882095" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="100%" height="600" src="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf?document_id=40841124&amp;access _key=key-217qla75xbrm3huuol9r&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" name="doc_588026590882095" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" wmode="opaque" bgcolor="#ffffff"></embed>! </object>! </p>! <p>For people who struggle to wrap their minds around the difference between a blog and a formal print publication, perhaps these two reviews will shine some light on the issue.  I think that there are subtle changes in style, content, and tone.  As I was writing my blog post, I considered my audience to be someone who might read the book one day.  When I wrote the print review, my audience became someone who was unlikely to read the book ever.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: David EMAIL: dpettegrew@messiah.edu IP: 153.42.40.246 URL: DATE: 11/04/2010 09:50:58 AM I was curious about your concluding comment here: "As I was writing my blog post, I considered my audience to be someone who might read the book one day.

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When I wrote the print review, my audience became someone who was unlikely to read the book ever." Why do you think your printed blog would not encourage anyone to read the book? ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 155.68.29.254 URL: http://kourelis.blogspot.com/ DATE: 11/04/2010 01:50:13 PM Somehow, I totally agree with the last statement. The printed book review genre has, in many ways, become the cheat sheet. I do this all the time. Blogging, on the other, hand has a different optimism. There is always an imagined next click. As a personal choice, blogging a book review gives it emotional credence. The print review, on the other hand, enters a different cultural medium. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Bill Caraher EMAIL: billcaraher@gmail.com IP: 134.129.192.180 URL: http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/ DATE: 11/04/2010 03:27:53 PM David,! ! I think what I mean is that if I bother to write about a book on my blog, I am implying that the book has interested or excited me in some way. A review for a journal is part of a larger scholarly project. I review books for academic journals with the assumption that my interest and excitement is personal and does not represent a universal attitude toward a work of scholarship.! ! Bill! ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Curt Emanuel EMAIL: cemanuel@purdue.edu IP: 75.205.132.11 URL: http://medievalhistorygeek.blogspot.com/ DATE: 11/06/2010 09:39:27 PM Academic reviews are pretty important to me when I'm considering whether to buy a book or not. In the case of Yasin, your blog comments interested me enough to recently seriously consider buying it (as you are an Academic in the field I felt this qualified as sufficient endorsement from someone qualified to make it). I have a pretty detailed method of determining what to buy - there are always more than I have reading time or money for. Academic reviews are an essential piece of that. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: A Comparison Between a Survey Assemblage and an Excavation Assemblage STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: a-comparison-between-a-survey-assemblage-and-an-excavation-assemblage

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CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 11/02/2010 07:14:04 AM ----BODY: <p></p> <p>For the past few months, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/ev en-more-experiments-in-intensive-pedestrian-survey.html">David Pettegrew and I have been "publishing" the preliminary results of some experimental analysis conducted over the past year</a> at the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">PylaKoutsopetria Archaeological Project on Cyprus</a>.&nbsp; As part of the experimental component to our project we were interested in documenting the relationship between the surface assemblage and the assemblage of material produced by excxavation <p>The archaeological fieldwork conducted on the elevated height of Vigla provided us with an opportunity to compare assemblages produced by intensive pedestrian survey and the excavation of a trench in the survey area. <p>Longstanding critiques of survey have suggested that the relationship between the surface assemblage and the subsurface material is too problematic for survey to be a technique used to produce a comprehensive view of the landscape. While it is true that there are more variables in the formation processes that impact the creation of a surface assemblage, we should be aware of the potential for a false dichotomy. Excavated assemblages are every bit as much a product of formation processes as those on the surface and as a result, we always have to temper our interpretation of past events with the understanding of the archaeological record as the product of a whole range of physical and cultural transformations. The goal of this comparison then is not to test the surface assemblage against the subsurface material, but rather to suggest that their correspondence indicates that the area may have endured similar archaeological processes. <p>As with all of our experimental units, the comparison is influenced by significant differences in the spatial comparison between the two sample areas. The surface area of our trench EU 8 represented only 6 sq meters; The two survey units 500 and 500.1 combined to covere over 6000 sq m. Any comparison of area, however, is problematic; the trench had volume and the relatively two-dimensional surface of the survey area did not. <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488a6ae55970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="SurveyAndExcavation" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488a6ae5b970c -pi" width="420" height="462"></a>&nbsp;&nbsp; </p> <p>The excavation unit produced significantly more ceramic material. The excavation unit produced over 4000 artifacts. By comparison, we counted anywhere from 366 to close to 1000 artifacts from our survey of various areas on the top of Vigla (depending on surface conditions and the number of walkers available), and these samples allowed us to estimate an overall artifact density of between 15,000 – 11,000 artifacts per ha. These are astronomical densities by any reckoning. <p>While we counted every artifact visible in our 20% sample of the surface, we collected artifacts using the chronotype sampling strategy which required us only to collect each unique type of sherd from each swath.&nbsp; Using this technique in two campaigns of field walking on Vigla, we collected 963 artifacts with a weight of 27.6 kg.&nbsp; In contrast, we collected and analyzed every artifact from the excavation area and this resulted in over 4000 artifacts, but this assemblage weighed less than 10 kgs more (37.0 kg) than the assemblage collected

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from survey. <p>The nature of the chronotype sampling method used in the survey makes it difficult to find a metric to compare the quantity of material collected from the survey against the quantity of material collected from excavated contexts. The key point for evaluating the correspondence between the two assemblages is not necessarily the quantities of material but rather the presence or absence of material indicating particular activity, periods, or material types present in the area. <p>Comparing the period date between the two collection strategies reveals that the survey collection produced more chronotype period categories (16 compared to 14) and nine of the periods represented in the survey assemblage were also represented in the excavation assemblage. In general, the survey material represented a longer chronological range with material from later periods present on the surface including material from the Late Roman, Medieval-Modern, and Modern periods. The excavated area, in contrast, produced more material from narrower periods and at least one object from a period earlier than those represented in the survey, a sherd potentially dating to the Bronze Age (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/10/br oad-period-artifacts-and-survey-analysis-quantifying-what-you-dontknow.html">for more on broad and narrow periods, see here</a>). This artifact appears to pre-date the earliest phases of architecture present in our trenches and may not represent a past activity on the site. In general, the material from both the survey and the excavation overlap, but the excavation material offered slightly more chronological resolution than the material from the survey. <p>The diversity of chronological periods in the survey material would appear to extend to the chronotypes represented in each unit. The excavation produced 54 chronotypes, while the survey unit produced 57. There are 30 overlapping chronotypes between the two collection methods. While the different sampling techniques make it difficult to compare the assemblages in a meaningful way, the quantity of material from each area nevertheless provides a very basic matrix for comparing the relative quantity of various types of material from each unit. The survey and excavation both produce a significant number of artifacts from the three rather general chronotypes: 'Coarse ware, ancient historic', 'medium coarse ware ancient historic', 'kitchen ware ancient historic'.&nbsp; The excavation also produced a significant proportion of material from two additional chronotype that were poorly represented in the surface assemblage: 'animal bone' and 'fineware, Hellenistic-Roman, Early' which made up 6.6% and 5.5% of the excavated material respectively, but less than 1% of the material from the survey. The absence of animal bone on the surface of the ground could be an issue with visibility (white and tan bones do not stand out as well against the buff colored soil) and certainly preservation.&nbsp; <p>It is notably harder to compare the potential range of activities present in the area. The chronotype method of collection privileges larger, better preserved sherds (walkers will often discard small or poorly preserved sherds if they find larger examples of the same chronotype). It also tends to under represent very common chronotypes in proportion to the total assemblage. In other words, there are fewer examples of chronotypes such as “medium coarse body sherd, ancient historic” in the survey sample in part because field walkers were instructed not collect multiple examples of this very common type of artifact. In the excavation, excavators collected every example of a “medium coarse body sherd ancient-historic” causing sherds of this type to make up a larger proportion of the total assemblage. <p>This tendency can be seen in the relative size of artifacts collected from the survey and excavation. From the survey, the collected artifacts were much larger and this probably reflects both our field walkers’ tendency to select larger sherds more frequently than smaller sherds for collection and the difficulty seeing the smallest sherds on the ground from

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a standing posture. These two tendencies combined to produce an average survey artifact weight almost 30 g as compared to the average size of an excavation sherd that was under 9 g. <p>The fabric groups present show some significant differences in the assemblage that we can largely trace to different sampling strategies. The survey unit preserved more coarse ware (47%) whereas the majority of material from the excavated unit was medium coarse ware. The weight of the two fabric groups as a percent of the total assemblage sheds more light on the situation. Medium Coarse wares from the excavation represented 53% by volume, but only 22% of the assemblage by weight. In fact, the average weight of a medium coarse ware sherd is less than 4 grams. In other words, many of the medium coarse fragments of pottery from the excavation are quite small, and these sherds are the most likely to be overlooked during survey. Cooking/kitchen ware, coarse ware, and amphora represented the other significant parts of the excavation assemblage. As the chart below indicates the percentage of weight is significantly different from the proportions determined by counts. In weight amphora and coarse wares combine to make up the majority of material. <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488a6ae6b970 c-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="image" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5865739970b -pi" width="400" height="180"></a> </p> <p>The material from survey shows different proportion, but these proportions are significantly biased by our sampling technique that suppressed the collection of redundant artifacts. <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5865748970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="image" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5865757970b -pi" width="400" height="170"></a> </p> <p>Coarse ware is the most common fabric group by quantity and makes up the majority of material by weight. Amphora sherds, which tended to be handles or very large body sherds, represent a massive quantity by weight, but significantly lower percentage by quantity. The opposite is true of medium coarse ware and kitchen/cooking ware. <p>Similar tendencies are visible from rim-base-handle-sherd analysis (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/so me-notes-on-rbhs-analysis-of-the-pyla-koutsopetria-survey-data.html">for more on R-B-H-S Analysis, see here</a>).&nbsp; <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488a6ae87970 c-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="image" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488a6ae95970c -pi" width="400" height="265"></a> </p> <p align="left">The results of this comparison suggest that for the height of Vigla the most major differences between the assemblage produced by survey and that produced by excavation are tied to the different sampling strategies used in these different contexts. At the same time, the basic patterns present in the survey assemblage were also present in the assemblage from the excavation.&nbsp; The presence of material from the Classical and Hellenistic period, the presence of fine ware, kitchen/cooking ware, and utility wares, and the almost complete absence of earlier material allows us to argue that the site was first occupied in the Archaic to Classical period, saw domestic activities, and then was used less intensively in later periods.&nbsp; This close correlation of survey and excavation assemblages reflects, in part, the stability of the soils on Vigla and the relative lack of erosion, on the one hand, and the lack of intensive

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activity during later periods, on the other.&nbsp; In other words, the surface assemblage and excavation assemblage enjoyed similar sets of formation processes which produced similar assemblages.&nbsp; </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Brief Review of CLIR and Tufts: Rome Wasn't Digitized in a Day: Building a Cyberinfrastructure for Digital Classics STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: brief-review-of-clir-and-tufts-rome-wasnt-digitized-in-a-day-buildinga-cyberinfrastructure-for-digital-classics CATEGORY: The New Media CATEGORY: Web/Tech DATE: 11/01/2010 07:32:07 AM ----BODY: <p>This weekend, I finally made it through t<a href="http://www.clir.org/activities/details/infrastructure.html">he most recent report on cyberinfrastructure and digital Classics</a>.  As the title of this post indicates, it was produced by the Council on Library and Information Resources and Tufts University, a longtime leader in the field of digital Classics.  The report is massive, running to over 250 pages, and gives a feeling of exhaustiveness.  The bulk of the report consists of a series of case-studies organized into the various allied- and sub-disiplines of Classics (Philology, Archaeology, Papyrology, Epigraphy, Prosopography, et c.).  For most case-studies there is abundant technical detail as well as some information on the guiding principals of the project, intended end-users, funding sources, and institutional affiliation. There is a pronounced emphasis on the core area of Classics and the analysis of texts of various kinds (inscribed, on papyrus, in edition, et c.), and with this emphasis on texts comes a corresponding emphasis on mark-up technology, collaborative editing, and various image-to-text initiatives like Greek and Latin OCR.  The report's scope, detail, organization and bibliography make it a must read for anyone interested in the work of digital humanities, digital Classics, or the future of the discipline Classics.  It is the type of report that any graduate student going on the job market should at least skim to become familiar with the basic terms, programs, and projects in the field of digital Classics.</p> <p>While I am hardly qualified to comment on the content of the report, a few things struck me as worth pointing out:</p> <p>1. New models of collaboration for new kinds of texts.  The most exciting thing about this report are the new perspectives on scholarly collaboration. At the center of these new perspectives are a set of new tools and collaborative

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environments which are designed to produce new kinds of texts.  In general, these texts are dynamic, multilayered, and designed to take into account both the work of numerous contributors. The next generation of scholarly editions, for example, will be increasingly transparent allow the end user to understand the processes that produced certain editorial decisions and, if necessary, filter the various editorial decisions to produce new versions of a text in keeping with new analytical, interpretative, or methodological positions. The same collaborative environment extends to epigraphy, papyrology, and even archaeology (in some way) where scholars have developed ways to work together to pool resources from around the world and to create new groups of texts. These new collections of texts are born digital, making specialized bodies of material (like epigraphical and papyrological corpora) more widely available, and more susceptible to re-analysis and re-interpretation.  The scalability of digital technology allows multiple scholars, a wide-range range of end-users, and diverse digital objects (texts, images, and interpretative methods) to all exist in the same place at the same time. These are new, transparent, and productive scholarly environments.</p> <p>2. Human infrastructure.  There is no doubt that the projects described in this report are exciting, but I felt that the report took the notion of cyberinfrastructure a bit too literally at times.  In places the projects described by the CRIL and Tufts teams stood strangely disembodied from larger social, institutional, and professional pressures and incentives. While the report made an obligatory mention of studies of scholarly collaboration, professional pressures, and potential end-users, I was not as easily able to grasp the creative environments from which these innovative programs sprung.  In particular, I struggled to identify the research questions or, more broadly, the scholarly discourse that inspired these new approaches to age old problems.  I recognize, of course, that large-scale digital initiatives often take into account a wide range of initiatives, research questions, and stake holders, but at the same time, scholarly collaborative while sometimes altruistic, rarely exists without some common research objectives. Moreover, these research objectives must exist in an environment where administrators, technical staff, and colleagues have the interests and the resources to promote and encourage innovation. The human infrastructure necessary to support cyber-infrastructure projects, to my mind, is far more crucial to their long-term health than the relatively ephemeral character of technical detail.  And this human infrastructure extends to how we teach students and the nature of academic and scholarly expectations. With more dynamic and robust tool available, it is curious that the willingness to avail oneself to these tools remains, to some extent, optional within the academic discourse. In other words, the eventual success of a digital infrastructure project will depend on the willingness of an editor, a peer reviewer, or a conference panel to expect a scholar to use a particular corpus of material.  The human infrastructure, then, represents a dense and complex web of knowledge, traditional practices, and support infrastructure that, to my mind, is far more important than the tools and vision at the root of a cyberinfrastructure project.</p> <p>3. The Social and New Media.  Another slight oversight in this comprehensive report is the absence of any real discussion of the role of the public backchannel in Classics cyberinfrastructure.  By digital backchannel I mean both blogs and the growing role of social media in stimulating discussion among scholars of the ancient world on topics both digital and traditional.  I am not one of those people who think that blogs are the new academic journals or who even press for new media spaces to carry substantial weight in tenure, promotion, or professional development decisions. On the other hand, I have argued that blogs occupy a novel and useful place in the expanding digital

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information ecosystem of Classics.  And bloggers and their blogs, like many other larger, more integrative digital infrastructure projects, have not come to terms with the tricky task of curating and preserving the huge quantity of analysis, discussion, and even knowledge produced through these new media.  With the growth of Twitter, Facebook, and other even more ephemeral social media portals the issue of curation has become even more tricky. If we imagine social and new media applications as playing a role in our digital future as scholars, then these outlets have to become part of the conversation of the digital future of the discipline.</p> <p>4. Mobile Futures.  Finally, I was surprised that mobil computing did not occupy a more significant place in this report.  If I understand the global trends in computing, the future is in mobile devices and applications. In fact, I read the report on my iPad. I do realize, of course, that some of the mobile computing "revolution" will involve us just doing on a mobile device what we've always done on a laptop or a desktop, but there is also a trend toward reimagining how we work and how we disseminate data over mobile devices.  As we look ahead, it seems clear to me that mobile devices, the cloud, and even greater degrees of integration and communication will produce new challenges for curation and new opportunities of realtime collaboration.</p> <p>As I said at the top, this report is a roadmap for anyone interested in the state-of-the-art in digital Classics and presents a brilliant case study for the impact of humanities computing in one field.  Any gaps or oversights, are incidental and tied more to the goals of the project than any shortcomings of the authors.</p> <p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 10/29/2010 09:17:54 AM ----BODY: <p>It finally feels like fall here.  Cold.  So some various varia and quick hits for a cool and cloudy Friday:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/archaeology/gigapan/niaux/?s ource=link_fb20101026caveart">A cool GigaPan of the Cave Art of Niaux</a>.  While you're GigaPaning, be sure to check out Scott "The GigaPanda" Moore's <a

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href="http://www.pkap.org/gigapan.html">GigaPans from the PylaKoutsopetria</a>.</li> <li>The good folks at the <a href="http://chnm.gmu.edu/">Center for History and the New Media</a> rolled out <a href="http://omeka.org/blog/2010/10/28/omekanet-beta-launches/">the beta test of Omeka.net yesterday</a>.  <a href="http://omeka.net/">Here's the page</a>.  <a href="http://sebastianheath.omeka.net/items">Sebastian Heath already has a page</a>.  We await his review!</li> <li>From the November 2010 issue of the American Historical Association's <em>Perspectives on History</em>: <a href="http://www.historians.org/Perspectives/issues/2010/1011/1011pro2.cfm">How is New Media Reshaping the Work of Historians?</a>.  And more on a similar theme with <a href="http://www.dancohen.org/2010/10/25/digital-history-at-the2011-aha-meeting/">the list of Digital History panels at the AHA Meeting in 2012</a>.</li> <li>Some pretty clever posts on a brand new blog called <a href="http://theaporetic.com/">The Aporetic</a>: <a href="http://theaporetic.com/?p=446">Googling Peer Review</a> and <a href="http://theaporetic.com/?p=701">Peer Review and the Public Sphere</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.rcet.org/geohistorian/">The Geohistorian</a> is a really cool place based history project.  Their really straight forward presentation "Using QR codes and mobile phones for learning" is the best of its kind that I've seen (<a href="http://www.rcet.org/research/presentations/eTech_2010_mcneal_qr.ppt">here' s a link to their powerpointer (.ppt)</a>)</li> <li><a href="http://www.xtranormal.com/watch/7451115/?ref=nf">This little video has gone viral (in certain circles)</a>.  It's not my favorite thing ever, but its a pretty clever take on the challenges facing anyone interested in getting a PhD in the humanities (although the people who seem to find it funniest, mostly have jobs).</li> <li><a href="http://www.acmi.net.au/AIC/TELSTRA_CONNECT.html">This is a pretty cool little article-like thing on early telecommunications in Australia</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304741404575564092478617462. html">Jay-Z in the </a><em><a href="http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304741404575564092478617462. html">Wall Street Journal</a></em>: the very fine line between "blowing up" and selling out. </li> <li><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/25/business/media/25carr.html?_r=4&amp;adxn nl=1&amp;adxnnlx=1288177551-c0e4+bbluT15BLIbqGpWrA">The Awl in the </a><em><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/25/business/media/25carr.html?_r=4&amp;adxn nl=1&amp;adxnnlx=1288177551-c0e4+bbluT15BLIbqGpWrA">New York Times</a></em>.  See previous bullet point.</li> <li><a href="http://blog.xplana.com/2010/10/recognize-the-inevitable-studenttechnology-use-e-books-and-apps/">More and more on student's use of eBooks and Apps</a>. </li> <li>This is pretty cool: <a href="http://bygdebok.library.und.edu/">Arne G. Breke Bygdebok Collection</a> (if you don't know what that means, it's not for you!)</li> <li>The American School of Classical Studies is <a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/news/newsDetails/videocast-graphicgreeks/">(1) videocasting their lecture series this year and (2) inviting cartoonists to speak</a>.  When I recorded a couple of presentations at the

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School for podcasting, there was interest, but some skepticism.  Now they have embraced the technology.  Imagine how much better a world we'll live in if scholars can't just give the same lecture over and over again, because they'll know it will be recorded and available for the public. </li> <li>What I'm listening to: The Clinic, <em>Internal Wrangler</em> and, in memory of Ari Up, The Slits, <em>Cut</em>. (both via my music consultant, Kostis Kourelis)</li> <li>What I'm reading: David Forgacs ed., <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/gramsci-reader-selected-writings-19161935/oclc/42953050">The Antonio Gramsci Reader</a></em>. (New York 2000).</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Assignments EMAIL: jennifer.park82@googlemail.com IP: 116.71.47.196 URL: http://www.mastersdissertation.co.uk/assignments_writing.htm DATE: 11/10/2010 04:10:33 AM I liked this post very much as it has helped me a lot in my research and is quite interesting as well. Thank you for sharing this information with us. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: A Defense of Asynchronous Teaching STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: a-defense-of-asynchronous-teaching CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 10/28/2010 06:29:38 AM ----BODY: <p>x-posted to <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>.</p> <p>Recently, I've been talking a good deal with one of my favorite interlocutors on teaching matters, <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/category/bretweber/">Bret Weber</a>.  He and I approach online teaching in different ways.  While I hesitate to speak for him, it seems to me that his online teaching emphasizes more cohort building, realtime interaction, and incremental assignments with set due dates.  This approach has suited his students, his teaching goals, and his program (<a href="http://www.und.edu/dept/socialwo/index.html">Social Work</a>) well.</p> <p>My approach to online teaching is almost the complete opposite.  When I first developed my idea for online teaching I wanted it be as experientially

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different from the classroom as possible.  I was probably overly strident in my efforts to establish this difference and romanced by change for the sake of change. Whatever the cause, I developed a radically asynchronous model for teaching my History 101: Western Civilization class.</p> <p>The class has 2 deadlines, and one of those deadlines is optional.  All work must be done by a date toward the end of the class so that I have some some time left to grade the inevitable onslaught of papers and assignments.  All the course material is available from the start of the class.  The only optional deadline is an optional midterm paper that, if the student decides to write it, is due at the mid point of the semester.  If a student opts out of this midterm paper, he or she must write a final exam paper that brings together all the content of the class.</p> <p>The lessons in the class are organized into 15 folders numbered for each week.  So students are guided to engage a body of material and assignments each week.  Each weekly folder includes readings, a quiz, a discussion board post, and, in many cases, one or two potential paper topics.  Along with the cumulative paper, students must write two other 3-5 page papers analyzing historical documents from the class. All the work from the all the weeks is due at the end of the semester.  In general, I grade two or three weeks at a time as assignments come in.  Assignments that come much later than two or three weeks behind the weekly folder inevitably get less attention, but the students know that I grade on schedule and give greater attention to work submitted in a regular and consistent way.  I use a Twitter feed and announcements to remind the students to keep up with the course and to let them know where I am in terms of grading material.</p> <p>This system has certain risks.  For example, I regularly write off the last two weeks of the semester to grade the papers from all the students who leave the work in the class to the last minute. These assignments tend to be, generally, of a lower quality, but the average grades for all assignments are not significantly lower than in my classroom classes where I tend to have more regimented deadlines.  It appears to be the case that this system probably leads some students to do more poorly on their papers which they leave to the last minute. On the other hand, it also appears that some some students do better than they would in a traditional synchronous course, and the students with better outcomes tend of offset the students who perform less consistently.</p> <p>Aside from the assessed results of the class, his system does offers some additional benefits as well:</p> <p>1. Flexibility for Students.  Teachers have always bemoaned the absence of face-to-face contact with students in an online environment.  My online classes have attracted students from around the world and across the country.  Face-toface time would be impossible with these students even leveraging all the technology available to maximize realtime communication in an online environment.  Moreover, many of my online students have lives that make regular schedules difficult.  Online teaching gives a student who works on oil pipelines and needs to be far from civilization for weeks on end, a way to begin a university education. To me this is a good thing, and an asynchronous course, particularly at the introductory level cultivates diversity in our classes and expands the democratizing aspects so close to the heart of higher-education.</p> <p>2. Flexible Engagement. One of the most challenging parts of creating a class schedule is attempting to address how different students will engage course material over the course of the semester.  For every assignment that some students master easily, other students, particularly in an introductory level course, will find challenging.  An asynchronous course allows students to engage material at their own pace and, moreover, allows different paces to exist

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in the class at the same time. It is interesting to see the natural divisions among students as small cohorts of students form and engage course materials at similar paces over the course of the semester. In a course of 70, about 10 students stay precisely on the weekly schedule, another 10 or so may fall the occasional week behind, and a third cohort of 10-15 students are never more than 2 weeks behind over the course of the semester.</p> <p>2. Flexible Assessment. One of the best things from a faculty standpoint of asynchronous teaching is that it restricts the bulk grading experience to one occasion at the end of the semester.  During the semester there is a constant trickle of two or three assignments a day.  I tend to assess assignments on a weekly basis and contribute to the online discussion board slightly more often. I find that grading the slow trickle of assignments over the course of the semester gives me far more time to make substantial comments on student work.  Moreover, it gives an advantage to students who can make reasonably consistent progress through the course.  I've found that even students with the most complex schedules rarely fall more than a couple weeks behind if they attend to the course in a serious way.  The half of the class that maintains a good schedule of engagement over the course of the semester tends to get the kind of substantial comments that allow their work to improve over the course of the semester.  Students who turn in all their work at the end of the semester do not get the same benefits as students who approach the course in a regular way.  They not only tend to get less sustained comments on their work, but also have less time to develop skills and improve on the skills introduced over the course of class.</p> <p>Asynchronous teaching is not a perfect system for all classes.  I might suggest that that it works best in larger, introductory level courses. It does little to accommodate  unmotivated or undisciplined student who can easily leave their work to the end of the semester or to set deadlines. My experiences has been, however, that these students tend to struggle in any learning environment and  the asynchronous system only exacerbates these issues.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Working Group in Digital and New Media Annual Report and Open House STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: working-group-in-digital-and-new-media-annual-report-and-open-house CATEGORY: North Dakotiana CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 10/27/2010 06:35:03 AM ----BODY:

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<p>On Thursday, the <a href="http://digitalgateway.und.edu/">Working Group in Digital and New Media</a> at the University of North Dakota will host its first open house and release to its various stake holders its first Annual Report.  The open house will run from 12-1 pm in the Working Group Lab 203 O'Kelly Hall. The open house and report seek to highlight the activities of the Working Group over their first year.  There is still a bunch of work to maximize the potential of this group, but there is momentum and opportunities for collaboration abound!</p> <p>Since readers of this blog participated in some way in the development of the Working Group (loyal readers probably remember these posts: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/12/th e-potential-and-role-of-digital-humanities-at-the-university-of-northdakota.html">Potential for Digital Humanities at UND</a>, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/01/di gital-humanities-white-paper-at-the-university-of-north-dakota.html">A Digital Humanities White Paper</a>, and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/10/se lling-the-working-group-in-digital-and-new-media.html">Selling the Working Group in Digital and New Media</a>), I thought it was fair to leak a version of our Annual Report on my blog.  The various members of the Working Group contributed to the Annual Report, I edited it, and <a href="http://joeljonientz.com/">Joel Jonientz</a> designed it.</p> <p>Here's the executive summary from the Annual Report:</p> <blockquote> <p>The Working Group in Digital and New Media emerged as the result of funding awarded from the President’s call for collaborative and transdisciplinary white papers in his New Initiative funding program. The Working Group is dedicated to the support and development of digital and new media projects across the disciplines on campus. Beginning in the spring of 2009, the Working Group has created a laboratory space uniquely suited to collaborative digital and new projects developed across campus. To date these projects have brought together contributors from the departments of Art and Design, Music, History, English, and Computer Science, as well as the Chester Fritz Library and the ITSS High Performance Computing Cluster. Faculty and students have produced a dynamic and diverse group of projects ranging from video shorts, musical compositions, to online and gallery museum exhibitions and collections, and blogs. Statistically, the Working Group projects accounted for over 2500 person/hours of work, over 15 faculty and student collaborators, and close to 20 major creative and research projects. The Working Group created the intellectual and technological infrastructure necessary for over $35,000 of internal and external grants in its first year alone. In the hyper-competitive realm of non-STEM funding, the collaborative infrastructure Working Group in Digital and New Media gives faculty in the arts and humanities a significant edge. The transdisciplinary research, creative activities, and teaching of the Working Group’s members will continue to leverage the common space of the Working Group Laboratory to expand collaborative research and creative activities on campus.</p> </blockquote> <p>And here is the Annual Report:</p> <p><a style="margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sansserif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; display: block; text-decoration: underline;" title="View WGDNM Annual Report on Scribd" href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/40227454/WGDNM-Annual-Report">WGDNM Annual Report</a>

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<object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" width="100%" height="600"> <param name="movie" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" /> <param name="wmode" value="opaque" /> <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="document_id=40227454&amp;access_key=key2lixczx02gfz8g1mqdlz&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" /> <embed id="doc_217106899147268" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="100%" height="600" src="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf?document_id=40227454&amp;access _key=key-2lixczx02gfz8g1mqdlz&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" name="doc_217106899147268" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" wmode="opaque" bgcolor="#ffffff"></embed> </object> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Hesperia, Offprints, and the American School STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: hesperia-offprints-and-the-american-school CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Notes From Athens DATE: 10/26/2010 07:07:07 AM ----BODY: <p>Yesterday I had one of those little thought-provoking coincidences that make you wonder about how things could be done better.</p> <p>At 11:44 am I got an email from the American School of Classical Studies publication office concerning our soon-to-be-published article on fortification around Ano Vayia.  Our article will appear in the next issue of the <a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/publications/hesperia">American School's journal, </a><em><a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/publications/hesperia">Hesperia</a>. </em>The email asked us where we would like our 50 complimentary offprints sent and whether we wanted to purchase 50 more for $150. Hesperia offprints are really lovely things. They are stapled, on high quality paper, impeccably edited, stylish in design, and include a nice, glossy cover.  In short, the $150 price for 50 does not seem unreasonable.</p>

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<p>At 1:45 pm that same day I received a form-email from Jack Davis, the Director of the<a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/"> American School of Classical Studies</a>. It was their annual fund-raising email.  The American School of Classical Studies at Athens is one of my favorite things in the world.  The institution played a key role in anything that is good about my professional development and no matter how long I am away, still has the feeling of a homeaway-from-home. I have benefited three times over from their generous fellowships and these fellowships have led to my dissertation and numerous publications. I have come to appreciation the American School for its awkward and paradoxical blend of things traditional and things contemporary and "modern". By not shying away from some of the most traditional aspects of a classical education (e.g. the flavor of the Grand Tour that pervades the <a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/programs/academic">Regular Program</a>), the School encourages students to reflect on the practices and institutions that have created the disciplines of Classics, Classical Archaeology, Ancient History, et c.  Because of these things, I am in the habit of giving money to the American School.  I can't give much as an Assistant Professor at a state school in North Dakota, but I give my proverbial widow's mite.</p> <p>Back to the coincidence: In the same day, within hours, the same institution that was asking for money also offered me that very day something for free.  This got me to think: what if we as contributors to <em>Hesperia</em> just turned down our offprints?  Now, I recognize that the circulation of offprints continues to play a small role in the "academic gift economy".  But, as I began to try to make a mental list of people to whom I'd like to send offprints, I was counting far fewer than 50 individuals.  Moreover, many of the people on that list would probably just as soon have a digital offprint (a handsomely formatted .pdf file) suitably disgraced with some personal note of thanks. The digital offprints of Hesperia are every bit as high quality as the print offprints with good resolution on photographs and searchable text.  Moreover, of the handful of people to whom I'd send offprints, almost all of them have access to <em>Hesperia</em>.  Less than a month ago I had a conversation with a resolutely "olde skool" American School type and offered to send him an offprint of my forthcoming article. He smiled, thanked me, and said, that he subscribes to <em>Hesperia</em>. (I knew this, of course, but apparently even among the "olde skool" the ritual component of offprint exchange had fallen into disuse.)</p> <p>All the same, I can anticipate some people saying that some individuals still keep paper offprint files and some of our European colleagues take the circulation of paper offprints quite seriously and some offprints serve as valuable contributions to small, highly specialized and underfunded libraries (say at the local office of the archaeological service).  The high quality of a <em>Hesperia</em> offprint makes them almost something of intrinsic value.</p> <p>On the other hand, I am pretty sure (although I won't admit to doing this) that we can still print out a copy of a <em>Hesperia</em> article, scrawl some heartfelt note of thanks of the first page, and present it to a colleague as a token of thanks.  Maybe this violates copyright?  I'm really not sure, but I can hardly imagine this to be the kind of practice that the International Copyright Police would enforce, and it would guess that it would be possible for <em>Hesperia</em> to give authors permission to reproduce a certain number of copies of their own articles. (Although it would be awesome to be approached by a neatly dressed Nigerian man outside the Agora in Athens with a stack of slightly blurry photocopied <em>Hesperia</em> offprints...).</p> <p>One more thing, <em>Hesperia</em> offers to let us purchase another 50 offprints for $150. Since <em>Hesperia</em> articles tend toward the long side, I assume that this price represents the average cost of printing 50 offprints,

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perhaps with some small compensation of watering down the copyright (in other words, perhaps they factor in that some people will receive an offprint and will decide not to purchase the journal, but I can't imagine that this represents a very large group).  Last year, Hesperia published 17 articles and if $150 is the average cost of a run of offprints, then they spent about $2550 on offprints.</p> <p>If every contributor over a year just said, politely, no thank you to offprints from <em>Hesperia</em>, we could, in effect, give the American School Publication Office a gift of $2500. I suspect that each of us would have to turn down all of our offprints because printing enjoys really significant economies of scale, and it seems fair to assume that these economies are realized at 50 copies of each article. I know some contributors will still want to "kick it olde skool" and will want to have their shinny <em>Hesperia</em> offprints, but I also suspect that, if given the option explicitly, a percentage of hipper, new skool contributors would turn ours down.  And I'd like to think that <em>Hesperia </em>and the American School would appreciate this little gift.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Chuck Jones EMAIL: chuck.jones@nyu.edu IP: 128.122.167.92 URL: http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.com DATE: 10/26/2010 08:41:48 AM Hmmm. Take it one step further Bill. What if each author was offered the opportunity to donate the $150 per offprint batch to a fund to subsidize the distribution of subscriptions (or e-access) to/in underfunded libraries (say at the local office of the archaeological service) - that would be 51 more copies of complete issues in the hands of people who need and use the journal on a continuing basis. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.192.180 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 10/26/2010 08:54:06 AM Chuck, I love the idea! I remember an old program on an airline (which probably went under) where you could donate your free upgrade to someone who was critically ill and needed to travel. Same kind of thing. Bill ----COMMENT:

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AUTHOR: Andrew Reinhard EMAIL: areinhard@ascsa.org IP: 71.168.218.10 URL: DATE: 10/26/2010 11:09:49 AM Hi, Bill, Thanks for a great post today. I am circulating it around the Publications office here in Princeton for comment. Chuck, that's also a good idea. Let me talk to Jack and to PubComm about this. Keep those ideas coming! I appreciate them. Andrew Reinhard ASCSA Director of Publications ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.192.180 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 10/26/2010 11:11:30 AM Andrew, Thanks for the note! Bill ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Tracey Cullen EMAIL: tcullen@ascsa.org IP: 71.168.218.10 URL: DATE: 10/26/2010 03:34:56 PM Bill (and Chuck), Thanks very much for these good ideas (and Bill especially for saying such nice things about the journal). I've always been a big believer in printed offprints-for advertising not only the author's work, but ours as well--hoping to attract more submissions this way. But saving (or donating) money, and sending out PDF offprints only--both good ideas. I just talked to our press, and they report that offprint orders overall have declined over the past year--and I have noticed that many fewer authors want the extra 50 Hesperia offprints (but no one--other than Bill!--has yet declined the free 50). The printed offprint with the shiny cover is still probably nice to give to "the authorities" when working overseas--but otherwise, a PDF would surely suffice. And save some trees as well. Anyway, thank you both. Tracey ----COMMENT:

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AUTHOR: David EMAIL: dpettegrew@messiah.edu IP: 74.99.148.10 URL: DATE: 10/26/2010 08:19:58 PM Excellent post, Bill. Tracey and Andrew, what about a box asking authors how many offprints they would like? Our department uses offprints for the display cases and the 'author day' at the end of the year. But I don't often send them out to people anymore when I have PDFs available. If I had the option of 5 offprints, that would probably be enough for my purposes. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Tracey EMAIL: tcullen@ascsa.org IP: 71.168.218.10 URL: DATE: 10/27/2010 03:38:05 PM This is a good idea, and easily enough done. The offprints are created by the press overrunning the print run -- so if you wanted 5, David, and others in the issue wanted 50, the press would still run 50 extra copies, chop off the spines, and throw out the ones not requested. So this approach wouldn't save many trees. But it would definitely save us the cost of labor in assembling and stapling offprints. Jane Carter just wrote to say she thought nice glossy offprints with covers like we produce have become akin to white gloves in church. Maybe not the cutting-edge image we want! -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: David Pettegrew's Setting Stage for St. Paul's Corinth Available as Podcast or Streaming Video STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: david-pettegrews-setting-stage-for-st-pauls-corinth-available-aspodcast-or-streaming-video CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: David Pettegrew CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: Late Antiquity CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 10/25/2010 07:02:42 AM

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----BODY: <p>For those of you who could not make it to the David Pettegrew's 2nd Annual Cyprus Research Fund Lecture, fear not!  We have made David's lecture available as both a downloadable podcast and as a streaming video.</p> <p><a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/CyprusResearchFund/Pettegrew Setting the Stage.mp3">Here's the podcast</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://conted.breeze.und.nodak.edu/p11229350/">Here's the video</a>.</p> <p>David's two days on campus were really exciting.  Not only did he speak to over 50 faculty,undergraduates, graduate students, and members of the community on the Thursday afternoon talk, but he also contributed to the history department's "brown bag" lecture series on Friday.  At his Friday talk, he presented a great primer to intensive survey archaeology and discussed the ideas of "source criticism" as applied to ancient material culture.  Finally, David took a couple of hours and read Latin with some of our graduate students and undergraduates at our weekly "Latin Friday Morning" reading group.</p> <p>It is always gratifying to see how much interest there is in the Ancient Mediterranean at the University of North Dakota.  So, if you enjoyed the lecture with here at UND, thanks for coming out! And if you enjoy the lecture via the streaming video or podcast, thanks for listening!  I also should thank Chad Bushy and Caleb Holthusen from UND's <a href="http://cilt.und.edu/index.html">Center for Instructional and Learning Technologies </a>office for not only preparing the video and podcasts, but trouble shooting during the live webcast.</p> <p>And, finally, thanks to David Pettegrew for agreeing to spend his fall break with us at the University of North Dakota. For more on his research and the Roman and Late Roman Corinthia, check out his blog <a href="http://corinthianmatters.com/">Corinthian Matters</a>.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Archaeology Excavations EMAIL: archaeologyexcavations@gmail.com IP: 122.164.139.213 URL: http://archaeologyexcavations.blogspot.com DATE: 10/26/2010 02:45:45 AM Respected Bill Caraher, I found your great archaeology resource <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com">http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.c om</a> Great Work excellent presentations. I like very much very much. I have more interesting in archaeology. i have two archaeology resource site.

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Please Welcome Our archaeology site 1) <a href="http://www.greatarchaeology.com">http://www.greatarchaeology.com</a> 2) <a href="http://archaeologyexcavations.blogspot.com">http://archaeologyexcavations. blogspot.com</a> If you link our site please enter your comments and please provide our site url from your great archaeology site resource. Thank You, Regards, archaeology excavations -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Local Wildlife STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: local-wildlife CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes CATEGORY: North Dakotiana DATE: 10/24/2010 12:21:56 PM ----BODY: <p>A cute little woodpecker feasting on whatever he was finding in the trees in our windbreak.  My wife took the photos.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Woodpeckler1.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f54f63de970b -pi" border="0" alt="Woodpeckler1.jpg" width="600" height="600" /></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Woodpeckler2.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f54f63f6970b -pi" border="0" alt="Woodpeckler2.jpg" width="600" height="600" /></p> <p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William

Caraher

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TITLE: Some Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: some-friday-quick-hits-and-varia CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 10/22/2010 09:55:13 AM ----BODY: <p>Just a quick gaggle of quick hits and varia on a sunny Friday morning:</p> <ul> <li>Yesterday's Cyprus Research Fund talk was well attended.  Over 50 interested students, colleagues, and members of the community showed up for David Pettegrew's talk: Setting the Stage for St. Paul's Corinth: How an Isthmus determined the maritime character of an ancient landscape.  If you missed it, <a href="http://conted.breeze.und.nodak.edu/p11229350/">you can watch the presentation here</a>.  And before too long we'll have the lecture up as an mp3 podcast.</li> <li>David directed to me his colleague, <a href="http://www.philipvickersfithian.com/">John Fea's blog: The Way of Improvement Leads Home</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.functionalfate.org/archives/2010/08/18/reasonableviolence/">Dimitri Nakassis got some blog-press</a> a while back venting his wrath while modifying the function of a plastic chair.</li> <li>I know this poem has made the rounds for years, but <a href="http://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/013.html">it's worth linking to again</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://nowviskie.org/2010/eternal-september-of-the-digitalhumanities/">Some interesting thoughts on Digital Humanities</a>.</li> <li>The Council on Library and Information Resources and Tufts has produced an impressive report on the state of Digital classics:  <a href="http://networkedblogs.com/9srkS">Rome Wasn't Digitized in a Day: Building a Cyberinfrastructure for Digital Classicists</a>.  I haven't processed it, but it looks like an amazing compendium of digital humanities projects and initiatives.  <a href="http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.com/2010/10/requestfor-comment-rome-wasnt.html">They are looking for comments apparently</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/4-Very-Different-FuturesAre/125011/">Some different views </a>of the research library of the future.</li> <li>And<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/10/17/magazine/17FOB-medium-t.html"> some more thoughts on E-readers</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.paphostheatre.com/paphos-theatre-educationblog.html">Another interesting archaeology blog from the University of Sydney's Excavations at the Paphos Theatre, Cyprus</a>. </li> <li>There is something profound about the <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x4o-TeMHys0">Rent is Too Damn High Party</a>.</li> <li>What I'm reading: George Jackson, Soledad Brother: The Prison Letters of George Jackson. (New York 1970).</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY:

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----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: David Pettegrew on Corinth! Live on the Interwebs! STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: david-pettegrew-on-corinth-live-on-the-interwebs CATEGORY: David Pettegrew CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 10/21/2010 08:09:46 AM ----BODY: <p>Join us today for the 2010 Cyprus Research Fund Lecture: David Pettegrew's "Setting the Stage for St. Paul's Corinth: How the Isthmus Determined the Character of a Roman City."  The talk is at 4 pm today in the East Asia Room of the Chester Fritz Library.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f53d0586970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="463" height="600" /></p> <p>If you're not from Grand Forks, FEAR NOT!  We'll also stream David's talk for free on the interwebs!  <a href="http://conted.breeze.und.nodak.edu/cyprus/">Here's the link</a>.  Just log in a guest.  If you're watching remotely and have a question for David, just Tweet it to me.  <a href="http://twitter.com/billcaraher">Here's my Twitter account</a> (@billcaraher) and use the hashtag: #CRF2010 at the end of your post.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: North Dakota's Joseph Kennedy and Psychical Research STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: north-dakotas-joseph-kennedy-and-psychical-research CATEGORY: North Dakotiana

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DATE: 10/20/2010 07:12:24 AM ----BODY: <p>Yesterday my History 240 class spent the afternoon at the <a href="http://www.library.und.edu/Collections/">Elywn B. Robinson Department of Special Collections</a>.  This is always a good time for me because not only do I get to enjoy the University Archivist, <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/09/09/a-note-from-the-archives-planningan-archival-field-trip/">Curt Hanson's, sense of humor</a>, but I also get to root around in special collections.  Yesterday, I decided to read <a href="http://www.library.und.edu/dept/library/Collections/og1289.html">a Merrifield Award Winning Essay</a> by a former Department of History Doctor of the Arts student, <a href="http://www.trinitybiblecollege.edu/directory/faculty/smith/ken">Ken Smith</a> who now teaches at <a href="http://www.trinitybiblecollege.edu/">Trinity Bible College</a> in Ellendale, ND.  I had a chance to meet Ken at the Northern Great Plains History Conference last week, and our brief chat reminded me to check out his essay.</p> <p>The essay is entitled: "UND's Joseph Kennedy and the Allure of Psychical Research", and it provides a fascinating (and creepy!) insight into the early 20th century interest in psychic and paranormal research. <a href="http://www.library.und.edu/Collections/og28.html">Kennedy</a> was a member of the "second Merrifield Faculty" who was hired during Webster Merrifield's term as university president in 1892. He followed Horace B. Woodworth as the main faculty member responsible for teaching philosophy and education and in 1901 he became the Dean of the Normal College. He remained in this position until his retirement in 1928.  While his primary area of expertise was education - particularly secondary and rural education, he was influenced heavily by the psychological and philosophical works of William James.</p> <p>According to Smith's work, Kennedy's interest in James paved the way for his critical interest in psychical research.  This interest culminated with a visit to Dr. James H. Hyslop in Boston.  Hyslop was the director of the American Society of Psychical Research which was a group founded by Richard Hodgson who was a colleague and correspondent of William James.  During Kennedy's visit to Boston, Hyslop arranged for him to meet with a medium named "Mrs. Chenowith" who apparently sought to contact Kennedy's family and friends who had passed to the other side. Unlike many mediums of her day, Mrs. Chenowith wrote out the messages that she received from the other side.</p> <p>Apparently the messages that Mrs. Chenowith communicated to Kennedy exist in the UND archives, although I have not yet had a chance to find them.  Kennedy struggled to understand and interpret the messages and initiated an almost two decade correspondence with Hyslop in the process.  As Smith points out, the correspondence, while always cordial, were not without tension.  Kennedy found the work of the medium unconvincing and Hyslop was not necessary amendable to that interpretation.</p> <p>Kennedy remained critically agnostic about the possibilities of parapsychological and spiritual phenomena his entire life.  He was open to the ideas enough to conduct his own research, but critical enough to probe ideas and occurrences quite deeply. Smith, for example, recounts an episode when Raymond Hitchcock, a professor of Mathematics, sought Kennedy out to analyze a lucid dream.  In the dream, Hitchcock saw a home that he then encountered in real life some time later. Kennedy resisted the temptation to attribute the <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/10/st -augustine-and-dreams.html">dream</a> to psychical phenomena attributing it

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instead to the power of the unconscious mind (although he stopped short of seeing the dream as an expression of an unfulfilled wish in a Freudian sense).</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: St. Augustine and Dreams STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: st-augustine-and-dreams CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 10/19/2010 06:56:15 AM ----BODY: <p>Long-time readers of this blog know that I have an interest in dreams and their role in archaeology, although that interest might not be very evident lately.  So after spending the better part of two weeks pouring over survey data from the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project</a>, I took about an hour to follow up on a citation that I culled from Ann Marie Yasin's recent book to St. Augustine's <em>De cura pro mortuis gerenda</em> (On the Care of the Dead).  The text is a letter that St. Augustine wrote to St. Paulinus of Nola about whether there was any benefit to be buried near the body or memorial of a saint.  Augustine takes this opportunity to articulate a criticism of ad sanctus burials (burials near the graves of holy people, particularly martyrs) which he then expands to a general critique of claims that the dead influence the world of the living.</p> <p>This is where dreams come in.  Augustine shows some concern for the stories in which dead people appear to the living particularly when their bodies are not buried properly.  Augustine, of course, knows that by challenging the authority of these kinds of visions, he runs the risk of criticizing widely held beliefs promulgated in the "writings of certain faithful men" (12).  Augustine makes clear later in the text that, among many possible episodes in Early Christian writing, he is referring here to St. Ambrose's claim (<em>Epist</em>. 20.1-2) that visions (or dreams) prompted him to discover the bodies of Sts. Gervasius and Protasius in Milan (21).</p> <p>The crux of St. Augustine's argument is not whether saints or the dead appear to people, but whether they are aware that they are appearing to people or appear to people in their sleep voluntarily. He argues that the dead do not have any knowledge of this in the same way that the living are unaware when they appear in someone's dream.  Augustine further proves his point by arguing that pious men sometimes appear in dreams and do bad things.  At the same time, pious people, like his own late mother, would certainly appear to the living

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when they were troubled or upset, if they could, indeed, influence the world of the living.</p> <p>It seems that this text dates to the early 420s and continues a North African inclination against the authority of visions and dreams directing the faithful to the locations of buried saints.  As early as the Council of Carthage in 401 the church rejected the practice of <em>inventio per somnia</em> (<em>discovery through sleep</em>).</p> <p>For more on this text, see:</p> <p>A. M. Yasin, <em>Saints and Church Spaces in the Late Antique Mediterranean</em>. (Cambridge 2009), 212-222.<br />D. Trout, <em>Paulinus of Nola</em>. (Berkeley 1999), 244-247.<br />H. Kotila, <em>Memoria Mortuorum: Commemoration of the Departed in Augustine</em>. (Rome 1992).<br />Y. Duval, <em>Auprès des saints corps et âme. L'inhumation « ad sanctos » dans la chrétienté d'Orient et d'Occident du IIIe siècle au VIIe siècle</em>. (Paris 1988).</p> <p> <p>For more on Dream Archaeology without leaving the comfortable informality of the blog, see below:</p> <p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/an other-better-attempt-at-dream-archaeology.html">Another, Better Attempt at Dream Archaeology</a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/dr eams-in-ravenna.htm"><br />Dreams in Ravenna<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/11/dr eam-archaeology-in-the-early-christian-west.html">Dream Archaeology in the Early Christian West<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/10/mo re-dreams-rel.html">Blindness, Dreams, and Relics<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/10/mo re-dreams-rel.html">More Dreams, Religion, and Archaeology<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/10/mo re-byzantine.html">More Byzantine Dreams...<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/10/dr eams-pausania.html">Dreams, Pausanias, and Archaeology<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/03/dr eams-inventio.html">Dreams, Inventio, and Archaeology<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2007/09/ko zani.html">Kozani</a></p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: David Pettegrew EMAIL: dpettegrew@messiah.edu IP: 153.42.40.246 URL:

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DATE: 12/06/2010 01:48:55 PM Fun post, Bill. Doesn't Augustine distinguish in this essay the role of saints vs. the role of the ordinary Christian dead? (I may be misremembering). He discusses some very interesting cases involving dreams. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Broad Period Artifacts and Survey Analysis: Quantifying what you don't know STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: broad-period-artifacts-and-survey-analysis-quantifying-what-you-dontknow CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 10/18/2010 07:14:23 AM ----BODY: <p>By far the most vexing issues facing most survey projects is the analysis of artifacts datable only to very broad periods of time (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/10/st ones-that-speak-and-some-other-data-from-the-pyla-koutsopetria-archaeologicalproject.html">a point I brought up in my blog post from last week</a>).&nbsp; In the work of the Pyla-Koustopetria Archaeological Project, these artifacts are the equivalent to objects of "unknown date" from other survey projects.&nbsp; The chronotype identification system required our ceramicist to date each artifact even if these dates are exceedingly broad.&nbsp; As a result, we have significant quantities of artifacts dated to periods that exceed 1000 years in length. These broad periods tend to represent two types of artifacts.&nbsp; </p> <ol> <li>Artifacts that do not fit into any known typology such as body sherds without particularly characteristic marks, fabrics, or shapes.</li> <li>Artifact types that remained in use for long periods of time.&nbsp; This is most often the case with various kinds of coarse and medium coarse utilities wares probably produced from local fabrics.</li></ol> <p>In some cases, the fabrics or shapes can tell use enough to allow us to group the artifact into a relatively welldefined, yet still exceedingly broad, date range.&nbsp; For example, the most common period for an artifact dated to a broad period is "Ancient Historic".&nbsp; This is a date range that extends across the entire period of historical antiquity on the island of Cyprus: 750 BC - AD 750.&nbsp; Almost all of these sherds (89%) are body sherds. The artifacts datable to this period appear over 77% of the total area of our survey and in 84% of the units where artifacts occur.&nbsp; Statistically, the distribution of "Ancient Historic" artifacts correlates more closely to the overall artifact densities across the entire study area than any other period, broad or narrow (the correlation is .674).&nbsp; This is particularly significant because artifact counts and the number of artifacts assigned to a particular period are independent variables: our artifact counts are based on the total number of artifacts visible on the ground according to clicker counts and the number artifacts dated to a particular period is a subset of the number of artifacts sampled from the units.&nbsp; Finally, the fabric types present in Ancient-Historic period more

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or less parallel the fabric groups present in narrower, better-known, or at least more clearly defined periods (e.g. Classical or Classical-Hellenistic). For the Koutsopetria plain, for example, "Ancient Historic" material appears as coarse ware, medium coarse ware, and kitchen/cooking ware which finds rough parallels with the groups of material present from other periods and the general functional character of the area (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/10/pr eliminary-analysis-of-pyla-koustopetria-archaeological-data-or-thinking-outloud-3.html">for those of you keeping track at home, we call the Koutsopetria plain Zone 1</a>)</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f5288654970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Ancient_Historic_Material" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f528865e970b -pi" width="454" height="502"></a> </p> <p>Other broad periods from our site represent small quantities of obscure material that stands outside traditional typologies.&nbsp; For example, there are only two sherds assigned to two chronotypes dated to the Ceramic Age (a Red Micaceous Pithos and coarse ware). Only four sherds assigned to four chronotypes received the generic Ancient date (Ancient Lekane, fineware, kitchen ware, medium coarse ware). Only one chronotype, amphoras, receive the designation Post-Prehistoric.</p> <p>In old days of survey, sherds dated to broad periods tended to be neglected either at the analysis phase, or more commonly at the sampling and collection phase.&nbsp; The vast majority of broad period sherds are body sherds (85%) and most of these would not appear to be diagnostic. As a result many traditional collection strategies that privileged diagnostic sherds (feature sherds with distinct marks, rims, handles, bases) would have overlooked broad period material. More recent work has at least assigned the designation of "unknown date" to these broad period artifacts, but rarely do they appear documented in the survey publication.</p> <p>This material is difficult to correlate with past human activities. At best, it reinforces the notion that certain types of productive practices may have endured for long periods of time without much in the way of visible changing.&nbsp; It suggests that certain vessel shapes, fabrics, and pottery categories may have continued to serve basic functions within the community, the household, and the economy for long periods of time as well. In Braudelian terms, the apparently long, slow, and relatively unchanging character of such a large part of our ceramic assemblage represents the slow swells of the sea.&nbsp; The more closely dated and rapidly changing character of fine wares or even the more diagnostic parts of the vessel , for example, which tend to allow us to produce our narrow period assemblages, show the more fickle and rapidly changing nature of ancient ceramic habits. </p> <p>The value then of our effort to understand the distribution and character of artifacts datable to broad periods from PKAP is that they give us a real measure of how much we do not know about material from our survey area.&nbsp; And at the same time, reveal that much of the most basic practices typical of the ancient world likewise continues to elude our grasp.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS:

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-----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: wysiwyg ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia-1 CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 10/15/2010 06:47:57 AM ----BODY: <p>It right around freezing this morning, so fall must really have arrived after positively balmy temperatures earlier in the week. &#0160;So, some quick hits and varia on a crisp Friday morning:</p>! <ul>! <li>If you have some time today be sure to check out the <a href="http://www.und.edu/org/greatplains/">Northern Great Plains History Conference</a> taking place here in Grand Forks and hosted the University of North Dakota.</li>! <li>And next week, if you&#39;re in the community here, I urge you to come and hear the incomparable David Pettegrew speak on <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/20 10-cyprus-research-fund-lecture-setting-the-stage-for-st-paulscorinth.html">Setting the Stage for St. Paul&#39;s Corinth: How an Isthmus Determined the Character of a Roman City</a>. &#0160;David will be the 2nd Annual Cyprus Research Fund lecturer.</li>! <li>Two new blogs: First, <a href="http://mybyzantine.wordpress.com/">a new popular blog on Byzantium</a> subtitled: &quot;making Byzantium alive for people today&quot; continues the remarkable new trend in pop-Byzantine history. It&#39;s a great blog that is far more informative and careful than sensational. &#0160;The same author also has <a href="http://patrickleighfermor.wordpress.com/">a nice blog on life, work, and friends of Patrick Leigh Fermor</a> whom the author asserts as the &quot;Greatest Living Englishman&quot;. &#0160;For those who don&#39;t know, Fermor is an influential 20th century travel writer, observer, and in many ways participant in Greek history.</li>! <li>The Oxford Centre for Late Antquity will have a colloquium next month on &quot;<a href="http://researchnewsinla.blogspot.com/2010/10/carnival-and-cultfrom-caesar-to.html">Carnival and Cult from Caesar to Chrysostom</a>&quot;. &#0160;When I was working on my dissertation, I was dismayed to find how little there was on festivals associated with Early Christian holy days, sacred spots, and architecture. &#0160;So it&#39;s great to a see a colloquium taking up this topic.</li>! <li>Does anyone use<a href="http://mailplaneapp.com/"> Mailplane</a>? &#0160;Is it worth the $25? </li>! <li>On Monday, I offered a response to a post by Edward Blum:&#0160;Ôªø&quot;<a href="http://usreligion.blogspot.com/2010/09/academic-blogging-somereservations-and.html">Academic Blogging: Some Reservations and Lessons</a>&quot;. &#0160;I wasn&#39;t the only one. &#0160;<a href="http://mcconeghy.wordpress.com/2010/09/28/should-i-blog/">Here&#39;s a nice response</a> by David McConeghy at his blog, A Lively Experiment. &#0160;He makes the great observation that with many graduate students today this

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isn&#39;t the case of academics becoming bloggers, it is sometimes the case of bloggers becoming academics. </li>! <li>More Liberal Arts 2.0 stuff (which is a phrase coined Jason Kottke&#39;s iconic blog&#0160;<a href="http://www.kottke.org/"> kottke.org</a>) &#0160;Wired has put together a short piece called &quot;<a href="http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/09/ff_wiredu/all/1">7 Essential Skills You Didn&#39;t Learn in College</a>&quot; and grouped them around a Liberal Arts 2.0 theme. I loved the little book called <em><a href="http://www.snarkmarket.com/nla/">New Liberal Arts</a> </em>which grew out of a series of<a href="http://snarkmarket.com/"> Snarkmarket</a> posts a couple years back and this post carries along the same theme.</li>! <li>There is a great project called: <em><a href="http://writinghistory.wp.trincoll.edu/">Writing History: How Historians Research, Write, and Publish in the Digital Age</a></em>. &#0160;From what I can understand, it is going to be crowd-sourced book on on Digital History which will also be collectively edited and reviewed. &#0160;I&#39;m excited to see how it will develop, and I wonder whether this might be a cool model for an archaeology and the new media volume and <a href="http://www.thefee.net/delirium/">Sam Fee</a> and I have bandied about over the last few weeks: Archaeology 2.0</li>! <li>What I&#39;m listening to: Harlem, <em>Hippies</em> (2010)</li>! <li>What I&#39;m (re)reading: Ann Marie Yasin, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/saints-and-church-spaces-in-the-lateantique-mediterranean-architecture-cult-and-community/oclc/422764940">Saints and Church Spaces in the Late Antique Mediterranean</a> <span style="font-style: normal;">(2009);</span> </em>A. D&#39;Ambrosio, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/let-fury-have-the-hour-the-punk-rockpolitics-of-joe-strummer/oclc/56988650">Let Fury Have the Hour: The Punk Rock Politics of Joe Strummer</a></em>. (2004) - I was drawn to this mostly because of <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=UKMBtint9LwC&amp;lpg=PP1&amp;dq=Let%20the %20Fury%20Have%20the%20Hour&amp;pg=PR19#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">Chuck D&#39;s brief comments on Strummer</a> and the Clash.</li>! </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: What is the Future of the Textbook? STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: what-is-the-future-of-the-textbook CATEGORY: Teaching CATEGORY: The New Media

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DATE: 10/14/2010 07:39:52 AM ----BODY: <p><em>Crossposted to <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a></em>.</p> <p>A recent short notice in the<em> Chronicle of Higher Education</em> asked the question: "<a href="http://chronicle.com/article/As-Textbooks-Go-DigitalWill/124881/">As Textbooks Go Digital, Will Professors Build Their Own Books?</a>".  The short article goes on the discuss the various a la carte options offered by traditional textbook publishes that allow a faculty member to create unique combinations of material in an online textbook.  Such a modular approach to textbook content is not new, of course.  In fact, I wrote a module on the "Historical Jesus" for a modular textbook and source reader called <a href="http://custom.cengage.com/etep/"><em>Exploring the European Past</em></a> coordinated by Ohio State and published by Thompson almost 10 years ago.</p> <p>The more interesting idea from the short Chronicle note is the idea that textbook publishers could become distributors of a wide range of content for increasingly customizable course packets.  In short, textbook publishers could become more like iTunes which produces almost no content, but provides an easy interface to access content produced by others.</p> <p>With the growing amount of content available on the web, a central hub for certain kinds of content would certainly make the creating of custom textbooks easier, but, many of us, I expect, have already taken the plunge into both aggregating content from across the web for our textbook, as well as creating on own content.  In other words, the model has probably begun to shift aware from the usefulness of the textbook as a single, authoritative entity and toward a far more fragmented, user-generated, and maybe less profit driven "marketplace" for course content.</p> <p>For example, instead of a formal textbook, my rather low-tech History 101: Western Civilization I class combines podcast lectures with a short, inexpensive monograph, and a gaggle of historical documents available in the public domain. For maps, I created a bunch of "places" that students can view in Google Earth.  For basic reference material, I provide comprehensive indexes with links to useful website or to Wikipedia.  In the end, I have created a custom textbook for free.</p> <p>Other contributors here to Teaching Thursday have taken some of these basic techniques even further by integrating <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/08/04/teaching-with-interviews/">custom made interviews</a>, <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/05/06/first-yearreflections-my-classroom-my-goals/">student generated content</a>, and other techniques to produce sophisticated and dynamic bodies of content.  With more and more content becoming available online, it is not difficult at all to imagine a custom textbook that draws exclusively from free material without sacrificing content, scope, or authority.  Perhaps this is more the case in a discipline like history where a blurry line has always existed between highquality, professional, specialized content and content generated for a popular audience, but I could imagine it being the case for other disciplines as well.</p> <p>What makes this scenario so compelling is that textbooks are becoming increasingly expensive.  Moreover, most textbooks are pretty mediocre in terms of content coverage, readability, and even accuracy.  One of my longstanding justifications for using Wikipedia entries in place of a traditional textbook is that they are no less accurate than collectively produced textbooks where little errors tend to creep in between editors and authors and unlike Wikipedia they can't be easily fixed, on the fly, by a critical reader.  At the same time, the

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pervasive (if somewhat shallow) criticism of Wikipedia creates an environment where students are prone to read entries critically and recognize the contested nature of even basic "facts".  And the increasingly robust online teaching tools make it easy to incorporate into the classroom a dynamic and growing body of good quality online video, audio, and massive quantity of public domain documents, works of literature, and data.</p> <p>All this being said, there is a convenience factor with textbooks that may for the short-term outweigh its flaws.  But what do you think? Are the days of textbooks numbered?</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Horace B. Woodworth at the Northern Great Plains History Conference STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: horace-b-woodworth-at-the-northern-great-plains-history-conference CATEGORY: Departmental History at UND CATEGORY: North Dakotiana DATE: 10/13/2010 08:34:55 AM ----BODY: <p>Horace B. Woodworth will make an appearance at tomorrow's <a href="http://www.und.edu/org/greatplains/">Northern Great Plains History Conference</a> in a panel called History of and History at the University of North Dakota. &nbsp;He'll be joined by Orin G. Libby (via Gordon Iseminger) and a historical cast from the Department of Social Work (via Bret Weber). &nbsp;They'll all gather at the Ramada here in Grand Forks at 9 am tomorrow (Thursday, October 14, 2010).</p>! <p>Bret's paper and mine come from our efforts to document the history of the University for the 125th-aversary last year. Gordon Iseminger's paper will come from his book project on the life and times of Orin G. Libby.</p>! <p>It's nice to have papers representing the history of the University because the Northern Great Plains conference was founded by members of the Department at UND. &nbsp;Here's the text from my<a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/DHChapter_Intro.html"> history of the department</a> (it doesn't add much):</p>! <blockquote>! <p><span style="font-size: 8pt; line-height: 130%;">There are several other development of note during the 1960s that demonstrate the position of the department both at the university and in the greater intellectual community.<span> </span>First, in 1966 the Department developed the Northern Great Plains History Conference.<span> </span>This conference, initially a cooperative venture with the University of Manitoba, sought to provide a venue

