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0.

71

NOTES FROM THE SHOP

Editor Donald H. Pes hke Design Director Ted Kralicek

. lanaging Editor Dougla: L Hicks Assistant Editors T ~ J .• trohman

James. 1. Dolan Richard . Peters G rdon Gaippe

Project D signer Ken Munkel

Illustrators David Kreyling Cary hristensen Rod toakes Chris Glowacki

Graphics Dire nor Jun n 'dcr

Project Supplies Leslie Ann GeaThart Kelly Bradford Scott Rhodes Customer! rvice Mgr, Linda "loTTOw

Cu. remer Service Linda Jones Genelle Bran n

tic Smith

J nnie Enos Janie Kcrkm r e Jozl} n Pross

J rry Vancinni ontroller Paul E. Gray Bookkeeping Linda O'Rourke

, \~tv.'ork Administrator Douglas lIl. Lidster Ad ministrative Assts_ Cbel)-J A. Scott Sand}BaI1ID Sourcebook Jean 1!yers

Kent A. Ruddnn 'hop Manager Steve Curti

Bu i lding • taiutenance ru:-n Griffith

AU'hi Krau. e

'tore ~lanag IS:

Berkel Y. eA Michael Delfaven O("S. toines, IA Kent Welsh

Woodsmith (I. Si'\ 0164-4114) is published bimonthly (Feb .. April, ju nc, Aug., Oct., Dec.) by Woodsmith Publishing Co., :?200 Grand Ave., Des :1.1 oines , LA 50312. Wood mitb is a registered trademark of Wood mith Publishing Co

l Copyright 1990 by Wood. mith Publishing Company.All rights reserv ·d.

ubscriptions: One year (6 issues) ::;15.95.

Twoy an; (12i!->",ul"') ~27.95.Callada/FoJ'eiJm: add ,'2. hear. t.:.S_ fund ... _ • .ingle copy: .>3.95. Second Class Postage Paid at De f cines. [A and at additional offices

Postmaster: . end change of address to 1I·",w:(.,,,!1tf,.Box 1071 .DesMoines.lA50350. 'ub scription Quesliorus? Call '00-333-5Oi5 :00 am to 5:00 pm, C entral Time. weekdays.

EDITOR'

COL U M

Sawdust

Wood mith

'~Then I walked into the shop, I .... ~ouldD'l figure oul what was going OD. Ev ryon was jus t. tanding there, looking at something ilting on the table saw.

Out of th ' com 'r of my eye, I caught a glimpse of what looked like a small TV screen. Then .I realized it was the prototype of the night light we had been working on.

The front panel of tile night light ha: a seen ofa cal abouttocatch hisdinner. (See the cover of this issue.) It was amazing to . ee how that scene mesmerized every one. 1 even found myself staring at the night light, sure thal any moment the cat would make his move.

Ken (our project designer) said he had more fun designing that scene than anything he's worked on in year'. Then he came up with three more scenes. So we decided to rede sign the box so you could store three panels in back and change them around asyou wanted.

Well, that wa the b ginning of what has prov d to be a v ry in te e ·tin).! issue, Every year we try to have nc i u devoted to project. that you can build as gilt for kid. and for friend .

roy HOX. Althouuh we were all me merized by the night light, I uppose the bigR'est challenge was the lOy box - the one that look . like a giant block (page fi).

You know the toughest pan about building these toy boxes? Keeping them in the correct perspective, By that I mean, we started out building them to adult ale. That didn't work for kids.

, Te buill the first one big enough to hold lots of toys. But when we gathered up a small herd of l .... oodsillith kids to test it out. it became clear they had a different perspective ... and shorter arm .

What we needed wa . a 'mall box for 'mall kids and a big box for big kid . That's when we came up with the id a of a false bottom that could be moved up 0 hart arm could reach all the way in. Then a' the arm (and all the oilier parts) grew over the o{;XI few years. you could adjust the false bottom down. TIl end result seemed to pleas e everyone,

GIFTS. In addition to the projects for kids. we came up with three projects that could be gifts for any age: a music box, a mirror. and a paper gripper.

As I was about to complete the music box,

I found a mall piece of burl veneer and

me inlay trips and couldn't re i st adding th m to the lid. Then I decided to make another lid and try my hand at chip carving a pall m in it

Although we don't show it. 1 also expcrim mt d with carving initials in the lid. The great thing abouta small box like this is that you can experiment with all sorts of techniques - and you wind up with very indi idualizcd gifts.

111e same thing happened with the hand mirror, At first. 1 concentrated on the basic te chnique . - cutting a blank La a ireular shape It) match the shape of the beveled glas. mirror, The next ta sk was to rout out a -ction for the mirror to rest in.

Ithought T had done okay, until T sawwhat happen, rl a' the mirror was u. ed, Almost everyone who picked it up placed it back down with the mirror side do .... l1. All of OIY an .ntion had been on the. ide with the mirror - but rlu- back side isjust a. important

Okay , another mirror. this time with a CaJ -ed initial on the back !\iuch better.And I thou rht about making a -ersion with a burl veu -cr inlaid as on the mu sic box. (See \ hal happe-ns v. h -n you're having fun.)

, E\\ FAn_". One of the most amazing thin.'!. that's happened in thepastycar is the growth or the U'OOdslllitll Catalo, Wf: aarted it a' a' rvice to show the projects in the back issue. of U'oodsmith and to indude some infnrmarion on project supplies,

II just keep' growing and now it' all we can do to keep up with the phone call and the-mail, Fortunately. we have a great group of people who are anxiou s to take your order and help in any way they can.

That group is growing again. Linda lorrow (our customer service manager) asked me if she c uld hire a few more people for the Iall a on. J said ure - but only if their first name begin with the letter T.

Wouldn't you know it she hired Jennie.

Janice, Jerry and Juzlyn (who's also known a Io h),

AJ 0, when Archie retired. Ken Griffith joined us to help out with the building maintenance. (Of course, Ken's wife helps out sometimes too. Her name is Jan. So we're back on those "I's" again.)

NEXT , nJNG. The December is sue of fi'uudl:Jlllith j o. 72) will be mailed during the week of December 1. 1990.

o, 1

Contents

I TIps & Techniques

I f4l A Special Tips Contest and six L.:!J great tips frmnfellow ioooduerkers: 1) Contour Bm·ing Jig. 2) A Vise Helper. ,1) Router Table Dowels. 4) Pilot Hole l'Vlarker . .'5) Wing Nut Wrench. 6) Hinge Mounting Helper.

I Toy Box II6l We built this Toy Box with kids in .... , -..:...,_--------". ~ mind. Two adjustable lid SZtpports prerentthe lids/tom slamming down 011 little/ingers. And to make it easy to move we put it on casters.

I Hand Mirror 11121 This routed H_a.ndMil'·rDrmakesan

L. --'- __ __j. elegant tuidition to any dresser.

And the carved initial make thi« a t1'llly personal g{{i.

I Shop Notes 111611) RO'lltinga CarllerRadius.2) Pho-

,-, ---=--------~ torOp}1 Transfer. 3) Ironing Veneer.

J) Hinge Locator Pins.

I Music Box ll181 Walnut bl~rl ~'e71~r and a?l inlai~

L. ___J accent Stl'1P lughilght the lid of this

classic iYlusic Bo».

I Paper Gripper 11221 We took a cue from. the local diner

L.... ----'=-- __ .:.:...::. ___J. and desiglled a Paper Gripper Owl

can be built in short order.

I Talking Shop I [241 We have i1l/onnatim1 on a eelf-een-

L.... __ __::=--_=-- ___J. feriny hill.qe bit. Plus, we look at

laying out boerd« and give afew tips/or sanding on a lathe.

I Night Light 11261 Built from solid cherry, this Night

.'----=- __ =-- ___J. Light adds a friendly glow to any

room. And with four interchangeable pallets, it will adapt to almost any mood.

11311 Hardware and project supplies neededfor the projects in this issue.

Hand Mirror

page 12

Night Light

page 26

o. 71

Woodsmith

3

FRO M

FELLOW

WOODWORKERS

TIps & Techniques

CO TOURBOR

GJIG

• When T need to drill accurate hole in contoured legs or any odd-shaped workpiece. I make a jig to hold the workpiece ecurely in position on the drill pres. table, refer to Fig. 2.

To make thejig.I start by jointing one edge of a 2x6 or 2x8 flat and square. (This provides a stable surface to sit on my drill press table.) Next trace the con-

TRAC£ CONTOUR.

ONTO JIG

lour of the workpiece onto the jig, keeping the edge to be drilled parallel with the jig'~ jointed edge. see Fig. 1. Th en cut out the contour on the band saw,

N ow place the jointed edge of the j ig 01'1 the d Ii II press table. set the workpiece into the cutout area. and drill. see Fig. 2.

Louis C. JOhlU~OIl Dacenport. Iowa

'ABLE DOWELS

VISE

ELPE.

To mill the square ~tock into a round dowel, press the tock against the round-over bit about 2" from the left end, see Fig. 1. Then push the. tock to the left. . topping about 2" from the right end. Thi . leave aflat urface for holding the lock safely against

I often need to hold long boards edge-up for doweling, morti sing, or planing. But it's hard to do this with onI r one vise. So, along with the vi' • at one end of my bench. I use an inexpensive metal helf brack I at the other end to hold up ih long stock, see Fig. 1.

'111e bracket hook into a shelf standard that's mounted on the

bench leg. The e tandard come in many length . and allow the bracket to be adjusted up or down to suit the size of the wood being worked.

I covered the lop edge of the shelfbracket with a piece of split garden hose to prevent marring the wood. see Fig. ] a..

Joltn O. ]!('Donald E IIgli-~lttOI{·I!. Xell' Jf'I'M'!f

o.

WORKPIECE

BRACKET ADJUSTS TO ACC-OMODATE· BOARD WIDTH

SUP OVER TOPEOOE Of BRACKn

ROUTE

4

the router table and th fence,

ow tum the stock 90 and rout the adjacent side, see Fig. 2. Then rout the other ide. in the same manner. Finally. cut the dow 1 to length.

Editor'« Xol : This techuique «orksfi III' for 11.!" -din /111'tev doicels and Iarqer. ()n thinnerpieces.the stock cibr«! • Ion much a« it passes U(1 'I' lite router bit. For u jig to make smaller diameter dotrels; • ee Woodsmith .'170 •. ?Y.

• When I have a project that requires short lengths of hardwood dowels, I make my own on the router table, see Fig. 1. It save money. and the dowel' grain and color match the re t of the proj ct.

I tart with a squat piec of

tock the xact width and thickne sasthe-de ired dowel diameter, but at least four inches longer than the desired length. To make a :Y4"-diameter dowel, for example, first cut some :V4" x :Y4" tock to rough length.

Then. mount a '¥l " round-over bit in the router table. (The radius of the round-over bit has to be half the desired diameter of the dowel.) It's very important that th e eu tiing edge of the bit be mounted flush with the table top and with the tence,

Stev Barrett Ka lispel! , Jlonia Il<!

SECONID: !;UIlEALONG feNCE

J .- ROtlND-OVli.R BIT

FIRST:

SLOWLY PUSl-I WOR.KPIECE INTO ROUND-(lVER BIT

ALlOW AT lEAST 2" ON EACH £ND TO HOLD THE WORKPIECE

L£AV( ENOS ;' SQUARI

WooJ.mim

0.71

Many ll'o(}(!stfluh readers tell u, they're very interested in making projf'Cts for the shop. So, for the next few i sues, w '1\ ask you for tips and technique on solving' different . hop problems.

Well read your tips and try them out. p to three of the best tips in each category will be awarded a {\'oodsmitlt Master ry Square. Duplicate or very similar tips will be considered in the order we receive them.

PILOT HOLE MARKER

.When joining two piece of wood with screws. I like to drill a shank half' in the top or front piece and a pilot hole in the anchor piece. But it's difficult to mark the pilot hole so it's accurately centered on the shank half'. Center punches are 100

large to fit through the shank hole. and thin awls are too. mall to be accurate. To solve the problem, I use an altered machini t's pin punch.

