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T H E M A G A Z I N E O F Y E S H I V A U N I V E R S I T Y F A L L 2 0 0 5 / S T A V 5 7 6 5 – 5 7 6 6

JEWISH LAW STEPS UP TO THE BAR BALANCING SPIRITUALITY AND HALAKHAH TALE OF A NAZI HUNTER

YESHIVA UNIVERSITY

Bringing Wisdom to Life.
U N D E R G R A D U AT E S C H O O L S

Yeshiva College Jay and Jeanie Schottenstein Honors Program Robert M. Beren Department of Jewish Studies Isaac Breuer College of Hebraic Studies James Striar School of General Jewish Studies Yeshiva Program / Mazer School of Talmudic Studies Irving I. Stone Beit Midrash Program Stern College for Women S. Daniel Abraham Honors Program Rebecca Ivry Department of Jewish Studies Sy Syms School of Business Rennert Entrepreneurial Institute
G R A D U AT E A N D P R O F E S S I O N A L S C H O O L S

Albert Einstein College of Medicine Sue Golding Division of Medical Sciences Belfer Institute for Advanced Biomedical Studies Michael F. Price Center for Genetic and Translational Medicine Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law Jacob Burns Institute for Advanced Legal Studies The Floersheimer Center for Constitutional Democracy Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology Wurzweiler School of Social Work
A F F I L I AT E S

Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik Center of Rabbinic Studies Rabbi Norman Lamm Kollel L’Horaah Yadin Yadin Semikhah Program Marcos and Adina Katz Kollel (Institute for Advanced Research in Rabbinics) Ludwig Jesselson Kollel Chaverim Bella and Harry Wexner Kollel Elyon and Semikhah Honors Program Israel Henry Beren Institute for Higher Talmudic Studies (HaMachon HaGavohah Le’Talmud) Max Stern Division of Communal Services Philip and Sarah Belz School of Jewish Music Yeshiva University High Schools The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy / Yeshiva University High School for Boys Milton and Pearl Unger Department of Jewish Studies Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls Yeshiva University Museum
IN ISRAEL

Caroline and Joseph S. Gruss Institute in Jerusalem S. Daniel Abraham Israel Program

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

J E W I S H L AW STEPS UP TO THE BAR
Cardozo highlights Halakhah’s potential contribution to understanding and improving American legal thinking.

SEEKING SPIRITUALITY IN A HALAKHIC WORLD
Is there room within Modern Orthodoxy for observance and spirituality?

F R O M T H E Y E S H I VA U N I V E R S I T Y MUSEUM COLLECTIONS
Paintings on display at the president’s residence and office.

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YU REVIEW EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD
Harvey Babich, PhD
PROFESSOR OF BIOLOGY

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ALUMNI
PROFILES EPHRAIM ZUROFF: NAZI HUNTER

Edward Burns, MD
PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE, P R O F E S S O R O F P AT H O L O G Y, A S S O C I AT E D E A N F O R A C A D E M I C A F FA I R S

“ His life’s work is the veritable embodiment of the post-Holocaust imperatives to ‘Never Forget’ and ‘Never Again’.”
IN THE FOOTSTEPS OF DR. DOOLITTLE JENNIFER SUSS ’97S AND J O C E LY N ( B R E I B A R T ) T H O M P S O N ’ 9 8 S

Rabbi Shalom Carmy, MS
A S S I S TA N T P R O F E S S O R O F B I B L E

Herbert Dobrinsky, EdD
VICE PRESIDENT FOR U N I V E R S I T Y A F FA I R S

Two SCW alumnae follow a road less traveled.

Carl Feit, PhD
DR. JOSEPH AND RACHEL ADES P R O F E S S O R O F P R E - H E A LT H S C I E N C E S

Joseph Luders, PhD
D AV I D A N D R U T H G O T T E S M A N PROFESSOR OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

William R. Jacobs, PhD
PROFESSOR OF MICROBIOLOGY AND IMMUNOLOGY

Howard Spierer, MA
SENIOR DIRECTOR, DEVELOPMENT

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BOOKSHELF

CLASSNOTES

from the president I

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YESHIVA UNIVERSITY
Morry J. Weiss
CHAIRMAN, BOARD OF TRUSTEES

In May, I performed one of the truly wonderful
responsibilities of my presidency, as Yeshiva University
conferred some 2,000 degrees upon our richly deserving undergraduate and graduate students. Such moments are bittersweet, for they mark both a beginning and an end. We will miss the class of 2005; through their hope, energy, and talents they have inspired us—the Yeshiva University family—to be more devoted and more committed in helping to heal a troubled world. Against the backdrop of that world, the uniqueness of this university stands in high relief. Our students, faculty, alumni, and friends recognize our institution as a paradigm for melding knowledge, values, caring, compassion, and community into wisdom. It is that wisdom that shapes our students, and through them impacts on our world and, ultimately, its future. That is why I charged our graduating students to “bring wisdom to life.” And, that is why I implore all in the YU family to do the same. Tap into the wisdom that emanates from the recesses of your learning and the expanse of your imagination. Become our ambassadors of wisdom learned and wisdom conveyed so that together we can make our world a better place.

Richard M. Joel
PRESIDENT

Daniel T. Forman
VICE PRESIDENT FOR I N S T I T U T I O N A L A D VA N C E M E N T

Georgia B. Pollak
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF U N I V E R S I T Y C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

YU REVIEW
June Glazer
EDITOR

Judy Tashji
C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

CONTRIBUTING TO THIS ISSUE:

David Hillstrom Cara Huzinec Esther Kustanowitz Ari Mermelstein Hedy Shulman
PHOTOGRAPHY

RICHARD M. JOEL

Norman Goldberg Peter Robertson V. Jane Windsor

Richard Bieler
SENIOR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR O F C O M M U N I T Y R E L AT I O N S

Jeffrey Swartz, CEO of The Timberland Company, delivered the keynote speech at YU’s 74th commencement exercises

Yeshiva University Review is published three times each year by Yeshiva University’s Department of Communications and Public Affairs. It is distributed by mail to alumni and friends of the university and on campus to faculty and administrators. Paid subscriptions are available at $15 per year. Editorial contributions and submissions to “Classnotes” are welcome, but the publication cannot accept responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. All submissions are subject to editing. Opinions expressed in the Review are not “official” university policy. Send mail to: Yeshiva University Review, 500 West 185th Street, New York, NY 10033-3201. Phone: 212-960-5285. Email: glazerjb@yu.edu.
© Y E S H I VA U N I V E R S I T Y 2 0 0 5

May 26 at The Theater at Madison Square Garden. Mr. Swartz also received an honorary doctor of humane letters degree from YU. To see his address, click on http://spider.mc.yu.edu/ news/_video/keynote.cfm.

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Prof. Suzanne Last Stone conceived and directs the Program in Jewish Law and Interdisciplinary Studies at YU’s Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law.

Jewish Law Steps Up to the Bar
One of the most exciting developments in legal thought in the last 50 years is the quest to understand and improve law by studying it in light of other disciplines and traditions. Today, contemporary law schools are dominated by an approach to law that incorporates the insights of the humanities as well as secular and religious legal traditions.

B Y A R I M E R M E L S T E I N Y H , ’ 0 0 Y, B

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n 2004, Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law brought the comparative study of Halakhah into the heart of this revolution when it launched its Program in Jewish Law and Interdisciplinary Studies (PJLIS). Conceived and directed by Prof. Suzanne Last Stone, PJLIS makes Cardozo the only law school in the country with a serious initiative to advance the role of the Jewish legal tradition in public intellectual debate through dialogue between Halakhah and other intellectual disciplines. Still in its infancy, the comparative study of Jewish law was pioneered by Israeli scholars of the modern Mishpat Ivri (Hebrew law) movement who sought to demonstrate that Halakhah is a “normal” legal system whose structure, substance, and values overlap with those of contemporary Western

legal systems. However, their approach deprived Jewish law of much of its distinctiveness. Moreover, it was primarily, though not exclusively, an Israeli phenomenon. In contrast, Professor Stone built PJLIS on the objectives of her own scholarship in Jewish law, in which she addresses and draws inspiration from specialists in Jewish law and religion as well as from theorists in Constitutional law and legal theory, political theory, philosophy, and literature. Through PJLIS, she envisioned a conversation between Halakhah, secular legal theory, and the disciplines of the humanities. This conversation would highlight the distinctiveness of Halakhah and its potential contribution to understanding and improving American legal thinking. “By studying Jewish law in light of the other humanities and

Ari Mermelstein is program coordinator for Yeshiva University’s Cardozo School of Law Program in Jewish Law and Interdisciplinary Studies and a PhD student in NYU’s Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies. He can be reached at mermels@yu.edu.

Cardozo is the only law school in the country with a serious initiative to advance the role of the Jewish legal tradition in public intellectual debate through dialogue between Halakhah and other intellectual disciplines.

secular and religious legal traditions such as American Constitutional law, Islamic law, and Canon law, we can focus on what is distinctive about Jewish law as well as what it can contribute to general legal thought. In this way, the program’s academic orientation intersects with that of American legal thinking generally,” said Professor Stone, who spent the spring 2005 semester as Gruss Visiting Professor of Talmudic Civic Law at Harvard Law School. She is the first woman to hold any of the several Gruss chairs in Jewish law at American law schools and the first American to hold the position at Harvard. PJLIS has generated significant interest in the intellectual community. A panel discussion slated for Dec. 7 at Manhattan’s Center for Jewish History (home of Yeshiva University Museum) and cosponsored by PJLIS underscores Halakhah’s new prominence—and Cardozo’s standing—in academic circles. Panelists will assess the legal theory of Professor Ronald Dworkin and its impact on the study of Jewish law; and Professor Dworkin, one of the 20th century’s most influential legal philosophers, will offer keynote remarks. His participation, says Professor Stone, illustrates the depth of interest in the subject and also the sense that Jewish law is ripe for cross-disciplinary conversation. (Editor’s note: For information about this and other upcoming events, visit the Program in Jewish Law and Interdisciplinary Studies Web site at www.cardozo.yu.edu/jlis.)

The fruits of this type of interdisciplinary dialogue were on display at the two conferences sponsored by PJLIS during 2004–2005. In its inaugural event, held in October and titled “Text, Tradition, and Reason in Comparative Perspective,” PJLIS hosted leading scholars of legal theory and Constitutional law, Jewish law, Islamic law, Canon law, and Confucianism. Participants examined the competing claims to authority of text, tradition, and reason in the Jewish, Catholic, Islamic, and American Constitutional legal traditions. At the second PJLIS conference, cosponsored and hosted by Harvard Law School in May, group study sessions focused on the legal dimensions of narrative in Jewish, Islamic, Catholic, and American legal writing. However, if a true conversation between Jewish law and other legal and intellectual traditions is to evolve, the next generation of scholars, rabbis, and thoughtful lawyers must be equipped with the tools to participate. In spring 2004 Cardozo introduced “Jewish Law and American Legal Theory,” a pilot course on the interdisciplinary study of Halakhah that Professor Stone and RIETS faculty member Rabbi Ozer Glickman taught to nearly 30 students from the law school, RIETS, and Yeshiva College. In addition, Cardozo recently launched a concentration in Jewish law offered under its new LL.M in Comparative Legal Thought. Lastly, workshops and reading groups are in formation at Cardozo to help create a community of young thinkers from a variety of academic back-

grounds who are interested in the interdisciplinary study of Jewish law. According to Professor Stone, exposing rabbinical and graduate students to contemporary legal theory could revolutionize Jewish studies as well as more traditional programs of rabbinic study. “A program in legal theory is crucial for those who work in Bible, midrash, and Jewish history because many of the issues they encounter are legal in nature,” she said. Even Talmud scholars, whose corpus of study is primarily legal, rarely turn to contemporary legal studies for insight, she noted, adding that traditional students of Jewish law also receive no instruction in legal theory and philosophy even though much of the halakhic system raises important issues of legal and political philosophy. “The relationship between law and morality, the role of authority and controversy, and the division of religious and political spheres are staples both of secular and religious legal thought,” Professor Stone said. Rabbi Glickman, who teaches another course in Jewish law at Cardozo this fall, added that “helping students of the Talmud formulate concepts by providing a self-consciously developed vocabulary would constitute a significant breakthrough. The language of legal theory would add an important dimension to our analytical arsenal.” Although PJLIS is driven by academic goals, it contains a distinct policy component. As part of the program’s policy objectives, Professor

“By studying Jewish law in light of the other humanities and secular and religious legal traditions … we can focus on what is distinctive about Jewish law as well as what it can contribute to general legal thought.”