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for scholars based in the Northern Plains to present their work as it was often prohibitively expensive to attend national meetings.<span> </span>The initial conference in 1966 was held in the Memorial Union and attracted over 150 scholars. In subsequent years attendance grew further.<span> </span>While many of the papers focused on the history of the Northern Plains, it included panels on other topics as well.<span> </span>This conference also improved the department’s visibility in a regional context as the conference frequently attracted scholars from more prominent universities like Wisconsin and Minnesota. Over the next decade, the responsibilities for the conference were shared between the faculty of the department and other schools in the area.<span> </span>The conference continues to be a viable academic conference to this day.</span></p>! </blockquote>! <p>And here's my paper:</p>! <p><a style="margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sansserif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; display: block; text-decoration: underline;" title="View Caraher History Before Libby on Scribd" href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/39250250/Caraher-HistoryBefore-Libby">Caraher History Before Libby</a> ! <object id="doc_629552822599770" width="100%" height="600" data="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" type="application/xshockwave-flash">! <param name="data" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" />! <param name="wmode" value="opaque" />! <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" />! <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" />! <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" />! <param name="FlashVars" value="document_id=39250250&amp;access_key=key1k8v9gtq82uhzbozfx0j&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" />! <param name="src" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" />! <param name="name" value="doc_629552822599770" />! <param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" />! </object>! </p>! <p>Here's <a href="http://www.und.edu/org/greatplains/documents/programfinal.pdf">a link (.pdf) to the full program of the conference</a>.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Stones that Speak and some other data from the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1

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ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: stones-that-speak-and-some-other-data-from-the-pyla-koutsopetriaarchaeological-project CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 10/12/2010 07:09:42 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the last few weeks I've been running what will hopefully be the final set of unique queries on the data from the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project's survey of the site of Pyla-Koutsopetria and its environs.&nbsp; These queries are mostly following little hunches or the comments that my co-director David Pettegrew made in the margins.&nbsp; It is re-assuring in some ways to find that I have not overlooked much (and I hope to circulate a working paper of my distributional analysis by the end of this calendar year), and its always fun to find little patterns.&nbsp; So here are two small PKAP patterns.</p> <p>For some reason on the edges of comprehension our ceramicist, Scott Moore, documented unworked stones collected in the bags of ceramics collected by our field teams.&nbsp; Unworked stones collected from the fields are not traditionally regarded as archaeological material (except that their presence in a bag of ceramics has associated them with the archaeological method).&nbsp; But Scott's unworked stones do show a pattern. In the last few years, archaeologists have suggested that "background disturbance" or the presence of stones or other materials that look like ceramic objects has a clear correlation with our ability to recover artifacts from the field (the best discussion of this is in Knapp and Given, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/sydney-cyprussurvey-project-social-approaches-to-regional-archaeologicalsurvey/oclc/51460580">Sydney Cyprus Survey Project</a> </em>volume).&nbsp; Presumably our field walker's tendency to collect stones from the field might reflect a similar pattern. The map below shows the distribution of unworked stones.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f501b467970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Unworked_Stone" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134882170f8970c -pi" width="470" height="518"></a> </p> <p>And as you can see, a pattern does emerge. Most of our unworked stone comes from units with high or modern background disturbance and this suggests two things.&nbsp; First, it confirms that the unworked stones are most likely unworked (in some cases Scott documented unworked stone because he was not entirely sure that they were unworked and wanted Nick Kardulias our lithics expert to check them out).&nbsp; Next, it suggests that background disturbance does influence our field walkers ability to recognize artifacts. It is encouraging to note, albeit in a tentative way, that our field walkers collected objects that they thought <em>might be </em>ceramics and this might give us enough confidence to at least suggest that they did not overlook objects that <em>might be </em>stones.</p> <p>The second little analysis I ran was on the distribution of faunal remains across the site.&nbsp; David Reese examined the faunal remains from our excavations in 2008 and 2009 and at the same time looked over a small quantity of faunal remains collected from the survey.&nbsp; I've added to the map the major roads in the area (rather inelegantly displayed unfortunately).&nbsp; Most of the faunal remains are near the major roads suggesting that at least some of them particularly the chicken bones - were discarded by passing traffic.&nbsp; The

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remains of sheep or goat bones appear cluster in the lowest lying area of the Pyla-Koutsopetria plain.&nbsp; This area is pretty marshy despite efforts to keep it drained and as a result not generally under cultivation.&nbsp; This kind of marginal land seems likely to have served as pasture for local flocks. </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f501b46e970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Faunal_Remans" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f501b484970b -pi" width="470" height="518"></a> </p> <p>The final analysis run over the last few days was on some very broad chronological periods into which we grouped material from the survey.&nbsp; Among the broadest is the "Ancient Historic" period which stretches from around 750 BC to the end of antiquity in AD 749. The transparent dots on the map below show the distribution of artifacts datable only to this long period in the past. Their distribution more or less follows over all artifact densities (with the exception of Kokkinokremos where the ceramicist who read our Iron Age to Bronze Age material used a slightly different designation).&nbsp; This suggests that artifacts grouped into this broad period are not likely to represent a single class of difficult to identify material, but rather a whole group of artifacts from multiple periods that remains outside of traditional ceramic typologies and chronologies. It is never heartening to see how much material from a survey goes unidentified (or identified in only the broadest possible way), but it is encouraging to see that it does not cluster in suggestive ways.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013488217134970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Ancient_Historic_Sherds" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f501b4d3970b -pi" width="470" height="518"></a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Dimitri Nakassis EMAIL: nakassis@gmail.com IP: 99.232.120.148 URL: DATE: 10/12/2010 07:44:02 AM It's also interesting that only one unworked stone was found at Kokkinokremos, when we had a team of experienced fieldwalkers doing the survey. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More on Academic Blogging STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0

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BASENAME: more-on-academic-blogging CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 10/11/2010 07:09:34 AM ----BODY: <p>There is still a slow simmer of resistance to the idea of academic blogging.  Most of it represents a kind of knee-jerk conservatism from individuals who refuse to accept blogging as anything more than a medium for middle-class "kids" to vocalize middle-class angst.  This most common form of this argument is the well-known: "why should I care about what you ate for breakfast?"</p>! <p>Every now and then, a scholar offers a more substantial response to the idea and while I typically find these responses every bit as wrongheaded, I do think that they deserve some careful consideration.  Recently Edward Blum published a short post (on his blog <a href="http://usreligion.blogspot.com/">Religion in American History</a>) entitled "<a href="http://usreligion.blogspot.com/2010/09/academic-blogging-somereservations-and.html">Academic Blogging: Some Reservations and Lessons</a>".  The post is clear and coherent and should be considered carefully.  It stems from his conversations with a group of recent Ph.D.s and graduate students who are excited about blogging as a medium as well as the author's personal experience as a blogger.</p>! <p>He established six main points:</p>! <blockquote>! <p>1. "Why would you give away for free the primary commodity you create?"</p>! </blockquote>! <p>I suppose that I must respond to this in the name of being systematic. First, being a blogger doesn't mean that you have to publish every idea on your blog indiscriminately!  Even today scholars can be reluctant to give a paper or commit to an article a brilliant book-worthy idea.  The bigger issue, however, is one already faced by the recording industry. Some circulation of free music that is the primary commodity produced by the recording industry - actually benefits record sales. Most band have MySpace pages, websites, blogs with free downloads, or even "leak" new music to fans.  If they're smart, they do not leak the entire album, but a few select singles.  In some sections of the recording industry mix-tapes and bootlegs are a primary means for unsigned artists to be discovered. Again, if all that musician has to offer is on a 36 minute mix tape, then there are likely to be problems down the line, but if a musician is smart and good, the mix tape works as a teaser that draws attention to their work.</p>! <p>(And it goes without saying that in a business where our rewards for scholarly production are modest, it may be that some day soon, blogging an idea and allowing to enjoy widespread, attributed circulation, could have as much currency as publishing in a very expensive book with limited access.)</p>! <blockquote>! <p>2. "Peer review matters. Academic disciplines will lose all credibility without peer review; it is essential to what we do – as protection for the author and publisher, and as a way to get the best out of your work."</p>! </blockquote>! <p>Of course peer review matters!  But let's not reduce all academic production to a kind of zero sum game.  A blog does not preclude writing for peer review and taking the peer review process seriously. After all, any scholars would be naive to think that all academic production receives the same level and kind of peer review.  Giving a paper at an academic conference, for example, is a different level of peer review than submitting an article to major academic

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journal.  Blogs fit into the academic ecosystem by allowing ideas to circulate in early forms. Scholars outside the humanities have already embraced the idea of "working papers" that circulate widely prior to formal peer review and publication, but as part of a parallel and less formal (but no less important) peer review process.   While most academic blogs do not reached the level of a "working paper" they nevertheless offer a medium ideal for scholarly conversation and critique.  If scholars are too busy or disengaged to participate in this discussion, then their perspectives will be ignored in the development of new knowledge.</p>! <blockquote>! <p>3. "Post-publication review matters. Blog posts don’t get reviewed in the <em>Journal of American History</em> or the <em>Journal of Southern History</em> – books do."</p>! </blockquote>! <p>Again, writing is not a zero sum game. Articles do not (usually) get reviewed in the <em>JAH</em> or <em>JSH</em>, nor do conference papers, but these contributions to the academic, scholarly conversation are nevertheless represent an important place for academic correspondences.  Blog fit into the existing academic ecosystem and expand it. Ironically, blogs are beginning to represent an important venue for post-publication review. A blogger can publish a quick review of a book at a much faster than a traditional journal.  In fact, some venues, like the Bryn Mawr Classical Review have taken on an increasingly bloglike interface and represent the first word on many academic publications in the field of Classics and Ancient history.</p>! <blockquote>! <p>4. "Blog posts could hurt your reputation just as much (if not more) than help it. Fascinating blog posts probably won’t get you an interview or a job, although they may make your name noteworthy enough so the committee looks at your application (although I doubt this for most positions). Articles will, solid dissertations will, fantastic conference papers will."</p>! </blockquote>! <p>Again, academic writing is not a zero sum game. Writing a blog post does not preclude writing an article, giving a conference paper, writing a book. Circulating ideas on a blog, however, gets them to a wider public. Of course, a hastily composed blog post could hurt an individual's career, but the same could be said of a hastily composed conference paper or a poorly-considered book review. There is nothing intrinsic to the blog medium that causes an individual to say outlandish things or attack other authors.  Of course, the ease with which a blog post can be circulated (via, for example, social media) and the wide audience that a blog post can have, should encourage bloggers to be sensitive to their academic reputation and the feelings of other scholars.  But I'd suggest that these are good things!  Blogs can accelerate certain aspects of professional development by allowing a junior scholar access to an academic conversation with certain rules of behavior and expectations.</p>! <p>(And I should say that I personally know some scholars whose careers have been helped by their blogs. It showed them to be far more dynamic and engaged than their slow to appear scholarly publications would suggest.)</p>! <blockquote>! <p>5. "Blogs often function like the current American media: extreme, partisan, and amnesiac."</p>! </blockquote>! <p>None of these things are intrinsic to the medium of blogging except, perhaps, the seemingly ephemeral nature of most forms of digital communication.  I actually like the ephemeral nature of my blog and have little inclination to make it an enduring venue for scholarly communication.</p>!

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<blockquote>! <p>6. "Finally, and this is most apropos for our blog – this is a blog about religion and religions, the most powerful ideas, rituals, concepts, and communities that exist. As I understand the spiritual, it is the deepest core of people, ideas, organizations, and communities. Writing about it flippantly or without review or without consideration can be extremely damaging."</p>! </blockquote>! <p>This point is a good one, but I think my argument throughout this post should now be clear. Blogs have a context that dictates to some extent the rules in which the blog operates. This context is set at the intersection of a broad and ill-defined public conversation about the topic on the blog and long-standing professional and social traditions of academy. This puts the blogger in a powerful position to communicate academic ideas to an audience that is often unfamiliar with the terms of the debate and the languages and customs of the academic discourse. This position is also fraught with certain risks.</p>! <p>Professor Blum's post highlights many of the risks associated with blogging (and overlooks, for rhetorical purposes I am sure) many of its benefits. It is useful to have these reminders periodically, if for no other reason than it forces those of us committed to the medium of blogging to articulate the place of the blog and blogger in the academic community.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Mcconeghy.wordpress.com EMAIL: IP: 174.47.231.87 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/mcconeghywordpresscom DATE: 10/11/2010 10:44:22 PM Well said! I had a similar set of responses when I first saw Blum's post. I was particularly concerned about his resistance to expanding the areas open to different kinds of scholarly products. <a href="http://mcconeghy.wordpress.com/2010/09/28/should-iblog/">http://mcconeghy.wordpress.com/2010/09/28/should-i-blog/</a> ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Jan Husdal EMAIL: husdal.com@gmail.com IP: 158.38.156.54 URL: http://www.husdal.com DATE: 11/04/2010 09:40:52 AM Thank you for a great post. I just read the post you are referring to, and I am glad someone else did too, and feels the way I do. As an academic blogger myself, mostly literature reviewer, going on for 3 years now, it has taken me a while to find my own style and reasons for blogging. The by far biggest reason is the interaction with other scholars.

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Why would I give away for free the primary commodity I create? Why not? Agreed, it is my intellectual property, but knowledge kept to myself isn't going to help anybody, not even me. That said, I'm quite selective as to what is published on my blog. Peer review matters. Yes, it does. And frankly, in line with what I just said, very little of what hasn't been peer-reviewed yet ever makes it to my blog. But most of what has made it through, will. Besides, leaking a few bits and pieces may attract the attention of other scholars interested in the same topic, and maybe willing to cooperate in a fruitful exchange of ideas. Not everybody is just out to steal my work. Conference papers don't get reviewed. Don't they? I see them appear often enough in the reference list of journal articles. Conference papers sometimes contain a lot more valuable information than the actual paper that it later turns into, and conference papers are the hardest papers to find, even with the help of my good friend Google. That's why I want my conference papers known. Blog posts could hurt your reputation. Possibly, but I always try to strike a balance between the good, the bad and the ugly in my reviews...and it has to be really bad for me to say something bad. It's all about constructive criticism. The biggest big upside to academic blogging is that I get publicly known to a worldwide audience, to the point that I am on occasion contacted “as an expert in the field” (which I'm not, not always) by other true experts in the field (who I consider to be way more expert than I am). In my opinion that is the biggest compliment an academic blogger can get. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 10/08/2010 10:37:56 AM ----BODY: <p>It's supposed to touch 80 degrees today here in beautiful and tropical Grand Forks.  So a few quick hit and varia on a sunny Friday:</p> <ul> <li>Another <a href="http://histsociety.blogspot.com/2010/10/blogging-inacademy.html">blog post on blogging in the academy</a>.  Good grief.</li> <li><a href="http://nymag.com/print/?/news/features/establishments/68506/">New York Magazine profile of Nick Denton of Gawker</a>.</li> <li>Sam Fee has some good thoughts on<a href="http://nymag.com/print/?/news/features/establishments/68506/"> Archaeology and the New Media over at Arranged Delirium</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://corinthianmatters.com/2010/10/07/more-corinth-incontrast/">David Pettegrew's Corinthian Matters reports more on the Corinth in Contrast conference</a>.</li>

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<li>Make plans now to come to the <a href="http://www.und.edu/org/greatplains/">Northern Great Plains History Conference</a>.  My paper is at 9 am on Thursday.</li> <li>Remember David Pettegrew will present the 2nd Annual Cyprus Research Fund Lecture at 4 pm on October 21 in the East Asia Room of the Chester Fritz Library.  <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/20 10-cyprus-research-fund-lecture-setting-the-stage-for-st-paulscorinth.html">Here's an abstract of his talk</a>. </li> <li>The second test of India vs. Australia<a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/india-v-australia-2010/engine/match/464525.html"> cannot be more exciting than the first</a>.</li> <li>Big news today, apparently, from the University of North Dakota.  I have no idea what it is, but I hope they use the word "game changer".</li> <li>What I'm listening to: Lee "Scratch" Perry, <em>Roast Fish, Collie Weed, and Corn Bread </em>and with the Upsetters, <em>Super Ape</em>.</li> <li>What I'm reading:  <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/howprofessors-think-inside-the-curious-world-of-academicjudgment/oclc/237048345">Michèle Lamont, How Professors think: inside the curious world of academic judgement</a>. (Cambridge, MA 2009).</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: A Showcase for Online Teaching Technology STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: 316 CATEGORY: Teaching CATEGORY: Web/Tech DATE: 10/07/2010 06:59:56 AM ----BODY: <p><em>Crossposted to <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a></em></p> <p>This week the Senate Continuing Education Committee hosted its regular Online Teaching Showcase.  Each semester the showcase brings together faculty who teach online and asks them to share some the techniques and technologies that they use to make their online classes more successful.  In some ways, this regular gathering of online teaching faculty is a great way to get a sense for future directions in online teaching.</p> <p>Many of the most common (and intriguing) applications that faculty used to reach their online and distant students sought to facilitate realtime

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interaction between faculty and student.  The old stalwarts, <a href="http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobatconnectpro/">Adobe Connect </a>and the various <a href="http://www.wimba.com/">Wimba Applications</a> (which are conveniently bundled into Blackboard), made an appearance.  Their reliable and familiar interfaces allow faculty to stream a lecture to a group of students in real time, record the lecture for an archive, and share screens with students.  <a href="http://www.tegrity.com/home">Tegrity Lecture Capture</a> joined these two applications as another option for faculty who are interested recording lectures live. Tegrity is a server (or as they say now "cloud") based application that allows students to view lectures either in real time or recorded without downloading software to their computer.  To watch a recorded lecture, the student downloads a relatively small executable file which they then run on their computer. Based on the demonstration that I saw at the Showcase, Tegrity allows for the faculty member to track students who stream the lectures from the cloud.  Faculty could not only see how long a student viewed a recorded lecture, but also isolate parts of the lecture that a student rewatched in order to identify problem concepts or explanations.</p> <p>I also saw a demonstration of <a href="http://www.tidebreak.com/">Tidebreak</a> which is an application that creates a dynamic, shared environment where students and faculty can share screens, swap files, and even take control of a central, shared workstation to demonstrate a procedure or execute a task.  I could imagine that software like Tidebreak could be used alongside Adobe Connect or Wemba to create a far more interactive online classroom, but with this advance comes greater complexity.</p> <p>Cloud based computing also was on display with products like Citrix.  Citrix allows students to access applications run "in the cloud".  The applications range from Adobe products like Photoshop to the standard suite of Microsoft offerings (Excel, Word, Access) and even more specialized applications like the statistics application SPSS.  From what I can tell, the goal of this kind of service is allow students access to software without the expense and complications individual licensing. It will eventually allow a faculty member to create an online computer lab where they could work with a group of students using virtualized software (again, from the cloud) without making them each buy the applications or worrying about the hardware that remote students are running.</p> <p>The applicability of these new applications and services is immediately apparent to the part of me that wants to create a richer, more dynamic online classroom.  Another part of me observes that the complexity of these applications will certainly increase the learning curve for a student engaging in online learning (even while services like Tegrity and Citrix could lower the point of entry from the stand point of hardware and software).  Much of the collaborative technology on display also privileged a live teaching environment.  Most of my online teaching, however, and I imagine this is true for many faculty members, is done asynchronously.  That is to say, we are not interacting with students live; instead students are viewing course material at their own pace and interacting with the instructor or their fellow students at far less regular interval than they would in a classroom environment.  While I am sure the users of each of these technologies would stress that they could also work asynchronously, it still seemed clear to me that the goal was to reproduce the classroom experience in a virtual or online way, rather than to imagine the online classroom as something fundamentally different.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY:

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----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Working on a New Departmental Website STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: working-on-a-new-departmental-website CATEGORY: Departmental History at UND CATEGORY: North Dakotiana DATE: 10/06/2010 08:49:39 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the last 6 months, the University of North Dakota has been working to release an updated and upgraded website.  As part of this process, every department has been asked to reconsider its web site.  The <a href="http://www.und.edu/dept/histdept/">Department of History's website</a> is, frankly, horrible, but, at the same time, it is clear that the website functioned successfully as the main point of contact for prospective graduate students. In some sense, the site is horribly broken, but it still gets the job done.</p> <p>The challenge now is to re-design the content and the organization of the department's website without undermining its basic functionality.</p> <p>First, we've been experimenting with some new text for the home page.  This is where we are at present (nothing is finer than a text created by a committee!):</p> <blockquote> <p> <p>From the earliest days of the University of North Dakota, history faculty have played an important part in preparing students to be engaged citizens of their communities, the state, and the world.  Today the department remains committed to teaching the past and developing in our students the reading, writing, and critical thinking skills necessary to take their place in an increasingly global world. Each faculty member is an active researcher in their respective fields, and brings fresh perspectives on different cultures and ideas into the classes they teach.</p> <p>The department offers the B.A., M.A., Ph.D. as well as a D.A. program.  These programs are supported by a diverse faculty whose active research interests span every period in American history as well as in West Africa, the Atlantic world, Ancient, Medieval, Early Modern, and Modern European history.  Faculty approach these periods with from diverse perspectives ranging from biography to the study of military, diplomatic, social and intellectual history and an emphasis on race, gender, and women as categories of historical analysis.  Faculty and student research draw upon textual analysis, the study of material culture, quantitative and data driven methods, and oral history to bring the past alive.</p>

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<p>The department supports both undergraduate and graduate student engagement in the discipline through a strong regional archive with collections of national significance, the largest library between Minneapolis and Seattle, the history honor society Phi Alpha Theta, several annual lectures, and editorship of the Oral History Review.</p> </p> </blockquote> <p> <p>We also hope to include pages devoted the faculty bios and a page with plain text descriptions of our undergraduate and graduate programs.</p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: What Horace B. Woodworth tells us about the Academia today STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: what-horace-b-woodworth-tells-us-about-the-academia-today CATEGORY: Conferences CATEGORY: Departmental History at UND DATE: 10/05/2010 07:11:49 AM ----BODY: <p>Next week is the 45th Annual <a href="http://www.und.edu/org/greatplains/">Northern Great Plains History Conference</a>.  Since the mid-1960s when a group of faculty at the University of North Dakota founded the conference, it has roamed universities across Northern Plains and assembled scholars from across the region.  My paper for this years conference will look at the career of Horace B. Woodworth.  He featured prominently in the first chapter of my history of the Department of History here at UND and is the topic of an article that I submitted to North Dakota History (but have strangely heard nothing about for the past two years; I am confident that this means that publication is imminent.)</p> <p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/02/ho race-b-woodwo.html">I've blogged on Mr. Woodworth before</a>, but today, I want to suggest that his career might have something to offer the academy today.  Over the past few years there has been a flurry of books suggesting that the organization of the modern American University is somehow broken.  Louis Menand's recent book, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/marketplace-ofideas/oclc/286488147">The Marketplace of Ideas: Reform and Resistance in the American University</a></em> (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/02/th

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oughts-on-the-end-of-disciplines.html">blogged here</a>) and Mark Taylor's, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/crisis-on-campus-a-bold-plan-forreforming-our-colleges-and-universities/oclc/501320939">Crisis on Campus: A Bold Plan for Reforming our Colleges and Universities</a> </em>have both rooted the current (and typically ill-defined) problems with the university in growth of professionalization of the disciplines and the self-serving and exclusionary rhetoric that come to ossify the departmental/disciplinary mode of university organization.  Both book (and numerous others) also saw fundamental changes in the American university as tied to changes in the organization of institutions; the traditional link between departments and disciplines must be weakened and replaced with a more integrated structure that better represents the dynamic realities of the modern workplace. In fact, as recently as last week, <a href="http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/story.asp?sectioncode=26&amp;storyco de=413700&amp;c=1">the president of the University of Chicago offered a similar argument</a> noting the tensions between the need for individuals to fill highly specialized entry level positions and the need to produce people who can thrive in the higher reaches of the modern economy through their ability to manipulate and integrate abstract ideas.</p> <p>What can Horace B. Woodworth teach us about these critiques?  When he came to the University of North Dakota in 1885, he had degrees from Dartmouth and Hartford Theological Seminary and had worked as a teacher, headmaster of private schools, a preacher and a farmer.  His first post was as Professor of Mathematics, Physics, and Astronomy.   By 1888, Woodworth was the Chair of Didactics, Mental and Moral Sciences, and the Principal of the Normal Department. In 1890, he left the Normal Department and assumed the title Professor of Mental and Moral Science and History. By the time he retired from the University in 1904, his title was simply Professor of History.</p> <p>Such a dynamic career would be impossible today, of course, as the barriers between disciplines (particularly the sciences and the humanities) are virtually insurmountable.  At the same time, Woodworth's career path reflects a response to pressures produced both within and outside of the institution.  The emergence of professional disciplines with more clearly defined professional standards guided Woodworth to a great specialization in teaching and in his research.  This ultimately culminated in the publication of his book, <em><a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=aVM6AAAAMAAJ&amp;ots=TaXoVzFMQ&amp;dq=The%20Government%20of%20the%20People%20of%20the%20State%20of%20North% 20Dakota&amp;pg=PP2#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">The Government of the People of the State of North Dakota</a> </em>in 1895.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe src="http://books.google.com/books?id=aVM6AAAAMAAJ&amp;ots=TaXoVzFMQ&amp;dq=The%20Government%20of%20the%20People%20of%20the%20State%20of%20North% 20Dakota&amp;pg=PP1&amp;output=embed" style="border: 0px;" width="450" height="700" scrolling="no" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p>While I understand that today universities are far more complex institutions than they were in the time of Woodworth and the pressures of tenure, increasingly narrow disciplinary training, and bureaucratic ossification constrain career paths for most academics, it is nevertheless true that our 19th century predecessors were capable of dynamic changes over the course of their academic careers.  As another example was someone like William F. Allen at the University of Wisconsin where he served as the Professor of Latin and Roman History; Allen was another New Englander trained as a Classicist at Harvard, Berlin, and Göttingen, but his most important contribution to academic life was his work editing<a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=LHktAAAAMAAJ&amp;dq=slave%20songs%20of%20

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the%20united%20states&amp;client=safari&amp;pg=PP7#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false"> Slave Songs in the United States</a>.</p> <p>The careers of individuals like Allen and Woodworth do not provide a template for a modern scholar to follow, but certainly demonstrate that the disciplinary organization in which we now reside (quite comfortably) is not immutable.  In fact, the response of these early faculty to tensions from outside and within their institutions offers a dynamic model for university faculty today.  University faculty should be engaged in their environment and our training offers us unique opportunities to act in dynamic ways that not only can improve the educational life of our institution, but also carve out and form the basis for new disciplines, fields of study, and knowledge.  Change is not only possible, but good.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Corinth in Contrast: Some Reflective Notes STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: corinth-in-contrast-some-reflective-notes CATEGORY: Conferences CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 10/04/2010 07:27:29 AM ----BODY: <p>I was fortunate enough to spend the last four days in Austin, Texas at the <a href="https://webspace.utexas.edu/sjf365/CC3/Intro.html">Corinth in Contrast conference</a>.  The conference sought to bring together archaeologists working in Corinth and scholars interested in New Testament studies, particularly the work of Paul and his correspondents in Corinth.  The hope was to produce more informed scholars on both sides of the discussion: archaeologists, on the one hand, who have a better idea of the impact of their work on the field of New Testament studies, and, on the other hand, New Testament scholars who have a more solid grasp significant, ongoing work at Corinth.  As I've blogged here in the run up to the conference, the theme was "studies in inequality" and generally speaking the papers presented showed a real willingness to attempt to understand inequality in Hellenistic and Roman Corinth.</p> <p>So, here are a few of my notes on what was a pretty illuminating four days:</p> <p>1. While it comes as no surprise, the folks who studied the New Testament were generally more engaged with archaeology than the archaeologists were with New Testament texts. In fact, many of the New Testament scholars had significant experience doing field work or were directing their own projects.  This almost certainly followed the age old precedent of  Biblical archaeology, which one

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could argue dates to Late Antiquity and the excavations of St. Helena.  I couldn't help think that archaeologists will probably benefit by the sustained interested in their field by New Testament scholars especially as resources to Classical studies continue to decline.</p> <p>2. Mechanisms of inequality.  The scholars working in New Testament studies had much clearer ideas about how individuals or groups in Corinth produced inequality.  Steve Friesen and James Walters, for example, both argued that ritual forms of interaction served to reinforce and challenge (at different times) unequal relationships in the Pauline community.  Among the archaeologists, Guy Sanders identified share-cropping as a method for maintaining economic inequality and a cycle of dependency; Sarah James saw the political arrangements following the sack of Corinth in 146 as crucial context for a hitherto overlooked group of Corinthians who probably struggled for an economic and political place within Greek society as much as they have within the dominant historical narrative of the city.  Pettegrew suggested that inequality may have been a product of Corinth's place as an emporium in the ancient world and seemed to suggest that market forced created a kind of inequality in a way that our image of a state sponsored diolkos would not. (The diolkos was the supposed road across the Isthmus of Corinth ostensibly designed to facilitate dragging ships between the Corinthian and Saronic gulf).</p> <p>3. Inequality and Marx.  One thing that really struck me as a historian was the almost complete absence of Marx from the conference. Marx, to my mind, was the foremost theorist of inequality in the academic world today.  In fact, it would be fair to suggest that Marx's critique of social inequality was central to our imagining of a future where social, economic, and political inequality did not exist.  While it is always easy to say that Marx lurked in the background of many of these papers (and to be fair Guy Sanders did mention Marx and James Walters referenced Althusser), it really amazed me that Marx's interest in the material conditions of inequality and his later use by so many literary theorists did not form a central axis around which New Testament scholars and archaeologists could find common methodological ground.</p> <p>4. Religion and Inequality.  It's hardly surprising, of course, that a conference that combines New Testament scholars and archaeologists would understand religion to be a major mechanism for producing (and challenging) inequality in the ancient world, but at the same time, it was remarkable to see the difficulty archaeology has in penetrating the dense intersection of cult, economy, and society.  Ron Stroud's paper on Corinthian Magic and Ritual did the best at this by looking at the archaeological evidence for the activities surrounding the use of curse tablets at the sanctuary of Demeter and Kore at Corinth during the Roman period.  He was successful in suggesting that the rituals surrounding the use of curse tablets represented the activities of a group who were alienated from access to more highly structured and regulated types of religious power.  In the case of the curse tablets from Demeter and Kore at Corinth, these individuals appeared to be women who sought recourse to both personal and social grievances by appeals to black magic.</p> <p>5. Historical Inequality. One thing that wanted to hear more about at the conference is the historiography (if you will) of inequality.  In other words, I wanted to understand a bit more about how our expectations and understanding of (in)equality have shaped our reading of the ancient world. Steve Fiesen's opening remarks prompted me to consider the crucial link between teaching about inequality in the past and producing a better future.  Michael White's closing remarks returned to some of these point by pointing out how different expectations of equality were in the ancient world and how the elaborately dendridic systems of patronage the created social cohesion, in fact, relied upon certain expectations of inequality to function. If nothing else the relationship

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between the patron and client (in its simplest form) implied a difference in power between the two parts of the dyad. A couple of papers suggested that the inequality of the ancient world depended, at least in part, on our approach to the past, how we have organized our evidence from the past, and what we think it means.  Sarah Lepinski for example, pointed out that the lack of interest in Roman wall painting and the social and cultural networks involved in its production stemmed in part from the way tendency in the modern nation of Greece to overlook a "colonial" period in its own history.  By overlooking the Roman period we have consigned Roman Greeks to an unequal status both to the dominant Roman power and to earlier "free" Greeks of the Classical period.</p> <p>The opportunity to contemplate these ideas was the product of a brilliantly organized conference with plenty of time for informal discussions, engaging plenary sessions, and fantastic logistical coordination. The conference experience easily ranks among the best that I've encountered.  Thanks to everyone involved from the organizers, Steve Friesen, Daniel Schowalkter, and Sarah James to the graduate assistant Ann Morgan!</p> <p>One more thing, David Pettegrew has promised some comments of his own on the conference over at his new <a href="http://corinthianmatters.com/">Corinthian Matters blog</a>.  They aren't posted yet, but keep your eyes peeled!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Please Stay Tuned STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: please-stay-tuned CATEGORY: Conferences DATE: 09/30/2010 06:45:41 AM ----BODY: <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013487dc5c29970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="500" height="375" /></p> <p>I'm at <a href="https://webspace.utexas.edu/sjf365/CC3/Intro.html">Corinth in Contrast</a> in Austin, Texas today.  I'll post an update this afternoon.  Meanwhile, please stay tuned.  If there is good internet access, I'll drop some Tweets on y'all (http://twitter.com/billcaraher) with the hashtag #CIC.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: -----

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EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: 2010 Cyprus Research Fund Lecture: Setting the Stage for St. Paul's Corinth STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: 2010-cyprus-research-fund-lecture-setting-the-stage-for-st-paulscorinth CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Conferences DATE: 09/29/2010 06:44:16 AM ----BODY: <p>This year's Cyprus Research Fund Lecture will feature Prof. David K. Pettegrew of Messiah College.  David is not only a long time collaborator with my in both Greece and Cyprus, but also regarded as one of the foremost scholars on Late Roman Corinth.  His talk will focus on over a decade of archaeological and historical research on the Isthmus of Corinth.  We hope he'll let us podcast his talk so that anyone, anywhere can listen to him!</p> <p>Here's a description of his talk:</p> <blockquote> <p> <p>Corinth has come down in history as the quintessential maritime city that became powerful and wealthy by capitalizing on the movement of commercial goods and peoples across a narrow isthmus at the center of Greece.  The connecting isthmus also allegedly made Corinth politically unstable, corrupt in morals, and exceptionally depraved.  As St. Paul’s letters show, Corinth was a Christian community with problems.</p> <p>Why was Corinth so consistently associated with travel, trade, and wealth in ancient thought?  And how did a land bridge facilitate commerce and traffic and contribute to the city’s development in the Roman era?</p> <p>In this lecture, David Pettegrew considers what the ancient texts and material evidence suggest about travel and commerce across the Isthmus and its effects on the maritime character of the city in the first and second centuries AD.</p> </p> </blockquote> <p>The talk is Thursday, October 21st in the East Asia Room of the Chester Fritz Library.  There'll be a small reception after the talk.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Pettegrew.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f4b2ade3970b -pi" border="0" alt="Pettegrew.jpg" width="463" height="600" /></p> ----EXTENDED BODY:

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----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Ambivalent Landscapes of the 6th century at Corinth in Contrast STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: ambivalent-landscapes-of-the-6th-century-at-corinth-in-contrast CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Conferences CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 09/28/2010 07:04:04 AM ----BODY: <p>As readers of this blog know (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/mo re-contrasting-corinth.html">here</a> and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/ev en-more-contrasting-corinth.html">here</a>), I've been working on a conference paper for the Corinth in Contrast Conference at the end of this week.  This paper is, in effect, an archaeological and architectural argument for the impact of Justinian on the Corinthian Isthmus.  (These ideas developed, more or less, from <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2007/12/ep igraphy-litur.html">my analysis of a pair of texts that reference Justinian from the Isthmus</a>).</p> <p>You've read the drafts, so here's the paper:</p> <p><a style="margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sansserif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; display: block; text-decoration: underline;" title="View Caraher Ambivalent Landscape 2010 on Scribd" href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/38304843/CaraherAmbivalent-Landscape-2010">Caraher Ambivalent Landscape 2010</a> <object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" width="100%" height="600"> <param name="movie" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" /> <param name="wmode" value="opaque" /> <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="document_id=38304843&amp;access_key=key29s5z4gyidaj9o4ldpu0&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" /> <embed id="doc_683454948842895" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="100%" height="600" src="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf?document_id=38304843&amp;access _key=key-29s5z4gyidaj9o4ldpu0&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list"

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name="doc_683454948842895" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" wmode="opaque" bgcolor="#ffffff"></embed> </object> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Digital Workflow and Microhistory STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: digital-workflow-and-microhistory CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: The New Media CATEGORY: Web/Tech DATE: 09/27/2010 08:27:11 AM ----BODY: <p>As you might imagine, I am pretty excited that <a href="http://www.uc.edu/pompeii/">Steven Ellis's team's</a> <a href="http://www.apple.com/ipad/pompeii/">use of the iPad as their primary,field data recording device</a> is getting some attention lately.&nbsp; I imagined this kind of digital workflow when I began working with Scott Moore to design the digital recording components of our project in Cyprus.&nbsp; Scott and I, from what I recall, always assumed a paper stage.&nbsp; This is what that stage looks like now:</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f49f8a57970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="PKAPPaperStage" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013487c00a95970c -pi" width="404" height="242"></a> </p> <p>I think that we fell back on the old archaeological wisdom that a paper stage somehow serves as a more dependable back up that digital copies. This led us to copying the entire archive each year and carrying it home (and still managing sometimes to lose copies of the original or not have them where we needed them). With a fully digital workflow, it is, of course, much easier to make copies of every stage of the documentation process and store them multiple places, and, provided that a good version control system is in place, manage these copies. </p> <p>I know that I also subscribed to the idea that paper copies preserve more fully the archaeological thought process.&nbsp; We insisted that our trench supervisors not keep separate, personal, notebooks (they did anyway) and write directly onto our recording sheets as they excavate.&nbsp; The hope was that the image of the stratigraphic unit form provided the best record of the process of excavation. In fact, as much as was possible, we have sought to associate digital images of

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these sheets (and the trench plans of each stratigraphic unit) with the digital copies of this data.&nbsp; This remains a time consuming process of keying the data from each sheet and digitizing each days trench plans. Having supervised the keying of most of our field data, I can attest to the hours of time and concentration that went into producing our digital versions.&nbsp; It's mostly done now, but it was a onerous process and we haven't quite produced data with the kind of immediate transparency that we had hoped for (although it is all still possible).&nbsp; Using the iPad to record directly into digital form the basic data from the trench would pay immediate dividends by streamlining the data collection process.</p> <p>On the other hand, I do wonder whether some of the data associated with the archaeological process might be lost. I was thinking about the faint evidence for revision that appears on our paper recording sheets - typically under various forms of erasure (usually a <s>strikethrough</s>) - that preserves irregular fragments of the archaeological through processes.&nbsp; If Wikipedia has taught us anything, digital recording makes it possible to record this same data by recording each change to the data set and each earlier version.&nbsp; In effect, the digital data collection could preserve a kind of digital palimpsest of each key stroke, deletion, adjustment, mistaken measurement.</p> <p>I am fascinated by this kind of micro-history and its potential to reveal patterns of behavior across an entire project and capture a more intimate look at how the archaeological method is performed.</p> <p>Just for fun, I used The Archivist to capture some of the buzz about the Apple story on Ellis's use of the iPad. <a href="http://visitmix.com/labs/archivist-desktop/">The Archivist</a> lets you download all the Tweets associated with any search criteria.&nbsp; For my little experiment, I captured all the Tweets that used the word "Pompeii" and "iPad".&nbsp; As of 6 am this morning when I staggered into my office, I captured 520+ Tweets.&nbsp; I then plotted them by hour over the last few days.&nbsp; Here's the chart.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013487c00aa7970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="image" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f49f8a80970b -pi" width="400" height="252"></a> </p> <p>They have averaged about 5 tweets an hour over the last 100 hours or so.&nbsp; The peek was 95 tweets per hour between 12:20 pm and 12:20 pm on September 23rd.&nbsp; Thus surge continued over the next hour where they had over 80 tweets and subsided to under 40 tweets later by 3:30 or so. The great thing about The Archivist is that it lets you download your Tweets so that you can data mine them using an application like <a href="http://rapid-i.com/">RapidMiner</a>.&nbsp; I didn't do that, but I did do some simple mining.&nbsp; For example, Ellis's name is mentioned in 131 of the tweets (or about 25% of the time) and about 16% of the Tweets are obvious "RTstyle" re-tweets. In Tweets with both Pompeii and iPad in them Ellis's university, University of Cincinnati, was never once mentioned nor was his project's name, the Porta Stabia project (even in two Tweets that appear to come from "official" University of Cincinnati channels!).&nbsp; In the hyper economical world of Twitter, there are good reasons not to include long word like Cincinnati or relatively obscure project names.&nbsp; In contrast, the most common phrases is "Discovering ancient Pompeii with iPad" which was the title of the Apple article and it appeared in 62% of the Tweets (suggesting the far larger number of retweets happen than had the traditional "RT" designation).&nbsp; For the record, my Tweet, which occurred very early in the Tweet cycle led to only three retweets.&nbsp; </p> <p>This is the kind of microhistorical analysis that could be possible by mining the minutia preserved in a fully digital workflow.</p> <p><em>By the way, it's a double blog day! I thought

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that I needed to do something to mark my 800th post and in the tradition of the National Register of Historic Places, I thought I'd just put up <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/th is-is-my-800th-post.html">a marker</a> (with a few links, it is a blog after all).</em></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Fee EMAIL: samfee@gmail.com IP: 209.131.80.228 URL: http://www.samfee.net/ DATE: 10/01/2010 10:49:37 AM I agree, and I'm struck by how valuable tracking that change in archaeological thought over time might be. There are a whole host of ways we could do it electronically. I'd suggest we could chronicle much more of that thought process by digital means than through a paper trail. Of course, it still comes down to the user actually recording those changing interpretations in the field. So any tool that gets implemented needs to be so easy to use that it isn't inconvenient for keeping track of our changing ideas. Otherwise, those changes will fall between the cracks. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: This is my 800th post STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: wysiwyg ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: this-is-my-800th-post CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 09/27/2010 07:21:25 AM ----BODY: <p>This is my 800th post.&#0160; Here&#39;s what I said at my: <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/me tadata-monday-700-posts.html"><br /></a></p><p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/me tadata-monday-700-posts.html">700th post</a> <br /><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/11/bl ogging-at-70000.html">ca. 600th post</a><br /><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/07/re flecting-on-academic-blogging-at-500-posts.html">500th post</a><br /><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/02/ha ppy-400th-post-from-history-240.html">400th post was my favorite and the most

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delicious</a><br /><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/10/me tadata-monday.html">ca. 300th post</a> <br />I missed my 200th<br /><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2007/11/10 0-posts.html">100th post</a>.</p> <p>Thanks for reading!!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: wysiwyg ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia-1 CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 09/24/2010 09:59:24 AM ----BODY: <p>Some quick hits for a cool and raining and busy Fall Friday:</p>! <ul>! <li>The most exciting thing this week is <a href="http://www.uc.edu/pompeii/">Steven Ellis&#39; Pompeii project</a> being featured on <a href="http://www.apple.com/ipad/pompeii/">the Apple website </a>for its creative use of iPads. &#0160;I had a chance to work with many of these people at Isthmia and I can attest that their use of the iPad at Pompeii was more than just a gadget exercise. &#0160;The technologies actually made excavation more efficient and appears to have made it easier to document their trenches more thoroughly.</li>! <li>A new and really useful <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/09/23/what-i-wish-i-had-know-beforeteaching-my-first-online-course/">Teaching Thursday this week</a> featuring 25&#0160; some starter tips for online course design and teaching.</li>! <li>I&#39;m beginning to like covers of &quot;Smells Like Teen Spirit&quot; better than the original. &#0160;<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2KZjnFZvCNc">Check this out</a>. (inspired by Chuck Jones who<a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TFoS9bho2Ww"> posted a link to this</a>)</li>! <li>Big announcements from <a href="http://www.zotero.org/">Zotero</a>. &#0160;My Zotero use had declined since I started using Chrome more often. &#0160;The recent announcement that Zotero was going to be cross platform and even create a free-standing version is great to hear. &#0160;And <a href="http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Zotero-Everywhere-How-Will-it/27037/">this post from ProfHacker</a> sets out some of the most exciting aspects of these developments. </li>!

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<li><a href="http://mediacaffeine.com/perspectives/environmental/put-cameras-ona-peregrine-falcon-and-a-goshawk-prepare-to-be-amazed/">These videos of Peregrine Falcon and Goshawk with cameras</a> on them are crazy. &#0160;I wonder how the cameras effect the birds aerodynamics?</li>! <li><em>The Atlantic </em>put together <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2010/09/the-atlantic-techcanon-1-10/62818/">a canon of major works on technology</a>. &#0160;There are some omissions but over all, it&#39;s pretty good.</li>! <li>I need to finish up my paper for the <a href="https://webspace.utexas.edu/sjf365/CC3/Intro.html">Corinth in Contrast</a> conference next week.</li>! <li>I received a vote for tenure from my department this week. &#0160;Thank for all the encouragement and support!</li>! <li>What I&#39;m listening to: Crocodiles, Sleep Forever and <a href="http://www.fatpossum.com/news/83">this free EP from the fantastic Fat Possum</a>.</li>! </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Some Notes on RBHS Analysis of the Pyla-Koutsopetria Survey Data STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: some-notes-on-rbhs-analysis-of-the-pyla-koutsopetria-survey-data CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: David Pettegrew CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 09/23/2010 07:45:55 AM ----BODY: <p>No RBHS is not a local high-school to whom I've outsourced PKAP data analysis, nor is it a new type of digital hi-def television.&nbsp; Those letters stand for Rim, base, handle, sherd and represent the basic parts of a ceramic vessel.&nbsp; Since most of the vessels one finds in survey and even excavation are not whole or are broken and mangled, documenting the rim, base, handle, and sherds from each vessel is an important way to understand how we as archaeologists are able to identify an particular object and assign it to a date, function, and even, sometimes, place of manufacture. It is also helpful in secure, stratigraphic contexts (that not in an unstratified survey context) for identifying the minimum number of possible vessels of a particular type because we know that some kinds of vessels on have, say, one-handle, then a four handles

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would represent at least four vessels of this type.</p> <p><a href="http://www.atypon-link.com/ASCS/doi/abs/10.2972/hesp.76.4.743">David Pettegrew's research</a> has really set the stage for applying this kind of analysis to the PKAP survey data. He has argued that certainly highly diagnostic artifact types (for example Late Roman 1 amphora handles or Late Roman "combed ware" body sherds) can distort the chronological distribution of material at a site.&nbsp; Periods characterized by less diagnostic artifact types tend to be less easily associated with a narrow chronology or function and under represented in relation to period defined by more easily identified vessels types.&nbsp; So isolating the way in which particular periods become visible using our Rim/Base/Handle/Sherd analysis becomes an important to critique our survey data. <p>Fortunately, the basic system that we use to document our ceramics, the chronotype system, took into account rbhs. The chronotype system required the ceramicist to separate and document as a group, called a batch, according the extant part of each type of vessel present . In other words, we counted in one batch all of the rims from, say, a Roman Amphora and in another batch all the handles from the same kind of amphora. This has allowed us to parse quite finely the character of our assemblages and its relationship to our ability to identify particular types of artifacts based on their individual parts. <p>So here are some basic observations: <ul> <li>Of the 19 periods with more than 20 sherds collected using our standard survey procedure, 13 counted the majority of artifacts as body sherds. In other words, for most periods, body sherds represent both the most common and the most chronologically diagnostic type of material.</li> <li>Only for the Archaic period were the majority of artifacts identified by one part of a vessel, and these almost all came from one type of vessel, so-called Archaic basket handled storage jars.</li> <li>Of the 258 chronotype (that is discrete types of artifacts) that produced extant parts (some chronotypes, like shells or wall plaster fragments, do not produce extant parts that we can easily record), 138 of 55% of these chronotypes were identifiable based on only one extant part. 76% are recognized by only two extant parts and 90% by three. 99% by four extant parts (mainly RBHS).&nbsp; In other words, most artifacts are only recognizable by one part of the vessel.</li> <li>It is interesting to note that the number of chronotypes associated with a particular period has almost no influence on the average number of extant parts by which a vessel is identified. Large number of chronotypes identifiable by a large number of extant parts (4+) come from Roman (40), Late Bronze Age-Hellenistic (18), Ancient Historic (39), Hellenistic-Early Roman (24) vessels. At the same time 4 or more extant parts also appeared for periods with fewer chronotypes, like Classical-Roman (6), Late-Cypriot II-Late Cypriot III (4), and Post-Prehistoric (4).&nbsp; This means that while the majority of sherds from each period are body sherds, they nevertheless have vessels that are identifiable based on other parts of the artifact.&nbsp; In other words, our ability to date artifacts to a particular period is independent from the number of vessels with identifiable extent parts. Some periods have three or four chronotypes with lots of identifiable fragments; others have 25 different chronotypes with a mix more and less easily identifiable artifact types.&nbsp; There does not seem to be a pattern.</li> <li>Far more central to the number of parts of the vessel that we can identify is the kind of vessel and their function. Kitchen/Cooking ware produce the most possible extant parts (4+) followed by coarse ware and amphora chronotypes (3.8). Medium coarse ware produced 3.5, while pithos, semi-fine, and fine all produced 2.4 or fewer extant parts per chronotype. This likely has more to do with the shapes of the vessel than the size of the vessel.</li></ul> <p>This kind of analysis may seem tedious and complicated, but it is important to understand how bias in our ability to identify a particular type of artifact can influence the kinds of chronological

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and functional landscapes that we create from survey data.&nbsp; In examining our data in this way, we can really see the point of contact between what our ceramicist does in placing artifacts in particular classes and our historical reconstructions of the landscape.&nbsp; The entire world of Pyla-Koutsopetria is literally born from the data gleaned from individual artifacts.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More on Open Learning STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-on-open-learning CATEGORY: Academia CATEGORY: Public History DATE: 09/22/2010 06:37:08 AM ----BODY: <p>A couple of weeks ago I sketched out a proposal for an "institute of open learning" at the University of North Dakota.  I pitched it to some of the "power-that-be", and I think that I have some basic start up funds to make it happen.</p> <p>Now the proposal has to make its way through the administrative hierarchy here on campus.  In the meantime, I'll make a draft of the proposal available here.  Everything included in the proposal is tentative right now including prospects for funding and collaborative relationships on campus, and I expect this might all change if and when we get down to brass tacks (e.g. cost of implementation, et c.).</p> <p>But for now, here it is:</p> <p><a style="margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sansserif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; display: block; text-decoration: underline;" title="View Proposal for the Development of Open Learning Courses on Scribd" href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/37922545/Proposal-for-the-Development-of-OpenLearning-Courses">Proposal for the Development of Open Learning Courses</a> <object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" width="100%" height="600"> <param name="movie" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" /> <param name="wmode" value="opaque" /> <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" />

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<param name="FlashVars" value="document_id=37922545&amp;access_key=keyvp8vo3vzdp4m6o12n4f&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" /> <embed id="doc_89885483313925" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="100%" height="600" src="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf?document_id=37922545&amp;access _key=key-vp8vo3vzdp4m6o12n4f&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" name="doc_89885483313925" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" wmode="opaque" bgcolor="#ffffff"></embed> </object> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Plotting Cut Blocks Across Pyla-Koutsopetria STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: plotting-cut-blocks-across-pyla-koutsopetria CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 09/21/2010 07:12:19 AM ----BODY: <p>Between 2005 and 2006, the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project documented over 500 features from the Koutsopetria plain.&nbsp; Most of these features were cut blocks of various sizes, material and descriptions as well as a handful of features associated with ancient agricultural installations (bit of an olive press, some andesite mill fragments, et c.).&nbsp; Over the past couple of days, I finally got to analyzing this data beyond simply observing that we have lots of cut blocks.&nbsp; <a href="http://www.pkap.org/staff.html">The field team</a> in 2005 and 2006 recorded detailed information regarding the location, size, and in many cases generally descriptions of each block and keyed them into a database that we could integrate with our GIS.</p> <p>Most of the architectural fragments including cut limestone and gypsum blocks, are concentrated in the immediate Koutsopetria plain where farmers have moved them to stone piles on the edges of the fields. Check out our newest additions (partially edited) to our Omeka Collection: <em><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse?collection=9">PylaKoutsopetria from the Air</a> </em>to get an idea of what these stone piles look like.</p> <p align="center"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/koutsopetria_north_2007_ 4944fb9f0e.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/koutsopetria_north_2007_

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4944fb9f0e.jpg" width="450" height="300"></p> <p align="center"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/koutsopetriawest9_2010_7 156214481.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/koutsopetriawest9_2010_7 156214481.jpg" width="450" height="338">&nbsp;</p> <p align="left">The most common type of cut block is made of local limestone and probably quarried on site. The majority of the blocks fall between 0.3 and 0.7 m in length and 0.3 and 0.5 in width. For the blocks where all three dimensions are visible, their volume falls between 0.06 and 0.03 cubic meters. This produced blocks of between 75 kg and 140 kg which would be relatively easily moved for construction. Some blocks, of course, could be much larger exceeding 1 m in length and weighing close to 500 kg. With blocks of this size, there is almost no doubt that some large scale, monumental architecture once stood in the immediate area.&nbsp; Here's a distribution map.&nbsp; The grey grid in the background is our survey grid and the color of the dots relates to the volume of the stone.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134878c0755970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="CutBlocks" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f46c6330970b -pi" width="454" height="338"></a> </p> <p align="left">We also documented a significant quantity of cut gypsum block.&nbsp; Since marble did not naturally occur on the island, Cypriots often used gypsum as a substitute in more elaborate buildings.&nbsp; These blocks are generally similar in size to the cut limestone blocks with lengths of around a half a meter and widths of 0.3 meters. The average volume of blocks was similar to that of the cut blocks with only a few blocks exceeding 0.1 cubic meters. There were slightly more smaller blocks owing most likely to the more friable character of gypsum. Most blocks fell between 0.01 and 0.06 cubic meters. Gypsum has a lower density than limestone and the blocks had correspondingly lower weight usually between 25 kg and 140 kg. Many, much smaller fragments of gypsum were scattered across the fields and several very large blocks appeared clustered together. Here's a map:</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134878c0769970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="GypsumBlocks" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134878c076f970c -pi" width="454" height="338"></a>&nbsp;</p> <p align="left">Finally, we also discovered a small quantity of marble from across the site.&nbsp; Most of these came from the central area of the Koutsopetria plain embedded in rock piles at the edges of cultivated tracks of land. The marble fragments are small &lt; .30 m in maximum length and relatively thin &lt;.04 m suggesting that all but one marble fragment was revetment or floor slabs. The wide distribution of material perhaps indicates that there were several marble clad buildings on the plain of Koutsopetria even though so little marble survives.&nbsp; Here's a map:</p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134878c0755970 c-pi"></a> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f46c6347970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="MarbleBlocks" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f46c634d970b -pi" width="454" height="338"></a></p> <p align="left">The next step in analyzing this material is considering its relationship to the re-used blocks found in the excavations at Koutsopetria and the construction techniques used in the fortification wall surrounding Vigla.&nbsp; It certainly seems possible that

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the majority of cut stone blocks scattered around the Koutsopetria plain came from the easily quarried fortifications at Vigla and perhaps also the extensive walls surrounding the Bronze Age site of Kokkinokremos.&nbsp; Gypsum blocks had fairly limited uses architecturally owing to their lack of strength and value as prestige materials.&nbsp; The gypsum fragments from around the site probably served in specific places in buildings and comparing their sizes to in situ blocks from elsewhere on the island might give us some idea of how they were used.</p> <p align="left">&nbsp;</p></a> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Romanization and Christianization STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: romanization-and-christianization CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 09/20/2010 08:02:38 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the last few weeks, I've been reading some basic, recent works on Romanization or the expansion of "Roman culture" across the area of either direct Roman political control or strong Roman influence.  Most of these works dealt with Western Europe and considered the relationship between the archaeological remains clearly identified as being Roman with those typically seen as "pre-Roman" or local.  Most works consider cultural change as a process and see the interaction between Roman and non-Roman representing both resistance and accommodation.  Moreover, most of these works see the term "Romanization" as problematic.  In particular, the notion of Romanization as a cohesive phenomenon functioning in similar ways across the entire area of Roman influence has done more harm than good and papered over variation in the process of cultural exchange rooted in social status, economic organization, traditions of elite display, and even Roman policies across the Empire.</p> <p>The basic critique of Romanization (for lack, at present, of a better or more compact term), has clear and obvious parallels with critiques of Christianization over the past 20+ years.  In fact, the conversations about the two concepts are so parallel that it is a wonder that more obvious (than I have seen) cross-pollination between these two scholarly approaches to cultural exchange have not appeared.  I've come away from studying this material with the following little gaggle of observations:</p> <p>1. The Viewer. Since John Clarke and Jas Elsner introduced me to the Roman viewer, I have become convinced that the act of viewing is central to the understanding the process of cultural engagement.  While it is almost old-hat

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now to observe that content producers (to use a nice, new media term) do not have exclusive control over how endusers view their content, actualizing this understanding in scholarship is a difficult task, especially if the enduser represents a group that has not left behind the kind of cultural material that scholars are apt to interpret (e.g. texts, monumental buildings, ceramics, sculpture, et c.).</p> <p>2. Hybrids. Post-colonial critiques have seemingly cast long shadow over the process of Roman political and cultural expansion. A hybridized elite worked to bridge the gap between the political core and periphery and hybrid cultural places created space for that could accommodate both local and non-local interests.  Within the study of Christianization, the notion of the hybrid has not seen the same interest from scholars, although it seems clear that the spread of Christianity can be at least partly associated with the religious, ritual, and political interest of the political center.  The rarity of any discussion of hybridity within the discourse Christianization is, in part, a matter of terminology. Certainly scholars have understood the emergence of Christianity as a process that produced myriad hybrids through, for example, processes like syncretism.  Our relative lack of interest in the notion of hybridity may stem from a reluctance to see the process of religious change as one of imperialism or colonization.</p> <p>3. Resistance. Hybrids form just one point on an increasingly nuanced ranged of potential cultural interaction in the ancient world.  The extremes, of course, are typically of greater interest to the scholar, if for no other reason than they are more likely to leave evidence.  The more pressing question, to my mind at least, ishow do we recalibrate our analytical lens to see more subtle forms of resistance to aggressive or openly hostile projects to promote social, political, or religious change. The process of Christianization took place over long spans of time and through the independent actions of multiple groups and agents; finding resistance in this context is far more than documenting the obvious occasions when Christian buildings were torched by hostile non-Christian groups.</p> <p>4. Plurality. Just as being Roman accommodates many different, sometimes incompatible, forms of cultural expression, being Christian can hardly be reduced to a fixed set of characteristics. The plurality of Roman culture and Christianity both require that we expand our understanding of how these two phenomena manifest themselves in a social, political, and cultural context.  In some cases, this might involve simply qualifying what we mean when we say Roman or Christian: for example, direct Roman political control or imperial or ecclesiastical Christianity.  In other cases, we might have to reconsider the relationship between hybrid identities and forms of Roman-ness and Christianity and the way in which such identities appeared to various groups of viewers.</p> <p>5. Erasure and Process. The creation of a Roman space or a Christian space in the ancient world was part of a process that involved, in part, the overwriting of earlier forms of cultural, economic, political, and social relationships.  In short, the process of Romanizing and Christianizing not only involves present forms of cultural expression, but projects these back into the past making it much more difficult for the historian and archaeologist to discover the traces of the process itself.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: -----

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KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits-1 CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 09/17/2010 10:09:49 AM ----BODY: <p>It's a beautiful but chilly fall morning, ideal for a little gaggle of quick hits:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.vanityfair.com/business/features/2010/10/greeks-bearingbonds-201010">There is an interesting article in </a><em><a href="http://www.vanityfair.com/business/features/2010/10/greeks-bearing-bonds201010">Vanity Fair</a></em> that looks at the role of Athonite monks in Greek financial crisis.  The economic power of monastic communities in both Greece and Cyprus evokes the role of monasteries in Byzantium.</li> <li><a href="http://news.stanford.edu/news/2010/september/morris-west-rules091410.html">An Ian Morris interview </a>offers a few gems: "The past sucked" and "The ancient distinctions between East and West will be irrelevant to robots". (via <a href="http://classics.chass.utoronto.ca/index.php/faculty/facultylist/42">Dimitri Nakassis</a>)</li> <li><a href="http://www.niemanlab.org/2010/09/twitter-queen-susan-orlean-on-themini-medium-the-interactive-narrative-and-the-writing-persona/">Twitter as narrative and as mind-streaming</a>.</li> <li>A new <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday yesterday</a> reminds me of some of the challenges from teaching my first class as a grad student years ago. (And if you don't, follow us at <a href="http://twitter.com/OIDatUND">OIDatUND on Twitter</a>)</li> <li>It's great to see Kostis Kourelis blogging again and his post on the<a href="http://kourelis.blogspot.com/2010/09/masons-of-morea.html"> Masons of the Morea</a> is great piece of mini-scholarship (also inspired by <a href="http://classics.chass.utoronto.ca/index.php/faculty/facultylist/42">Dimitri Nakassis</a>). </li> <li>What I'm reading: R. Hingley, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/globalizing-roman-culture-unity-diversityand-empire/oclc/56051095">Globalizing Roman Culture: unity, diversity and empire</a></em>. Routledge 2005.</li> <li>What I'm listening to: Saccharine Trust, <em>We Became Snakes</em>; Busta Rhymes, <em>When Disaster Strikes;</em> The Walkmen, <em>Lisbon</em>.</li> </ul> <p>Have a great fall weekend!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: -----

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EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: What does Archaeology and the New Media look like? STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: what-does-archaeology-and-the-new-media-look-like CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 09/16/2010 09:13:35 AM ----BODY: <p>After a phone chat with an old friend yesterday, I got to wondering what an edited volume on archaeology and the new media would look like.  Here are my random thoughts:</p> <p>1. Dynamic. If we've learned anything from the New Media moment, it's that static media is old media. The New Media - whatever that really is - is dynamic, adaptive, conversational, and unstable. It is a bit difficult to understand how a traditional edited volume that recognizes the value of the New Media in archaeology would bridge the gap between a static book form (and I would certainly count most ebooks as static, electronic versions of the Old Media) and the dynamic forms of expression that have characterized new media concepts. I could, perhaps, imagine a publication as a application for the iPad or coming wave of Android tablets that would fully embrace the nascent ability of ereaders, like the Kindle, to allow people to read collectively by providing access to other readers annotations.</p> <p>2. Historical. At the same time, I'd want a volume to reflect and capture a specific historical moment in the development of archaeology as a discipline.  As archaeologists, we know that excavation and documentation are both productive and destructive processes.  The creation of a volume on archaeology and the New Media could embrace this destruction/production dichotomy both by preserving in some way our thinking about the role of web 2.0 technologies in our work and by destroying the web 2.0-ness of these technologies (and ways of thinking) in a static, profoundly archaeological volume.  The archival tendency in archaeology could presumably accept the loss of the New Media experience for the sake of its historical description and preservation in another medium.</p> <p>What do these first two points mean? An application or web site and an archive (a printed volume)?</p> <p>3. Sampling Strategy.  The one thing about New Media engagement with archaeological work is that range of applications and goals.  Some projects see New Media as a means of publicizing their work to an established group of "stakeholders" or even working to expand the group of stakeholders by leveraging the webs infinite reach (and this is the point of departure that my project took when first experimenting with blogging).  Other projects developed New Media technologies in their core project goals viewing the text-blogging or photoblogging or video-blogging or pod-casting or whatever as central to the way archaeological research functions as story telling.  The use of new media also

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extends from the New World archaeological practices to the deepest bastions of Old World archaeology and from the most highly restricted research oriented projects to field schools.  Sampling a range of project's that have used New Media would be necessary to document New Media in both practice and theory.</p> <p>4. Definitions. The sampling strategy proposed above would help create a definition for the New Media in an archaeological context that would capture a moment in time and a discrete range of relationships between archaeological methods and media technologies. The production of an archives forms the basis for this kind of disciplinary definition that can serve as a measuring stick of effectiveness, innovation, and mark out more clearly conceptual boundaries.</p> <p>5. Best Practices.  There are practical concerns for using New Media technologies in archaeology.  Some of them have to do with control over archaeological data and various national policies for the dissemination of sensitive archaeological information.  As New Media technologies are increasingly used to record various aspects of archaeological research, there should be a set of  best practices to ensure that the output of even the most ephemeral outputs are not lost.  While a single set of best practices is unlikely to emerge, principles of curation would certainly provide a framework around which more practical approaches could cohere.</p> <p>What are your thoughts on the design, scope, and content of a volume on Archaeology and the New Media?</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Fee EMAIL: samfee@gmail.com IP: 209.131.80.228 URL: http://www.samfee.net/ DATE: 10/01/2010 11:05:49 AM For the first two points, I think it is indeed both an archive and a web app. (A web app will run both online and natively - once compiled - for both iOS and Android). This would let us hit the broadest audience: users of text, the web, and mobile devices. It could also help form a community around the work. What I continue to struggle with though is how to collect and organize the ideas we have for content. I think you've got some good ideas here - the best practices section could essentially be a collection of case studies for the use of new media in archaeological research and education. I think the definitions ideas works as well, although I might broaden it... I guess I better get to work! I'll write up my ideas and post to my blog. We'll have a prospectus in no time : ) -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Metadata Wednesday STATUS: Publish