Pin punches are available at most hardware stores, and come in the same diameters as drill

/

__)i / I

- lV GRIND TIP TO ~ "----DIAMElIEIt OF

PILOT HOLE DRILL 81

lOP PIECE

ANCHOR P[ECE

WI G NUT WENCH

.1 I was never able to fingerli,ghtcn the small wing nuts on my H'uudslllith router table fence securely enough so the fence wouldn't slip. To solve this problem. I built a wing nut wr nch, refer to Fig. 2. It provides so much torque that you have to be careful not to 'nap off the wing nul '.

To make the wrench, 1 cut orne 1 :V4"-thick stock 3W'

square. ee Fig. 1.3'2"

ext. [ bored a 3/6"-

diameter hole'"

centered in the end grain, lW' deep. 111en I wid ned the opening of the hole with a countersink

bit, see Fig. Ia,

ext, using the table saw, I cut the

slot in the workpiece

!jIi'!" deep and V,,"

wide. A W'-wide dado blade centered on the thickness of the stock will cut the slot in one pass. You could also make two passes with a standard lfs"-widc blade.

After cutting the slot, cut the stock to a "T' shape on the band saw, so the hole and slot are at the ba e of the "1"', Sf' Fig. 1.

Finally. soften all til edge of

To begin, we want tips on how to organize drill bits, Uyou have a procedureora fixture that keep all your drill bit type. and sizes organized. we want to hear about it.

V e'll publish the be t tip. on organizing drill bit in the February 1991. i ue of Wood.·mifh (No. 73), Send your tip (po lmarked no later than overnber 2, 1990) to

hop Tips Conte .t. n'oudslII itn, 2200 Grand Ave .. De' Moine • Iowa 50312. \\'1'11 continu to publish other lips and Techniques. too. and pay upon publication Slfito Sl for thes tip based on the published 1 ngth,

bit . I buy a punch wi th th sam e pin diameter as theshank hole. Then I grind down the tip so it matches the diameter of the pilot hole I want to drill. To do this. drill a hole through a crap wood block the same diameter a the

hank hole and in rt the pin punch. Then clamp the wood block to the tool re t on the grinder with the end of the punch against the side of the grinding wheel.

see Fig. L

Next, rotate the punch ill Ole wood block until the tip i the same size as the pilot drill bit To use the pin punch. insert il

the wrench with a router and a 114" round-aver bit.

This wrench tightens 'VII" and smaller wing nuts. n also works well tightening the thumbcrew . like those that lock a fence in place on the back of the radial arm saw table.

Walter E. chneidmiller colt AFR, Illinois

"" I

'-' 8" DIA. HOLE

0.71

Woodsmith

DRILL an ORGANIZERS

in the pre-drilled shank hal and tap the punch to mark the center ofth pilot hole. see Fig. Ia.

Harl'P!1 Sinnn« Dayton, Ohio

H NGE HE P

• Here's another way doublesided carpet tape can be used around the shop. ] usc ilLa help accurately align and attach loose-pin hinge .

First, J screw tilt' hinge onto the door. J ext apply a layer of carpet tape to the hinge leaf that contact - the cabinet.

Then. po ition the door on the cabinet and pre s on th hinge I cation. Once tilt' tape is firmly attached to the cabinet, gently remove the hinge pin and the door. The carpet tape holds the hinge leaf securely in pia for pilot hole drilling and outlining for mortising.

This technique can also be used for tight pin hinge .. After pressing firmly on the hinge location, very carefully open the door and support it whil you attach the hinge to the cabinet.

John U'cl>tick BOIl/riP!", r()fnmdo

JUS T

FOR

KID

Toy Box

How do you get kids to put their £0)'5 in a toy box? Make it look

like a toy itself. This one is large enough to hold plent)1 of toys, et it has a false bottom that adjusts so that even the mallest kids an reach inside.

This loy box looks so much like a toy, itrnighteven gel used. Apart from looking like a lot of fu n, we tried to design it with kids in mind. The lid are, upported with slow-dosing lid upports, so they won't slam on little fingers. Curiou fingers will al a lind rounded edges both in ide and out. And, the bottom rest on adju table shelf upport so it can be raised for even the shorte t arms to reach the bonom.

CONSI'R,·rnON. The con truction of the box i fairly imple. We u edmapleplywoodforthesidesand added olid maple trips at the comers so we could round them over. The front and back have mitered frame with a large glued-on letter and number. (WoocU mifh Preject ! 11pplies is offering full-size pat-

terns for the letters and numbers and a complete hardware kit Ior the to), box. ee urces, page 31.)

HARDWARE. There's actually more hardware on this project than meet the eye. The lids are attached to the sides with. piano hinges, and upportcd with slow-dosing lid supports. There' a false bottom thai re t onadjustableshelfsupport .Andtherealbottom i po itioncd to allow room for casters (soMomorDad can roll the toy box to where the mess is).

}11 '[ H. One of the advantages of using maple is that it presents a good surface for painting. I painted the boxes with bright primary colors. After the paint dried. I applied two coats of gloss polyurethane varnish over the entire toy box to protect the paint from chipping.

6

WooJ mith

No. 71

EXIPLODED VIE

O,YERAU. DIMENSIONS: 22" W x 22" H x 22" D

PUlLSIRIP ~

END CAP

~

UD PANEL

-@

EDGING 51RIP

©

LEVELING PAD

®

~

®

FRAME pes.

~

BOnOM

@

EDGING STRIP

LETTER

[1 •• MASONItE)

CASTER

®

END PANEIL

MATERIALS

CUnlNG DIAGRAM

SUPPLIES

• 5.9 Board Ft. of -lI4·-thick maple

• 1 sheet ~4·-1t1ckmapleplywood

• (2 pes) 114' Masonite 16" x 10"

'. 1 Qt. gloss polyurethone varnish

• lNhite enamel spray po nt

• (2 colors) Enamel spray prunt

.' (2) H nges llr.!· x2OJ/4' w/screws

• (2) Ud supports

• 1 1;2" Finish nails

• (4) SlielFbrackets

• (4) 2' Casters

WOOD PARTS

A SIde Pc.lne!s (2) 3/4 P!Y-2!)o/16 x201,-2 B End Panels (2) 3/4P!Y-2O!¥tol( 21ln C Edg, Strips (4) 3Ju: 3.1,0; 22

D' Bottom (1) 3/4 ply -211;4 x 190/"4

E Frame Pes. (8) :"¥4 x 2 ·24 rgn.

F False Stm. (1) 3/4 ply - 15¥.u 201/4 G Ud Panel (2) 3.14 ply - 8~6 x 183.14 H End Cops (4) :V4 x 4-4 - a:¥16

Hinge Stnps (2) 3.14)( 3.14 - 20%

J Pull Strips {2} 3/4X 2 - 20 h

K Lev Pads (2) 3116 x 3.14 _ 2

'." " 5,· • 4B" {l.T Bel. ft.]

I ~ i

E

E

ALSO R£OUIHD:

~ SIU£T 14' " a'I 'OF' _. P1 'l'W"00D I • SHHT 12' ,. 41 Of I· .. • MA50NIIIi

o. n

Woodsmith

7

straight router bit to cut these grooves. (You could use a table saw and an adjustable dado blade et to the thickness of the plywood.)

cur 1llE IIt>\HUt."T. Ned, to join the end panels to the side panels, rout ¥411-wide by 1,-2"-deep rabbets on the inside face of both side panel (A). see Fig. 3a.

ROTJ'O.1. With the side and nd panel complete. th next step i to make th bottom (D). To determine the ize of th bottom, dry damp the sid and end pan I togeth r and mea ure the insid width and length. ext, add :W'10 each dimen ion 0 Ihe bottom will fit into the ¥s'l-deep grOOY

in the panel. The bottom can now be cui from apiece of :Y~"-thick plywood (mine rneas ured 211,14." x 19¥4[1).

SHmr.Y. Begin assembly by gluing one end pan I (B) into the rabbets of the side pan L (A) to fonn a -shaped subassembly, set' Fig. 4 .. 'ext_ slide in the bottom (D) and secur the end panel to the sides with llll" fini: hing nails see Fig. 43. Finally, glue. clamp, and nail the other end panel in place.

I b gao building the toy box by making the four ide and end panels.

BIA,"ffiS. To make the ide panel ( ) and end panels (8)

tart by cutting four blanks of i¥1"-thick plywood to a rough width of22" and a rough

length 0 r 22" . Fig. L

EDGI G ITRWS. To hide the edges of the plywood and a1low for routing a rounded edge later. I glued :VI" x i¥1" hardwood edging to one edge of each plywoodpanel, Cut the edli!ing sbips (C)i to a finished length of 22" and glue them flush along one edge of each blank, see Fig. 1. Keep the end DIllie blank and the ends of the strip flush.

TRt"'f RL\J'lKS. Once the edging strips are glued to the blanks. the sid and end pan I can be trimmed to their fini hed ize, The width of the side and end panel (which i actually the height of th e box) is the same on

all four panels. To trim the panels to width, place the hardwood edging. trip (C) of each blank against the table saw rip fence and cut each panel to a fini hed width of 21V16", SE'C second step in Fig. 1.

After the panel have been cut to the same width, the next step is to cut them to length. Start by cutting the side panels (A) to a finished length of 20111", see Fig. 2. Next, since the end panels (R) will sit in W'-deep rabbets, cut them 1 I' longer than the side panels (21 !fl'), see Fig. 2.

GKOOVES. Once the 'ide and end panel have been trimm d to ize, the next step i to cut a groove in each piece to accept the bottom of the toy box. Before cutting the grooves, take a minute to orient the pieces,

ee Expled d View, page 7. On the ide panel (A).th edging stripi on the botio.o. On the end pan I (B) , th trip i located 011 top to hide th expo d plywood edge.

The ?r'i "de p groove are located on th in. ide face of the panel, Ilf.:!" up from the bottom edges, ce Fig. 2a. I used a :V~".

1

--_.-rj

FIRST: GlUE 3 .. " x 3 .. - HAJlDWOOD EDGrNG

" STRIPS fO IILI. FOUR

PL '!'WOOD BlANKS

@@ SIDE/END BLANKIMAKE FOUR)

22"

z> EDGING ___. '-@ STRIP

tRIM TJoIiS EDGE

W1D1'H OF 2~ 1 16"

2

NOIE:

EDGING'" DOWN

,_ SIDE PANEL

END_ I IP'ANEL

CROSS S!EClION

4

®

SIDE PANEl.

BOTTOM

r;;, SlOE 'CIpANEl

SUDE IN ROnOM BEfORE AlTAC1fING ornER tND PANEl

SIDE PANR

NAIL WITH 11,," FlNISH NAILS

ClAMP' ACROSS END PA:NU

®

/

Woodsmith

0.71

Once you've assembled the box, work can begin on the frames. The frames hide the exposed plywood rabbet joints and give the toy box its building block look.

cur mA111E PlECES. Start by ripping eight frame p~e('es (E) to a finished width of 2" and a rough length of 24". ext, miter the ends of the frames so their finished length (long-point to long-point) equals the distance acres one end of the box. see Fig. 5. On my case thi mea ured 2211.) Note: The lop and side frame pieces will extend 10/'16" above the e d panel (B) so they'll be flu h with the top of the lids once they'r in-

tailed, refer to Fig. 18.

1T.o\CH FRJ\Il1'ES. After the frames have been mitered to size. they can be glued to the ends of the box, Start by gluing and clamping one frame piece flush to the bottom of the box, sec fig. 5. Next, glue two uprighlframc pieces flush with each side panel. Finally, glue the top frame pieces in place. (I used C -clarn ps to hold these.)

ROUND OVER EDGES. After the frame pieces are glued on, the next step is to rout a radius on the top comers of each frame, set'

GLUE IBOTTOM fRAME PIECE

" nUSHWIfH

~~ BOTTOM 01' IBOX

NOlE: AU. . . 22" '-...

fl!.AM.E PlECiE.S 2" WIDE..

,Cut lE.NGTH TO MATCH WlDTHOF&OX

Fig. 6.1 did this with a router and a ¥4" roundover bit. (For more on this technique, see Shop otes on page 16.) Then, I used the same bit to round over the bottom edg s of the sides. see Fig. 6 and also page 16.