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Stone hopes to initiate ongoing debate and discussion among scholars, intellectuals, and lay people on topics of critical concern to the American public and, more specifically, the Jewish communities in America and Israel. “The dramatic transformation of public debate due to contemporary political events, globalization, and technological revolution has spotlighted religion as a primary resource in confronting these new challenges,” she said, citing topics of concern to the general and Jewish publics that include the relationship between religion and democracy, tolerance, civil society, human rights, just and unjust war, and responsibilities of citizenship. To meet the program’s policy objectives, PJLIS cosponsors the “Jews and Justice Series” at the Center for Jewish History, which features lectures and colloquia that explore the Jewish contribution to the development and practice of law and legal institutions. Recent installments of this series included discussion on the finding by the International Court of Justice that Israel’s security fence is in violation of international law, religious attitudes towards tolerance, and Mel Gibson’s film “The Passion.” Such timely issues will also be the focus of

PJLIS’s inaugural weekly colloquium, “Religion and the Idea of the Secular,” to begin in fall 2006 on how public and private space is constituted and defined from both religious and legal points of view. Future programming will devote attention to other aspects of the relationship between Jews and the law, including a conference planned for 2006 that will explore the role of Jews in the American legal profession. The historical significance of housing PJLIS at YU’s law school is not lost on David Rudenstine, the Cardozo dean. “Establishing the Program in Jewish Law and Interdisciplinary Studies follows naturally from Yeshiva University’s vision in founding Cardozo School of Law,” he said. Cardozo is ranked fifth in the country in the field of law and philosophy by the Educational Quality of US Law Schools 2003–04 survey (www.utexas.edu/law/faculty/bleiter/rankings/philo.html), and boasts a faculty especially interested in the interdisciplinary study of law. “Such a vision embodies the belief that Cardozo can make a significant contribution to the field of law given the pivotal role of law in the Jewish tradition and the school’s commitment to scholarship and teaching,” he said. I

Participants at the October ’04 “Text, Tradition, and Reason in Comparative Perspective” conference included: (on steps at left, front to back): Sanford Levinson, University of Texas Law School; Silvio Ferrari, Facolta di Giurisprudenza, Universita degli Studi di Milano; YU President Richard M. Joel; and Adam Seligman, Boston University (seated in front row, from left): Marion Katz, New York University; Christine Hayes, Yale University; Asifa Quraishi, University of Wisconsin Law School; Michael Puett, Harvard University; Said Amir Arjomand, SUNY-Stony Brook; Ron Garet, University of Southern California Law School; and Suzanne Last Stone (middle row): Yaakov Elman, Yeshiva University; and Asma Barlas, Ithaca College (back row, from left): George Fletcher, Columbia Law School; Paul Kahn, Yale Law School; Steven Fraade, Yale University; Arye Edrei, Tel Aviv University Law School, CSL visiting professor; Haym Soloveitchik, Yeshiva University; Hon. John T. Noonan, Ninth US Circuit Court of Appeals; and Hanina Ben Menahem, Hebrew University Law School

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Seeking Spirituality in a Halakhic World
BY JUNE GLAZER

Spirituality vs. religious doctrine is a topic of heated debate in many religions. A new book in a series that addresses issues of concern to the Jewish community tackles the issue head on.

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new book in a series that examines the interaction between Torah and Madda*—“God’s word” and “God’s World”—is challenging Modern Orthodox Jews to rethink the requirements of observance and belief. Torah Umadda, the defining philosophy of Yeshiva University, becomes fertile ground for debate in Jewish Spirituality and Divine Law (The Michael Scharf Publication Trust of the Yeshiva University Press, 2005). Tenth in the series, it is a compilation of papers presented at a 2000 symposium by the same name under the auspices of the Orthodox Forum, a think tank that addresses issues of concern to the Jewish community through conferences and follow-up volumes. The symposium considered a potential clash between spirituality and Halakhah (Jewish law). The book, edited by Adam Mintz ’84Y,B,R and Lawrence Schiffman, is a multidisciplinary look at how experts in the fields of intellectual history, education, prayer, and the arts reconcile the central principles of Orthodox belief and practice with widely accepted values of contemporary secular society. Recently, four of its contributors—presenters at the “Jewish Spirituality and Divine Law” Orthodox Forum in 2000— gathered for a follow-up conversation with YU Review and Rabbi Robert S. Hirt YH,’59Y,B,R, senior adviser to YU’s president and overall editor of the Orthodox Forum series. Their discussion focused on a perceived dearth of spirituali-

ty in contemporary Orthodox life and ways within Jewish practice and learning to bolster it. Following are excerpts from that conversation. R O U N D TA B L E PA R T I C I PA N T S :
LAWRENCE SCHIFFMAN, PhD, chairman of

What are some main points of your paper? DR. SCHIFFMAN: I examined the sources that

New York University’s Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies; Ethel and Irvin A. Edelman Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies; Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration adjunct professor; and Jewish Spirituality and Divine Law coeditor Orthodox Forum Paper: “Jewish Spirituality in the Bible and Second Temple Literature”
ALAN BRILL, PhD, ’82Y,B,R, assistant profes-

sor of Jewish mysticism and thought at YU; founding director of Kavvanah, a Center for Jewish Spirituality Orthodox Forum Paper: “Dwelling with Kabbalah: Meditation, Ritual, and Study”
ERICA BROWN ’87S, scholar-in-residence for

the Jewish Federation of Greater Washington and director of its Leadership Institute Orthodox Forum Paper: “Orthodoxy and the Search for Spirituality in Jewish Adult Education”
CHAIM I. WAXMAN, PhD, ’63Y,B,R, professor of sociology and Jewish studies at Rutgers University Orthodox Forum Paper: “Religion, Spirituality, and the Future of American Judaism”

I think are really at the foundation of Judaism— the Bible and some of my favorite material that I work on from the Second Temple period. I sought to extract from these sources a sense of how Temple ritual, sacrifices, and prayers were directly connected to spiritual experience and were not mechanistic. DR. BRILL: My goal was to show that spirituality has been part of our tradition since medieval times through a wide variety of spiritual schools. And, although it has skipped several very rational generations—Judaism has pushed away from spirituality in the modern period due in part to the Enlightenment and 20th-century philosophy—spiritual continuity can resume by going back to the traditional texts and resources. MS. BROWN: My paper deals with many of the assumptions I believe we make about what people should derive from adult education classes but don’t. Experiential and non-intellectual aspects of adult education can enhance spirituality, yet the Orthodox community does not emphasize them. People often lose interest in Judaic studies by the time they are young adults. We need to help them [reconnect] by teaching them with sufficient emotional potency for them to grow spiritually. DR. WAXMAN: There is a difference between [the popular conceptions of] religion and spirituality in American society. While in America spirituality has definitely increased—people looking for answers beyond what is empirically observable—that is not the same as religion, and par-

* Torah Umadda is the name of the philosophy that, within the spectrum of Orthodox Judaism, perceives the relationship between Jewish and general studies as symbiotic. It is the foundation upon which Yeshiva University was established.

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ticularly not the same as Orthodoxy. Although there has been a significant increase in religion and spirituality in general—and in particular among American Jews—that hasn’t necessarily meant an increased religious commitment.
What practical applications do your findings have? DR. SCHIFFMAN: I believe that there is a seri-

priate way starting in eighth grade [to begin] the process of softening the souls. Spirituality needs to be a fundamental part of how we view things. And I do not think we should be making a straw man out of various parts of eighties new-age spirituality and continually harping on that. There’s a solid core of very committed people interested in mysticism and spirituality.
What is the role of spirituality in the Orthodox and general Jewish communities today? DR. SCHIFFMAN: spirituality as we’re defin-

ty will necessarily reach the “average” Orthodox reader. I think there are many people who do not regard prayer as spiritually engaging nor are they necessarily looking to Judaism for intellectual depth. We need to expand our “spiritual” language beyond prayer and study.
Can spirituality and Orthodoxy be mutually hostile? If so, how can we reconcile them? DR. SCHIFFMAN: If spirituality is encouraged

ous question of whether or not a sense of a connection to God—to something beyond ourselves —exists as we do a variety of rituals. While you’re making Kiddush [the blessing over wine], for example, you may be thinking that, yes, God took us out of Egypt [mentioned in Kiddush], and that’s important to know. But there may be no connection or emotion of any kind. It could be-

ing it is highly emphasized among hasidic groups. And there are groups within the nonOrthodox Jewish community that emphasize it as well. So, this feeling that there really is a God, that He really does matter, and that you’re some-

within the halakhic framework, then it cannot possibly be hostile. DR. BRILL: Great figures through the ages, like [11th-century halakhist] Nachmanides, Rabbi Yosef Caro [16th-century author of the Shulchan Arukh, the definitive compilation of Jewish law], the Maharasha [16th-century com-

Schiffman

Brill

Brown

Waxman

come a non-spiritual religious experience. Judaism, in its origins, placed great emphasis on spirituality in one’s religious life. And having lost it, for many of us we ought to be bringing it back. DR. WAXMAN: [I’m not speaking of] a spirituality that is personalistic or individualistic through which people try to find what’s meaningful for themselves. That does not involve any commitment. I am talking about a spirituality that has significance to one’s life to the extent that it involves commitment—to tradition, to institutions, and to the group. To the extent that it involves a connection between spirituality and commitment. MS. BROWN: We have placed such an emphasis on text, on intellectual development, on a kind of Maimonidean rationalism, that we’re not strengthening core experiential aspects of Judaism in elementary and high school and also in adult education. DR. BRILL: Spirituality needs to be taught as part of the school curriculum in an age-appro-

how in contact with Him through fulfilling the law is not confined to a small minority. In my paper I found that emphasis to be at the heart of the biblical Jewish experience as well. So, to the extent that we’re failing [to bring spirituality to the performance of mitzvot], I think it’s because we’ve simply left it out, not because we view spirituality as something bizarre. DR. WAXMAN: There is a Modern Orthodox elite that underscores intellectualism and places emphasis on the mind almost to the exclusion of the heart. They’re missing the boat on both accounts and need to bring back a kind of spirituality that is part and parcel of “normative” Halakhah. RABBI HIRT: When the Rav [Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveitchik] noted that learning is a form of tefillah [prayer] and tefillah is a form of learning, it was an attempt to bridge the intellectual tradition and the existential dimension. MS. BROWN: I’m not sure that correlating study with prayer as an experience of spirituali-

mentator on the gemara], and the Vilna Gaon [18th-century Lithuanian scholar] all combined spirituality with the halakhic tradition. Spirituality doesn’t have to contradict Orthodoxy, though it certainly seems that it does because of the way in which we present it. MS. BROWN: Perhaps we ought to think about the kinds of words that would help people have an experience of transcendence or of transformation without making [the negative] associations that are typically made with the word “spirituality.” DR. WAXMAN: Can spirituality and Orthodoxy be mutually hostile? Sure, when spirituality moves people to go beyond Halakhah, to be deviant. But hostility or distance between them has negative impact both on those who are thinking of spirituality and those who want to be within the halakhic framework. So if they are hostile, they need to be reconciled. Can they be? Of course, and that’s what we’ve been trying to point out. I