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ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: metadata-wednesday CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 09/15/2010 09:25:38 AM ----BODY: <p>Every once and a while, I get in the mood to post some metadata about my blog.  I last did this at the end of April <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/me tadata-monday-700-posts.html">when I hit my 700th post</a>.  I was thinking about waiting until 800 to do it again, but here I am at 792 and I got just a bit impatient.</p> <p>So, here's some new metadata.</p> <p>First, the summer is always a slow time for the blog.  Over the last 150 days, I received 7008  visits or about 47 hits a day according to Google Analytics.  These unique visits accounted for 10,047 page views or about 67 page views per day (or 1.43 views per visit).  The analytics provided by TypePad claim about 1,800 more page views (11, 903), so as per usual, web analytics is a precise, but rather in exact science.  The numbers reflect the summer lull, for the previous 5 months, I recorded 9,139 unique visitors and 14,559 views.  Overall, I am still hanging just under 80 page views a day.</p> <p>Here's the traditional map of Archaeology of the Mediterranean World visitors:</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="MetaDataSept10.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013487604051970c -pi" border="0" alt="MetaDataSept10.jpg" width="450" height="174" /></p> <p>The top 10 countries: US, Greece, UK, Canada, Italy, Australia, France, Germany, India, and Cyprus.  In the US, the top 10 states were North Dakota, California, Pennsylvania, Ohio, New York, Florida, Texas, Washington, Illinois, and Michigan.</p> <p>More interesting, perhaps, to my readers interested in technology is the browser data:</p> <p>Firefox: 46%<br />Internet Explorer: 28%<br />Chrome: 11%<br />Safari: 10%<br />Opera: 3%</p> <p><a href="http://techcrunch.com/2010/09/02/chrome-firefox-techcrunc/">As a number of observers have noted</a>, Chrome is digging into Firefox's share.  Last time I ran numbers (from October 2009 - April 2010), Firefox accounted for 53% of the browser share and Chrome was 6%.  It's interesting that since that time Internet Explorer and Safari has more or less held steady and Opera has more than doubled it share.</p> <p>Over the same span of time, the different operating systems of the computers accessing my blog have not shifted much:</p> <p>Windows: 72%<br />Mac: 23%<br />Linux: 2.5%</p> <p>iPhone: 0.8%<br />iPad: 0.7%<br />iPod: 0.2%<br />Android: 0.2%<br />Blackberry: 0.1%</p> <p>Linux has grown, and there have been notable shifts in the number of people accessing my blog from mobile devices with iPhone, iPod, and iPad showing marked increases as well as Android (but the overall number of views on these devices has remained small).</p> <p>So that's where my blog is in the metadata university.  It's a far cry from the first few times I reported on metadata at <a

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href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2007/11/10 0-posts.html">100 posts</a> and<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2007/09/tr affic-report.html"> at 2500 (!!) hits</a>.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Even More Contrasting Corinth STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: even-more-contrasting-corinth CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 09/14/2010 08:00:37 AM ----BODY: <p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/mo re-contrasting-corinth.html">Yesterday I promised more inequality, resistance, and contrast in the Corinthia</a>, and here at the Archaeology of the Mediterranean World, I mostly deliver on what I promise.</p> <p>Over the last few days I've been thinking about these small texts:</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="LechGraffiti.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f432ee67970b -pi" border="0" alt="LechGraffiti.jpg" width="450" height="168" /></p> <p>This is the text of two graffiti discovered on a wall fragment from the octagonal baptistery at Lechaion.  Both texts are rather fragmentary.  The first text seems to ask for someone to remember a woman named Eudokia, and the second text is a plea to help the deacon Loukianos, his wife (?), and children.  Both texts conform to the long standing practice of inscribed prayers.  The texts were scratched into what appears to be the mortar of the wall.  The photograph is poorly reproduced in my photocopy of the publication and Pallas' description of the location of the text is unclear.</p> <p>These texts represent a very personal plea for aid set up in a sacred place.  This practice was a long-standing Christian tradition and similar calls for help appear in mosaic floors and inscribed on columns, liturgical silver, and ceramics from across the Mediterranean basin.  At the same time, their rather humble mode of execution contrasts dramatically with the lavish decoration present in the Lechaion basilica.  These texts were not carved into marble and positioned where an audience could experience the proximity of the individuals to the sources of ecclesiastical, ritual, and religious power.  These modest letters were scratched into a wall of the baptistery which is an unusual place

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for such imprecations.  The most obvious explanation for the disjunction between these texts and their surroundings may be that these texts date from the time that the octagonal baptistery appears to have functioned as a church, perhaps after the collapse of the enormous basilica to its south.  Like the graffiti documented by Orlandos on the columns of the Parthenon, the modest character of these texts represents more an eagerness to locate one's prayers in the existing physical fabric of the building rather than a lack of resources or access to official sanction.  After all, Loukianos was a deacon who presumably could have arranged for a more official venue for his call for help.</p> <p>At the same time these texts present a vivid contrast to another, betterknown inscribed prayer from the Corinthia: the request for protection found at Isthmia. Unlike the modest texts incribed on the wall of the Lechaion baptistery, this text which asks God to protect Justinian, Victorinus, and everyone living according to God in Greece</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f432ee72970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="450" height="338" /></p> <p>As readers of this blog are probably tired of hearing, this text should probably be associated with the refortification of the Hexamilion wall by the emperor Justinian, and I have argued (as have others) that the Lechaion basilica is probably another example of imperial activities in the region.</p> <p>I am not sure that I'd argue too forcefully that contrasting character of these two texts represent some kind of inequality or resistance in the Corinthian landscape, but on the other hand, the graffiti text from Lechaion is far more likely to represent an authentic local voice.  And this local voice surely did not share the same access to resources as the emperor, and this local voice may not have had the same ability to endure the the challenging years of the Early Byzantine period in Greece.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More Contrasting Corinth STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-contrasting-corinth CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 09/13/2010 07:14:42 AM ----BODY: <p>As some of you may know, I am toiling away on a paper that I will give at the Corinth in Contrast conference in Austin at the end of the month.  I've been

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looking at the way in which the 6th century, likely Justinianic, building boom in the Corinthia represented a monumentalized discourse of authority (both local and imperial, political, military, and religious) in the region.  This is a version of a paper I gave some years ago at a conference celebrating <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2007/12/ep igraphy-litur.html">50 years of field work at Isthmia</a>.  In that paper, I focused on two Justinianic inscriptions; in my paper for Corinth in Contrast, I planned to focus on archaeology and architecture.</p> <p>I produced a decent draft of my paper entitled "The Ambivalent Landscape of Christian Corinth: The Archaeology of Place, Theology, and Politics in a Late Antique City", but realized that the paper had very little to do with the theme of the conference:</p> <blockquote> <p><span style="line-height: 21px;">This conference explores the stratified nature of social, political, economic, and religious spheres at Corinth, and how the resulting inequalities are reflected in literary texts and material remains.  The analysis focuses on a specific population center (the Corinthia) over a given period of time (Hellenistic to Late Antique).</span></p> </blockquote> <p>In particular, my paper had almost nothing to do with "inequality".  This bothered me.</p> <p>Over the weekend, I read Louise Revell's <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/roman-imperialism-and-localidentities/oclc/476883783">Roman Imperialism and Local Identity</a></em> (Cambridge 2009) with the idea models of Romanization might give me some way to access the relationship between a monumentalized discourse and social, economic, and even political inequality in Corinth.  Revell's introduction does a nice job at summarizing recent problemizations of Romanization, and emphasizes the performative aspects of Romanization as central to way in which imperialism manifests on the local level and local practices manifest as resistance, accommodation, and ambivalence.</p> <p>Despite my initial interest in performance in the way that I originally interpreted the Justinianic inscriptions, I had abandoned using this approach for a reason that I now forget (it might have to do with a particularly summary rejection of an article, but it might have just been time to move on).  After reading Revell, I began to see contrasts across the Corinthian countryside that hint at just the kind of inequality - whether manufactured as an ideological position or "real" - that would make my paper fit better to the theme of the conference and give it a more potent theoretical edge.</p> <p>First, and most generally, the act of producing monumental architecture is a kind of performance.  I argue that the Lechaion basilica (and related buildings) and the renovated Hexamillion wall are buildings with projected imperial power onto the Corinthian landscape.  Corinthians themselves not only saw these buildings as intrusions of 6th century imperial theology into local ecclesiastical affairs (<a href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/28019578/EpigraphyLiturgy-Justinianic-Isthmus-Caraher">for more on this read over this still unpublished paper</a>), but also contributed to the various ways that these buildings produced meaning.  Local Corinthians, irrespective of theological (or, frankly, religious predilections) surely contributed to the physical construction of the great church and the repairs to the various monumental walls Procopius reports Justinian to have funded in the Corinthia.  Building made their bodies physically complicit in the production of imperial ideology on the Isthmus.  Moreover, individuals involved in manual labor would have surrendered their bodies - if, in fact, working on imperial projects had an ideological or

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theological aspect - more readily than elites who could have held their bodies apart from the actual performance of imperial power.</p> <p>The bodies of the work crews who labored physically to construct imperial authority on the Isthmus do leave traces. Sanders has reported that similar graffiti in the wet mortar of both the Lechaion basilica and the Panayia bath in the city of Corinth proper (and perhaps the Hexamillion wall as well) suggest that the same work crews or the same organization provided labor for both buildings.  The simple inscribed fish in the mortar of both buildings would have been probably been covered with a layer of finer stucco when the building was completed and not visible.  At the same time, the symbol of the fish seems likely to have had religious significance.  The fish had been one of the earliest symbols associated with Christianity.  While we have no idea whether these symbols were set to mark out these buildings as "Christian" (as if this was necessary for the Lechaion basilica church!) or to mark the work of a particular crew of laborers or some kind of apotropaic function that suggested either resistance or accommodation, it is clear that the laborers had agency in the act of constructing these monumental buildings and hence were capable of seeing their labor as a ideological action.</p> <p>At the opposite end of the spectrum, the second largest basilica in the Corinthia is the Kraneion basilica.  Roughly contemporary with Lechaion basilica, it has clear similarities in form. Both churches have numerous annex rooms, a nartex and atria (albeit Kraneion appears to have a second atria extending to the south), water features in the western atria, and a baptistery arranged to the northwest of the church.  The most striking difference between these buildings is that the naves are separated from the aisles at Kraneion by means of a series of narrow piers supporting arches.  Lechaion follows a more traditional pattern by separating the nave from the aisles by a series of columns supporting arches that spring from ornate ionic impost capitals.  At least some of the columns in this nave colonnade were imperially controlled Proconnesian marble and the ionic impost capitals are sufficiently regular in design to suggest an imperial work crew.  The absence, then, of a marble colonnade at Kraneion would have made this church stand out.  If we assume that the nave colonnade at Lechaion worked to communicate the building's imperial funded status, then the absence of such a colonnade at Kraneion may have positioned this church as a conspicuously non-imperial foundation.  While it is impossible to do more than suggest this argument, it is striking that Kraneion is one of the few churches in the Late Roman province of Achaia that used piers in the place of the colonnade. This becomes more significant, if we assume (as <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/church-society-and-the-sacred-in-earlychristian-greece/oclc/59019454">I have argued elsewhere</a>) that the colonnade in Late Roman Greece served to frame the perspective of the congregation as they watched the liturgical proceedings performed by the clergy in an otherwise empty nave.  The contrasting arrangement between these two buildings would hardly be lost on even the most casual observer especially as the Lechaion basilica demonstrates that the colonnade is a feature suited to display of wealth and control over lavish resources.  Like the fish in the mortar, the absence of a nave colonnade could represent a local response, perhaps even resistance, to the wealth and authority vested in display.</p> <p>Neither of these examples explicitly suggest inequality in a modern sense fueled by a post-Enlightenment understanding of the rights of human agents as individuals.  On the other hand, these two examples (and the careful reader will observe that I do have one more, but it'll have to wait until I get into my office this morning to check a citation), demonstrate that despite different the differing economic and social position of the actors within Corinthian society,

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there was nevertheless ample opportunity to participate in both acts of resistance and accommodation.</p> <p>Stay tuned for more...</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: David EMAIL: dpettegrew@messiah.edu IP: 74.99.148.10 URL: DATE: 09/13/2010 09:01:38 PM Look forward to reading it. I too need to retune my paper (almost finished) according to angle of inequality. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 09/10/2010 10:41:17 AM ----BODY: <p>It's a rainy and dreary Friday.  So just a modest list of quick hits:</p> <ul> <li>I put in my tenure application yesterday.  <a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/dept/artsci/facultystaff/forms/_docs/T&amp;P_Checklist_2010.pdf">This is the first page of it</a> to give you an idea of the number forms, and forms about forms, and forms summarizing the work summarized on other forms. I found it too difficult to include my blog in the official paperwork for tenure, but I think it will lurk in the background to some extent.</li> <li><a href="http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2010/09/the-future-of-reading2/">The future of reading</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://mith.umd.edu/vintage-computers/">This is a pretty fantastic site that considers computers as historical objects</a>.</li> <li>A little press for my <a href="http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/175010/">Fall of the Roman Empire class</a>.</li> <li>There will be some announcement regarding <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/09/aproposal.html">this post in the next few weeks</a>. </li>

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<li>There are two people who I follow on Facebook whose posts are so amazing to me that I want to collect them and create a Tumblr of them.  They're models of what not to say as an academic in a new job or searching for a job.  But they're also a kind of poetry of frustration and professional unawareness that make them somehow more wholesome and honest.</li> <li>This is a great weekend for sports: Formula One, NASCAR at Richmond, great college football, first weekend of the NFL, and some great baseball pennant races.</li> <li>What I'm reading: L. Revell, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/roman-imperialism-and-localidentities/oclc/476883783">Roman Imperialisms and Local Identities</a></em>. (Cambridge 2009)</li> <li>What I'm listening to: The Urinals, <em>Negative Capability... Check it Out!, </em>The Minutemen, <em><a href="http://www.corndogs.org/">Acoustic Blowout</a></em>.</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: My Career in Paper STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: my-career-in-paper CATEGORY: Academia DATE: 09/09/2010 07:39:27 AM ----BODY: <p>So, my tenure application is almost done.  And this is more or less what it looks like.  In other words, my career in its most radically material form.</p>! <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="MyLifeinPaper.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f406b210970b -pi" border="0" alt="MyLifeinPaper.jpg" width="450" height="450" /></p>! <p>It hardly looks impressive. I've seen some tenure files spill over three large binders.  But this is what it is.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: -----

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KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Evan Nelson EMAIL: evannelson@mail.und.edu IP: 134.129.203.235 URL: http://www.gradschool.und.edu DATE: 09/09/2010 10:30:11 AM I do see a bit of sag in the desk, which is impressive. Also, it never hurts to include an 8x10 glossy head shot. With a subtle spray of cologne. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Susan Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.205.189 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/susancaraher DATE: 09/10/2010 07:25:48 AM I happen to know there is a lot more to it. You should have put the big diesel in the photo too. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: A Proposal STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: a-proposal CATEGORY: Academia CATEGORY: North Dakotiana CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 09/08/2010 07:33:07 AM ----BODY: <p>As readers of this blog know, I get pretty excited about various projects that seek to open up research and teaching to the general public.  I have a naive faith that the public is interested in what we as scholars do and a commitment to trying to meet them half-way in explaining my research, interests, and discipline.  I am not always sure that I succeed in making my research accessible, but, as I hope this blog testifies, I certainly try.</p> <p>As part of this commitment, I've been mulling over a way to offer my classes to the public for free.  It's easy enough to make content available; I post my podcasts and usually syllabi here, list the books and topics of my classes, and even report on my pedagogical successes and failures. These efforts, however, are a one way window into my courses.  With the exception of the occasional blog post from loyal readers or past students, I don't get much feedback from students because the media that I have used to communicate my course material is not designed to foster the kind of dynamic interaction that a full-featured online course, for example, or a classroom discussion requires.</p> <p>A recent notice in the <em><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/OpenTeaching-When-the/124170/?sid=at&amp;utm_source=at&amp;utm_medium=en">Chronicle

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of Higher Education</a></em> and a quick read of Mark Taylor's new book, <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Crisis-Campus-Reforming-CollegesUniversities/dp/0307593290">Crisis on Campus: A Bold Plan for Reforming Our Colleges and Universities</a></em> (New York 2010), once again rekindled my interest in imagining a different way to teach. In a moment of excitement, I sent an email to one of the "powers-that-be" on campus and pitched an idea that the University of North Dakota offer some free classes on-line, open to anyone who signs up (for no credit) as well as paying students (for credit). I pitched the idea to some of my trusted interlocutors here and got some good responses, and now have a meeting set up with some folks on the technical side of developing this idea as well as folks on the administrative side.</p> <p>I even have imagined a name for this venture: The Institute for Open Learning at the University of North Dakota.</p> <p>The programs would look for intellectual and technical support from folks with existing expertise on campus and seek to build alliances that encourage the development of contemporary, sophisticated, and varied course material for large scale online teaching opportunities on the web.  As I have argued in <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Crisis-Campus-Reforming-CollegesUniversities/dp/0307593290">an earlier blog post</a>, teaching an open online class with for-credit students enrolled will offer unique opportunities for students to simultaneously experience life within and outside the university classroom.  As Taylor and others have suggested, bridging the gap between the life within the academy and life outside the academy is a vital way to keep what we do here relevant and, at the same time, communicate and reinforce core academic values to a broader audience.  I remain optimistic that if more people saw what goes on in a university classroom, they would be more able to understand the value in a university education.</p> <p>And, unlike most of flights of fancy, I even have something of a funding model: At present the university splits funds collected from an online instruction fee with the college who then usually passes some of these funds onto individual departments.  In effect, departments have a financial incentive to teach online classes.  What I'd want to do is to capture a sliver of the funding that the University collects from these online classes and use that to offer incentives to faculty to develop and teach open classes.</p> <p>Ok. That's not a great plan, but there's more.  My idea of an Institute for Open Learning is mostly altruistic, but part of it imagines that these open classes can serve as marketing vehicles for both various programs as well as the university's efforts at online teaching in general.  In fact, I'd go so far to say that these classes could come to represent the University's commitment to the local and global community as well as showcase the truly exceptional teachers on campus.  In order to make the link between the universities outreach and marketing goals and the course content clear, the courses would be available for advertising.  These advertisement would have to adhere to certain standards of taste and would have to come from approved sources (mostly, I suspect in house, but it could extend to various approved groups like the local art museum or the local visitor bureau).  For example, each page might have a banner type advertisement for the Graduate School or for The College of Business and Public Administration.  In addition, there could be simple introductions to each podcast or video lecture which feature a brief advertisement much in the same way that NPR introduces segments of its programing with a plug for the title sponsor.  These advertisement could be relatively inexpensive since our overhead would be relatively low.  And a significant percentage of the revenue could go toward course development, faculty recruitment, and advertising for the Institute.</p>

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<p>Over time, I could imagine offering 4-6 class a year over the spring, fall, and summer semesters.  If the Institute is successful, these course could develop a following and a significant group of engaged and interested learners.  This group of learners could also be an audience for various other programs at the university - some of them, like local and visiting lectures, conferences and colloquia (like the Writers Conference), and events would be free - while others like new certificate programs or distance programs in allied fields would be for credit and involve a fee.</p> <p>I have a meeting tomorrow the begin the process of pitching this idea. Like most of my great ideas (ahem), I suspect that my excitement has led me to overlook some kind of fatal flaw in my plan, but until then I am going to just enjoy the excitement of a new idea.</p> <p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Shawn EMAIL: shawn_graham@carleton.ca IP: 134.117.115.238 URL: http://www.electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com DATE: 09/08/2010 10:24:00 AM I think it's a great idea! The phrase 'long-tale education' keeps popping into my mind as I read your proposal... have you seen what the Open University offers by way of 'free' using their Moodle platform? In my former life in the for-profit edu world, I floated the idea of free courses in order to habituate potential students to our platform, and as a marketing tool, but I didn't have the high-level contacts to get very far. The idea of 'giving away' learning was a bit of a lead balloon there, strangely enough (and I think of that Simpson's episode where the class visits Fort Springfield and are chased away 'cuz they're lernin' fer free!'). I will follow this project with interest! Good luck! ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Shawn EMAIL: shawn_graham@carleton.ca IP: 134.117.115.238 URL: http://www.electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com DATE: 09/08/2010 10:25:00 AM ...er, make that 'tail'. Long-tail. Darned homonyms. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Some Places in History

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STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: some-places-in-history CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 09/07/2010 07:41:10 AM ----BODY: <p>I know that it's not Thursday yet, but I want to talk about teaching anyway.  I was perhaps one of the last people on earth to use overhead projectors.  I loved the packets of maps that textbook publishers used to circulate with their "instructor issues".  I put them carefully into three-ring binders and carried them around with me for years after I stopped using the textbooks. I finally stopped using them when our local teaching technology folks removed (mercifully) the last of the clunk overhead projectors from our classroom and replaced them with ELMO document camera projectors.  The shiny, plastic overheads did not appear very effectively on the ELMO's camera and I had to find alternatives.</p> <p>In class, I usually call up Google Maps, and there is usually the embarrassing moment where I search for the location of some well-known historical site.  For example, I can never find the Rubicon river quickly.  I end up fumbling around and pointing to the Po or some other eastern Italian river until figuring out my mistake.</p> <p>In any event, to help manage my geographic lapses, I started to put together .kmz files of the sites that I am going to refer to in each lecture.  When I open this file in Google Earth, bring yellow pushpins appear at the site that I plan to talk about in lecture.  This is not a revolution.</p> <p>As I moved my class online, I preferred to use Wikipedia for basic geographic information and provided the students with indexes of major names, events, and places and, generally, link them to Wikipedia entries, which I have found are as good anyplace (and generally as good as any textbook).  For some reason I didn't include my little .kmz files.</p> <p>But now I have, and here are the first three; I'll add more as I find them and tweak them to fit the newest iterations of my lectures.  All these files should open in Google Earth.</p> <p><a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/GEPlaces/Ancient Greece.kmz">Ancient Greece</a><br /><a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/GEPlaces/Hellenistic World.kmz">The Hellenistic World</a><br /><a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/GEPlaces/Rome 1.kmz">Rome 1</a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: A new class to new students: The Fall of the Roman Empire

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STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: wysiwyg ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: a-new-class-to-new-students-the-fall-of-the-roman-empire CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 09/06/2010 07:46:37 AM ----BODY: <p>Tomorrow I begin to teach 6 week class on the Fall of the Roman Empire to the local, <a href="http://olli.und.edu/">University of North Dakota, branch of the Osher Life Long Learning Institute</a>. &#0160;This Institute focuses mainly on teaching community members - primarily &quot;seasoned adults&quot; and &quot;life long learners&quot; - and does not offer courses for credit. &#0160;The expense is minimal and the goals of my class will be to entertain as much as educate. &#0160;I&#39;ll have to balance my tendency to go into great detail about minute events of the Late Antique world (although it is hard to understand how anyone could not care deeply about the machinations leading up the Three Chapters Controversy!). &#0160;On the other hand, I am pretty excited to offer a class to the greater community. &#0160;My grandmother took classes at a similar institution at the University of Delaware after my grandfather had died, and she seemed to really enjoy them. It will feel good to share some of my knowledge, see how my approach plays to an audience not worried about getting a good grade, and to hear what my &quot;students&quot; think about the end of the ancient world.</p>! <p>That all being said, this is the first time that I&#39;ll teach a course in my particular area of specialty on campus at UND. &#0160;It seems hard to believe that I&#39;ve been here for 8 years and have yet to teach a course on the Late Antique world. &#0160;Another reason to be excited.</p>! <p><img alt="NewImage.jpg" border="0" height="366" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f3ddc05a970b -pi" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" width="300" /></p>! <p>I have conceived of the class in 6, more or less autonomous units:</p>! <p>1. Introduction to the Fall of Rome<br />2. Politics, Popes, Emperors, and Invaders<br />3. Christians and Pagans<br />4. Cities, Buildings, and the End of the Empire<br />5. Archaeology and the End of the Empire<br />6. Rome After Rome: The Long Shadow of Late Antiquity</p>! <p>The course is a blatant bait-and-switch. &#0160;My focus will be less on the &quot;Fall of Rome&quot; as discrete political event and much more on the period of Late Antiquity. &#0160;My goal will be to convince the class that the legacy of Rome refracted through political, religious, social, and economic changes of the 4th to 8th centuries is far more important than the sacking of a city or the death of an Emperor (well, except, I suppose to the folks who lived in Rome or the family of the Emperor). &#0160;In fact, I want them all to understand that the most of the basic tensions that define modern political and religious discourse have roots in Late Antiquity. &#0160;So the Fall of Rome is less about the death of some romanticized (I couldn&#39;t resist!) ancient world and much more about the birth of a society that has strangely familiar echoes.</p>! <p>Wish me luck!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: -----

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EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Amalia T EMAIL: amalia.stankavage@gmail.com IP: 75.15.28.82 URL: http://amaliadillin.blogspot.com DATE: 09/06/2010 10:00:30 AM Good luck! It sounds like a great course! ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Diana Wright EMAIL: dianagwright@comcast.net IP: 76.104.197.147 URL: http://surprisedbytime.blogspot.com DATE: 09/06/2010 10:56:05 AM Bait and switch. Fun course. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Daniel Sauerwein EMAIL: daniel.sauerwein@und.edu IP: 208.107.115.6 URL: http://doctoralbliss.wordpress.com DATE: 09/06/2010 01:36:39 PM Darn, if it didn't conflict with my class with Dr. Reese, I would love to sit in on it. I may have to look into this, as I would love to teach a class on the Civil War. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 09/03/2010 09:20:34 AM ----BODY: <p>Lots of little things on a sunny but windy Friday before a holiday weekend.</p> <ul> <li>An interesting, if a bit peculiar article, on the <a href="http://www.digitalhumanities.org/dhq/vol/4/1/000080/000080.html">Landscape of Digital Humanities</a> (via <a href="http://mediterraneanceramics.blogspot.com/2010/08/numbered-paragraphs-indigital.html">Sebastian Heath who offers some technical notes</a>)</li>

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<li>An interesting and FREE book about <a href="http://digital.designingobama.com/">the design aspects of Obama's Presidential campaign in 2008</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://www.thewildernessdowntown.com/">This is a supercool customizing video based on a good Arcade Fire song</a>.  The power of the intertubes!</li> <li>Have you checked out this week's <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a> (an advertisement for myself!)?  <a href="http://twitter.com/OIDatUND">You absolutely MUST follow us on Twitter</a>.  Do it!</li> <li>My wife's awesome new content-driven marketing site "<a href="http://gradstories.omeka.net/">Grad Stories</a>" is now up. </li> <li>The tech blog <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2010/09/02/chrome-firefoxtechcrunc/">Techcrunch claims that 31% of its traffic yesterday </a>was from people using Google's Chrome browser.  For the past month at this blog, Chrome only represents 10% of my traffic.  Firefox produces 37%, IE runs 35% of my visitors, and Safari runs about 12%, Chrome comes in at 4th, with Opera holding strong at just under 4%.  I might need to do a meta data Monday to contextualize these result. </li> <li>The blog for the <a href="http://lateantiqueostia.wordpress.com/">KentBerlin Ostia Excavations </a>is one of my favorites.  Their recent post on using <a href="http://lateantiqueostia.wordpress.com/2010/09/01/thunderbirdsare-go/">remote controlled helicopters to photograph the site from the air</a> should have <a href="http://www.chss.iup.edu/rsmoore/">Scott Moore</a> reaching for the nearest tech grant application especially in <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/2010/06/th e-voyage-of-pkap-airship-1.html">light of our less than successful Kite-o-blimp experiment this summer</a>. </li> <li>This <em>Esquire</em> article from 1971 on the "<a href="http://www.lospadres.info/thorg/lbb.html">Secrets of the Little Blue Box</a>" is really great (via <a href="http://kottke.org/10/09/phone-phreaking1971">kottke.org</a>).  The language of using blue boxes to hack the phone system reminds me of William Gibson's descriptions of the "jacking in" to his imagined internet. </li> <li>If you're a reader in South Florida, you should be excited for the <a href="http://www.surfandsongfestival.com/">3rd Annual Surf and Song Festival in Fort Myers</a>.  <a href="http://twitter.com/SurfandSongFest">You can even follow them on Twitter</a>.</li> <li>I'm totally bummed that Mohammed Amir, the great young Pakistani bowler, has been caught up in the recent spot fixing scandal and <a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/pakistan/content/current/story/475695.html">now struck from the ICC awards list</a>.  This is a cat from Taliban controlled areas of Pakistan who was a thing of beauty to watch bowl (even as he was dismantling Australia and being cocky about it!).  I hope that his career and reputation survive. </li> <li>What I'm reading: Mark Taylor, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/crisis-on-campus-a-bold-plan-for-reformingour-colleges-and-universities/oclc/501320939">Crisis on Campus: A Bold Plan for Reforming out Colleges and Universities</a></em> (Knopf 2010).</li> <li>What I'm listening to: Dinosaur Jr., <em>You're Living All Over Me </em>and <em>Dinosaur</em>. </li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY:

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----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching the World for Free STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-the-world-for-free CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 09/02/2010 08:33:27 AM ----BODY: <p><em>Crossposted to <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>.</em></p> <p>This week the <em><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/Open-Teaching-Whenthe/124170/?sid=at&amp;utm_source=at&amp;utm_medium=en">Chronicle of Higher Education</a></em><a href="http://chronicle.com/article/Open-Teaching-Whenthe/124170/?sid=at&amp;utm_source=at&amp;utm_medium=en">'s technology blog featured</a> a short article on two faculty members who offered a course to the public for free and attracted over 2,000 non-credit earning students.  The article argues that, for some classes, opening the course to the public created a more diverse and dynamic classroom environment only really possible through online teaching.  In Profs. Downes' and Siemen's class, non-credit students and paying, for-credit students mingled in discussion forums, witnesses the same lectures, and engaged the same readings, but unlike efforts pioneered by places like MIT where the lectures and syllabi are made public, these non-credit students were invited to participate fully in the educational process as well by engaging with their fellow students and, presumably, the faculty member.  In short, their class emphasizes the interactive potential of online teaching over and above the internet's well-known ability to disseminate prepared content.</p> <p>I couldn't help but also see this as an opportunity to democratize the university experience in a fairly radical way.  Not only would students have to consider how a particular class or material or problem solving exercise helps them to navigate the unpredictable shoals of a distant, abstract "real world", but they will be forced to confront the "real world", right there, in the classroom.  In other words, such a public course might help students overcome the separation between what happens in the classroom where students sometimes regard skills, methods, and knowledge as simply "course objectives" or tools to get an "A", and what happens in the real world where these skills, methods, and knowledge function in a far more ambiguous way and the rules followed to get an "A" rarely apply neatly.  Expanding the conversation by bringing the real world into the foyer of the Ivory Tower could have a revolutionary effect on how students understand the application of classroom skills.</p> <p>I've just begun to discuss the possibility of running some classes like this at the University of North Dakota.  As part of my sounding out processes, I talked to my good buddy, online teacher extraordinaire, and frequent Teaching Thursday contributor, <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/category/michael-

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beltz/">Mick Beltz</a>, and he and I came up with some issues that will have to be considered before developing and deploying a class to the general public.  Both of us bring the perspective of teachers in the humanities with some online teaching experience.</p> <p>So, five observations.</p> <p>1. Technology. The first thing I thought of is how do we run a course like this.  It seems that the classes described in the Chronicle article ran through <a href="http://moodle.org/">Moodle </a>which is open source and, presumably, more flexible (or at least developable) than Blackboard in some ways.  The course will also have to be able to function with almost no live technical support.  I can't imagine any university who would want to commit large scale technical support to a class full of non-credit, non-paying students. So every aspect of online delivery would have to be iron-clad to work and very straight forward to access.</p> <p>2. Scaleable content and exercises. Once one had assurances of a solid platform, then the content would have to be scaled in some way. For example, a course that relied on a $400 textbook would not be a very appealing class to open to the public because few public, non-credit students will be interested (it seems to me) in purchasing a $400 textbook.  Open source content and public domain texts would work better.  Multiple-guess type questions are more easily scaleable than essay tests and papers.  Currently I teach my online History 101 class as asynchronous - meaning all the content is available from the first day.  This may not scale well for a massive online course where a less-engaged public might not be inclined to complete weekly assignments in order and prefer to skip around defeating any pedagogical goals dependent upon the sequential engagement with content.</p> <p>3. Access and Control. One key to managing the relationship between paying, for-credit students, and non-credit students is creating levels of access that, for example, prevent open discussion boards from turning into the worst kind of comment sections on a blog.  I initially thought that limiting the length of time a discussion board was accessible would limit the opportunities for crazy comments or spam.  Mick offered a better solution.  He suggested that discussion boards be controlled through "adaptive release" exercises.  In other words, to get access to a discussion, you have to score above a particular grade on a quiz based on the readings.  Of course, a clever instructor could develop a whole series of adaptive release access points; with achievement would come ever more intimate levels of access much in the same way that video games release bonus features at certain levels.  This adaptive release model would not only limit access to people with malicious intent (to some extent), but also create incentives to non-credit students to engage the material in the class.</p> <p>4. Goals and Objectives. A public course - like any course - will need a clear sets of goals and objectives. There is no escaping that any course like this would have to be experimental at first.  And like any experiment, we would have to establish certain metrics to determine whether the class was successful or not.  The simple statistics, like number of students and length of time onsite (as a metric for engagement) would be useful, but we would also want to see if we could gather data on student engagement more broadly.  The goal, to my mind, would be to draw people into the subject matter.  Following the model of many video game creators, we'd want our course to create an immersive space, and we would have to monitor certain clear criteria to determine whether this was successful.  We might also borrow from are colleagues in marketing to understand better the various metrics used to determine the success or failure of a website or a viral or web-based marketing campaign.</p>

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<p>5. Resources.  The biggest hurdle to implementing a class like this would be to determine whether the benefits of the course are worth the commitment of resources.  A public access course has the potential to break down barriers between "the academy" and the public, engage types of learners who might not be inclined to enroll for credit at a university, and expose students to ways of thinking, priorities, and experiences rare or impossible in the classroom.  On the other hand, how many hours per week does managing a potentially massive online class take, how robust of a cyber-infrastructure, and, even, what is necessarily to publicize the course and actually get non-credit students to "enroll".  As much as we'd like to say that we're teaching the world "for free" there is always some cost in time and resources.</p> <p>Those are just my preliminary thoughts on the potential issues and rewards of teaching the world for free.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Sean McMullin EMAIL: grondhammar@gmail.com IP: 144.92.40.77 URL: DATE: 09/02/2010 10:48:45 AM Great post. I like the clarity of the five hurdles you've set out here. #5 is a huge issue unless you manage public expectations well, and set up some pretty strong barriers to personnel access. You may wish to check out David Wiley's work (davidwiley.org) He's a professor who's been practicing with and researching open educational content for several years, and has some interesting insights & examples. One of his ideas relating to your #3 (Access and Control)... He set up one of his courses like a role-playing game. Students could "level up" by completing assignments and doing well on assessments. Those with greater levels could then "multi-class" and gain broader access to resources. It worked because the course was 1) asynchronous and 2) taught to 18-25 yr olds for whom the role-playing mechanics were well-known. Not sure if it would generalise very well to an internet-wide audience. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: The Archaeology of Moving STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: the-archaeology-of-moving

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CATEGORY: Departmental History at UND CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes DATE: 09/01/2010 07:45:39 AM ----BODY: <p>Almost a year ago this month, the Great Move occurred as the administration rooted the Department of History from its long-standing and exceedinglycomfortable space in Merrifield hall and moved us across the quad to O'Kelly.  We are now settled into what I think most of us regard as equivalent, if not superior space, at least in the case of my office.</p> <p>As I was reflecting on the events surrounding our move, I stumbled on a very recent article by John Schofield (whose work I am really coming to appreciate and notice) in the journal <em>Archaeologies</em> called "<a href="http://www.springerlink.com/content/c734302760t35647/">Office Cultures and Corporate Memory: Some Archaeological Perspectives</a>".  He describes the archaeology of office culture and corporate memory through a study a move made by English Heritage in 2006.  The English Heritage office moved from a prestigious Savile Row address in London to a new "more modern" office space further from the city center.</p> <p>The paper itself is a vivid - but not exceedingly detailed - account of the things left behind in the office of the English Heritage as well was the spaces, behaviors, and memories embedded for him the spaces so recently occupied by coworkers.  At the end of his article, he comments on the feelings associated with abandoned and empty places:</p> <blockquote> <p>As an archaeologist I am fascinated by empty buildings and by the material culture of abandonment. One of my earliest lessons in archaeology concerned Skara Brae, a story of hurried desertion with precious objects left where they fell.  More recently I have studied and inspected military buildings forsaken at the end of the Cold War... In Malta I have studies former bars that closed abruptly with the Navy's withdrawal in the mid to late 1960s, bars that have remained firmly locked ever since. I like these empty places and do sometimes feel something as I wander about.</p> </blockquote> <p>As I look back <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/07/th e-merrifield-move.html">on some of my blog posts</a> from the days of the move, I think the final line of the quote captures the experience of wandering through the abandoned offices in Merrifield.  I felt something even though I did not have a particularly long history history associated with Merrifield Hall, nor did I enjoy a particular luxurious or historically rich accommodation there.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Fauna from the Pyla-Koutsopetria Survey

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STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: fauna-from-the-pyla-koutsopetria-survey CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 08/31/2010 07:56:23 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the course of the intensive pedestrian survey at <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">Pyla-Koutsopetria</a> we collected a sample of the faunal material present on the surface of the ground (that is to say the animal bones visible in each unit).  Over the past month, David Reese, one of the leading specialists in faunal remains in an archaeological context examined the material from both our survey and excavation.</p> <p>While I won't present all Dr. Reese's finds here on the blog (that will have to wait for the full, final report), I will give a brief preview of his finds.  The majority of the material from the site was <em>Ovis/Capra</em> (sheep/goat).  My understanding is that the bones of the two animals are basically indistinguishable (in fact, if one could distinguish the two, I am sure Dr. Reese would have!).  The goat and sheep bones likely reflect the more recent past activity at the site which almost certainly involved grazing.  At present the site is under cultivation with cereals - mostly for feed - but this might be the result of the region's appropriation by the British after independence in the 1950s.  At present our site has relatively restricted access because of the activities at various live-fire ranges in the area.  It is also possible that some grazing continues in the early spring, fall, or winter months when we are not present on the site.  A few of the bones show signs of being butchered and cooked, but it is difficult to know whether this occurred on site - in a possible domestic context - or if these bones represent lunches taken in the fields, rubbish thrown from passing travelers, or even bits of household trash carried out into the fields at some earlier time as composted fertilizer.  The presence of a few worn chicken bones from the fields almost certainly represents meals taken in the field or domestic rubbish.</p> <p>More evidence for grazing comes from the presence of numerous bones from dogs (<em>canis familiaris</em>).  While we regularly see packs of hunting dogs training across the coastal ridges in the evening hours, the link between dogs and herds of sheep or goats is too close to ignore.</p> <p>Aside from the dog and sheep/goat bones, there are two objects that really stood out.  First, Dr. Reese identified an eroded part of a <em>bos taurus</em> (cow!) bone on the site.  Since cattle have somewhat different grazing patterns than goats and sheep, this bone suggests that at some point our site may have seen grazing cattle and possible pasture land.</p> <p>Finally (and most exciting!), Dr. Reese identified a fragment of human skull from one of survey units near the western most extent of our site.  As readers of this blog know, we've been <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/pr eliminary-analysis-of-pyla-koustopetria-archaeological-data-or-thinking-outloud-4.html">struggling to identify the location of a cemetery that served the inhabitants of our diachronic settlements at Vigla and Pyla-Koutsopetria</a>. Cesnola spent some time in the general vicinity of a site that could be ours (relating his description of the place to our side has proven to be almost impossible; for the description of Cesnola see the link below), as he passed

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back and forth to his summer home at Ormidhia.  <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=Um_PAAAAMAAJ&amp;dq=Cesnola%20Cyprus%20It s%20ancient%20cities&amp;pg=PA178#v=onepage&amp;q=Ormidia&amp;f=false">His description of a place called Palaeocastro (which is one of the names for our site) included graves which he appears to have excavated</a>.  The fragment of skull identified from our survey was not particularly close to the area that Cesnola appears to be describing.  So, the mystery of the Pyla-Koutsopetria burials continues with any tiny fragment of evidence suggesting that graves or even tombs are present near our site, but lie undiscovered.</p> <p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Dimitri Nakassis EMAIL: nakassis@gmail.com IP: 99.232.120.148 URL: DATE: 08/31/2010 08:54:25 AM Bill, when Michael and I went to the Pyla καφενείο an old guy told us that they used to take flocks out to the coastal ridges before the British base appropriated the land. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.192.180 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 08/31/2010 09:27:21 AM Dimitri, Thanks, man! I assumed as much. That must account for the goat/sheep bones in the survey. Bill -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Doors of History STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: doors-of-history CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes CATEGORY: North Dakotiana

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DATE: 08/29/2010 04:50:09 PM ----BODY: <p>My wife has recently stripped the doors in our house and has begun to repaint them.  Like most turn of the century homes in the area, they have wooden doors.  These doors are substantial, hang poorly (in most cases) and preserve the history of the house in through the marks in the door.</p> <p>The archaeology of the house is preserved in the house itself.</p> <p>This door shows at least four different lock and works on the door preserved under multiple coats of paint.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Door1.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134868b0e27970c -pi" border="0" alt="Door1.jpg" width="420" height="281" /></p> <p>The evidence for an earlier latch:<br /><img style="display: block; marginleft: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Door2.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134868b0e32970c -pi" border="0" alt="Door2.jpg" width="281" height="420" /></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Door3.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f366e542970b -pi" border="0" alt="Door3.jpg" width="420" height="281" /></p> <p>In this detail you can see the outline of the earlier doorplate, cylinder, and lock.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Door3_Detail.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f366e54b970b -pi" border="0" alt="Door3_Detail.jpg" width="420" height="420" /></p> <p>An upstairs door show another set of interesting marks preserving tiny bits of the houses history. The elegant doorplate and crystal doorknob probably date to the earliest years of the house. While the floors upstairs in our house are fir as opposed to the floors downstairs which are a more luxurious maple, the doorknob and plate show certain concessions to display in the more private quarters of the house.  Of course, a nice doorknob and plate is an easy addition to a house at some later date, but the floors on the second floor are more or less permanent.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Door4.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f366e555970b -pi" border="0" alt="Door4.jpg" width="420" height="420" /></p> <p>Evidence for the use of a simple latch on the inside of the door.  The door must have been pushed open a few times because it's clear that someone forced the door open, striping the simply threaded latch, and causing someone to drive the latch back into the door again in a slightly different place.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Door5.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f366e56a970b -pi" border="0" alt="Door5.jpg" width="420" height="420" /></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: -----

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KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 155.68.29.254 URL: http://kourelis.blogspot.com/ DATE: 09/01/2010 08:54:45 AM Here's what I find interesting in the transition of locks. 1) The separation of the lock and handle, held in one piece into two different mechanisms and locations, 2) The shift from the presumably ornate composite to the "security" aesthetics of the newer bolt. Most likely what happened is that the original mechanism was too complicated to service and it had to be replaced, but no composites were available. The technology of the new pieces is 1950s. The 1950s/60s in-situ locks I've seen tend to have the color of the actual material, brushed aluminum. The fact that these have been faux-plated to look like bronze makes me think that the switch occurred after the 1980s, probably 1990s. Now if you're really crazy, you can start hunting for the original 19th c. fixture. There are some crazy antique stores in Pennyslvania where you walk in and see literally thousands of locks. But I wouldn't go there. KOSTIS -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 08/27/2010 10:31:37 AM ----BODY: <p>Some quick hits on a windy, but sunny Friday morning:</p> <ul> <li>Some really cool imaginings of what a new American currency could look like <a href="http://richardsmith.posterous.com/tag/dollarredeign">here</a>.</li> <li>Tim Caromody is both really smart and increasingly ubiquitous.  <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2010/08/10-reading-revolutionsbefore-e-books/62004/">Here are his thoughts on reading revolutions</a> and here are his thoughts on the <a href="http://www.wired.com/epicenter/2010/08/fivemyths-about-philadelphias-blogging-tax/all/1">so-called Philadelphia blogging tax</a>.</li> <li>This is <a href="http://24flinching.com/word/headline/subway-lifeblood/">a perfect page </a>to look at while listening to the punk rock.  Great photos.</li> <li><a href="http://www.uic.edu/htbin/cgiwrap/bin/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/2962/25 80">Some thoughtful and careful research</a> on why academics blog.</li> <li><a href="http://www.technologyreview.com/web/25997/">4Chan is pretty wild</a>.</li>

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<li>Go and check out<a href="http://teachingthursday.org/"> Teaching Thursday</a> this week to find what OID will be to next year.  And while you're at it <a href="http://twitter.com/OIDatUND">follow us on Twitter.</a></li> <li>What I am listening to: X, Los Angeles.</li> <li>What I am reading: Michael Azarrad, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/our-band-could-be-your-life-scenes-from-theamerican-rock-underground-1981-1991/oclc/45804603&amp;referer=brief_results">Our Band Could be Your Life: Scenes from the American Indie Underground</a></em>.</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Diana Wright EMAIL: dianagwright@comcast.net IP: 76.104.197.147 URL: http://surprisedbytime.blogspot.com DATE: 08/31/2010 10:13:33 AM Love this. When my DC 1905 apartment was repainted in 2004, my daughter photographed four layers of wallpaper under several more layers of paint. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Thursday: The First Week of Class STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-thursday-the-first-week-of-class CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 08/26/2010 07:46:31 AM ----BODY: <p>It's the first week of class and I already feel like I am behind! Since some of my students have discovered this blog (it's inevitable, right?), I thought I was post up my five tips for success in my classes.  I think that these things are generalizable:</p> <p>1. Come to class.  I seem to inspire students to skip class.  This used to frustrate me, but now I view this as a kind of formal resistance, which I admire enough to take on the role of "the man".  I've blogged on this before <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/te aching-thursday-grading-and-resistance.html">here</a> and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/05/gr ading-detroit-and-student-resistence.html">here</a>.</p> <p>2. Take notes.  I have had students tell me that they don't need to take notes because they can remember everything.  This is impossible and a cover for

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laziness.  Note taking is the first step in learning because it forces us to interpret and condense what we are hearing in class.</p> <p>3. Do the readings. My classes depend on the careful reading of primary sources.  These form the basis for in-class discussions, writing assignments, and exams.  If you don't do the reading, you won't get it.</p> <p>4. Work with your fellow students.  If you can't figure out how to work together in the classroom, the library, or the quad, then do it online; social media applications provide a great platform for collaboration between students.  For all its faults, Blackboard has baked in an increasingly robust set of collaborative tools that I am more than willing to deploy to allow the students to work together.</p> <p>5. Talk to me.  If you are struggling or if you feel like you are beginning to struggle, talk to me.  Despite recent reviews which rank University of North Dakota faculty among the least accessible in the country, my door is almost always open.  So come and talk about how you can do better in class.</p> <p>I leave off this list obvious things like doing assignments, turning them on time, and taking test seriously, because most of our students understand this kind of thing. It's the more mundane and unstructured expectations (attendance, note taking, reading) that students struggle to prioritize.</p> <p>Good luck in the new semester!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Peer Review and the New Media STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: peer-review-and-the-new-media CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 08/25/2010 08:33:08 AM ----BODY: <p>A bunch of people have sent me Monday's <em>New York Times</em> article: "<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/24/arts/24peer.html?_r=2&amp;scp=3&amp;sq=s hakespeare&amp;st=cse">Scholars Test Web Alternative to Peer Review</a>".  This article describes a recent trial at Shakespeare Quarterly where they eschewed traditional peer review and instead opened the review process to a panel of experts and others on the web.  The process garnered over 350 comments from 41 people which the editors evaluated.  Ultimately they selected the four articles for publication in a special edition of the journal on Shakespeare and the new media.</p> <p>Whenever a journal attempts a project like this it attracts attention and almost inevitably provoked headlines heralding the impending end of the traditional practice of academic peer review.  Most articles envision

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traditional peer review to involve a journal circulating an article to an anonymous pair of experts who evaluate the article's suitability for publication in the particular journal and, in most cases, offer comments. This description of the peer review process is, of course, idealized.  In reality, journals particularly in Europe - have widely varying standards and practices for peer review with widely varying degrees of transparency. So the introduction of a new method of peer review which takes advantage of the increasing degree of connectivity on the web does not so much represent radical novelty amidst stodgy, ossified, practices of peer review, but another point along a continuum of practice.</p> <p>Despite this reality, I know that any modifications to the traditional peer review practices are likely to create waves. I generally consider my colleagues across the disciplines to be fairly liberal minded folks, but it never ceases to amaze me how limited our perspectives become on matters like scholarly publishing.  In fact, it befuddles me why academia struggles so mightily with the idea that "in the future" we could acknowledge the value of academic and intellectual work produced through a wide range of publishing paradigms ranging from the un-edited and un-reviewed blog to the highly polished peer reviewed journals.  Of course, I can anticipate one response: with the explosion of new publications and formats, the "average scholar" struggles to keep abreast of developments in his or her field.  Moreover, introducing a new layer of less rigorously reviewed material to the mix contributes to the massive quantity of material that scholars are expect to understand.</p> <p>On the other hand, the rise of highly integrated and sophisticated social networking applications is making it easier to filter scholarship through a layer a kind of secondary review by colleagues.  My friends and colleagues serve, in effect, as another layer of peer review ensuring the we as a group have access to "important" scholarly contributions even from obscure journals.  While there is no guarantee that good scholarship will find its way through our social network, the economies of numerous eyes scanning the growing body of scholarly literature gives us a better chance of seeing things important to our common research interests.</p> <p>The other traditional complaint against adjusting the peer review process is that it will ultimately undermine the quality of scholarship produced.  It is as if the practice of circulating working papers, archaeological reports, prepubication drafts, informal reviews, has not existed for as long a peer-reviewed publications.  For centuries scholars circulated manuscripts to colleagues and friends without the benefit of anonymous, exterior reviews. The major shift now is that we can democratize the process of circulating working papers by using the web rather than informal and private avenues of scholarly communication.  In fact, the newly democratized practice of pre-publication circulation offers the potential to uphold the highest standards of peer review.  The pressure will be on the peer review process to demonstrate the superiority of its product in relation to non-peer reviewed work.  Such competition should make any benefit inherent to the traditional method of peer reviewed scholarship all the more visible.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS:

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-----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Archaeology and Sound STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: archaeology-and-sound CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Punk Archaeology DATE: 08/24/2010 09:10:21 AM ----BODY: <p>During my recent travels I was able to read over the series of articles published in the most recent <em><a href="http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/title~db=all~content=g925690055">World Archaeology</a></em>.  These articles were dedicated to exploring the place of archaeology in the world today. They considered the place of archaeology in the production of compelling narratives, campus life, the new media, and in pressing problems like homelessness, environmental sustainability, and even transparency in government.  The articles blended methodological sophistication with practical real life applications to show how the tools and approaches that archaeologists have developed over the history of the discipline can contribute to documenting and analyzing problems in the recent past.  If anything, these articles, to generalize, were too practical in their approaches to problems perhaps assuming that for something to be relevant in todays culture, it had to have a direct<em> practical application </em>rather than a more long term theoretical or methodological benefit.  On the other hand, these articles did reflect the increasingly permeable disciplinary boundaries of archaeological research as they drew upon techniques, methods, and approaches developed by disciplinary neighbors like sociology, anthropology, communications, and philology and literature.</p> <p>One striking omission from this wide ranging group of articles was anything on the archaeology of sound. There have been some intriguing recent work on the sounds of archaeology and they key role that hearing materiality plays in our ability to identify objects, spaces, and materials.  In fact, heavily damped spaces create a kind of sensory deprivation that obscures the materiality and social "reality" of a space.  (At the same time, noise pollution and the saturation of our environment with a range of mechanical sounds is generally recognized as a problem to be dealt with in a architectural - in other words material - way.)  It is worth noting that I am not the first to think about this kind of thing. The sound of archaeology has contributed to the idea of archaeology as performance and sensory as well as contributed to our idea of how past monuments sounded.</p> <p>Over the past year, I've been thinking about music as a place where archaeological methods could be deployed productively through an exploration of punk rock music.  Punk rock, in particular, sought to celebrate a highly materialized kind of music, through their preference for live recordings in particular places (particularly iconic venues like CBGBs or Max's Kansas City) and their conscious efforts to emphasize the low-fi, diy character of their recording spaces.  (One of my favorite moments in a punk rock recording is when you can hear a bottle fall and hit the ground (and seemingly not break) during a Replacement's song).  The term garage band made clear the link between music, a

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particular sound, and a space.  This all stands in contrast to the increasingly over-produced character of modern pop music which goes to great lengths to create spatially and materially impossible sound which could never be produced in a way that someone could witness and experience. (For a remarkable critique of this check out <a href="http://snarkmarket.com/2009/3683">this article on Pompamoose</a>, a band that tries to make every sound on their remakes of pop songs visible in some way.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Diana Wright EMAIL: dianagwright@comcast.net IP: 76.104.197.147 URL: http://surprisedbytime.blogspot.com DATE: 08/24/2010 09:43:43 AM A bit of study was done on this at Chartres 20+ years ago. You should see the recent book by Deborah Howard & Laura Moretti: Sound Space in Renaissance Venice with sound tracks at <a href="http://www.stjohnscollegecambridge.co.uk/soundandspace/">http://www.stjohn scollegecambridge.co.uk/soundandspace/</a> ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Richard Patterson EMAIL: kingricheast@aim.com IP: 65.191.38.214 URL: DATE: 12/04/2010 12:57:11 AM Hey! I hope all is well with you! I was just browsing and saw the interview! It was a privilege to hang out with you and to be able to produce the canvas for your office. I am a better man for having met you. I am doing well. I am currently in my second year of teaching in the North Carolina Public School System. I am looking for ways to earn my doctorate in Early childhood education and be able to influence those who come from similar backgrounds as myself. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Lechaion after the Basilica STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: lechaion-after-the-basilica CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 08/23/2010 07:55:45 AM -----

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BODY: <p>Readers of my blog know about my near obsession with the Mighty Lechaion Basilica.  I return to it as often as I can on my increasingly infrequent and short visits to Greece and every visit to the great church reveals another interesting aspect of its history.</p> <p>This last visit got my thinking about the later history of the church.  At some point in the 7th century or later, the building collapsed. At some point, a small chapel appears in the baptistery of the church and this seems to have required the movement of the baptismal font from the center of the octagonal space to the southeastern wall. It may be that this space served the community who continued to venerate at the site in the immediate aftermath of the damage to the main church.</p> <p>Once the main church had collapsed, much of the rubble of the superstructure was stripped away and at least some of the marble sculpture likely vanished at this point.  In the apse of the church, the community constructed a small chapel.  At present we don't know enough about the chronology of the building and its attendant ceramics - to assign a date to this small building.  The position of the foundations of the later church below the level of the earlier basilica's floor indicates that the builders had removed the majority of the collapse from the main basilica prior to its construction.  </p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; border: 0px initial initial;" title="LechLate3.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348667a671970c -pi" border="0" alt="LechLate3.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p> <p>Considering the massive size of the collapsed masonry from the churches halfdomed apse, this must have been a massive job.  The absence of large quantities of collapse around the site, however, suggests that the quarrying activity at the church after its collapse may have been systematic.  There is similar evidence for such systematic quarrying activities across the Mediterranean (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/08/ko urion-and-aba.html">I've even blogged about it before!</a>) and the quantity of prestige materials used in the building must have made it an appealing source for building material.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="LechLate1.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f3435bf5970b -pi" border="0" alt="LechLate1.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="LechLate2.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348667a664970c -pi" border="0" alt="LechLate2.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p> <p>In fact, the builders of the later church used spolia heavily (and predictably) in the foundations of the little church including parts of Proconnesian marble columns, various bits of architectural sculpture, and what appears to be "<a href="http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.14680092.2008.00313.x/full">verde antico</a>" engaged columns.  In fact, the buildings seem to have tried to use the verde antico columns symmetrically in the foundations suggesting that the use of spolia, even in structural parts of this building, was not random or completely opportunistic, but systematic.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="LechLate6.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348667a655970c -pi" border="0" alt="LechLate6.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p> <p>Reused bricks appear in the foundation courses of the mostly destroyed semicircular eastern apse and the buildings used large, ashlar blocks - probably

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spolia originally used in the basilica itself and now in tertiary use in the smaller late church - at the architecturally sensitive join between the apse and the nave.  In short, this building while modest in size, has indications of careful construction.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="LechLate5.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348667a66b970c -pi" border="0" alt="LechLate5.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p> <p>From what I can tell, there is no plan of this building and very limited discussion of it in the preliminary reports on the Lechaion church.  Moreover, this building does not appear on the plans of the basilica even though it clearly represents an important, late chapter to the life of this important site on the Gulf of Corinth.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Lechaion Basilica and Lechaion Fountain House STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: lechaion-basilica-and-lechaion-fountain-house CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 08/20/2010 10:14:50 AM ----BODY: <p>One of my side projects this summer was to check out the architectural sculpture from the Lechaion basilica and a nearby fountain house.&nbsp; In particular, I wanted to compare the ionic impost capitals present at both sites.&nbsp; The capitals are in fancy Proconnesian marble and look like they were produced by masons with ties across the Mediterranean.&nbsp; <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/so me-thoughts-on-st-leonidas-and-baptism-at-lechaion-in-greece.html">I've blogged about this before</a>.&nbsp; </p> <p>These are from the basilica:</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013486559840970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013486559857970c -pi" width="124" height="94"></a> <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013486559930970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f3320a0c970b -pi" width="124" height="94"></a> <a

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href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f3320ad6970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f3320add970b -pi" width="124" height="94"></a> </p> <p>These are from the fountain house:</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f3320b7b970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013486559a9f970c -pi" width="124" height="94"></a> <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013486559b71970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013486559b82970c -pi" width="124" height="94"></a> <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f3320cfa970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f3320d26970b -pi" width="124" height="94"></a> </p> <p>The impost capitals from the fountain house are particularly significant because it is one of the few occasions where this kind of architectural sculpture appears in a building other than a church. And the relationship to the column capitals from Lechaion should be pretty clear.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 98.111.157.223 URL: http://kourelis.blogspot.com/ DATE: 08/20/2010 04:16:59 PM If I remember correctly, some of these blocks have masonry numbers and even dedicatory inscriptions? -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Hard at Work at the Isthmia Excavation House STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: hard-at-work-at-the-isthmia-excavation-house CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 08/19/2010 07:32:00 AM

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----BODY: <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134864e8c3b970 c-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134864e8c69970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134864e8c8a970 c-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134864e8cba970c -pi" width="304" height="404"></a></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f32b1a5c970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f32b1a87970b -pi" width="304" height="404"></a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Telling Stories with Archaeology STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: telling-stories-with-archaeology CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 08/17/2010 12:45:53 PM ----BODY: <p>One of the great things that I've learned from working with <a href="http://classics.uc.edu/index.php/research/40-isthmia">Steven Ellis's team at Isthmia the Corinthia</a> is the idea of archaeological research as the basis for story telling.&nbsp; Steven used this metaphor a number of times over the first week of our work here as a way to frame the goals of our research.&nbsp; It was absolutely enlightened and almost completely opposite from my growing obsession with archaeological data collecting.&nbsp; Recently, when I have approached archaeological problems, I become consumed by the need to document and gather.&nbsp; This primary stems from an abiding faith that, somehow, data will produce knowledge. </p> <p>I don't want to suggest that Steven and his team are not interested in data.&nbsp; In fact, they have collected and collated a remarkable amount of detailed information on the East Field Area and organized it carefully in sophisticated databases designed to facilitate their daily

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analysis.&nbsp; What was striking how little they talk about data as the product of their field work.&nbsp; In contrast, I am ALWAYS thinking about data as the product of archaeological analysis.&nbsp; Data then becomes - at some uncertain time in the future - the basis for interpretation.&nbsp; This is completely and unabashedly positivist.</p> <p>Steven's team has talked about the stories from the very first day. This reminded me that the archaeological process was about narrating events as much a collecting data.&nbsp; Beginning with the idea that a narrative should be the product of archaeological analysis ensured that data collection worked toward the goal of explicating the site and its history rather than squandering resources on producing data without clear objectives in mind.</p> <p>Some of this coincides with a recent article by <a href="http://www.informaworld.com/smpp/112018903257400975/gotoissue~db=all~dest=latest~cur=g924451445~tab=toc~order=page">C. Holtorf in <em>World Archaeology</em></a>, where he discusses the "meta-stories" that so often organize the presentation, analysis, and interpretation of archaeological information.&nbsp; These narratives serve not only to make bits of information understandable, but also provide the basis for comparing various similar narratives across time.&nbsp; These stories inform one another by providing structures which help humanity to approach large scale, complex, and pressing questions about the fundamental nature of society.&nbsp; Holtorf draws in part on <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/metahistory-the-historicalimagination-in-nineteenth-century-europe/oclc/700666">the work of Hayden White</a> who looked at the narrative structures present in the work of 19th century scholars like Marx, Burkardt, von Ranke, and Michelet.&nbsp; Holtorf seems to suggest that archaeological story telling might follow 19th century models: "By stories (or narratives) I mean an account of one or more characters acting out plots in a sequence of events that contain a distinctive beginning, middle and end." (383).&nbsp; </p> <p>While stories of the 19th century, novelistic type are clearly recognizable to a broad audience, they hardly represent the scope of potential story types familiar to even popular audiences.&nbsp; Television shows like <em>Lost</em>, and popular feature films have become increasingly comfortable twisting time, inverting the standard order of narration, and leaving the audience with ambiguous endings.&nbsp; Story telling in the 21st century is open to a much wider range of potential organizations, resolutions, and plots than its 19th century predecessors.</p> <p>I can even imagine that some of these narrative types will find ways to "narrate" the structure of data rich descriptions and explorations of the archaeological landscape.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Cornelius Holtorf EMAIL: cornelius.holtorf@lnu.se IP: 90.227.170.172 URL: http://web.comhem.se/cornelius/ DATE: 09/02/2010 01:26:41 PM

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I think I agree with you. There is a difference between the definition of a story and how you may be telling that story. If you think of the movie Pulp Fiction, for example, then this is relatively conventional story told in a very interesting, twisted way. Archaeological stories and meta-stories can be told like this, too, I suspect. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.192.180 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 09/02/2010 01:30:25 PM Thanks for the comment. I suspect that this is the inspiration, in part, for folks like Christopher Tilley who show that story-telling is not incompatible with more austere and non-narrative descriptions of archaeological data. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: owlfarmer EMAIL: owlfarmer@gmail.com IP: 66.226.212.190 URL: http://owlfarmer.blogspot.com DATE: 11/02/2010 04:09:30 PM This was an especially helpful post for someone (a lapsed archaeologist) who teaches about archaeology in an intro to humanities class as part of a "humanities toolkit" that helps us understand the stories of cultures. As an aside, I also live in a part of Texas near Corinth--which is pronounced by non-natives of the town as "CorINTH" because of St. Paul's letters to the CorINTHians. Needless to say, they're not among the New Testament scholars you mention in a more recent post. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Sprawl STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: wysiwyg ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: sprawl CATEGORY: Punk Archaeology DATE: 08/16/2010 12:55:00 AM ----BODY: <p>On Kostis&#39; urging, I have been listening to the new Arcade Fire album, the <em>Suburbs</em>. The album itself is a meditation of urban planning and its social impact, but I&#39;ll leave this larger issue to Kostis.&#0160; What I want to focus on in particular is the notion of sprawl that comes through in the last couple of songs in the album.&#0160; <a href="http://www.spin.com/reviews/arcade-fire-suburbs-merge">As critics have noted</a>, the idea of sprawl (as in, but not exclusively, urban sprawl) derives some of its meaning in punk circles from <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Gibson">William Gibson&#39;s</a> fictitious topography of the post-apocalyptic east coast.&#0160; Gibson described an massive east coast settlement stretching from Boston to Atlanta

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partially housed in a series of dilapidated geodesic domes.&#0160; This forms a suitably bleak environment for his high-tech dystopian novels.&#0160; Arcade Fire&#39;s understanding of the sprawl clearly has roots in their critique of urbanism in its many 20th and 21st century guises.&#0160; The sprawl consists of a bleak assortment of architectural (&quot;dead shopping malls&quot;, bright lights), social,(dead end jobs, threatening police), and perhaps environmental images (the black river).&#0160; All these images resonate with Gibson&#39;s dystopian and apocalyptic vision of the near future world.</p> <p>The kind of dystopian social critiques of the future are almost always rooted in a kind of utopian view of the past (and has obvious links with genres like the jeremiad).&#0160; In fact, they rely on a recognizable past remaining hidden in plain sight to make it clear to the reader that their own present has become just another layer of detritus.&#0160; Gibson - like Sonic Youth and to some extent Arcade Fire - liken the Sprawl to the failings of capitalism to produce a sustainable, responsible prosperity. The chorus from the Sonic Youth anthem chants: &quot;Come on down to the store, you can buy some more and more and more.&quot;&#0160; The verses paint the same kind of dystopia as Arcade Fire&#39;s with cheap clothing, depressing shotgun houses, and rusted machines along a river.&#0160; </p> <p>Scenes of polluted nature, urbanism, and faded modernity, is pretty standard fair for both science fiction and music, and the same ideas inform our archaeological imagination as well.&#0160; <a href="http://punkarchaeology.wordpress.com/2010/08/02/more-punk-andnostalgia/">As I&#39;ve mentioned earlier</a>, romantic views of the natural landscape appeal to me even though I know that these views are as profoundly unhistorical as utopians imaginings of a primordial, edenic nature.&#0160; Human activities have had a fundamental influence on almost every aspect of the Eastern Mediterranean places where I work.&#0160; As an archaeologist, I already understand that there is no escaping from the sprawl and our own present is, in fact, a past dystopian future. </p> <p>Like the works of Gibson and the music of Sonic Youth and Arcade Fire the crass consumerism of late capitalism is held up to be at least tacitly responsible for decline.&#0160; The focus falls (predictably and particularly) on the relationship between individuals (and their behavior) and objects.&#0160; In fact, the physical character of objects take on an archaeological character as they become vehicles for both present identities and history.&#0160; This is archaeological thought: while punk&#39;s characters take in the sprawling ruins of shopping malls and rusted machines that stretch outward from centers of human settlement, archaeologists lovingly document the tell-tale haloes of ceramic material encircle ancient sites.&#0160; In fact, many scholars argue that the practice of spreading manure created these ceramic haloes. Within the settlement, residents discarded bits of broken pottery on piles of household (both human and animal)waste.&#0160; The practice of studying the remains of human activity in the countryside by documenting these worn fragments of discarded goods reminds us of a profoundly dystopian image: communities literally consuming their own waste. </p> <p>So, as both archaeology and our punk friends scrutinize materiality as an indicators of culture.&#0160; They invite us to contemplate the remains of the past as both a cautionary tale for the ephemeral nature of the material accomplishments that we hold dear, while at the same time validate our ability to understand the past (and the present) through bits of meaning embedded in those same good and practices.&#0160; The failures of culture manifest themselves in the discarded objects, buildings, and goods scattered about, and these same practices construct a body of material that we can study and reproduce the past.&#0160; </p> <p>The presence of nature amidst these man-made ruins and the parallel between the ruins of capitalism (dead shopping malls) and natural features (rise like mountains beyond mountains) reminds us that all of our surroundings are

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cultural, and, at that point, dystopian landscapes become familiar.&#0160; We not only live in the sprawl, but we have always lived in the sprawl.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: A Few Quick Hits at the End of a Busy Week STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: a-few-quick-hits-at-the-end-of-a-busy-week CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 08/13/2010 08:50:09 AM ----BODY: <p>Not much in the way of time to explore the interwebs lately, but a few heres and theres:</p> <ul> <li>I've been thinking about Sprawl especially as I listen to Arcade Fire's new album.&nbsp; I re-read William Gibson's <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/count-zero/oclc/248547973">Count Zero</a></em> this past summer (on the flight to Cyprus, in fact) and it is among Gibson's "Sprawl Trilogy" along with <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/neuromancer/oclc/24379880">Neuromancer</a> </em>and <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/mona-lisaoverdrive/oclc/17876008">Mona-Lisa Overdrive</a></em>.&nbsp; These books inspired <em>Sonic Youth</em>'s track Sprawl (from Daydream Nation) and this track may or may not have come to inspire the penultimate song on Arcade Fire's album the recent album Suburbs (for what appears to be a reference to this, check out <em><a href="http://www.spin.com/reviews/arcade-fire-suburbsmerge">this otherwise ordinary review in Spin</a></em>).&nbsp; <li><a href="http://writing.upenn.edu/~carmody/Home.html">Tim Carmody</a> one of my favorite New Media Academic Hipsters is blogging this week at <a href="http://www.kottke.org/">kottke.org</a>. If you don't already check out his usual blog, <a href="http://snarkmarket.com/">Snarkmarket</a>, on a regular basis, you should.&nbsp; He edited one of the more clever (and probably fleeting) little collections of reflections on the New Media entitled the <a href="http://snarkmarket.com/nla/"><em>New Liberal Arts</em></a>.&nbsp; UND almuni and New Media Design Hipster, <a href="http://www.fimoculous.com/">Rex Sorgatz</a>, contributed. <li><em><a href="http://www.informaworld.com.ezproxy.library.und.edu/smpp/title~db=all~cont ent=g925690055~tab=toc~order=page">World Archaeology</a> </em>has a nice collection of assorted article on 'archaeology and contemporary society'.&nbsp; It has a cool introduction by John Schofield, who I think is pretty bright.&nbsp; I haven't read much of it yet, but did notice that there were no articles on archaeology and music (via <a href="http://individual.utoronto.ca/nakassis/">Dimitri Nakassis</a>).&nbsp; Punk

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Archaeology remains untapped. <li>And more teaching news, <a href="http://twitter.com/OIDDirector">Anne Kelsch</a>, the Director of University of North Dakota's <a href="http://www.oid.und.edu/">Office of Instructional Development</a> (and the patron of <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>) is now on Twitter complementing the Office of Instructional Development's own Twitter feed OIDatUND.&nbsp; So you can see the leading edge of our new social media presence.&nbsp; Which brings me to... <li>Checked out <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/08/12/leaving-the-classroom-behindteaching-the-public-humanities/">the most recent Teaching Thursday</a>?&nbsp; It's fantastic!</li></ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Go to Teaching Thursday! STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: go-to-teaching-thursday CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 08/12/2010 08:48:59 AM ----BODY: <p>Missing out on your Archaeology of the Mediterranean World?&nbsp; Well, I defer to a far more articulate commentator than I am today.&nbsp; Check out <a href="http://www.und.edu/dept/philrel/weinstein.html">Jack Russell Weinstein</a> (from the <a href="http://www.und.edu/dept/philrel/">Department of Philosophy and Religion</a> at University of North Dakota) as he blogs on <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/08/12/leaving-the-classroom-behindteaching-the-public-humanities/">Leaving the Classroom Behind:Teaching and the Public Humanities</a>.&nbsp; He captures many of my own sentiments on the role that the public humanities should play in our society.</p> <p>And while you're at it, sign on to follow the new Twitter feed for the Office of Instructional Development: <a title="http://twitter.com/OIDatUND" href="http://twitter.com/OIDatUND">http://twitter.com/OIDatUND</a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS:

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-----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: The Best Inventoried Find from the East Field STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: the-best-inventoried-find-from-the-east-field CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 08/11/2010 08:12:19 AM ----BODY: <p>One great thing about photographing all the inventoried cards is you discover remarkable finds, many of which are unfortunately unpublished.&nbsp; <p align="left">Amidst ordinary inventory cards was the following:</p> <p align="center"><br><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348621cc3b970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2fe41c5970b -pi" width="404" height="271"></a> </p> <p align="left">It is a tragedy that the camera was "broken" than day.&nbsp; </p></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Daniel Sauerwein EMAIL: daniel.sauerwein@und.edu IP: 208.107.115.6 URL: http://doctoralbliss.wordpress.com DATE: 08/12/2010 12:04:55 AM Unsure of how to react to the image, as I would guess you were doing a dig on Pandora ;). -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Photos of Photos on Inventory Cards STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: photos-of-photos-on-inventory-cards CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 08/10/2010 09:49:38 AM

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----BODY: <p align="left">I spent today taking photographs of the inventoried artifact cards at the Ohio State Excavations at Isthmia dig house.&nbsp; First off, this was incredibly boring work.&nbsp; It involved taking pictures of roughly 5&nbsp; 7 inch inventory cards for about 6 hours straight.&nbsp; I managed to photograph about 1500 of them.&nbsp; It reminded me that most of academic life is, in fact, tedious and archaeology - despite its somewhat exotic image (and genuinely exotic locales) - mostly involves a level of unparalleled tedium.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134861bb2dd970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN4894" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134861bb328970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a> </p> <p>Second, it did give me a chance to muse over the nature of media in archaeology.&nbsp; The cards were hand written (mostly) and included a photograph of the inventoried object, pasted, generally onto the card itself.&nbsp; I was translating these images into a digital image, which would eventually form the basis for a textual image of the object in a relational database.&nbsp; The transition from one media to the next always constitutes unique challenges in any discipline and it is particularly challenging to translate physical objects like cards - which are as much artifacts as documents of the artifacts collected - from one form to the next.&nbsp; The most obvious loss is the physical appearance of emendations, additions, and corrections (inscribed in each instance in different hands, colors, pen types, and styles) and the attendant humanizing of the interpretative process over generations.&nbsp; </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134861bb41d970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN5295" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2f83994970b -pi" width="404" height="304"></a> </p> <p>The cold reality of text based databases is that even if earlier notation are not overwritten (either in a graphically visible sense or in a digital sense), the human aspect of inscribing physical objects ends.&nbsp; And this is particularly significant for archaeology which is first and foremost, the study of material objects.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 98.111.157.223 URL: http://kourelis.blogspot.com/ DATE: 08/10/2010 12:18:36 PM I have a reference for you from a German article on the history of photography that discusses this card system, basically invented by Lucy Talcott in the Agora in the 30s.