Shop Note: I chose the 3/4" round-over bit because it provides a smooth transition between the hardwood edging strips and the plywood. ]f you don't have th is bit, you could use a If.!" round-over bit.

IDECORAl1VE EDGE. After th %" radiu is rout d, rout a VIII round-over with a shoulder on the in ide and outside edge" of th

6

\ ROUT 3."

ROUNI)-QViER ON IBOTTOM OF SlDES,

frames, see Fig. 7. This should r provides a crisp edge for masking and painting the faces of the frameslater.

To rout the decorative edge, adjust the router bit so it just dears the surface of the end panel (B), see Fig. 7. When routing the inside edge of the frames, move the router in a clockwise direction. On the outside edges of the frames, move the router in a counterclockwi direction, ec fig. 8. Shop Note:

To 11 elp k p th e router from tipping into the panel. l placed a ¥4"-thick temporary spacer inside the frame, see fig. 8.

7

I." ROLIN!).

OVER BIT

F LSE BOn'OM

Afalse bottom can be added to make the toys accessible for smaller children.

The size of the false bottom (F) can be determined after the box is assern bled. Start by measuring the inside dimensions, see Fig. 9. Then subtract WI (for lhe shellbraekets) from the width and length and cut the bottom (mine measured 18¥4" K 20V4''). Next so you can pullout the bottom, drill a I" finger hole, centered 2" from one edge.

SHELF flRACKEIK The false bottom rests on Lshaped shell brackets. These brackets are mounted in a series offour VI" holes that are drilled into the inside Iace oJ each end panel (H), see Fig. 10.

0.71

ROI!IT INNER AND 'OIJ'ltR EDGf OF FR:AME

USE l~· STOOl( TOK£EPROIITER BASE lEVEiL

ROUT CLOCIICWJSE ON INNER EDGE

ROUT OO~NTER~LOCKWISE J~~ ON OUTER EDGE 0

LISE I!IMPIATE TO DRJUL SHEll' _- BRACKfT HOLES

9

Th toy box has two lid which open up from the center. Each lid consists of a plywood panel edg d with hardwood, see Fig. 11.

LID PANEL. I began the lids by first determining the size of the plywood lid panels (G). 0 determine the length of the panels. start by measuring the inside di tance between the two mitered end frames. Then, u btract 1(4" for clearance and 1~" for the two :¥'I"-wide end cap (H). On my case the panel were 183/4"100g. set' fig. 11.)

To d termine the width of the lid panel , mea ur between the outside lace of the side pan I (mincm a ur d 22''). Now. subtract a total of 5!¥1 " (4" for two pull strips m, Ill.!" for two hinge trip (I), and Vi" for the center gap between the lids). Then, divide this measurement in hall to get the width of each panel (in my case, 8=Y'16" wide). Now cut the two panel to size, see Fig. 11.

EDGlNG STIUPS. The edging strip. that surround the lid panels bide the plywood edg . [ ripped all the hard wood strips to the same thicknes as the plywood <:¥4"). Then, cut four end caps (H) to a finished width of :Y4" and a rough length of 9" .• ext. cut two hinge ·trips (I) to a finished width of =Y'1" and a rough length of 2111. And finally, cut two pull strips (J), to a fini shed width of 2" and a rough length of 21".

E:MBLY, Aftercultingthe pieces to size, gl UP th end caps em onto the ends of the lid panel (G), eFig.ll.Oncethegluei dry, trim t.h end cap flu ]l\ .. ith the edges oHhe plywood. ext glu the hinge trips (I) and pull trip Q) ont each lid panel. see Fig. 1]. Then, after the glue drie , trim the strip flu sh with the outside edge of the end cap .

HA.."IDLE Pt. u_ Th next step is to cut a hand hole in th pull trip. so kids can open the lid ea ilY. Clamp the lids together with the ends flush and the pull strips (J) facing

UMBE

each other. SCI:' Fig. 12. Then, mark the center of the lid an d layout a 3" diameter circle. ext, cut out each half-circle and then sand the edge' mooth, see Fig. 13.

HI GE SfKII'S. With the pull strip complete, the next step is to round over the hinge strip (0 to match the radius on the comers of the frame', see Fig. 13. Here

NOTE:

USE 3.-,. 3." STOC,I( FOR HING( STRIPS AND END CAP PIECES

again, I used the h" round-over bit,

SOFIE\' EDGES. After rounding over the hinge strips, I removed the sharp edges on the lids. To do this, use a 1l4"round-over bit to soften the hand hole in the pull strips OJ. see Fig. 13. I also rounded over th bottom in ide edges of each lid (except for th bottom olthe hinge trip Lee Fig. 13.

'tD

HINGE STRIP

13 ROliU,>."

ROUND-OVER ON TOP' SURfACE OF HINGE STRIP

CD

CUTOUT I-IANDHOLE

,

After (he lids are eompl te, the next tep i to cut out the letter and number that are glued onto the end panels.

1R~S. FERPATT'ER..X. tart by enlarging the desired patterns, see Exploded View, page 7.

'ext., tran fer both pattern onto 1(4"-lhick Masonite. (l chose Masonite because the edges tear les s than plywood.) I used 3M's Spray Mount to glue the enlarged pattern directly onto the Masonite, see Fig. 14 .

. cur OLT LETTER D:-.a: mER .. ext, [ used a sabre saw to cut out the letter and number and then sanded any rough edges smooth, see Fig. 15.

10

ENLARGE UTnR TO 14" TAU.

-

GLUE LErT£R TO 16" x 16' PliCE Of I .,' MA~NIT£

\X1ooJsmith

DO NOT RQUND OV£Q. BOTTOM

EOOf Of HING£ STRIP

- ---.,_ ROUT I."

ROUND-QVER ON BonOM £DGES AND' HAND' HOLE

,.

15

Cut OUT IBTEJI A:N 0 R~OVEPAPERPA~RN

SAND EDGES :SMOOTH

o. 71

Ie FINISH

Before I glued the 1 iter and number to the end panels, I applied a finish to file toy box. To achieve the look of ill kid's building block, the end panels and the faces of the frames are painted, see Fig. 16.

MJ\SKJNG. Before the end panels can be painted, the toy box must be masked off.

Start by masking off each 'end panel (B) where the letter or numberwil1 be located to provide an unfinished surface to glue to. To do this, center a letter or number on each end panel and trace lightly around it, see Fig. 17. Then, mask off a rough area within the traced outline.

ext. [ masked off the edges an d faces of lli.e frame pieces, and covered the rest of the box with new paper.

PAl T PANEI~~. AUe!" the panels are masked off, paint can be applied. 1 sprayed on two coats of white gloss enamel from an aerosol can .. After the second coat is dry, remove the masking materials.

PAINTFRAMES,,""ll I'.IIlIT[R/NUl\tBER. Th next step is to paint the faces of the frames

HARDWARE,

The final tep i to anach the lids (with piano hinge ) .the lid upports andthe casters.

I 'STJ\ll. Hl GES. I screwed piano hinges on the side panel (A) and then attached the lids to the hinges. Start by cutting the ] V2"wide piano hinges to fit each side panel and screw them in place, sec Fig. 18. ([ used a self-centerin~ hinR'e bit to drill the hinge screw holes, see Talking Shop. page 241).

I.J:.-VEL. UDS. To make positioning of the lids easier. I first leveled them flush with the top of the toy box. Since the lids sit on hinges, two leveling pads (K) are attached to the top edge ofeach end panel (8), see Fig.IS.

To do this, cut the pads the same thickness as the hinge knuckles (mine measured

and the letter or number with a bri_ght color. Before the paint can be applied to the face of the frames, Iheedges of the frames must be masked off, see Fig. 100.. To do this, run a strip of masking tape around the molded edges of the frames. Then, mask off the end and. side panels. Once this is done, paint the raised face of each Iram and the letter or numberwith the same color. (I U d red and

blue gloss spray enamel.)

.\TI,\CH LE1TER AND Nmmm. "With the painting complete, remove all the masking materials and glue the letter and number onto the end panels.

APPLY Po:I.Yl.IREl1-I.A.'Il'E. Finally, apply two coat of glospolyurethane to the enure toy box (including the painted area ). sanding lightly between the coats.

19'

16

WHI1I\E BACkGROUND' _

FIRST:

C.ENTER _LETliR WITHIN fRAME AND TRACE WITH PENC'IL

SECOND:

MASK AREA UNDER LET'l'ER BEFORE PAINTING fA'C!:

INSfAlLl. un SUFPORTS. Once the lids are fastened, the lid supports can be installed. The lid supports I chose have three features that I really like. First, they ease the lids down slowly. Second. they're adjustable so as kids get older, the lids can close faster. Third, the supports have a detent position that "locks" the lids open. To install the supports, layout the hole locations on each tid and end panel (B), see Fig. ]9'. Then, drill pilot holes (I used the hinge bit again) and fasten the supports in place.

IXSTAU.CASIERS. Finally, to mak tb loy box easy to move around, I in called cast r on the bottom (0). Attach a caster g"i~ in from each inside come!", see Fig. 20.

-UD

lOA ILEVEUNG

NY PAD

PAINT LETTER AND FRAME --- .~ IFACE SAME COlOR

'}''!6'lthick) and 2" long. Then, center the pads on the end panels and nail th em ill place with small brads. see Fig.l8a Finally. apply a coat of'polyurethane to the leveling pads.

A1TACH UDS. Once the pads are in place. the lids can be screwed to the hinges. To mark the hinge screw hole location iII the ends of each lid. I used locator pins. see Shop

otes, page 17. Position the lids on the hinges so the side-to-side gaps and the gap between the pull strips ill are the same.

After the 'end hole locations are marked. drill a pilot hole for each screw. Then, secure each lid with two NO.4 X 0/8" woodscrew . ext, drill the remaining pilot holes with the hinge bit and install the rest of the screws.

-11'2"

BOTTOM

SCIIfW HINGE - TO !lOX Fr ST, THEN TO LID

THltkNUSOF IEtfEUNG PAD· MATCH.ES

THICKI'I:E55 Of HINGE KNUCKLI'

0.71

\Voodsmith

11

__ CENTER

POINT

• 'i'lw 11·irrm· .~Jmum in this fwttrnl i$.1'o I' a J'i!Jht -h fll/ded [Jf!1"8(t'1. Ttun i.,. iC.~ to be held iii th« lejl hand while !(~il!g

'.2" til", right 'wild for cnmbillg

r>; j j GR.lD hair. For a fpft·lwnded per~ + y ~ SOl!, CIl! Ol!t the patsem and

--~~ : LAY OUT flip it01'«rSO th« handle flln/,s

I 'ON 3.- theotflm·w(llJ·

:::::::::;:-:====::::::::._....:......; BiIle'K WQodsmit11 f'mJect SJlp-

STOCK plY.. i.~offe·,-i/lgrrfull-..,i::epat. ferll (wd all fir" lIiy--'i.rcdpfw' bellelt rs, Q,$ well as aM' beveled glu.sa tnirro«. Far more inJormnti(m, set! page 31.

WEEKEND

PROJECT

Hand Mirror

The trick to cutting the top of this mirror to a perfect circle revolves around a simple pivot p'in. Once )'OU know the secret, it's an easy weekend project that makes a great gift.

There were a couple of challenges in making this hand mirror, First. I had to figure a way to cut the outside Lop edge to a perfect circle. And then how to rout a circular recess for a round mirror.

The solution to both of these problems is to use a pivot pin and a router. By rotating the router around the pin. you can rout perfect circles. Then, by varying'

the distance between the bit am! the pin, you can rout two concentric circles.

Another challenge (and this one's optional) is carving the initial on the back. To "carve" the initial) used a router and straight bit. and then textured! the background by haad, On page 15 we've mcluded stepby-step insrruetions for this procedure.

12

Woodsmirh

No.71

e NEW ROUTER BASE PLATE

The fir t step in making the hand mirror i to replace your rouu r base plate with a shopmade plate. The new plat needs to be larger than the original so it can be set over a pivot pin. Then it's used for routing the circular shape around the lop of the hand mirror and recesses for the Rlass mirror and carvina,

H}\.<;E PLAl'E. I cut the new ba .. e plate from a piece of V4" Plexiglas (or usc Masonite) to a width of 6" and 71f2" long, see Fig. 1.

ow, center your router's original base plate over the new plate and use it as a template to locate the mounting holes and bit hole. Then drill these holes and mount the plate to your router.