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Talking Among Themselves

VOLUMES IN THE ORTHODOX FORUM SERIES
Rabbinic Authority and Personal Autonomy edited by Moshe Z. Sokol Jewish Tradition and the Non-Traditional Jew edited by Jacob J. Schacter Israel as a Religious Reality edited by Chaim I. Waxman Modern Scholarship in the Study of Torah: Contributions and Limitations edited by Shalom Carmy Tikkun Olam: Social Responsibility in Jewish Thought and Law edited by David Shatz, Chaim I. Waxman, and Nathan J. Diament Engaging Modernity: Rabbinic Leaders and the Challenge of the Twentieth Century edited by Moshe Z. Sokol Jewish Perspectives on the Experience of Suffering edited by Shalom Carmy Jewish Business Ethics: The Firm and Its Stakeholders edited by Aaron Levine and Moses Pava Tolerance, Dissent, and Democracy: Philosophical, Historical and Halakhic Perspectives edited by Moshe Z. Sokol Jewish Spirituality and Divine Law edited by Adam Mintz and Lawrence Schiffman

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he Orthodox Forum was convened in 1989 by Chancellor Norman Lamm ’49Y,B,R to reflect the thinking of some of today’s most esteemed Torah Umadda scholars—rabbis and academics in secular and Jewish studies from the United States and Israel who have contributed to the understanding of these issues through their scholarship. It is composed of two components: symposia and books—“vehicles for involving scholars in a conversation that they may not have had the opportunity before to join,” said Rabbi Hirt. Dr. Lawrence Schiffman, Jewish Spirituality and Divine Law coeditor, sees the think tank as a way to “turn my attention more toward problems of our own community.” Chairman of New York University’s Skirball Department of Hebrew and Judaic Studies and Ethel and Irvin A. Edelman Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies, he says he is usually focused on more theoretical and historical issues. These “conversations” among scholars are at the heart of the Forum process. Prior to the symposium, presenters receive each other’s original papers so that “each can come to the symposium with a full awareness of the others’ ideas,” according to Rabbi Hirt. At the Forum gathering, presenters and invited guests—rabbis, educators, policy makers, and those with a particular interest in the subject—discuss and critique each offering. Afterward, presenters revise their papers based on new insights and submit them to a Forum volume editor who compiles them into a book. The volumes find their way to libraries, academic institutions, and individuals around the world who can effect practical change in Jewish education, policy, and communal awareness. “The collegiality of the Orthodox Forum allows all participants to hear and anticipate the kinds of questions that a reader might ask when a paper gets published,” said Erica Brown, a contributor to the most recent volume. “In journal and book chapter writing, you rarely have the opportunity to hear feedback before you publish something. The Forum gives you a sounding

board to improve and rewrite sections and also question whether you have discussed the most important issues of your topic.” The process is intended to create a body of literature that “speaks with a sense of authority, but that is not authoritarian, based on the input of people from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines,” Rabbi Hirt said. It also builds a community of scholars from across the board who are committed to Modern Orthodoxy—“people who are reinforced in their approach to life by the knowledge that other scholars share their general world view. This is something that did not exist before the Orthodox Forum,” he said. In addition, the Forum is a vehicle for younger people who are emerging as scholars, many of whom are YU alumni who may have lost contact with the university but, through the Orthodox Forum, have reconnected. Others are non-alumni who identify with the university’s mission. For them, the Forum is a way to become involved in the intellectual life of the university, Rabbi Hirt said. “As an academic institution with a high level of Jewish studies for men and women, Yeshiva University has a responsibility to the Jewish community to promote ideas and values. These symposia and books reflect what we feel informs Modern Orthodoxy at the highest level,” he noted, adding that the Forum does not speak to Modern Orthodoxy alone. “Our audience includes the Jewishly educated college graduate regardless of where he or she is on the ideological spectrum.” “President [Richard M.] Joel now wants the Forum to move forward, to develop in an activist mode so that we can disseminate this information in the widest possible way—in communities, on Web sites, and through curricula. And the Forum is a natural component of President Joel’s new initiative, the Center for the Jewish Future. Under its auspices, we can more readily tap into the resources at Yeshiva University and the synergy that is within its institutions,” Rabbi Hirt said. I

Volumes in the Orthodox Forum series are available through local bookstores. Also, they may be ordered through Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. by calling customer service at 800-462-6420 or by visiting www.rowmanlittlefield.com. All Web site orders receive a 15% discount.

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From the Yeshiva University Museum Collections
Yeshiva University Museum, a teaching institution, occupies a special place among New York’s Jewish cultural and artistic institutions by preserving and exhibiting artifacts representing the cultural, intellectual, and artistic achievement of more than 3,000 years of Jewish experience. A selection of paintings from its collections is on display at the residence and office of President Richard M. Joel, representing a sampling of work by some of the important artists in its holdings. Among them:
(AT THE RESIDENCE)

Jewish Mother Boris Schatz (1867–1932) Painting: Oil on board Frame: copper repoussé, color Jerusalem, ca. 1929 Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (88.18) Gift of the Jewish Community Center of Greater Baltimore

(AT THE OFFICE)

Yemenite Jews in Safed Chaim Gross (1904–1991) Watercolor on paper New York, 1957 Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (70.13) Gift of Charles Frost

(AT THE RESIDENCE)

Panorama of Jerusalem Ludwig Blum (1891–1974) Oil on canvas Israel, mid 20th century Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (85.40) The Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff Collection

(AT THE OFFICE)

Lighting the Menorah Chaim Gross (1904–1991) Watercolor on paper New York, mid 20th century Collection of Yeshiva University Museum (70.10) Gift of Charles Frost

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alumni
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Efraim Zuroff: Nazi Hunter
BY HEDY SHULMAN In the final paragraph of his memoirs, Simon Wiesenthal, renowned Nazi hunter, recalls an SS corporal’s chilling words to him in 1944—words that continue to motivate ongoing efforts to find those responsible for the crimes of the Holocaust. “You would tell the truth [about the death camps] to the people in America. And you know what would happen, Wiesenthal? They wouldn’t believe you. They’d say you were mad. Might even put you in an asylum. How can anyone believe this terrible business—unless he lived through it?”

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he work that Simon Wiesenthal began after World War II of collecting evidence on Nazi atrocities and seeking the capture and prosecution of Nazis such as Adolf Eichmann, Franz Stangl, and Alois Brunner, is being carried on by Efraim Zuroff, PhD, YH, ’70Y. He is director of the Israel Office of the Simon Wiesenthal Center and the Center’s chief Nazi hunter. A historian and activist, Dr. Zuroff has assumed Mr. Wiesenthal’s mantle. Coming of age in the late 1960s, a time of protest and questioning, Dr. Zuroff and many of his contemporaries channeled their energies into Jewish causes, especially after Israel’s victory in the Six-Day War. As an undergraduate at Yeshiva

College, he was active in Israelrelated issues and spent his junior year in Israel studying at The Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Upon his return to YU, he established the first Israel aliyah club and took courses on the Holocaust that deepened his interest in the subject. He was one of the campus leaders active on behalf of Soviet Jewry and played varsity basketball for YU’s Mighty Mites (in 1974 renamed the Maccabees) in pursuit of his athletic passion. Though he was a student at YU for three years, his connection to the institution stretches back much further. “My family has more than 160 years of service to YU,” Dr. Zuroff said. “My grandfather, Dr. Samuel L. Sar, was known as Mr. Yeshiva and was the first dean of men as well as head of develop-

ment and recruitment. He dedicated his entire life to YU and died at the Chag Hasemikhah [RIETS rabbinic ordination ceremony] in 1962 after delivering opening remarks in Lamport Auditorium.” His father, Dr. Abraham N. Zuroff, was principal of Yeshiva University High School for Boys in Brooklyn for 30 years and supervisor of (then) four YU high schools. Subsequently, he taught and did guidance work at the Washington Heights campus high school for 13 years. Eli Sar, Dr. Zuroff ’s uncle, was medical director at YU for almost half a century and his mother, Esther Zuroff, was director of student services at Stern College for Women for three decades. Following graduation from Yeshiva College, Dr. Zuroff made aliyah and began working at Yad Vashem (the national Holocaust remembrance center in Israel). He earned his master’s degree in Holocaust studies at The Hebrew University and eight years later was invited to serve as the first academic director of the Simon Wiesenthal Center in Los Angeles. After returning to Israel from California, he earned a PhD from the Institute for Contemporary Jewry of The Hebrew University for his pioneering research on the activities of the Vaad Ha-Hatzala Rescue Committee between 1939 and 1945. He has published two books and close to 200 articles, translated into 14 languages, on the Holocaust and its impact on contemporary Jewish life. His career as a Nazi hunter began at the Center following a meeting with Simon Wiesenthal. At the time, he also began his co-

operation with the newly established Office of Special Investigations (OSI), founded in 1979 by the United States Department of Justice to prosecute Nazi war criminals living in America. In 1980, Dr. Zuroff returned to his home in Israel where he worked for six years as a researcher for the OSI. During the course of investigating the postwar escape of Josef Mengele, the infamous Angel of Death of Auschwitz, he discovered a method of utilizing postWorld War II refugee records to uncover the escape routes of hundreds of Eastern European Nazi war criminals to Western democracies, enabling them to conceal their collaboration with the Nazis. The method utilized refugee records that had been compiled by the International Tracing Service (ITS). The ITS was established by the International Red Cross shortly after World War II to locate relatives and friends of Europeans dislocated by the war. This discovery led to the opening of the Wiesenthal Center in Israel that its namesake founded and directs to this day. “Efraim Zuroff has tenaciously fused action with memory, particularly in his indefatigable efforts to press often reluctant governments in Europe and elsewhere to investigate and prosecute the perpetrators of Nazi crimes,” said Eli Rosenbaum, OSI director. “His life’s work reflects an unswerving devotion to the pursuit of both juridical and historical justice. It is the veritable embodiment of the post-Holocaust imperatives to ‘Never Forget’ and ‘Never Again.’” A tall, imposing figure, Dr.

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Efraim Zuroff

Simon Wiesenthal

Zuroff has a quick smile, though when discussing his life’s mission his expression is steely. “I am motivated by the desire to achieve justice and to make it clear that anyone who seeks to harm Jews will always be pursued,” he said. “I believe this is an obligation we have to the victims. To do otherwise would send the message that people can get away with genocide.” Achieving justice is becoming more difficult; many of the thousands who escaped prosecution are aging, as are witnesses. Added to this is the lack of political will to prosecute local Nazi collaborators in post-Communist societies and in some of the countries of refuge. To overcome these obstacles, three years ago the Simon Wiesenthal Center created a campaign

employing more innovative methods to bring Nazi war criminals to justice. The Center, in partnership with the Targum Shlishi Foundation of Miami, FL, founded by Aryeh Rubin ’72Y, officially launched “Operation: Last Chance.” This program, conceived by Mr. Rubin and coordinated by Dr. Zuroff, offers financial rewards for evidence that facilitates the prosecution and conviction of Holocaust perpetrators. “Targum Shlishi [Third Interpretation] is committed to bringing remaining Nazi war criminals to justice regardless of the passage of time,” Mr. Rubin said. An investment manager and a venture philanthropist, he is a child of parents who escaped Hitler’s murder machine. His

mother left Hanover, Germany in 1939 with her family and went to The Hague “on vacation” before they ultimately settled in the US. His father escaped to Siberia where he spent the war and over a span of 45 days lost his father, brother, and niece. After studying in an Austrian yeshiva, and with stopovers in other European cities, he, too, made his way to the US. “We cannot allow the world to believe that people can get away with murdering Jews,” Mr. Rubin said. “Let those murderers of our families, be they 75 or 105 [years old], fear that knock on the door until their dying day.” Dr. Zuroff and Mr. Rubin met as undergraduates at YU, and spent time together in Israel. They reconnected in Los Angeles in 1980. After the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the breakup of the Soviet Union, there were new opportunities to access records of Eastern European Nazi war crimi-

nals, and the two men cooperated on a number of initiatives, including the DLANG (Don’t Let Australian Nazis Go) project, the pursuit of Evald Mikson in Iceland, Bogdan Kosizy in Costa Rica, and Dinko Sakic in Croatia. These ventures led to the creation of Operation: Last Chance, established in 2001 and generously funded by the Targum Shlishi Foundation. Together the old friends have traveled to 11 countries in pursuit of justice. “Effie is one of the unappreciated stars of Jewish life. He could have done anything but he chose to devote himself to hunting down Nazi war criminals. He is the true successor to Simon Wiesenthal,” Mr. Rubin said. Operation: Last Chance encourages eyewitnesses to come forward with the promise of a $10,000 reward. The program is publicized through extensive advertising and media campaigns in

His life’s work reflects an unswerving devotion to the pursuit of both juridical and historical justice.