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-----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Four Impressions of Greece STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: wysiwyg ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: four-impressions-of-greece CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 08/09/2010 12:06:00 AM ----BODY: <p>I&#39;ve traveled to and from Greece often enough over the last few years that I should not be surprised or put off by anything, but each time, no matter how collected I try to act, something strikes me as particularly bizarre, makes me uncomfortable, and reinforces my feeling that I do not travel well.</p> <p>1. Inexact Time.&#0160; To get to Ancient Corinth you can take the train from the airport.&#0160; This isn&#39;t difficult. You just take the regional rail from the airport station to the end of the line and then literally walk across the platform to the train to Corinth.&#0160; There is one ticket, all the trains leaving the airport go the same place, the platforms are well labeled.&#0160; But still, I managed to get confused.&#0160; I am going to blame the person who sold me the ticket, but because it makes me feel better about myself and not because it was her fault.&#0160; When she handed me the ticket she told me that the right train would leave in 30 minutes.&#0160; On the board in the wellmarked train station there were numerous trains arriving (all going the same place, it would seem), but none that arrived in 30 minutes.&#0160; In fact, there were two trains that arrived almost exactly 5 minutes before and 5 minutes after the 30 minutes the nice woman had told me to wait.&#0160; So, as any season traveller seeing the possibility of 2 well-marked trains going to the exact same place, I panicked and randomly picked one.&#0160; It worked out fine and by the time I arrived in Corinth, I had recovered.</p> <p>2. Blank Billboards. As the train sped through the Attic countryside along the route of the modern Attic Highway around Athens, I couldn&#39;t help but notice the number of blank billboards.&#0160; The billboards looked new and presumably they were set up for to capitalize on the flood of Olympics tourists, but now in an era of economic uncertainty in Greece, the billboards are a bleak sign.&#0160; It can&#39;t be a good sign when companies can&#39;t afford or be bothered to advertise their wares in the summer months - high tourist season - on the main route from the airport to downtown Athens. The Greek countryside is filled with abandonment both ancient and modern and the empty billboards with their exposed and blank plywood pallets just contributed another aspect to the Greek scene.</p> <p>3. Producing a landscape.&#0160; Once I lost interest in staring at blank billboards (and abandoned a crazy plan to count them) and transferred onto the high-speed train south to Corinth, I began to look forward to my first glimpses of the Isthmus of Corinth.&#0160; While I am not usually associated with work on the Isthmus - David Pettegrew is probably the next in line to be the new Mr. Isthmus (Dr. Isthmus?), I still do get a thrill to see the familiar landscape of development, olive groves, market gardens, citrus orchards, archaeological landmarks, and, for lack of better term, human detritus. The idea of finding such a historically important (at least for what I study) place to be familiar is a remarkable feeling.&#0160; Moreover, my little archaeologist&#39;s ego is further stoked when I see the ridge of Mt. Oneion and its imagine that I

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can make out the faintest traces of its less well-known site.&#0160; See, the thing is, I documented that site.&#0160; In fact, I &quot;discovered&quot; it and documented it (with the help of numerous other people) and published it (with my co-author, Tim Gregory).&#0160; It was cool to see Mt. Oneion and imagine its fortification.&#0160; It gave me an instant feeling of familiarity and of accomplishment. I know it&#39;s dorky, but... </p> <p>4. Always an outsider.&#0160; I still feel like an outsider in Greece and doubly so when I settle into my oftentimes home-away-from-home at the American School in Athens.&#0160; This summer, my short field season, will have me living at their famous compound in the village of Ancient Corinth.&#0160; I had visited it numerous times, enjoyed the hospitality of its community of scholars and directors, and frequently marveled at the collected, historical expertise of the Corinth folks.&#0160; At the same time, I&#39;ve always felt like an outsider there.&#0160; Now, part of this is because I was an outsider!&#0160; I have never dug at Corinth and most of my research on the region focuses on the margins (both in terms of interest and in terms of geography).&#0160; Moreover, I am not renowned for my academic confidence or my ease in fitting into different kinds of professional and personal situations (as I said, I don&#39;t travel well).&#0160; That being said, I had hoped one day to feel more comfortable at the Hill House and the American School more generally.&#0160; It hasn&#39;t happened yet, but maybe this year it will begin. </p> <p>More from the field as I capture the time to blog.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: maddy EMAIL: archaeobaking@gmail.com IP: 76.91.201.89 URL: DATE: 09/05/2010 03:05:49 PM Bill, I still remember you picking me up from the airport and driving me to Ancient Corinth all those years ago. The fact that you can drive in Greece is pretty impressive. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 08/06/2010 06:53:15 AM ----BODY:

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<p>It's still pretty dark here in North Dakota so it's a bit hard to predict what the day will be like, but it nevertheless seems like a fine time for a short quick hits and varia.</p> <ul> <li>There's some activity over at <a href="http://punkarchaeology.wordpress.com/">Punk Archaeology</a>.</li> <li>And there is some really good activity at <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>. And my collaboration with the <a href="http://www.oid.und.edu/">Office for Instructional Development</a> at the University of North Dakota has extended to include a <a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/471156.html">Twitt er account (OIDatUND)</a>.  Follow us!</li> <li><a href="http://antiquatedvagaries.blogspot.com/2010/07/hands-off.html">This is a pretty neat blog post</a> on an archaeologist's relationship with their tools.</li> <li>Kurt Vonnegut on semi-colons: "Don't use semicolons. They stand for absolutely nothing. They are transvestite hermaphrodites. They are just a way of showing off. To show that you have been to college." (via <a href="http://kottke.org/10/08/kurt-vonneguts-advice-to-youngwriters">Kottke.com</a>). </li> <li><a href="http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2010/08/update-on-googlewave.html">Google Kills Google Wave</a>.  Google announced that they would no longer develop Google Wave, which to me is sort of a tragedy.  I quite liked Wave and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/01/te aching-with-technology-thursday.html">saw it's potential in the classroom</a>. In fact, I used Wave to coordinate an practicum on public history that I ran with a small group of graduate students, and it worked really well to integrate "real time" communication (particular walking a student through an operation on a piece of software) with "more traditional" types of "bloggy" or discussion board type written communication.  Anyway, I wonder if the very deliberate and gradual roll-out strategy made it difficult to gain the kind of critical mass of adopters necessary to make Wave a useful tool. </li> <li>An interesting <em>NYTimes </em>article "<a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/08/04/arts/design/04maker.html">Wringing out Art of the Rubble in Detroit</a>" that complements my recent little essay on Detroit as a context for punk and spolia, and <a href="http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=128935865">a great radio interview with Queen's Brian May on NPR</a>. (both via Kostis Kourelis)</li> <li>It's curious that <a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/471156.html">Marcu s North has such a strong hold</a> on a spot on the Australian Test side.</li> <li>What I am reading: Chuck Klosterman's <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/fargo-rock-city-a-heavy-metal-odyssey-inrural-north-dakota/oclc/45202097"><em>Fargo Rock City</em></a> and <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/sex-drugs-and-cocoa-puffs-a-low-culturemanifesto/oclc/52121417"><em>Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs : a Low Culture Manifesto</em></a>. Jennifer Egan's <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/visit-from-the-goon-squad/oclc/449844391">A Visit from the Goon Squad</a></em>.</li> <li>What I am listening to: Arcade Fire, <em>The Suburbs</em>.</li> </ul> <p>I'm off to Greece so the blog might be a bit quiet for the next couple of weeks or not.</p>

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----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More on Bronze Age Kommos STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-on-bronze-age-kommos CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 08/05/2010 07:37:42 AM ----BODY: <p>Kommos is one of my favorite sites in the Mediterranean. Not only is it beautifully situated, but it has a great guide and the results of the excavations there contribute (in a way that I can understand as a non-Bronze Ageologist) to broader discussions of Mediterranean connectivity and economic organization.  In fact, I like Kommos so much that <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2007/12/ko mmos-on-crete.html">I blogged about the site almost three years ago</a>.  (Have I really been blogging that long? Don't I have better things to do with my mornings by now?)</p> <p>As I noted in my first blog post on Kommos, the most interesting thing about the site is the evidence for how deeply interconnected it was with other regions across the Mediterranean.  An article in the most recent volume of <em>Hesperia</em> makes a further contribution to what scholars already know about the economic networks in which Kommos participated.  In "Mycenaean and Cypriot Late Bronze Age Ceramic Imports to Kommos" (Hesperia 79 (2010), 191231), Jonathan Tomlinson, Jeremy Rutter, and Sandra Hoffman confirm using neutron activation analysis that Kommos featured numerous imports from both the Mycenaean world and, more interesting to me, from Cyprus.  From what I can gather, the assemblage at Kommos produced a significant quantity of Late Minoan III vessels and White Slip II milk bowls and Base Ring II cups in particular.  Apparently these types of vessels were shipped around the Aegean stacked in pithoi (Dimitri Nakassis clarified this for me).</p> <p>Neutron activation analysis demonstrated that the material from Cyprus could be identified with certain discrete production sites on the island.  It is hard to completely understand what this could mean (especially for a time period outside my specialty).  On the one hand, it may be that Late Bronze Age Cyprus had certain sites and production facilities dedicated to an export economy in ceramics (like scholars have argued for copper production).  On the other hand, it also could indicate that certain classes of high-value Late Bronze Age ceramics were only produced at certain sites.  Or, finally, on the third hand (!!!), it could mean that Kommos only had particular political and economic

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relationships with particular sites on Cyprus and imported material from those places to the exclusion of similar material derived from other sites.  All three possibilities reflect how well-organized the commercial economy of Cyprus was in the Late Bronze Age (something that we had already suspected based on the evidence found in the Uluburun shipwreck).  It is interesting to think how patterns of exchange that link discrete consumption and production sites would influence the more decentralized patterns of pre-modern commerce conjured up by <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/corrupting-sea-a-study-of-mediterraneanhistory/oclc/42692026">Horden and Purcell</a>.  For Horden and Purcell, trade seems to flow through flexible and largely decentralized networks of microregions which depended, to some extent, on dynamic, highly-flexible networks of both supply and demand that functioned across a local, regional, and interregional scale. Would the presence of discrete and seemingly long-standing relationships between sites of consumption, like Kommos, and production centers challenge the more decentralized model advanced in <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/corrupting-sea-a-study-of-mediterraneanhistory/oclc/42692026">The Corrupting Sea</a></em>?</p> <p>It is even more interesting to see how neutron activation analysis has allowed Tomlinson, Rutter, and Hoffman to identify the regional production sites that simple visual inspection of ceramics would not have detected.  The downside of this technology, of course, is the expense and the expertise required to analyze and interpret the results.  If we can imagine an archaeological world where neutron activation analysis (and other sophisticated methods for identifying and describing ceramics) become more common, we can see a world where the oftentimes black art of ceramics analysis has simultaneous become blacker and become more transparent.  The individual abilities of ceramicists to identify artifact types consistently can now be verified through a more consistently replicable process, but, at the same time, a process that requires a level of scientific expertise that most Mediterranean archaeologists lack.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: The Next Project... STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: the-next-project CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 08/04/2010 07:28:54 AM ----BODY: <p>By the end of this week, I'll be back in Greece continuing a long-standing project and initiating a new collaboration.  Next week, I'll be working at the

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Ohio State Excavations at Isthmia with Steve Ellis's <a href="http://classics.uc.edu/index.php/research/40-isthmia">East Isthmia Archaeology Project</a>.  The project focuses on the mysterious East Field at Isthmia.  The East Field is a tangles mass of walls of various dates and has puzzled archaeologists from its initial excavation in the 1970s.</p> <p>Over the past 5 years, Ellis' team has replanned the East Field and established a new relative chronology of the walls.  At the same time, I've been working on (re)digitizing the context data from the Ohio State Excavations at Isthmia and integrating it with the various inventoried finds from the various parts of the site.  Our hope for  this summer is that we'll be able to bring together Ellis' relative chronology of the walls with some parts of my  digitized finds database to determine whether the ceramic data can contribute a more precise chronology to stratigraphic dating of the walls.</p> <p>I also hope that my time at Isthmia will help me come to terms with what I'd need to do to digitize all of the inventoried finds.  From my understanding, the finds inventory is primarily stored on index cards at the Isthmia excavation house.  These cards contain the basic chronology, typological, and stratigraphic context for artifacts ranging from inscriptions, to lamps, pottery, architectural fragments, and various metal objects.  My feeling is that it would be inefficient to attempt to key the data from these cards at Isthmia.  My plan right now is to figure out a way to very efficiently create images of each card so that the data can be keyed back in the US.  I am hoping to discover a way to photograph batches of the cards quickly.</p> <p>My work with the finds data is part of larger and quite diffuse effort to digitize most of the archaeological records from Isthmia.  Jon Frey has been working to digitize the notebooks and produce a new site plan, and my hope is that my finds data will integrate smoothly into his efforts.</p> <p>During my time in Greece, I'll be staying at the Corinth Excavations in Ancient Corinth.  Despite working in the Corinthia for almost 15 years, this will be the first time that I've ever stayed at the Corinth Excavation hostel.  I am almost giddy.</p> <p>More from the field as my adventures develop!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Some Thoughts on Kim Bowes' Private Worship, Public Values, and Religious Change in Late Antiquity STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: some-thoughts-on-kim-bowes-private-worship-public-values-andreligious-change-in-late-antiquity CATEGORY: Books CATEGORY: Late Antiquity

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DATE: 08/03/2010 08:30:22 AM ----BODY: <p><img style="float: right;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2d1b4f2970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="139" height="206" /></p> <p>I just finished reading Kim Bowes' <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/private-worship-public-values-and-religiouschange-in-late-antiquity/oclc/183179509">Private Worship, Public Values, and Religious Change in Late Antiquity</a> </em>(Cambridge 2008).  The first lines of her introduction recounted one of my favorite stories from Late Antiquity: Pulcheria's dream inspired excavation of the remains of 40 martyrs from Sozomen (<em>Hist. Eccl.</em> 9.2). Any book that begins with a example of dream archaeology is o.k. to me.</p> <p>But, I'll admit that this incident was not why I  read this book. Instead, I wanted to gather recent insights into the relatively late date for monumental architecture in Greece.  Bowes does not talk about Greece directly in her book, but argues for the prevalence and importance of churches associated with elite domestic contexts throughout better documented regions of the Mediterranean.</p> <p>These buildings are important because they represent an architectural counterpoint to the bishop's church which stood as a product of the ecclesiastical hierarchy and the centralized authority traditionally associated with that institution.  Acknowledging the widespread existence of church buildings funded by the Late Roman elite and prominently associated with both rural and urban elite domestic contexts reminds us that the spread of Christianity was not the simple, linear growth of the institutional church, but a process riven with disputes.  In fact, the victory of institutional Christianity overwrote evidence for many of the disputes in the process of producing a single triumphant narrative for the victor of the church.</p> <p>Bowes' book also continues to enrich our understanding of space by reminding us of the fluidity between public and private spaces in the discourse of power in Late Antiquity.  Issues of display, patronage, and both public and spiritual mediation played out over a monumental landscape produced as much by private funds and initiatives as institutional authority of the church.  As a result, efforts in the law codes to suppress privately funded church buildings were as much political moves as economic ones as the institutional church sought to suppress rival spaces of power in the Early Christian landscape.</p> <p>The book also contributes to our understanding of the later 5th and early 6th century boom in ecclesiastical architecture in the Eastern Mediterranean.  While Bowes does not discuss these periods explicitly - her book concludes in the middle decades of the 5th century - it may be that the boom in church building occurred as the institutional church made the final push for an exclusive claim to monumental architecture.  The story the church of St. Polyeuctos in Constantinople and the rivalry between Anicia Juliana's private church and the imperial church of Justinian is suggestive of just this kind of rivalry.</p> <p>In the Corinthia, and in Greece more generally, it is exceedingly difficult to differentiate between churches associated with the local, non-ecclesiastical elite, and those constructed by bishops or under the auspices of the ecclesiastical hierarchy.  Evidence from epigraphy does suggest that non-church officials did build churches, but this tells us little about who controlled the church, its clergy, and the rites that took place there.  There is  some suggestive evidence, however:  for example, groups of smaller, rural churches dot the Greek countryside - like those that throughout southeastern Attica - and many are not clearly associated with known settlements suggesting

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the kind of elite-controlled rural churches that Bowes has linked to villas in the West.  Moreover, we know that there existed a villa-culture in Greece and that some civic power likely moved from the urban core to suburban and even exurban villas of the elite.  It would be natural then for these buildings which already served some "public" functions to include religious space as well, although as far as I know we have no specific evidence for this function among the handful of Late Roman villas thoroughly excavated in Greece.  The evidence for 6th century church building in better excavated and documented urban areas like the group of contemporary churches located in the Corinthia - could, then, represent an institutional response to largely undocumented elite, private, rural practices.</p> <p>While this all remains tremendously speculative, but it does allow us to explain how Christianity grew in Greece without evidence for monumental ecclesiastical architecture.  The needs for Christian communities was largely met by church buildings associated with the traditional and increasingly rural elite rather than the new-fangled authority of the emergent, but not yet locally-powerful ecclesiastical hierarchy.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Diana Wright EMAIL: dianagwright@comcast.net IP: 76.104.197.147 URL: http://surprisedbytime.blogspot.com DATE: 08/03/2010 12:59:33 PM Your book recommendations are quite reliable. I immediately contact ILL. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More Punk and Nostalgia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-punk-and-nostalgia CATEGORY: Punk Archaeology DATE: 08/02/2010 09:39:59 AM ----BODY: <p>Kostis Kourelis brought to my attention a recent <em><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/24/arts/design/24may.html">New York Times</a></em><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/07/24/arts/design/24may.html"> article</a> on an exhibit of Victorian era stereoscopic photographs called "A Village Lost and Found".  What made this exhibit interesting to punk archaeology fans, was that former Queen guitarist Brian May curated the exhibit and co-wrote the

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accompanying book.  The New York Times review of the exhibition both feigns surprise that a rock 'n' roller like May would be interested in such quaint, esoteric artifacts as hand-colored stereoscopic images and, at the same time, acknowledged the deep nostalgic vein in British society (and its music).  In doing so, the NYT's author makes reference to one of my favorite albums which lurks around the margins of punk rock, The Kinks Are the Village Green Preservation Society.</p> <p>The double album, released in 1968, consists of series of tracks celebrating traditional village life in England.  Topics range from the Village green to picture books, trains, farms, and typical village characters (Johnny Thunder and the deviously rocking Wicked Annabella).  The nostalgic element captured, however ironically, in the Kink's album continues in punk music.  As I have noted before, punk always had an affection for the pop music of the earlier generation, even though punk rockers from the Germs to the Ramones and the Heartbreakers typically sped up the hooks and contorted the lyrics that gave pop music its wide-spread appeal.  One of my personal favorites is the Germ's cover of Chuck Berry's "Round and Round".  At the same time punk rockers like Jonathan Richman (especially in his early Modern Lovers tracks like Old World, which is bracketed later in the first Modern Lovers' album with the track Modern World) produced music with the same whimsical nostalgia as the Kink's Village Green:</p> <p>I see the '50's apartment house<br />It's bleak in the 1970's sun<br />But I still love the '50's<br />And I still love the old world<br />I wanna keep my place in this old world<br />Keep my place in the arcane knowledge<br />And I still love the '50's and I still love the old world</p> <p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/01/pu nk-rock-nostalgia-and-the-archaeology-of-musical-utopia.html">As I have argued before </a>the archaeological character of these songs is not in their perfect reproduction of the past, but in the preservation of the past through critique.  For example, the Kink's celebration of the Village Green evokes the nostalgia for the earlier times that shot through modernizing British society. In fact, as <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/id eas-of-landscapes.html">Matthew Johnson has described in his <em>Ideas of Landscape</em></a>, such nostalgia for an earlier period influenced how archaeologist have studied the landscape and regarded material and buildings from the modern period.  Romantic notions of the earlier, rural world, celebrated its simplicity, inherent virtues (especially of Britishness and, as we have witnessed recently the "real" America of the small town), and purity, and expected some degree of continuity to be visible in the society and culture of contemporary denizens of the countryside and the small town.</p> <p>Punk tried to make a mess of these idyllic critiques by taking the staid nostalgia and melding it with what to many appeared to be the most fleeting, contemporary, and critical musical genres. In some ways, this finds a parallel between those of us committed to sophisticated and critical approaches to archaeology of the countryside, but still enamored with the illusory, antimodern character of the rural scene.  I can admit to loving to explore the lonely hilltops in Greece, to document isolated ruins, and to embracing the contrast between the bustle of the village or city and the peaceful "isolation" of rural Greece.  I often will pause and listen just to the wind and revel in the absence of the motorbikes or trucks while at the same time scrutinizing the read-out on a state-of-the-art GPS unit or looking at a map showing an aerial photograph analyzed via sophisticated computer software.  Moreover, as much as my analyses call into question the notion that the Greek countryside was

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isolated, I still use a view of olive covered hills in my publications and presentations to evoke the exotic, traditional character of an archaeological past.  The contrast between my reliance on modern technology to document the past and the romantic image of the rural Greece produces a productive conflict.  My appreciation of the beauty and isolation of the Greek countryside drew inspiration from traditional romantic views of rural life while, at the same time, my approach to field work and conclusions challenges those very same views.  A Punk Archaeology approach embraces these same ironies drawing heavily on traditional of thought while at the same time challenging them.</p> <p><a href="http://punkarchaeology.wordpress.com/">For more musings on Punk Archaeology be sure to check out our blog here</a>.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 98.111.149.120 URL: http://kourelis.blogspot.com/ DATE: 08/02/2010 05:25:01 PM Brilliant!!! -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits-3 CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 07/30/2010 07:59:29 AM ----BODY: <p>It's a rainy Friday before a (hopefully) sunny weekend, so we have some fun varia and quick hits to get your day going right.</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/07/29/teaching-what-youdon%e2%80%99t-know-student-research/">A nice response</a> to my short review of <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/teaching-what-you-dontknow/oclc/316037957">T. Huston's <em>Teaching What You Don't Know</em></a>.  There is nothing more humbling than advising graduate or undergraduate research. Student research consistently reminds me how much I don't know even in my own field and energizes me with new and refreshing approaches to familiar topics. Most importantly, however, student research reinforces the importance of process in my own work.  It makes me want to be more systematic, more organized, more exhaustive.</li>

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<li><a href="http://punkarchaeology.wordpress.com/">Punk Archaeology </a>is back.  I have a couple of most posts brewing in my brain. But the blog might not last for much longer, so if you haven't checked it out, it's probably best to do it now.  And fear not, something else is in the works.</li> <li>I started using <a href="http://hootsuite.com/">HootSuite</a> this week (instead of<a href="http://www.tweetdeck.com/"> Tweetdeck</a>).  While I appreciate the aesthetic of Tweetdeck and actually like the Adobe Air built interface, it may be the Hootsuite is more useful as I look to juggle several <a href="http://twitter.com/billcaraher/">Twitter</a> accounts this fall.  So it's Hootsuite on my laptop, <a href="http://seesmic.com/">Seesmic </a>on my Android Phone, and Tweetdeck on my iPad.  But to read my social media on my iPad nothing beats <a href="http://ax.itunes.apple.com/us/app/flipboard/id358801284?mt=8">Flipboard</a >.  For a cool little review of it, check out this post on<a href="http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Making-Social-Media-More/25858/"> ProfHacker</a>.</li> <li>I also purchased a copy of <a href="http://www.redsweater.com/marsedit/">MarsEdit</a> this week. I've been looking for blogging software for my Mac that would rival the simplicity and ease of Window's Life Writer.  I tried <a href="http://illuminex.com/ecto/">Ecto </a>for a year and found it just a bit too quirky for my taste. (Actually, I was annoyed that I could not change the font size of the text I was writing without changing the size of the font in the blog).  I like MarsEdit better.</li> <li>As an historian with a serious professional interest in archaeology housed in a history department, I am increasingly aware of how the professional credentials amassed in my strange interdisciplinary space do not neatly align with those of my colleagues.  For example, I do not get any explicit credit for running my own archaeological project and my collaborative publications (often with 3 or more authors) - standard practice among archaeologists - does not look like the more solitary scholarly efforts of my colleagues.  In any event, I was interested to see how closely my work fits into the new set of best practices for Public History recently approved by the AHA, OAH, et c.  <a href="http://www.foundhistory.org/2010/06/16/oah-aha-ncph-approverecommendations-on-evaluating-public-history-for-tenure-and-promotion/">Check out the details and commentary at Found History</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://craigmod.com/journal/kickstartup/">This is a cool article </a>on how to use<a href="http://www.kickstarter.com/"> Kickstarter</a> to fund a publishing project.  It gets me thinking about Phase Two of Punk Archaeology.</li> <li>Marcos Ambrose is leaving <a href="http://jtgdaughertyracing.com/">JTG Daugherty Racing </a>at the end of this year.  I hope he manages to upgrade his ride.  Rumor has it that he might move over to fill one of the two vacated seats at Petty Racing.</li> <li><a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/england-v-pakistan2010/engine/current/match/426413.html">England v. Pakistan</a> will show whether Pakistan is really that good or Australia is really that bad.  So far, England appears committed to keeping things interesting.</li> <li>What I'm Reading: R. Price, trans, <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/acts-of-the-council-of-constantinople-of553-with-related-texts-on-the-three-chapterscontroversy/oclc/427610844&amp;referer=brief_results"><em>The Acts of the Council of Constantinople of 553 : with related texts on the Three Chapters Controversy</em></a>. (Liverpool 2009); <a href="http://www.hesperiaonline.org/"><em>Hesperia </em>79.2</a>; M.T. Fournier, <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/minutemens-double-nickels-on-the-

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dime/oclc/81453237"><em>The Minutemen's Double Nickels on the Dime</em></a>. (New York 2009)</li> <li>What I'm listening to: The Minutemen, Double Nickels on the Dime.</li> </ul> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Punk and Spolia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: punk-and-spolia CATEGORY: Punk Archaeology DATE: 07/29/2010 10:48:20 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the last week or so, I've been listening again to the<a href="http://www.detroitcobras.org/index.html"> Detroit Cobras</a> and thinking about some of our first conversations on Punk Archaeology.  The Cobras specialize in what they have called "revved up soul".  They make this wonderful noise by covering (mostly) lost classics of the MoTown era over the  driving rhythms of punk and the fuzzy, distorted lo-fi sound of the punk blues movement.  Rachel Nagy's voice succeeds at being both smooth and abrasive at the same time.  Some critics have called their sound "Garage Soul".</p> <p>Their first album, Mink, Rat or Rabbit covered songs by 1950s and early 1960s bands like The Marvelettes, The Shirelles, Irma Thomas, The "5" Royales, and The Shangri-Las.  Later albums continue this tradition.  (They're first two albums - Mink, Rat or Rabbit and Life, Love and Learning - are, to my ear, their best.  (Notice the absence of the "Oxford comma" in both titles.)</p> <p>The point of mentioning this somewhat obscure band is to consider the relationship between punk and spolia.  Spolia is a technical archaeological term for the re-use older fragments of architecture in new construction. It is typically associated with Late Antiquity and was initially regarded by critics steeped in the Classical Tradition as indicative of the lose of technical skills and economic impoverished conditions at the end of Antiquity.  Other saw the use of spolia as a conscious decision on the part of Late Antique builders and, at worst, reflective of a taste for a discordant, disorganized, and, ultimately, decadent aesthetic.</p> <p>Of course hip-hop music withstood similar criticisms as they cut up and sampled R&amp;B classics to form  rhythmic backdrop for their poetry.  Such reuse of earlier material was unoriginal and indicative of a kind of creative bankruptcy among "today's generation".  Punk took their lead from pop music which they sped up and made more up-tempo, raucous and chaotic.  The Cobras occupy a third space recently developed by bands like the White Stripes and the

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Black Keys where punk, R&amp;B, and blues infused with the DIY, lo-fy sound of the garage (which represents a more austere and suburban version of the venerable lo-fy Juke Joint).</p> <p>The epicenter of this music has been Detroit (or the Rust Belt more broadly) where the punk of the MC Five and the blues Son House and John L. Hooker intersect.  The music here has tremendous symbolic significance, as Detroit has become emblematic of the decline of "traditional America" and images of the ruinous conditions of the factories have become images of the decline of America's fortunes as a manufacturing power.  The photographs are archaeological in their attention to detail and the need to accommodate history.</p> <p>The music of the Detroit Cobras provide a counterpoint to the haunting, archaeological photographs of abandoned Detroit.  Fragments of the city's earlier days come through in their music, but rather than critique the declining fortunes of America's industrial heartland, the music calls forth the continued vitality of those days in much the same way that spolia maintained a conscious connection with earlier architecture.</p> <p>The archaeological impulse in of punk rock of the Detroit Cobras reveals a kind of native archaeology of the American city which draws backwards on its unique history to produce critical memory.  Such work is the work of archaeologists both of the past and the present who sought to communicate something meaningful from the fragments of the past that remained visible in their present.  The spolia preserved in the music of the Detroit Cobras presents a musical museum in much the same way that the fragments of the past in produce meaning in the context of a physical museum today or in the context of monumental architecture in Late Antiquity.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Constantina Katsari EMAIL: c_katsari@yahoo.com IP: 86.182.44.10 URL: http://constantinakatsari.wordpress.com DATE: 07/31/2010 11:50:46 AM Not in a million years would I have made a connection between spolia and punk, until I saw your article. This is a valid point that could be pursued further. Are you thinking of publishing it in the near future? ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL: IP: 208.107.184.168 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 08/02/2010 05:29:24 PM Constantina,

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Yep. I am collaborating with Kostis Kourelis on a long-ish term, album length, project that seeks to bring together a bunch of singles like this into something of a collection. Thanks for the comment and will keep you informed! For more see here: <a href="http://punkarchaeology.wordpress.com/">http://punkarchaeology.wordpress.co m/</a> Bill -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Some Thought on Clay Shirky's Cognitive Surplus STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: some-thought-on-clay-shirks-cognitive-surplus CATEGORY: Books CATEGORY: The New Media CATEGORY: Web/Tech DATE: 07/28/2010 09:09:16 AM ----BODY: <p><img style="float: right;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485c652cf970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="140" height="212" /></p> <p>I downloaded onto my iPad - via the Kindle application - a copy of Clay Shirky's <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/cognitive-surpluscreativity-and-generosity-in-a-connected-age/oclc/466335766">Congnitive Surplus</a> </em>(New York 2010).  This book has receive a good bit of attention on the interwebs, in large part because Shirky is unapologetic about the potential of the internet and particularly the potential of the internet for good.  In an era where one's status as a pundit almost depends upon a certain cynical view of the world, this book is refreshing and positive.</p> <p>In short, Shirky argues that the internet provides an outlet for surplus energy that the prosperity of the second half of the 20th century has made available to us.  The rise in prosperity has allowed residents of the West, in particular, to enjoy increasing amounts of free-time and leisure.  Shirky contends that the number one use of this leisure time over the last 60 years has been watching television.  Watching television is solitary, somewhat antisocial, and, most importantly, passive.</p> <p>The rise of the internet has begun to slowly encroach on the dominance of television.  Unlike TV the internet is social, provides a platform for both passive consumption and active production of media, and encourages the formation of communities with shared interests.  The dynamic character of the web as a social platform functions to channel energies previously locked away in in the passive relationship between the individual and the television.  The web has already begun to channel the "cognitive surplus" unleashed by the West's recent prosperity, but hitherto squandered through passive and more or less solitary leisure-time activities.  Shirky's best example of this is Wikipedia which

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appeared out of the many moments of leisure enjoyed by tens of thousands of individual contributors.  The result is a testimony to the aggregate knowledge of global community of individuals which prior to the internet would have found a singular, intellectually substantial expression.</p> <p>While this is cool thesis, it also caused me to think about a few things:</p> <p>1. I am not convinced that the "cognitive" activity that Shirky associates with the internet comes directly from surplus time spent in front of the television.  It's a great idea, but a relatively unsophisticated argument.  First, people always used some of their free time in productive, social ways.  Whether it is membership in a community organization, work with a church or other religious group, or serving as an elected official or a volunteer, the cognitive surplus created by economic prosperity poured innumerable areas of social and community life.  As the internet allows for communities to extend beyond the institutional and social confines of traditional, place-based communities, surely some of Shirky's apparent "cognitive surplus" comes at the expense of these other, more traditional forms of community and social organization.  At the same time, there are those who suggest that the rather diffuse creativity on display on the internet comes at the expense of more <em>economically </em>productive pursuits.  The individuals who produce <a href="http://icanhascheezburger.com/">LOLCats</a> for example <em>might </em>otherwise be watching television, but also might be reading a book, working, learning or refining a skill.  I am all for these profoundly democratic expressions of creativity, but I'd be reluctant to argue that television and the internet form a kind of zero-sum dyad.  The arguments for the evils of the internet, in fact, tend not to be arguments for the watching of television, but rather arguments that the internet undermines more rigorous, local, focused, and ultimately socially responsible uses of time and talent.  Shirky does little to undermine these critiques.</p> <p>2. The notion of channeling surplus is always appealing, but what really matters is how that surplus (cognitive or otherwise) is channelled.  The downside of the unfettered and limitless nature of the internet is that it can minimize the impact of a small contribution while still giving the individual the sense of contributing to something larger.  (And I say this a blogger who regularly devotes 4 or 5 hours a week launching my two-cents into the void, and with the understanding that these 4 or 5 hours could be spent polishing up a lecture, reading another, important, argument, reading a graduate student's paper just that much more carefully, or any number of professionally and socially responsible (impactful) activities).  The radically democratized space of the internet is the most efficient venue for all forms of surplus.  The "eat local" movement provides a nice model here.  Just eating locally produced foods is not a sure-fire solution to ecological, economic, and ethical problems facing large scale food production in a globalized economy. In the same way, the shear scale of the internet presents significant problems for the efficient use of specialized surplus.</p> <p>3. Finally, this is the first book that I've read cover-to-cover (so to speak) on my iPad.  The most interesting aspect of this experience (aside from the fact that the iPad is a very nice tool for reading a book) is that I could where other people highlighted passages in Shirky's book.  Slight, dashed underlines showed me commonly annotated passages and clicking on the passages indicated how many people underlined that particular text.  Here is a great example of Shirky's of how the internet takes the solitary act of reading and annotating a text and turns it into a global activity with numerous participants creating a running commentary.  While at present (as far as I can tell) the Kindle application only allows readers to share underlining, it would be remarkable in the future for readers to share margin notes, comments, and even

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links to other passages in other books.  The aggregate of these activities would instantly turn any book into a critical edition.</p> <p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Sue Boudreau EMAIL: sueboudreau2004@yahoo.com IP: 24.7.84.235 URL: http://trythis1thing.wordpress.com DATE: 07/30/2010 11:30:00 PM Enjoyed your summary - seems right on to me. I also love the bright side to the inexorable tech tide and the antidote to hand-wringing about kids today. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Even More Experiments in Intensive Pedestrian Survey STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: even-more-experiments-in-intensive-pedestrian-survey CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: David Pettegrew CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 07/27/2010 07:39:33 AM ----BODY: <p><em>Even more guest-posting brilliance from our esteemed guest blogger, <a href="http://home.messiah.edu/%7Edpettegrew/">David Pettegrew</a>, the codirector the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project</a> and the 2010 Cyprus Research Fund speaker.  Be sure to check out his posts on <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/pk ap-season-in-review.html">Tuesday</a>, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/pr ocession-pyla-koutsopetria-pottery.html">Wednesday</a>, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/ex periments-in-intensive-survey-at-pyla-koutsopetria.html">Thursday</a>, and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/mo re-experiments-in-intensive-pedestriansurvey.html">yesterday</a></em>.</p> <p>Over the last few days (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/ex periments-in-intensive-survey-at-pyla-koutsopetria.html">here</a> and <a

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href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/mo re-experiments-in-intensive-pedestrian-survey.html">here</a>), we have been discussing the results of an experiment we carried out 2010 in order to assess the relationship between the number of artifacts we see in pedestrian survey and the number actually on the ground.  You can read about the first two phases of these experiments here and here.</p> <p>Today we consider the kinds of artifacts that we observed during total collection and the sorts of material that made up the surface matrix.  When we set up the experiment, we consciously decided not to collect artifacts via the chronotype sample as we normally do in our pedestrian resurvey.  What crueler thing could one do to the project ceramicist than overwhelm him with 1,000+ surface artifacts? (After all, the logic of sampling is to manage human resources more effectively.) Because we didn’t identify the artifacts from the total collection grid according to chronotype as we did for the survey units, we limited the kinds of comparisons we can make between the pedestrian survey sample and the total collection.</p> <p>Even still, there were still some things we could do to give us a sense of the kinds of material on the ground, especially their fabric and functional attributes.  How much of the surface assemblage of a high-density unit at Koutsopetria consists of cooking ware, coarse wares, coarse wares with surface treatment like combing, and table wares (slipped or unslipped)?</p> <p>To address this question in part, we sorted all pottery from each total collection unit into three basic fabric classes: semi-fine and fine ware (whether decorated or not), cooking ware, and medium-coarse and coarse wares (including amphora sherds).  The results below show the count of each of the categories in each of the total collection grid squares and give in parentheses the percentage of that fabric group in terms of the total number of potsherds in the unit.</p> <div></div> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2977b19970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="508" /></p> <p> </p> <p>Fine ware constitutes 7.6% to 15.4% of the number of potsherds in each subunit; cooking ware only 1.7% to 5.4% of the total number of potsherds; and coarse wares consistently 80.2-87.2% of the overall assemblage.  Unsurprisingly, for a predominantly Late Roman assemblage, the great majority of the sherds are coarse, a small percentage are fine, and tiny percentage are cooking.  The disparity between coarse wares, on the one hand, and fine and cooking wares on the other would have been even greater had we compared weight instead of count, since most fine and cooking ware sherds are thin-walled and small.</p> <p>We also counted the “parts” of the vessel according to the standard ceramicist categories of rims, bases, handles, shoulders / necks, and body sherds.  Rims represented 2.9-7% of the total sherd count, bases less than 2.2%, handles from 2.2 to 5.3%, neck and shoulders typically less than a percent. Body sherds typically represent over 90% of the surface assemblage.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2977b7e970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="220" /></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg"

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src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2977b85970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="220" /></p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2977b8c970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="220" /></p> <div>Finally, we tabulated the data in a slightly different way, breaking down the surface assemblage for each subunit by both fabric group and part.  The results shown in the table below suggest that this Late Roman assemblage includes for fine wares mainly body sherds (73.8% of fine wares) and rims (19.5%), for cooking ware mainly body sherds (84.5% of cooking wares) and handles (6.9%), and for coarse ware mainly body sherds (92.9% of coarse wares).  </div> <div></div> <div><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2977b96970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="255" /></div> <div><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2977ba2970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="255" /></div> <div><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2977bb7970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="255" /></div> <div> <div>Coarse ware body sherds make up 79.5% (n=1474) of the total number of sherds (n=1,854) counted for all 4 subunits.  By contrast, fine ware rims make up 2.2% of the total pottery assemblage and cooking ware rims form only .11% of the total pottery assemblage!!!  The 71 fragments of slipped and glazed fine ware (i.e., not including fine ware lacking clear glazing or slip) represent only 3.8% of the total number of potsherds counted (n=1854).  These few black glazed Classical-Hellenistic sherds and red slipped Roman-Late Roman sherds are the typical objects used to provide most of the chronological information for dating archaeological sites but they represent less than 4% of our surface assemblage of this unit at Koutsopetria.</div> <div></div> <div>Finally, it is worth asking what percentage of coarse body sherds have surface treatments and decorations like grooving, combing, and ridging — the kinds of surface treatments that usually lead to them being collected in most regional surveys.  To address this question, we counted the coarse sherds for two of the subunits (G1 &amp; G15) with spiral grooving, combing, or wheel ridging.  The 66 sherds represent 12.5% of the 526 coarse body sherds from those subunits and 9.8% of 672 total sherds from those units.  These “diagnostic body sherds” then are more visible than glazed and slipped fine ware but still quite unrepresentative of the surface pottery as a whole.</div> <div></div> <div>I suppose our next steps with the results of these experiments are to compare them with 1) the chronotype sample from the broader survey, and 2) the data from subsurface excavated deposits.  I think the interesting results of the experiment certainly justified the time it took to totally collect the subunits and will allow us to understand how close our chronotype sample is to the population of ceramic artifacts on the ground.</div> </div>

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----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More Experiments in Intensive Pedestrian Survey STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-experiments-in-intensive-pedestrian-survey CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: David Pettegrew CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 07/26/2010 06:54:24 AM ----BODY: <p><em>More guest-posting brilliance from our esteemed guest blogger, <a href="http://home.messiah.edu/%7Edpettegrew/">David Pettegrew</a>, the codirector the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project</a> and the 2010 Cyprus Research Fund speaker.  Be sure to check out his posts on <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/pk ap-season-in-review.html">Tuesday</a>, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/pr ocession-pyla-koutsopetria-pottery.html">Wednesday</a>, and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/ex periments-in-intensive-survey-at-pylakoutsopetria.html">Thursday</a></em>.</p> <p>Last Thursday, we introduced the survey experiment that PKAP conducted in June 2010 to assess the relationship between the number of artifacts that we see when we walk across a survey unit and the number of artifacts actually on the ground.  In other words, we wanted to assess how effective our survey methods are in actually assessing what was on the ground.  On Thursday, we compared the artifact densities detected by the project’s untrained student fieldwalkers to those counted by trained senior staff members.  Today we will discuss the second phase in our 2010 experiment, an assessment of the total population of all artifacts on the surface of select subunits.  This part of the experiment was designed to give us a total count of all surface artifacts that can be compared with the artifact counts reported in yesterday’s discussion.</p> <p>We began by selecting four 10 x 10 m subunits based on the densities of the 10 x 10 m artifact densities counted by the experienced senior staff members.  As with past experiments (published in the <em>RDAC </em>2007), we selected our 4 subunits to represent the range of density variation: the lowest density quartile (G15), highest density quartile (G9), and two middle quartiles (G1 and

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G6).  Each total subunit was 10 x 10 m, representing 1/16 (6.25%) of the 1,600 sq m survey unit.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="144.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485b373af970c -pi" border="0" alt="144.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p> <p>To vacuum a high-density unit, you really have to spend a lot of time picking individual artifacts off the ground.  For each of our units, students Andrew, Zane, Valerie, and Luke, and I  walked very slowly in adjacent passes across each selected square gathering together in 1 or 2 corners of the unit all the artifacts present.  An initial pass was never enough for we observed how many artifacts we missed initially.  Usually two additional passes were necessary to vacuum the surface completely, and each pass involved either crawling on hands and knees, or bending so that you had a closer view of the ground.  I have to admit that my back and neck got sore after a while of this.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="143.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485b373bd970c -pi" border="0" alt="143.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p> <p>The results of this “total collection”, shown below, are interesting to compare with the “pedestrian survey counts” discussed yesterday.  You have to keep in mind with the comparison that the pedestrian counts represent a 20% sample of each subunit while the total collection counts represent a 100% sample.  You have to multiply the pedestrian count by a factor of 5 to estimate the “total putative count” (i.e., an estimation of what the total count would be for 100% of the unit) for the pedestrian-walked unit.</p> <p>The first outlined set of grid units below shows the total counts from each of the total collection units.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485b37193970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="535" /></p> <p>The second set of grids compares the total collection counts with the pedestrian survey counts in parentheses (multiplied by 5 to create the 100% putative sample).  </p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485b371a6970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="521" /></p> <p>The third shows the factor difference between these two types of counts.  </p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f28f543a970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="521" /></p> <p>Here is where it gets even more interesting.  We can estimate that the 940 artifacts experienced fieldwalkers counted through pedestrian survey across the entire unit (i.e., the pedestrian counts from 4 walker swaths) would produce a putative pedestrian survey count (factoring for the 20% sample) of 4,700 artifacts.  In other words, had we walked 100% of the unit, we would have counted about 4,700 artifacts.  Now, if total collection (vacuuming) produces on average 2.96 times the number of artifacts as pedestrian survey, we can estimate that there were 13,212 artifacts actually on the surface of the ground.  To provide some perspective, we collected and brought back to the museum 8,788 total artifacts from the 252 grid squares of Koutsopetria and 19,657 total

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artifacts from our survey of the entire Pyla-Koutsopetria area.  A single survey unit at Koutsopetria totally collected would produce 1.5 times the number of artifacts sampled from all 252 grid squares at Koutsopetria and .67 of the total artifacts sampled across the entire Pyla area.  If we were to apply the same multipliers to all 252 forty x forty meter grid squares, i.e., the main part of the site of Koutsopetria, the total artifact count of 19,182 would produce a putative total count of 95,910.  Our estimated total population of artifacts (based on the 2.96 factor) is at least 284,894 (and in reality, poor visibility in many units often limited our sample to 50% of the ground).  This is *why* sampling is important!</p> <p>As for TIME, total collection requires a huge commitment.  Although we (<em>for clarification here, "we" means David - Bill</em>) initially considered surveying all 16 subunits, i.e., an entire 40 x 40 m unit, this proved unrealistic given the time it took for 5 individuals to vacuum a single subunit: 1.5 hours each for G1 and G6, 2 hours for G9, and 1 hour for G15.  Using the total time it took to hoover 25% of the grid square (6 hours) as an index for hoovering this unit, we estimate that 5 individuals could hoover a high-density 40 x 40 m unit in about 24 work hours or well over 100 work hours!  If the typical survey work day is 6 hours long (say, 6AM-noon), it would require 4 full days of a team collecting artifacts from the surface.  Truly this would be an incredibly time intensive task!  By contrast, sampling 20% of the unit through pedestrian survey takes about 20-30 minutes.  In this perspective, total collection requires 72 times more time than pedestrian survey collection!</p> <p>One final comparative result is interesting to note here.  The “other” category increases dramatically through total collection, including numerous pieces of ancient glass (9), lithic stone artifacts (7), shells (24), slabs (13), gypsum (141), ceramic bricks (2), stone vessel (1), marble revetment (3), and a ceramic tessera or gaming piece.  Although total collection was time intensive, this sort of qualitative information is quite useful in filling out our picture of the overall survey unit and indicates something of the functional variability within each survey unit.</p> <p>Tomorrow, we will conclude our discussion of experiments with an overview of ceramic fabric categories.  Stay tuned!</p> <p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits-2 CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 07/23/2010 07:30:05 AM

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----BODY: <p>This week has been an exciting one at the Archaeology of the Mediterranean World.  We hosted our first guest blogger, David Pettegrew, who gave us an overview of the work this summer at the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project.  David's review of the season will continue on Monday, in the meantime check out the first three posts:</p> <p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/pk ap-season-in-review.html">PKAP Season in Review</a><br /><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/pr ocession-pyla-koutsopetria-pottery.html">Processing Pyla-Koutsopetria Pottery</a> <br /><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/ex periments-in-intensive-survey-at-pyla-koutsopetria.html">Experiments in Intensive Survey at Pyla-Koutsopetria</a></p> <p>So other odds and ends:</p> <ul> <li>Imagine! <a href="http://chronicle.com/article/Colleges-Help-Studentsto/123653/">Using blogs, photos, and other "new media" techniques</a> to get students to engage with their experiences while studying abroad. </li> <li><a href="http://mashable.com/2010/07/20/qr-codes-mainstream/">I love the idea of using QR codes</a> .... somehow.  I can imagine a world where the barcode on a book in the library serves as a QR code and opens to the student various user-generated data attached to that specific books. It could be anything from book notes, to citations for a good review, another book that challenges the author's thesis, tips on getting the most from the book, advice on reading time.  At the University of North Dakota, at least, these bar codes are unique to our library and not particularly stable (e.g. when a book loses its bar code a new one is simply added and a attached to a book's record).</li> <li>In more important news, my favorite cheap beer (I am not hip enough to drink PBR) is undergoing a facelift.  <a href="http://www.underconsideration.com/brandnew/archives/miller_high_life_overh aul.php">Miller High Life has a new(ish) look</a>. Don't worry, the lovely High Life lady continues to feature in the new design (after all, she is the oldest icon in American brewing).  Check out the critique here.  My favorite aspect of the High Life is the shape of the bottle which was designed to evoke a Champagne bottle and its moniker: the Champagne of Beers. </li> <li>I am not sure exactly how I would use this software, but I have to admit <a href="http://notational.net/">Notational Velocity</a> is pretty slick. It allows you to take notes quickly on your computer and, more importantly, find those notes in a super efficient way.  The program follows many of the basic guidelines of hipster software: it lacks most bells and whistles, is open source, and does what it does really, really, well.</li> <li> <a href="http://www.plannedobsolescence.net/five-years-posttribble/">Planned Obsolescence</a> and a flurry in the Twittersphere reminded me that it has been five years since <a href="http://chronicle.com/article/Bloggers-Need-Not-Apply/45022/">Ivan Tribble's famous and critical Chronicle article on blogging</a>.  This article and the responses probably motivated me to start my blog more than any other (even though it took me another two years to overcome my worry about the technical aspects of blogging).  It made me think that I was going to be doing some transgressive, that I would be upsetting people like Tribble, and that I was defying convention and somehow making my life and career more notable.  (I suspect this is the same reason why I took a year off after I finished my Ph.D.

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and before I went on the job market.  By taking the year off I flagrantly ignored people who told me it was career suicide and made me feel, if just for a minute, that  convention did not apply to me.)</li> <li>Alun Salt is messing around with a <a href="http://alunsalt.com/">nice new blog design</a>.  He does a nice job integrating social media and more formal blogs as <a href="http://alunsalt.com/2010/07/20/and-now-the-blog-re-design-inenglish/">he describes here</a>. </li> <li><a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/pakistan-v-australia2010/engine/current/match/426395.html">Australia is keeping things interesting in their second test against Pakistan</a>.  All out for 88 and as of this writing 218/5 and 48 ahead of Pakistan??? Things don't look good for them. </li> <li>I am reading: K. Bowes, <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/privateworship-public-values-and-religious-change-in-lateantiquity/oclc/183179509"><em>Private Worship, Public Values, and Religious Change in Late Antiquity</em></a>.  (Cambridge 2008) and David Fischer's, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/historians-fallacies-toward-a-logicof-historical-thought/oclc/60580">Historians Falacies: Toward a Logic of Historical Thought</a></em>. (New York 1970).</li> <li>I am listening to: <a href="http://www.detroitcobras.org/index.html">Detroit Cobras, </a><em><a href="http://www.detroitcobras.org/index.html">Mink, Rat, or Rabbit</a></em>; <a href="http://www.amandapalmer.net/afp/">Amanda Palmer, </a><em><a href="http://www.amandapalmer.net/afp/">Performs the Popular Hits of Radiohead on Her Magical Ukulele</a></em>, and  Alphaville, <em>Forever Young</em>.</li> </ul> <p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Experiments in Intensive Survey at Pyla-Koutsopetria STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: experiments-in-intensive-survey-at-pyla-koutsopetria CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: David Pettegrew CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 07/22/2010 07:47:46 AM ----BODY: <p><em>Another guest post from our esteemed guest blogger, <a href="http://home.messiah.edu/~dpettegrew/">David Pettegrew</a>, the co-director

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the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project</a> and the 2010 Cyprus Research Fund speaker.  Be sure to check out his posts on <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/pk ap-season-in-review.html">Tuesday</a> and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/pr ocession-pyla-koutsopetria-pottery.html">Wednesday</a></em>.</p> <p>When I announced my plans to conduct a survey experiment where we would “vacuum” an entire 40 x 40 m unit, <a href="http://individual.utoronto.ca/nakassis/index.html">Dimitri</a> and Bill both laughed and told me that I had to try it simply for its absurdity.  The 40 x 40 m survey unit was our standard size for the 252 units that we laid out across the Koutsopetria plain .  As far as survey units go, 40 x 40 m (or 1,600 square meters) is a relatively small unit compared to that typically employed by those who conduct distributional survey.  At the same time, when on the group, 40 meters is still vast when compared to the dimension of most lived space.  After all, a 40 x 40 meter unit is over 130 square feet on a side and over 17,000 square feet which makes a single survey unit much larger than even the most over-sized suburban McMansions.  The reason that my suggestion was humorous, however, had to do with the method I proposed for collecting artifacts.  In our typical pedestrian survey, we only looked at 20% of the surface of the unit (for a more reasonable and suburban 3,400 square feet) and only collected each unique artifact from what we saw on the surface.  My proposal was more extreme: get down on our hands and knees and completely “vaccum” (or “hoover”) all the artifacts from 100% of the unit to produce an exhaustive (and exhausting!) total collection rather than a quick 20% sample.</p> <p>Why?  I had the suspicion that the amount of artifacts we see when we walk across the unit is but a fraction of the total number of artifacts actually on the ground.  The suspicion was based on experiments conducted in 2004 &amp; 2006 where we ‘vacuumed’ artifacts from a 5% sample of our 40 x 40 m units, producing on average artifact counts that were 4 times greater than that produced through our 20% sample using pedestrian survey.  We also proved through these experiments that the substantially larger number of artifacts did not really contribute much new chronological or functional information that warranted the additional investments of time and energy.  We published a report on those experiments in an article by the authors in the Report of the Department of Antiquities, Cyprus 2007.  However, we were aware of the substantial fluctuations of artifacts within 40 x 40 m units and the risk of a 5% sample (80 sq m) being unrepresentative of the unit as a whole (1600 sq m).  The point of our 2010 experiments, then, was to test the results with a much more robust sample.  While I initially wanted to vacuum 100% of the unit, time constraints prohibited me to vacuuming 25% of the unit.  Even still, 25% of the unit is 5 times greater than what we sampled in 2004 and 2006.</p> <p>Due to the limited time for fieldwork this season (and time constraints were one of the reasons that we sampled the units to begin with!), we could only resurvey a single unit placed in the highest-density area immediately northeast of the excavated apse of the early Christian basilica.  We picked this unit to overlap with our very first Discovery Unit, a grid square of 40 x 40 m surveyed in 2004 northeast of the enclosed excavated part of the site of Koutsopetria.  We divided the 40 x 40 unit into sixteen 10 x 10 m subunits, each representing 6.25% of the overall unit area (1,600 sq m).  The grid squares have been given the prefix of G followed by a number between 1-16, as the following plan shows.</p>

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<p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f2777ade970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="324" />In our interest in comparing artifact counts noted during pedestrian survey—where a surveyor walks across the unit examining a 2 m wide swath and counting all pottery, tile, lithics, and other artifact types—with the total population of artifacts actually on the surface, we implemented two stages to the experiments.  The first stage (pedestrian survey) we will report on today.</p> <p>We began by having four fieldwalkers walk across the unit, recording all artifacts visible in their swath, giving a 20% sample of every 10 m of space across a 40 m transect.  We collected ‘sub-tract’ artifact counts every 10 meters to produce density figures for each of the subunits (G1-G16) and assess the fluctuating density of pottery, tile, and lithic artifacts within a survey unit.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f277c125970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="486" height="324" /></p> <p>We collected the data for pedestrian survey three times.  The results of these three separate pedestrian survey exercises are shown in the four figures below.  The numbers represent artifact counts of each type (pottery, tile, other, and total), and the gray shaded columns with orange numbers represent the total artifact count for the swath per fieldwalker.  </p> <p>The first time (see figure 1.1 below) a group of untrained students walked the units—Andrew, Luke, Valerie, and Zane—who who had only seen artifacts at the museum and not in their "natural" (or better, archaeological) contexts.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f277c12f970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="334" /></p> <p>A steady light rain the following day provided the chance for these same students to rewalk the unit a second time (see figure 1.2 below) with artifacts slightly more visible as a result of the washing of the dust.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134859ca897970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="334" /></p> <p>Finally, a group of experienced fieldwalkers—David Pettegrew (DKP), Dimitri Nakassis (DN), and Bill Caraher (WRC) —walked the unit and counted artifacts (see figure 1.3).</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f277c134970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="344" /></p> <p>Hence, the variables in these three episodes of pedestrian survey were experience, and, to a lesser extent, the amount of dust and dirt obscuring the surface of the pottery.  Otherwise, between episodes environmental factors were constant, as were methodological factors and figure 1.4 shows the average of all the counts produced.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f277c139970b -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="480" height="332" /></p>

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<p>We walked these units on June 9 and 10 and each took between 15 minutes and half an hour.</p> <p>Comparing simply the total artifact counts (the bottom right grid within each of the outlined figures), it is interesting to note that the rain appears not to have made a difference overall in density counts between units [1.1] and [1.2].  Although one student count went up significantly after the rain (LHM: 118  243), and another student count was slightly greater (AMH: 200  241), VAW’s total counts were essentially unchanged (335 to 334), while ZRB’s total counts actually declined (238).</p> <p>As far as the other variable (experience) goes, there were some significant disparities between experienced walkers and inexperienced walkers as evident in counts for particular grid squares (compare G1 for [1.1] and [1.3]).  Otherwise, the overall artifact counts were comparable for the units: the lowest-density and highest-density subunits occurred between all three walking episodes.  If we look at total artifact counts for each unit as a whole, students counted 942 artifacts in [1.1] and 1056 artifacts in [1.2] while experienced walkers counted 940 artifacts in [1.3].  That is remarkably close!  <span style="white-space: pre;"> </span></p> <p>We noticed one major difference, however, in the “other” category, which includes all artifacts besides pottery and tile: marble revetment, gypsum, shell, ancient glass, and ground stone agricultural implements.  The experienced field walkers noted 2-4 times the number of other artifacts in [1.3] than inexperienced fieldwalkers in [1.1] and [1.2].  An experienced walker counted 4 lithic artifacts (chipped stone &amp; ground stone) in G3 and G7 that an inexperienced walker missed.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Processing Pyla-Koutsopetria Pottery STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: procession-pyla-koutsopetria-pottery CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: David Pettegrew CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 07/21/2010 08:24:25 AM ----BODY: <p><em>Another post with help from our guest blogger and 2010 Cyprus Research Fund lecturer, <a href="http://home.messiah.edu/~dpettegrew/">David Pettegrew</a>. Check out the first in our series of posts <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/pk ap-season-in-review.html">here</a>.</em></p>!