PIVOT HOUS. N' ext. drill two V16"-rua. holes (A and B) in the new base plate, see Fig. l.The ehol will fit over apivot pin (17 gauge brad) that's driven into the workpiece.

R,OUTING SIEPS

After the new base plate is complete, you can use this set-up lO cut out the top of the hand mirror and rout the recesses,

~DRROR BL\.'I,1{. To make a hand mirror,

tart by cutting a %"-lhick blank to a width of 71ft' and length of 13", sec the Pattern on the oppo ite page. Then layout the pattern on the blank.

To keep the router bit from cutting inlo my bench when routing all the way through the blank, I screwed the blank (in the waste section) to a piece of plywood and then clamped the plywood to the bench. see Fig. 3.

PIVOT PL .. Next, drill a V16" hole for the pivot pin all the WdY through the blank at the centerpoint of the circle. (If you aren't going to carve the back, drill the h01(' only :Y8~' deep.) ow drive a 17 gauge brad through

~n~~~ ~

~6?~~~" I

SCREW MIRROR BLANK TO P,l:YWOOD aASE

MIRROR BLANK

r_

PL'llWOOI) BAS~ _

To locate the holes, first mount a W' straight bit in the muter. Drill one hol.e Oabelled A) 3V4" from the outside edge of !:h bit, see Fig. 1. This hole will be used to guide Ole router when routing (cutting out) the circular outside edge of the mirror blank.

NEW 11I01IITtA! BASE PLAlE

[MAKE fROM 1 4" P,IIEXlGI.AS OR MASONrTEI

DRIll. I 16" HOU;S

the hole and into the plywood (or blank). Then snip off the brad W' above the surface,

OursIDE EDGE. With the pivot pin in place. you're ready to begin routing. First, cut out the outside edge of the mirror by making repeal passes with the router and a W'

rraight bit, see Fig. 3. Since you don't want to rout a complete circle (or you would cut off the handle). mark start and slop points hOI1 of where the circle turns in J the handle.

ext, set the bit 1f4" deep and drop the base plate hole that's farthest from the bit (hole A) over the pivot pin. Then, tip the router at a slight angle so the bit is directly over the start point and tum on the router, refer to Fig. 2'. ( ote: if you're using a plunge router. you won't have to tip the ruuter.)

Now, slowly plunge the bit into the blank.

Now drill a second hole (8) 2¥1611 from the edge of the bit, see Fig. 1. This hole will be used when routing the circular r cess on the front of the workpiece for the beveled glass mirror, and on the back to fonn a border for the carved initial.

Then pivot the router around the circle until you reachthe SLOp point.

Repeal this proces • lowering the bit W' (or less) between passes until the bit cuts through the blank, see Fig. 3a.

HO' rrUHHOK HEC . :'-lext, to raul the

rece forthemirror,re. tth bit:YI6" deep, and po ilion the otherpivothole (B) over the brad. No ..... foul a complefecird , see Fig. 4. (This ..... ill rout a groove slightly larger in diameter than the glass mirror to allow for wood movement)

ClEA. x Ol'TWASIIE. After tile perimeter of the recess was routed, I reset the router to 1/1" deep and removed the pivot pin. Then [ cleaned out the waste freehand, see Fig. 5. (This creates a VIGil-deep trough for glue squeeze-out, sec Fig. 5a)

0.71

13

Woodsmith

FINISH NG THI

IRROR

o.

aEViELJED G:LASiS, M.IRROR SHOULD BE RECESSED SUGHnY .____,

I~

After the recess for the beveled glass mirror is cleaned out. you can cut the blank to fmal shape. But first. I routed a decorative chamfer arou nd the edge of the rece s.

CH.MfFER. To rout the chamfer, [ used the same technique as before (rouling with a pivot pin), see Fig. 6. To do this, drive the brad back into the hole in the center of the mirror recess.

Then mount a V..groovp bit in the router and lowertbe bit to cut 1f4" deep, ee Fig. 6a. (You can't use a chamfering bit with a bearing since the beariagwon't clear the bottom of the recess) ext, position the router base

a the hole closest to the bit (pivot hole B) sets over the pivot pin.

N ow turn 011 the muter and plunge the bit into the workpiece.The n rotate the router in a counterclockwise direction. This should rout a c hamfer around the recess with a face that's l,.-B" wide.

After the chamfer is routed, the blank can be removed from the plyv.·ood. (Note: If you plan on carving the initial on the back side, tu m the blank overand rout the perimeter of the carving at this time with a straight bit. See the step-by-step instructions for carvi Ilg on the opposite page.)

cur TO' WU'E. Once all of the routing is complete, the handle can be cut to hape all the band saw, see Fig. 1. Istarted by cutting about 1,116" outside the layo1i.lt line.

s.~"l'V TO FINAL SHAJ'E. ext, mount a sendinz drum in the drill press and sand up to the outline of the handle. see Fig. 8. Don't sand the circular (top) part of the mirror or you may gouge it out of round. Just sand so there' a smooth transition between the mirror circle and the handle. sec Fig. Sa.

Bl'LLN&' E lOGE. After the handle was sanded to final shape. [routed a softbullnose profile all the way around the entire piece, see Fig. 9. To do this. mount a Ijztl round-over bit in the router table and set it¥161t above the table, see Fig. 9a.

Then rout both the top and bottom edges of the mirror. After routing. lightly hand sand the edge to remove the fiat pot at the center, but don't round over the edge . Here, you want a cri p line.

IHNISH. Before mounting the beveled glass mirror, I fini hed the wood with three coals of tung oil. Do not apply finish to the recessed area where the beveled glass mirror will be mounted.

GillE IN MIRROR. IIW the beveled glass mirror C3lI be glued in place. [ used Dow Silicone Sealant and applied a thin bead onLo the recess, see Fig. 10. ( ilicone sealant is elastic an d will allow the wood to expand and contract with changes in humidity.)

Fmally. position the beveled glass mirror into the center of the recessed Mea and press it down finnly into the silicone sealant. see Fig. lOa.

UNIFORM GAP' .AU. AROUND' EDGE OF MIIUilOR

14

Woodsmith

No.71

ROUTER

TECH

I QUE

Routing Letters

Carving an initial on the back of the mirror mak it a more personal gift-yet !he carving i a't all that difficult. In the step b low, I've don almo t the whole job with a router.

Full- iz patterns of the lett rs at the botLorn of the page are available from n'~ mitn Project upplies.se« page 31. They come printed with a centerline and centerpoint, SO they're ea y to align.

lEITER AUGNME:lIo rr, To align the letter,

first draw a centerline down the back of the mirror th rough the pivot pin. N ext, press th centerpoint of the letter pattern down over the pivot pin. Then, align the centerlines on the pattern and the mirror back. ow the pattern is in po ition to be glued down.

snPPUNG, To enhance the letter. 1

tippled or dotted the background with a nail set, sec photo. I found that by firmly tapping a o/'j2" nail set. I created a very different look than [got from lightly tapping a 1iJ.G" nail set

Align' etter paUeTII in circle and glue with rubber cement UT spray adh('- 8ille. Cut around outside edge a/the letter with a sharp knife. Di..<;ro.rd background.

5 .verf, soften the edges o.fthe letter. t» do this, hold the side ofthe nail set at (l slight angle and rub tile sherp edges of the letter until they're rounded.

So try a cou ple different combination of nail set sizes and depth on a SCf"dP piece to see wh ich you like b t. The trick [0 a good background i uniform dot placcm nt and depth.

To rout perimeter 0/ the recess far an initial, screw blank to plywood j{'ith min'Or side dOlt'll. Roui a 1/16 "·deep circle by setti ng pioo: Iwle "B" on the pito: pi II.

4 Remove IC'usfe II·itlt sallle 1/s" routl?l' bit, aad then peel off leiter pattern.

Plug pivot pill hole with literfrom. f>.d.geu/ biank, Alia suud recessed area lerel.

3 ,UOllnt 0 lI. "straight bit il1 router and .~f't 1/16" deep. Jfake a freehand pass around theollt,~idee.dge(Jftl1P fetter. Getos do 'e us possible inthout wucllillg the leU .,'.

6 Fiuall u, siippte or dol the backgI'OlOl.;, 11 sing a #J ... " 111· smaller lIail :sel.llold lhe na it set llpright (mritalJfirmly with a tta 111 nlPr.

J2L 11 C 'f) 'E l' q:J{ I J 'l(L!M 90£ 0 P Q~S 'T u 0/ 'W X 9' z

Wood rnith

15

SOME

TIPS

FRO M

OUR

S HOP

Shop Notes

R.OUTING

CORNER RADIUS

• As 1 was making the Toy Box shown on page 6, 1 had La rouL a large radius on the comers of each side frame. Ordinarily you can use a band saw, sabre saw, or a rasp to rough cut the radius, and then sand it smooth.

Doing this freehand workll fine when you only need to radius a couple of corners. But for the Toy Box, [ wanted to radius all four comers of both framcs->- eight radiu cuts altogether. And, since I wanted the radius to be a perfect are, ] decided to make them using a round-over bit in the roun r.

CH.l:POUT PROBLEM, Since the round-over bit (in this case a large:}':ttrbit) fonns!heradiusby cutting aC'ros.~ the corner - rather than around the comer - there's a tendency for the wood to split away on the outfeed side of the workpiece. Buttherc' awaytoprcventthis, and also to keep th router from tipping on the edge of the frame.

SCRAP" !\l\."OWlCH, ~ The trick involves sandwiching the workpiece between two pieces of scrap, sec Fig. 1. 111e router will still produce chipout, but on the scrap pieces, not the workpiece.

hop Note: To rout the radius on the Toy Box, I first made a replacement base of !l4" Masonite for the router. (Most muter bases aren't pre-drilled to accept a :Y4" round-over bit.)

TOP mAl\tE COR. x ERS. To rout the radius on the top comers of the frames. first Clamp two

q uare-cornered pieces of scrap across the corner; see Fig. 1. Then rout the radius in several light passes, lowering the bit slightly between passes.

BOTTOM CORNERS. [ routed the bottom comers next. but did them a little differently. Here the

router can ride along th. bottom edge of the side piece, but still needs support to avoid tipping. SoIfita scrap piece in th recess oft.he bottom, see Fig. 2.

To avoid the problem of chipout, first back-rout the outfeed side. This involves making the first router pass aero s the finallnch or two of the outfeed (right-hand) end in a right-to-left motion, see Fig. 2a. Then, when the muter is fed across the workpiece in the proper direction (left-to-right) , it won't split 3 chunk off file frame as it exits from the cut, see Fig. 2.

ROUT FROM LEfT TO RIGHiT IN SEVERAL P'IISSES

PHOTOCOPY TRA SFER

• When it came lime to carve the lid for the Music Box. T wanted to make a few practice designs, but I didn'twantto redraw them.

JlEAT TRANSFER. Then l remembered a tip that appeared in Wood~mith '0.45, involving the use of an iron to transfer a pattern from a photocopy. The secret i the type of toner photocopiers use-it's heats nsitive. By reapplying heat. some of the toner transfers [0 the workpiece.

I found it best to make a dark

copy, which puts more toner on the paper.

HOW TO. To use this tech=ique, set the iron on it's highest setting and tape the photocopy face down on the workpiece.

Then, "iron" the back of the photocopy until orne of the toner relea e from the paper.

ole: Thi technique will produce a mirror image. For an explanation of how to get a nonmirrored image (sud as for letters), see W()OO.~mith No. 47.

16

Woodsmith

TAPE PHOTOCOPlr ,0' PATliERN IN PLACE

~' I

APPl.'I' HEAT -~ --UNTIL OImlNE IS lRANSFURED

10.71

IRO

GVENEER

• When making the Mu ic Bo hown on page 18. I wanted to dre .. -up the lid with a piece of walnut burl vene r.

PROBLEM • Applying vene r can be- a time-consuming proces . First, since the veneer is Idom flat, it has to b flattened before you can use it.This part of the process alone can take several days.