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DR. ZUROFF’S WORK

has made him a sought-after

expert on genocide. In 1995, he was invited to Rwanda by US AID and the Rwandan government to attend a conference of experts from 13 countries

“ Let those murderers of our families, be they 75 or 105 [years old], fear that knock on the door until their dying day.”

discussing commemoration, rehabilitation of survivors, and justice. In 1996, a German NGO sought his help in assisting the Rwandan Ministry of Justice to put its house back in order and in preparing for trials of perpetrators of genocide. In 1997, he was invited to South Africa and met with representatives of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission who were investigating Apartheid atrocities, and in 1999 Dr. Zuroff traveled to Macedonia to meet refugees from the ethnic cleansing in Kosovo. YU Review asked Dr. Zuroff about this aspect of his work.

countries such as Germany, Austria, Lithuania, Estonia, and Poland, where Nazi war crimes were committed with the active participation of the local population. The program began in July 2002 in the Baltics because these countries had the highest victim rate in Europe during the Holocaust. Not only were the local Jewish communities almost completely annihilated, but many thousands of Jews from other countries including Germany, Austria, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and France were deported to the Baltics and murdered in Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia. Press conferences are held in key cities in each country announcing the monetary reward offered by Operation: Last Chance

Aryeh Rubin conceived the Operation: Last Chance campaign.

and are followed by ads that publicize the reward and highlight the active participation of local Nazi collaborators in the mass murder of the Jewish community. In fall 2003, the effort was launched in Poland, Romania, and Austria, followed by campaigns in Croatia and Hungary in summer 2004. The final effort was initiated in Germany on January 26, 2005, the day before the country’s national memorial day for victims of the Holocaust, marking the project’s culmination. Between 2001 and 2004, as a result of Operation: Last Chance, more than two dozen Nazi war criminals have been convicted in six countries. During 2002, the US alone filed 10 new indictments against Nazi perpetrators. But, thousands of Nazis are still alive, many living out their years in relative comfort. In a 1987 telephone interview with The Chicago Sun Times, Alois Brunner, reportedly living in Damascus, Syria and responsible for the murder of 128,500 Jewish men, women and children, said, “The Jews deserved to die. I have no regrets. If I had the chance I would do it again.” “Time is quickly running out,” Dr. Zuroff said of his new push to hunt down Nazis. And, with a nod to the work that lay ahead, he added, “There is no statute of limitations on genocide.” I

YUR: What factors must come into play before genocide can occur? EZ: First, there has to be intent. Then there has to be a group with power that is determined to wipe out another group that is unable to protect itself. That is all that is necessary—that and the silence and acquiescence of the world. Today, terrorist organizations can carry out genocide by utilizing a nuclear bomb or weapons of mass destruction. Until recently, only a state could harness the resources to create a systemic genocide. YUR: What is the relationship between genocide and the nature of man? EZ: If there is anything that genocide reveals, it is the incredible capacity for evil, the almost limitless capacity of the inhumanity of man against his fellow man. One of the best ways to bring home that lesson is to bring to justice those responsible for such acts regardless of their age. I call empathy for murderers who are old men “the misplaced sympathy syndrome.” No killer deserves any empathy simply because he reached an elderly age. On the contrary, these are people who had absolutely no sympathy for their innocent victims and must therefore be held accountable.

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STERN COLLEGE FOR WOMEN

In the Footsteps of Dr. Doolittle
B Y E S T H E R D . K U S TA N O W I T Z

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hen Jennifer Suss ’97S began her studies at Michigan State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine in 1997, she was a fish out of two kinds of water. A metropolitan girl from the New Jersey suburbs, she lacked the farm experience of many of her classmates. An Orthodox Jew, she was worried because “some of my classmates had never met a Jew before.” At first, the transition to life in East Lansing, Michigan, was difficult. “Did they have any preconception about Jews?” Ms. Suss wondered early on. “When I arrived, some of my classmates seemed to be practically looking for my horns, but by graduation, people knew what I could and couldn’t eat, and would stop by on Shabbat because they knew I couldn’t answer the phone. I made some of my closest friends.” Both Jen, a biology/pre-health sciences major at Stern, and Jocelyn (Breibart) Thompson ’98S, a biology major from Baltimore who enrolled at Michigan State’s College of Veterinary Medicine a year after Jen, have had a life-long interest in taking care of animals. While Jen was in college, her cat was diagnosed with kidney failure and given three months to live. She injected the cat twice daily with subcutaneous fluids and he lived for nearly three more years. “It was such a wonderful feeling to have given him that extra time. It made me realize how rewarding it is to help improve the quality of life of an animal.”

“I was always interacting with animals,” Jocelyn recalled. “My mom never was an animal person, so when we got a dog when I was twelve, he became my responsibility.” In school Jocelyn favored the sciences. “I was told that [vet school] was a very long and difficult path. But I still thought about it,” she said. After considering marine biology, during her senior year she realized “at the last minute” what she really wanted, and applied to veterinary school. During their respective first years, both Jen and Jocelyn had

exams scheduled on Yom Kippur, but took them earlier to fulfill their course requirements. “I was stressed out; I knew that everyone else was sitting in lab and getting an extra day of studying that I didn’t have,” said Jocelyn, who had assumed that professors would have been more considerate of the Jewish holy day. But just as fellow students had become more accept-

ing of her, so too, professors became more accommodating. “I did not care how long and difficult this journey would be. I wanted to wake up every morning happy and excited to be doing something that I love,” Jen said. Because neither woman had prior experience working with farm animals, both have “fish out of water” stories. Jen recalled trying

“ I wanted to wake up every morning happy and excited to be doing something that I love.”

Jen Suss (right) has come a long way since the day she tried to lasso a sheep.

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Jocelyn Thompson realized “at the last minute” that she wanted to be a veterinarian.

to lasso a sheep and take blood; it took her so long to catch the animal that the other students began laughing. Jocelyn got pinned between a cow and a wall while taking the bovine’s heart rate. “One of the other students had to move the cow out of the way,” she said. Jocelyn experienced no lasting trauma from the cow encounter, but learned that “you have to watch out for their feet.” Now both veterinarians, the

Stern alumnae are ensconced in the jobs they have always wanted. Jocelyn is in private veterinary practice in Birmingham, Michigan, and Jen works in New Jersey at the Bloomingdale Animal Hospital and Van Saun Park Zoo. “The path was not easy, but definitely rewarding,” Jen said. “When you have a dream and want something so badly, you do whatever it takes to get there.” I

eshiva College marks its 75th anniversary with a series of events that are expected to draw some of the largest gatherings of YC alumni in the school’s history. A gala dinner aboard the USS Intrepid on Sept. 21, reunions across North America, and events at the Wilf Campus including lectures and special courses are just a few of the events that are planned in celebration of this unique institution. “I am amazed at how much good will Board members and alumni serving as marshals—and everyone involved in this effort—have for Yeshiva College,” said Stanley M. Raskas ’65Y,B,R, chairman of the YC at 75 Celebration. “When we join together to celebrate the history of this unique institution, we will also be looking to secure its future and academic excellence.” The gala celebration on Sept. 21 will honor Hadassah ’54TIW and Marvin S. Bienenfeld ’53Y,R, first YC Board chairman; and Jeanie and Jay Schottenstein, YU Trustee and second YC Board chairman. The dinner will also feature a tribute by alumni to longtime faculty members. “Our primary goals are to get as many alumni and spouses and friends as possible to attend the Intrepid dinner and our other events, and for them to sense the excitement about what is new and exciting at Yeshiva College,” says Mr. Raskas. “I feel indebted to Yeshiva College for all that it has done for me and for my family members who have attended there.” As part of the anniversary year, the Board is conducting a campaign to raise $1 million to renovate the science labs on the Wilf Campus. Part of the money raised will go toward upgrading the communications lab with sophisticated electronic and filmmaking equipment. More than 170 YC alumni are volunteer class marshals and ambassadors in communicating and generating support for the celebration among fellow alumni. The marshals kicked off the yearlong celebration by gathering on the Wilf Campus in July for a sports night and barbecue hosted by President Joel. YC offered two special YC at 75 courses last spring: “Jewish New York,” with Jeffrey Gurock, PhD, Libby M. Klaperman Professor of Jewish History; Joanne Jacobson, PhD, associate professor of English; and Hadassa Kosak, PhD, associate professor of history; and “Modern Orthodox Thought,” taught by Alan Brill, PhD, assistant professor of Jewish mysticism and thought. “YC at 75 is a milestone around which to rally,” said Joshua L. Muss ’62YC, YC Board of Directors chairman. “We want to create an opportunity to raise alumni awareness and bring them back to see old friends and celebrate.” For further information and to volunteer, contact YC75@yu.edu or 212-960-0193.

New Alumni Web Site: Check It Out!
The Alumni Affairs Web site has been redesigned with a fresh new look and additional features. The reader-friendly site provides visitors with links to the student newspapers, The Commentator and The Observer, and is complete with a volunteer section; a calendar of events; giving opportunities; access to the online community; and profiles of alumni in the news. Visit the site at www.yu.edu and click on “Alumni, Donors & Friends.”

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In the Service of Freedom

Max Kampelman: an official “Living Legend.”

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mbassador Max Kampelman YH’37, YU Honorary Degree recipient in 1990 and a YUHS Distinguished Alumnus, in April received the Publius Award of the Center for the Study of the Presidency. The Center “seeks to further the understanding and functioning of the American Presidency and its related institutions and, thereby, to educate, illuminate, and inspire leaders of tomorrow.” In 2000 Ambassador Kampelman was among those receiving the first Library of Congress “Living Legend” awards. In 1999 he received the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian award, and in 1989 the Presidential Citizens Medal, which recognizes “citizens of the United States who have performed exemplary deeds of service for their country or their fellow citizens.” Ambassador Kampelman served under Presidents Carter and

Reagan as Ambassador and Head of the US Delegation to the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE). He subsequently served as Ambassador and Head of the US Delegation to the CSCE Copenhagen Conference on the Human Dimension, the CSCE Geneva Conference on National Minorities in July 1991, and the CSCE Moscow Conference on the Human Dimension in September 1991. A lawyer, diplomat, and educator, he also served as ambassador and head of the United States Delegation to the Negotiations with the Soviet Union on Nuclear and Space Arms

in Geneva; and counselor of the Department of State, before rejoining the law firm of Fried, Frank, Harris, Shriver & Jacobson LLP, where he is now counsel.

He received the Publius Award for his role “in the negotiations and events that contributed to an increase in human freedom at the end of the 20th century,” according to the award citation. “During the Cold War,” it continued, “he helped shape the diplomacy required to contain totalitarianism, and, with his work on human rights, stood with those who fought for freedom. In foreign and domestic service for Democratic and Republican Presidents, Max Kampelman has demonstrated the breadth and vision, civility, and inclusive leadership that our Founding Fathers hoped would grace our country.” I

HELLO, THIS IS YU CALLING
Jonathan Hay and Avraham Cooper were among the YU students who enjoyed asking alumni to participate in last year’s annual fund drive. If you made a pledge, please be sure to send in your payment using the gift envelope enclosed in this magazine. For an even quicker and easier way to give, donate online at www.yu.edu/onlinegiving.