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<p>In 2010 the<a href="http://www.pkap.org/"> Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project</a> was above all the year of the potsherd.  Excavations generate a lot of material.  Our thirteen Excavation Units in 2008 and 2009 generated pottery at rates faster than our poor ceramicist, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/scott_moor e/">Scott Moore</a>, could read and pottery began to pile up at the museum while we were finishing our work.  We promised Scott that 2010 would be different and we were fully committed to getting the material read.  In fact to our surprise, some bureaucratic snafus getting our permits to do fieldwork prevented the collection of additional materials, and allowed us to devote more time to processing the material collected in past seasons.  So rather than venturing out into the field, we spent each mornings out at the museum processing hundreds of bags of ceramic artifacts and our afternoons processing digital data from previous years.  The result of all this is that we caught up.</p>! <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Workspace.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134859688ba970c -pi" border="0" alt="Workspace.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p>! <p>Now to the untrained eye, ceramic processing looks like a bunch of people doing just one or two different tasks.  If you had come to Larnaka and peeked into our work space, you might only discern a couple of obviously different activities say, washing vs. analysis.  But the team was conducting a wide range of different tasks related to the finds.  The most obvious and important preliminary activity involved washing artifacts.  There were a slew of them to wash, 147 bags to be exact, each bag containing dozens, sometimes hundreds of artifacts.  Student enthusiasm for washing artifacts declined over a period of a week and a half but that is to be expected.</p>! <p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_graduate/dallas_def orest/">Dallas Deforest</a> photographed every catalogued artifact at a resolution high enough to be published.  In 2010, Dallas took over 1,200 digital photos of our catalogued artifacts to join the 3,100 artifacts taken in previous years.  Two of our PKAP veterans from 2009, Becky Savaria and Melissa Hogan, began the process of labeling these photos.  In late June, David spent about 10 additional hours getting all the photos in order.  Now we have an archive of 4,300 digital photos of the 700+ catalogued artifacts and uncatalogued artifacts.</p>! <p>Building 13 was the central hub of ceramic analysis.  Our co-director and golden child, Scott Moore, spent 3 weeks analyzing the ceramics from excavations including those occurring in the 1990s at the site of Koutsopetria and our more recent ones at Koutsopetria and Vigla.  Scott analyzed the pottery in two different ways.  First, he “scanned” less significant contexts from stratigraphically unimportant matrices like the plowzone, the kinds of contexts where reading pottery in great detail is not all that beneficial.  “Scanning” involves 1) sorting pottery into broad categories based on fabric groups (e.g., fine ware, cooking / kitchen ware, and coarse ware); 2) setting aside the most distinct and diagnostic artifacts; 3) making basic observations about the context as a whole on a scanned unit form; and 4) analyzing in greater detail the most diagnostic pottery.  Indeed, scanning is common in Mediterranean urban excavations where excavations might easily produce hundreds of thousands of artifacts (or millions).  The more important contexts Scott read more thoroughly by identifying every artifact with a specific chronotype.  A chronotype is simply a specific, limited identifier for known groups of pottery that combines date, potential functions, shape, and

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appearance.  The point is that Scott read (and this is an estimate) 200 contexts while in Cyprus this year.</p>! <p>The other activities going on in Building 13 were data management (Bill), illustration (Becky Savaria, Melissa Hogan) and artifact cataloguing.  David, Dimitri, and several students wrote more detailed catalog entries for particularly significant finds from the survey and excavation.  In 2007, we completed a formal catalogue of the most significant artifacts from our archaeological survey.  This year, we completed the catalogue of artifacts recovered in the two years of excavated soundings.  The combined total of catalogued artifacts now exceeds 700.  While it is unlikely that we'll be able to publish a catalogue of 700 different artifacts, we plan to eventually release this complete catalog in a digital form and publish on paper a smaller number of "greatest hits".</p>! <p>We recorded the following information for each artifact in our catalogue.</p>! <p>Artifact Number:</p>! <p>Dimensions:</p>! <p>Munsell:</p>! <p>Description Fabric:</p>! <p>Description Shape:</p>! <p>Description Decoration:</p>! <p>_______________________________</p>! <p><span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Besides this work, we did a variety of more specialized work.  Sarah Lepinski and Bill completed the documentation of the architectural and painted plaster from the excavated area at Koutsopetria producing a complete catalogue of material for publication.  Sarah's painstaking examination of the plaster from the excavated area has revealed not only several phases of reconstruction and redecoration that remained obscure in the stratigraphic record, but also import clues about the architecture and even construction techniques used in the building.  Nearby, several students completed a special project analyzing artifacts from the plowzone which we plan to report on later in the week.</p>! <p>In sum, at the end of the 2010 season, we can offer this summary of the quantity of artifacts processed by team PKAP between 2003 and 2010:</p>! <p>Total number of units processed (from both the survey and the excavation): 711.  Each unit represents a discrete archaeological context either in terms of stratigraphy, method, or horizontal space in the survey area.</p>! <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="ProcessedPots1.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134859688f6970c -pi" border="0" alt="ProcessedPots1.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p>! <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="ProcessedPots2.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485968910970c -pi" border="0" alt="ProcessedPots2.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p>! <p><em>PKAP Pottery Processing by the Numbers</em></p>! <p>Batches of artifacts processed: 12,900.  Scott divides the pottery from each unit into batches of similar types of artifacts based on the artifact's fabric, the part of the vessel represented, and the chronotype.  Over the past 8 years Scott has processed slightly fewer 13,000 batches.</p>! <p>Total number of artifacts processed: 37, 141.  Each batch has an average of 2.9 artifacts.</p>! <p>Total weight of artifacts processed: 1,482.1 kg or 3,208.7 lbs or over 1.5 <strong>tons </strong>of pottery.</p>! <p>Artifact Photos Taken: 5,500</p>!

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<p>Artifacts Catalogued: 727</p>! <p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: PKAP Season in Review STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: pkap-season-in-review CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: David Pettegrew CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 07/20/2010 07:20:28 AM ----BODY: <p><em>As promised yesterday, this week will features (gasp!) a guest blogger, Dr. David Pettegrew.  David is the co-director of the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project and over the next three days he will report on the various work conducted by the project this season.  David will be visiting us here in Grand Forks in October as the annual Cyprus Research Fund Lecture Speaker. </em></p> <p><span style="white-space: pre;"> </span>Perhaps the greatest misimpression about archaeology today is that it mainly consists in digging holes in the ground.  Excavation is the perhaps the most glorious and maybe even the most exciting, component of archaeological work (<em>although some people find the analysis of the results of survey and excavation the most exciting. Bill</em>), but it’s still only a tiny part of the pie.  As you may have gathered from this blog, our own work rarely involves traditional excavation.  In the field, we’ve devoted lots of time to pedestrian survey, geophysical prospection, aerial photography, illustrating, and recording notes—and lots of time to processing all those artifacts, i.e., washing, analyzing, cataloguing, photographing.  Beyond the field season, we spend most of our time processing data, reading, writing, and publishing their finds, and preparing for the next field season.  Students who join us every summer in Cyprus for 3-4 weeks may forget that most of our work goes on for months after Cyprus.  And the work is harder, not easier.</p> <p>This morning we mailed a copy of our 2010 final report to the Cyprus Department of Antiquities.  If the <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/07/py la-koutsopetria-press-release.html">press release posted yesterday</a> represents a kind of quick and dirty abstract of our work in the Pyla area, the annual final report provides in excruciating detail a full outline of our work.

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 Anyone who does archaeological work has got to produce these things, and they’re not fun to write.  This year’s report with contributions by <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/scott_moor e/">Scott</a>, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/">Bill</a>, <a href="http://home.messiah.edu/~dpettegrew/">David</a>, and Sarah Lepinski, was about typical in numbering 77 single-spaced pages.  They have been longer (100 pages) but they’re rarely shorter.  Why so long?  What we do is complicated and has to be explained in enough detail that it makes sense to anyone reading the report in the future.  We tend to provide more detail in our reports than we need for our articles which does make it easier at a later point to create papers about our work.</p> <p>As we’ve discussed here and here, the point of our 2010 field season was completing the analysis of artifacts from our 2008-2009 excavations of the sites of Koutsopetria and Vigla.  We also anticipated being able to conduct additional fieldwork at these sites.  As it turned out, for reasons we’ve explained elsewhere, we were unable to excavate and we received permission only at the 11th hour for our other fieldwork activities.</p> <p>Even still, as we outlined in our final report, we’re not disappointed and did manage to accomplish the following tasks:</p> <p>1. We finished a preliminary “read” of all the artifacts collected during intensive survey (2003-2007) and excavation (2008-2009), cataloguing in greater detail about 300 finds from survey and excavation.</p> <p>2. We finished documenting and illustrating the area excavated by Maria Hadjicosti. We have posted about that <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/06/fr om-blimp-to-page.html">here </a>and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/06/cl eaning-time.html">here</a>.</p> <p>3. We took low-altitude blimp photographs of the excavated area and the landscape. We have already posted the results of that—including the disastrous flight of …. — <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/2010/06/th e-voyage-of-pkap-airship-1.html">here</a> and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/2010/06/pk ap-airship-1-takes-to-the-skies.html">here</a>.</p> <p>4. We continued documenting subsurface remains using ground penetrating radar.</p> <p>5. We conducted limited resurvey of ridges to the west of Koutsopetria.</p> <p>6. We conducted experiments designed to calibrate the results of the intensive survey in the study area.</p> <p>Such activities lack the dazzle of opening another excavation unit (as exciting as that can be) but, we would argue, prove more important in the long run for our understanding of the site and create a solid foundation for the final publication of our fieldwork now in preparation.</p> <p>In the next few days we will be providing some behind-the-scenes glimpses of the kinds of post-processing work that we have been doing in the month since our field season ended.  Since we have already written about #s 2-3 elsewhere, we will focus our comments on #s 1, and 4-6.  Enjoy.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: -----

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KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Pyla-Koutsopetria Press Release STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: pyla-koutsopetria-press-release CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 07/19/2010 07:24:10 AM ----BODY: <p> <p>At the send of each season, the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">PKAP</a> team prepares a press release that accompanies the final report submitted to the Department of Antiquities.  The press release also gets sent out (in slightly modified form) by the various collaborating universities.</p> <p> </p> <p>Here it is:</p> <p>From May 20th to June 21st the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project conducted a study and field season in the coastal zone of Pyla Village on the south coast of Cyprus.  An international team of scholars under the direction of William R. Caraher (University of North Dakota), R. Scott Moore (Indiana University of Pennsylvania), and David K. Pettegrew (Messiah College), have worked in this area since 2003 documenting a sprawling Archaic to Late Roman settlement at the site.  This year, the PKAP team took low altitude blimp photographs of the entire site, sampled the subsurface remains using groundpenetrating radar, and conducted several experiments to calibrate the results of earlier fieldwork.  This work will allow the PKAP team to correlate more accurately the relationship between material on the surface of the grond and material still safely buried.  Another part of the PKAP team worked in the Larnaka District Archaeological Museum to document the nearly 13,000 finds collected since 2003.  The ceramic, architectural, and stone artifacts have revealed a vibrant community through most of antiquity with trading ties spanning the Mediterranean basin.  The study of these finds has revealed that a site on the coastal height of Vigla was a fortified settlement from Archaic to Hellenistic times complete with a fortification wall and significant quantity of domestic ceramics.  This is an unusual type of settlement on Cyprus and may have served as the base for a garrison protecting the eastern flank of Kition and the Larnaka bay.  In Late Roman and Early Byzantine times, the town of Pyla-Koutsopetria stretched across the coastal plain below Vigla. This settlement appears to have been a bustling, cosmopolitan town during at the end of antiquity and may have met its demise after a series of earthquakes.  The ceramic evidence demonstrate economic and cultural ties to Asia Minor, North Africa, Egypt, and Aegean.  Preparations for publication are now under way.</p> <p>_______</p> <p>In more exciting news, stay tuned to Archaeology of the Mediterranean World for a special guest blogging experience!  <a href="http://home.messiah.edu/~dpettegrew/">David Pettegrew</a> and I are going

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to collaborate to produce a series of posts reporting on some archaeological experiments conducted this past summer on the Koutsopetria plain.  Curious? Stay tuned!</p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits-1 DATE: 07/16/2010 07:16:19 AM ----BODY: <p>It's another beautiful Friday morning in the Archaeology of the Mediterranean World Blogcast area.  So it seems like a good time for another exuberant gaggle of quick hits and varia:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://melissaterras.blogspot.com/2010/07/dh2010-plenary-presentnot-voting.html">Melissa Terras' Digitial Humanities 2010 Plenary talk</a> (Present, Not Voting: Digital History in the Panopticon) is among the best, recent "state-of-the-field" talks about Digital Humanities.  It is equal parts optimism and critique and any digital humanities project could take something away from it.</li> <li>Harvard's Center of Geographic Analysis, <a href="http://africamap.harvard.edu/">AfricaMap</a> is a nice combination of of GIS, online distribution, gobs of data, and a user-friendly interface. It's not overly flashy and has all the feel of something that almost anyone with a modest budget, time, and data could do (in other words, accessible), and at the same time is built on a robust, and "lightly" customized Open Source foundation.  The spelling mistakes on the "About" page actually add charm.</li> <li>Apparently the colon, the punctuation mark not that body part, has come under some <a href="http://www.themillions.com/2010/07/colonoscopy-it%E2%80%99stime-to-check-your-colons.html">intense scrutiny lately</a>.  The changing role of punctuation in the media has an almost immediate "trickle down" influence into how students use punctuation.  The new evil: the rise of the jumper colon.</li> <li>I missed some things being out of the country.  Here is Yannis Hamilakis' most recent thoughts on post-colonialism and archaeology: "<a href="http://proteus.brown.edu/tag2010/7821">Are we Postcolonial Yet? Tales from the Battlefield</a>". It was delivered at the Theoretical Archaeology Group meeting in May.</li>

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<li>I've follow enough cricket to know that <a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/pakistan-v-australia2010/engine/current/match/426394.html">this match</a> won't get more interesting, but I am still naive enough to think that Pakistan could put together some kind of rally and do something spectacular.  As of lunch on day 4, Pakistan is chasing 439 (!!) and are now 224 back with a second innings of 216/4.  I know, it'll never happen, but it's a beautiful Friday and there is no harm keeping an eye on the score, right? </li> <li>I am listening to three somewhat interesting freebies from World Around Records lable: Naturetone's <em><a href="http://www.worldaroundrecords.com/albums/nihon/">Nihon</a></em>, Louis Mackey's <em><a href="http://www.worldaroundrecords.com/blog/2010/jul/7/louismackey-destroyer-of-all-things/">Destroyer of All Things</a></em> (if for no other reason than it's awesome, throwback, album cover), and J. Dante's EP<em><a href="http://www.worldaroundrecords.com/blog/2010/jul/2/new-music-j-dantedestiny-ep/"> Destiny</a></em>.  All are worth a download, listen, and chill.</li> <li>I am reading: S. Friesen, D. Schowalter, J. Walters, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/corinth-in-context-comparative-studies-onreligion-and-society/oclc/496282300">Corinth in Context: comparative studies on religion and society</a></em>. (Brill 2010); C. Nadia Seremetakis, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/last-word-women-death-and-divination-ininner-mani/oclc/21950994">The Last Word: Women, Death, and Divination in Inner Mani</a></em>. (Chicago 1991); and M. Trachtenberg, The <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/craft-of-international-history-a-guide-tomethod/oclc/60972182">Craft of International History: A Guide to Method</a></em>. (Princeton 2006).</li> <li><a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ArIj236UHs">This is pretty funny</a>.  The Old Spice Guy (and concept) has received a good bit of buzz lately.  <a href="http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/writers/tim_tuttle/07/07/tony.stewar t/">Too bad for Tony Stewart</a>. </li> </ul> <p>Have a good weekend!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Thursday: Teaching What You Don't Know STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-thursday-teaching-what-you-dont-know CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 07/15/2010 08:15:11 AM

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----BODY: <p><img style="float: right;" title="NewImage.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134857309f9970c -pi" border="0" alt="NewImage.jpg" width="140" height="212" /></p> <p>This past week, I read <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/teaching-whatyou-dont-know/oclc/316037957">T. Huston's </a><em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/teaching-what-you-dontknow/oclc/316037957">Teaching What You Don't Know</a></em>, largely on the recommendation of <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/05/28/some-summerreading-from-teaching-thursday/">Anne Kelsch and her fantastic summer reading list</a>.  I spend a good bit of my career teaching courses that are at the absolute fringes of what I know.  In fact, I am far more drawn to class that touches on at least some material outside my main field of study.  It may sound perverse, but I spend plenty of time pondering the wonders of the ancient world; so I never feel particularly slighted if I don't have to talk about antiquity in each and every class that I teach.  In an ordinary semester, I teach Western Civilization I, which begins and ends beyond the chronological limitation of my knowledge, The Historians Craft, which is part historical method and part historiography neither of which constitute a particular specialty of mine, and once a year I teach Graduate Historiography, which only touches briefly on any scholar who I have studied intensively.  In short, most of my time is spent teaching what I don't know, if content is the main criteria by which teaching knowledge is evaluated.</p> <p>As Huston points out, most of us end up teaching outside our area of specialty sometime during our academic careers.  This is as much a reflection of the narrow scope of most graduate expertise as the nature of undergraduate curricula that tends to be equal parts conservative in the division of knowledge and cutting edge in the move to cross/trans/inter disciplinary research.  For example, my Western Civilization class is a very traditional way of introducing students to European history which probably fits awkwardly with the methods, approaches, and concentrations most new history faculty experience in Graduate School.  At the same time, the expanding influence of digital methods in history and the influence of social science and other disciplines with the humanities ensures a constantly revised body of post-structural/modern/colonial critique.</p> <p>In some ways, we are always teaching what we don't know and, as a result, this book provides numerous helpful observations to manage the experience of teaching at the edge of understanding.  While many of these are almost selfevident (e.g. read what you have assigned before the class begins... does this really count as advice?), some deal with how to manage student expectations.  In history, it is always amazing to meet a student who is under the impression that we have taken the liberty of memorizing all of the primary sources.  Managing student expectations is central to moving from the solid ground of content mastery (after all, I can list all the Roman Emperor and their dates of rule, can you?) to the far more marshy ground of teaching method or encouraging students to explore new approaches, analyze new texts, and imagine new problems.</p> <p>It's hard to overstate the importance of these techniques in a field like history where teaching content is giving way to teaching method, the ability to teach what you don't know is all the more important.  After all the real test of understanding comes only when a student confronts a foreign body of information and deploys successfully the techniques, methods, and approaches necessary to master it.  While it remains easy enough to create "laboratory" type experiments for students where the instructor knows the possible outcomes

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and the students do not, these kind of teaching models almost always fall short of the risks inherent in real world research.  As I tell my undergraduate historical methods class, when you pick a research topic in the real world, you are, to a very real extent, on your own to make sense of the material at your disposal.  As an instructor, I can bring whatever knowledge of method and content to bear on the topic and material at hand, but there is no guarantee that I know the best way to approach a historical problem.  As the infamous "banking" system of teaching where students master a set body of content gives way toward approaches that emphasize learning by doing (or other active learning type approaches) the possibility for teaching what you don't know increases massively.  In fact, one could even argue that if you're not teaching what you don't know, then you're not doing it right.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Ideas of Landscapes STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: ideas-of-landscapes CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Books DATE: 07/14/2010 08:03:07 AM ----BODY: <p>I strongly recommend Matthew Johnson's <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/ideas-of-landscape/oclc/62728643">Ideas of Landscapes</a></em> to anyone interested in landscape archaeology.  It is among the best books on the topic, and it does a nearly brilliant job of putting the concept of landscape archaeology in a historiographic context.  Johnson's main focus is on the emergence of landscape archaeology as a discipline in Great Britain.  He begins with the Romantic approaches to the study of landscape with particular attention to Wordsworth's famous rambles from his home in Grasmere and argues that the Romantic tradition inspired a particular kind of empiricism which privileged experience as the quintessential character of the landscape. This Romantic empiricism continues to influence landscape studies even today through the decidedly more post-modern efforts of archaeologists to present landscapes in a phenomenological terms (see for example, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/wa lking-home-and-the-phenomenology-of-landscape.html">the approaches critiqued by John Bintliff</a>).</p> <p>Johnson goes on to point out that some of the aversion to theory among local historians derives from this same Romantic empiricism, and this has limited the ability of scholars to take conclusions formed on the basis of detailed local

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studies and expand them into more far reaching arguments.  As I noted yesterday, the use of maps, aerial photographs, and detailed topographic plans fortified the empirical nature of landscape studies by melding to modern technologies and techniques.  The result was a discipline with an increasingly fine-grained capacity for microhistory, but no more robust theoretical foundation to understand the implications of this kind of methodology.  (Here he brilliantly invokes E.P. Thompson's<em> <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/making-of-the-english-workingclass/oclc/178185">Making of the English Working Class</a></em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/making-of-the-english-workingclass/oclc/178185"> </a>and <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/povertyof-theory-other-essays/oclc/4515967">Poverty of Theory</a></em> by paralleling Thompson's attention to detail and, in the latter, attack on theory to the detailed studies of local landscapes produced by contemporary archaeologists.)</p> <p>In his conclusion he places landscape archaeology at the intersection of two longstanding, divergent strands in archaeology: one, the urge to document in a detailed way the intricate features visible in the landscape and the tacit empiricism implicit in that method, and, two, the need to generalize and theorize about larger problems in the develop of human society and the epistemological critiques that are central to any effort to synthesize myriad more focused studies.  The former derives from archaeology's longstanding ties to a Romantic view of landscapes, and the latter from fields like anthropology (and more recently history) which insist upon critiquing the particular. The contrast appears in the accusations that New Archaeology produces dry-as-dust, quantified, landscapes that while generalized and generalizable, lack any real sense of place.</p> <p>My brief, rambling impressions do not do the book justice.  So I'll offer just a few more:</p> <p>1. Johnson ties Romantic empiricism to map making to colonialism in a way that stands as an important caveat to Mediterranean archaeologists who often root their claims to local knowledge and authority in deeply impressionistic views of the landscape.  At the same time, we deploy the tools of New Archaeology and produce quantified landscapes.  The intersection of older impressionistic practices with the rigor of New Archaeology have allowed us to appropriate for research large areas of the Mediterranean basin, but at the same time have moved to the foreground the colonial tendency inherent in so many archaeological practices.</p> <p>2. Johnson presents a particularly interesting critique of the palimpsest metaphor in landscape archaeology.  While I am more familiar with this metaphor in the study of cities, Johnson discusses the role of the palimpsest in the larger metaphor of landscape as text.  He suggests that the metaphor has become "too strong" and reinforced a view of the landscape as static rather than engaging with more dynamic models for textuality common elsewhere in the humanities.  I've railed against the use of the palimpsest metaphor for years largely because the two levels of the palimpsest have no clear relation to one another.  For example, a text of Plautus could be erased and the skin used for a sermon of St. Ambrose.  These two texts are unrelated whereas historical landscapes are places where interaction between past and present is continuous and the memory of overwritten or erased landscapes often persist preserving the past "under erasure" for political and social goals.</p> <p>3. Finally, the link between British landscape archaeology and Mediterranean landscape archaeology is a direct one and the history of the latter cannot be fully understood without understanding the history of the former.  I sometimes wonder if separating Mediterranean landscape studies from its British (and to a

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less extent North American roots) has allowed certain sections of Mediterranean archaeology to persist with just the kind of Romantic empiricism that Johnson critiques.  In fact, I find myself celebrating the more isolated and remote parts of Greece (the southeastern Corinthia and the island of Kythera, for example) for many of the same Romantic reasons that Wordsworth championed his local landscape.  The isolation from the bustle of the everyday (in other words social, political, economic reality), the feeling of antiquity, and the untrammeled natural beauty.  Johnson's work will certainly give me pause.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Shawn EMAIL: shawn_graham@carleton.ca IP: 134.117.115.134 URL: http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com DATE: 07/26/2010 11:29:17 AM I'm reading Johnson's book at the moment too, and it is brilliant! I'm only a few chapters in though... the connection with Hoskin's work is well laid out, but I wonder to what extent Hoskin's work influenced British work in say Italy, where the tradition is from Ashby and Ward-Perkins? ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL: IP: 208.107.184.168 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 07/26/2010 11:49:23 AM Shawn, I'd be keen to hear your take on that exact matter. I assumed that British landscape archaeology contributed (as much as New Archaeology and other, newworld, developments) to the earliest efforts at landscape archaeology in Greece where there was a clear parallel to the Romantic, pedestrian, solitary wandererarchaeologist (e.g. Cattling's Cyprus Survey or Hope Simpson's survey of prehistoric sites). But I am not as familiar with developments in Italy. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Picturing Landscapes STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: picturing-landscapes CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project

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CATEGORY: Survey Archaeology DATE: 07/13/2010 08:45:29 AM ----BODY: <p>I just finished reading <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/ideas-oflandscape/oclc/62728643">Matthew Johnson's <em>Ideas of Landscape</em>(Blackwell 2006)</a>.&nbsp; In it, he argued that maps, air photos, and archaeological hachured plans formed the foundation of landscape archaeology in Great Britain (and, I'd contend, elsewhere).&nbsp; Landscape archaeology in the Mediterranean has certainly benefited from maps and air (and increasingly satellite) photos which represent the first step, typically, in data gathering for an archaeological project. The first aerial photographs that we acquired in the study of our site of <a href="http://www.pkap.org">Pyla-Koutsopetria</a> were the 1963 and 1993 series produced by the Cypriot Department of Maps and Surveys.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f240f675970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="a63149KoutsopetriaCropped" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485668e7a970c -pi" width="424" height="382"></a> </p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f240f695970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="A93256KoutsopetriaCropped" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485668e9f970c -pi" width="424" height="462"></a> </p> <p>Since then, we were lucky enough to have a series of oblique, relatively low altitude air photos taken from an RAF helicopter in 2007.&nbsp; These photos provide more detail, but the oblique angles make them more difficult to use for producing accurate maps.&nbsp; </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485668eae970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Picture 044" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f240f6d0970b -pi" width="424" height="284"></a> </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485668ec5970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Picture 047" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f240f6e8970b -pi" width="424" height="284"></a> </p> <p>This past summer, we took even more low altitude and far more oblique air photographs using the infamous helikite (half helium blimp and half kite).&nbsp; We only had enough helium for a limited number of flights and this tempted us to take the airship up in, let's say, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/2010/06/th e-voyage-of-pkap-airship-1.html">unfavorable conditions</a>.&nbsp; The results were blurry, but we were able to salvage some good quality aerial photographs from the set.&nbsp; The camera was rocking furiously beneath the wind-buffeted helikite so the photos lack a good representation of the horizontal.&nbsp; More disappointing is that the strong breeze from the sea made it difficult to photograph the fields closest to the busy Larnaka-Dhekelia road.&nbsp; The 1963 and 1993 aerial photographs showed some feature near the intersection of the main road and the northeast running road that now leads to the water treatment facility.&nbsp; While the feature does not stand out in the 2007 RAF photographs, they were taken after a particularly wet early summer which caused green wheat to be left in the field.&nbsp; The nicely ploughed fields of summer

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2010 may have provided a different image.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f240f702970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f240f70b970b -pi" width="424" height="319"></a></p> <p align="center">&nbsp; <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f240f715970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013485668ef6970c -pi" width="424" height="319"></a> </p> <p>One of my jobs for this summer is labeling these photographs and moving them to Omeka.&nbsp; For now, enjoy a different perspective on the site of Pyla-Koutsopetria.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Drawing Archaeology STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: drawing-archaeology CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 07/12/2010 06:43:06 AM ----BODY: <p>A week or so ago I was asked why archaeologists spend so much time preparing line drawing illustrators of things when photography is quick, cheap, and "more accurate".  The answer is pretty easy, in fact.  Some things are impossible to photograph.  For example, Dimitri Nakassis and I spent an afternoon illustrating a wall uncovered by looters on our site. The only way we could reproduce the wall was to go down into a relatively narrow hole and produce a stone-by-stone illustration of the what we saw.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="VigWall1.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134855fea3f970c -pi" border="0" alt="VigWall1.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="VigWall2.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134855fea56970c -pi" border="0" alt="VigWall2.JPG" width="420" height="315" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="Koutsopetria_Wall_2010.jpg"

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src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134855fea70970c -pi" border="0" alt="Koutsopetria_Wall_2010.jpg" width="420" height="368" /></p> <p> </p> <p>Likewise, as I have documented elsewhere, our illustration of the architecture at Pyla-Koutsopetria.  Here a line drawing enables us to combine features that are not all visible at the same time in a photograph.  In the drawing below, we were able to combine the results from excavation (at the far the southeastern and southwestern corners of the plan) with a stone-by-stone architectural drawing of the room and the plans produced by the architect at the time that the room was first excavated.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="PKbuildingwTrenches.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134855fea86970c -pi" border="0" alt="PKbuildingwTrenches.jpg" width="420" height="356" /></p> <p style="text-align: left;">The images is, in effect, a historical composite of three different archaeological moments.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 07/09/2010 07:34:40 AM ----BODY: <p>Some quick hits and varia on a gorgeous Friday morning in the Grand Cities.</p> <p>Lots of talk about blogging on the intertubes lately.  First, <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/web/06/29/your.blog.unpopular/index.html?eref =rss_tech&amp;utm_source=feedburner&amp;utm_medium=feed&amp;utm_campaign=Feed%3A +rss%2Fcnn_tech+%28RSS%3A+Technology%29&amp;utm_content=Google+Reader">CNN tells us how to keep your blog popular</a>.  The Economist suggests that <a href="http://www.economist.com/node/16432794?story_id=16432794">blogs are becoming more specialized</a>, occupying cybersilos, and becoming the place for longer writing.  In <a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/interview-rexsorgatz-infuses-blog-thinking-into-big-media-brands-2010-7#ixzz0tBdC0Kra">a recent interview</a>, UND alumnus and new media star, Rex Sorgatz, credits blog culture for his own rise to cyber stardom, but when collaborating on a new media project said: "Just throw out the blog, I don’t want another blog,' cause I have this antagonism with media companies who come along and think, 'I have something innovative, I am going to do another blog.'"</p>

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<p>I'm listening to: Big Boi, <em>Sir Lucious Left Foot... The Sone of Chico Dusty</em>; Damian Marley and Naz, <em>Distant Relatives</em>; Mulatu Astatke, <em>Ethiopiques, Vol. 4</em>; The National, <em>High Violet</em>.</p> <p>I'm reading (and summer reading is the BEST reading): Matthew Johnson, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/ideas-of-landscape/oclc/62728643">Ideas of Landscape</a></em>; Therese Huston, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/teaching-what-you-dontknow/oclc/316037957">Teaching What You Don't Know</a></em>; Clay Shirky, <em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/cognitive-surplus-creativity-and-generosityin-a-connected-age/oclc/466335766">Cognitive Surplus: Creativity and Generosity in a Connected Age</a></em>.</p> <p>Some UND profs get some good press. Jack Russel Weinstein has <a href="http://www.philosophyinpubliclife.org/Instute/presscoverage.html">an article in the NEH Magazine </a><em><a href="http://www.neh.gov/news/humanities.html">Humanities</a> </em>about his call-in Radio show WHY?  Check out <a href="http://www.whyradioshow.org/upcomingepisodes.html">WHY? on Sunday at 5 pm</a> to hear a follow up report from Paul Sum who has returned from a year long Fulbright to Romania to discuss, "Exporting Democracy Revisited: A Report from Romania".  Elsewhere, <a href="http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/168079/">chemist Mark Hoffman demystifies his research</a>.</p> <p>If you haven't followed Rangar Cline's work in Umbria, check out his blog <a href="http://undertheumbriansun.blogspot.com/">Under the Umbrian Sun</a>.  Also check out the Archaeological Institute of America's <a href="http://www.archaeology.org/interactive/sagalassos/fieldnotes/">Interactive Dig at Sagalassos</a>.</p> <p>Enough for this morning. Have a good weekend!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Thursday: Communicating with Students Online STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-thursday-communicating-with-students-online CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 07/08/2010 08:37:39 AM ----BODY: <p>I was invited this morning to check out the work of the Online Teaching with Technology Seminar here at the University of North Dakota. (<a href="http://cilt.und.edu/workshops/twt.html">The seminars have a somewhat underwhelming web site</a>.)  I was asked to say a few words on communicating

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with students using technology.  I probably have some idiosyncratic attitudes toward these practices, so I thought I might work through some of them on my trusty blog here.</p> <p>The first observation that I'll offer is that I use technology most extensively in my online and large lecture format classes.  For my mid-level courses and grad classes, I generally have an open door policy.  One other idiosyncratic aspect of my communication strategy is that I no longer have an office phone.  When we moved buildings a year ago, my phone was never hooked up.  After a few weeks of not having a phone, I found it really liberating and decided just to go with it.  So, the two most basic ways for a student to contact me is to either drop me an email or stop by my office.</p> <p>I find that these one-on-one meetings with students tend toward the inefficient.  I often end up repeating to each student who comes by the same things.  In a small class, the impact of this repetition is relatively small; for a bigger class, however, one could end up repeating the same clarifications, explanations, or helpful insights numerous times.  As a result, I try to find ways to communicate consistently with students as a class.</p> <p>The most obvious technique to do this is to maintain an updated syllabus that attempts to address the most common student issues.  While this generally works, the syllabus is typically a stable medium for communicating with students.  The greater challenge comes when I have to make changes to the course or address spontaneous issues arising during the semester.  In these cases, I've taken to using Twitter to send out messages addressing specific problems as they arise.  This allows me to "talk" to the class as group while still being timely.  The nice thing about Twitter is that it privileges a certain economy of communication and this forces me (and I suspect my students) to be clear and focused.</p> <p>Twitter as a primary means of "classroom" communication has several downsides (as <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/05/te aching-with-twitter-an-interim-report.html">I have documented here</a>).  One is that it functions in real time.  If a students it not paying attention to Twitter when I address a particular issue, they have to sort their their Tweets or my Twitter feed to find the relevant Tweet.  I've attempted to deal with this through two techniques.  First, I've experimented with using <a href="http://www.twaitter.com/">Twaiter</a> to release scheduled Tweets.  This frees me to compose a Tweet on a particular classroom issue whenever I want and then to release it when it will have maximum visibility.  For example, I can schedule a Tweet reminding the students that they have 6 hours to complete an assignment exactly 6 hours before it is due.  I can also schedule Tweets to repeat or post weekly updates on time.</p> <p>Some students, however, find it more difficult to follow a Twitter feed than to monitor the classes Blackboard page.  I've experimented, more or less successfully, with embedding a Twitter feed into the weekly announcements section in Blackboard.  I typically post an aggregated feed of those Tweets marked with that week's hashtag (e.g. #H101Week1, #H101Week2).  A student who might not check his or her Twitter account can nevertheless check out all the action from that week right inside Blackboard. The only downside is that the Twitter feed only remains active for a relatively short length of time (typically less than a semester) and will usually only include a fixed number of Tweets.</p> <p>Another frustration with using Twitter so heavily is that it remains difficult to link to pages within Blackboard.  Perhaps this will change with Blackboard 9.  I am not a huge fan of Blackboard, but each new iteration becomes easier to use and more dynamic and powerful.</p>

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<p>I've also found discussion boards are a great way to make communication and assessment more transparent. Each week students are required to post a response to a question on a class discussion board.  I have long ago abandoned any hope for a real, dynamic discussion on a class discussion board, but I have discovered that students do read each others' posts.  In many cases, the answers to the discussion question become better (if less original) with later posts.  While I continue to grade each student's work separately, the tendency for students to repeat or (better still) base their answers on earlier discussion posts makes it easier for me to address common problems.  Each week, I will make a post to the discussion board highlighting the good and the bad in the week's posts.  The lack of originality in the posts and the tendency for students parrot ideas present in earlier posts makes it easier to use this kind of public, collective comments to address problems and reinforce good behavior.  Moreover, as long as the earliest posters in each discussion board are conscientious (and they are most frequently a self-selecting group of conscientious students), then week-to-week the entire class will follow the early posting students and begin to internalize my comments.  I understand that this kind of "passive learning" is not in vogue, but I will contend that it is a way to condition students to certain practices of argument by creating an environment that successfully leverages both peer pressure and what we can charitably call "a tendency toward lowest effort approaches to learning".</p> <p>Twitter and discussion boards are just two ways that I have used collective communication to replace personalized emails, long, unfocused office visits, and redundant comments on student papers.  For longer assignments, I continue to use personalized comments (supplemented with a "common comments" sheet that I circulate to all students).  And I do not discourage students from contacting me directly over email for personal problems or problems that are not resolved in more public forums.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Some Questions about Late Antique Prosperity and Christianization in the Corinthia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: some-questions-about-late-antique-prosperity-and-christianization-inthe-corinthia CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 07/07/2010 08:29:08 AM ----BODY:

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<p>I am slowly working to prepare a paper for the <a href="https://webspace.utexas.edu/sjf365/CC3/Intro.html">Corinth in Contrast conference</a> scheduled for the end of the September.  (It's my problem that I'm working on the paper this far in advance, not yours.) It is notable that most of the scholarship of the Late Roman period in the Corinthia rooted in archaeological evidence continues to make two major arguments: (1) the Corinthia remained prosperous much longer than an earlier generation of scholars thought and (2) At some point in Late Antiquity, and through a variety of processes, the Corinthia became Christian.</p> <p>The first argument is an economic version of the old "decline of the Roman Empire" debate.  To simplify, this argument demonstrates that Corinth remained economically prosperous far longer than people expected.  This prosperity depended upon its place within the larger economic world of the Roman Eastern Mediterranean (which included numerous other sites that continued to prosper longer than scholars have traditionally thought).  The continued prosperity of Corinth and the Eastern Empire allowed for the city to continue to fulfill many functions traditionally associated with the Classical or Roman city albeit perhaps through different institutions.  In other words, the city was not in decline (at least economic decline), but was undergoing changes in institutional structure.  This proposition typically contributes to an updated version of the "decline of the Roman Empire" debate which centers on more qualitative arguments over continuity or change in the Roman world.  Typically, scholars have continued to see prosperity in the Late Roman Corinthia well into the 6th century A.D.  The evidence for this argument largely comes from revised dating of ceramics.  By assigning ceramics later dates, we can not only show that trade continued later than expected, but also revise the dating of buildings and other civic activities to show that urban life continued later than expected.</p> <p>The second argument is related, but largely independent from debates over prosperity in the Corinthia.  Increasingly, scholars have argued that Corinth Christianized rather later than other cities.  The largely 6th century date for the construction of Early Christian basilicas is the main evidence for the Christianization of Corinth at a late date.  In other words, monumental architecture provides evidence for the presence of the Christian church as an institution in Corinth, and this must have represented a critical mass of Christians among the population and accelerated the conversion of lingering pagans.  Some scholars have even seen the large scale and number of baptisteries around the city of Corinth (at the Lechaion, Kraneion, Skoutelas, and Kenchreai basilicas) as being a functional response to the large number of converts present in the community.</p> <p>In general, there has been only minor efforts to generalize from the larger historical consequences of these two debates.  The questions linked to these two positions are numerous and significant.  For example, if Corinth is so deeply interconnected with the larger Mediterranean, why does it Christianize later than many other major Mediterranean urban areas? Does the relatively late date of Christianization suggest that economic ties did not facilitate cultural or religious change?  Did the continue prosperity of Corinth stand so independent from imperial ties that the construction of monumental Christian architecture by the local elite did not represent a strategy to improve one's status both across the empire and at home?   Did the religious ties to the west (through the position of the Church of Corinth as subordinate to the Papacy in the West) and economic and political relationship between Corinth and centers in the East?</p> ----EXTENDED BODY:

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----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Church and City in Late Antiquity STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: church-and-city-in-late-antiquity CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 07/06/2010 08:02:45 AM ----BODY: <p>Nate Andrade had <a href="http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/earl/summary/v018/18.2.andrade.html">a nice article in the most recent volume of the <em>Journal of Early Christian Studies</em></a>, titled, "The Processions of John Chrysostom and the Contested Spaces of Constantinople".  In it, Andrade considers the role of processions, particularly those led by the controversial Patriarch John Chrysostom, in transforming urban spaces inscribed with "secular" or even pagan significance into spaces of Christian ritual.  He set Chrysostom's actions against the dual backdrops of his longstanding criticism of secular institutions ranging from the baths to the theater and games (many of which date to his days in Antioch) and Chrysostom's battles with members of the Theodosian court in Constantinople.  The use of processions, highlighted by singing psalms, obvious displays of Christian regalia, and perhaps even the Christian scents of incense, combated the secular or even demonic associations that Chrysostom saw in the chaotic, temptation filled, world of the Late Antique city.</p> <p>Andrade's subtle article relies on the unprecedented textual sources for the city of Constantinople in the 5th century and the relatively substantial accounts of Chrysostom's controversial term as bishop of the city.  (A similarly, if now somewhat dated account of the relationship between the city and church appears in <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/vox-populi-popularopinion-and-violence-in-the-religious-controversies-of-the-fifth-centuryad/oclc/5171155">Tim Gregory's </a><em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/vox-populi-popular-opinion-and-violence-inthe-religious-controversies-of-the-fifth-century-ad/oclc/5171155">Vox Populi</a></em>).  It's tempting to imagine how Chrysostom's use of processions in Constantinople would translate to cities where our textual evidence is more limited.  For example, do the acclamations inscribed in public spaces in Aphrodisias (and <a href="http://www.jstor.org/stable/29901">so carefully analyzed by C. Roueché</a>) commemorate a kind of processional practice similar to those employed by Chrysostom?</p> <p>It is particularly valuable to consider how public processions expanded the range of liturgical practice from the space of the church building to the urban space and the community.  As early as the early 4th-century, Licinius considered it a useful strategy of expel Christians from their churches and

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force them to hold their services outdoors or outside the walls of the city (Eusebius, <em>VC,</em> 1.53).   This suggests that Chrysostom was not the first to challenge the secular or pagan nature of the city through Christian assemblies held outside the space of the church.  J. Baldovin argues for a kind processional warfare between various groups of Christians in the city of Constantinople during the 5th century (<a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/urban-character-of-christian-worship-theorigins-development-and-meaning-of-stational-liturgy/oclc/18426295">Baldovin, </a><em><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/urban-character-of-christianworship-the-origins-development-and-meaning-of-stationalliturgy/oclc/18426295">The Urban Character of Christian Worship</a></em>, 183184).  Andrade's article as well as earlier and later evidence suggests that urban space could well accommodate Christian liturgical practices which the clergy viewed as tool to sanctify secular or pagan places.  This turns on its head the idea that Christian sacred space, namely church buildings, represented sacred spaces that were a kind of pre-condition for liturgical practices.  While the presence of relics, iconography, and both functional and mnemonic architecture surely reinforced the suitability of the church for liturgical activities, the Christianized space did not require these features.  In other words, Christian activities made places sacred in Late Antiquity.</p> <p>The mobility and transferability of the Christian sacred within Late Antique society makes using archaeology to reconstruct Christian landscapes particularly challenging. With the exception of the kind of inscribed acclamations mentioned earlier, processional liturgies would leave very little physical evidence.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Varia Friday STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: varia-friday CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits CATEGORY: Weblogs DATE: 07/02/2010 07:54:05 AM ----BODY: <p>Ok, I'm being lazy today. <em><a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/completelist/0,29569,1999770,00 .html">Time Magazine</a></em><a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/completelist/0,29569,1999770,00 .html"> released a list of the best blogs</a>.  While this is sort of like getting advice on the automotive industry from a Saturn manager, it is nevertheless interesting to see what Time regards as the "Best".  Most of the

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blogs listed are the usual suspects (<a href="http://www.theawl.com/">The Awl</a>, <a href="http://boingboing.net/">Boing Boing</a>, <a href="http://www.engadget.com/">Engadget</a>, <a href="http://thesartorialist.blogspot.com/">The Sartorialist</a>, <a href="http://kottke.org/">Kottke.org</a>), so it's not a particularly useful list for finding new and exciting things (which is not to say that blogs like Boing Boing do not introduce the new and the exciting).</p> <p>What's ironic, of course, is that Time - the most mainstream of mainstream magazines - list features the most mainstream of mainstream blogs.</p> <p>Perhaps more interesting is how broad the definition of blog has become.  I mean, is <a href="http://pitchfork.com/">Pitchfork</a> really a blog? Wouldn't some other designation, like Webzine be better for it?  It does publish daily and presumably it is powered by a blogging software (like Wordpress or some variant).  It does not adhere to the traditional "most recent first format".  Moreover, the content on a blog like Pitchfork is more enduring that the varia presented daily at one of my favorite blogs, Kottke.org, or a tech blog like Engadget.</p> <p>In any event, the increasing flexibility of what the mass media imagines to be a blog (wait, maybe, Time magazine is just a blog too!) can only be good news for those of us who use the blog format for somewhat more serious (or at least somewhat less random) pursuits...</p> <p>Here are the lists:</p> <p>Best Blogs (the links are to Time's critique of the blogs, not to the blogs themselves): <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999747,00.html">Zenhabits,</a> <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999751,00.html">PostSecret</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999752,00.html">Climate Progress</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999733,00.html">HiLobrow</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999732,00.html">Hipster Runoff</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999734,00.html">Kottke.org</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999735,00.html">Cake Wrecks</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999738,00.html">The Oatmeal</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999737,00.html">S___ My Kids Ruined</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999739,00.html">Deadline Hollywood</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999748,00.html">Everything Everywhere</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999749,00.html">The Sartorialist</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999750,00.html">Information Is Beautiful</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999736,00.html">The Daily Kitten</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999755,00.html">Shorpy</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761

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_1999756,00.html">Apartment Therapy</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999757,00.html">Double X</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999758,00.html">Strobist</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999759,00.html">Roger Ebert's Journal</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999870,00.html">The Awl</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999868,00.html">GeekDad</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999863,00.html">Engadget</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999861,00.html">The Washington Note</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999860,00.html">The Consumerist</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999761 _1999893,00.html">Pitchfork</a></p> <div class="specialsArticle"> <p>Essential Blogs: <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999765 _1999764,00.html">The Daily Wh.at</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999765 _1999864,00.html">TechCrunch</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999765 _1999873,00.html">Gawker</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999765 _1999871,00.html">Politico's Ben Smith</a>, <a href="http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,1999770_1999765 _1999872,00.html">Boing Boing</a></p> </div> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Techno-musing Thursday STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: techno-musing-thursday CATEGORY: Web/Tech DATE: 07/01/2010 07:17:31 AM ----BODY:

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<p> <p>I am willing to try almost any piece of technology at least once if I think that it has the potential to improve the way that I teach, write, or do research.  The investment in time required to learn a new piece of software or gizmo while often unsatisfactory one an individual level, has so far paid dividends across the whole range of technologies that I use to manage my everyday life.  To put it another way, I was very reluctant to learn to use the so-called e-mail, but the initial investment in learning Eudora (many years ago) has added a level of efficiency to my everyday life that more than makes up for the time wasted trying to learn to use the latest gizmo or application.</p> <p>Over the past six months, I've used and appreciated a whole range of new technologies, ranging from my iPad and my Android powered phone to light duty web-aps that solve an immediate problem (how is it possible to schedule a meeting without <a href="http://www.doodle.com/">Doodle</a>?).  From that little gaggle of software and hardware, three piece of intriguing technology stand out:</p> <p>1. <a href="http://omeka.org/blog/2010/04/29/omeka-net-alphaarrives/">Omeka.net</a>. I am really excited to be an alpha test for Omeka.net.  <a href="http://omeka.org/">Omeka</a> is an online collection management software produced by the <a href="http://chnm.gmu.edu/">Center for History and the New Media at George Mason University</a>and our neighbors at the <a href="http://www.mnhs.org/index.htm">Minnesota State Historical Society</a>.  It allows an individual or organization to organize and present collections of material - from texts and podcasts to images and video.  As someone who views the world as a kind of infinite archive, a program of this kind has obvious appeal.  For the last year, I've had Omeka running on a server at the University of North Dakota and it has become <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/">home for various collections </a>of images including a fine art photography exhibition, a research archive of vernacular architecture in Greece, and a small collection of maps from my survey project in Greece.</p> <p>The only downside to the program was that it took me quite some time (and a bit of money) to get it up and running on a University server.  Omeka.net eliminates the hassle of running and maintaining server based software because they offer both the software and the server side maintenance in the same way that Wordpress.com hosts Wordpress blogs.  This means that soon, even the least technologically inclined could be up and running with Omeka and begin to catalogue their personal or group archives.</p> <p>The potential for teaching is really clear.  Curation is becoming an important watchword in our digital age as people come to realize that the quantity of data produced has come to challenge our ability to manage it. The ability to deploy and teach easily a powerful tool like Omeka for collecting, organizing, and presenting a wide range of digital material (primarily in the humanities, but Omeka is hardly a tool limited to a particular discipline) will introduce information management and literacy skills that are likely to be relevant for our digital age.</p> <p>Right now, Omeka.net is out in invitation only Alpha testing with all the attended caveats, but I asked for an invitation and received it within a few months.</p> <p>2. <a href="http://illuminex.com/ecto/">Ecto</a> vs. <a href="http://www.red-sweater.com/marsedit/">MarsEdit</a>. This past week, <a href="http://chronicle.com/blog/profhacker/27/">ProfHacker</a> (a must read for tech-curious faculty) discussed briefly the relative merits of two offline, blog composition tools, Ecto and MarsEdit. If you're a blogger (and these days, who isn't), it is almost essential to be able to write a blog post someplace other

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than the online space provided by your blog provider.  In general, the online editors provided by most blogging services (e.g. Typepad, Wordpress, Blogger) are underpowered, a bit fickle, and dependent on your connection to the internet (and stability of your browser) to work.  There is nothing more frustrating than composing a brilliant post online and seeing it vanish with a browser crash or internet interruption.  Offline composers are half light-duty word processors and half light-duty html editors.  The best option is probably Windows Live Writer, but there is no Mac version of this flexible and stable little program. The two best for Mac users are Ecto and MarsEdit.  Both provide a word processor type interface that allows you to compose easily, edit HTML, and to integrate various media content.</p> <p>I used Ecto for over a year and found it pretty satisfactory.  It did a particularly nice job managing links (and a blog is nothing without its links to other blogs and sites on the web) and images.  MarsEdit has a slightly nicer interface for writing, however.  I love that I can change the font that I am writing with in MarsEdit without changing the font that appears on my blog.  In other words, I indulge my idiosyncratic preference to compose in American Typewriter font without having to publish using that font. MarsEdit may be a bit less capable of handling images, however.</p> <p>Either tool makes blog writing less of an adventure and more of a pleasure.  The simple interfaces encourages a focus on the words (not dissimilar from the recent spate of simplified word processors like<a href="http://www.hogbaysoftware.com/products/writeroom">WriteRoom</a>) and the stability and security the software encourages me to write in a longer form than I might do on the web.</p> <p>3. <a href="http://daytum.com/">Daytum</a>.  Daytum is one of the quirkier services on the web.  It provides a subscriber with an interface where they can record and quantify <em>things</em>.  For example, I count the number of words that I write each day (since I started using Daytum, I've written 73,810 words).  I also record whether I get a ride home with my wife or walk; to date, I've walked home 35 times and got a ride home 34 times since January.  I like recording the temperature in my office in the morning, but I'm just like that.  I also like the idea of keeping track of how many pages I read each day, but I've found that more of an inconvenience as I move from reading paper books and articles to reading across a wide range of media, many of which do not use pages at all (e.g. the web, on my iPad, et c.).</p> <p>Daytum is a free indulgence for those obsessed with quantifying their lives.  At the same time, it represents the far fringe of a whole batch of software designed to help one become more efficient or at least more aware of how one spends their time. As academics, it seems like we are always running out of time, stumbling across some new deadline, or having to negotiate some kind of delicate work management solution to balance relationships, teaching, research, or "outside" interests.</p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ------------

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AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Indigenous Archaeology Georgian Style STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: indigenous-archaeology-georgian-style CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Cyprus CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 06/30/2010 07:52:55 AM ----BODY: <p>One of the most exciting afternoon from this year in Cyprus involved a trip to the ruined monastery at Yialia in the mountains about Polis on the Western side of Cyprus.  According to textual sources, Georgian monks founded the monastery on the island in the 10th century and it was occupied until the 14th century.  The church is currently under study by a group of archaeologists from the Republic of Georgia with support, apparently, from the Archbishop of Cyprus.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="DSCN4713.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134851c33dc970c -pi" border="0" alt="DSCN4713.JPG" width="450" height="337" /></p> <p>The monastic church itself is a traditional Athonite plan with its characteristic triconch arrangement. Massive cisterns, storeroom, and living quarters for the monks (apparently) extend from the church's southern side. The monastic church underwent several significant modifications in plan including an extension to the narthex, rather significant adjustments to the eastern end of the church, a chapel annex on the northern side, and a very strange tetrapylon type structure abutting the southern apse of the Athonite triconch.  The ruins preserve some wall painting on the upper, more sheltered parts of the collapsed vaults, as well as some better preserved frescoes which were built around during the buildings numerous modifications.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="DSCN4726.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134851c33f2970c -pi" border="0" alt="DSCN4726.JPG" width="337" height="450" /></p> <p>The most interesting thing about this very curious building is how it is used today.  The ruins of the church are currently used for the celebration of liturgy.  A portable altar and prothesis stand at the eastern end of the church despite the ruinous condition of the sanctuary space.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="DSCN4734.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f1f6e2ed970b -pi" border="0" alt="DSCN4734.JPG" width="450" height="337" /></p> <p>Incense burners and evidence for the burning of candles dot the various ledges and niches of the ruined walls.  The practice of re-using excavated, yet nevertheless consecrated sacred space is not entirely rare.  I observed a similar phenomenon at the church of St. Tychon near Amathous, for example.  It does, however, shed some valuable light on the intersection of long-standing forms of religious archaeology (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/an

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other-better-attempt-at-dream-archaeology.html">dream archaeology</a> being just one example) and modern "scientific" archaeological practice.  This kind of provision use of a ruined church may also reflect some of the practices common to ancient and Byzantine Christianity where churches damaged by earthquakes or neglect continue to be places of intermittent devotional practices.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="DSCN4740.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f1f6e2ff970b -pi" border="0" alt="DSCN4740.JPG" width="450" height="337" /></p> <p>Making this point all the more clear, a casket occupies of the center of the nave.  Apparently the excavations revealed a number of burials around the church and the monastic complex.  A few of these burials appear to be marked by small, Georgian style crosses.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="DSCN4720.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134851c3453970c -pi" border="0" alt="DSCN4720.JPG" width="450" height="337" /></p> <p>It seems reasonable to assume that the remains from these excavated grave sites are placed in the conspicuous casket.  Apparently, the Georgian church plans to build a new monastery nearby and perhaps the bones of these now excavated monks will be brought to rest there.</p> <p><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" title="DSCN4723.JPG" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134851c3463970c -pi" border="0" alt="DSCN4723.JPG" width="450" height="337" /></p> <p>The architecture, decoration, inscriptions (some in Georgian), and artifacts from this church will surely contribute to our understanding of the multi-ethnic character of Medieval Cyprus.  More than that, however, the combination of "scientific" archaeology and Christian devotional practices shows the potential for a kind of indigenous archaeological practice to exist alongside largely "western" (by some definition) archaeological practices, methods, and presumably epistemology.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Diana Wright EMAIL: dianagwright@comcast.net IP: 76.104.197.147 URL: http://surprisedbytime.blogspot.com DATE: 06/30/2010 11:00:36 AM Splendid post and a fascinating view of how history continues! follow-up on this church over the years. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More on Polis STATUS: Publish

I hope you will

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ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 0 ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-on-polis CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Early Christian Baptisteries CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 06/29/2010 08:17:26 AM ----BODY: <p>One of the great conversations that I had this past week at Polis Chysochous centered on how one goes about publishing a complex site or sites.  Starting this fall, (as I discussed yesterday) a dynamic and diverse team of Late Antique, Byzantine, and Medieval scholars (Amy Papalexandrou, Kyle Killian, Sarah Lepinski, R. Scott Moore, Nora Laos, and myself) are planning to publish two multi-phase Christian churches excavated over the last 20 years in the village of Polis.  The sites are relatively complex architecturally with numerous overlapping and interrelated phases; they have also produced robust assemblages of Late Antique to Medieval ceramics, highly fragmentary wall painting, glass, and mortuary remains.</p> <p>In a traditional publication each of these materials would have its own discrete section (or perhaps even volume) produced after a period of careful study by a specialist.  For example, Amy, Nora, and I would study the architecture and publish it complete with a description, comparanda, and comments on the significance of this architecture for existing typologies.  Kyle and Scott would perform a similar study of the ceramics; Sarah would study and publish the wall painting.  These practices have their roots in the history of discipline of archaeology (and the humanities more broadly).  In the first half of the 20th century (outside brief pockets of critique), the humanities emphasized the mastery of (highly!) specialized bodies of material which collectively would contribute to the expanding pool of knowledge on a give topic.  This empirical mode of research favored intensive, specialized, and discrete studies which would build a enduring body of factual knowledge.</p> <p>Over the last 40 years (and perhaps more recently in the proudly anachronistic world of Mediterranean archaeology), scholarship have moved to more highly integrative approaches to research. These approaches have implicitly (or more recently explicitly) recognized that discrete bodies of knowledge exist only in relation to complex interpretative processes.  These interpretative processes inform both the hypotheses that guide our research as well as the techniques that we use to collect data to evaluate these hypotheses.  In other words, a body of factual knowledge does not exist outside interpretation.  The goal of producing an enduring body of empirically sound knowledge is simply not attainable.</p> <p>As a result of this trend, scholars have worked to produce more richly integrated, interpretative publications across the humanities.  While vestiges of earlier practices persist in catalogue of finds and narrow specialist studies of distinct artifact types, these practices are increasingly arranged in relation to large archaeological and historical problems.  Our efforts at Polis will, I hope, look to how the assemblage of ceramic material informs how we understand the architecture and decoration of these buildings; at the same time, I hope that the architecture informs our interpretation of the decorative material and the ceramics present at the site.  The interplay between these various bodies of material create the interpretative space which we hope will

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produce a richer, more clearly historically relevant publication of the site.  In short, our study will regard the material culture (architecture, ceramics, plaster, et c.) of the past as both the product and the producer of historical interpretation.</p> <p>This approach is not novel, and on Cyprus we have some great models (particularly <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/cypriot-village-of-lateantiquity-kalavasos-kopetra-in-the-vasilikos-valley/oclc/249640107">Marcus Rautman's publication of the churches at Kopetra</a>), but it is not universally applied.  What could make our approach interesting, however, is that we will attempt to implement it as a team of specialists (rather than as a single visionary scholar who can command a vast body of material).  Wish us luck!</p> <p> </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: From Pyla-Koustopetria to Polis Chrysochous STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: from-pyla-koustopetria-to-polis-chrysochous CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/28/2010 09:22:56 AM ----BODY: <p>I am back from Cyprus after a little over 5 weeks. Over the next week or so, I'll bring everyone up to date on the triumphs and tragedies of our study and field season.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>I have spent the past week at the site of <a href="http://web.princeton.edu/sites/Archaeology/rp/polisexhibit/intro.html">Pol is Chrysochous</a> on the western side of the island. A team from Princeton University under the direction of William Childs have been documenting the site of Polis since 1983 and excavating at the site since 1984. The site itself lies amidst the modern tourist town of Polis and as a result, the excavated areas are sometimes separated from one another by some distance as the map below indicates. The material from these various excavations indicate activity on the site from as early as the Chalcolithic period, and there is archaeological evidence that the area prospered as late as the 16th century and the Lusignan era.</p> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134850cead3970c -pi" width="358" height="480" alt="201006280756.jpg" /><br /> </div>

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<p>I was invited to visit the site by Amy Papalexandrou who was working to study and publish the Late Antique and Medieval material from the site. This included two basilica style churches both with Early Christian and later phases (one is clearly visible <a href="http://web.princeton.edu/sites/Archaeology/rp/polisexhibit/polis1.html">to the right in this photograph</a>, the other is barely visible <a href="http://web.princeton.edu/sites/Archaeology/rp/polisexhibit/polis14.html">t o the far left in this photograph</a> ). While both churches have appeared occasionally in the literature on the architecture of Christian Cyprus, neither has been published thoroughly. I hope to contribute to their publication and learn more about the architecture and use of these buildings as well as the political, social, economic, and religious history of the island in the shadowy period of the late 7th to 10th century.</p> <p>The later phases of the Early Christian basilicas on Cyprus have attracted some scholarly attention. Of particular interest is the practice of transforming wood-roofed basilicas to barrel-vaulted structures sometime between the 7th and 10th centuries. The phenomenon was initially studied by A.H.S. Megaw in the 1940s. Numerous other scholars have considered the date, cause, and significance of this phenomenon, including most recently, Charles Stewart in the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 69 (2010), 162-189. Unfortunately, few scholars have appealed to excavated remains to make their arguments for the chronology of this change, nor have they consistently appealed to archaeology to consider attendant changes in decoration, function, or even social significance of the churches transformed after the end of antiquity.</p> <p>The churches of Polis both show signs of modification after their original construction. Moreover, both churches were systematically and relatively carefully excavated revealing evidence for chronologically important ceramics, . As a result, these buildings represent an important opportunity to document the later life of Early Christian architecture on the island and in the process consider more fully life on Cyprus during the tumultuous years of condominium when Arabs and Byzantine jointly ruled the island.<br /></p> <p>In other words, the story of the buildings at Polis allows us to continue the story begun with at the Late Antique coastal settlement at Pyla-Koutsopetria, which appears to have fallen been in steep decline by the end of the 7th century and shows little activity in later eras. Unlike Polis, the vulnerable coastal position of the Pyla-Koutsopetria and its clear dependence on the trading networks sustained by the trans-Mediterranean Roman Empire probably doomed the settlement to abandonment.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Last Days in Larnaka STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1