Also. once the veneer is flat, it's glued down and held in place with a veneer pre until the glue dries. But. because very little air can get to the glue when it's in the pre .It may take 24 hours for the glue to dry completely.

PAPER·a.s.CKED VEz.iEER. To

peed up the process, I took a couple of hort cut . Fir l, I u I'd a paper-backed flexible veneer. Thi type of veneer require no flattening. That's because the veneer i . laminated to a sheet of paper which keeps the veneer fiat and intact.

GU IXG ON \'EXEt:R .. ince I didn't want to wail 24 hours for

the glue to dry. I came up with a technique f r peeding up the drying lime -I used an electric clothe iron.

111e iron provides a source of heat that causes the water in the glue 10 evaporate quickly.

IRON. Before applying the veneer, tum the iron to a medium heat setting (about "cotton" on my iron). The iron I u e is an older model that do n't have any steam hole' in the bottom. If you have a newer model with steam holes. make u re the

team setting is turned off. ote:

To keep from getting glue on the base of the iron. you maywant to cover it with aluminum foil.

While the iron is warming up. cut the veneer so it's slightly larger than the workpiece. Then apply glue to the workpiece. (l use yellow woodworking glue.) Use just enough glue to "butter" the urface, so the grain patt rn barely hows through.

TACK 0 'E CORNER Once the glue is applied, all thai' left i to iron down the veneer. To do thi .

start by placing the veneer on the glued workpiece. sec FIg. l. Then. to keep the vene r from moving. I place the iron over one corneruntiltheveneerstay PUL.

Now, with the comer "tacked down," move the iron slowly back and forth across the piece until the glue is set.

ote: Leavingtheiron in plac mar cau e the ven -er to burn.

Finally. flip the workpiece over and. u ing a sharp knife, trim the veneer flush with the ide . ee Fig. 2.

CU1"VEN[£R LARGER THA:N WORKPIECE

IIASEWITH ALUMINUM FOil

-X'ACTOOR OTHER 5H"A11P KNIFE

LOCATOR PINS

.1 came acrossa common problem while I was attaching the lid to the Toy Box case. I had already mounted the hinge' onto the case and needed to pre-drill and rew the lid to th hinge.

The problem is you can't mark

the hinge hole locations on the lid once the lid is set in position. I needed a way to locate th I' exact center of the hinge holes on the lid without opening them up.

!\lADE FRO SCRE\\. To do thi , I made locator pin by cut-

ting off most of the thread - on a couple of extra hinge screws. Then. I filed the Lilt end of the screw' to a fine point. e Fig. 1.

Th'GTHEPIX .To use the locator pins, place one pin in the end holes of the hinge and close

114,.. ')" Fh

woeo,,,""{

CUTOFf THREADS

FILE TO' A POINT

FlU

WOQD-fAcro VI5f

I

th hinge flap. see Fig. 2. ext. po 'ilion the lid on th case and pres down so the pins leave impressions on the inside of the lids. Then, open up the lid, remove the locator pins, and drill the pilot holes.

a.

FIRSt:

POSITION UD

SECOND:

PRESS UD DOWN TO MAKE IIMPRESSIONI

1

0.71

17

WOlxLmirh

WEEKEND

PROJECT

Music Box

You have to plan ahead 1 even on a small box like this. The sides are routed to shape first. Then you can try your hand at two different styles fOT the lid.

The real reason r wanted to build this music box wa to experimentwith two techniques [seldom get the chance to tryworking with veneerandehlpearving.Itwas great fun to try these techniques on the small lid, and ] didn't have to wony about a major effort. (For more on these techniques, see Shop otes on page 11.)

Anoth erchallenge was trylngto figure out a way to get the music works to start when] opened the lid and to slop when I dosed the lid. The secret is a small pin connected to the wire shut-off arm of the music mevement,

The overall secret to making this project go smoothly is to make sure everything works befare the box is assembled. I w01.llldl up dry-assembling it several times (with rubber bands) before actually gluing it up.

1 also found it best to sand all the inside surfaces befare assembly. Then, after the box is assembled, J used a spray can 1:0 apply the finish rather !:han using a brush.

T E BLANK

The first step in building the music box is to make the Iront, back and side pieces. Instead of routing four individual pieces, it's safer to rout a single long blank, then cut oil four pieces to length.

To make the blank, start with a V211·thick piece of stock. Rip the stock to a finished width of 2W' and a rough length of.2411.

ROUND OVER lEDGE. Alter the blank is cut to size, rout a V4" round-over wiili a shoulder along one edge, see Fig. I a. Adjust the bit so a \41" shoulder is left on the bottom edge of the blank to form the ba of the rn ill sic box.

SHADOW LL"'l'E. After routing the roundover. the next step is 10 rout a "shadow line" around the topouisuie edge oIthe blank, see Fig. lb. To do this, W used a !flu straight bit, and adjusted th bit to stick up !Ai" above the router table. Once the height is set, adjust the fence so the bit routs a 'V16"-wide rabbet on the au tside Jace of the blank.

INNER UP. The next step is to rout a lip, on the fop inside edge, for the Plexiglas dust cover to sit on, see Fig Ic, Since this lip is the same depth as the hadow line, the height of the router bit doesn't have to be changed. Simply move the fence over to make a Vot"· wide rabbet

BOTrOl'Il GROOVE. The last step is to cut a cut. Then position the fence :Y4" from the Vs"-wide groove for the bottom of the music outside of the blade. '!lith the inside of the box to fitinto, see Fig.Ld, To cutthisgroove, blank face down, place the base edge of the raise the table saw blade to make a V41'-deep blank against the fence 3.I1d cut the groove.

1

END' VIEW OF BLANK

OUT RABBET

Q.

b.

1 B"

SHOIILDER - -"

dl.

CUT GROOVE

1

0.7]

Wood.mith

FRO T,

AC , & SIDES

After all the cuts are made on the long blank, the next step is to cut the frontlback pieces (A) and side pieces (E) to their finished lengths. But there are two 'problems here.

First, you have to support and guide these mall pieces while mitering the ends to length. cond, each pair of piece has to be exactly the same length.

AlJXlUARY FENCE. The solution to both problemsi . La attach an auxiliary f nc to the

ROUGH LENGTH 6"

@

FRONT/BACK (2 PIECES]

ssEM.LY

Once the front/back, and side pieces are mitered to length, the next step is to make the bottom of the music box.

BOTrO I.The bottom (C) is a piece of solid wood that' resawn and planed down to fit the Vx"-wide grooves in the ide of the box. To d tennille the length and width of the bottom. dry a semble the box. holding it together with a rubber band.

ow, measure the inside dimcn ion of the box, and add the depth of the grooves on all four ide. To provide extra clearance during assembly, subtract !jIS" from the length and width and cut the bottom to ize,

KE\ \rrND HOLE. Before assembly, holes have to be drilled in the bottom and one of the ides to accommodate the music work . To make the alignment of the pin and the movement a simple a possible. tart by drilling an oversize hole (Y2" diameter) in the bottom (0 for the keywind stem to pass through.s e Fig. 4.

SHt .orr "'l~. The music movement has a wire hut-off ann that moves to start or stop the mu ic. On the music box this arm i activated with a shut-off pin that acts as a witch when the lid is opened or closed.

To mount this pin, drill a I "-dia. hole in one of the ide pieces (B). Thi hole i located 3/4" from the long point of the miter and centered on the top edge of th id piece (8). see Fig, 5. To allow room to conn ct the pin to th wire ann, drill out a ree . on the in ide face of the ide piece with a F 0 tner bit, ee Eg. 5.

IIIOUl'Io"ITNG HOLES. . ow. dry assem ble the box again. putting the pin in plac and attach-

miter gauge. This fence supports the mall pieces. And, by using a stop block, you can cut each pair of pieces to exactly the same length, refer to Fig. 3.

ROUGH 1£. GTHS. Before mitering the pieces. cut the two frontlback.pieces(A) to a rougillengfh of6". see Fig. 2. And the two side piece (8) to a rough length of 5".

nUM TO SIZE. Once the piece are cut to th ir rough 1 ngth • tilt Ihe table saw blade

to 45' and trim off one end of all four piece . (A you mak the cuts, you Mil al a cut a kerf in the fence that's usedforthe next cut.)

To cut the pieces to final length. measure from the long-point of the mitered end and mark the length, see Fig. 2. Then adju tth po ition of the stop block by laying the pi again t the £ nee until the mark align with the edge of the kerf in the fence, see Fig. 3a. Then miter the pieces to length.

@

SIDES (2 P[ECESl

ing itto tliJe wi re arm. Then.centerthe movement in the box and mark !he location of the two mounting holes. see "~Ig. 4. Disa mble the box and dri111,i ., mounting hole .

GL E- P. Finally, apply glue to the mit. red end and rea emble the box with the b nom (C) in place, see Fig. 6. ( fake ure that the pin and ann are connected.)

!lEND ARM INTO POsmON

4

MOVEMENT

MOUNTING SCREWS----

SHIII·OfF IPIN

_/

GWETHE MroERED CORNEIlS TOGETHER ""ND Hom IN PLACE wrrH RIIBa£R BANDS

0.71

19

Woodsmith

THE LID

'ext.] began work on tile 1f2"-thick lid. TIl.e lid (0) is cut to the same dimen ions as the outside dimensions of the box (3W'wide and 4.v.t" long), see Fig. 7.

I decided to dress-up the lop of the music box with burl veneer and an inlay trip. (Another option is the carved lid hown on the opposite page.)

VENEER. The first step is to glue the burl veneert« the topofthe lid (0), see Fig, 7. for a Quick way 1.0 apply veneers. ! e Shop ales on page 17.

ROUND O\IER EDGES. The next step is to round over the Lop edges of the lid. To do this.I used a V4r, rnund-over bit on the router table, see Fig. 8. Start by adjusting the height of the bit to produce a h6" shonlder;

IlABBEr FOR I IAV. Once the round-over is complete, r routed a small rabbet around the edge of the veneer for the inlay strip. Start by marking the width of the inlay strip on the top of the lid, see Fig. 9.

ext. adjust a 112" straight bit to cut a rabbet slightly shallower than the thickness of the inlay, see Fig. 1.0. (The strip will be sanded flush later.) ow, adjust the fence so the bit culsjust up to the width mark.

FlT INlAY STRIPS. After the rabbets are cut on all four edges. I mitered the ends of the inlay strips wi!h a chisel. To guide the chisel at 45'1 made a jig, see Fig. II.

To install the inlay. miter one end. Then temporarily tape this piece in place. 'ext mark the short point onhe miterwith aknife, see Fig. 12. Align this mark in the jig and cut it to length.

Finally. glue the inlay strips in place and sand them flush with the veneer.

FINISHING, TOIUeHES

To complete the music box, attach the lid and drop in a dust shield made of Plexiglas.

HlNG!ES. The] id is attached to the box with two small butt hinges. To mount these hinges, I chiseled out two mortises in the top edge of the back piece (A), see Fig. 13. Each mortise is the same length as the runge and as deep as the hinge knuckle, see Fig. 133_

Next, position the hinge flush with the illsid» edge ofthe mortise, see Fig. 13a. Mark the bole locations. drill pilot holes with an 18 gauge brad. and screw the hinges in place.

To locate-the pilot holes in the lid, fold the hinge closed and stick a piece of doublesided carpet tape on each hinge, see fig. 13. Then press the lid down on top ofthe hinges.

ow open the lid. mark the screw hole locations, amll drill the pilot hole.

FrN(SH ,'\NO' onsr COVER. Next, I removed the works and hinges and prayed on two ccats of aerosol Deft Clear Wood Fl nish.

Finally, cut a lfflll-thkk dust cover from Plexiglas (0 rest on the inner lip.

20

ROUlER TAIII.£ FENCE

TOP'FACE IDOWN I

c-

101
c--
SET DE PDlI SUG+lTiL Y
I.£SS nlAN Jl.IICKNESS
'OF INLAY 51iRlP
ADJUST IF£NCiE /
so BI1 eurs-~ ..
rOMARK ~-__L
... :1. I ( I ~ ,
I 1- STRAIGHT BIT II I
.._____- -I T,OWIDTH OF INlAY

~.·-THIOK STOCK GLUE ON IBASE

TO lOCATE PILOT HOLIES, USE CARPET TAPE AND STICK UD TO ,K1NGES,

1,a,THICK PI.£XIGI.AS , DUST COVER

Woodlsmith

0.71

DESIGN

OPTION

Carved Lid

1 Holding tf? knife at a steep (6.5") angle, plullge the tip ofille knife into the workpiece. Theu. usillg gaur thumb es a pil'ol. pull the kll~fe uiollg the outline.