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More Alumni Become Board Members

Save the Date!
Sunday, September 18, 2005 Beren (Midtown) Campus

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BACK TO SCHOOL
For all Beren Campus Alumnae • Stern College for Women • Sy Syms School of Business Featuring: • Morning Torah Learning Program • Luncheon including the reunion classes of 1960, 1965, 1970, 1975, 1985, 1990, and 2000 (all alumnae are invited to attend) • Afternoon classes with distinguished professors

eshiva University is reaping benefits from a dramatic increase in recent years in the number of alumni in leadership positions on its various boards. Of the 336 people currently serving, as we go to press 123 are alumni and represent a 27 percent jump from just five years ago when 97 alumni served. Daniel T. Forman, vice president for institutional advance-

headed by Rabbi Richard C. Bieler ’74Y,R,B, senior executive director for community affairs, Yeshiva University will be engaging alumni throughout North America and Israel. For Kathryn O. Greenberg ’82C, the first CSL alumni chairman of its Board of Directors, becoming involved in Cardozo is natural. “I don’t think there is anyone who cares more about a school than someone who went there,”

“Alumni bring to the table the fact that they really know the school and what the issues are.”
ment, said the belief that alumni hold the key to the university’s future sustenance and growth emanates from the leadership of David S. Gottesman (YU Board of Trustees chairman, 1993–2000), continued under chairmen Robert M. Beren (2000–2002) and Ronald P. Stanton (2002–2004), and has been enhanced by the current leadership of Morry J. Weiss. But, says Mr. Forman, Yeshiva University has only scratched the surface. “We are unique in that historically we have attracted civic leaders, but we want a more balanced level of alumni participation,” he said. “Our goal is to have the various YU boards composed of 80 percent alumni.” With a host of initiatives, such as the Center for the Jewish Future under the direction of Rabbi Kenneth Brander ’84Y,R, and national community programs said Ms. Greenberg, who also sits on the YU Board of Trustees. “Alumni bring to the table the fact that they really know the school and what the issues are.” And Mordecai D. Katz YH’48, chairman of the BRGS Board of Directors and a member of YU’s Board of Trustees, said alumni involvement sets an example for others to follow. “It’s almost like a domino effect,” he said. “Once you get the momentum started, it stimulates other alumni to fall into line and get involved.” Joshua L. Muss YH,’62Y, YC Board of Directors chairman and member of the Yeshiva University Board of Trustees, asked: “What better person to appreciate YU than a person who went there? Alumni know the ‘lay of the land’ and understand its needs and benefits.” I

For reservations and information, contact the Alumni Office: 212-960-5373 or alumni@yu.edu

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Alumni who serve on YU boards:
(as of July 2005)

Y E S H I VA U N I V E R S I T Y BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Nate Kacew ’98C Jonathan Kukin ’87C James E. Schwalbe ’93C Bonnie Steingart ’79C Stephen A. Weiss ’90C Joseph Appleman YH,’47Y, honorary director Louis Henkin YH,’37Y, honorary director

Jayne (Grundman) Beker YH,’90F Julius Berman ’56Y,R Marvin S. Bienenfeld ’53Y,R Sender Z. Cohen YH,’94Y Aaron Feuerstein ’47Y Felix L. Glaubach YH,’50Y Alan E. Goldberg YH,’79C Lance L. Hirt ’87Y Michael Jesselson YH’69 Richard M. Joel YH’68 Mordecai D. Katz YH’48 Norman Lamm ’49Y,R,B Vivian (Glueck) Rosenberg YH’78 Irwin Shapiro YH,’53Y,R Moshael J. Straus YH,’74Y David Yagoda YH’44 Jacob E. Goldman ’40Y, honorary trustee

RABBI ISAAC ELCHANAN T H E O L O G I C A L S E M I N A RY BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Alfred J. Friedman YH’52 Fred Halpern YH’61 Sherri (Steinberg) Herring ’72S Sharon (Herzfeld) Kleiner YH,’88S Seryl B. (Stadtmauer) Kushner ’76S Murray Laulicht ’61Y Susan (Ungar) Mero ’87S Debbie (Morris) Niderberg ’86S Marcia Robbins-Wilf ’81F Eudice Zauderer Rohinsky YH’58 Vivian (Glueck) Rosenberg YH’78 Deina Shapiro ’75S Roberta A. (Romanoff) Strauchler YH’78 Shira (Radinsky) Yoshor ’89S

Robert I. Kantowitz YH,’76Y, vice chairman J. Philip Rosen YH,’78Y, vice chairman Leon Wildes ’54Y, treasurer Stanley I. Raskas ’65Y,B, secretary Marvin S. Bienenfeld ’53Y,R, founding chairman Joshua Annenberg ’89Y,C Zev S. Berman ’82Y Morris Bienenfeld YH,’78Y,R Stephen Brown YH,’79Y Aaron Feder ’55R Elliot Feinerman ’73Y Herbert Frisch ’73R Felix L. Glaubach YH,’50Y Nahum Gordon YH,’57Y David L. Gottesman ’72Y Shalom E. Lamm ’81Y Arthur M. Luxenberg ’81Y,C Joel Mael ’79Y Steven Major ’90Y Jay L. Pomrenze ’70Y,R Marvin Reiss ’66Y Sheldon Rudoff YH,’54Y,R Leonard Z. Shapiro YH,’58Y,A Samuel H. Solomon ’75Y,B,R Joseph Stechler ’73Y Alan E. Uliss YH,’76Y,A

Julius Berman ’56Y,’59R, chairman Moshael J. Straus YH,’74Y, secretary Hyman Arbesfeld YH,’53Y,’56R Howard S. Balter ’83Y,’85R Shael Bellows ’61Y,’64R,B

ALBERT EINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE BOARD OF OVERSEERS

Jack C. Bendheim YH,’68Y Moshe Bessin YH,’67Y Marvin S. Bienenfeld ’53Y,’56R Alvin J. Blumenfeld YH,’61Y Felix L. Glaubach YH,’50Y Alan E. Goldberg YH,’79C

Gerald Dorros ’68A Adam Gottbetter ’92C Michael Jesselson YH’69 Elizabeth Stoner ’77A

BERNARD REVEL G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F JEWISH STUDIES BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Benjamin Heller ’85W Jacob W. Heller YH,’56Y Michael Jesselson YH’69 Mordecai D. Katz YH’48 Norman Lamm ’49Y,’51R,B Morton L. Landowne ’69Y Irwin Peyser ’54R Solomon Rybak ’63Y,’66R,B Henry Schachar YH,’74Y Alvin I. Schiff ’47Y,F Joel M. Schreiber ’57Y,’60R,B William J. Schwartz ’65Y Irwin Shapiro ’53Y,’55R Norman Stark ’69Y Moshe Talansky ’54Y,’56R

Mordecai D. Katz YH’48, chairman Walter Feder ’48R Martin N. Kaufman ’76Y Rabbi Haskel Lookstein ’58R,B Irwin Shapiro ’53Y,R Moshe Talansky ’54Y,R

A Z R I E L I G R A D U AT E S C H O O L O F J E W I S H E D U C AT I O N A N D A D M I N I S T R AT I O N BOARD OF DIRECTORS

SY SYMS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS BOARD OF DIRECTORS

William L. Silber ’63Y, secretary Isaac Corre ’85Y Henry Kressel ’55Y Manfred M. Rechtschaffen ’54Y,R Edward I. Zughaft YH’76

Moshael J. Straus YH,’74Y, chairman Henry I. Rothman ’64Y, vice chairman Steven Adelsberg YH’71, secretary Sender Z. Cohen YH,’94Y, treasurer Julius Berman ’56Y,R David E. Miller ’53Y,R Zev Weiss ’88Y

F E R K A U F G R A D U AT E SCHOOL OF PSYCHOLOGY BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Beth Myers ’86F, vice chair Peter Abrons ’84F, vice chair Jayne (Grundman) Beker YH,’90F, chair emeritus Ellen J. Klausner ’93F Therese Rosenblatt ’94F Kathie Kramer Rudy ’90F Lisa Hershberg Striar ’93F,’97F

WURZWEILER SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Gary Weiss ’84Y Jonathan Zizmor YH,’69A David A. Zwillenberg YH,’73Y

STERN COLLEGE FOR WOMEN BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Joan (Sadinoff) Katz ’80W, vice chair Joan O’Donnell ’80W, assistant secretary Janet Adler ’96W Joel Daner ’60Y,’62W Meri (Zaidins) Kraidman ’62W Lilly Tempelsman ’79W Roselyn (Heller) Weitzner ’76W

BENJAMIN N. CARDOZO S C H O O L O F L AW BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Dorothy (Gewirtz) Berman ’59S, vice chairman Monique (Censor) Katz ’63A, vice chairman Cali (Daar) Orenbuch ’85S,B, vice chairman David Yagoda YH’44, honorary chairman Sandra (Ehrenreich) Quinn ’71S, honorary founding chairman Susan (Mitchell) Ascher ’61S Hadassah Bienenfeld ’54TIW

Y E S H I VA U N I V E R S I T Y HIGH SCHOOLS B O A R D ( I N F O R M AT I O N )

Kathryn (Olson) Greenberg ’82C, chairman Mark S. Lieberman ’84C, vice chairman Rachel L. Warren ’92C, vice chairman Leon H. Charney ’60Y Hon. Sandra J. (Ellstein) Feuerstein ’79C Shimmie Horn ’93Y,’96C

Miriam R. (Peyser) Goldberg ’79S, chairman

Y E S H I VA U N I V E R S I T Y MUSEUM BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Y E S H I VA C O L L E G E BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Ted Mirvis YH,’73Y, vice chair Michael Jesselson YH’69

Joshua L. Muss YH,’62Y, chairman Emanuel J. Adler YH,’76Y, vice chairman

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For the Love of the Game

Amy Gordon Guterson: Acting on Our Behalf

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my Gordon Guterson ’86S presented “An Improvisational Journey: From Stern College to Off-Broadway to Hasidut, Creating Theater and Making Film” at the 2005 Morris Epstein Forum on the Arts lecture on March 7. Ms. Guterson, who lives in Pittsburgh with her husband, Yaakov Guterson ’87A, and their four children, studied theater and fine arts at Stern, where she was president of the Stern College Dramatics Society and directed many of its productions. While attending Stern, she studied acting with Uta Hagen at the Herbert Berghof Studio and later earned a graduatelevel degree in acting at the New Actors Workshop, under the direction of Mike Nichols and Paul Sills. Ms. Guterson performs with Pittsburgh Playback Theatre, a professional improvisational company. She is cofounder and artistic director of Kol Isha, a Jewish women’s theater group that creates and performs origi-

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f you don’t know the story of the Yeshiva University “Mighty Mites”—yes, that’s what they were called before they became the Maccabees —then you may want to pick up a copy of “For the Love of the Game—A Basketball Story.” Asked by legendary YU basketball coach Bernard “Red” Sarachek to write a historical account of YU’s basketball program, former player Abbey Gewirtz ’55Y traced the 50 years of YU basketball before the Max Stern Athletic Center was built in 1985. Prior to that year, the YU team played wherever it could in all five

NYC boroughs. And who could forget Coach Sarachek, a member of the NYC Basketball Hall of Fame, holding strategy sessions with his players on the subway. “We schlepped all over the place, to 24th Street, to the Bronx, and to Queens,” Mr. Gewirtz said. “What we had to go through back then made us stronger. Those were the glory days.” A must for every YU basketball player or fan, “For the Love of the Game” is available through the Office of University Alumni Affairs at alumni@yu.edu or at 212-9605373. I

nal theater pieces, focusing on issues of Jewish womanhood and Jewish unity. She has written works for the group including the full-length play “Journey Through Ruth,” based on the Book of Ruth. “Becoming Rachel,” a film she wrote, directed, and produced, premiered in April at the Pittsburgh Jewish/Israeli Film Festival. The Morris Epstein Forum on the Arts is sponsored by Stern College. It honors the longtime Stern College English professor who died in 1973. Professor Epstein authored several children’s books and edited World Over magazine, published by the New York Board of Jewish Education. He was also a drama and book critic for WEVD radio in New York.

The Office of University Alumni Affairs can be reached at alumni@yu.edu; by phone at 212-960-5373; or by fax at 212-960-5336. Our mailing address is Yeshiva University, Office of University Alumni Affairs, 500 West 185th Street, BH723, New York, NY 10033-3201.