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ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: last-days-in-larnaka CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/19/2010 11:28:38 PM ----BODY: <p align="left">The museum team from the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project finished packing up the museum on Friday and is heading off to Polis on the western part of the island to check out the work of the Princeton Polis Expedition.&nbsp; They have not only substantial quantities of Late Antique pottery for Scott, but a pair of Early Christian basilicas (for me) and some Roman and Byzantine wall painting (for Sarah).&nbsp; </p> <p align="left">Packing up at the end of the season provides a useful perspective on the quantity of material that we have processed and analyzed during the year, and need to synthesize in the off season.&nbsp; The stacked creates filled with artifacts represent order from the chaos of real fieldwork and provide the basis for both the chronological and functional analysis of both our survey area and our various soundings.</p> <p align="left">In general, this was a successful season, although the various small projects, student volunteers, site visits, issues with the British base, and bizarre archaeo-political controversies conspired to give it a bit of a disjointed feeling.&nbsp; </p> <p align="left">And the real success of the season will only be evident this off season as the various members of the team continue to work to write up the results of our 7+ seasons of fieldwork.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f181d1a4970 b-pi"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f181d166970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN4325" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f181d168970b -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></a></p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f181d170970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN4326" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f181d17d970b -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f181d18f970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN4328" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013484a9aab8970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f181d1a4970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN4330" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013484a9aacb970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f181d1ae970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN4333" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013484a9aae4970c -pi" width="304" height="404"></a>&nbsp;</p> <p align="left">There might be a bit of radio silence from the blog over the next week, as we might not have the

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same degree of internet connective in Polis.&nbsp; But I'll be back blogging by the end of the week.&nbsp; Don't you worry.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Top Five Mistakes on the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: top-five-mistakes-on-the-pyla-koutsopetria-archaeological-project CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/17/2010 11:25:16 PM ----BODY: <p>As another field season comes to a close, it is useful to reflect back on some of our mistakes over the past few years.&nbsp; I am pleased to say that no mistakes were so significant that archaeological information was lost.&nbsp; On the other hand, most of these mistakes brought a certain amount of inconvenience to our seasons and set us back in time, energy, and sometimes other resources.</p> <p>1. Not applying for a single, big grant. Over the past eight seasons, PKAP has been fortunate to be funded by a series of small to mid-sized grants.&nbsp; The support of numerous organizations not only made our initial fieldwork possible, but also made it possible for us to take advantage of opportunities (like excavation and more robust remote sensing campaigns) that were not present at the project's onset, bring in collaborators from around the world, and to introduce over 50 students to field archaeology and the island of Cyprus. The downside of relying on small to mid-sized grants is that each fall became a frantic scramble for resources to fund the next season. Each spring, as we waited on the grants, became an exercise in speculative accounting as we produce multiple budgets and plans based on the possible level of funding provided by our outstanding grant applications.&nbsp; Fortunately, we always received enough support to pursue our most optimistic plans, but the wait (particularly over the last few years as "changes" in the global economy made it difficult to predict funding levels) was excruciating.&nbsp; Next time we conduct a multi-year archaeological project in the Mediterranean, we will make it contingent upon receiving a multi-year grant.</p> <p>2. Messing with the Cypriot Bronze Age. While I am not a liberty to go into details about this mistake, I have learned that the Cypriot Bronze Age is not fun nor is it necessarily an open field for inquiry.&nbsp; It seems best for specialists in Late Antiquity working on a largely historical site, to steer very clear of the Late Bronze Age and <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/22/science/22sail.html">other messy prehistoric periods in Cyprus</a>.</p> <p>3. Identifying an Early Christian

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basilica on Vigla from resistivity results.&nbsp; After conducting a substantial campaign of electrical resistivity survey in 2007, we concluded that an Early Christian basilica stood atop the coastal height of Vigla. In fact, our scrutiny of the architecture directed the location of our trenches in 2008.&nbsp; It only took a few days of excavating to discover that the remains on Vigla were not associated with an Early Christian church, and moreover, were not monumental.&nbsp; Now it appears that we have a Classical to Hellenistic fortified settlement on the height.&nbsp; (For more on this, see <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2007/12/py la-koutsopetr.html">here</a> and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/06/th e-vanished-ba.html">here</a>)</p> <p>4. <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/2010/06/th e-voyage-of-pkap-airship-1.html">Flying PKAP Airship One on a windy day</a>.</p> <p>5. Conducting a study season without a registrar. At one point this year, I looked over the numerous scholars and students working on PKAP material and could see no order to the chaos.&nbsp; In past years, our registrar has brought order to chaos and allowed for the smooth movement of material through processing and study.&nbsp; This year, we proceeded without a registrar - a feat only attempted once before - and the results were terrifying.&nbsp; Well-labeled (fortunately) artifacts everywhere, forms everywhere, well-labeled (phew!) pottery bags everywhere, scholars and specialists everywhere, and me frantically trying to keep up with various questions and requests on my lap top while attempting to analyze the data.&nbsp; Fortunately, a long, hot, day in the museum last </p> <p>There are some honorable mentions to this list: working on Cyprus in late July and August for one year, working on a site in the British Sovereign Area (paperwork on top of paperwork!), waiting for five years before discovering how useful a camp manager was to the project, and leaving too little time each season to wrap up all the odds and ends in a calm and collected way.&nbsp; </p> <p>Despite these mistakes, we are pleased with the results of our 8 years of relatively intensive field work and study.&nbsp; We don't lose artifacts, we haven't lost a student (and have had remarkably few "problem" students), and we are well on our way to produce a monograph length study of our work. So, if I am lucky enough to embark on another project like PKAP, I can only hope that it turns out as well.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: The Teaching Blogosphere STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: the-teaching-blogosphere CATEGORY: Teaching CATEGORY: The New Media

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DATE: 06/16/2010 11:31:07 PM ----BODY: <p>Just a quick repost from over on <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>:</p> <p>If you read this blog, chances are that you read other blogs like it.&nbsp; So I thought it would be a useful exercise to crowd-source some of the more useful teaching related blogs on the web.</p> <p>The three blogs that I check most regularly are:</p> <p><a href="http://tomprofblog.mit.edu/">Tomorrow's Professor Blog</a> aggregates a great selection of online teaching articles each day.&nbsp; It's a great daily review of what's new across the web.</p> <p><a href="http://chronicle.com/blog/profhacker/27/">Prof Hacker</a> has recently moved to the Chronicle of Higher Education's webpage.&nbsp; It deals with much more than just the "hacking" or technology aspects of teaching to include professional advice, productivity tips, and even recipes!&nbsp; </p> <p>Not to be left out, Inside Higher Ed, offers the daily <a href="http://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology_and_learning">Technology and Learning Blog</a> which covers ground similar to Prof Hacker with maybe a slightly greater emphasis on technology.</p> <p>Finally, I'd be remiss not to mention Mark Grabe's <a href="http://learningaloud.com/blog/">Learning Aloud blog</a> which provides a nice array of personal technology tips with an eye toward their use in the classroom.</p> <p>This is just a small sample of the vast teaching related blogosphere.&nbsp; What blogs do you read to keep up with recent developments in teaching?&nbsp; Let's work to create a list of teaching blogs that you find useful as a resource.</p> <p>Post your favorite blogs in the comments section over at <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Near Disaster on PKAP Airship One STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: near-disaster-on-pkap-airship-one CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/15/2010 11:34:56 PM ----BODY: <p>The chaotic second flight of <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_graduate/2010/06/pk ap-airship-one-and-the-end-of-the-season.html">PKAP Airship One</a> has become

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an instant legend around these parts.</p> <p>Contrary to what the manual says, we now know that the PKAP Airship One is capable of a 4g negative dive.&nbsp; <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/2010/06/th e-voyage-of-pkap-airship-1.html">Scott Moore has documented it</a>.&nbsp; He'd tell you where it occurred, but it's classified and he'd have to kill you.&nbsp; (If you don't know what I'm talking about ask somebody my age or Google "4g negative dive").</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: From blimp to page STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: from-blimp-to-page CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/13/2010 11:05:06 PM ----BODY: <p>An afternoon with the newest tool in the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project arsenal, PKAP Airship One, produced a series of spectacular aerial photographs (the adventure of the airship was documented by <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_graduate/2010/06/pk ap-airship-one-and-the-end-of-the-season.html">Dallas Deforest here</a>).</p> <p>I did some quick, post-processing of the low-altitude aerial photographs, which I document below.&nbsp; My main interest was transforming the aerial photographs into quick plan views.&nbsp; I first georeferenced the image (and orthorectified them to compensate for any distortion) using a series of points acquired by GPS.&nbsp; </p> <p>I then sketched in the most visible features in the photograph in ArcGIS.&nbsp; The final image is a drawing, base on the photo, prepared for ground-truthing this afternoon in the field.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f0eb4e65970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Building_Photo" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f0eb4e76970b -pi" width="400" height="421"></a> </p> <p align="center"></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f0eb4e82970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Building_Points" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f0eb4e9a970b -pi" width="400" height="421"></a> </p> <p align="center"><a

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href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013484159ad1970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Building_Lines" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f0eb4ec5970b -pi" width="400" height="421"></a> </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f0eb4edb970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="Building_Drawn" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f0eb4ee8970b -pi" width="400" height="421"></a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Susan Caraher EMAIL: IP: 208.107.184.168 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/susancaraher DATE: 06/14/2010 11:40:41 AM That's so cool!! -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Documenting the Damage STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: documenting-the-damage CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/10/2010 10:34:42 PM ----BODY: <p>Over the last four or five years, we've witnessed first hand the work of looters on our site in Cyprus.&nbsp; Their work with metal detectors has left pockmarked fields in their wake, and this past year they left a 2 m deep hole at the site of Vigla.&nbsp; </p> <p>The hole was probably not worth the looters efforts as all it did was expose a 2 m high stretch of fortification wall which I diligently worked with Dimitri Nakassis to document yesterday evening.</p> <p>This sectional of wall is the best preserved stretch of the wall surrounding the height of Vigla.&nbsp; Even more useful, it is the only stretch visible (for the moment at least) on the northern side of the height and confirmed our suspicions regarding the course of the wall in this area.&nbsp; Unfortunately, its excavation by looters prevented us from retrieving any significant chronological data from the hole despite a few pieces of coarse ware scattered about inside the hole.</p> <p align="center"><a

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href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013483f2dc17970 c-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0838" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f0c83c3b970b -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 71.162.226.29 URL: http://kourelis.blogspot.com/ DATE: 06/11/2010 10:05:00 AM Oh man, I've got to dig up an essay I read sometime ago about the looterarchaeology relationship and how it is fundamental. Both need each other (for prospecting at different levels). I've started reading this 1920s Greek novel and it starts with a couple of looters. I wonder why Postprocessualists don't do more with looters. Now, that would be a fabulous ethnographic project!!! -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Cleaning Time STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: cleaning-time CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/09/2010 10:20:46 PM ----BODY: <p></p> <p>We finally have received permission from the British base to work out at our site. Since the students leave this coming weekend, this means reprioritizing and frantic days of fieldwork.&nbsp; One of the top priorities has been to clean up the site of Pyla-Koutsopetria so that we can complete the documentation of both our excavations and the architecture exposed by previous work on the site.</p> <p>Cleaning a site involves removing invasive weeds, "winter wash" (that is dirt that has come into the site over the winter months), and trimming up the inevitable slumping of our once carefully cut scarps.&nbsp; It's pretty tedious work, but since we've spent the previous two-and-a-half weeks in the museum, the students (and staff) attacked these jobs with extra energy.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013483b489c3970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0821"

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src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013483b489db970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a> </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013483b48a13970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0817" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013483b48a2f970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f08af83f970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0815" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f08af88d970b -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f08af91d970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0823" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013483b48b81970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f08af91d970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0824" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013483b48bde970c -pi" width="304" height="404"></a> </p> <p>We also lost the services of our hardworking cook today; Chester Beltowski left early this morning to return to Grand Forks.&nbsp; This leaves us with a different cleaning situation...</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013483b48c4c970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0829" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f08af9a7970b -pi" width="304" height="404"></a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Archaeology and the Tragedy of the Commons STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: archaeology-and-the-tragedy-of-the-commons CATEGORY: Archaeology CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/08/2010 06:27:58 AM ----BODY:

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<p>One of the more intriguing conversations this summer has been regarding the role that the state, non-state institutions (foreign archaeological schools, national archaeological associations, et c.), and even funding agencies play in shaping the nature, extent, and character of archaeological fieldwork.&nbsp; The delays in receiving permission to work on the British base (which, to be clear, has nothing to do with archaeological matters), has tried the patience of the team and forced us to adjust our fieldwork plans on an almost daily basis.</p> <p>The question that I've been considering is what would happen if archaeologists were simply allowed dig or survey wherever they wanted.&nbsp; If all constraints were removed, would we experience the archaeological equivalent of the tragedy of the commons?&nbsp; In other words, how deep are our commitments to responsible archaeology outside of the structures of the community?</p> <p>My experience on archaeological projects, including PKAP, suggests that there is a tendency for every individual and project to view their research as the most important.&nbsp; This "selfish" tendency drives projects and individuals to prioritize their work over the work of others.&nbsp; Most scholars understand their approaches, methods, research questions, and conclusions to be of great significance.&nbsp; One result of this understanding is, in part, to prioritize fieldwork that will contribute to their work.</p> <p>The tendency to privilege one's own research over others had tended to drive research projects to work up to any limits established by outside authorities.&nbsp; In the Mediterranean, this generally involves the local state archaeological authorities and any international archaeological institutions involved in managing the work of foreign expeditions. In fact, these institutions largely grew up to control the archaeological work in an area.&nbsp; On a micocosmic level, we constantly debate at PKAP the priorities of the project and the strategies of these largely friendly interactions involve project staff moving their research interests at the top of the list.&nbsp; </p> <p>The tendency to privilege one's own research interests on both the micro level (e.g. within a project) and at the macro level (among other projects) might well create conditions where the overall health of the field and the protection of the archaeological remains for future generations might not be a primary concern.&nbsp; In a tragedy of the common scenario, the drive of individuals to survive or prosper leads to the destruction of community resources.&nbsp; There is no reason to imagine that this would not occur in an archaeological context if forces did not exert influence.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Nicosia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: nicosia CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project

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DATE: 06/06/2010 10:46:12 PM ----BODY: <p align="left">I took my first trip to Northern Nicosia on Saturday, and my first stop was the 13th century Selimeye Mosque.&nbsp; This imposing Gothic building was the cathedral of the Frankish bishop of Cyprus until being converted into a mosque in the 16th century at the time of the Ottoman conquest of the island.</p> <p align="left">It remains a dramatic example of the fusion of Frankish, Byzantine, and Turkish architecture.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f03cf31e970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0768" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f03cf32a970b -pi" width="304" height="404"></a> </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348366c7f1970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0788" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f03cf353970b -pi" width="404" height="304"></a> </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348366c807970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0795" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348366c81d970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a> </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348366c836970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0796" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348366c853970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a> </p> <p align="left">We also managed to catch the Pope's motorcade and a quick glimpse of the holy head as he made his way to a meeting with the Archbishop of Cyprus.&nbsp; The Pope's white hat stands out against the black garb of the Orthodox clergy in the second photograph.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348366c862970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0746" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f03cf3e9970b -pi" width="404" height="304"></a> </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f03cf3ff970 b-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0749" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133f03cf41c970b -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ------------

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AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: The Future of Ancient History STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: the-future-of-ancient-history-1 DATE: 06/04/2010 11:07:22 PM ----BODY: <p>The recent Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in Ancient History at Nottingham in the UK inspired vigorous and wide-ranging debate among the PKAP staff.&nbsp; Tim Cornell's and Robin Osborne's perspectives were particularly thought provoking.</p> <p><a href="http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/classics/ampah/2010.aspx">Here's a link to the meeting's site with embedded videos</a>. </p> <p>It's at least suggested viewing for any graduate students in ancient history.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: The Future of Ancient History STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: the-future-of-ancient-history CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/04/2010 10:38:36 PM ----BODY: <p>The recent Annual Meeting of Postgraduates in Ancient History at Nottingham in the UK inspired vigorous and wide-ranging debate among the PKAP staff.&nbsp; Tim Cornell's and Robin Osborne's perspectives were particularly provocative.</p> <p><a href="http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/classics/ampah/2010.aspx">Here's a link to the meeting's site with embedded videos</a>. </p> <p>It's at least suggested viewing for any graduate students in ancient history.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: -----

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KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Open Ended Learning in the Summer STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: open-ended-learning-in-the-summer CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 06/02/2010 11:22:24 PM ----BODY: <p>One thing that I sometimes forget is that most of my learning has come not from structured classroom space with structured relationships to material and environment, clear learning outcomes, and rigid forms of assessment. Summer time provides the perfect time of year for such open-ended learning.&nbsp; The relentless pressures of teaching and learning are relaxed, the weekly grind of meetings of subsides, and for those of us who do research or teach abroad, the scenery changes allowing for those dislocating moments which are so central to the uncanny experience associated with learning. </p> <p>For students and faculty summer breaks can be akin to recess or playtime that some education critics see as particularly valuable as an opportunity to develop skill wellsuited for real world engagement with the unfamiliar.&nbsp; The challenge for me and our team, is how do we manage the unstructured environment especially when both students and faculty tend to understand learning most frequently within far more formal&nbsp; conditions.</p> <p>The greatest challenge to fostering informal and unstructured learning is in encouraging students to take full advantage of the unstructured opportunities, in allowing for the unpredictability and inefficiency of unstructured learning, and in designing assessment programs that can evaluate a wide range of possible outcomes.&nbsp; </p> <p>This summer, we've been waiting on a permit to conduct fieldwork and during this time we have had a diverse group of students washing pottery and biding their time with various small projects.&nbsp; Our lack of fieldwork has removed one of the more easily assessed and focused aspects of the project's educational goals. In its place, I've advocated for a series of open ended learning events, which would force the students to engage with their environment (the city of Larnaka) or a set of archaeological artifacts (plow-zone pottery).</p> <p>There has been some reluctance to let the students just roam free, however.&nbsp; Moreover, there is persistent concern that students wouldn't "get" an assignment that was required, but at the same time had no goals beyond engagement. In fact, students are as conditioned to expect assignments with distinct, assessable learning goals.&nbsp; This, obviously, is the cause of the most common student question in the classroom: "will this be on the test?"</p> <p>The summer provides a chance for both faculty and students to shift expectations and to recognize the opportunities for productive learning outside the institutional constraints of regularized university life.&nbsp; These opportunities, like recess or play time in younger children, can cultivate the sense of wonder, observation, and engagement.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY:

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----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Provisional Discard at the Larnaka Museum Apotheke STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: provisional-discard-at-the-larnaka-museum-apotheke CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 05/31/2010 06:06:48 AM ----BODY: <p>Due to a bit of a paperwork issue and a series of British holidays, we have not been able to get the students in our field should out to our site.&nbsp; While there is plenty of work to do at the museum where we are gaining momentum in processing artifacts, we are still working to find ways to get our students to flex their fieldwork brain-muscles.&nbsp; In other words, we hope to find ways to get the students to think archaeologically on a larger and more complex scale than the individual artifact.&nbsp; </p> <p>One of the suggestions that I made was that we could get the students working on the amazing assemblage of material present just outside the museum storerooms.&nbsp; Unlike the "archaeological" material in the storerooms, the assemblage of stuff in the storage area's courtyard represents a whole range of storage and discard practices.&nbsp; While documenting and studying the various objects, stored, and discarded used by the local archaeological establishment may seem to some (of my colleagues) as a classic example of busywork, I think that it would be a great exercise in archaeological description.</p> <p>It also is an interesting opportunity to consider the remains of a wide range of archaeological and conservation practices.&nbsp; As archaeology comes to play a more and more prominent role in the presentation and performance of the modern state, we have to assume an increasing amount of recovered archaeological material itself reentering new archaeological contexts.</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013482894230970 c-pi"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013482894255970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0726" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013482894264970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></a></p> <p align="center"><img style="borderright-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottom-width: 0px; border-leftwidth: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0728" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013482894284970c -pi" width="404" height="304"></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134828942a0970 c-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0729" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134828942b8970c

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-pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ef59ee9b970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="DSCN0730" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ef59eeb4970b -pi" width="404" height="304"></a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project gains pace STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: pyla-koutsopetria-archaeological-project-gains-pace CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 05/28/2010 06:54:15 AM ----BODY: <p>It's been a bit of a slow start to the summer work at the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">Pyla-<em>Koutsopetria </em>Archaeological Project</a>.&nbsp; Some of this may be because my bag and computer power supply were lost for a bit, but after a roundabout trip to the island, I am back in the blogging business.</p> <p>But if you miss this PKAP blogosphere, then you ought to check out our staff blog here: <a title="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/" href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/">http://m editerraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/</a></p> <p>And follow us on Twitter (now that I have my phone and can provide exciting blow-by-blow descriptions of our work) with the hashtag: #pkap</p> <p>Or at the <a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/PKAPBlogAggregator.html">PKAP Blog Aggregator site</a>.</p> <p>We've spent the last few days in the museum attempting to set priorities for the study season, introduce the students to the project, and organize the ceramics that need to be processed.&nbsp; Our biggest challenge right now is that the paper copies of many of our forms have gone missing in our time away from the Larnaka Museum.&nbsp; On the one hand, this is not surprising since the museum is an active and busy place all year around.&nbsp; On the other hand, we had hoped that our paper data recording sheets would remain in relatively close proximity to the physical artifacts for the duration of the project.&nbsp; The missing sheets provide another challenge, the data has not been entered into our database yet and this was one of the goals of the 2010 PKAP season (we have copies back in the US).&nbsp; One of the main downsides of paper copies is that they can't be multiple places at once, like our digital databases. </p> <p>While we hope to get copies of our artifact sheets from the US before too long, their absence makes it harder for us to

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identify and focus on particular artifacts as we prepare our catalog for publication.&nbsp; We've become totally dependent on our ability to querry data efficiently in order to identify patterns in our finds data that will reward further research.</p> <p>This weekend, we take the students on trips to Paphos, the monastery of Ay. Neophytos, and the small coastal site of Ay. GeorghiosPeyeas and Maa. then, on a special Sunday trip, to the Classicla to Late Roman site of Amathous and then to the seaside town of Zygy which once prospered as a major export port for the islands carobs. We appear to have a good group of students this year, so these trips should be exciting. </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project gains pace STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: the-return-of-the-pyla-koutsopetria-blogosphere CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 05/28/2010 06:50:24 AM ----BODY: <p>It's been a bit of slow start to the summer work at the <a href="http://www.pkap.org/">Pyla-<em>Koutsopetria </em>Archaeological Project</a>.&nbsp; Some of this may be because my bag and computer power supply were lost for a bit, but after a roundabout trip to the island, I am back in the blogging business.</p> <p>But if you miss this PKAP blogosphere, then you ought to check out our staff blog here: <a title="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/" href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/">http://m editerraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/</a></p> <p>And follow us on Twitter (now that I have my phone and can provide exciting blow-by-blow descriptions of our work) with the hashtag: #pkap</p> <p>We've spent the last few days in the museum attempting to set priorities for the study season, introduce the students to the project, and organize the ceramics that need to be processed.&nbsp; Our biggest challenge right now is that the paper copies of many of our forms have gone missing in our time away from the Larnaka Museum.&nbsp; On the one hand, this is not surprising since the museum is an active and busy place all year around.&nbsp; On the other hand, we had hoped that our paper data recording sheets would remain in relatively close proximity to the physical artifacts for the duration of the project.&nbsp; The missing sheets provide another challenge, the data has not been entered into our database yet and this was one of the goals of the 2010 PKAP season (we have copies back in the US).&nbsp; One of the main downsides of paper copies is that they can't be multiple places at once, like our digital databases. </p> <p>While

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we hope to get copies of our artifact sheets from the US before too long, their absence makes it harder for us to identify and focus on particular artifacts as we prepare our catalog for publication.&nbsp; We've become totally dependent on our ability to querry data efficiently in order to identify patterns in our finds data that will reward further research.</p> <p>This weekend, we take the students on trips to Paphos, the monastery of Ay. Neophytos, and the small coastal site of Ay. Georghios-Peyeas and Maa. then, on a special Sunday trip, to the Classicla to Late Roman site of Amathous and then to the seaside town of Zygy which once prospered as a major export port for the islands carobs. We appear to have a good group of students this year, so these trips should be exciting. </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: First days on Pyla-Koutsopetria 2010 STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: wysiwyg ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: first-days-on-pyla-koutsopetria-2010 CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 05/27/2010 12:26:03 AM ----BODY: I&#39;ve made it to Cyprus, but my bag has not. Inside this bag is the massive power brick for my computer, so for the time being, I am reduced to using my iPad as my primary computer. As various pundits have observed, the iPad is much better suited for consuming media than its production. In other words, my blog posts will be short. On the positive side, the flight gave me an opportunity to read Michael Given&#39;s most recent article on The Ottoman landscape of Cyprus (Given and Hadjianastatsis, BMGS 34 (2010), 38-60. Drawing on textual and archaeological evidence, Given and Hadjianastasis reconstruct segments of the Ottoman period Cypriot landscape looking at history of a series of villages on the northern slope of the Troodos mountains. I also read Charles A. Stewart on the 8th century vaulted churches of Cyprus, particularly those on the Karpas (JSAH 69 (2010), 162-189). These buildings represent an important, albeit local, transitional step between wood-roofed basilicas and more centrally planned, vaulted or even domed structures. Finally, we&#39;ve begun to introduce the students to our work in the museum, the local topography, and local sites. So far the students and staff are filled with early season energy and enthusiasm. Stay tuned!!<br />

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----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: You're not going to dig? STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: youre-not-going-to-dig CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 05/24/2010 08:20:08 AM ----BODY: <p>As I put the final touches on my packing for my trip to Cyprus, I want to address a question that I have been asked numerous times over the past few weeks. What do you do over there if you're not digging? And why aren't you doing fieldwork this summer?</p> <p>As for the first question, my project, the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project, has never been a traditional excavation. In fact, the project started with no intention of digging at all. Our initial research methods and goals involved conducting an intensive pedestrian survey across the the Pyla coastal zone. Excavation served to ground truth various hypotheses developed by survey and remote sensing. So, we had never intended to excavate large areas or conduct a full-scale excavation of buildings. Instead, the goal was to establish chronology of subsurface remains, to try to determine their function, and to generate a stratified sample of artifacts to which we could compare our survey materials. So, in short, our excavations were limited in scope and, as a result, limited in duration.</p> <p>Despite the limited nature of our excavations, they, nevertheless, produced a good bit of material that requires careful documentation. We will devote most of the 2010 season to documenting excavated material and preparing detailed catalog entries for important artifacts collected during excavation and survey. As we have begun to prepare our final analysis of the Pyla region for publication, we have identified artifacts, units, and contexts that require more thorough and comprehensive documentation. Over the next four weeks, we'll spend time making sure that the key pieces of archaeological evidence are thoroughly analyzed so that they can support our arguments.</p> <p>Fieldwork is the most fun part of archaeological work, but as the pioneering underwater archaeologist <a href="http://www.archaeology.org/0307/etc/conversations.html">George Bass recently quipped</a>, "my most exciting discoveries have all come in the library". The same can be applied to the artifacts stored away in museum storerooms which when cleaned from the dirt of the field can often reveal crucial information overlooked during the bustle of excavation or survey. Our ceramicist's careful attention to each artifact is a time consuming and tedious

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process, but the results of his work (and the entire teams efforts to facilitate his work by cleaning artifacts, dividing them into lots, keeping records, and cataloging) will allow us to reconstruct the history of the site in a way that digging another or even just a bigger hole would not enable us to do. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>So, off to Cyprus today, to spend four weeks or so in the museum storerooms helping our ceramicist go through our collected corpus of artifacts. As with every year, this blog will continue through the summer, although perhaps with a few short interruptions. Also be sure to check out our <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_undergra/">Undergra duate Perspectives Blog</a>, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/">the PKAP Season Staff Blog</a>, and our long-running, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_graduate/">Graduate Student Perspectives blog</a>. Or check out the <a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/PKAPBlogAggregator.html">PKAP Blog aggregator</a> for the most recent posts from all three.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Nick Karatjas EMAIL: karatjas@iup.edu IP: 144.80.228.225 URL: DATE: 05/24/2010 09:18:33 AM Have a great and productive trip and time in Cyprus. this year. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits

Sorry I cannot be there

DATE: 05/21/2010 08:27:53 AM ----BODY: <p>The countdown to the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project is official on, so we'll spend today running errands and making final preparations for a Monday departure.&nbsp; In the meantime, you can enjoy a little bevy of quick hits:</p> <ul> <li>I love reports and statistics, so I was pretty excited when the <a href="http://www.und.edu/dept/datacol/reports/subFolder/sophomore%202010/sophomo

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re2010.htm">2010 University of North Dakota Sophomore Satisfaction Survey</a> was released by our Office of Institutional Research.</li> <li>If you share my worry about the state of graduate education in the U.S., the you certainly need to read the <a href="http://mygradspace.wordpress.com/2010/05/17/the-future-ofgraduate-education-in-the-u-s/">latest report of from the Council of Graduate Schools</a>.&nbsp; And, for more info on Graduate Education, you should certainly bookmark, the other blog in our household: <a href="http://mygradspace.wordpress.com/">The UND Graduate School Blog</a>.&nbsp; It's curious that the <a href="http://chronicle.com/section/Home/5">Chronicle of Higher Education</a> does not feature a blog on Graduate Education in the US.</li> <li>Teaching Thursday begins its summer semi-slumber this next week.&nbsp; We'll keep posting throughout the summer (perhaps not with the same regularity), but our readers move on to more summer related tasks like mowing the lawn, family vacations, and neglected research projects.&nbsp; Before you go, be sure to read <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/05/20/more-firstyear-teaching-reflections-two-different-experiences/">the last installment</a> in our series of <a href="http://en.wordpress.com/tag/first-yearreflections/">First Year Teaching Reflections</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://ghostsofnorthdakota.wordpress.com/">Ghosts of North Dakota</a> continue to update their growing catalogue of photographs of abandoned North Dakota towns. Their most recent trip through the "abandoned" landscape of North Dakota produced some pretty brilliant results.</li> <li>While the <a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/PKAPBlogAggregator.html">PKAP blogosphere</a> is about to return to bloom, it is now joined by some new Mediterranean fieldwork blogs.&nbsp; I'm keeping an interested eye on my old buddy Rangar Cline's <a href="http://undertheumbriansun.blogspot.com/">Under the Umbrian Sun</a> blog which will document their work at the excavations at Vicus ad Martis Tudertium.</li> <li>In recent weeks, the Penn State student run blog <a href="http://onwardstate.com/">Onward State</a> has attracted a good bit of media attention.&nbsp; Being involved in re-imagining the University of North Dakota's web presence, I am not sure that the imperiously named "Web Oversight Council" fully understands the potential power of a site like Onward State and its ability to influence the image of the university on the internets.&nbsp; </li></ul> <p>Off to run errands!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Another Thesis: American Scheherazade STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: another-thesis-american-scheherazade CATEGORY: Departmental History at UND DATE: 05/20/2010 07:30:52 AM

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----BODY: <p>Nigar Soubra, one of my M.A. students here at the University of North Dakota will soon defend her thesis. It's entitled "American Scheherazade: Strategic Orientalism and Hybridity in the Ottoman Tales of Demetra Vaka Brown".</p> <p>Here's the abstract:</p> <blockquote> <p>In the academic era of Post-Colonial scholarship, the discourse of Orientalism is particularly under close observation and it is a subject for heated debates among many Post-Colonial scholars. Since Edward Said’s Orientalism identified this discourse as a homogeneous historical and political process, the subsequent field of scholarship engaged in the process of understanding and re-defining the term of Orientalism. Post-colonial hybrid personas who were actively engaging and strategically re-addressing the course of Orientalism destabilize Said’s monolithic definition and create a ground for a more complex discussion of this seemingly diverse discourse, which extended beyond Western colonial agendas. A hybrid cultural status of a GreekAmerican writer and an immigrant from the Ottoman Empire, Demetra Vaka, as well as her first publication, Haremlik, are the focus of this thesis, which implements a “close-reading” of the narrative in order to understand the author’s ambivalent use of Orientalism. It is argued that Vaka Brown’s culturally in-between status granted her a privilege of authorial authority and authenticity in her representations of the East to the West. Vaka Brown ambivalently not only re-addressed the previously constructed Orientalist stereotypes but also engaged in developing Orientalist knowledge through classification and representation of cultural difference. It is argued that Vaka Brown utilized Orientalism strategically in order to establish her authorial authority based on her origins, to map the cultural differences between the East and the West, and to bring an air of commercially desirable exoticism to her narrative. In the era of American material Orientalism, when American popular culture was enchanted by the allure of exotic merchandise and the idea of escapism, Haremlik represented an authentic voice of experience and a story about the “other.” In Haremlik, Orientalism is a tool for mapping of cultural differences and a hallmark for marketing. It is argued that Vaka Brown’s strategy for representing an inherent incompatibility between the East and the West was imbedded in her nostalgic idea about the timeless and unchanging Orient. The idea of westernizing Orient threatened the author expertise on the intimately familiar Orient. Not only did the westernization of the Ottoman Empire destabilize her knowledge about the intimately familiar “other,” but also the idea of the cosmopolitan Ottoman Empire’s disintegration and the rise of Turkish nationalism threatened the existence of Greek minorities in Turkey.</p> </blockquote>Congratulations Nigar! ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ------------

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AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Byzantine Archaeology and Indigenous Archaeology STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: byzantine-archaeology-and-indigenous-archaeology CATEGORY: Byzantium DATE: 05/19/2010 08:50:53 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the last few weeks, I have been re-reading some work on indigenous archaeology and considering its application to the study of Byzantium. The new edition of <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/archaeological-theory-anintroduction/">Matthew Johnson's <i>Archaeological Theory</i></a> spurred this, in part, as did a more careful reading of <a href="http://www.unl.edu/rhames/courses/current/readings/McGheeAmAnt08.pdf">Robe rt McGhee's 2008 critique</a> of indigenous archaeology in <i>American Antiquity</i> 73 (2008), 579-597. The main arguments supporting indigenous archaeology stem from the idea that indigenous peoples (broadly construed) understanding the material past in different ways from that articulated and advanced by "scientific" (broadly construed) archaeology. In its most radical applications, indigenous archaeology sees "traditional" Western archaeological practice as the continuation of centuries of imperialism rooted in the physical appropriation of the past. Advocates of "scientific" archaeology, of course, argue that the miracle of the Western scientific approach to disciplines is that the theories, methods, and conclusions are universal and universalizing. This makes it possible, in their view, for Western archaeologists to contribute to a universal understanding of an indigenous past. Indigenous archaeologists (perhaps more properly the advocates of indigenous archaeology) argue that Western archaeological practice developed from profoundly different understandings of time, the past, and material culture which preclude representing indigenous pasts in ways that do not intentionally undermine indigenous practices at the expense of Western values.</p> <p>I've maintained (even occasionally on this blog) that the notion of indigenous practice is no limited to groups traditionally represented (by the West) as indigenous, but that we are all indigenous to someplace. As silly as this seems, this simple notion allows us to re-position European practice as not simply Western and imperialist and, frankly, "bad," but as indigenous as well. This has obvious parallels with <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/provincializing-europe-postcolonial-thoughtand-historical-difference/">Chakrabarty's ideas of provincializing Europe</a> and undermines the oppositional character of both the West (to the East or to the "other") and the "indigenous" as categories. In other words, Western practices are indigenous too.</p> <p>The problem becomes, however, that scholars traditionally understand Western archaeological practices through the lens of historical analysis and in the "context" of specific historical developments. As a result, the methods involved in understanding and writing this history of archaeological practices draw upon the same basic intellectual frameworks and methods that inform Western archaeological practices themselves. From a theoretical and methodological perspective, this creates a kind of circular analogy whereby western archaeology is understood only through the western practice of history. Ironically, perhaps, this circularity is liberating inasmuch as this same circularity besets

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traditionally identified indigenous practices as well which often find draw upon "indigenous" models for understanding the past to validate and authorize particular archaeological practices.</p> <p>Where does all this leave Byzantium? This is what I am beginning to attempt to work out:</p> <p>Byzantium clearly possessed an indigenous archaeology which manifest itself through dream inspired excavations, the use of <i>spolia</i>, the practice of <i>inventio</i> (the rediscovery of lost sacred objects) and <i>translatio</i> (the transfer of sacred objects from one place to the next), and the practice of renovation, refurbishment, and reconstruction. All of these practices represent particular views of the material past that contribute to a broader understanding of Byzantine history and Byzantine culture. (I've documented some of these practices <a href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/30697799/Caraher-Dream-Archaeology2010">here</a> and <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=U2KXRCJ3gq8C&amp;lpg=PP1&amp;dq=Gregory%2 0Caraher%20Medieval%20Post%20Medieval&amp;pg=PA267#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false"> here</a>). These practices represent profoundly Byzantine attitudes to the past, to material culture, and to significant (and sacred) places in their world. These practices remain embedded within persistent sacred narratives and continue to produce meaningful landscapes. All of this suggests that these indigenous archaeological practice continue to function and inform social behavior on some level.</p> <p>Moreover, the persistence of a kind of "Byzantine archaeology" suggests that discrete pre-modern <i>archaeological</i> practices existed in the West and produced meaningful landscapes. In other words, "Western" practice is neither historically unified, exclusively modern, nor even necessarily exclusionary. Western archaeology in all of its modern, disciplinary, manifestations nevertheless circulates in a world of archaeological practices that continuously challenge it exclusive right to produce meaning. Byzantine and other archaeologies that exist at the margins of disciplinary practice present important avenues for the revitalization of archaeology as a discipline. Not only do these practices demonstrate the potential for differing forms of archaeological knowledge of co-exist, but also reinforce the historical, religious, and even irrational influences on the seemingly universalizing methods of modern archaeological research.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Medieval and Post Medieval Archaeology of the Mediterranean - 2011 Archaeological Institute of America Colloquium STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1

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BASENAME: medieval-and-post-medieval-archaeology-of-the-mediterranean---2011archaeological-institute-of-america-colloquium CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Conferences CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: Late Antiquity CATEGORY: Medieval and Post Medieval Greece Interest Group of the AIA DATE: 05/18/2010 07:15:05 AM ----BODY: <p>I just heard the good news that the Medieval and Post-Medieval Interest Group of the AIA has had a panel accepted at the 2011 AIA.&nbsp; The proposal is from David Pettegrew (the Interest Group president from 2008-2010) and Amelia Brown (current president 2010-).&nbsp; I'll post updates on the panel including the abstracts for the papers and hopefully the podcasts of the actual panel over at our <a href="http://pendentive.wordpress.com/">Pendentive Blog</a>.&nbsp; </p> <p>Here's the abstract for the entire colloquium session and the paper titles.&nbsp; Looks like a great panel.</p> <p>"Travel to Greece between Antiquity and the Grand Tour"</p> <p>Two sets of travel texts have consistently formed the backdrop to archaeological interpretations of ancient Greek sites and landscapes: Pausanias's 2nd-century Description of Greece and early modern accounts of western Europeans, who themselves often wrote with an awareness of Pausanias. Throughout most of the 20th century, archaeologists attempted to relate these texts to the new discoveries of excavation and survey, while in very recent years scholars have sought to understand these accounts, and the landscapes they represent, in terms of their particular social and intellectual contexts. In general, however, there has been very little research on travel to Greece between Pausanias and the start of the Grand Tour, despite the growing recognition that interregional communication continued uninterrupted between the 3rd and 17th centuries, both in Greece and in the Mediterranean more broadly. Indeed, the textual evidence for Late Antique, Byzantine, and Ottoman travel to Greece is greater than is often realized as historians, geographers, imperial functionaries, sailors, merchants, students, Hellenes, Christian pilgrims, monks, ‘barbarian invaders,’ refugees, pirates, Crusaders, knights, and armies, among many others, visited the peninsula and islands of Greece. It is true that most of these travelers did not (or even could not) record their visits to Greek lands in writing, but the extant textual evidence is not insubstantial. Some educated travelers followed ancient writers and prefigured the Grand Tourists by recording their interest in the monuments of classical antiquity while others ignored the classical past and sought places associated with St. Paul and Christian holy men and women, or viewed sites unaware of either Christian or classical pasts.&nbsp; The textual evidence itself exists in the context of an ever-expanding body of material culture of Late Antique to Ottoman date produced by both urban excavation and regional survey. In this colloquium, we analyze the varied written sources for different kinds of travel into, within, and around Greece between the 3rd and 17th centuries together with the regional archaeological evidence to illuminate landscapes from Late Antiquity to the Ottoman era. Our goal is to combine both kinds of evidence to better understand post-antique travel and the sites and landscapes visited before the Early Modern era.</p> <p><em>Papers</em><br>"Intellectuals on the Isthmus of Greece,"<br>David K. Pettegrew, Messiah College</p> <p>"Christian Pilgrimage to Byzantine Corinth,"<br>Amelia R. Brown, University of Queensland</p> <p>"Two Italian Travelers on Karpathos in 1923 and c 1423, and an archaeological explanation for Sorzadori,"<br>D.J. Ian Begg, Trent

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University</p> <p>“'To tell you something very special': Cyriaco of Ancona in Greece,”<br>Diana Gilliland Wright, Independent Scholar</p> <p>"Athens through Ottoman Eyes."<br>Pierre A. MacKay, University of Washington</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Monday: Reflections on the End of a Year STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-monday-reflections-on-the-end-of-a-year CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 05/17/2010 09:06:13 AM ----BODY: <p>As I work to get my final grades together for the Spring semester, I leafed back through my teaching notebook and began to think a bit about how to change my classes next semester. (I've already blogged at some length about <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/05/te aching-with-twitter-an-interim-report.html">my Twitter experiment this semester</a>). I have to good fortune of teaching the same classes almost every semester, so I have a nicely iterative environment to experiment. This also allows me to chart trends over multiple semesters and make observations about the kind of variation present in my classes.</p> <p>So for this semester, I have five observations:</p> <p>1. Three years ago, I started a multiple-guess option for my History 101: Western Civilization class. I allowed the students to opt into a full multiple guess test, a half-multiple guess and half essay, or an all essay exam. At this time, I created a fairly robust test bank and revised my lectures to ensure that I hit on the answer for each question. Eventually, I recorded these lectures and podcasts (more on this later). Each semester, I add a few questions to the test and cycle a few questions out basically at random. Over the past three years, most students answer each question correctly. That is to say, that over 50% of the students answer the questions right and the average grade on the multiple guess sections hovered around 60%. I haven't done more sophisticated statistical analyses on these questions, but it never ceases to amaze me that students' responses do not pattern more clearly.</p> <p>2. Attendance woes. Students do not come to my classes. I probably average less than 60% attendance in my larger 100 level night class and less than 70% in my midlevel, majors class. I've tried all sorts of tricks to get students to attend. In other words, I've incentivized student attendance, but I need to do it better. This is absurd on some level: I use incentives to make students want to do something that they have paid to do. Generally, these incentives have a pedagogical goal. In my large lecture class we do a series of in-class writing

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assignments focusing on the use of primary source readings. Some of these are individual writing assignments (which tend to put pressure on individuals to do the reading and come to class prepared), some are small group assignments (which force students to pool their preparation and resources), and some are large group assignments (which encourage students to hash out the best answers from a group of with similar levels of preparation). These in-class writing assignments are facilitated by myself and my teaching assistant, focused on building the skills required in the short paper and on the essay sections in the exam, and contribute to a discussion grade that is worth 30% of their final grade. Despite the grade and pedagogical incentive to come to class students still skip in remarkable numbers. The reasons are similar: the class is too long (it's a 2:20 minute night class), they work, they can listen to versions of the lectures as podcasts, they are busy with other classes, and my class competes with <i>Lost</i>. The defeatist in me sees the reasons for cutting class as being deeply embedded in student culture (here?), but part of me thinks that I can find the right combination of incentives and penalties to break student resistance to attending class.</p> <p>3. Podcasts are the new textbook. Two years ago, I transitioned from using textbooks to using my own podcasts to provide basic narrative for my class. I did this for three reasons. First, podcasts could serve both my in-class and my online class . Second, textbooks are really expensive and even though most of my 101 students sold their textbooks back at the end of the semester, I was skeptical that the use of the book was worth the money that the students paid. Finally, I had this strange idea that students would find it easier to listen to podcasts than to read a textbook. While there is no disputing that podcasts serve my online teaching well and that they are free, students -- according to my very informal poll -- did not find my podcasts any more appealing than a textbook. In fact, many of the students admitted to not listening to them at all. This surprised me as I had tried to use the podcasts to turn class time in a more dynamic space where I could talk about big, conceptual issues in the history of the West and spend time focusing on class writing. The result, however, seems to have been that many students felt that the podcasts were as good as my lectures and opted to neither attend my lecture nor listen to the podcasts. Yikes.</p> <p>4. Drafts. I used to be a big advocate of students writing multiple drafts of papers. In fact, I structured an entire class midlevel history class around this practice. In the best case scenarios, students would diligently work to improve a manuscript focusing on various different skills in each version and eventually produce a sophisticated and polished final draft. In the most-case scenario, students would work hard on one draft of the paper - either the first or more often the last - and temporize with the rest making insignificant edits, cosmetic fixes, or (most annoyingly) only those changes that I recommended explicitly. So, this year I did away with multiple drafts and instead assigned multiple, different, unrelated, short papers each of which focused on developing a particular skill set: focused thesis, citation formats, good prose, et c. The final paper of the semester required the students to bring together these skills into a single paper. The result: well, as a group, these papers were no way worse than the results from papers for which I required multiple drafts.</p> <p>This got me wondering if the formal process of producing drafts particularly completed, substantial, and relatively polished drafts - was an artifact of older technologies and practices which focused on the production of relatively complete texts which were then subjected to editing. This made sense in a world where handwritten texts had to have a degree of polish to be legible and type-written texts involved a significant commitment of time and energy. As a result, drafting involved the creating of relatively work-intensive texts,

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which were then only re-produced after receiving substantial editing. Today, producing a text is relatively easy (as this blog undoubtedly shows!). Editing can be performed on the fly, printing is a separate and fairly easy process, and as a result we focus less on creating distinct versions of a paper and more on the malleability of the text-always-in-revision. In this environment submitting a copy of a text for critique marks the end of the editing processes, during which time the text exists on screen or on scrap papers, rather than in a polished format suitable for circulation.</p> <p>5. Process versus Product. Along similar lines, I have included components of my classes that focus on process. A colleague here uses journaling as a way to capture parts of the intellectual process. I've been using an old-school threaded discussion board where I post weekly discussion questions. The students do not discuss the questions as much as write short reflections on the discussions questions supported with evidence from the primary source readings for that week. Mostly these short reflections are poorly considered, historically problematic, or logically flawed. Despite that, the students nevertheless write around 3000 words a semester and strive over 15 weeks to write using historical sources as evidence. I've defended these short assignment, which I evaluate on a 5 point scale, as ways to get the students write and useful contributions to my goal of having students write 5000 words a semester in an introductory level class. What I need to do now is set up a way to evaluate whether these short assignments are successful in making the students better writers or whether they merely reinforce poor writing practices.</p> <p>By noon today, I will have submitted my grades and dust will largely have settled from another semester. Hopefully, I'll have some new ideas by the time the fall semester rolls around.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Amalia T EMAIL: amalia.stankavage@gmail.com IP: 75.27.145.208 URL: http://hellia.blogspot.com DATE: 05/17/2010 02:50:04 PM In regard to multiple drafts, I think you might be on to something. Not to say that writing and rewriting are not important (as I know far too well, even if I never believed it in college), but we do much more editing and revision during the writing process now than we could have done before. Recently I went back to handwriting for a novel and I realized just how much I depended on and utilized the delete key during my writing process. At least a third of every page was crossed out as I wrote and edited and changed my thoughts mid sentence. It is so easy to erase and correct, backtrack and rewrite, that even a first draft will have been edited multiple times during the process of putting it together.

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That being said, academic writing and fiction writing aren't the same, and the process of marshaling argument is a little bit more complex than storytelling, but writing is still writing when all is said and done. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.192.225 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 05/17/2010 03:04:53 PM Amalia, Actually, I think that academic writing and fiction writing are very similar in terms of process. And I think that the changes that are taking place now in how the process works (and is taught) are relevant in both spheres! Bill -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quck Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quck-hits CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 05/14/2010 07:48:47 AM ----BODY: <p>It's the last Friday of finals' week and my stack of grading has reached imaginable proportions. So, there's plenty of time for a Friday varia and quick hits. Plus, it's sunny for the first time in weeks.</p> <ul> <li>I succumbed to peer pressure and have <a href="http://und.academia.edu/WilliamCaraher">an academia.edu page</a>. I'm not sure what it will do for me, but I have it. Two people follow me.</li> <li>I'm pretty amused by all <a href="http://mashable.com/2010/05/12/anotheriphone-4g-found/">these "lost" Apple 4th generation iPhones</a>. I am not sure why it is taking so long for people to figure out that it's a viral marketing campaign. Do you think that they might have learned to appreciate these tactics from the sustained pre-iPad buzz which surely contributed to the significant sales bounce in the first few weeks of its release?</li> <li>Home grown tech 'n' teaching blogger Mark Grabe <a href="http://learningaloud.com/blog/2010/05/14/simple-is-good-posterous-issimple/">writes a bit about</a> and <a href="http://grabe.posterous.com/">on Posterous this week</a>.</li> <li>I received my <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Archaeological-TheoryIntroduction-Matthew-Johnson/dp/140510015X/">Second Edition of Matthew Johnson's Archaeological Theory</a> today. Weekend reading.</li>

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<li>I like messed around a bit with the <a href="http://www.zotero.org/blog/zotero-maps-visualize-your-zotero-library-onthe-globe/">new Zotero mapping plug-in</a> (yep, even plug-ins have plug-ins) and I like what <a href="http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com/2010/05/12/zotero-mapsvisualizing-archaeology/">Shawn Graham observes</a> regarding the potential to map things from, say, an <a href="http://opencontext.org/">OpenContext.org</a> or Omeka database.</li> <li>I spent a few hours a day over the last few days playing around with <a href="http://rapid-i.com/content/view/181/190/">RapidMiner</a>. It's pretty cool.</li> <li>If you haven't checked out <a href="http://en.wordpress.com/tag/firstyear-reflections/">our series of reflection from first year faculty</a> at the University of North Dakota, you need to hop over the <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/" title="Teaching Thursday">Teaching Thursday</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://store.apple.com/us/browse/home/shop_mac/family/macbook_pro?mco=MTM3 NDczMzg">I ordered a new Macbook Pro</a>. I'm going down to 15 inches. With cheap and large monitors these days, I no longer see the need for the 17 inch laptop.</li> <li>Australia v. Pakistan in the World T20 Final Four, and England looms on the horizon, and Monte Carlo. A good weekend for sport.</li> </ul> <p>That's all I can think of off the top of my head this sunny Friday morning. The prospects of finishing grading, cleaning up my office, and taking a week to reflect and prepare for Cyprus are amazingly appealing right now.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Diana Wright EMAIL: dianagwright@comcast.net IP: 76.104.197.147 URL: http://surprisedbytime.blogspot.com DATE: 05/14/2010 08:43:02 AM "William added themselves to the department Department of History" So nice to see grammar as an essential part of academic webbing. -----

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COMMENT: AUTHOR: Chuck JonesEMAIL: cejo@uchicago.edu IP: 128.122.167.53 URL: http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.com/ DATE: 05/14/2010 09:09:02 AM Upload some of your articles to acadermia.edu to see what it can do for you -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Random Art returns to O'Kelly Hall STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: random-art-returns-to-okelly-hall CATEGORY: Departmental History at UND CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes CATEGORY: North Dakotiana DATE: 05/13/2010 07:59:45 AM ----BODY: <p>I've documented on this blog the work to renovate the second floor of O'Kelly Hall where the Department of History now resides. Most of this has come from a well-meaning, but misguided efforts to impose corporate order on a creative space. (For more see <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/02/ok elly-graffiti-under-erasure.html">here</a> and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/09/fr om-merrifield-to-okelly.html">here</a> and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/08/ma king-the-professional-office.html">here</a>)</p> <p>So, I was ecstatic yesterday morning to see the first reappearing of public art in the newly renovated second floor of O'Kelly. It appeared above the wood "accent line", in a little awkward space below the sloping ceiling of a stair well. It's a modest start. I have no idea who did it. But it is fantastic to see something public and creative in the newly sanitized O'Kelly hall way.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ed89d7cb970b -pi" width="200" height="334" alt="201005130746.jpg" />&nbsp;&nbsp;<img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ed89d7d3970b -pi" width="200" height="334" alt="201005130752.jpg" />&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: left;">I feel myself becoming more creative and less corporate already. Now back to grading.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS:

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-----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Pyla Koutsopetria 2010 Newsletter STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: pyla-koutsopetria-2010-newsletter CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project DATE: 05/12/2010 08:41:38 AM ----BODY: <p>One of the casualties of this year's hectic schedule was the PylaKoutsopetria Archaeological Project Newsletter. Each year, the PKAP directors produced the venerable newsletter and printed it out, in color no less, on paper. But this year, with <a href="http://www.chss.iup.edu/rsmoore/">Scott Moore</a> being department chair in History at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, <a href="http://home.messiah.edu/~dpettegrew/">David Pettegrew</a> frantically working on two books with a newborn in the house, and my typical hectic schedule (with seems somewhat lame in comparison), the newsletter did not appear in paper form.</p> <p>But, we'd be remiss if we didn't keep our PKAP Public appraised of our winter work and summer plans.</p> <p><b><i>Summer 2009</i></b></p> <p>The 2009 field season was our most successful to date. Our main focus was our continued work on a series of soundings at Pyla-<i>Vigla</i> and Pyla<i>Kokkinokremos</i>. On Vigla, <b>Prof. Dimitri Nakassis</b> assisted by David Pettegrew and <b>Brandon Olson</b> (Penn State) directed soundings designed to establish the date of the fortification wall discovered in 2007 and to try to learn more about the maze of walls across the interior of the plateau. While we were not able to date the fortifications with any precision despite moving over 2 m of earth, we were able to establish that the structures across the interior of the Vigla plateau were most likely domestic in nature and had an important phase dating to the Hellenistic period. <b>Michael Brown</b> and <b>Dr. Sarah Costello</b> (University of Houston) opened two soundings on Pyla<i>Kokkinokremos</i> in an effort to continued to clarify the function, chronology, and organization of this Late Bronze Age site. Michael directed the research at this site and it will appear in his University of Edinburgh dissertation which should be completed this summer. We also returned to excavations at Pyla-<i>Koutsopetria</i> which had been begun almost 20 years earlier by <b>Dr. Maria Hadicosti</b>. We sought to determine the phasing and chronology of a collapsed room apparently associated with an Early Christian basilica complex. <b>Dr. Sarah Lepinski</b> and graduate student <b>Dallas Deforest</b> (Ohio State) expanded two earlier trenches and revealed multiple episodes of destruction and repair at the site.</p> <p>We could not have accomplished our work across all three sites without the help of a gaggle of Messiah College undergraduates: <b>Melissa, Becky, Kyle, Nick, Courtney, Rachel, Caitlin, Matt,</b> and the inimitable <b>Alex</b>. This group was joined by <b>Jon Crowley</b>, a three year PKAP veteran from IUP and <b>Paul Ferderer</b> a graduate student from UND.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013480b717a6970c -pi" width="480" height="319" alt="201005120837.jpg" /></p>

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<p>We also had the assistance of <b>Prof. Beverly Chairulli</b> and her remarkable Ground Penetrating Radar rig. While we still await the final results of her work at Vigla and across a series of survey units with high density artifact scatters some 300 m to the north of Vigla, we are optimistic that these will enable not only to discover new activity areas in the Pyla<i>Kousopetria</i> region, but also to show that our modest soundings represent small windows into the extensive and still unexcavated remains. By using GPR (along with earlier seasons of resistivity and intensive survey), we have been able to learn a significant amount of information about the sites in our region, while only excavating small areas.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013480b717b6970c -pi" width="480" height="240" alt="201005120749.jpg" /> <i><br /></i></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><b>Susan Caraher</b> worked not only in the field each day, but also collaborated with Sarah Costello to keep artifacts moving through processing at the museum storerooms in an orderly way. Without the care of our registrars data collected from the field would be lost. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>As anyone who follows this blog knows, we continued our Artist-in-Residence program with <b>Ryan Stander</b>, an M.F.A. student in photography from UND (for more on them see below!) . The video work of <b>Ian Ragsdale</b> complemented Ryan's spectacular photographs and we look forward to the third installment of the PKAP documentary series this coming fall!</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e2013480b71792970c -pi" width="480" height="360" alt="201005120800.jpg" /> <i><br /></i></p> <p>Last, but not least, graduate student <b>Dalton Little</b> (UND) worked with us as camp manager and cook bringing his own unique brand of cranky efficiency to the project. Ian's wife <b>Randi</b> also joined the PKAP team and helped with all manner of archaeological and child care related tasks necessary to keep the project running smoothly.</p> <p><b><i>Winter 2009-2010</i></b></p> <p>This has been a particularly hectic summer for most members of the PKAP team. Not only was Michael Brown frantically working to complete his dissertation, but rest of the PKAP team began the process of writing up the results of our 7 years of field work and study. As a result, we now have first drafts of 3 or 4 substantive chapters completed for the final publication of our work in the Pyla-Koutsopetria micro-region.<br /></p> <p>We also made significant strides in entering and processing the massive quantity of archaeological data recorded in the field over the past 7 seasons. A diligent group of interns keyed and collated data in the Working Group in Digital and New Media laboratory on the UND campus. As a result, we have completely digitized the results of our survey and our excavation notebooks. So, PKAP researchers can now access both images of the paper copies produced in the field and the keyed version of the same data into a relational database. Over next few months we hope to have the remainder of our finds keyed into our ever expan ding finds database, as well as the linked to our massive collection of both site and artifact photographs.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ed83c97c970b -pi" width="480" height="360" alt="201005120825.jpg" style="padding-bottom:0px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: left;">The winter of 2009-2010 also saw the exhibition of Topos/Chora, the work of Ryan Stander our artist-in-residence. Again helped by a team from the Working Group in Digital and New Media, we helped Ryan produce a gallery show at the Empire Arts Center in Grand Forks, but also created a more

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permanent online gallery of his photographs from Cyprus accompanied by a series of essays, podcast interviews, and a special trailer of Ian Ragsdale's forthcoming documentary. <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/exhibits/show/toposchora">Here's the link</a>.<br /></p> <p><i><b>Summer 2010</b></i><br /></p> <p>This summer, we plan to have much smaller team accompanying us to Cyprus. While we will still bring together students from Messiah College, IUP, and UND, and researchers from across the U.S. and Canada, we will focus our energies on completing the documentation of the finds from the various soundings excavated over the past 2 years. Scott who has played more of a supporting role the past few years will take center stage and direct the work at the Museum. Since Susan Caraher won't be joining us this year, this will involve not only setting research priorities, but also making sure that artifacts move through the museum in an orderly way.</p> <p>While this can sound like boring work (compared to the excitement of excavating), the chances of discovering something really exciting is, in fact, every bit as high. A single sherd can change the dating of an entire building and a link our small site on the Cypriot coast to trade networks that span the entire Mediterranean.</p> <p>As per usual, we'll keep the PKAP Public up-to-date with blog posts, tweets, and podcasts from the field. We'll make an announcement here when the our little army of bloggers begin to produce content again! So, stay tuned!&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Greece in Two Conferences STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: greece-in-two-conferences CATEGORY: Conferences CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: Late Antiquity CATEGORY: Notes From Athens DATE: 05/11/2010 08:10:51 AM ----BODY: <p>Here are two cool conferences to fire the imagination.</p> <p>First, the Gennadius library will host a conference entitled "Philhellenism, Philanthropy, or Political Convenience? American Archaeology in Greece" next week. The Gennadius web site provides information on <a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/archives/philhellenism-workshop-scope-

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and-content">the scope</a>, <a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/archives/philhellenism-workshoplist">the speakers</a>, and <a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/archives/philhellenism-workshopabstracts">the abstracts</a>. As one might expect the American School Director, Jack Davis, and the School's Archivist, Natalia Bogeikoff-Brogan, have assembled an impressive group to talk about the deeply intertwined phenomena of philanthropy, philhellenism, and archaeology. I suspect that the ongoing events in Greece will provide this conference with an even more urgent backdrop. (Also check out the <a href="http://www.ascsa.edu.gr/index.php/gennadius/eventDetails/mystrasidentities-and-perspectives/">one-day conference on Mistra</a> two days later!)</p> <p>Next fall, the University of Texas will host a conference called "<a href="https://webspace.utexas.edu/sjf365/CC3/Intro.html">Corinth in Contrast</a>". This is the third in a series of conferences focusing on the history and archaeological of Ancient Corinth. The first has appeared a book, called <i><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/urban-religion-in-romancorinth-interdisciplinary-approaches/">Urban Religion in Roman Corinth</a><span style="font-style: normal;">, and I suspect that the <a href="http://www.utexas.edu/research/pasp/corinth/index.html">second conference</a> is a forthcoming publication</span></i>. I am among those invited to give a paper which I have tentatively entitled, "The Ambivalent Landscape of Christian Corinth: the Archaeology of Place, Theology, and Politics in a Late Antique City". As the conference is centered around:</p> <blockquote> <p>"the polarities that we often use to characterize forms of inequality—urban/rural, male/female, Greek/Roman, rich/poor, pagan/Christian, Jew/Gentile, monotheist/polytheist, slave/free, high/low status, etc. Participants are also encouraged to move beyond these polarities by 1) bringing forward new data; 2) reexamining existing data; 3) showing connections between different forms of inequality; and/or 4) applying new methods or theories. The focus on Corinth should allow us to produce more nuanced appraisals and more complicated categories of analysis. "</p> </blockquote> <p>Since ambivalence is a viable opposite of polarity, I think I should be able to speak to the major themes of the conference.</p> <p>It's also exciting to see that there will be a PKAP contingent including David Pettegrew and Sarah Lepinski as well as Sarah James who is one of the conference's organizers and an honorary PKAP member by marriage. The CorinthKoutsopetria Axis is a intellectual alliance to be reckoned with!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching with Twitter: An Interim Report

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STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: teaching-with-twitter-an-interim-report CATEGORY: Teaching CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 05/10/2010 09:38:23 AM ----BODY: <p>I've just completed my first large scale experiments with integrating Twitter into my classroom. For those who don't regularly follow this blog, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/11/te aching-with-twitter-tuesday.html">I used Twitter in my 100 level Western Civilization at the University of North Dakota</a>. The class met once a week, at night, for two hours and twenty minutes. Most of the students are freshmen and sophomores, with a spattering of juniors and seniors typically in the hard sciences or engineering. The two biggest problems in the class are poor attendance (I am competing with Lost and, to be blunt, the class has a vigorous in-class writing component and perhaps not the most interesting lectures) and a tendency among students to disengage sometime over the course of the semester. Because the class meets only once a week and attendance is a struggle, students tend to disengage from the class and vanish into the night until the midterm or final forces them to re-engage, but at that point it is sometimes too late to get back into the swing of things, make up myriad missed assignment, and get a decent grade in what is otherwise a fairly easy class.</p> <p><i><span style="font-style: normal;">Twitter seemed one way to try to engage the students on the days when my one-day-a-week, 100 level class is probably the furthest thing from their minds. So, I created a Twitter page and began to Tweet regularly. Over the course of the semester, this account acquired 111 followers, all students in my class, or over 75% of all the students in the class. Signing up for Twitter was voluntary, although I motivated the students with a vague promise to make it work the 3 minutes necessary to sign up. Over the course of the semester, I posted 152 Tweets (approximately 10 per week) which represent both public tweets and responses to student tweets. I posted several scheduled tweets each week. Generally, I'd post a quick recap to the class on Wednesday, I'd post weekly announcements on Thursday, and on Friday I would post some kind of trivia questions on my world famous "Trivia Friday". 90% of the Tweets were directly concerning the class. The other 10% of the Tweets concerned campus activities or current events (e.g. the death of Guru, et c.) that touched loosely on classroom conversations.</span></i></p> <p>I also experimented with using Twitter to provide a back channel in class. Using weekly hashtags (#H101W3 = History 101 Week 3), I encouraged students in the lecture style class to post questions or comments during class. I then had an active version of <a href="http://www.tweetdeck.com/">Tweetdeck</a> on the classroom computer on which I could check students tweets or project them on the screen during my lecture. Most, if not all, of the students in the class have cell phones and many (perhaps 30%) had laptops in class.</p> <p>While I was not disappointed with the Twitter experiment -- after all it involved only a modest time commitment on my part (in general, a tweet took me less than 2 minutes to write so less than 20 minutes per week on average) -only a tiny fraction of my students embraced it and it did not appear to have any positive (or negative!) impact on the class. Here are some observations:</p>