RECESSED LID

I had just completed the veneered lid on the music box, when someone suggested doing a chip-carved lid, I thought I'd give it a try.

I'm not an expert chip carver. so I decided to tick to a very simpl de ign. (To transfer tnt' full size pattern abov .see Shop Noles on page 16_)

Because ittook me several attempts to get the carving just right, I made the lid to accept a drop-in carved panel, 'Ibis way I could carve the design several times on a long strip of wood. then cut out the one that l thought looked the best and tit it in the lid recess.

I ArnRIAI_. I carved the design shown above in a W'-thick strip of basswood. Bass-

I

MAKE GAUG~ FROM SCRAPB~OCK

o. 71

2 Tile second cut will remove the chip. To make thiB Cllt, Spi11 tile wfJl"kpiece around. Hold theknifee! the same angle ns beforl!olld pull the knife touerd YOll.

wood is a soft, almost grainless wood that carves easily.

GAUGE. Before m actually started work on the lid, I made a gauge for laying out the outline of the recess, see Fig. 1 below. Later III ed this gauge as a support for a chisel to cleaa up the edges of the routed reces . refer to Fig. 4.

IAYOIrr. Once you've finished making the gaug .jrse it to layout the recess on the top of the l,.2"·lhick lid. see Fig. 2.

ROlTIlNG. \Vith the layout complete. the next step is to rout a If,,"-deep recess to aecept the carving. see Fig. 3. To do this. use a W' straight bit and rout dose to the line.

Woodsmirn.

em. EL SUPPORT. Now. to get a crisp shoulder around the recess, I used a chisel to cutto the layout line. Here again I used the layout gaugt , but this time a a upport (or the chi el, see fig. 41. To get the insert to fit lightly, angle the chisel to undercut the . i des of the reces lightly. ee FigAa.

ROUNDO'IlER. Once you've fini hed chiseling the recess to the line. rout a WI roundover with a VIS" shoulder around the four edges of the lid, see Fig. Sa.

An that's left is to cut the carved panel to m the recess. Then apply a small amount of glue to the bottom of the panel and press it into place. sec Fig. 5.

ROUl I 4"·DE.EP CLOSE

u.

116'" 5HOULD,ER I

/'

I .• " ROUNDOVER Bit

21

PROJECT

The idea for this project. came from a local diner. After I ordered, the waitress slipped my order under a holding device for the chef When I looked at the device] was sur" prised to find glass marbles holding the paper. I thought it would be handy to have one of these grippers to hold drawings in the shop or the grocery list in the kitchen.

The challenge was designing the gripper so it would easily hold a piece of paper when it's slipped into place, out not so firmly that the paper rips when pulled out. Mer some tria] ami error, I was able to make it work by drilling a shallow pocket behind each marble.

MARBLE HOLDER

I began building the gripper by cutting a marble bolder (A), from 4'4"-lhick stock to a width of ] Ifl' and length of 111;2'\ see Fig. 1.

IN G

Paper Gripper

down the length of ill workpiece, see Fig. 1.

!UP 10 W1D1H. ext, rip the workpiece (with the holes down) at a 20" angle so the distance from the edge of the board to the long point of !he angle is 1", see Fig. 2a.

'MlUu;r FUN PAPER. To provide an area for the paper to slip into, I cut a rabbet along the angled edge, see Fig. 3. To do this, leave the blade at 20· and lower it to¥: "abovethe table, see Fig. 33. Then move th fence towards the saw blade th thickness of the blade ..

at could be longer or shorter, butthis length will hold a 8W' x nil piece ofpaper.)

DRIU. aoizs, The marbles are held in 0/'4"diameter 110le set at an angle to the back plate. It's ea iest to drilla series 01 stra iglrt holes. and then rip the workpiece at an angle, Start by drilling len !li16"-deep hole

ACK PLATE Afterrabbetting the marble holder, ~ made a back plate (8), see Fig. 4. It's cut from a piece 0 f %" tock. 2l,ii" wide and 13 W'long.

Then, to keep the marbles from gripping the paper too tightly. drill a series of shallow 3/4" holes in the back plate, see Fig. 4.

DRII.LJlEN 3l1"·DIA. HOLES I

1

MARBle HOLDER

BA.CK PLATE

IIRIU TEN HOLES,

22

lEND VIEW

~"'----T----------'

IT=:-: @

Woodsmith

0.71

HANGING 'HE GRIPPER

You can hang the gripper on the waIl by driving screws through the back plate .. But r used a system that hides the screws.

This system involves cutting a dovetail groove in the back of the back plate and screwing a matching dovetail-shaped bar to the waIl. Then the gripper slides over the bar, refer to' Fig. 1 L

DOVETAIL GROOVE. To rout the ¥4"-wide groove in the back. ofthe back plate (B), start by positioning the ru uter table fence so a !hOI dovetail bit is centered on the width of tne workpiece. see Fig. 5.

ow make a series of passes turning the workpiece end-far-end between passe. Move the fence back slightly between every other pass, sneaking up on the final width.

IIANGI:'\G .HAR. After th groove is cut, the next tep is to cut a hanging bar (C). Though the bar De dis to be 0/'16" thick to match the groove, I found it safer to start with a piece that wa ¥4" thick and 15" long. Later I resawed itto thickness.

Without changing the height of the dovetail bit. move the I nee to cover most of the bit.Then, make a narrow pass alongeach edge of the stock, see Fig. '6.

Chec k the fit of the bar in the groove. [fit's a little wide. move the fence back slightly and make another pass until the bar just slides into the groove.

Once the bar fits the groove. it can be resawn to final thickness. see Fig. 7. To hold the back plate slightly away from the wall cut the bar a hair thicker than the depth of the groove in the back plate. (You may have to snap off a sliver of wood on each edge.)

BE\rEL. EDGES. Now slide the bar into the groove inthe back plate and !rim aU four edge of both the bar and the back plate at a 20' angle. sec Fig. 8.

ASSEMBLY

FInally. assembly can begin. I started by findin,; some marbles at a local loy store that were fairly consistent in diameter.

MRBLES. For the gripper to work property, all the marbles should be close to 0/'811 diameter, 'to check for consistency, make a gauge by drilling a 5/s"-diameter hole through a piece of scrap. see Fig. 9. Once I found len marbles that dropped snugly through the gauge, I placed one marble in each hole of the holder (A) and temporarily taped them in place. see Fig. 10.

ASSEMBLE PARIS. 'ow, glue the top edge of the holder (A) to the back plate (B) so it' centered on the length andillu h with th top bevel, see ,"'ig. 11.

"n'tSH ""'110 I\IOl1:\mNG. Alter assembling the part'>. 1 applied tung oil to the wood and rhenmountedthe hanging bar (C) to the wall with countersunk screws. Finally. slide the back plate over the bar,and s]ip your Woodsmith renewal notice into the gripper.

HANGING iBAR © ............ fI 5,· lONGI- .

CUT BAR TO fIT GROOVE

10

®

MARBI..E HomER I

-- GLUE AREA

MARIlLE~ GAIIGE

11

_.....-,MAIlBLIE HOlDER

,REMOVE TAPE

• AfTER A.S5EMBlY

I. ~

HANGING "-----

BAR COUNTERSINK HOLIES

ANI) !iCliEW' BAR TO WALL

0 .. 71

Wood:smith

COMMENTS

AND

QUESTIONS

Talking Shop

SELF-CENT _ ING HI GE BIT

I. When mounting the hinges on the Toy Box, shown on page 6,1 was faced with drilling multiple pilot holes for the piano hinges. 0 matter how careful you are when dr:illing these holes, the drill bit can move off center. If the pilot hole is off-center, the hinge will move when the screw is installed.

U'lNGE MOVEMENT. The reason the hinge moves has to do

H(NGE 15 CENTER"m IIIIT PILOT HOLE IS OFF<£N1tR

PILOT HOLE

,

HINGE

TIGHTENING SCREW CAIISES HING~ TO' SHIFT POSmON

with the way hinge are made. Most hinges have countersunk screw holes to accept flathead screws, As these screws are tightened down, the hinge is pulled out of position, see Fig. l.

So, what's the best way to drill perfectly centered holes for hinges, or any hardware that has countersunk SCf("W holes?

UJL.'I;GE BrI'S. The solution to this problem is aunique self-cen-

HINGE

tering drill bit. This bit is known by many names: Vix bit, pringaction hinge bit or self-centering hinge bit. There are two common sizes available. One drills pilothelesfnr o.Sandfiscrews and the other drills pilot holes for I 0.8,9, and 10 screws. (See Sources on page 31.)

eONS1R1 mON .. The bit consists of three mai n parts, see Fig. 2. An outer case that s chucked into a drill A highspeed twist drill bit that's held in the outer case with a set screw. And a springloaded retractabl inner sleeve.

IIU\\I TO. TIle key to making thi bit work is the tip of the inner sleeve - it's ground to the same bevel as the countersunk holes in the hinges. To drill a hole. start by holding the hinge firmly in place. Then, as you insert the bit into the hinge

mounting holes, the beveled tip centers the twist bit perfectly. '~"hen you push down OJ] the bit, the j nner sleeve retracts into the outer case as the drill bit enters the wood.

DEPTH SETfING. The other thing J like about these bits is how easily you can set the depth of the hit. Simply loosen the Allen head set screw on the outerca e, and position the bit to the correct depth, see Fig. 2. Then, retighten the . et screw and drill the pilot holes.

ROUGHING OUT BO RDS

.1 recently stopped at a local lumber yrrrd to pick up .'01111" Iw I'd ioood fo ,. a p ro jed. J 1(1(1., ann d with a cuttillg diagram and material, list ill Olle hand and a tape meaSll re in fh('otller.

Since hardwood lumber is no: cui in lim/orm widths and lengtJu'i, it UHIS evident that the "idpcW" board.s sholt'll 011 '!u:~ ("ltfting diagram ~t'el'el1 'I· readily ami/able. lf7wt tricks do YOLl use uhen buying and laying01lt bomUs?

-loe Perzel

sti 11 neapolis, Milt nesoia I usually start by selecting enough boards to match the specified total board footage re-

quired for the project Then arid 15%t020%fordefect andirr gular-shaped boards (tho e that are tapered or with uneven edges). Ill'm dealing with piece that have a uniq ue hape or ize, I'll look for boards just for them.

PROJECf fA.'IUUAROY. Once the lumber is in the shop, there's a temptation to start culling immediately. But now's the time to sit down and take a few minutes to carefully study your plans. And ask, weh ere are the problem pieces? "\'bat pieces will be visible? 'Vhal pieces have to be exactly flat?

Once you're familiar with the project pieces, the next step is to

figure out what pieces will be cut from which boards. At this poim it's like a jigsaw puzzle and there are two ways to approach it

• CAU BRA\ INGS. The first method istouse a scale drawing. Simply sketch a reduced outline of each board on graph paper. (]!

any of the boards have checked ends. cut off any defects before sketching the outline.)

Next, usc the materials list to start sketching where the project parts might fit onto the board. Since most material lists give finished dimensions for

24

0.71

Wood smith

part. add space for the saw kerfs and any jointingorplaning.

If the project has many parts. you might want to make a reduced scale template lor each piece (like the kitchen or bathroom design kits that are sold). You can easily move the parts lifollnd to find what pieces fit best on which boards.

Scale drawings do have one limitation though, the boards are assumed to be perfect - no knots, taper. or wild grain.

lAY our 0 BOARDS. That's why .1 like the second method, laying out the pieces directly on the boards with chalk. If the parts don't JiL I can wipe the marks off with a damp sponge and IT]' again.

Before marking any boards. sort through them and keep an eye out for pieces with pleasing

grain pattern. Use these for the highlyvi iblepartsoftheproject (such as table tops and drawer fronts). The boards with slight defeetscan be used for parts that won't be seen (interior parts, drawer backs and bottoms).