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Spreading the (Written) Word

Y E S H I VA U N I V E R S I T Y H I G H S C H O O L S

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t’s a traditional publishing company with a twist: one that also offers free online content. Started by Rabbi Gil Student ’94Y and Rabbi Moshe Schapiro ’93Y,AG,R in 2004, Yashar Books publishes printed volumes as well as online divrei Torah, both designed to spark dialogue among those who study Torah around the world. “In the last 20 years there has been a huge change in the intellectual and scholarly thinking of many in the Orthodox world,” Rabbi Student said. “Unfortunately, many of their new ideas don’t get publicized. Scholars come up with brilliant notions but only their students hear about them.” Rabbi Schapiro, a Judaica reference librarian at the Mendel Gottesman Library on the Wilf Campus and rabbi of the Synagogue of the Palisades in Fort Lee, NJ, and Rabbi Student, a former finance executive at Radian Insurance,

came together to fulfill a life-long dream of publishing Jewish books. They have recently published The Right and the Good: Halakhah and Human Relations by Rabbi Daniel Z. Feldman ’94Y,R, instructor of Jewish studies at YU, as part of an ongoing series on Jewish ethics that will include a volume titled Moral Issues of the Marketplace in Jewish Law by Aaron Levine, Samson and Halina Bitensky Professor of Economics at YC. The Open Access Project is an online resource center that bring together elements of a virtual beit midrash (study hall)—with free downloads of articles, essays, and eventually, entire books—and includes a public forum. It can be found at www.yasharbooks.com /Open/. “We want to make good quality scholarship accessible to the public at large, which is bound to be a boon for those beyond the walls of a university or yeshiva,” Rabbi Schapiro said. I

HANGING TEN FOR CHARITY
Thanks to the efforts of lawyer Ben (Aaron) Katz YH’88 (pictured left with actor Martin Sheen), the Santa Barbara, CA, surfboard maker Yater received permission to recreate the surfboard belonging to Col. Kilgore (Robert Duval) in the movie “Apocalypse Now.” Film director Francis Ford Coppola had designed the board and owned the rights, but when the film, starring Mr. Sheen, was re-released in 2001, Mr. Katz noticed the Yater logo on the surfboard used by Col. Kilgore. After inquiring about purchasing one, Mr. Katz discovered that it was not an authentic Yater surfboard and that Mr. Coppola had used the company’s name without permission. Mr. Katz approached Yater about making a limited edition of the board and organized a permission “swap” between Mr. Coppola and Yater, clearing the way to produce 90 surfboards that are duplicates of the one in the movie. Yater gave Mr. Katz several boards, which he auctioned with all proceeds given to a charity for war veterans.

Be Part of History
The President of Yeshiva University and Board of Directors of Yeshiva College cordially invite you to the

Gala Celebration of the 75th Anniversary of Yeshiva College
Join hundreds of Yeshiva College alumni, friends and family as we celebrate this momentous occasion Wednesday, September 21, 2005 • Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum

For more information, please call 212-960-0193 or e-mail Kuperman@yu.edu

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The Office of University Alumni Affairs is looking for the following “lost” alumni. If you know of anyone’s whereabouts, please contact the YU Alumni Office at alumni@yu.edu. The most current list is available at: www.yu.edu/alumni/mia.asp

STERN COLLEGE FOR WOMEN • Class of 1960 Bessie Kopperman Ethel Milch Korn Miriam Resnikoff Metzger • 1965 Shirley Reingewertz Esther Mann Snyder Sheila Snyder Frayda Fink Weiss Susan Wenger Rachel Solomon Witty • 1970 Judith Gluck Applebaum Alice Chesler Pearl Moskowitz Cohen Vera Deutsch Dickman Rosalyn Eisenberg Deborah Album Esterman Krystine R. Forem Roberta Katzen Rifka Schikman Zdanowitz Wendy Zuckerman • 1975 Rachel Shapiro Ben-Zev Susan Lebowitz Bondi Chana Butler Shapiro Cohen Martha Gluck Viviana M. Goldschmidt Susan Kofman Kaplan Debra B. Pomrenze Peleg Sara Kirschbaum Podemski Pnina Pollack Judith D. Reiss Aline M. Rockman Judy Schacter Esther C. Tartak Janet R. Waterstone • 1980 Sara Jane Kaplan Bromberg Elizabeth Anne Heinig Cohen Nina Feld-Dagan Ruth Ganger Peggy Goldberg Mindy Sara Heller Bonnie Kletter Greta Nathanson Annie Kelman Pomrantz Medea Rizinashvili Linda Susan Rubin Barbara Silverman Carolyn Smith Snyder Barbara Weiss Melanie Wolf • 1985 Paloma Benhamu Naomi Liberman Blank Karen A. Chriqui Robyn Godis Hindy J. Kalish Edythe Buchbinder Kaye Rachel Landau Sara Goldstein Leibowitz Deborah Naimark Joy Malka Rothenberg Marilyn M. Wermut

• 1990 Lisa E. Bermundo Sari Polansky Drazin Michelle A. Frankel Hindy Najman Franks Aviva Gartenberg Susan L. Goldstein Rachel H. Goodman Toby A. Hirsch Miriam Segal Hober Veronica R. Edelstein Kaye Amy D. Newman Michelle L. Pahmer Sherri L. Prostak Linda R. Rayman Alison R. Reed Chaya Gold Rosenfeld Rebecca Fishman Silverstein Sara L. Weiss • 1995 Sandra G. Abrams Leah Koslowski Benscher Sharon Berezin Bridget F. Burrows Maya A. Cohen Arielle Elbaz Miriam Engelstein Malki Blond Fogel Alyssa Insel Forman Deena M. Frank Lisa Nussbaum Glass Yael C. Greenberg Yoela Levin Holman Pessi Elias Hornblass Rachel Iskowitz Rachel Israel Sara Y. Kamin Rachel V. Katz Dara Knapel Janet Abboudi Lauer Meira Drazin Lebovitz Naomi Liebowitz Maron Leora Salzhauer Leslie J. Tuchman Sasnowitz Tzipporah Tischler Solomon Leba Spiegelman Esther Stein Abby Cooper Weisberg Yaffa Zweig • 2000 Dvasha S. Allen Amy Lauren Berman Tammi Sara Blumenfeld Esther Leah Caro Olga Dynina Rachel Leah Farkas Naomi Tikva Feuer Rachel Toby Glass Miriam Cheryl Grossman Elana Sharona Hurwitz Yael Kabasso Rena Kantrowitz Andrea Joyce Katzenstein Aimee M. Klapper Suzanne Laura Litman Nicole Rachel Maryles

Tova Rein Judith Kayla Robinson Miriam E. Rosenblatt Ruth Mirjam Rosenkranz Sara A. Schacter Olga Pantukhova Segal Annie Hollander Steiner Rochi Iris Steiner Aliza Stern Yael Wexler
SY SYMS SCHOOL OF BUSINESS • Class of 1990 Evan Bart Robert Bloom Mark M. Bransdorfer Deerah R. Fruchter • 1995 Simon Abadi Marc A. Bruger Robert Rabinowitz Eric Reinhard Rena Ennis Reinheimer Phyllis B. Roth Sarit Stein Robert Williger Joseph Zaionz • 2000 Caroline Bitton Rafal Sabastian Buczyk Barbara M. Elbaz Eli Feiler Aviad Goldwicht Jessica Gottesman Jeffrey Greenberg Adina Loberfeld Haller Vladimir Libine Joseph London Sara Beth Lowe Steven Dov Pollak Dina Adelsberg Reich Edmundo Rosenberg Sharon Beth Shtern Talia Ilana Spierer Vitali Spivak Tami Sue Thomas Hannah Vermes Susan Wohlgelernter Y E S H I VA C O L L E G E • Class of 1955 Leonard Borstein Abraham Bruckenstein Sol Flug Milton Freundlich Henry Hartman Oscar Krater (Kratzer) Norman Liss Joseph Naimer Alvin Schreiber Stuart Sloyer

• 1960 Michael Frank Martin L. Gordon Aharon Orlandsky Joseph Rosenthal Sender Shizgal Harry Turner Arthur M. Wittow Yosef Jerome Wolicki Mordecai E. Zeitz • 1965 Stephen L. Gralla Elieser Neuberger Shaul Rotter Michael G. Samet Harold Wasserman Murray Zimmer • 1970 Martin J. Birn Arnold Eliasov Joshua Fink Walter Hertzberg Steven Kelter Elliot Levine Karl Lifschitz Manny Miller Michael Silber Neal Tober Harvey Weinrib Gerald A. Wolkinson Robert Young • 1975 Yehuda Charlap Victor Delouya Joshua Fluk Aryeh Leon Neil Ted Amnon Ness Noah Reifman Micahel Saks Yaakov Jerrold Shemaria Michael I. Skobac David I. Sternberg Judd H. Zisquit • 1980 Ephraim Becker Warren Burstein Steven Allan Eisenberg Simon Grunbaum Michael Jay Kahn Vidal Keslassy Edward Alan Levin Daniel A. Levy Isaac Livni Jeffrey Rein Ken A. Resnicow Murray Rosenthal Elan Jonathan Sober • 1985 Brian D. Aarenau Jay Stuart Auslander Martin Mordechai Devon Joel Finkelstein Naftali Friedman Abraham Bert Hidary Ari Hier

Moshe D. Lichtman Eric S. Strauss Alan I. Talansky • 1990 Daniel E. Chefitz Bary Diner Moshe Elliot Fisher Yitzchok Genack Steven H. Jutkowitz Ari Keehn Mark Isaac (Mordechai) Schrek Michael S. Shapiro • 1995 Ronen Abergel David Alex Bailey Ezra M. Cohen Joseph Crystal David Debow Gil Dersovitz Jeffrey Goldman Matthew J. Goldsmith Jason A. Gottlieb Ari Grover Shimon Harary David Kaplan Andrew Michael Leibowitz Daniel J. Loew Kevin Ohayon Aryeh Pearlman Jeremy Rosner • 2000 Benjamin Ahdut Morrie Jeffrey Assouline Ami Y. Attali Benjamin Beiser Elliot Moshe Fischer Israel Frenkel Jonathan Gamss Stephen Gordon Joseph M. Mandelbaum Alexander Migirov Scott Nadel Gabriel Nivasch Avi Gershon Oppenheimer Yevgeniy Pavlovskiy Ben-Zion M. Radinsky Samuel Ritter Ilan Simon Rubinstein Matthew Scharf Roni Y. Schwartz Ariel S. Seidman Radislav Sendersky Daniel Silber Doron Simon Shmuel Sorkin Gary Turkel Chaim Woolf Benjamin Young Michael Zaidel

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2005–06 Alumni Highlights
The Sunday morning Kollel Yom Rishon (men) and Midreshet Yom Rishon (women) learning programs were phenomenal successes in their first year. Both programs attracted hundreds of alumni and guests from communities in the NYC area to the Wilf Campus each week. For program information, schedules, and audio recordings of shiurim (lectures), visit www.kollelyomrishon.org and www.midreshetyomrishon.org.

Rabbi Daniel Z. Feldman ‘94Y,R, instructor of Jewish studies at YU, was the featured author at YCAA’s Sixth Annual Soy Seforim Sale Book Signing and Lecture in February.

Some 80 alumni and guests in the real estate industry participated in an innovative networking exercise March 16 at the Beren Campus. Lining up along a rope, participants had a few moments to meet, greet, and exchange business cards with another professional. When the bell rang, they moved down the line to meet the next person.