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<p>1. UND Students are not on Twitter. While I did not sample the entire class, my random sample of 25 students show that only 5 of this group use Twitter in a regular way and I suspect that the number of regular Twitter users in my class is even lower. So, Twitter is not built into these students' information ecosystem. My morning routine involves starting Tweetdeck and scrolling quickly through my Tweets, but this seems unlikely to be the case for our students. As a result, Twitter appeared to the students as "something extra" and, as a result, an inconvenience rather than a helpful supplement to their already existing information network. As I have discussed elsewhere on this blog, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/05/gr ading-detroit-and-student-resistence.html">students resist anything that they see as a work increase</a>, even if we make clear how these additional "burdens" advance learning objectives.</p> <p>2. Shared Commitment. Twitter works best within a community of people with a shared commitment to engaging one another and the topics at hand. In other words, Twitter is not a particularly efficient tool for one-to-one communication between faculty and a student or it is at least no better than email. Twitter facilitates community interaction in which students can respond to one another or interact with each other in a public way. Because my class only met once a week in a lecture hall setting, had an prevalent lecture component, was rather large (100+), and encompassed a wide range of students of different academic years and standings, there was little existing community for Twitter to facilitate. As a result, students did not, in general, respond to each other, but penned tweets generally directed toward me and usually in response to a specific query. A parallel trend appears in my efforts to encourage the use of Blackboard's wiki tool to produce study guides and class notes. A few students work hard to create a nice set of notes, and the rest of the class become passive consumers. Despite the bribe of points, there is no shared commitment to the class that would support the collective effort to create a body of notes. Neither Twitter nor the Wiki is enough to create community.</p> <p>3. Techniques. Despite my efforts to give the students plenty of instruction on how to use Twitter, my students still struggled with things like hashtags (used to mark posts as belonging to a particular week or lecture), and we never used retweets or replies. This contributed to the one-way nature of the Twitter conversations especially as I was the only one responding to anyone in the class.</p> <p>4. Technology. Finally, students compartmentalize technology. Most of the tweets in my class come from "the web" which I assume means through either their desktop or laptop computer as opposed to a mobile device like a phone or smartphone. In other words, despite the recent concerted interest to integrate social media with mobile devices, very few tweets and almost none from first time Twitter users came from phones (either as text message or Android/WinMo based apps -- we do not have iPhones here in North Dakota). This was disappointing because I thought Twitter would be widely accessible from mobile phones and, as a result, sufficient democratized not to leave less technophilic students at a disadvantage. Another technological issue that arose was the slow speed of Twitter searches made it hard to capture Tweets on specific lectures during class time. As a result, students were not able to create a realtime back channel, but only one delayed by 10 to 15 minutes which over the course of a 2 hour class is significant.</p> <p>So, while my first experiments with Twitter in the class did not produce the social media plus education utopia that I had hoped, it did highlight certain weaknesses in the class as I now teach it. I need to work to create more of a community in the large lecture class if I want to tap into this community with tools like Twitter or wikis. These tools do not create the sense of community,

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but only serve to manage it. At the same time, I need to find ways to communicate the technical aspects of Twitter more effectively so that students can maximize the effectiveness of the medium.</p> <p>I am excited about the prospect of integrating Twitter into the online version of my Western Civilization I courses this fall and spring. Since the students already expect to interact with me and their fellow students through an online medium, there might be a greater sense of value assigned to the simple Twitter interface (as compared to the more cumbersome blackboard interface).</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 64.134.241.231 URL: http://kourelis.blogspot.com/ DATE: 05/10/2010 01:41:45 PM very interesting ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: sauerkraut EMAIL: IamSauerkraut@yahoo.com IP: 98.235.97.184 URL: http://run4chocolate.wordpress.com DATE: 05/20/2010 08:19:04 PM Many people do not use twitter from mobile devices because they believe it involved extra payment for data. At least that's been my experience. And some, ie, me, prefer the simplicity of tweeting from the docking station. There's too much other stuff which needs remembering besides the steps needed to get each app up and running, and working. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostas Arvanitis EMAIL: kostas.arvanitis@manchester.ac.uk IP: 82.6.78.121 URL: http://digitalheritage.wordpress.com DATE: 05/29/2010 06:55:58 AM Thanks for sharing this; very interesting indeed! -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits

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CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 05/07/2010 09:13:57 AM ----BODY: <p>It's a rainy and maybe even snowy Friday morning for my Varia.</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://mattgemmell.com/2010/04/26/creative-space-and-ipad">This is a cool review of the iPad</a>, and this makes me feel just <a href="http://mashable.com/2010/05/06/ipad-owner-demographics/">a bit guilt about owning one</a>.</li> <li>ProfHacker always <a href="http://chronicle.com/blogPost/How-to-GradeStudents-Class/23726/">has clever, interesting, and useful stuff</a>. Although I think their <a href="http://chronicle.com/blogPost/Open-Thread-Wednesday/23448/">Open Thread Wednesday</a>, should be Open Thread Thursday.</li> <li><a href="http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/athens_greece">The events in Greece this past week</a> (really this past year) are really sad and stressful. I hope that the country finds ways a way out of its difficult time with a minimum of violence and in a way that is equitable for all of Greek society. (And I do realize that this statement is banal and a cop-out)</li> <li>While I write this, I'm listening to Australia v. India, and <a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/world-twenty202010/engine/current/match/412691.html">Australia is off to a good start</a>. (Right now, Australia has launched three balls outside of the grounds, but Shane Watson just got out.)</li> <li>I'm tempted to try to figure out <a href="http://prezi.com/">an excuse to use Prezi</a>.</li> <li>I'm pretty happy with my new HTC Incredible, but Android will take some getting used to. I can't quite figure out how to integrate Google Docs with Android yet. Any tips?</li> <li>I keep forgetting to post a link to this good, local blog: <a href="http://philosophyinpubliclife.blogspot.com/">Philosophical Questions Every Day</a>.</li> <li>A nice short post on <a href="http://mygradspace.wordpress.com/2010/05/04/social-networks-and-highereducation-whos-doing-it/">Social Networks and Higher Ed with a local focus</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://nickname.und.edu/logo/">More on the Logo and Nickname</a> (and this will be endless). The good thing is that there will be more committees.</li> <li><a href="http://media.twitter.com/blackbird-pie/">We can now experiment with embedding tweets in blog posts</a>.</li> <li>If you haven't checked out <a href="http://en.wordpress.com/tag/firstyear-reflections/">our new series of blog posts on Teaching Thursday</a> featuring the reflections of first year faculty here at UND, you should.</li>

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<li>This is reading and review day!</li> </ul><!-- end of tweet --> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: First Year Reflections at Teaching Thursday STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: first-year-reflections-at-teaching-thursday CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 05/06/2010 07:58:42 AM ----BODY: <p>I'm going to shift the attention from my blog to <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/" title="Teaching Thursday">Teaching Thursday</a> where we will begin a series of posts by first year faculty at the University of North Dakota. These posts capture both the energy of first year faculty, but also (and more importantly) the new perspectives on how to teach on our campus.</p> <p>The last few weeks have been really productive for the Teaching Thursday "team" (which is basically me). We've come up with some great ideas for the blog new year that will see it expand from one day a week to a new goal of 10 posts a month. But for that Teaching Thursday excitement, stay tuned.</p> <p>For now, head over to <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/" title="Teaching Thursday">Teaching Thursday</a> and check out the first post of our <a href="http://en.wordpress.com/tag/first-year-reflections/">First Year Reflections</a> series.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Islands in the Corinthian Gulf: Some Archaeological Data

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STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: islands-in-the-corinthian-gulf-some-archaeological-data CATEGORY: Thisvi-Kastorion Archaeological Project DATE: 05/05/2010 02:48:31 PM ----BODY: <p>Over the last few days, I've taken a break from my normal routine to key in data collected by the Ohio Boeotia Expedition from the island of Kouveli in the Gulf of Domvrena on the northern coast of the Corinthian Gulf near the site of Thisvi. The results of the work by the OBE on the islands in the Gulf of Domvrena have appeared in scattered publications with the most substantial publications appearing in a volume of the <em>DXAE </em>and <em>Byzantine Studies </em>(<a href="http://www.zotero.org/billcaraher/items/126637709">here</a> and <a href="http://www.zotero.org/billcaraher/items/126638161">here</a>)</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ed475055970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="image" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ed4750d5970b -pi" width="400" height="307"></a> </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ed475199970 b-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="image" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348079b527970c -pi" width="400" height="307"></a> </p> <p align="left">This continues my work to move the data collected over the course of the Ohio Boeotia Expedition to digital form.&nbsp; As with the earlier data, I keyed the data into an Access database that will, hopefully, eventually, feed into the transect data from the survey of the island of Kouveli stored in a GIS.&nbsp; Right now, however, all I have is the finds data.</p> <p align="left">Despite the lack of a spatial component, I think that I can make some modest observations about the character of the data collected from this survey.&nbsp; In Gregory's 1986 publication, he reports that he surveyed 138,000 m2 with a sample area of 207 m2.&nbsp; This produced 494 artifacts (and an overall density of 2.39 m2 or an imposing 23,864 artifacts per ha).&nbsp; That is impressive artifact density despite the relatively small sample.&nbsp; Of these 494 articles, we have records from at some 320 of artifacts that were at least read in a preliminary way and the majority of these artifacts (60%) were assigned a chronology -- albeit in small handful of cases this chronology was as broad as "Ancient".&nbsp; As Gregory noted in publication, the vast majority of artifacts date to the Late Roman to Byzantine period.&nbsp; The assemblage was predominantly coarse and utility wares, particularly combed, spirally grooved, and wheel ridged body sherds which likely derived from storage or transport vessels.&nbsp; There was also a significant number of cooking posts and a light scatter of fineware including a piece of (LRC) Phocaean Ware from 10 and other, perhaps regionally produced, red glazed sherds in table ware forms like plates.&nbsp; It's striking to note that over 54% of the identified sherds were body sherds rather than more traditional feature sherds like rims, handles, and bases.</p> <p align="left">Also interesting is the quantity of later material on this rather rough and rugged island.&nbsp; The Byzantine period is substantially represented and some of the

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relatively "late" late Roman artifacts - datable to the 7th century AD for example - suggests evidence for continuity of use between the Late Antiquity and Byzantium.&nbsp; While a closer analysis of the material from the island is necessary to determine function, it would appear that Byzantine finewares are more recognizable in the assemblage,particularly brown and green glazed ware, chaffing dishes and bowls, and at least one piece of Constantinopolitan white slip. (It would be romantic to see this sherd as the ragged fringe of the prosperous ties between Boeotia and the Capital in the Middle Byzantine period).</p> <p align="left">Even later still, it appear there was some Ottoman period activity on this island as "Turkish" period glazed wares appear in the assemblage.&nbsp; It will be very useful to correlate this material with recent studies of Ottoman period activities on the nearby mainland.&nbsp; The presence of table ware on the island suggests that activity on the island was more than simply episodic exploitation and might suggest more sustained habitation.&nbsp; Even into the modern period small quantities of table ware appear alongside other evidence of modern activities like shell-casings.&nbsp; </p> <p align="left">Most striking of all, perhaps, is that dearth of clearly identified earlier material especially compared the seemingly vigorous landscapes of the nearby mainland.&nbsp; Unlike the hinterlands of Thisvi or, further east, Thespiae, there is apparently no evidence for Classical and Hellenistic period activity on the island and very little evidence for activities from the Roman period.&nbsp; Even a relatively rugged island, then, seems to show signs of the Late Roman economic and demographic boom in Greece.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Blogging and Being Local STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: blogging-and-being-local CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes CATEGORY: North Dakotiana CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 05/04/2010 08:20:58 AM ----BODY: <p>This past week, a public records request went out on campus for all of our syllabi for the Spring and Fall 2010. My first thought was: if they really want my syllabi or to have an idea what I am teaching in my classes they should just go to my blog or web site. Putting aside the inefficiency of doing that for every faculty member across campus, it made me think a bit about how blogging made our work at the university more transparent and how important this could be in a day-in-age when the university, and public education more broadly, is under

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the duel threat of declining resources and elevated (and perhaps unrealistic) expectations.</p> <p>I was asked some months ago by a person in our admissions office here, what is was, exactly, that I did. After recovering briefly from the shock that this person would not be intimately familiar with my brilliant academic career (cough, cough), I tried to explain why it was that I needed to be in my office over the weekend and what it meant when I said that I was swamped by data.</p> <p>More recently, I've encouraged my public history students to write <a href="http://webmuseweavers.wordpress.com/">a blog, and they have, more or less, here</a>. One of the blog posts considers the difficulty in understanding community in the age of internet and easy travel. We tend to imagine communities that revolve around shared values or even experiences rather than any physical proximity. As a result, it is not only possible, but likely that someone in the admissions office here would not know what people at the university did even though they worked less than 200 m from their offices. On the other hand, it is likely that this individual knows well what folks in the admission offices at other universities around the country or the world do.</p> <p>Finally, there is a recent initiative on campus to engage more fully with the local community. This is partially a response to the flap over the name and logo here, but it may also be a genuine effort to bridge the gap between the "town and gown" and to recognize our common ground and our shared resources</p> <p>These conversations got me thinking about how my blogs function within our spatially local community and whether they serve as a point of contact between people here in Grand Forks, in North Dakota or even just at my home university. <a href="http://lancasterarchitecture.wordpress.com/">A blog</a> authored by a class offered by Kostis Kourelis, for example, has succeeded in helping bridge the gap between his home university (Franklin and Marshall College) and t<a href="http://articles.lancasteronline.com/local/4/252906">he community in Lancaster</a>. My blog -- with its tendency to focus on Mediterranean archaeology -- has not captured the public attention as effectively.</p> <p><a href="http://teachingthursday.org/" title="Teaching Thursday">Teaching Thursday</a>, on the other hand, was explicitly designed for the University of North Dakota community tends to be read as much by folks elsewhere as by folks here on campus. While this accomplishes the goal of improving the transparency of university level teaching methods, it does not necessarily present what is happening here on campus in a way that is of interest to the local community or in a way that attracts to community's attention.</p> <p>Recent interest in geolocating and enhanced reality as major additions to the social media arsenal will certainly improve our ability to local our blogs spatially. Services like <a href="http://foursquare.com/">Foursquare</a> already leverage the social network of Twitter and GPS receivers built into new mobile phones to establish spatially local connections on the internet. Enhanced reality applications like <a href="http://www.layar.com/">Layar</a> enables an individual to view a very simple "enhanced reality" and a GIS interface updated in real time to view the social media, local businesses, and even tags left by other users embedded in space. In the near future, people will be able to locate our blogs spatially and use space to mark out a relationship to a community. In fact, our ability to localize our blogs will make it easier (it is, of course, possible now) to demonstrate (or even produce) relationships between the specific place where the blog is located (or composed, hosted, or even "anchored") and places discussed by the blogger.</p> <p>The advantage of our ability to embed our blogs within real, lived space is that we will be better able to recognize the place of the new media in relation to our local selves. Our work will continue to be available and of interest to anyone with access to the World Wide Interwebs, but we'll better be able to

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localize ourselves spatially and demonstrate the global links present in to our local, lived, communities.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Grading, Detroit, and Student Resistence STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: grading-detroit-and-student-resistence CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 05/03/2010 08:43:22 AM ----BODY: <p>Last week I juxtaposed reading <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/detroit-i-do-mind-dying/oclc/39157532">D. Georgakas' and M. Surkin's <i>Detroit: I do mind dying</i></a> (New York 1975) and grading a stack of lower division undergraduate papers. This got me thinking back to some posts from a couple months ago where I speculated that students disregard particular sets of instructions as a form of resistance. Georgakas and Surkin's work looks at the organization of resistance particularly among minority (mostly African-American) auto workers in Detroit in the late 1960s and early 1970s. They explore the rhetorical of the day and demonstrate the pervasive overlap between developing radical ideologies and the institutions and realities which promoted these positions. In their hands, grass-roots resistance to the dangerous, unrewarding, and soul-crushing work on the Detroit assembly line became the foundations for a genuine radical consciousness.</p> <p>I am not going to argue that our students are on a course to a radical consciousness through their resistance to what they perceive to be an oppressive educational regime, but I will suggest that some of the patterns of student behaviors are sufficiently consistent to be regarded - from the perspective of behavior alone - as resistance. I'll admit that my sample is small, but to my mind this has the benefit of capturing the "situatedness" of the acts of resistance. Moreover, I'll contend that the forms of resistance are not merely the gap between teaching and learning that is typical of educational environments.</p> <p>Over the last three weeks, I've encountered three forms of resistance.</p> <p>1. The contraction. I insist that students do not use contractions in their writing. As a result, contractions have proliferated. They are particularly common in the opening paragraphs of papers.</p> <p>2. Capitalization. I have begged students to observe the rules of capitalization and even conceded the "obscure" rules like whether to capitalize proper terms like "the crusades". As a result, students have stopped

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capitalizing proper names, names of cities, and in some cases, even the first person pronoun.</p> <p>3. Attendance. Over the last three weeks, I asked the students in my lower division, major's course, to make it appoint to attend the final month of the semester where we will workshop writing and focus on preparing the final paper. The next class, my attendance dropped by over 60% and the following three weeks attendance was at its lowest point ever. Despite having taught for close to a decade, I can't help feeling that asking students to attend constituted a kind of rookie mistake.</p> <p>All three of these issues are not earthshaking forms of resistance. My students do not (as a rule) plagiarize, are polite and (generally) conscientious, do not complain in class about workload or teaching philosophy, and are as engaged in the learning process as you might expect students to be at the 100 and 200 level. In other words, their reluctance to follow seemingly simple guidelines are not symptomatic of an adversarial relationship between "management" and "labor". Instead, I am regarding these measures as lines in the sand gestures marking off the limits of my authority and the students' willingness to embrace my expectations. I suspect that I could get students to follow these guidelines with draconian measures (by definition out of the proportion to the significance of the rule being enforced), but I suspect that this would just displace student resistance elsewhere (which in the case of class attendance would probably be a good thing).</p> <p>In short, I've come to expect resistance to certain policies, and have noted that they tend to coalesce around more marginal educational goals rather than core concepts of the course. This distinguishes it from the various large-scale union actions documented by Georgakas and Surkin, and places student resistance in another category of resistance in which various kinds of work-slowdowns and almost bureaucratized obstructions establish the limits of engagement in shared goals.</p> <p>Of course identifying places and types of resistance places faculty in the potentially awkward position of seeing themselves as negotiators in the learning process between the content (and expectations of whatever groups manage the measurable learning outcome) and the student who ultimately the the final arbiter in whether any learning expectation is reasonable. While we have seen over the past few months the worse case scenario, when entire faculties (at the secondary level) are let go after failing to negotiate the divergent expectations successfully. At the university level, where students are adults, student resistance must be taken serious and articulated as active behavior with the potential to disrupt both the expectations of management and, ultimately, if not resolved, the functioning of society and the economy.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Assorted Things STATUS: Publish

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ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: assorted-things CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 04/30/2010 09:43:50 AM ----BODY: <p>So, if you missed my talk yesterday, you can read it <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/an other-better-attempt-at-dream-archaeology.html">here</a>.</p> <p>And, if you missed a pretty interesting Teaching Thursday, you can read it <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/04/29/interdisciplinary-teaching-as-achimera/">here</a>.</p> <p>I have a pretty good weekend ahead my as I have tiny gap in my schedule which should allow me do to finish up some odds and ends before the end of the semester and the build up to the Pyla-<i>Koutsopetria</i> Archaeological Project season.</p> <p>In the meantime, I'll write letters of recommendation, read <a href="http://books.google.com/books?id=gNdglUBHSUC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=Kristeva+Abject&amp;hl=en&amp;ei=jevaS 4bGE4nQM4_g3JMB&amp;sa=X&amp;oi=book_result&amp;ct=result&amp;resnum=1&amp;ved=0 CDMQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">some Kristeva</a>, read some of the essays in <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/hellenisms-culture-identityand-ethnicity-from-antiquity-to-modernity/oclc/192048201">K. Zacharia's edited volume,</a> <i><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/hellenisms-cultureidentity-and-ethnicity-from-antiquity-tomodernity/oclc/192048201">Hellenisms</a><span style="font-style: normal;">, work on a new edited volume project, put the finishing touches on an <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/ea rly-chrsitian-baptisteries-a-short-description.html">encyclopedia article</a>, and finish <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/02/ar chaeological-ethnography-part-2.html">a book review</a>.</span></i></p> <p>And, of course, listen to some of the World Twenty20 and watch the night race at Richmond.</p> <p>Have a good weekend!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Another, Better Attempt at Dream Archaeology STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS:

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ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: another-better-attempt-at-dream-archaeology CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Late Antiquity CATEGORY: Mediterranean Archaeology in North Dakota DATE: 04/29/2010 08:29:48 AM ----BODY: <p>For those of you in the Grand Forks Metropolitan Area this evening, I am giving a talk at the North Dakota Museum of Art in the Faculty Lecture Series. The talk starts at 4:30 with a reception from 4:00. <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/ip ads-powerpoint-and-agency.html">Considering my post yesterday</a>, I promise to include only a few illustrative slides using The Powerpointer.</p> <p>My talk is entitled Dream Archaeology and represents the third version of my efforts to come to terms with this subject. Unlike earlier versions, I think that I problematize my paper somewhat better and add a bit of flair (mostly because I am going to present it to relatively diverse audience). If you doubt my efforts to make my paper better you can (although I don't recommend it) <a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/WorkingPapers/Dream%20Archaeolo gy_Working_Nov2008.pdf">read the first draft here</a>, <a href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/29361884/Dream-Archaeology-2009">read the second draft here</a>, and contemplate my third draft below:</p><a title="View Caraher Dream Archaeology 2010 on Scribd" href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/30697799/Caraher-Dream-Archaeology-2010" style="margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-systemfont: none; display: block; text-decoration: underline;">Caraher Dream Archaeology 2010</a> <object id="doc_487269490776634" name="doc_487269490776634" height="600" width="100%" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" style="outline:none;"> <param name="movie" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" /> <param name="wmode" value="opaque" /> <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="document_id=30697799&amp;access_key=key21c1iybbuqhac3sqcieh&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" /> <embed id="doc_487269490776634" name="doc_487269490776634" src="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf?document_id=30697799&amp;access _key=key-21c1iybbuqhac3sqcieh&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" type="application/xshockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" height="600" width="100%" wmode="opaque" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" /> </object> &nbsp;&nbsp;<br /> For more on Dream Archaeology without leaving the comfortable informality of the blog, see below: <p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/dr eams-in-ravenna.htm">Dreams in Ravenna</a><br /> <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/11/dr eam-archaeology-in-the-early-christian-west.html">Dream Archaeology in the Early

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Christian West<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/10/mo re-dreams-rel.html">Blindness, Dreams, and Relics<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/10/mo re-dreams-rel.html">More Dreams, Religion, and Archaeology<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/10/mo re-byzantine.html">More Byzantine Dreams...<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/10/dr eams-pausania.html">Dreams, Pausanias, and Archaeology<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/03/dr eams-inventio.html">Dreams, Inventio, and Archaeology<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2007/09/ko zani.html">Kozani</a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: iPads, Powerpoint, and Agency STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: ipads-powerpoint-and-agency CATEGORY: Web/Tech DATE: 04/28/2010 08:31:19 AM ----BODY: <p>There two curious articles published yesterday. <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/27/world/27powerpoint.html?th&amp;emc=th">O ne was about Powerpoint</a> (or as I call it The Powerpointer) in the <i>New York Times</i> (and picked up by the <a href="http://chronicle.com/blogPost/PowerlessPoint/23518/"><i>Chronicle of Higher Education</i>'s Brainstorm blog</a>). The prevalence of Powerpoint in military briefings has apparently reached epidemic levels and many folks within the military are saying that the reliance on Powerpoint to communicate information not only makes the seemingly endless stream of briefings debilitatingly boring, but also might impair the ability to make good decisions. In fact, one military official argued that Powerpoint is responsible for creating "the illusion of understanding and illusion of control" in the U.S. Military. Let's hope that this is hyperbole. What is clear, however, is that creating, presenting, and enduring Powerpoint shows takes a tremendous amount of time, and a significant part of that time is spent dealing (in both good and bad ways) with Powerpoint rather than dealing with content of the Powerpoint presentation. This would seem to be a perfect example of technology having agency; Powerpoint creates a culture that depends upon the use of Powerpoint for

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its daily work, basic communication patterns, and ultimately its decisions making.</p> <p><a href="http://academhack.outsidethetext.com/home/2010/apple-and-censoringeducation/">The other article appeared at the blog academHacK</a> and questioned the value of the iPad in higher education. David Parry argued that Apple's practice of censoring apps that do not coincide with rather ambiguous and strictly enforced views on propriety offers a serious threat to the utility of the iPad in the context of Higher Education. In large part, Parry's argument was focused on the possibility that Apple would censor textbooks that appear as apps on the device. This might happen, of course, but it seems to me another version of a standard complaint: Apple's device is too limited and limiting to be useful in a university classroom. Whether it is content creation, app censorship, the devices inability to run Flash, or even the inflexible and relatively hack-proof operating system, digital humanists have begun to rally against the iPad as another example of the things wrong with how the computer industry approaches academia. The fear is that the potential of the iPad will ultimately lull us into accepting its limitations and, as a result, limiting the potential for genuinely creative intersection of technology and learning. In other words, the iPad promotes a coarsely transactional approach to teaching and learning and facilitates the highly commodified packets of knowledge move from a relatively inflexible content provider to consumer.</p> <p>Both of these arguments postulate that the object (Powerpoint and the iPad) exert control over the user in particularly unsubtle ways. Powerpoint somehow makes military briefings boring or suspends critical inquiry. iPads create apparently insurmountable barriers between content consumers (students) and content producers. A little Bruno Latour could go a long way in this context. Both the iPad and Powerpoint exist in a particular network of relations that both influence how this technology is used and will be used. To assume that the iPad will be used on University campuses without some kind of compromise regarding its flexibility and issues of censorship marginalizes the power of university faculty to find or create work arounds, to reject poorly designed devices (just like many faculty members reject poorly designed textbooks or poorly conceived website), or to create pedagogical environments where the strengths of the iPad shine and its limitations are accommodated without sacrificing the teaching or learning objectives.</p> <p>The same can be said for the Powerpointer. Compared to the tedious practice of preparing, creating, and maintaining collections of photographic slides, The Powerpointer is revolutionary. Moreover, in a critical environment like the university or the military, it can be controlled. Boring Powerpoint presentations likely reflect boring lectures, unnecessary briefings, and a culture of tedium rather than actually producing them. In fact, it may be that The Powerpointer manifests agency by allowing us to recognize the inefficiency of a particular culture or practice of which it is a part.</p> <p>It is always disappointing to see a piece of technology blamed for its limitations as if technology existed outside the human networks in which it is used. Recognizing the role of technology in establish expectations is a valid form of critique, but a <i>symmetrical</i> approach to understanding technology demands that we give equal consideration to the character of the networks in which the technology will function.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT:

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----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Damnatio Memoriae and The Ralph STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: damnatio-memoriae-and-the-ralph CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes CATEGORY: North Dakotiana DATE: 04/27/2010 07:28:48 AM ----BODY: <p>One of the more interesting sub-plots in the ongoing University of North Dakota logo and nickname scandal is the fate of the mighty Ralph Engelstad Area. This monumental structure has hosted UND Ice Hockey games for the past 10 years. As <a href="http://www.theralph.com/asp/default.asp?p=13">its web site</a> puts it (drinking deeply of the ancient art of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ekphrasis">ekphrasis</a>): "It's impossible to describe the $104+ million Ralph Engelstad Arena in just a words, but it is described by many as the 'finest facility of its kind in the world.'" In short, it is a lovely facility, built by an eccentric donor who built the arena and established it it as a separate entity from the University. A not unbiased description of the most controversial element of <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralph_Engelstad">Ralph Engelstad's life appears in wikipedia</a>.</p> <p>In recent years, the defining feature of The Ralph (as it's affectionately known) are the thousands of images of the <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:UNDsiouxlogo.png">Fighting Sioux logo</a> including a massive one in inlaid granite on the floor of the lobby. By all accounts, the almost ubiquitous use of the logo was intentional, and the controversy surrounding the logo threatened to derail the construction of the building.</p> <p>Now with the logo and nickname almost certainly put to rest, the University, the State, and the NCAA are stuck with this monumental building emblazoned with thousands of symbols of the Fighting Sioux. Fortunately, the West has several well-established traditions for dealing with just this kind of controversy. The best known perhaps is <i>damnatio memoriae</i>, or the damnation of the memory of an individual. Practiced by the Romans for centuries, this involves the removing of the name and image of an individual who had fallen afoul of popular or political favor. Typically this occurred after the individual's death. In practical terms this involved erasing the name and often times image of the individual physically from monuments. In fact, this typically occurred among the elite, political, classes and, as a result, almost always had a monumental component. In many cases, the practice of damnatio preserved just enough of the name of the discredited individual to remind a viewer of that individual's fate. So it did not involve eradicating the individual from all public memory as much as preserving some tiny fragment of the individual to remind the public of that individual's fall into dishonor. In the ruthless and competitive world of

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Imperial Roman domestic politics, it was not enough to defeat one's opponent. The memory of that defeat</p> <p>The practice of <i>damnatio memoriae</i> found a subtle variation during the Christian period when groups of Christians sought to suppress the practice of paganism. Like in Roman politics, the Christian goal was not necessarily to defeat the pagans. In fact, most Christians thought that the power of the old gods had suffered defeat at the time of the incarnation (i.e. when Jesus, the son of God, came to earth). Christians in the 4th-6th centuries, then, were merely the mopping up operation. That being said, there are numerous incidents where Christians sought to mark the defeat of the pagan gods through the symbolically charged destruction of their temples and symbols. In one of my favorites from Mark the Deacon's Life of Porphyry of Gaza, architectural fragments from the burned and desecrated temple of Zeus in Gaza (the Marneion) were used to pave the courtyard of the Christian church erected in its place, so that:</p> <blockquote> <p>"When, therefore, the ashes were carried away and all the abominations were destroyed, the rubbish that remained of the marble work of the Marneion, which they said was sacred, and in a place not to be entered, especially by women, this did the holy bishop resolve to lay down for a pavement before the temple outside in the street, that it might be trodden under foot not only of men, but also of women and dogs and swine and beasts. And this grieved the idolaters more than the burning of the temple. Wherefore the more part of them, especially the women, walk not upon the marbles even unto this day." <a href="http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/porphyry.html">Mark the Deacon, <i>Vita Porphyrii</i>, 76</a>.</p> </blockquote> <p>In most cases, it was the desire to monumentalize one's memory (or one's causes) made <i>damnatio memormiae</i> possible. In this context, the problem of removing all the logos from The Ralph evaporates. In fact, keeping some of the logos present and visible (or at least obviously under erasure) will remind visitors of the controversy and, in particular, who lost and who won. (And it will remind all of us that at least part of this controversy has nothing to do with actual Sioux, and almost everything to do with the structure of power between donors, the NCAA, and the University community.)</p> <p>I've offered some more thoughts on the <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/04/un d-the-logo-and-the-name.html">logo and nickname controversy here</a>.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: BrianB EMAIL: elucidarian@gmail.com IP: 134.129.193.248 URL: DATE: 04/27/2010 10:46:11 AM

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Excellent entry! I love it when you tie the current world, especially locally, to antiquity. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Metadata Monday: 700 posts STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: metadata-monday-700-posts CATEGORY: The New Media CATEGORY: Weblogs DATE: 04/26/2010 08:00:30 AM ----BODY: <p>This is my 700th blog post and so it seemed like a good time to aggregate and reflect on some metadata.</p> <p>The blogs received on average 79 page views a day and over its three year life I've had 87,657 page views. Over the past 120 days, however, I've had well over 100 page views a day. I set as a goal (and I am not really sure why I have goals for things like this) to have 100 page views a day; now that I have that, I think I'll aim for 1000 page views a week. I've had 373 comments over the lifetime of the blog. My bounce rate is a respectable 75.8%. The average time on site is 1 minute 13 seconds and visitors look at 1.50 pages.</p> <p>65% of my visitors are first time visitors and this has held pretty steady over the past couple of years. That means that 35% of you like what you read enough to come back! What's pretty cool is that over 20% of my visitors return more than 9 times.</p> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecf66e79970b -pi" width="480" height="84" alt="201004260755.jpg" /><br /> </div> <p>Since my first post, I've had visitors from 149 countries with the US, Greece, the UK, Canada, Italy, Australia, France, Germany, Cyprus and Denmark as the top 10.</p> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecf66e6a970b -pi" width="480" height="213" alt="201004260715.jpg" /><br /> </div> <p>I also have had visitors from all 50 states with California, North Dakota, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Illinois, Texas, Florida, and New Jersey as the top 10.</p> <div style="text-align: center;"> <img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecf66e59970b -pi" width="480" height="216" alt="201004260716.jpg" /><br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;">

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The top referring blogs are the usual suspects with some new additions: </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 1. <a href="http://kourelis.blogspot.com/" title="Kostis Kourelis">ObjectsBuildings-Situations</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 2. <a href="http://www.archaeology.org/online/features/blogs/">Archaeology Magazine</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 3. <a href="http://www.iconoclasm.dk/">Iconoclasm</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 4. <a href="http://grandforkslife.blogspot.com/">Grand Forks Life</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 5. <a href="http://surprisedbytime.blogspot.com/">Surprised by Time</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 6. <a href="http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com/">Electric Archaeologist</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 7. <a href="http://researchnewsinla.blogspot.com/">Research News in Late Antiquity</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 8. <a href="http://www.atrium-media.com/rogueclassicism/">Rogue Classicism</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 9. <a href="http://antiquatedvagaries.blogspot.com/">Antiquated Vagaries</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> 10. <a href="http://ancientworldbloggers.blogspot.com/">Ancient World Bloggers Group</a> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Thanks to everyone who links to my blog. I love that this list of blog reflects so many of my research interests. I've also seen a pronounced uptick in referrals from both <a href="http://twitter.com/BillCaraher">Twitter</a> and Facebook. It seems that the social network is beginning to exert some influence on who reads my blog. </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> I haven't posted any browser and viewer data <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/10/me tadata-and-macintosh.html">since October 2009</a>, here's an update on that kind of thing since that post.

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</div> <div style="text-align: left;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Operating Systems: </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Windows: 74.11% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Macintosh: 23.20% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Linux: 1.78% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> iPhone: 0.46% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> iPod: 0.08% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> iPad: 0.05% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Android: 0.03% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Windows continues to decline among the readers of my blog and Macintosh continues to grow. It's remarkable to think that from 2007-2008 Windows accounted for 82% of my readers and Macintosh only 16.5%! </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Browser: </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Firefox: 52.95% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> IE: 27.97% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Safari: 9.51% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Chrome: 6.14% </div> <div style="text-align: left;">

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Opera: 1.78% </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Firefox continues to be the most popular browser and by increasingly margins over Internet Explorer. It's remarkable that from 2007-2008, Internet Explorer accounted for 45.05% of traffic to my blog; now it accounts for less than 30%. Chrome continues to become more popular and, it would seem, that Opera has steadily become less popular. This is a shame since the newest Opera browser for Mac is a sound alternative to Safari and far better than Chrome for OS X. </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> As I noted last October, I do think that my statistics speak to the particular niche in academic culture that my blog occupies. Computer savvy archaeologists and historians probably gravitate toward Macs and use Firefox. </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: left;"> Thanks for taking the time to visit this blog. I'm looking forward to the next 700 posts. </div> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Evan Nelson EMAIL: evannelson@mail.und.edu IP: 134.129.168.218 URL: DATE: 04/26/2010 09:11:20 AM Congrats on 700; that's a thing to be proud of, too. I sometimes wonder how much of the internet is blogs with less than ten posts. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Susan Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.203.228 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/susancaraher DATE: 04/26/2010 11:00:36 AM Noice One! That is quite an accomplishment - may there be many more posts!

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-----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Varia and Quick Hits STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-varia-and-quick-hits CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 04/23/2010 09:55:48 AM ----BODY: <p>Just a few quick hits on a beautiful Friday afternoon:</p> <p>First, check out this cool series on digital history and public history: <a href="http://chnm.gmu.edu/staff/sharon/bracket/21st-century-public-history-parti/">Part 1 of 3</a>, <a href="http://chnm.gmu.edu/staff/sharon/bracket/21stcentury-public-history-part-ii/">Part 2 of 3</a>... And it complements Tom Scheinfeldt's recent post on <a href="http://www.foundhistory.org/2010/04/21/digital-history-and-the-publichistory-curriculum/">Digital History and the Public History Curriculum</a> at Found History.</p> <p>Kathy Nedergaard continues to write <a href="http://webmuseweavers.wordpress.com/category/kathrynnedegaard/">interesting posts</a> from my Public History/Digital History Internship.</p> <p>We were effected by McAffocalypse this week. <a href="http://www.engadget.com/2010/04/21/mcafee-update--shutting-down-xpmachines/">The recaps is pretty interesting</a>.</p> <p>Are you excited that the <a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/wt202010/content/series/412671.html?template=fixtu res">World 20/20 is in our time zone</a>?</p> <p>A good, practical list of advice for <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/04/22/strategies-and-tips-for-scholarlywriting-and-publications/">academic writing</a> on Teaching Thursday. We aspire to be a local versions of <a href="http://chronicle.com/blog/ProfHacker/27/">ProfHacker</a> which just moved over to the Chronicle of Higher Education's webpage.</p> <p>University of North Dakota ranked number 1 on <a href="http://www.forbes.com/2010/04/19/college-tuition-risk-public-personalfinance-tuition_2.html">Forbes' "Tuition Risk List"</a>. This meant that we were at least risk of a tuition increase. This may be a good thing for students, or it may not be.</p> <p>Have a good weekend!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS:

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-----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: New Additions to the Lakka Skoutara Archives STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: new-additions-to-the-lakka-skoutara-archives CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 04/22/2010 08:08:01 AM ----BODY: <p>We have added another series of photographs to our Omeka archive of <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse?collection=4">archaeologica l and landscape photographs from Lakka Skoutara</a> in the southeastern Korinthia. Tim Gregory and Lita Tzortzopoulou-Gregory took these photographs in the summer of 2009 and they were prepared for the archive by <a href="http://webmuseweavers.wordpress.com/category/kathryn-nedegaard/">Kathy Nedergaard</a>, an intern at our <a href="http://digitalgateway.und.edu/">Working Group in Digital and New Media</a>. The archive is now over 650 images each with some amount of meta data (including the name of the photographer, date of the photo, short description of the feature, and some rudimentary tagging).</p> <p>These photographs feature alonia (threshing floors) and cisterns from the site. Both aloni and cisterns are common features in the Greek countryside. The substantial construction of both cisterns and aloni makes them enduring features of the Greek countryside and relatively easy to identify markers of intensive agricultural practices. Alonia were crucial to the production of wheat and cisterns, particular in the arid lands near the coast of the Saronic Gulf, were important for watering animals involved in threshing and their human companions.</p> <p>We have full descriptions of the threshing floors and cisterns and before this archive is complete we'll add the dimensions and even locations of these features to the images. But for now, enjoy the images.</p> <p><b><i>Alonia (Threshing floors)</i></b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/2058">Aloni 2</a>:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/2058"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecdd6d2f970b -pi" width="321" height="480" alt="201004220737.jpg" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Aloni+3">Aloni 3</a>:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/2043"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134800d651f970c -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220735.jpg" /></a></p> <div style="text-align: center;"> <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Aloni+4">Aloni 4</a>:<br /> </div> <div style="text-align: center;">

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<br /> </div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1993"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecdd6d45970b -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220732.jpg" /></a><br /> </div> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Aloni+6">Aloni 6</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/2055"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134800d6502970c -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220733.jpg" /></a></p> <p><b><i>Cisterns and Wells:</i></b></p> <div style="text-align: center;"> <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Cistern+1">Cistern 1</a>:<br /> </div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <br /> </div> <div style="text-align: center;"> <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1989"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134800d6519970c -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220749.jpg" /></a><br /> </div> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1989"></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Cistern+3">Cistern 3</a>:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecdd6dc9970b -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220750.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Cistern+5">Cistern 5</a>:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/2031"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134800d6546970c -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220752.jpg" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Cistern+6">Cistern 6</a>:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1987"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecdd6d37970b -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220753.jpg" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Cistern+8">Cistern 8</a>:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1997"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134800d650f970c -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220754.jpg" /></a></p>

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<p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Cistern+9">Cistern 9</a>:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1988"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134800d652d970c -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220755.jpg" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Well+1">Well 1</a>:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecdd6d9e970b -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220757.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/browse/tag/Well+2">Well 2</a>:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1963"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20134800d653f970c -pi" width="480" height="321" alt="201004220758.jpg" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;">For more on this project:<br /></p> <p><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/cr eating-ruins-formation-process-pictures-from-lakka-skoutara.html">Creating Ruins: Formation Process Pictures from Lakka Skoutara</a><br /> <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/la kka-skoutara-a-partial-archive.html">Lakka Skoutara: A Partial Archive<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/10/be tween-sea-and-mountain-the-archaeology-of-a-20th-century-small-world-in-theupland-basin-of-the-southeastern-korinthia.html">Between Sea and Mountain: The Archaeology of a 20th Century "small world" in the upland basin of the southeastern Korinthia<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/08/sl opes-and-terraces-at-lakka-skoutara.html">Slopes and Terraces at Lakka Skoutara<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/08/co rinthian-infiltration-the-interior-of-some-houses-at-lakkaskoutara.html">Corinthian Infiltration: The Interior of Some Houses at Lakka Skoutara<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/07/la kka-skoutara-the-survey.html">Lakka Skoutara: The Survey<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/07/th e-houses-of-lakka-skoutara.html">The Houses of Lakka Skoutara<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/06/co llapse.html">Collapse<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/06/pr ovisional-discard.html">Provisional Discard<br /></a><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/06/co nstruction-in-the-corinthia.html">Construction in the Corinthia</a></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT:

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----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: UND, the Logo, and the Name STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: und-the-logo-and-the-name CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes CATEGORY: North Dakotiana DATE: 04/21/2010 07:56:08 AM ----BODY: <p>I resisted posting anything on this topic for as long as I could, but the lingering drone of the Fighting Sioux conversation has finally pushed me to write. Before I say anything, I want to confess that I am not an expert on this topic nor am I particularly engaged in the ongoing controversy regarding the Fighting Sioux logo. I don't have an ax to grind and while I am certainly a "liberal faculty member", I don't feel particularly pressed by the requirements of political correctness or any sort of liberal orthodoxy. In fact, I find both political correctness, in all of its awkward and poorly executed forms, and any kinds of orthodox to be pretty boring, onerous, and unproductive.</p> <p>So, that being said, here are four of my views on this entire logo issue (for the official views of the <a href="http://nickname.und.edu/logo/">University go here</a>).</p> <p>1. The Lack of Civility. The biggest issue from my perspective is that the logo debate has brought out the worst in people on both sides. The lack of civility and carefully considered conversations is disappointing. In fact, two colleagues over the past couple of weeks have said that they have banned discussions of the logo issue in their classes. Read the comments on any news article or blog (and I won't link to them from here) to see how rancorous both sides have become. Moreover, the positions are boring: one side blames everyone from the university administration to the NCAA to the Native Americans and the State Board of Higher Education, and the other side pontificates in a painfully condescending way. So, again, it's disappointing to see that a University community can't engage this topic in a more intellectually productive way. At present, the debate makes almost everyone look bad, and it seems to me that we are in a situation where the need for both sides to claim "victory" makes compromise and conversation increasingly impossible.</p> <p>2. Identity is Messy. Anyone who has been on a university campus for more than 20 minutes over the past two decades should know by now that identity is a messy thing. This is important to remember as we try to resurrect some kind of civil discussion about the Fighting Sioux logo and name. There is no doubt that one side sees itself as honoring the Sioux by appropriating (in a respectful and perhaps even consensual way) parts of the Sioux identity. This is not particularly radical from a historical perspective and is not inherently bad. What strikes me as naive is the idea that if the university could get the Sioux to somehow vote to approve this process, then it would be in the clear. I am liberal enough to know that things aren't made right or moral or ethical, just

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because a group votes for something. The entire idea that the Sioux could vote as a body to allow another group to associate (respectfully, I am sure) with some aspect of their identity seems to be so deeply problematic that I can not understand how it is seriously regarded as a way forward. Fortunately, some groups within the Sioux seem to agree with this and have refused to put this matter to referendum. Identity is far too fluid and contested a thing to be defined by a democratic process alone. The idea that somehow this issue would be resolved if the Sioux voted to approve the logo and name is naive.</p> <p>3. The NCAA. The NCAA is a voluntary organization that has the right to set certain rules for its member institutions. This just makes sense. If the member institutions do not like the rules, they can either change them or quit the organization. While I can understand why no one seriously talks about leaving the NCAA, it is a bit surprising that more people don't at least hold it up as a potential course of action. My solution would be to drop out of the NCAA and reform the hockey program as an <a href="http://theahl.com/">AHL franchise</a>. Playing professional hockey at UND would be revolutionary and, perhaps, offer a way forward to other schools who feel that the NCAA does not adequately represent and protect the distinct character of their programs. Moreover, it could be a real threat to the NCAA as an organization. Imagine if the elite football programs created a University Professional Football League (UPFL) which paid their student-athletes a competitive wage based on some kind of profit sharing model? Isn't this a more fun conversation than most surrounding the logo and name?</p> <p>4. Colonialism. Spending time in Australia with my wife's family has led me to think about the place of Native American's in American society in a different way. I do worry that the eliminating the name and logo will serve as another means of hiding or (to be post-modern about it) erasing the awkward legacy of European (i.e. white) - Native American relations in the Northern Plains. By "returning" to the Sioux the complete control over their identity, image, likeness, and name, we run the risk of eliminating a point of contact that represented a shared moment in history which while contentious and certainly ugly would nevertheless provide the basis for an ongoing discussion. By problematizing the name and logo as a highly visible historical artifact, it forces us to consider complex and messy issues of identity, colonialism, authority, and race. These are not the kinds of things that interest the NCAA. In other words, I cannot think that the NCAA's motives are pure. Their interest is in protecting the commercial entity that is the NCAA and to do this, they will make policies that seek to eliminate controversies and create a product that is the most appealing to the broadest possible audience. We can, of course, argue that a popular, pristine, and neat NCAA product is a good way forward for all member institutions in that it will guarantee the greatest possible revenues from various, highly lucrative commercial ventures.</p> <p>So, I've said my piece. I haven't been a member in the community here long enough to understand completely what is at stake or what the consequences of any particular course of action would be. I can, however, complain that the tenor of the current conversation makes thoughtful, creative, and perspective discussion of the situation pretty difficult. I still talk to my students about it, though, because I think it is our job to challenge our students (on both sides of the debate) to try to see things in <a href="http://www.und.edu/branding/">a creative, innovative, and spirited way (oh, we're Future Ready too)</a>.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: -----

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EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: A Study of the City of Ravenna STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: a-study-of-the-city-of-ravenna CATEGORY: Books CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 04/20/2010 08:27:39 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the past decade or so, there has been a new wave of scholarship on the Late Antique city. These works have ranged from <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/decline-and-fall-of-the-romancity/oclc/44720517">W. Liebeschuetz, <i>Decline and Fall of the Roman City</i></a> (Oxford 2001) or <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/refiguringthe-post-classical-city-dura-europos-jerash-jerusalem-andravenna/oclc/31753671">A. Wharton, <i>Refiguring the Post-Classical City</i></a> (Cambridge 1995) to a myriad of specific city studies: <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/alexandria-in-late-antiquity-topography-andsocial-conflict/oclc/34663398">Haas on Alexandria</a>, <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/roman-berytus-beirut-in-lateantiquity/oclc/52937907">Hall on Beirut</a>, <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/corinth-the-first-city-of-greece-an-urbanhistory-of-late-antique-cult-and-religion/oclc/43615467">Rothaus on Corinth</a>, <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/pagan-city-and-christian-capital-rome-inthe-fourth-century/oclc/41641325">Curran on Rome</a>, et c. It's clear that the late ancient city has remained a source of fascination for scholars and the increased quantity of archaeological evidence available has allowed even more robust and synthetic works that have significantly revised our view of urban life in Late Antiquity</p> <p><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/ravenna-in-lateantiquity/oclc/316772672">Deborah M. Deliyannis, <i>Ravenna in Late Antiquity</i> (Cambridge 2010)</a> fits into this tradition by focusing on one the best studied cities in the Late Antique world. The monumental efforts of F.W. Deichmann to document the architecture and history of the city of Ravenna formed a solid foundation of Deliyannis' book which, if nothing else, summarized many of the conclusions from Deichmann's numerous German tomes in English. In fact, the strength of this book is the massive amount of summary description of the major monuments in the city. At the same time, Deliyannis' familiarity with the literary sources for the city, particularly, the <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/book-of-pontiffs-of-the-church-ofravenna/oclc/52341636"><i>Liber Pontificalis</i> of Agnellus</a> which she has translated, provided a critical textual basis for many of her conclusions.</p>

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<p>.<img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201348000430d970c -pi" width="140" height="206" alt="201004200824.jpg" /><br /></p> <p>In short, Deliyannis argued that Ravenna was uniquely positioned between East and West both politically and culturally. Nowhere is this more clear than in Its status as both a capital and a more marginal city over its long post-antique history. The result of these influences was the blend local and Mediterranean wide trends that produced a unique synthesis of Late Antique culture. The influences of the East in the Adriatic is an area of growing interest especially as we have come to recognize that the aftershocks of the various theological, ecclesiological, and Christological controversies in the East had a significant impact on Imperial authority in regions like the Balkans which fell under the ecclesiastical jurisdiction of the Papacy, but the political influence of the emperor in Constantinople.</p> <p>While Deliyannis' book does a brilliant job bringing to light the architectural history of the city, it is disappointing that she seemed so much less interested in subjecting the people of the city of Ravenna to the same scrutiny. The was no effort in the book to consider substantially everyday life in the city. The absence of any discussion of the economy of Ravenna was particularly striking. Aside from a few comments on the presence of kilns, the vaguely described ebb and flow of imported pottery, and the tendency to re-use bricks in the construction of churches, there is no sense for how Ravenna fit into the trans-Mediterranean economic networks which so many scholars of Late Antiquity have scrutinized.</p> <p>There was also almost no discussion of the local economy. Particularly striking was the absence of any discussion of the hinterland of Ravenna and its port at Classe. To be fair, Deliyannis makes clear that the marshy territories to the west of the city apparently contributed to its defense and apparently the city did not suffer from lack of water. She does not, however, discuss how the city was fed or even (and perhaps more interesting) whether the marshy land around the city provided any economic advantage to the inhabitants. This is disappointing because so much attention in recent times has focused on the relationship between cities and their hinterlands. In fact, recent work has focused almost as much on the hinterlands of Late Roman cities as on their urban cores (see, for example, <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/corinth-on-theisthmus-studies-of-the-end-of-an-ancient-landscape/oclc/86115995">David Pettegrew's work</a> on the near-hinterland of Corinth or <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/tilling-the-hateful-earth-agriculturalproduction-and-trade-in-the-late-antique-east/oclc/316430311">Michael Decker's recent book</a> on the Late Antique hinterland of major Levantine cities).</p> <p>Finally, it also stood out that Deliyannis did relatively little to place the city of Ravenna explicitly into the recent conversations on the urban fabric of Late Antiquity. How does the unique urban history of the city of Ravenna compare to other Late Roman cities both in Italy and elsewhere? And how does the city of Ravenna for all its unique characteristics, inform how we understand the regional politics of Italy, the Balkans, or even the Late Antique Mediterranean? This broader perspective would have added considerable significance to this already valuable contribution to the history of a city.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT:

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----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Sketches of Three Baptisteries STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: sketches-of-three-baptisteries CATEGORY: Early Christian Baptisteries DATE: 04/19/2010 08:19:57 AM ----BODY: <p>I spent a little time this weekend working on my absolutely rudimentary illustration skills.&nbsp; I took as my object the three baptisteries that I included in a recent draft of an encyclopedia article.&nbsp; I worked on tracing them from well-known illustrations with an eye toward simplifying the plans to facilitate their reproduction at a smaller scale.</p> <p>Producing new illustrations is almost always a good exercise in that is forces me to reflect critically on the various features included in the various floor plans.&nbsp; I used Illustrator for these illustrations and mostly traced them from existing plans.&nbsp; I did free sketch some of the features, though, and they are more illustrative than accurate.</p> <p>I suspect, for example, that leaving out the thresholds and some of the features associated with the flooring at the Dura Baptistery has had little effect on how most scholars are likely to interpret the basic features of the plan: the baptistery is a room in the northwestern corner of the atrium style house.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201347ff99c87970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="DuraBaptSketch" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecc985d1970b -pi" width="400" height="393"></a> <br>Dura Europas Baptistery (after <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/excavations-at-dura-europos-final-report-82the-christian-building/oclc/186669600">Wells (1967)</a>, plan 5)</p> <p align="left">Likewise, my plan of the Lechaion baptistery illustrates the complexity of the structure and the strange relationships between the two, apparently contemporary, centrally planned rooms and the long apsidal hallway to their west.&nbsp; It boggles the mind that an "architect" (or builder) could so carefully articulate the interior spaces of the various structures, but arrange their relationships to one another in such an awkward way.&nbsp; The narrow passageways linking the northern building to the baptistery proper appear to have been original to the plan, but utterly inelegant. </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201347ff99caf970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="LechaionBapt" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201347ff99cb9970c -pi" width="400" height="400"></a> <br>Lechaion (after <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/palaiochristianika-vaptisteria-teshellados/oclc/4737938">Volonakes (1976)</a>, plan 1b)</p> <p align="left">My sketch of the Orthodox Baptistery in Ravenna eliminated some of the later features which commonly appear in plans and sought to capture the relationship

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between its architectural massing and the central baptismal font.</p> <p align="center">&nbsp;<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201347ff99cc1970 c-pi"><img style="border-bottom: 0px; border-left: 0px; border-top: 0px; borderright: 0px" border="0" alt="RavennaBapt" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20133ecc985ee970b -pi" width="400" height="393"></a> <br>Orthodox Baptistery in Ravenna (after <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/orthodox-baptistery-ofravenna/oclc/237215">Kostof (1965)</a>, fig. 1)</p> <p align="left">I will never be confused for an architect, but the exercise of re-illustrating the plans of well-known buildings can frequently reveal some feature of aspect of the building (or even the plan) that I might have otherwise overlooked.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 04/16/2010 07:48:13 AM ----BODY: <p>A little gaggle of quick hits on a bright and sunny Friday.</p> <p>First, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/pylakoutsopetria_season_s/bret_weber /">the former cook</a> of the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project, obviously scarred by his time working for scraps for a group of scrooge-like archaeologists, takes to the streets on tax day to promote a universal living wage. (Bret Weber holds is the tall guy holding the banner sign).</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201347fea7586970c -pi" width="480" height="316" alt="201004160706.jpg" /><br /> (<a href="http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/image/id/31264/headline/Picket/">Pho to Grand Forks Herald</a>)</p> <p style="text-align: left;">There are lots of cool things taking place over the last couple week at the University of North Dakota. The Ceramics Department is celebration the 100th year of ceramics at UND with a a Centennial called 50/50. The name represents the 50 years of ceramics at UND under Margaret Cable's guidance and the 50 (plus 1) years since her retirement in 1949. <a href="http://www.pottery.und.edu/centenial.html">Here's the link</a>. The Theater Department is producing <a

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href="http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/157882/">Sarah Ruhl's <i>Eurydice</i></a>.</p> <p style="text-align: left;">If you haven't checked out <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/04/15/bridging-the-gap-in-graduateeducation/">Teaching Thursday</a> this week, you should. <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/04/15/bridging-the-gap-in-graduateeducation/">Rebecca Romsdahl's thoughts</a> on graduate education are insightful and productive. In some ways, Rebecca's thoughts complement those offered by <a href="http://kourelis.blogspot.com/2010/04/medieval-art-connecting-withstudents.html">Kostis Kourelis on the same day.</a> I need to use more reflective practices in my classes. For more on teaching, check out <a href="http://learningaloud.com/blog/aboutme/">Mark Grabe</a>'s Learning Aloud project with its <a href="http://learningaloud.com/blog/">helpful blog</a>. There has also been a good bit of activity over at UND's <a href="http://mygradspace.wordpress.com/" title="Graduate School Blog">Graduate School Blog</a> including a flashy new advertisement:</p> <div style="text-align: center;"> <object style="height: 344px; width: 425px" width="425" height="344"> <param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/oCixalWeeqM" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/oCixalWeeqM" type="application/xshockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="425" height="344" /> </object> </div> <p style="text-align: left;">And they now have a <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/UNDGradSchool">YouTube channel</a>!</p> <p style="text-align: left;">Have a good weekend!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Dreams in Ravenna STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: dreams-in-ravenna CATEGORY: Late Antiquity DATE: 04/15/2010 07:00:52 AM ----BODY: <p>So, I'm sick and I promised myself that I wouldn't blog today and focus my meager energies on the handful of things that absolutely need to get done.</p>

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<p>But then I thought, wait, don't I need to remark on a dream from Agnellus of Ravenna?</p> <blockquote> <p>41. Meanwhile, when in that time the mother of Valentinian, the Empress Galla Placidia, was building the church of the Holy Cross our Redeemer, her niece, by the name of Singledia, was advised one night by a vision, in which a man in white vestiments stood there, adorned with a grey-haired head and a beautiful beard, and said, "In such and such a place not far from this church of the Holy Cross, which your aunt is having built, as far as a bowshot, build me a monasterium, as you will find it traced out. And where you find the likeness of a cross in the ground, there let an altar be consecrated, and dedicate it in the name of Zacharias, the father of the Precursor.</p> <p>Waking at once, she ran swiftly to the place, where its outline had been shown; she found that a foundation had been dug as if by the hand of man. Running forward at once, she told the empress with great joy and requested workmen from her; and [Galla] gave her thirteen builders. And at once she started to build as she had found it drawn out; and in thirteen days she built in all and brought it to completion. And she consecrated it and endowed it with gold and silver and golden crowns and most precious gems and gold chalices, which come out in procession on the Nativity of the Lord...</p> <p><a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/book-of-pontiffs-of-the-church-ofravenna/oclc/52341636">trans. D. M. Deliyannis</a> (who also has fascinating new book called <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/ravenna-in-lateantiquity/oclc/316772672&amp;referer=brief_results"><i>Ravenna in Late Antiquity</i></a>)</p> </blockquote> <p>I know that I feel better now.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Early Chrsitian Baptisteries: A Short Description STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: early-chrsitian-baptisteries-a-short-description CATEGORY: Early Christian Baptisteries DATE: 04/14/2010 07:48:03 AM ----BODY: <p>I finally have a working draft of an encyclopedia entry that was due some time ago. The entry is on Early Christian baptisteries, and I try to provide a

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cursory study of their architecture, ritual, decoration, and function in less than 2500 words. For some reason this kind of writing always takes me far more time than longer writing projects, so I not only underestimate how long it will take me to produce the original text, but also how long it will take me to tweak and fuss with the text once it is produced.</p> <p>In any event, I present an advanced working draft here for your enjoyment.</p><a title="View Early Christian Baptisteries Working on Scribd" href="http://www.scribd.com/doc/29902863/Early-Christian-Baptisteries-Working" style="margin: 12px auto 6px auto; font-family: Helvetica,Arial,Sans-serif; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; font-size: 14px; line-height: normal; font-size-adjust: none; font-stretch: normal; -x-systemfont: none; display: block; text-decoration: underline;">Early Christian Baptisteries Working</a> <object id="doc_348006909609960" name="doc_348006909609960" height="600" width="100%" type="application/xshockwave-flash" data="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" style="outline:none;"> <param name="movie" value="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf" /> <param name="wmode" value="opaque" /> <param name="bgcolor" value="#ffffff" /> <param name="allowFullScreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always" /> <param name="FlashVars" value="document_id=29902863&amp;access_key=keysy6ww5xxo2nb3zmx67d&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" /> <embed id="doc_348006909609960" name="doc_348006909609960" src="http://d1.scribdassets.com/ScribdViewer.swf?document_id=29902863&amp;access _key=key-sy6ww5xxo2nb3zmx67d&amp;page=1&amp;viewMode=list" type="application/xshockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" height="600" width="100%" wmode="opaque" bgcolor="#FFFFFF" /> </object> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: History of and History in the University of North Dakota STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: history-of-and-history-in-the-university-of-north-dakota CATEGORY: Departmental History at UND CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes CATEGORY: North Dakotiana DATE: 04/13/2010 07:12:50 AM ----BODY:

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<p>Next fall, the University of North Dakota will host the Northern Great Plains History Conference. This regional conference was originally organized by members of the History Department in the late 1960 and has continued almost every year since then being hosted by various school across the Northern Plains.</p> <p>It seems fitting then, that there be at least one panel that focuses on the history of the University of North Dakota and the Department of History. So, I have organized a panel of three papers for the event.</p> <p>Here it is:<br /></p> <p><b>History of and History in the University of North Dakota</b></p> <p>“History before Libby: University before Disciplines”<br /> 
<i>W. Caraher, Department of History, University of North Dakota</i></p> <p>It is commonplace to imagine now that disciplinary divisions are traditional and neatly contemporary with the creation of the American university system in the late 19th and early 20th century. In reality, of course, this was not necessarily the case. Nor was it the case that the development of disciplines, such as history, took place at only an institutional level. This paper will examine the career of Horace B. Woodworth who served the University of North Dakota from 1885-1904. During the same decades when the discipline of history was reaching its professional maturity through the work of H. B. Adams at Johns Hopkins and his students like Frederick Jackson Turn at Wisconsin, Woodworth underwent his own professional development migrating from the Professor of Mathematics, Physics, and Astronomy to the Professor of Moral and Mental Science to the University of North Dakota’s first Professor of History. At his retirement in 1904, he was the first University faculty member to earn a Carnegie Pension and from 1910 – 1949 the Education Building on campus bore the name Woodworth Hall in his honor. The lack of a clear disciplinary home, however, has consigned his name to obscurity and overwritten a valuable, transdisciplinary, precedent in the history the university and its faculty.</p> <p>“Dr. Orin G. Libby: Campus Gadfly”<br /> <i>
G. Iseminger, Department of History, University of North Dakota</i></p> <p>The word “gadfly” comes from the words “sting” + “fly” and a dictionary describes the “pest” as “a purposely annoying or provoking person who criticizes others to get them to reform themselves or their institutions.” In the long history of the University of North Dakota, a period of 125 years, many faculty members aspired to be the campus gadfly. Few succeeded as well as Dr. Orin G. Libby whose tenure in the university’s history department spanned the period 1902-1945. Nothing was so insignificant that it escaped his attention nor so important that he dared not criticize it and urge that it be changed or eliminated. He chided the administration for not clearing campus walks of snow, forcing women students to drag their long skirts over the drifts and then sitting all day in class with wet skirts around their ankles. He criticize Dr. William G. Bek, Dean of the College of Liberal Arts, for compromising graduation standards be eliminating the foreign language requirement for the Ph.B. degree. He was the unofficial leader of a group that attempted to remove Dr. Thomas F. Kane from his position as university president on the grounds that he was “irresponsible, inefficient, negligent, intellectually weak, morally vacillating, and wholly incompetent.” Although many felt Libby’s “sting,” he was a respected member of the faculty when he retired in 1945 at the age of eighty-one.</p> <p>“History of Social Work at UND: 1983-2009”<br /> <i>
B. Weber, Department of Social Work, University of North Dakota</i><br /></p> <p>In 2008 I took up the task of writing the history of the Social Work Department at the University of North Dakota: my small contribution to a larger project surrounding the school’s 125th anniversary. My work built upon Louis

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Geiger’s University of the Northern Plains and former department chair Professor Ken Dawes’ work covering the department up till 1982. My argument concerning the recent twenty-five years is that department chairs—despite no real managerial authority—shaped the major events.</p> <p>In 1982 UND’s Social Work Department was a modestly sized undergraduate program. By 2007 it also housed the University’s third largest graduate program outside the Medical School and was administering several quasiindependent service units helping both Social Workers and the general population of North Dakota. This growth was due to multiple interdependent factors, but in the final tally the Department Chairs provided the nexus of change. More precisely, five and a half chairs operated in contexts beyond their control, dealt with controversies and dysfunction, lawsuits and investigations, and the troubling combination of academic freedom and the loose knit process of faculty governance. Yet, through example, cajoling, leadership, and luck they deserve the credit for the accumulated changes—good and bad.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Filmmaking and Archaeology: Some Summary Thoughts STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: filmmaking-and-archaeology-some-summary-thoughts CATEGORY: Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 04/12/2010 08:22:00 AM ----BODY: <p>I’ve been lucky enough over the past 5 years to work with two fantastic young documentary filmmakers, Joe Patrow and Ian Ragsdale, in shooting documentary films based on our fieldwork at the Pyla-<i>Koutsopetria</i> Archaeological Project in Cyprus. Recently Ian has been pressing me (in a good way) to think about what we want to get out of his documentary work and to offer some general insights into how I understand what we have done. This has caused me to begin the process of marshaling 5 years of on and off discussions with Ian and Joe regarding issues related to making an archaeological documentary. Over this time, we’ve talked vaguely about co-writing an article that provides some practical tips for producing a “research film” designed to explore, communicate, and promote a research project. I’d like to think that this informal and spontaneous list will be the first step to writing up something more formal.<br /></p> <p>As someone with very little technical knowledge of the filmmaking process, I’ve relied on the project’s independent filmmakers to tell our project’s