DO rr FORCt-T KERf'S. ''\'1len laying out., mark the pieces lf411 wider ami 1f2" longer than needed to allow for kerfs, jointing, and squaring up.

I usually:fill in the large pieces first so that the cutoffs can be used for smaller parts. I also try to align cross-cut lines in each board to make rough cuts more manageable.

A.. ... EXMfPlE. Recently I was working on a project that required the following pieces: (A) 4"x 14" (2 ea.), (B) 13i4"x &'W' (4 ea.), and (C) 1:V4" x.16" (3 ea.Ll was fared with finding the best

EXAMPLE 2:

All. PIECES FIT WITH1WO ,COMMON C'ROSSCIlTS

1

MAtERIALS LIST

c

get with ordinary sandpaper. And it' ea ier to sand harp detail if the folded edges of the paper are crisp.

I do however, use Stikit sandpaper quite a bit, .1 fold it back-toback so the grit on one side keeps the sandpaper from slipping all my fingers while the other side sands the workpiece.

TF;ofNlgrES. Once the sandpaper has b en selected, the next thing Lo consider is technique. Start by removing the tool rest so that you don't get your fingers pinched between the workpiece and the tool rest.

Next, make sure you're sanding in the right direction. You should sand with your hand under the workpiece - with your lingers following the direction ofthe workpiece rotation. II you sand on lop of the piece, the wood can grab the sandpaper (and your fingers) and can crunch your knuckles against the spinning wood ..

Shop Note: II you own a lathe that has a rever sable motor, make sure your fingers always follow the direction of the workpiece rotation .. Reversing a lathe and sanding in both directions bends 'the wood fibers and allows them to be r moved more easily. This can produce a very

EXAMPLE 1:

AJL PIKES [10 NOT FIfAND NO COMMON CROSSCUTS

A

B

B

Po

way to get the pieces from a 6'1. wide board that was 4 Ieet long, see Fig. 1.

The first time I laid it out. I couldn't lit all the pieces on the board. Not only that, there weren't any clear cross-cuts.

B

--~--~

So I wiped off the chalk and tried again. T11is time all the pieces fit, and I could start by cress-cutting the board into three manageable pieces. Then it was easy to rip all the parts from these three short pieces.

LATHE, SANDING

0.71

smooth surface .

LATIIE 'PEED.

,Vit]} andpaper in hand, you're ready lo elect the lathe speed. The speed that I usc for most sanding is the same that I've used to make my finish cuts. However, there are a f, w exceptions to this where I'll change the speed of the lathe.

I'll slow down the lathe when I'm sanding faceplate work, such as plates and bowls. The rims and edges of this type of work can burn very easily. Although the rim revolves at the same revolutions per minute as the center of the work. the rim has a greater velocity and a larger diameter. This means there will be more wood ill contact with the sandpaper in the same amount of time.

Another time to decrease speed is when sanding work with small beads or sharp crisp edges. By slowing down, you'll be able to control how rapidly the wood is removed. It'll take longer to sand at this speed, but there's lessof achance of removing a fine detail that you spent considerable time forming.

W oodsmirh

PRESSL".RE. Now that lhe lathe speed is set and you're ready to sand, one question remains. How much pressure should be applied when sanding? The best indica Lor I know for correct sanding pressure is heat

If your fingers start. heating up, you need to back off the pressure. Excessive pressure creates friction and the heat produced can bum both the sandpaper and the wood.

BlfRN]SmNG, Once the saading job is done, there's one more step I like to do before finishing. l turn on the lathe and burnish the turned piece with its own shavings. Burnishing compacts wood fibers to produce a smooth surface. So I take a generous handful of shavings and press them firmly into the piece.This produces a soft, smooth sheen.

• 1 ueeer seem to be able to get my flLMlillg project· as smooth QB I'd. like. le there a tnc« t.o sanding 011 a lathe?

c.t: Ketterer

Zelienople, Pen nsyll'Ullia The real trick in sanding on the lathe is to g t the lathe and the sandpaper to work together - not against each other. 111is can be done by choosing the right sandpaper and then using correct sanding techniques. (Note:

Remember. no amount of sanding will make up for a rou~hly turned pieee.)

SA."'DPAPER. Before you sand a project, the first step is to choose the correct type and grit sandpaper. I use aluminum oxide sandpaper because it

tay sharper longer and doesn't break down from heat as quickly as the other types.

] generally use a progressive series of four grits of paper: 120, 150, 180, and 220. This works well for most projects and will produce a smoeth finish. An exception to this is on end grain. Here, ]11 often start with 80 or 100 grit and go on to finer grits.

Many turners use cloth-back paper or put Contact paper on the back of sandpaper. But folding these thick papers doesn't leave the crisp edges that you

25

JUS T

FOR

KID S

Night Light

You can create magic with a scroll saw and a Christmas tree bulb. And it's magic that can change from season to season with four interchangeablepattems.

YOU don't often think about projects that get their ~ann from the wood that's missing. This night Light is one of those proj ts, It's a box. with solid wood sides, top, and bottom. Wh at males it inlere ting i the front panelthat screens the light shLliling from a small bulb inside.

We designed lhi night lighlwith four of these interchangeable scroll-sawn panels. You can slide one in front of the ligl1t.an.d store the others in a compartment in the back of the box.

WOOD. I used cherry for all the parts of the night lighl The color and warmth of cherry enhance the glow cast b)' the light And because cherry is dosegrained, it cuts well on a scroll saw.

• ·PPUf:S. The light fixture is a Christmas tree-

ize (4 watt) bulb that clip tightly into the base of the box. This light bulb lixture, alongwith a full- ize drawing of each of the four patterns (and a piece of felt doth [or the boltom)is available [rom WQIJIf[smiih Project Supplies. see Sources, page 31.

26

Woodsrnith

0.71

OVERAll DIMENSIONS: 9" IH X 6" W x 51/4" ,D

@

IUD IBLOCK

SlODGE ('HAMBER I~OR EXTRA, IN11ERCHANGEABlE ~ANEl5



DIVIDER PANEL

LIGHT DETAIL

@

INTERCHANGEABLE PANELS (41

.....____..

@

SIDE

@

SIDE

I'INtlii WINGS, Of UGIiIl FIXTU RE AND PUSH [mo UGH1"80ARD

~

G.

A Interchangeable Panels (4) 1;& x 43/6 X 8

8 Divider Panel (l) 1;'1 x 43;4, X 8

'e Back Panel (l) 1;4)( 43/H 8

D Sides (2) 3/4 x 43;4 X 8

E Base (1) ~ X 5V.p: 6

F IJd(1) 'n)(51/4X6

G Ud Block(l) 0/4 x 2 x 4

H Ught Board (1) 'Ill x 2 x .:I

SUPPUES

• (4) No.6 x l' Fh woodscrews

• Tung oll finish

• Felt cloth 6' x 6' (rough)

• N°ght Ught Kit (see page 31)

® UGHrOO,AR,D

'-------~o_

UGHT FIXTURE

CD

BASE

P'HOTO DErAILS

No. 71

Woodsm.:ith

27

PA ELS

Istarted building the nightlight bycutting six panel blanks (four for the interchangeable panels, vlu one divider panel and one back panel) . The night light boxis built around these.

PANEL BIAXK. To mak the, e . ix 1(4'1. thick panel (A,B & C), first cut a piece of :V4" stock to a final width of 4:V4" and a rough length of 26", see fig. 1.

KESAW PANELS. Then resaw thi into two panels that are each slightly thicker than W'. [ used the table saw and made two passe with a sharp blade, ee Fig. 1. You could also use a band saw or thickness

51

planer to reduce the stock to I,I~II. Now, sand or plane the saw marksfrom all the panels so they're each the same fini hed thickness of 1(4". Then cross-cut both blanks to produce

six 811-longpane1s. see Fig. 2.

hop Note: Instead of resawing solid stock. you could use plywood (but the plies will how on the finished pattern panels).

After resa .... -ing and cutting the panels to size. the next tep is to make the grooved sides of the box.

IDE 8LANK. The two sides (0) start out as one blank 01 :V411-thick stock. Cut the blank to a finished width of 4Y4" and a rough length of 16I,1i', see Fig. 3.

PANEL GROOVES. Next, cut three 1111-wide groove Iorthepanel to slide into. I used the table saw with a rip blade to form all the groove. But before cutting the grooves in the blank, cut a test piece the same ize a the blank to check the width and position of the groove.

The first grooves to cut are the two outside ones, see Fig. 3. To do this. set the fence

.114" from the inside edge of the blade. and raise the blade %11 above the table.

N ow make one pass to cut a kerf in the test piece forming the out ide limit of the groove. Then tum the piece end-for-end and cut a kerf near the other edge. When you're satisfied with the depth of the ked anti its distance from the edge. cut kerfs on both edges of the actual workpiece following the same procedure.

Now repo. ition the fence and make a second pass on the te t piece, a the hll panel fit snugly in the groove in the te t piece. Then make the cut! in the actual workpiece to complete the two outside grooves.

Form the groove for the divider panel in the same way. Thi groove i 'located 2" from the back edg of the box. sid s. see Fig. 3.

SIURAGE CHMIIBER. AIt r the three 11411. wide grooves were cut, I cut a III-wide

~ rorage" chamber. see Fig. 3. Do this by making a ries of passes with the rip blade.

oi IOE EDGES. 'cxt, to make the ides appear thinner than their actual 3/4" thicknes • I trimmed the front and back edge' down to 1(21' thick. see Fig. 4. To do this . set the table saw blade Vii from the fence and :¥-" high. see Fig. 5.

81..U.NOSE PROmL After trimming the outside edges. rout a bullnose profile on them with a %" round-over bit To do this. first raise the bit 1;.1" high and round over the outside edge (grooved face /I p). see Fig. 6. Then raise the bit lhll high and round over the inside edge (groovedoll'lI). eFig.7.

PRE·ASSE."\mLY. 1 ow cut the side piece into two . "-long sections, e Fig. 3. Then glue the back and divider panels in place (flu. h at the top and bottom) between the Iwo ide • refer La Exploded Vi ew, page 27.

3

SECOND: CUT DIVIDER GROOVE

FIRST: CUT TWO ---=-_ OUTSIDE GROOVES

- ....

2"

BACK EDGE

8"

NOTE:

USEliEST PIECE TO tHECK CUTS

Woodsmith

2'

fRlM---' ,

fRONT AND I 2"

BACK 'EDGES Of

SIDE PIECES TO ' ~. THICK"

A11GROOVES ARE ~""DEEP

ROUTER TABU! fENCE

0.71

Begin making the base and lid of the box by cutting a blank to a final width of 51;4", and a rough length of 121h", Resaw, then sand. the blank: til' a final thickne of Jt.l". Now cut 'he blank into two pieces, each 6'1 long, Lo form a base (E), and a lid (F).

j'lNGEH sun. A Mfinllt'r slot" in the base allows access to the electrical fixture. To rnake th is, bore two 111 holes in th base, then cut out the waste between them with a sabre saw, see Fig. 8a.

CORDGROOl'E. ext.lorma 1,I4t1-<ieepgroove for the electrical cord in the bottom of the base using the router tabl . see Fig. 9.

ROllNI).O\'ER EDGES. After cutting this groove, soften all the edges (If the top and bottom with a :Y!I" round-over bit. To do this, raise the bit W' above (he table, see Fig. 10.

ASSEM.L. G THE BOX.

When the" base and lid are complete. finish assembling the night light box. Do this by first drilling countersunk shank holes on the bottom side of the base, see Fig. 1111.

·ext. center the base on the side assembly, and temporarily clamp rhem together. The sides should be inset an equal distance all around the base. see Fig. 11. (In my case, this was V4".)

'oW drill pilot holes through the shank hole into the bottom ends of each side piece, see Fig. 11a. Then glue and screw U-Ie base in place with #6 x I" Fh wood screws.

uv HWl'K.The IJd lit snugiyontothe tep

8

NOTE:

®

IBASE

BORE TWO-

1 "-I)IA. 1'-- ~____j-~~.J _ _.L

EN]) HOLES

fO:R 'FINGER' SLOT

of the box by means of a lid block that's glued to the underside of the lid. see FiR'. 12.