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Spring 2005 Reunions

Cardozo Class of 1980

Yeshiva College Class of 1980

Brooklyn Girls High School Class of 1955

Yeshiva College Class of 1955

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Westward, oy!
BY JUNE GLAZER

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he Hebrew Kid and the Apache Maiden, by Robert J. Avrech YH’68, is the bikorim (first fruits) of a new initiative by Mr. Avrech and his wife, Karen (Singer) ’80F that is as much a tribute to their late son as it is an offering of quality literature for observant Jewish young adults. The Avrechs began Seraphic Press (Seraphicpress.com), named for God’s first order of angels, shortly after their son, Ariel Chaim, died in 2002 at age 22 from side effects of chemotherapy. Ariel became quite religious as a teenager and was studying at Ner

especially young adult literature. And he lamented that there was so little material for Orthodox kids. Much of what’s out there that kids read deals with topics that are inappropriate for them, not to mention for observant kids,” said Mr. Avrech. The Brooklyn-born son of Rabbi Abraham Avrech YH,’40Y, R,W, MSDCS associate director for four decades and director of rabbinic alumni of RIETS and of YC, Robert is Hollywood’s first Orthodox screenwriter, with credits that include Body Double and A Stranger Among Us. He delivered the 1999 Morris Epstein Forum on the Arts lecture at SCW, calling his

“My novels are a love song from a Jew to America.”
Israel yeshiva in Baltimore when he was hospitalized for the last time. Mr. Avrech wrote the book while his son was dying. Ariel helped him with some of the difficult halakhic questions that arose in the narrative while writing the book, and lived to see the completed manuscript, which he liked very much, his father said. “Ariel really enjoyed literature, talk “Lights! Camera! Action!: Shomer Shabbos in Hollywood.” The Hebrew Kid and the Apache Maiden, published in 2005 and soon to enter into its second printing, is a coming-of-age story that takes place in the Arizona Territories in the period following the Civil War. It is told by the main character, a boy named Ariel who is about to celebrate his bar mitz-

vah. He and his family, pious Jews fleeing pogroms in Russia, become stranded in Apache country and come face to face with the US Cavalry, Indian warriors, homesteaders, and outlaws. The oddity of being Jewish in the Wild West— and of being part of the “Jewish tribe”—enables them to escape a succession of perils. (Ariel’s mother helps to pacify the notorious Doc Holliday by serving him cholent and potato kugel.) “We’re discovering that the book has a wide readership, including Conservative and Reform Jews and even among the Christian community,” Mr. Avrech said. Under the Seraphic Press imprimatur, he is working on a second Hebrew Kid novel, The Hebrew Kid and the Gangs of Tombstone— like its prequel, carefully researched and incorporating real characters. Says Mr. Avrech, “I love American history, and I believe that we Jews are blessed to live

here. My novels are a love song from a Jew to America.” Other books are in the works at Seraphic, as well—next up is The Shidduch Diaries by Michael Levin—and the Avrechs would like to create a literary magazine for young adults. “Karen and I are determined to publish fiction that will enrich the lives of Jewish children. We hope that Seraphic Press books will not only be a kiddush HaShem (sanctification of God’s name), but also a matzevah (monument) to Ariel Chaim’s memory,” Mr. Avrech said.

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The Company My Father Built
by Susan Bitensky Lerner Sands Point Press

The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram
by Thomas Blass ’63Y,F Basic Books New York

The author tells the story of her father, honorary University board member and Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology board chair emeritus Samson Bitensky, who grew up in interwar Poland. She traces his journey to America and chronicles how he became a textile manufacturer and CEO of Fab Industries.
Mishpat L’Avraham: Collected Articles on Jewish Law
by Abraham M. Fuss YH,’56Y,B Biegeleisen J.S. Brooklyn, NY

The author, professor of psychology at University of Maryland, Baltimore County, has written a comprehensive biography of one of the most controversial and inventive psychologists of our time. The Man Who Shocked the World was named one of the top science books of 2004 by Discover magazine.

The Chimney Tree
by Helaine (Gewirtz) Helmreich YH’64 Toby Press New Milford, CT

Articles written by the author over the past 40 years were collected and prepared by his wife and children on the occasion of his 70th birthday. An attorney in New York and formerly in Israel, he has a lifelong interest in Jewish studies, Jewish law, and history.

A saga that unfolds with forbidden love between the daughter of a prominent Hasidic family and a Polish Christian boy, the author traces the heroine’s life from European shtetls to America and finally to Israel as she seeks to reunite her family and rebuild her life.
Fahrenheit 9-12: Rebuttal to Fahrenheit 9/11
by Aaron I. Reichel YH,’71Y,B,R iUniverse, Inc. New York

Mystery writer Rochelle Krich ’69S has sold Spanish rights to Blues in the Night, her first Molly Blume mystery. Her third Molly Blume volume, Grave Endings, recently won the Calavera Award at Left Coast Crime in El Paso and also the Mystery Writers of America Mary Higgins Clark Award. (Rochelle offers reading guides for her three Molly Blume titles—Dream House is the second in the series—and is available for conversations with groups via speaker phone.) Also, the Israeli translation of her Blood Money, in Hebrew titled Kaspei Dam, is now in bookstores in Israel.

The author has written a “frameby-frame” rebuttal to the controversial film “Fahrenheit 9/11.” He is a lawyer, author, and editor, and is on the federal and NY and NJ state bars.
A Lifetime Companion to the Laws of Jewish Family Life
by Deena R. (Cohen) Zimmerman ’88A Urim Publications Jerusalem, New York

Around the Family Table A Comprehensive “Bencher” and Companion for Shabbat and Festival Meals and Other Family Occasions
by Shlomo Riskin YH,’60Y,R,B Urim Publications Jerusalem

The author is a pediatrician in Israel and a yoetzet Halakhah (women’s halakhic adviser). Her book helps married and engaged couples of all ages learn the laws of Jewish marital life. Additionally, it emphasizes an understanding of the interplay between Jewish law and women’s health issues throughout the life cycle.

A book of prayer and celebration, it is intended to serve as a guide for meaningful expressions of the Jewish experience at home. Inspiring stories and personal commentary by the author supplement the text throughout.

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Voices of Bereavement: A Casebook for Grief Counselors
by Joan Beder, WSSW associate professor New York and Hove: Bruner-Routledge

The casebook is a collection of compelling case studies drawn from the author’s experiences as a grief counselor, each reflecting on an unusual set of circumstances— the bereavement of an identical twin, the death of an adolescent’s disabled sibling, and a husband’s grief after a miscarriage.

associate professor of speech and drama; Lawrence Schiffman, Ethel and Irvin A. Edelman Professor in Hebrew and Judaic Studies at NYU; Jay Goldmintz ’81F,R, headmaster of Ramaz Upper School; Dr. Schnall and Daniel Pollack of WSSW; and Michael Broyde YH, ’84Y,R, a dayan (judge) in the Beth Din of America and a law professor at Emory University.
Antisemitism
by Jerome Chanes YH,’64Y,W SCW WSSW, and AGS adjunct professor ABC-CLIO Santa Barbara, CA

delves into 14 areas of interpersonal relations and provides an indepth review of the subjects and how they have been understood throughout Jewish history.
“Remember Amalek!”: Vengeance, Zealotry, and Group Destruction in the Bible According to Philo, Pseudo Philo, and Josephus
by Louis H. Feldman YC Abraham Wouk Family Professor of Classics and Literature Hebrew Union College Press

God vs. The Gavel: Religion and the Rule of Law
by Marci A. Hamilton Paul R. Verkuil Professor of Public Law and Director, Intellectual Property Law Program, CSL Cambridge University Press

The Book of Passover
by Benjamin Blech ’54Y,R, assistant professor of Talmud Citadel Press New York, NY

The first reference work on the subject of antisemitism, it joins the publisher’s series on contemporary world issues, available in both print and eBook formats. The author presents a survey of the historical, political, and sociological contexts of antisemitism in more than 50 countries.
Nutrition for Life
Coauthored by Darwin Deen ’81A, AECOM professor of family and social medicine (with Lisa Hark, MD) DK publishers

The author details how three firstcentury CE Jews grappled with the quandary presented by the obligation to exterminate the nation of Amalek in light of the Torah’s proscribing that “fathers shall not be put to death for children, neither shall children be killed for their fathers.”

The author offers a comprehensive look at how laws providing religious freedom are being used by religious entities to shield them from legal liability in cases of clergy abuse, medical neglect, even murder.

ALUMNI AUTHORS
We thank the following alumni for submitting their works since the last YU Review: Robert J. Avrech YH’68 Rabbi Aaron I. Reichel Esq. YH,’71Y,R,B

Intended as a keepsake, the author compiles all the special traditions of the Pesach holiday. The book includes insights, thought-provoking ideas, recipes, explanations of customs, relevant quotations, trivia and games, decorating ideas, and a list of helpful links and resources.
Tradition: A Journal of Orthodox Jewish Thought Jewish Education: A Special Issue (Vol. 37 No. 4)
edited by David J. Schnall YH,’69Y,R, AGS dean Rabbinical Council of America in conjunction with the Azrieli Papers, an AGS project

Get the lowdown on how good nutrition can improve health. The book offers reviews on popular diet programs; guidance on all aspects of nutrition; advice on using food as medicine to treat cholesterol, osteoporosis, diabetes, migranes, and more; and real-life examples of health problems and how improved nutrition can remedy them.
The Right and the Good
by Daniel Z. Feldman ’96Y,R, instructor of Talmud Yashar Books Brooklyn, NY

The Hebrew Kid and the Apache Maiden
Dr. Bryan B. Kagan ’76Y

Fahrenheit 9 -12: Rebuttal to Fahrenheit 9 /11
Rabbi Bernhard H. Rosenberg ’69Y,F,R,AG

Dancing in the Mist Flight of a Butterfly
Rabbi Alfred J. Kolatch YH,’37Y

The Holocaust As Seen Through Film
Rabbi Samuel H. Solomon ’75Y,R,B

The Comprehensive Dictionary of English and Hebrew First Names
Miriam Lieberman ’78TIW,W

Power Point for Litigators Saying Goodbye
Dr. Joel B. Wolowelsky ’69BS

Women at the Seder— A Passover Haggadah
To have your book displayed in the Alumni Authors Library, send a copy to the Office of University Alumni Affairs, Yeshiva University, 500 West 185th Street, BH723, New York, NY 10033-3201.

For the first time in 30 years, Tradition has devoted an issue to topics in Jewish education. Contributors are Peninnah Schram, YU

The book (published in 1999 by Jason Aaronson) has been re-released in an expanded edition. It

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I Professional News

Yeshiva University Review welcomes Classnotes submissions that are typewritten or neatly printed. Relevant information (name, maiden name, school, year of graduation, and a contact phone number) must be included. The magazine is not responsible for incomplete or incorrect information. Graduates of CSL, WSSW, FGS, and AECOM may also direct notes to those schools’ alumni publications. In addition to professional achievements, YUR Classnotes may contain alumni family news, including information on births, marriages, condolences, and bar/bat mitzvahs. Engagement announcements are not accepted. We reserve the right to edit submitted items. We cannot be responsible for time-sensitive submissions that expire before publication. Items sent for the next edition of Yeshiva University Review will be included as received and as space permits. Photographs are encouraged.

Rabbi James I. Gordon YH,’44Y,R was cited by the Jerusalem Post for having completed three cycles of SHAS, each in a different language—Yiddish while he was spiritual leader in Oak Park, MI; English with an RCA-sponsored group in Jerusalem after making aliyah; and Hebrew at Hazvi Yisrael, the Jerusalem synagogue where he maintains membership. Rabbi Gedalia Dov Schwartz ’46Y,R received the Rabbi Abraham Isaac HaKohen Kook Award at the 90th Anniversary Dinner of Religious Zionists of America. He has been chairman of the Beth Din (Rabbinical Court) of America of the Rabbinical Council of America (RCA) since 1991, and also heads the Rabbinical Court of the Chicago Rabbinical Council. Prior, Rabbi Schwartz served for nearly two decades as spiritual leader of Young Israel of Boro Park and has held pulpits in Providence, RI, Englishtown, NJ, and Philadelphia. He is editor of the RCA’s journal HaDarom. Rabbi Aaron Ben-Zion Shurin ’40Y,R, SCW instructor of Judaic studies, 1949–56 and 1966–2001, was honored in Nov. by The Forward for his 60 years as a columnist for the Yiddishlanguage newspaper.