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story. Being a part of these activities, however, has convinced me that these films are not only valuable communication (and teaching) tools, but also useful reflective activities in their own right. My comments below are based on three seasons of working with a documentary filmmaker. Joe Patrow worked with us in 2005 and 2007 and produced two films: <i><a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/DocuScript/DSHomePage.html">Sur vey on Cyprus</a> <span style="font-style: normal;">and</span> <span style="font-style: normal;"><a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/Emerging_Cypriot.html"><i>Emerg ing Cypriot</i></a>. Ian Ragsdale worked with us in 2009 and is editing his film: <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/PKAP2009#p/a/u/0/L271e8lVkQY"><i>Voices from Cyprus</i></a>. Both Ian and Joe provided short interviews <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/02/em erging-cyprio.html">here</a> and <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/06/py la-koutsopetria-filmmaker-ian-ragsdale.html">here</a>.</span></i></p> <p>As a final note, these comments are not meant to be proscriptive, but rather descriptive of my thinking as we discussed the making a film that communicated our project to a wider audience.</p> <p>1. Consider various audiences. We’ve used our films for such a wide variety of events that we have reaped the benefits of pitching our films to as broad an audience as possible.</p> <p>2. Modular Movies. When Joe Patrow returned to Cyprus to shoot another video in 2007, he quickly realized that to do something creative with similar material, he had to change the way that he would approach editing his work. As a result, he produced a series of shorts titled <a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/Emerging_Cypriot.html"><i>Emerg ing Cypriot</i></a>. These shorts were mostly under 5 minutes in length and captured various aspect of our work. To be fair, this approach clearly emerged from his first film, <a href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/DocuScript/DSHomePage.html"><i> Survey on Cyprus</i></a>, which told our story in a linear way, but also divided the story into a series of well-defined chapters. The benefit of a modular film is that it allows us to use the film for multiple purposes including embedding it in Powerpoint presentations, disseminating it over the web, and using in a classroom setting in a flexible way. With the advent of YouTube, Ian was able to take this concept even further by uploading a series of interviews edited in the field to a <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/PKAP2009#p/u">PKAP YouTube channel</a>.</p> <p>3. Process over product. One thing that we emphasized on our discussions with both Joe and Ian was the importance to show process rather than just product. In part, our emphasis on process was a necessity for an archaeological project that focused on the gradual accumulation of data rather than the search for a spectacular single find. The emphasis on process, however, ensured that whatever happened over the course of the season, we could tell the story of the project as an event in-and-of itself and not be dependent on a spectacular find or even the elusive answer to a research question during the time when the camera was rolling.</p> <p>4. Personalities. One thing that both Joe and Ian have managed to do is capture the unique mix of personalities present on our project each season. From the passionate to the silly, the personalities drive the story of the project forward and captures the human aspect of field research. In other words, Ian and Joe balanced the technical aspects of archaeological research against the individuals involved in the project. The result of this balancing act was a more

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engaging film which captured the human dimension of decision making in the field.</p> <p>5. Embed the filmmaker. Both Ian and Joe were effectively embedded in our project. This was perhaps largely a consequence of there only being just single person rather than a film crew, but it also speaks to the good match between the filmmaker and our team. Ian was trained as an archaeologist and Joe had an M.A. in history; so, both understood our project’s goals and methods and offered independent, critical interpretation of our work.</p> <p>6. Trust. Closely related to our ability to embed the filmmaker was our willingness to trust both Ian and Joe to tell the story of our project in a responsible and accurate way. In other words, we knew that these two guys would not go out of their way to make us look bad or to distort our methods and goals. What we have discovered is that the best results come from letting our filmmakes tell our story in their own voice.</p> <p>7. Time. One thing that we perhaps underestimated when we first started these projects in the time that they would take. Almost every member of the project had to be willing to take time out of their day to engage the camera and talk about what they were doing. When everyone is harried, tired, and busy, this was a significant commitment. And this says nothing of the commitment that both Joe and Ian have made to take our harried and tired comments and cobble them together into a cohesive story. Filmmaking takes time.</p> <p>8. Landscapes and Place. Video captures a different view of landscape than still photography or maps and plans. Both Joe and Ian were very effective in placing the project in its physical and natural environment. In particular video provides a sense of time to travel through the landscape that still photography often struggles to capture.</p> <p>9. Humor. Both Ian and Joe captured the humorous moments that are inevitable in any collaborative research project. Not only has this made their work more watchable (and less preachy), but also more human and more authentic.</p> <p>10. Technology. One of the great things that we’ve witnessed over the past 5 years is how much easier it is to distribute the results of our filmmakers labors. With the advent of YouTube, more robust broadband connections, and more larger and faster online storage it is now possible to distribute high-quality video over the internet with almost no specialized technological infrastructure.</p> <p>While it remains popular to complain about how academics and p<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2008/12/ar chaeologists-the-media-and-the-real-story.html">articularly archaeologists are portrayed in the media</a>, it is also increasingly easy to push back by producing professional quality films to depict archaeological work on a way that is both entertaining and academically responsible. Technology makes it simple to distribute the film around the world, high-quality HD video cameras are relatively inexpensive, and it is now possible to edit and add special effects on a desktop computer. So, if you want to shoot a film, team up with a filmmaker and do it.</p><br /> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS:

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----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Kostis Kourelis EMAIL: kkourelis@gmail.com IP: 155.68.29.254 URL: http://kourelis.blogspot.com/ DATE: 04/12/2010 11:58:44 AM I used Survey of Cyprus for teaching, to explain what pedestrian survey is all about to an undergraduate audience. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Sean Williams EMAIL: sean@heritage-key.com IP: 94.194.204.88 URL: http://heritage-key.com/ancient-london/video DATE: 04/13/2010 04:01:58 AM Why can't more archaeologists see that film-making is an essential part of getting the word out today? We've made some videos on the archaeology of London - take a look! ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Ian Ragsdale EMAIL: delvebelow@gmail.com IP: 168.7.221.176 URL: http://www.bigapefilms.com DATE: 04/14/2010 12:50:36 PM These insights are going to play a huge part in how I structure my upcoming seminar on digital filmmaking at Rice University. A big theme that I am taking away from recent reading, discussions, and contemplation is that videos for projects like PKAP can accomplish many tasks at once. The process of making a movie informs the research process. An instructional video goes live on the Internet and becomes a promotional tool in addition to a teaching tool. Brandon Olson used his featured vlog as a "thank you" to those who funded his participation in PKAP, in the hopes that that would not be forgotten during the next application season. It is gratifying to hear the breadth of benefit of PKAP's use of video. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Some Quick Hits and Varia on a Sunny Friday STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: some-quick-hits-and-varia-on-a-sunny-friday CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 04/09/2010 10:07:35 AM ----BODY: <p>Just a few, semi-frantic quick hits:</p> <ul> <li>It's been heartening to see the <a href="http://kourelis.blogspot.com/" title="Kostis Kourelis">Objects-Buildings-Situations</a> has sprung back to life lately!</li>

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<li>Check out the <a href="http://sports.espn.go.com/rpm/racing/news/story?id=5069688">Corinth Canal on ESPN</a>.</li> <li>Teaching Thursday features <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/04/08/experienced-interdisciplinarity-atund-the-integrated-studies-program/">a really thoughtful history of Integrated Studies at UND</a>.</li> <li>This is a great new <a href="http://gizmodo.com/5511678/apple-ipadreview">iPad review</a> (via <a href="http://www.fimoculous.com/">Fimoculous</a>).</li> <li>Gonjasufi is fantastic, multimedia, and world wide: <a href="http://gonjasufi.tumblr.com/">tumblr</a>, <a href="http://twitter.com/gonjasufi">Twitter</a>, <a href="http://www.sufisays.com/">web</a>, <a href="http://www.facebook.com/pages/Gonja-Sufi/47704155280">Facebook</a>, <a href="http://www.myspace.com/gonjasufi">MySpace</a>.</li> <li>If you haven't been following it, the University of North Dakota retired the Fighting Sioux logo and name this week. Check out the webcast of the <a href="http://nickname.und.edu/logo/?page_id=91">open forum meeting on it here at noon</a>. Here's the <a href="http://www.grandforksherald.com/event/article/id/157079/">Grand Forks Herald coverage</a>.</li> <li>It seems a shame that <a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/455150.html">Natha n Bracken lost his Cricket Australia contract</a>. I think that the Australian selectors are fickle and short sighted.</li> </ul> <p>Have a good weekend!</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: More on Christian and Pagan Statues STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: more-on-christian-and-pagan-statues CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Late Antiquity

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DATE: 04/08/2010 08:54:38 AM ----BODY: <p>A few months ago a thought-provoking article on the destruction of pagan statues and sanctuaries in Egypt by <a href="http://www.iconoclasm.dk/">Troels Myrup Kristensen</a> appeared <a href="http://muse.jhu.edu/login?uri=/journals/journal_of_late_antiquity/v002/2.2 .kristensen.html">in the <i>Journal of Late Antiquity</i></a>. Now, less than a year later, another thoughtful and extensive article on the topic has appeared in the august pages of the <i>American Journal of Archaeology</i>: "<a href="http://www.ajaonline.org/index.php?ptype=content&amp;aid=3639">Production to Destruction? Pagan and Mythological Statuary in Asia Minor</a>" by Ine Jacobs.</p> <p>The article is a sweeping study of the production, re-use, and destruction of pagan statuary in Late Antique Asia Minor. Jacobs brings to light particularly important issues regarding the declining production of statuary over the course of Late Antiquity particularly at traditional production centers in Asia Minor. She also touched in useful ways on issues regarding the context is which a statue was displayed (pp. 288-289) Statues that appear to have come from a cultic context or with close associations with local cult activities (for example, isolated statues of Artemis found at Ephesos) were more likely to be destroyed or damaged than statues in more secular settings or in groups depicting mythological or literary events. This resonates, in particular, with the work of <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/hellenism-in-lateantiquity/oclc/20724797">Glen Bowersock</a> (and others) who have shown that emergence of Christianity did not suppress the importance of pagan literary motifs in Late Antique culture. In fact, he, Peter Brown, and others have shown that references to pagan gods in literary texts was inseparable from the demonstration of Late Antique <i>paideia</i>, the elite discourse of both pagans and Christians.</p> <p>At the same time, Jones introduces the idea of statuary as decoration particularly in so-called "secular" contexts. Pagan statues, for example, could stand in baths, fountains, theaters, and even gates without offering a sustained threat to the increasingly Christianity community. The incidents of violence toward statues -- ranging from ritual and systematic destruction to the incising of crosses on the heads of pagan statues -- appears to have been sporadic and, in most cases, random. And this likely reflects the nature of most anti-pagan (and indeed anti-Christian) sentiments in antiquity.</p> <p>The article concludes with a nice catalogue of "Pagan and Mythological Statue Remains in Late Antiquity" which should be a nice guide for anyone looking to do some work on this topic.</p> <p>Whenever I read any article on the destruction of pagan statues in Late Antiquity (or their preservation in increasingly "decorative" contexts), I begin to consider the relationship between Christian attitudes toward pagan statuary and the emergence of the iconoclastic movement at the very end of Late Antiquity. I can't help but think whether the changing attitudes toward statues and images more generally tell us less about the end of antiquity and more about the emergence of Byzantine attitudes towards images. The creation of secular art (following <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/end-of-ancientchristianity/oclc/20825371">R. A. Markus's idea</a> that the discourse of Christianity, in effect, created the secular out of the remaining fragments of the pagan world in Late Antiquity) must have put particular pressure on its opposite, religious, and in the Late Antique world, Christian art. The surplus meaning generated from the secularization of pagan art created a new set of

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expectation for Christian art and these new expectations met their challenge in the iconoclastic controversies at the very end of antiquity.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Troels Myrup EMAIL: troelsmyrup@gmail.com IP: 87.57.143.104 URL: http://www.iconoclasm.dk DATE: 04/08/2010 10:59:00 AM Bill, good to see you promoting Ine's AJA paper! I think you're quite right about the need to re-think "destruction" (as well as "conservation") as the guiding principle(s) to understand the role of "pagan" statuary in LA. It's important to see these phenomena as part of a change in what may be termed visual practices rather than as a confrontation with a pagan past. As I argue in my dissertation, production and destruction are indeed often complementary processes rather than opposites, when we think more broadly about the impact that these images had on ancient viewers and what they did to and with them. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: An Open Letter on Byzantine Archaeology and Dumbarton Oaks STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: an-open-letter-on-byzantine-archaeology-and-dumbarton-oaks CATEGORY: Byzantium CATEGORY: Late Antiquity CATEGORY: Medieval and Post Medieval Greece Interest Group of the AIA DATE: 04/07/2010 07:49:23 AM ----BODY: <p>Recently Dumbarton Oaks invited a group of archaeologists with research interests in the Byzantine period to Washington, D.C. to discuss the future of Byzantine Archaeology in North America. <a href="http://kourelis.blogspot.com/2010/04/dumbarton-oaks-byzantine-archaeologyin.html">Kostis Kourelis has posted the schedule on his blog</a>. He has also <a href="http://kourelis.blogspot.com/2010/04/byzantine-archaeologyintercollegiate.html">re-posted a related letter</a> that he sent to the new director of Dumbarton Oaks, Margaret Mullett last year, and links to a nice post critiquing <a href="http://kourelis.blogspot.com/2009/05/dumbarton-oaks-andsurface-surveys.html">Dumbarton Oaks' attitudes toward intensive pedestrian survey</a>.</p>

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<p>I was invited to this conference, but unfortunately the invitation came too late for me to secure funding to make it. I belly-ached a bit about the somewhat abrupt planning of the conference which made it difficult for those of use in the hinterland to attend. In a big picture kind of way, it is understandable that Dumbarton Oaks would have overlooked the interest of very junior scholars who lived many miles from either coast. As a result, Director Mullett invited me (as I am sure she did to other folks) to send along my thoughts on Byzantine Archaeology in North America.</p> <p>After some thinking, I decided that I might as well post my email here.</p> <blockquote> <p>Dear Director Mullett,</p> <p>Thank you for the invitation to contribute my thoughts to the ongoing reflection on the relationship between Dumbarton Oaks and the discipline of archaeology. So that you know, I consider the work done at DO over the past five decades to be fundamental to the development of Byzantine studies in the US and I tried doggedly for over a decade to get funding for my research from the institution, not so much because I felt like I could contribute to what was going there, but because I felt that being in contact with the environment, people, and resources of DO would make me a better scholar. I learned this respect for the institution from my advisors Jim Morganstern and Timothy Gregory, both of whom benefited from the generosity, collegiality, and resources of DO.</p> </blockquote> <blockquote> <p>My take on how DO could return to the forefront of the study of Byzantine archaeology involves reconsidering both the place of Byzantine and Medieval archaeology in the academic world and leveraging the resources that DO has developed to contribute not only to Byzantine studies, but to archaeology more generally. To do this, I can see three things:</p> <p>1. Archaeology has become increasingly method driven over the past 30 years. These methods range from the quantitative approaches of New Archaeology to the more reflective methods of post-processuralism. Medieval archaeology has taken advantage of both of these developments (although more the former than the latter!). A recently published proceedings from a 1998 conference on the archaeology of <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/medieval-and-postmedieval-greece-the-corfu-papers/oclc/476763831">Medieval and Post-Medieval Greece</a> shows the discipline’s deep investment in a wide range of methodologically sophisticated discourses. Unfortunately, publications from Dumbarton Oaks were largely absent from the bibliographies in this work and, as result, from the conversation. I know that Kostis Kourelis has shared with you his thoughts on the role of DO in the support of intensive pedestrian survey in the Mediterranean world. (And I recognize that DO has supported innovation in preservation practices as well as in such scientific methods as dendrochronology). Overlooking intensive pedestrian survey, however, is particularly glaring because this method has contributed significantly to how we understand the Byzantine period across so much of the Eastern Mediterranean. Looking at a slightly bigger picture and overlooking my own, practical commitment to this form of archaeology, DO has supported very little in the way of overtly methodological discussion in Byzantine archaeology. In short, if DO wants to influence the future of Byzantine and Medieval archaeology in the Mediterranean, they need to engage in methodology. (Marcus Rautman and Tim Gregory's contributions here are particularly significant.)</p>

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<p>2. At the same time, archaeology – and the humanities in general – have become increasingly theoretical. Most of this theoretical bent comes, as you know, from the so-called challenge of postmodernism. Despite these somewhat discredited (or at least controversial) origins, the themes introduced by postmodern thought have exerted a tremendous influence on archaeology by not only asking difficult questions of the archaeologist as practitioner, but also offering important critiques of the role of archaeology in the emergence of national identities, the understanding of material objects as active agents in social networks, and the place of archaeology in challenging historical and political orthodoxies. Despite the longstanding investment of DO on the study of important objects from the Byzantine Mediterranean, they have exerted very little influence on discussions of how and why objects create meaning. The most striking example of this is that DO has played a key role in supporting the study of Byzantium in Eastern Europe where the intersection of archaeology, Byzantine studies, and national identities is particularly visible and susceptible to important scholarly critique, but offered very few critical reflections on Byzantine archaeology as an a cultural and political phenomenon. (<a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/making-of-the-slavs-history-andarchaeology-of-the-lower-danube-region-ca-500-700/oclc/45283024-of-the-slavshistory-and-archaeology-of-the-lower-danube-region-ca-500-700/oclc/45283024">The work of Florin Curta</a> is an important representative of this approach) &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>3. Permeability. The final observation regarding DO’s place in the academic ecosystem may be largely self-serving. As impressed as I have been with its scholarly achievements, I have larger felt like an outsider looking in on its resources and activities. I am not naïve and I understand that my academic credentials have not positioned me geographically or professionally to gain access to what DO has to offer on a regular basis. Moreover, I understand that resources (both financial and otherwise) are limited. That being said, I do wonder whether DO can make itself more inviting to scholars from outside its traditional academic catchment area. One can easily imagine programs that range from archaeological field schools for graduate students, pedagogical outreach to ensure the health of Byzantine archaeology as field taught in American universities, and research outreach so that the good work of scholars affiliated with Dumbarton Oaks is visible beyond the traditional bastions of Byzantine studies (the AIA lecture program is a nice parallel here).</p> <p>Issue 3 likely reflects my own professional insecurities and academic limitations, and I hope it does not overshadow the significance of issues 1 and 2. The theoretical and methodological are areas where the archaeology of the Medieval and Byzantine world has exerted an influence beyond those interested in its traditional chronological and geographical limits. I suppose my earlier observation that DO’s position of leadership in the field of Byzantine archaeology has lapsed derives from the observation that they have not played a particularly significant role in developments in archaeology that have extended to other periods and places. My perspective on the potential of Byzantine archaeology may be a bit naïve, but it seems to me that the transdisciplinary nature of Byzantine Studies and the deep and persistent commitment to art, texts, architecture, and objects provides a formidable foundation for a kind of sophisticated, synthetic archaeology. This is a powerful offering for an academic community that looks in an increasingly positive way on the inter- and transdisciplinary organizations whose efforts to forge research questions across disciplinary boundaries in a self-conscious way surely reflects the future of academia.</p>

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<p>Respectfully yours,<br /> Bill Caraher</p> </blockquote> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Some more thoughts on Leonidas, Baptism, and Korinth STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: some-more-thoughts-on-leonidas-baptism-and-korinth CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 04/06/2010 07:50:47 AM ----BODY: <p>Thanks to our rock-star quality interlibrary loan staff here at the University of North Dakota, I was able to get my greedy mitts on F. Halkin, "Saint Leonide et ses sept compagnes martyrs a Corinthe," <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/epeteris-etaireias-buzantinonspoudon/oclc/473756833"><i>EEBS</i></a> 23 (1953), 217-223. This little gem of an article will help me complete (or at least fill out) some thoughts I offered a couple of weeks ago <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/so me-thoughts-on-st-leonidas-and-baptism-at-lechaion-in-greece.html">in this blog post</a> (and in a <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/11/th e-ambivalent-landscape-of-late-antique-corinth.html">related post here</a>). Just in case you can't be bothered to click through to either of those links, I suggest that the prominent baptistery on the coast at Lechaion may have particular significance to the site. In short, if this is a church dedicated to St. Leonidas and his companions, then a baptistery (and references to water) would have particular significance since the saint and his friends were martyred by drowning off the coast.</p> <p>The Late Byzantine (or later, at least, post early-13th century) life of St. Leonidas published by Halkin in the 1930s includes a couple references that would appear to support my argument. I'll include paragraph 8 below (p. 223):</p> <p><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201347faedf6e970c -pi" width="480" height="343" alt="201004060701.jpg" /></p>

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<p>While I won't translate the entire passage, I'll offer a quick translation of two sections (note that my translations were tweaked in the comments!). First, beginning at line 5:<br /></p> <blockquote> <p><span id="comment-6a00d83451908369e20133ec80d36a970bcontent"><b>UPDATED:</b> <a href="http://individual.utoronto.ca/nakassis/index.html">Dimitri Nakassis</a> provided this nicer translation:</span></p> <p><span id="comment-6a00d83451908369e20133ec80d36a970b-content">"So with much time having passed and with the public executioners having started sending Leonidēs down into the Gulf first, he [Leonidēs], having raised his face to heaven, said, “Behold! And with this second baptism today have I been baptized, which makes the man within us more clean.”"</span><br /></p> </blockquote> <p>Also then at line 12:</p> <blockquote> <p><b>UPDATED</b>: He also offered this:&nbsp;&nbsp;"Pious men, dragging the bodies of the saints lying on the beach, having attended to them in honor they buried them, having built a church on the spot, where [the bodies], both augustly worshiped and extolled everlastingly, to those who approach faithfully they make to gush out healings each time."</p> </blockquote> <p>According to Halkin (and I have no reason to doubt it) this is the only reference to a church built to honor Leonidas and his martyrs in the accounts of his martyrdom (p. 219). The text that Halkin presents here is almost certainly post-13th century in data and pulls information from a range of known synaxaria and a few other lost sources. One of this unknown sources preserved -- it would seem -- some memory of the great church on the Lechaion coast. Moreover, the clear and explicit link between drowning, baptism, and the massive baptistery at Lechaion might even hint that the building preserved in the memory of this text is not the church, but the baptistery. The baptistery may well have stood longer than the church to its south and considering the relatively shallow depth of the excavations at the site, it seems plausible to assume that significant parts of the buildings on the coast were long visible.</p> <p>The goal of all this speculation, of course, was to understand the link between the Lechaion basilica and the elaborate nymphaion located less than a kilometer to the south of the basilica along the coastal bluff. This structure shares many decorative cues with the Lechaion basilica and I have proposed (very tentatively) that the shared emphasis on water brings together the Corinthian wide theme of the <a href="http://www.worldcat.org/title/fountains-and-theculture-of-water-at-roman-corinth/oclc/50497698">well-watered city</a> and the specific circumstances of Leonidas and his companions' martyrdom. This is just another, albeit very small scale study, of how religious authority projected into the Corinthian landscape.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS:

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----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Dimitri Nakassis EMAIL: nakassis@gmail.com IP: 99.232.120.203 URL: DATE: 04/06/2010 02:39:04 PM I would have translated the first passage, "So with much time having passed and with the public executioners having started sending Leonidēs down into the Gulf first, he [Leonidēs], having raised his face to heaven, said, “Behold! And with this second baptism today have I been baptized, which makes the man within us more clean.”" ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL: IP: 134.129.192.225 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 04/06/2010 03:24:07 PM Dimitri, Thanks! Mine was really hasty -- I mistranslated timeron. Pretty lame. Bill ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Dimitri Nakassis EMAIL: nakassis@gmail.com IP: 99.232.120.203 URL: DATE: 04/06/2010 06:21:50 PM Also, I think that I would translate the second passage as follows: "Pious men, dragging the bodies of the saints lying on the beach, having attended to them in honor they buried them, having built a church on the spot, where [the bodies], both augustly worshiped and extolled everlastingly, to those who approach faithfully they make to gush out healings each time." This sentence is weird to my Classically-trained eye. Why is σύροντες present? Why is δομησάμενοι (itself bizarre) aorist, since surely they built the church AFTER they buried the bodies of the martyrs? Why use this odd verb, εκβλύζω, with ιάσεις (liquid imagery, perhaps)? -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: The iPad and My Computer Ecosystem STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: the-ipad-and-my-computer-ecosystem CATEGORY: The New Media CATEGORY: Web/Tech DATE: 04/05/2010 09:03:52 AM -----

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BODY: <p>Enough people have asked that I feel either mocked or obligated to report on my first two days with my Apple iPad. (And for the record, I think that they're mostly mocking me.)</p> <p>As I have said before, I am not necessarily an early adopter, but I also understand that the next generation of any device will almost always be better than the device that I decide to eventually purchase. Also, despite one of my former student's suggestions, I am not an Apple fanboy or "the high priest of the Apple cult" (although the latter seems sorta cool). I use four computers regularly. I do most of my writing on a MacBook Pro which is now a couple of years old. I do GIS, database, and basic statistical work on the Big Diesel -- a 17-inch Dell XPS laptop -- and I also increasingly use this computer for editing podcasts and various things involved in developing my online classes. At home, we use a Mac Mini as a media server for our stereo and it runs through our TV for movies and the like and surf the web on a three year old Toshiba laptop running Ubuntu. I don't game, but I do have an iPod Touch that I use regularly to do light web-surfing, check emails, and listen to music.</p> <p>So, that's my computer ecosystem right now. The one thing missing was a ebook reader. I travel pretty regularly and I also read all the time. I read books, articles, student papers, drafts of my own writing, blogs, newspapers, and even, more and more rarely, fiction. Most of the academic articles that I read are now disseminated in PDF format and I do at least part of my own editing work in front of a computer. In other words, I wanted a device that allowed my to consume media in a more efficient and comfortable way. I had plenty of computers that enabled me to produce media in a flexible environment.</p> <p>I was romanced by the Kindle and found it charming and functional enough to get one for my mother for Christmas a few years back, but I was worried that its web-surfing abilities seemed pretty limited for a $300 device. I thought maybe the Nook would be the answer or even one of Sony's elegant ebook readers, but the reviews on these devices were never quite enough to push me to order one. In particular, I wanted a device that would let me do a bit more than basic websurfing since online classes had increasingly come to play a part in my teaching load. I wanted to be able to read and critique discussion board posts, for example, in my classes' threaded-discussions. This can be a time consuming process, and I wanted to be able to do it with more physical flexibility than I currently had with my laptops. I also wanted to be able to manage the various blogs that I write or administer. While I write sitting at the computer, I wanted to be able to administer comments, spam, and other basic maintenance aspects of blogging without having to boot up a computer and without being at my desk.</p> <p>With these needs in mind, the iPad is doing fine so far. I spent time on Easter reading a little gaggle of articles that I had downloaded over the course of the previous week. I uploaded them to my <a href="http://www.mediafire.com/">Mediafire</a> account and downloaded them easily onto a PDF reader on my iPad. I suspect that I'll continue to do most of my research on my laps tops since I am completely dependent on Firefox based <a href="http://www.zotero.org/">Zotero</a> to keep track of citations, but I could imagine doing some light research on it in a pinch.</p> <p>I read my Sunday <i>New York Times</i> on it and even contemplated spending $80 on <a href="http://www.amazon.com/Hellenism-in-Byzantiumebook/dp/B0017XZJPA">Anthony Kaldellis's</a> <i><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Hellenism-in-Byzantiumebook/dp/B0017XZJPA">Hellenism in Byzantium</a>,</i> before opting for the free, <a href="http://www.gutenberg.org/wiki/Main_Page">Project Gutenburg</a>produced, version of Conrad's <i>Secret Agent</i>. I also read some discussion

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board posts, a couple of blogs, and even watched part of a TV show on it. So, from what I can tell it does everything that it advertised it could do. The only frustration that I've encountered is figuring out how to organize files that I've uploaded to the device. I have the 32 GB version, so I could imagine having quite a bit of articles, photographs, and even scanned books on it, but I would need a more clear way of keeping these various documents organized before I make the device my research companion for trips to museum storerooms and the like.</p> <p>Aside from that, it's aesthetically appealing, fast, stable, and seemingly bug free (although time will surely tell).</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Dallas DeForest EMAIL: deforest.6@osu.edu IP: 65.60.192.124 URL: DATE: 04/05/2010 12:39:30 PM <a href="http://www.theonion.com/articles/new-device-desirable-old-deviceundesirable,2862/">http://www.theonion.com/articles/new-device-desirable-olddevice-undesirable,2862/</a> dallas ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL: IP: 208.107.184.168 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 04/05/2010 12:44:46 PM Absolutely. Except, I didn't have an old device and I never want to have one either. They sound like they are pretty undesirable. ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Mark Hilverda EMAIL: mark.hilverda@gmail.com IP: 99.236.177.154 URL: http://twitter.com/markhilverda DATE: 04/05/2010 07:28:41 PM I've got to ask...how do standard pdf journal articles look on the iPad? Is a full page clear and readable and is zooming still needed? This could be amazing... ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: William Caraher EMAIL:

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IP: 208.107.184.168 URL: http://profile.typepad.com/billcaraher DATE: 04/05/2010 07:46:23 PM Mark, They actually look great. It was very comfortable to read on. Bill ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Daniel Sauerwein EMAIL: daniel.sauerwein@und.edu IP: 208.107.115.6 URL: http://civilwarhistory.wordpress.com DATE: 04/05/2010 11:26:16 PM Bill, Can't wait to see this new addition to your electronic family. Hope your Easter was a good one. See you tomorrow. Daniel ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Evan Nelson EMAIL: evannelson@mail.und.edu IP: 134.129.168.159 URL: DATE: 04/06/2010 03:00:12 PM You do know that mocking usually masks abject jealousy, right? ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: R Sang EMAIL: ratchnok@yahoo.com IP: 64.178.99.226 URL: DATE: 04/28/2010 12:27:05 PM Can you use zotero on the iPad? -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Quick Hits and Varia on a Holiday Friday STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: quick-hits-and-varia-on-a-holiday-friday CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 04/02/2010 07:30:43 AM ----BODY: <p>A little gaggle of quick hits and varia on a rainy holiday Friday (it seems fitting that Good Friday be rainy and dark):</p> <ul>

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<li>For the first time in a few years Eastern (Greek) Easter and Western Easter coincide. While both groups use the same method to establish the date of Easter, the has to do with the differences between the Julian and Gregorian calendars and the lunar calendars upon which the two churches use to reckon the date of Easter. The holiday will also coincide next year.</li> <li>Some interesting conversation about inter-disciplinarity <a href="http://www.profhacker.com/2010/04/01/building-an-interdisciplinaryidentity-in-a-mostly-non-interdisciplinary-academic-world/">here at ProfHacker</a>, and <a href="http://electricarchaeologist.wordpress.com/2010/04/01/ethan-watrall-onbranding-and-interdisciplinary-identity-amen-brother/">here at the Electric Archaeologist</a>, and in the comments on this post <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/03/18/reflecting-on-interdisciplinaryteaching/#comments">here in Teaching Thursday</a>. Keep an eye on Teaching Thursday for more discussions on the inter/trans/multi/cross disciplinary moment.</li> <li>At Tomorrow Museum, <a href="http://tomorrowmuseum.com/2010/03/28/theeditor-and-the-curator-or-the-context-analyst-and-the-media-synesthete/">it's all about curating</a>.</li> <li>I am counting the hours until my iPad arrives (and it left Anchorage, Alaska early this morning). The best review is probably <a href="http://www.boingboing.net/2010/03/31/a-first-look-at-ipad.html">this one on Boing Boing</a>, but I also liked <a href="http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,1976935,00.html">the slightly bigger picture perspective offered at (gasp) Time</a>. I had a great (but too short) discussion with a few students about it this past week and I love that the iPad makes people angry. It reminds me of the early 1990s when being serious about a Mac was seen as an insult to the serious and sacred power of the PC. But before I get too excited, I read this and then <a href="http://www.boingboing.net/2010/04/02/why-i-wont-buy-an-ipad-and-think-youshouldnt-either.html">felt a tiny twinge of guilt</a>. There is, however, something slightly disingenuous about Doctorow's critique. The idea that the iPad or any "walled-garden" type product is bad because we can't get inside to manipulate how it works falls apart when pushed too far. The goal with a product like the iPad is to enhance the experience of consuming content. It's the equivalent of getting a nice pair of new speakers or getting a favorite book rebound in a classy new binding. It enhances the pleasure of consuming music and reading. We can complain that no one should own stereos because, after all it deprives the individual from creating music -- like on a piano -- or that we shouldn't spend time reading books or even sanction their distribution because it will slowly crush our desire to write. These are just silly arguments. The time when the only way to enjoy technology was when you built it or customized it yourself is over.</li> <li>So, one of my graduate students in my public history internship continues <a href="http://webmuseweavers.wordpress.com/">to blog, and she's pretty good at it</a>!</li> <li>The University of North Dakota is slated to begin a major construction project in the heart of campus. It will involve an expansion and renovation to the College of Education Building. I want to start a campus wide drive to call rename it the Woodworth Building (<a

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href="http://www.und.nodak.edu/instruct/wcaraher/DHChapter_1.html">if you don't know, you better ask somebody</a>)</li> <li>You can also follow <a href="http://webdevelopment.und.edu/">how UND is revising their website here</a>. I served on one of the committees involved in some of the decisions making. It was an education on how the university works.</li> <li><a href="http://www.cricinfo.com/nzvaus2010/content/story/454066.html">This was quite a display by Mitchell Johnson</a>. I just wish he was more consistent.</li> </ul> <p>One last thing, I brought my breakfast to work this morning in this plastic bag photographed below. It was mixed in with our assorted other plastic bags. It must have entered our collection from Cyprus somehow. There isn't a Carrefour (a French supermarket chain) in the US or even in North America. How's that for the movement of plastic around the world:</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201347f976abc970c -pi" width="480" height="360" alt="Photo 6.jpg" /></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Chuck JonesEMAIL: cejo@uchicago.edu IP: 128.122.167.53 URL: http://ancientworldonline.blogspot.com/ DATE: 04/02/2010 10:56:37 AM I suppose you noticed that the Time review was written not by a techie but by a (gasp) regular person with a good grasp of the language - Stephen Fry. Well, maybe he's not quite so regular... ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: renaissance costumes EMAIL: renblogposts@gmail.com IP: 125.60.227.198 URL: http://www.renaissancemodel.com/ DATE: 04/05/2010 12:35:47 AM Hmmm.. probably you have now received your iPad. :) enjoy your new gadget and hopefully you can post a review on how the thing is doing.. :) -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Thursday: How to introduce the M.A. in History? STATUS: Publish

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ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: teaching-thursday-how-to-introduce-the-ma-in-history CATEGORY: Teaching DATE: 04/01/2010 08:26:56 AM ----BODY: <p>Over the past semester, we've re-conceived our M.A. program in History here at the University of North Dakota.&nbsp; As part of this process we've added another required M.A. level course.&nbsp; Traditionally, we've required that the students take a graduate historiography course; in our new program we will require our students also to take a an introduction to historical methods course.&nbsp; This course will involve a "refresher" (let's call it that!) on advanced research techniques.&nbsp; This means an introduction to both library and online resources for doing independent historical research as well as basic refresher on note-taking, outline-writing, and thesis-formulating.&nbsp; This work will likely culminate in the student's writing a feasibility study for their proposed M.A. research.&nbsp; In a two year program, it is never too early to start working on research.</p> <p>The second part of the class will be the so-called parade of scholars.&nbsp; This will involve at least part of our graduate faculty presenting their research interests and methods.&nbsp; Our department has a nice range of scholarly approaches; several of use work on material culture (albeit in different ways), we have an oral historians, a quantitative historian, a biographer, a few archival guys, and a clever, philological Medievalist.&nbsp; So, if even half of the graduate faculty in our department come through the seminar, we'll provide a nice introduction to historical approaches present in our department.</p> <p>The only other issue is how does the historical methods course work together with it's trailing course in historiography.&nbsp; The methods, approaches, and techniques of history are closely related to both the history of the discipline (particularly the process of professionalization) and the theoretical and epistemological assumptions that we rely upon to understand the past.&nbsp; While separating methods from theory (or theory from practice) has long been a practical and pedagogical expectation, it also enables student to take unreflective approach to how they understand their own discipline.&nbsp; In short, we preach that understanding the past is vital for understanding the present, but then offer courses that separate the two making it appear that present practice is sustainable without a sophisticated understanding of the history and theory of what we do.&nbsp; It could be hypocritical at best, and at worse, perpetuate the a kind of theoretical complacency that is not uncommon in history department and among graduate students.</p> <p>On the other hand, you can't teach everything at once.&nbsp; And the division between theory and practice does allow for a rather neat pedagogical division.&nbsp; The practical techniques of historical research are best learned through going and doing historical research, whereas the theoretical and historical foundations for the discipline are perhaps better introduced through a directed readings type environment where a group of scholars wrestle with challenging ideas a group.&nbsp; The challenge of rewriting the curriculum is how to accommodate these two different, yet nevertheless fundamental aspects the process of learning how to conduct historical research and analysis.&nbsp; The key issue is whether we should structure our curriculum around pedagogical issues or around the conceptual links that unite theory and technique in the practice of history.</p> -----

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EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: The Personal Archive STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: the-personal-archive CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 03/31/2010 07:48:51 AM ----BODY: <p>I'll admit that I am currently obsessed with <a href="http://omeka.org/">Omeka</a> (and particularly excited about their new foray into <a href="http://omeka.org/blog/2010/03/09/omeka-net-be-first-inline/">cloud hosting</a>).&nbsp; As any reader of this blog knows, it's a free, open-source web-publishing platform.&nbsp; And I have begun to use it extensively to publish images from my archaeological work in the Mediterranean.&nbsp; The software is powerful and relatively easy to use. I've managed to build three archives so far.&nbsp; The first included <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/collections/show/3">the works of Ryan Stander</a> who was the artist in residence at the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project this past summer.&nbsp; The second, which I featured in this blog yesterday, included images taken of <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/collections/show/4">the site of Lakka Skoutara</a> over the course of 9 years showing archaeological formation processes playing out in the Greek countryside.&nbsp; Yesterday, I uploaded <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/collections/show/6">a series of maps</a> documenting the distribution of material across our study area in Cyprus.&nbsp; The maps show the distribution of artifacts by chronotype across the coastal zone of Pyla Village, and these maps will be linked to places within a working draft of a chapter for the upcoming PKAP monograph on the distributional analysis of material at the site.&nbsp; </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1932"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/hellenisticearlyroman_2f 7a1b0d0a.jpg" width="400" height="400"></a><br>Distribution of Hellenistic to Early Roman period artifacts</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1944"><img src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/romanearly_dfd6bdb181.jp g" width="400" height="400"></a><br>Distribution of Early Roman period artifacts</p> <p align="left">Eventually, a working draft of this chapter (part of which have appeared, albeit in very fragmentary forms in this blog in Thinking Out Loud <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/09/pr eliminary-analysis-of-pyla-koustopetria-archaeological-data-or-thinking-out-

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loud.html">One</a>, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/09/pr eliminary-analysis-of-pyla-koustopetria-archaeological-data-or-thinking-outloud-2.html">Two</a>, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/10/pr eliminary-analysis-of-pyla-koustopetria-archaeological-data-or-thinking-outloud-3.html">Three</a>, <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/pr eliminary-analysis-of-pyla-koustopetria-archaeological-data-or-thinking-outloud-4.html">Four</a>) will appear on my <a href="http://www.scribd.com/billcaraher/">Scribd page</a> or, better still, in <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/">my Omeka archive</a> alongside the other maps and images using their clever Google powered <a href="http://omeka.org/codex/Plugins/DocsViewer">document viewer plugin</a>.</p> <p align="left">None of these applications took me more than a few hours to find my comfort zone and I can uses these applications to continue to expand the personal-professional archive that began with the blog.&nbsp; Each archive is designed to accommodate different types of material, operates with slightly different principles of organization, and has a different aesthetic of display (or user-interface as the kids call it).</p> <p align="left">The scholarly process becomes more transparent and de-mystified.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Creating Ruins: Formation Process Pictures from Lakka Skoutara STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: creating-ruins-formation-process-pictures-from-lakka-skoutara CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters CATEGORY: Medieval and Post Medieval Greece Interest Group of the AIA DATE: 03/30/2010 07:54:22 AM ----BODY: <p>One of the most exciting things about our recent efforts to produce an online archive of images from the rural site of Lakka Skoutara is that it is now possible to track the processes that have created the ruins visible today.&nbsp; It's remarkable how much the houses have broken down over just a decade of observation.&nbsp; Click on the images of the houses to get access to the archive itself (powered by <a href="http://omeka.org/">Omeka</a>) and selective Dublin Core metadata.</p> <p> House 3 represents one of the most dramatic changes over 8 years time. Once the roof collapses, the walls fall down fairly quickly.&nbsp; The fieldstone and mud mortar addition on House 3 below collapses much more quickly than the modern cinder block and concrete.&nbsp; It's

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interesting that the end walls on the house remain standing, but I suppose unsurprising since they bear very little of the roof's weight.&nbsp; </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1892"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house3_image1_2001_8f2be aa35c.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house3_image1_2001_8f2be aa35c.jpg" width="400" height="270"></a><br>(2001)</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1896"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house3_image1_2002_51dd3 cf609.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house3_image1_2002_51dd3 cf609.jpg" width="400" height="270"></a><br>(2002)</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1154"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house3_image4_corinth_ju ne12_2004_edb2c7d3e7.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house3_image4_corinth_ju ne12_2004_edb2c7d3e7.jpg" width="400" height="300"></a><br>(2004)</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1124"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house3_image57_2009_fd1b 971c59.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house3_image57_2009_fd1b 971c59.jpg" width="400" height="300"></a><br>(2009)</p> <p align="left">The change in house 2 is equally dramatic, but here you'll notice some little editing issues.&nbsp; For example, in many cases the images scanned from slides are backwards.&nbsp; Note that between 2001 and 2002, the tiles of the house were removed and as a result the roof gives way quickly.&nbsp; </p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1899"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house2_image1_2001_28767 bd627.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house2_image1_2001_28767 bd627.jpg" width="400" height="273"></a><br>(2001)</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1900"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house2_image5_2002_09788 40f81.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house2_image5_2002_09788 40f81.jpg" width="400" height="272"></a><br>(2002)</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1037"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house2_image1b_corinth_j une12_2004_53ea038174.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house2_image1b_corinth_j une12_2004_53ea038174.jpg" width="400" height="300"></a><br>(2004)</p> <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/items/show/1015"><img alt="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house2_image5_2009_386af cdaf2.jpg" src="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/archive/fullsize/house2_image5_2009_386af cdaf2.jpg" width="400" height="268"></a><br>(2009)</p> <p align="left">The plan with this project is not only to create a resource where students and scholars can observe the way that buildings break down over time.&nbsp; Be sure to check out <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/collections/show/4">the growing archive here</a>.&nbsp; The plan is to add some maps and plans as well as some more pictures over the next few weeks so it is always worth stopping back through the archive.&nbsp; I'll also likely move <a href="http://www.scribd.com/full/28737818?access_key=key1265siotexydjqyoet25">the working papers</a> over to my Omeka page soon as well.</p> <p align="left">For more on this project:</p> <p align="left"><a

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href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2010/03/la kka-skoutara-a-partial-archive.html">Lakka Skoutara: A Partial Archive</a><br><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/10/be tween-sea-and-mountain-the-archaeology-of-a-20th-century-small-world-in-theupland-basin-of-the-southeastern-korinthia.html">Between Sea and Mountain: The Archaeology of a 20th Century "small world" in the upland basin of the southeastern Korinthia</a><br><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/08/sl opes-and-terraces-at-lakka-skoutara.html">Slopes and Terraces at Lakka Skoutara</a><br><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/08/co rinthian-infiltration-the-interior-of-some-houses-at-lakkaskoutara.html">Corinthian Infiltration: The Interior of Some Houses at Lakka Skoutara</a><br><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/07/la kka-skoutara-the-survey.html">Lakka Skoutara: The Survey</a><br><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/07/th e-houses-of-lakka-skoutara.html">The Houses of Lakka Skoutara</a><br><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/06/co llapse.html">Collapse</a><br><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/06/pr ovisional-discard.html">Provisional Discard</a><br><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/2009/06/co nstruction-in-the-corinthia.html">Construction in the Corinthia</a></p> <p align="left"></p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT: AUTHOR: Maddy EMAIL: maddy.bray@gmail.com IP: 76.91.201.94 URL: DATE: 04/25/2010 02:35:54 PM This is very cool. Thanks Bill! -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Three Things From the Writers Conference STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: three-things-from-the-writers-conference CATEGORY: Grand Forks Notes CATEGORY: North Dakotiana CATEGORY: The New Media

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DATE: 03/29/2010 08:16:51 AM ----BODY: <p>This past week's writers conference was a pretty spectacular event.&nbsp; I managed to attend several of the lunchtime sessions and a few other events.&nbsp; I wish I could have done more.&nbsp; Even with that somewhat limited exposure, I came away with innumerable impressions and ideas that I hope can somehow influence my thinking and work over the next year.</p> <p>1. Writing as Performance.&nbsp; <a href="http://www.undwritersconference.org/wcauthors.html#williams">Saul Williams</a>, whose poetry is as much about performance on stage as it is about language, made the point that he regarded the page itself as a performance space.&nbsp; I am not sure why I was surprised by this.&nbsp; In the previous days panel entitled "beyond the screen", a number of the participants described the creative process in performative terms.&nbsp; One work discussed in this panel was a collective called <a href="http://www.booki.cc/collaborativefutures/">Collaborative Furtures</a> created a single book over <a href="http://www.mandiberg.com/2010/01/25/wewrote-the-book-collaborative-futures-transmediale-booksprint/">a week period</a>.&nbsp; The act of writing was as much the final product as the book itself.&nbsp; It got me thinking about blogging as a kind of performative writing.&nbsp; The time-based aspect of the blog -- with the date of publication forming the primary organizing principle -- represents writing in a way that centers more on the way that ideas develop through time and careen off one another than any one central theme, argument, plot, or even space.&nbsp; The time based component of the blog draws inspiration from the practice of writing journals which seek to capture the immediacy of experience.&nbsp; I think this relates to our somewhat erratic efforts on the <a href="http://punkarchaeology.wordpress.com/">Punk Archaeology</a> blog where we have (I think tacitly) abandoned any plan or argument or even rhythm to our posts and introduce ideas as they come to us. In effect, blogging (even my rhythmic, daily, inscription) performs the act of writing by insisting on the temporal dimension of its practice. Like working papers, blog posts are showing the work that final drafts of academic and professional writing obscures behind a find layer of polish.&nbsp; Blogs represent ideas as events in the process of development.</p> <p>2. There is no New Media.&nbsp; One of the themes of the writers conference was the New Media and one of the really obvious outcomes of all the panels that I attended is that the very notion of the New Media has outlived its purpose.&nbsp; First off, we probably can't call many of the things that are traditionally associated with the New Media "new" any more.&nbsp; After all, the internet as we know it is 20 years old and computer based media actually predates widespread access to net.&nbsp; Like any once-new medium for communicating ideas, any effort to produce a common definition is bound to be inadequate to describe the work of artists and writers across such varied platforms as interactive fiction, web-based video, digital music, installation art, and multimedia arguments.&nbsp; In fact, if there is any complaint that I have about the writers conference is how little common ground there was between the people on the largest and (to my mind) potentially most dynamic panel -Beyond the Screen -- which featured new media pioneers and masters across mutiple fields: <a href="http://www.undwritersconference.org/wcauthors.html#condit">Cecelia Condit</a> (film), <a href="http://www.undwritersconference.org/wc-authors.html#amerika">Mark Amerika</a> (film and literature), <a href="http://www.undwritersconference.org/wc-authors.html#montfort">Nick Montfort</a> (literature), <a href="http://www.undwritersconference.org/wcauthors.html#moulthrop">Stuart Moulthrop</a> (art and literature), <a

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href="http://www.undwritersconference.org/wc-authors.html#miller">Scott Miller</a> (music).&nbsp; While we can all accept that a lack of easy definition can suggest the existence of something profound, in the case of the New Media it may indicate, instead, that whatever moment in time the newness sought to capture and define has passed.&nbsp; The New Media no longer has a center around which ideas are coalescing.&nbsp; In other words, whatever middle ground once existed which allowed authors and artists to share ideas has now once again dispersed and we must find new paradigms to understand how former "New" media works relate.</p> <p>3. Anxiety and the Book.&nbsp; The first panel I attended was provocatively titled: "Are Books Obsolete?".&nbsp; The title alone suggests the anxiety surrounding the coming of the ebook reader, the speed and fluidity of the web, and the end of the page as a basic unit for measuring writing, reading, and certain basic intellectual accomplishments.&nbsp; While there were plenty of opportunities to celebrate the "new" opportunities made available through the hypertextual medium of the electronic "page", the underlying anxiety persisted. In this context, all of the sometimes incredible power of books came to the fore: their ability to capture attention, to stimulate pleasure through their weight, forms, and even scent, to structure narrative through conditioning interaction, to create better, more thoughtful readers, and to sustain the creative arts by protecting the intellectual property of the author.&nbsp; Anyone who has read this blog knows that I appreciate the role that objects play in creating relationships between individuals, but all of the anxiety about the end of the book seems strangely overwrought.&nbsp; There is no denying there importance of books to the Western intellectual tradition, there is also no denying that most people in history did not read books.&nbsp; And more than that, even most people who could read did not necessary read books.&nbsp; I'd even argue that today, most of us spend more time reading newspapers, magazines, loose papers, and letters than books.&nbsp; It's not that books aren't important (and I suspect that they will continue to be), but that their impact has always been focused on a particular groups and particular circumstances.&nbsp; Perhaps it's just the historian in me who noticed the lack of historical context for the significance of the book.&nbsp; This is not to suggest that a dose of "historical reality" will alleviate fears that the end of books as we know it will swiftly bring about the end of Western civilization, but it certainly would make the extent and significance of the book as an object and technology easier to understand.</p> <p>Any event that causes me to think is a good event (even if the only thing that I think is "who is that guy and why is he doing that?") and, with this broad definition, the Writers Conference qualifies as a good event. It was exciting to hear people talk so freely and to speculate so widely about the life of the mind on a campus and in a community where such talk is not always readily accepted. I'm already looking forward to next year, and if you have a few bucks, <a href="http://www.undwritersconference.org/wc-donation.html">give something</a> to help the Writers Conference continue to stimulate the minds of the northern plains.</p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: ----COMMENT:

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AUTHOR: Evan Nelson EMAIL: evannelson@mail.und.edu IP: 134.129.168.159 URL: DATE: 03/30/2010 08:58:25 AM Was the fourth thing you learned just how awesome Saul Williams is? I've always come away from the Writers Conference week feeling like my brain was two sizes bigger than my head. Even after hearing of these events second hand, I feel the same way now. -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Friday Quick Hits and Varia STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: friday-quick-hits-and-varia-1 CATEGORY: Varia and Quick Hits DATE: 03/26/2010 10:24:08 AM ----BODY: <p>Just some quick hits on a sunny Friday.</p> <ul> <li>An interview with <a href="http://www.wiredjournalists.com/notes/An_Interview_with_Rex_Sorgatz_aka_Fi moculous">UND alumnus Rex Sorgatz</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://bloggingpompeii.blogspot.com/2010/03/topography-ofpompeii.html">Crowd-sourcing Pompeii elevation data</a>.</li> <li><a href="http://sounds.bl.uk/maps/Soundscapes.html">Soundscapes in the UK</a>.</li> <li>The last day of the Writers Conference features presentations by <a href="http://www.undwritersconference.org/wc-schedule.htm">Frank X. Walker and Saul Williams</a>. Pretty exciting stuff.</li> <li>I've added some more photographs to the Lakka Skoutara collection on my Omeka page. <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.und.edu/collections/show/4">Check them out</a>.</li> <li>Sneak peek at the newest blog in the Caraher Blog empire: <a href="http://pendentive.wordpress.com/">Pendentive</a>. It's the successor to Squinch... check it out.</li> <li>Some really positive feedback on the <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/2010/03/25/teaching-thursday-a-year-inreview/">Teaching Thursday: Year in Review</a>.</li> </ul> <p>Be sure to check out Saul Williams at the Chester Fritz Auditorium tonight at 8 pm!</p>

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----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Teaching Thursday: A Year in Review STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: 1 ALLOW PINGS: 1 BASENAME: teaching-thursday-a-year-in-review CATEGORY: Teaching CATEGORY: The New Media DATE: 03/25/2010 08:02:16 AM ----BODY: <p><em>Crossposted to <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a></em> <p>We interrupt your regularly scheduled <em><a href="http://teachingthursday.org/">Teaching Thursday</a>, </em>for a brief effort to summarize its first year in existence. Teaching Thursday emerged from a conversation between me and Anne Kelsch. The idea of Teaching Thursday began on my blog as an online extension of his regular teaching journal.&nbsp; The idea was to take time each week to reflect on some issue either in the media or in practice that influences the way in which he taught. As with blogging in general, the reflective writing soon became addictive and this addiction (as they often do) led to changes in behavior.&nbsp; I found that I became more aware (and, indeed, interested) in how changing approaches to my classroom practice produced different results, created different environments, and reflected changing attitudes toward teaching more broadly.&nbsp; I thought it would be a great idea to supplement the regular discussions organized by the Office of Instructional Development with a weekly teaching blog where folks across campus (and perhaps even outside of campus) could reflect on the things that they do that influence how they teach. <p>SInce those first conversations, Teaching Thursday has seen 63 posts and 66 comments.&nbsp; The most common categories (and we divided the post into many, probably too many categories) and those related to <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/category/onlineteaching/">online teaching</a> (5), <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/category/technology/">technology</a> (7), <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/category/cheating/">cheating</a> (4), <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/category/student-expectations/">student expectations</a> (6), <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/category/graduateinstruction/">graduate instruction</a> (6), and <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/category/future-teaching/">the future of teaching</a> (6), and <a href="http://teachingthursday.org/category/summerteaching/">summer teaching</a> (4).&nbsp; These posts were written by over 20 authors representing 15 departments or divisions on campus and several offcampus bloggers to add some diversity to our perspective here.&nbsp; The posts

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featured the full range of faculty (both tenure track and non-tenure track, from full professors to assistant professors), staff, and administrators who are all committed to teaching in some way on the University of North Dakota campus. <p>Below is a list of the 25 most popular posts from the past year.&nbsp; One of the great things about blogs is that you can track, to some extent, the number of times your pages were viewed.&nbsp; Of course, any kind of web statistic must be taken with a grain of salt, but the ability to say something about what your audience found interesting, compelling, or timely.&nbsp; The list below ranks the most popular posts based on the number of page views per day. The diversity among these popular posts is remarkable to me.&nbsp; They range from very traditional blog posts which merely point toward an article of interest on the web, to inspirational essays, to thoughtful critiques and practice teaching advice.&nbsp; <p><b>1. </b>2.4. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2010/02/11/howard-zinn-andteaching/"><u>Howard Zinn and Teaching</u></a>, R. Kahn<br><b>2. </b>1.80. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2010/02/25/the-recruiting-paradoxrecruiting-and-teaching-a-new-generation-of-graduate-students/"><u>The Recruiting Paradox: Recruiting and Teaching a New Generation of Graduate Students</u></a>, E. Nelson<br><b>3. </b>1.75. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2010/02/18/online-teaching-thepanopticon-and-the-unequal-gaze/"><u>Online Teaching, the Panopticon, and the unequal gaze</u></a>, M. Beltz<br><b>4. </b>1.59. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/11/05/on-the-habit-ofcheating/"><u>On the habit of cheating</u></a>, M. Beltz<br><b>5. </b>1.39. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2010/01/14/how-to-spot-a-badprofessor/"><u>How to spot a bad professor</u></a>, W. Caraher<br><b>6. </b>1.38. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/09/17/the-cost-ofcheap-education/"><u>The Cost of Cheap Education</u></a>, A. Kelsch<br><b>7. </b>1.28. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2010/03/04/the-englishdepartment-and-beyond-the-und-writers-conference/"><u>The English Department and Beyond: the UND Writers Conference</u></a>, C. Alberts<br><b>8. </b>0.95. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/04/02/technology-andpedagogy/"><u>Technology and Pedagogy</u></a>. W. Caraher<br><b>9. </b>0.87. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/11/12/teaching-thursdaycritiquing-the-three-year-solution/">Teaching Thursday: Critiquing the Three Year Solution</a>, J. Hawthorne<br><b>10. </b>0.70. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/09/03/the-new-future-ofteaching-graduate-student-mentoringdeconstructing-framework/"><u>The New Future of Teaching: Graduate Student Mentoring/Deconstructing Framework</u></a> J. Benoit<br><b>11. </b>0.67. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/09/01/teaching-thursdaysboundaries-and-manners/"><u>Teaching Thursdays: Boundaries and Manners</u></a>, C. Prescott<br><b>12. </b>0.63. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/08/27/the-new-future-ofteaching-social-networks-changing-expectations-and-perils-of-access/"><u>The New Future of Teaching: Social Networking, Changing Expectations, and the Perils of Access</u></a>, W. Caraher. B. Weber<br><b>13. </b>0.57. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/11/19/teaching-thursday-somethoughtful-tips-for-online-teaching/"><u>Teaching Thursday: Some Thoughtful Tips </u></a>, M. Beltz,W. Caraher, T. Prescott, B. Weber<br><b>14. </b>0.57. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2010/01/21/the-panopticon-andonline-teaching/"><u>The Panopticon and Online Teaching</u></a>, W. Caraher<br><b>15. </b>0.47. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/04/23/mentoring-graduatestudents/"><u>Mentoring Graduate Students</u></a>, C. Prescott<br><b>16.

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</b>0.42. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/10/08/the-cost-ofcheap-education-another-perspective/"><u>The Cost of Cheap Education: Another Perspective </u></a>, M. Beltz<br><b>17. </b>0.41. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/12/03/three-thursday-thoughtson-teaching-1-lexical-analysis/"><u>Three Thursday Thoughts on Teaching: 1. Lexical Analysis </u></a>, D. Perkins<br><b>18. </b>0.40. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/10/01/reflecting-on-teachingan-all-campus-colloqium-on-the-scholarship-of-teaching-andlearning/"><u>Reflecting on Teaching: An All-Campus Colloquium on Teaching and Learning</u></a>, W. Caraher<br><b>19. </b>0.39. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/03/12/call-me-edupunk/"><u>Call me Edupunk</u></a>, C. Alberts<br><b>20. </b>0.38. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/04/09/using-models-toteach/"><u>Using Models to Teach</u></a>, C. Barkdull, B. Weber<br><b>21. </b>0.37. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/10/22/cheating/"><u>Cheating</u ></a>, W. Caraher<br><b>22. </b>0.31. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/10/16/on-spurring-selfreflection-in-decision-making/"><u>Reflecting on Teaching Colloquium: On Spurring Self-Reflection in Decision Making,</u></a> D. Sauerwein<br><b>23. </b>0.30. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/10/29/onlinecheating/"><u>Online Cheating</u></a>, C. Prescott<br><b>24. </b>0.26. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/05/05/another-view-on-teachinggraduate-students/"><u>Another View on Teaching Graduate Students</u></a>, A. Kitzes<br><b>25. </b>0.24. <a href="http://teachingthursday.wordpress.com/2009/07/16/making-the-most-of-amonth-in-china-the-role-of-a-directed-journal/"><u>Making the Most of a Month in China: The Role of a Direct Journal</u></a>, C. Berry <p>Over the first year, the blog has enjoyed over 7500 page views (and this does not count views via its RSS feed in Google Reader and the like).&nbsp; The chart below shows that the trend over the past 12 months is clearly a positive one especially when you consider that December and January are typically slow blog months (both in terms of posts and visits) and March still has a week left and is showing exceptional traffic. In short, I am optimistic that the upward trend will continue. <p align="center"><a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201310fdc2121970 c-pi"><img style="border-right-width: 0px; border-top-width: 0px; border-bottomwidth: 0px; border-left-width: 0px" border="0" alt="TeachingThursdayStats" src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e201310fdc2129970c -pi" width="400" height="168"></a> </p> <p>While we do not collect a full set of analytics data, we can say a few things about how people got to our blog.&nbsp; The biggest referrer is <a href="http://www.und.edu/">und.edu</a>, followed by <a href="http://www.und.edu/dept/oid">und.edu/dept/oid</a> (the home page of the office of instructional development). My personal blog -- <a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/">The Archaeology of the Mediterranean World</a> provided some traffic as did the <a href="http://mygradspace.wordpress.com/">Official Blog of the Graduate School</a> , but more important perhaps are various social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter which drove a considerable quantity of traffic to the site.&nbsp; Finally, several other sites picked up our blog and linked to it.&nbsp; The most exciting link came from the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2009/11/07/us/07ihtcurrents.html?_r=3&amp;ref=world">the New York Times</a>, but we also attracted links from India, South America, and several blogs in the US.&nbsp; The most exciting thing is that every day, every week, and every month we see more and

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more traffic coming to <em>Teaching Thursday </em>to discover what our faculty and friend have to say about teaching. <p>Without sounding sappy, I've been very pleased to discover so many people on campus willing to write critical, reflective, and practical posts on aspects of their teaching.&nbsp; As we look ahead to our 10,000 visit and 100th post, I am excited to continue to work to develop content and participation on the blog. In particular, I'd like to get more participation from across campus, and extend invitations to my colleagues in the College of Engineering, Nursing, the Law School, and Medical School (I'm already working on ways to draw in colleagues in Aerospace!) to contribute what you do that is inspirational, practical, and exciting to the conversation.&nbsp; With the recent emphasis on the STEM disciplines, I think that this forum can become a useful place for teachers both within and outside of the STEM fields to&nbsp; exchange ideas that will enrich all of our classroom experiences. <p>I'd like to thank all the contributors over the past year -- especially those who wrote multiple posts or took the time to write about teaching during busiest parts of the semester -- and thank Anne Kelsch's for all her hard work to keep the blog in the campus eye. </p> ----EXTENDED BODY: ----EXCERPT: ----KEYWORDS: -----------AUTHOR: William Caraher TITLE: Some thoughts on St. Leonidas and Baptism at Lechaion in Greece STATUS: Publish ALLOW COMMENTS: 1 CONVERT BREAKS: ALLOW PINGS: 0 BASENAME: some-thoughts-on-st-leonidas-and-baptism-at-lechaion-in-greece CATEGORY: Early Christian Baptisteries CATEGORY: Korinthian Matters DATE: 03/24/2010 07:46:11 AM ----BODY: <p>The Lechaion basilica and baptistery are among the most impressive archaeological and architecture remains from the Early Christian period in Greece. As I have blogged on many times, the massive Lechaion basilica stood near the coast at Corinth's Western harbor. It's baptistery is often thought to date earlier than the massive basilica situated to its south largely because they have slightly different orientations. (<a href="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/the_archaeology_of_the_me/korinthian _matters/">This post has a companion post here</a>).</p> <p>Scholars have often associated the basilica with the martyr Leonidas and his several companions who, according to the preserved <i>lives</i>, were drowned in the Gulf of Corinth (<i>AS</i> II, April 16). Since Robin Jensen's visit a few weeks back, I've been thinking about this episode and its relationship to the great church at Lechaion. In several articles, Jensen argues that <i>ad sanctos</i> baptism was a not uncommon practice in Early Christian times (<a

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href="http://people.vanderbilt.edu/~james.p.burns/chroma/practices/pilgrimjens.h tml">for a nice summary see here</a>). This largely involved traveling to pilgrimage sites or even just local martyr's tombs for the initiation rite of baptism. For Jensen, this evokes the long-standing association between baptism as a kind of spiritual rebirth and the death of martyrs as their birth into spiritual and eternal glory.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20120a96f6e94970b -pi" width="480" height="214" alt="201003240733.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><br /> <img src="http://mediterraneanworld.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83451908369e20120a96f6e8c970b -pi" width="401" height="383" alt="201003240733.jpg" /></p> <p>I began to wonder whether <i>ad sanctos</i> type baptisms might have taken place at Lechaion. After all, the church is conspicuously close to the sea where a martyr shrine to Leonidas would be appropriate. Moreover, the church makes abundant use of water both in some of the imagery present in the yet unpublished architectural sculpture (at least one unpublished fragment of sculpture includes a dolphin which would have had particular significance in the context of baptism and Corinth through the myth of Arion) and in the various water features associated with its massive western atrium. These water features include the installation of a large basin, perhaps for fountains, in the center of its western hemicycle and two large basins along the eastern wall of the atrium. The baptistery itself is quite la