To make the lid block (G). start by cutting a J/4" piece of stock to fit the opening of the light chamber (with a front panel in place).

With the lid block cut to size, rout a narrow chamfer along all four edges of one side of (he block (The chamfered edges let you remove and replace the lid more easily.)

low, lay out the position offhe lid block on the underside ofthe lid (see Fig. 12a) , and glue the block in place.

UGIIT Hu..um. The light fixture ha a spring retainer that's designed to seat into a

BonOMS1DE .--- OF BASE

ROUlIER TABLE FENCiE

Villi-thick board with a 1 I' hole, see rig. 13.

'I'll' make the light board (H), firs! measure the opening at the bottom of '1:11(' light chamber. Then rut a piece of VsII resawn stock to fit this opening, see Fig. 13a. Bore a 1" hole through the center of this piece, then glue the light board in place in the bottom of the base.

1-, ISII. I applied a tung oil finish to the box. I ole: The box will reflect more light through the panels if you pain! the three inside surfaces of the ligi1l chamber while.

Finally, glue a piece of fell 011 tile bottom ofthe box to hold the electrical cord in place.

13"

J

...,/

"",..___

I

..,

/~.

S ,'1

7 -~

• NOTE~

~ 1.·INsn

I ON ALL SIDES

®

UD

SiIDE

UD' BLOCK@

LlGtiT BOARD



2"

4"----1

I-I--

I .• " R.ESAWN / STOCK

a.,

I!~ I

2"

,....--1'

I

\..CIJiI'

TO'Fn

®

LIGHT BOARD

o. 71

29

Woudsmith

SCROLL

SAW

PATTERNS

Night Light Panels

The magic of the nightUghl i in the scroll-sawn panels. Here are orne suggestions for making four interchangeable panels,

SC:ROLLIN _ TIPS

The patterns shown here are hall-s ize, ,,0 have them enlarged 200% at a copy shop, or send for the full-size patterns from U'lJods1lIith Project Sllpplies, see Sources, page 31.

ote: The ligMerareas of the drawi ngs are those that sh auld be cut away. (I used a No.5 skip tooth blade in the scroll saw (or each of the patterns.)

AITACH I'AnERN. First finish sand each of the pan I blanks. Then glue a pattern to the blank using 3M's Spray Mount or a light coat of ru bber cement

DRUA. HOLES. Before you begin to saw, drill starting holes for the pierce (inside) cuts, and for the other hole .

II'1NISH. Finish the panels by dipping them in a shallow pan of lung oil, 111en poke out the excess finish from the drill holes with a wire brad. (A shot of compressed air works even better.)

FALLING S1ARS

Drill the holes for the background starsfirst (using V16" and VS" drill bits).

The points on the moon and the falling stars will be sharpest if you fOITIl them wi th two i nterseetingeuts, rather than by trying to pwot around them.

lACK O·LANIE N

Drill out the stars (with V16'1 and ~2" bits) and the moon (with a ¥4" bit) first, Then cut out the details of the pumpkin. Pivol the blade only when cutting out the eyes and th mouth.

Cut around the fence parts next, and finally cut around the cat,

CAl FISHI I·

This pattern requires the most starting holes for the pierce cuts. Drill these first. then cut out the smaller areas.

Cut around the cat last [f'nis gives you more support when you're scrolling between the leaves).

SNOWY PINE

Drill holes for the snowflakes (1,I16"bit) and the tree ornaments ~").Then drill starting holes for the snow on the branches. ext cut the tree outline, and finally the snow on the ground.

Woodsmirh

No. 71

30

PROJECT

UPPLIES

Sources

TOY BOX

All the hardware Deeded to build the Toy Box is available from Woods.ruth Projeet Sug» plies. The package includes hinges. lid supports, shelf supports, casters. plu s a sheet of full

ize patterns on uer A. B, and C and numerals 1, 2, and 3. ole: \Voodand paint not included.

Toy Box Hardware 771-100 Toy Box Hardware

Package $34.95

.' (2) 11,.<2" x 24" Hing , 'r ws • (2) Adjustable Lld Support

.' (4) 2" Plate Casters

.' (4) Shelf PinSupports

• (l) Pattern A. B, C and 1. 2, 3

HAND MIRRO

A 5" round beveled glass mirror for the Hand Mirror is available from Woodsmitb Project Supplies. Included are a full-size mirror and letter pattern. Please .~pecif.1f lette». eWe recommend Dow's Silicone Seelant to attach the mirror.)

Hand Mirror 171-2005" Round Beveled Mirror ( pecify letter) . ..... .95

• 0) Full-Sire irror Patt m

• (I) Capital Letter Pattern 165-305 (3-0z. tub ) Dow Sili-

cone Sealant $3.29

MUSIC BOX

All the hardware for the Music Box is availahl from Woodsmitb Project Supplies. This package contains an 18 note musical movement,

ate: Wood is 1101 in luded. (See wood kits in next culumn.)

Music Bo Hard\\: re

77I,300Edelwti~s S14.95

771-302 It" A Small

World $14.95

771-304. i1("IlI.· iR:hl $]4.95

771-306Some rhere Over

The Rambow $14.95

'. (Ipr.) 1,12" x 'r6" Brass Plated

Hinges. ·R· ....

• (1) VI;" X 2'/ I X 37 II I' XiJ,:-I;l. (You cut 10 fit your bo: J '.O)Musical muv -nu-nt with on/ off pin. ISUPllli('"S limit. d, call for movem -nt availabllit

No.71

Music Box Wood Kit

We aliso put together a wood kit containing olily the wood, veneer, and inlay to make the Music Box. (Order the music movement and hardware separately, see column at left.) This package includes all the walnut, inlay, and burl Veneer. '01(':

This is !lot a ready-to-a 'mble kit, All piece' mu 1 be cut, Burl veneer may contain patches or scams. so wc'r upplring mure than you need.

Music Box Wood Kit 711-350 Music Box. Wood

and Inlay KiL.. ']7.95

'.0.) V2" x 2ljz" X 24" Walnut

• (1) \t'.?" x 3ljz" x ,lVi' \'1,' alnut

• (1) 1(8" X 27,~" X 37 'Walnut Plywood Bottom, Good 1 Sidr-, • (1) 4" X 12" Walnut Paper Racked Burl Veneer

• (1) :V16" x 2·1" Maplc/Walnut!"'~aple Inlay trip

Music Box Cbip·Can;nf! Kit

We also put together a kit for chip-carvers, It's identical to the veneer kit, but instead of v 'I1H'r and the inlay, we supply a long block of bas wood for plenty !If practicing. We're also including a full- ized chip-carving pattern. Music Box Chip-Caninll Ki,t 71l-375 Mu it Box Chip-

Carving Kit... S17.~15

• (1) V4" X 2¥-I" x 1611 Basswoc II

• (1) V2" x 2lt2" x 24" WablUl .' (1) V2" x 3W' x 4Jt.z" Walnut .' (1) lis" x 2718" J{ 37;8" Walnul

Plywood Bottom, Good 1 Side.

CARVING KNIVES

'We experimented with a variety of knives while chip-carving the top of the Music Box shown on page 21. 1 even called Wayne Barton who is one of the finest chip-carvers around to ask him about carving knives. And he sent u a No.1 Swiss made Klotzli cutting knife to try out

What a difference - these are 111. same knives used in Swiss arving schools and Swiss wood hop. The blade i short (only ] 1I4"-long) so you can controlthe nil precisely. The handle is also

horter and thinner than the I1U1l;"rs we tried. It feels as if it was cu stem molded to fit my palm. After practicing, it made sharp, clean precision cut safelyandveryaecurately, (Thi is the knife I'd recommend. It's

IIOW11 in the photos on page 2].)

If you don't wanl to rnak the investment of a Klotzli knife, we'r offering a less expensive option. This knife has a larger 12 ~ .!"-Iong) sheepfootblade with a thi rk oval handle. \,Vliilei,! can be used for chip carving, the longer blade makes it more of a multi-purpose knife.

Chip-CarviIng Knive 771·3 ·5 .K1otzli Swiss Made Culling Knife

(Overall Length 5¥: U) SI3.5O

759·] 2:0 Sheepfoot Blade Knife

(Overall Length 6¥8U) $6.50

To order by mail, use the form enclosed with a current issue or write YOUI' order on a piece of paper, and send with a check or moneyerder. (Include $3.:,0 handling and shipping charge ~ ith each order.) [A reo ident add 4% sale tax; CA residents add 6.25\1' sales tax. Send to:

Woodsmith~jectSupp 'ie. p ,0. Box 10350

Des l\loines, IA 50306

for faster service use OUI' Toll I, n-c order line. Phone orders can he placed Monday through Frida)', 8:00 l\tVl: to 5:00 PM

ultra] -tandard Tune.

Bl'for calling. have your \ I. \ ur : Iaster Card rcady.

8 x4447002

A rio .. 10 6 treek« Jar dl'!il'e'lY. '" I'rice« ItlIbiecr to C'hange <iff, r iJeeember.1990.

NI HII' UGHI

The hardware Ior the Night Light on page 26 is available from Wood mith Prcject Sup;plies. This package includes a socket/light switch alld plug (with, ix foot of cord), two .f watt white night light bulbs, adhesive-backed green felt. and 'four full-size scroll saw patterns. (See previous page for pattern .)

ig)1t Light Hardware 771-400 Night Ught Hard-

ware Package 9.%

.' (1) Socket/light _ witch, Six

Foot Cord and Plug

• (2) 4 Watt While Ligln Bulbs

• (] pc.) Adhesive-Backed felt

• (4) Full-Sized Patterns and Instruct ioaal Sheet: Falling Stars. Jack O'Lantern, Cat Fishin', and Snowy Pine.

Night Ug)1t Cherry Wood Kit

We al. o put together a cherry wood kit containing an.i}' the wood to make the ight Light, 771-450 Night Light Cherry

WoodKit $22.95

.' (6pcs.) V4" x 4:V4t1 x 811 Panels

• (2pcs.) If.!u x 5W' x 6"Base/lid

• Ope.) ¥4" x 4¥l' X 16W' Sides .' U) V4'1 x 2" X 4" [jd Block

.' (1) Villi X 211 X 4" Cherry Plywood Light Board, Good 1 Side.

V.X BIIS

In Shop ott's, on page 24. we discussed using Vb: bits. We are offering two sizes: a No.5 Vix bit will drill pilot holes for No.5 and 6 screws. The r 0.9 Vrx bit can be used foro. 8, 9, and 10 screws.

V1X.RUs

77~ ·505 0.5 Vix BiL. $8.95

77]-509 o.9VIXBil $9.95

771·500 Both Bits $17.95

ROn R. I IS

We also used some router bits that we don't normally usc .. These bits arecarbide-tipped.

Router Bits 271-603 Va" Straight Bit

(W Shank) $9.%

771-175¥4" Roundover Bi!

Wi' Shank Only) ' 14.95

158-350 Vi' Dovetail Bit

(W Shank Only) S15.75

31

A

LAST

LOOK

Final Details

.. Th« secret to keeping paper in its place ;.5 a fete urdinary gla.~s marbles. A Ilmqllf' sliding dorrtui! sf/sfew holds ih» Gripper to the uxil! .

.l .lhrking (T ci vcula r Hom] Jlirrol' iJ;1! 'I m; difficult Il~ It IlW!J seem. 1\·ith nil a/I.d!wry base 011 tke router. :<imply piroi a1"OIl1Id (I pin.

Music Box

.l Opelling this walnut JIII."jC Bar j.~ a pli'U-'~nf ~~1I1JI-i~e. The bm.'1.~ mm'l"l1Icnl sillri.s pia!li)lg wlu'll the liII is lifted and s tops II'hel/ ITs ('/().sed.

... <:;111' Illy 1i}11hpfjd offthi.~ rllpl'ru XI!lhll.illht to "elll(H'" OHI of tke scroll suu:« 1)(111<'1,.. •• \ Imlf/P1i.':itumyr cll(11,illf!'r holds unused pW11 {so

32

1"0.71

Woodsmith