The event, held in March 2005 at The Plaza in NYC, was in support of the Rabbi Arthur Schneier Center for International Affairs at YU. Rabbi Schneier, a longtime advocate for religious freedom and human rights, spearheaded with President Richard Joel creation of the center as a forum for discussion of important international issues—war and peace, security and terrorism, human rights, global health, intellectual property rights, and the environment. Also, Rabbi Schneier was appointed chairman of the editorial board of Midstream. Anne (Rosenbaum) Senter YH,’58S is chairperson of the Township of Teaneck (NJ) Zoning Board of Adjustment. She has been a board member for 15 years.
I Personal News

Mazal tov to Rabbi Saul Aranov ’59Y,R,B on the birth of a granddaughter, Hadas Batya, to children Shalhevet and Aryeh Heymann. Shoshana YH’59 and Moshe Berlin YH,’58Y, of Jerusalem, have 27 grandchildren. Their eldest, Mordechai, was inducted into the elite Duvdevani commando unit this past erev Purim. Israel Bick ’ 59Y announces the marriage of his son, Mayer Benjamin, to Gail Anita Katz. Mazal tov to Rivka Kahn ’54TIW and Rabbi Pinchas (Paul) Kahn YH,’53Y,R,F, of Jerusalem, on the birth of a great-granddaughter. Sol Steinmetz ’52Y,R and wife Tzipora celebrated the bar mitzvah of grandson Natanel in Israel.

Dr. Samuel Kay ‘58Y is among 26 Holocaust survivors who were honored at the 39th annual dinner of Cong. Ahawas Achim Bnai Jacob and David, West Orange, NJ. A pediatrician, he attributes his choice of profession to his experiences during the war: “So many children died in the Holocaust and I don’t want to see more children hurt. It made me more caring,” he says. Dr. Kay was four years old when the war broke out and his father disappeared. He and his mother, 22 years old at the time, survived by hiding in Poland’s forests. After liberation, they eventually immigrated to the US and settled in Newark. Today there are 30 members of his immediate family— his revenge, he says, against the Nazis.

’50s
I Professional News

Herb Adelman YH’59 was awarded the Frank Capra Achievement Award from the Directors Guild of America at its annual awards dinner in Jan. ’05. Yeshiva University honored Rabbi Arthur Schneier ’51Y,R on his 75th birthday, 50th year as rabbi, and “for his leadership in advancing peace, religious freedom, and tolerance.”

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announce the birth of granddaughter Roni Rnana Schler. Sarah (Singer) Eiferman YH’62 and husband Zecharia announce the birth of a grandson. Cantor Sherwood Goffin ’63Y,CTI, BSJM outreach coordinator, and wife Batya announce the birth of granddaughter Ayala Yehudit to children Elly and Chavi Goffin and the birth of Asher Yosef to children Rabbi Uri and Yael Goffin. Phyllis (Curchack) Kornspan ’69S, of Petach Tikvah, Israel, celebrated the birth of a granddaughter to children Yonatan and Shlomit of Shvut Rachel. Mazal tov to Dr. Joel Luber ’68Y on his marriage to Sarah Feld of Bet-El, Israel. Batya (Beth Spiegelman) ’71S and Yisrael Medad (Winkelman) ’69Y, of Shiloh, Israel, announce the birth of their second granddaughter to their children Tzruya and Oren Luzon of Ofra. Mindy (Ganz) ’74S,B and David Ribner ’68Y,B,R,W, of Jerusalem, announce the birth of a grandson. Charlene Rosenberg YH’68 and Rabbi Bernhard Rosenberg ’69Y,F,R,AG announce the birth of grandchild Akiva Yosef to their children Joshua and Ilana Merl.

Jerome A. Chanes YH,’64Y,W, adjunct professor at SCW, WSSW, AGS, and RIETS, delivered a Library of Congress Lecture in Dec., in conjunction with the Library’s exhibition, “Haven and Home,” commemorating 350 years of Jews in America. He spoke on “Antisemitism in America, Past and Present: Realities and Myths.” He is thought to be the first YU undergraduate alumnus to lecture as part of the prestigious series. Also, his book, Antisemitism: A Reference Handbook, was published in Dec. by ABC-CLIO and is the first-ever comprehensive reference work on anti-Semitism (see Bookshelf). Pinhas Friedenberg ’67Y, Hudson County (NJ) Community College registrar, spoke on student privacy rights at the annual meeting of the NY State Organization of Bursars and Business Administrators. He spoke on ID theft and record fraud at the fall meeting of the NJ-NY Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers and at the annual meeting of the Middle States Association of Registrars and Officers of Admission (MSACROA), where he also spoke on successfully implementing an imaging system. At the MSACROA meeting, he was elected vice president for professional development. Dr. Stephen Kleinman ’64Y has practiced podiatric medicine for 28 years and was named Podiatrist of the Year. Recently, he earned a JD degree from Hofstra University School of Law and was awarded three certificates of completion—Constitutional, taxation, and matrimonial law.
I Personal News

Israel Honors Alvin Schiff
In February, the Office of the President of Israel, in cosponsorship with the Jewish Agency of Israel, awarded Dr. Alvin Schiff ’47Y,F that country’s highest civilian honor, the Israel President’s Prize. Dr. Schiff, Irving I. Stone Distinguished Professor of Jewish Education at AGS, traveled to Jerusalem to receive the award from President Moshe Katsav. It recognizes his contributions to Jewish education during his 58-year career as a Jewish educator. Dr. Schiff was nominated for the prize by four Americans—including author and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Elie Wiesel and RIETS board chair Julius Berman ’56Y,R—and two Israelis. His career includes his founding in 1959 of YU’s Department of Graduate Jewish Education (now AGS), which he directed for 11 years, and his tenure as executive vice president of the Board of Jewish Education of Greater New York (BJE), 1970–91, a moribund organization he turned into a leading worldwide Jewish educational agency. He also founded a number of initiatives that have become venerable institutions in Jewish life in the US and Israel, including the Salute to Israel Parade in New York, the Hidon Ha-Tanakh (Bible Contest) in the US, March of the Living, and National Commission of Torah Education (now Association of Modern Orthodox Day Schools). In 1958, he established the Tochnit Yod Gimmel Post High School Program in Israel, which set a precedent: today some 6,000 students spend the year between high school and college studying at Israeli yeshivot. In addition, Dr. Schiff authored 15 books and more than 300 articles and research reports, and served as editor of the Journal of Jewish Education, 1967–97. Also, he has been visiting professor or lecturer at institutions including Harvard and New York University. Dr. Schiff began his career at YU as an instructor of Hebrew studies at Talmudical Academy (today YUHS) and of education at Teachers’ Institute, 1947–59. In 1977 YU awarded him an honorary degree.

’70s
I Professional News

Pnina (Pam) Forman Aronson ’68S and husband Ya’akov (Jerrold), YUHS faculty member 1964–68, of Rehovot, Israel, celebrated the births of their 19th and 20th grandchildren to their daughters Bracha and Tehilla. Miriam (Fuchs) YH’61 and Jerry Bass YH,’64Y announce the birth of a grandson. Toni (Feltscher) ’70S and Phil Chernofsky YH,’69Y, of Jerusalem,

Rabbi Raymond Harari ’76Y,B,R was named Head of School at Yeshivah of Flatbush Joel Braverman High School, Brooklyn. He will serve as its chief educational officer, effective July 2005. Rabbi Harari is a graduate of the Braverman High School. He has taught there since 1980 and also is spiritual leader of Cong. Kol Israel. Abraham J. Katz ’75Y, an attorney, started an e-mail-based weekly newsletter on understanding tefillah. He has combined the first 46 issues, representing an introduction to prayer and to birchot hashachar, into an ebook, available free of charge on CD or by e-mail attachment. The book and a sample newsletter can be obtained by contacting beureihatefila@ yahoo.com.

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Ted Mirvis YH,’73Y and wife Ruth were honored by UJA-Federation of NY at its 2005 Riverdale Renaissance Reception in March.

Mignone (Eckstein) YH’72 and Ezra Rosenfeld ’77B celebrated the birth of a granddaughter, born to their daughter Orit Rosenfelt Karine. Mazal tov to Leah (Elaine Becker) ’72S and Dr. Dahvid Wolf YH,’72Y, of Metar, Israel, on the birth of a grandson.

Rabbi Azriel (Jeremy) Rosner ’95Y,AG,R is rosh midrasha of the Tiferet Center for Advanced Torah Studies for Women, a new Israel program for American post high-school young women slated to open in Sept. ’05 in Ramat Beit Shemesh. He expects to begin with 49 students from the US, Canada, and England, and he is already looking for a new building to accommodate up to 120 students. Alumna Leba (Stark) Schneider ’97S and a BRGS master’s program student, serves as director of student affairs. For information about Tiferet, visit www.tiferetcenter.com.
Aviva (Anna Borvick) ’82S and Joseph Offenbacher YH,’79Y were guests of honor at the second annual dinner of Cong. Shaare Tefillah of Teaneck, NJ, which they founded. Nava Rephun YH,’76W presented marriage workshops at the Sephardic Bikur Holim in Brooklyn, NY; Cong. Shomrei Emunah in Englewood, NJ; and Bayit Vegan, Jerusalem. Nava is a licensed clinical social worker and a certified Imago Relationship Therapist who works with couples and individuals in her NYC private practice. She conducts workshops in the US and Israel. Joyce (Gabel) YH’76 and Daniel Straus YH’74 were honored last November by AMIT in recognition of their support and leadership.
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’80s
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Dr. Allan Barsky ’88W is professor of social work at Florida Atlantic University in Ft. Lauderdale, where he teaches professional ethics, conflict resolution, and addictions. He has recently published two textbooks, Alcohol, Other Drugs, and Addictions, and Social Work Education: A Student’s Manual. Marcia (Salmansohn) Bronstein ’82W was appointed vice president of development for the JCCs of Greater Philadelphia. Formerly, she was vice president of institutional advancement at Martins Run, a life care community in Media, PA. Rabbi Daniel Cohen ’89Y,AG,R was named spiritual leader of Cong. Agudath Sholom in Stamford, CT. Formerly he was rabbi at Beth Midrash Hagadol-Beth Joseph in Denver, CO. He succeeds Rabbi Mark Dratch ’79Y,R,F, who stepped down after eight years to launch JSAFE, the Jewish Institute Supporting an Abuse-Free Environment. Mark Lehrman ’86Y,B is the new director of YU’s S. Daniel Abraham Israel Program. Formerly assistant director of admissions heading up YU’s recruitment efforts in Israel, he works closely with Howard Weisband, President Richard M. Joel’s senior adviser on Israeli affairs, to develop additional services and programming for YU’s students in Israel. Dr. Ellen (Weinberg) Mausner ’81A started an online dating service, “DocDates” (www.DocDates.com) for singles with advanced degrees. Applicants must provide proof of a degree higher than the baccalaureate. Rabbi Nahum J. Spirn ’87Y,B,R and wife Rebecca celebrated the birth of Yeruchmiel Nissim. Mazal tov also to

ALUMNUS IS NEW OU PRESIDENT
Stephen J. Savitsky YH,’67Y, of Hewlett, Long Island, was installed as the Orthodox Union’s president at its Biennial National Convention in Jerusalem in Nov ’04. Mr. Savitsky has been chairman of the board since the last OU Convention, in Dec. ’02. He succeeds Harvey Blitz, who has served as OU president since 2001. Actively involved with the OU for more than 15 years, in addition to being chairman of the board, he has served as dinner chairman, chairman of several missions to Israel, and chairman of the Community and Synagogue Services Commission. He also headed the Human Resources Commission and has been a member of the OU Executive team for over a decade. Mr. Savitsky has held many additional leadership positions in the Jewish community, including president of the Vaad Hakashrus of the Five Towns and Far Rockaway; founder and president of the Kew Gardens Hills eruv; president of Cong. Ansche Chesed in Hewlett; and board chairman of Mesivta Ohr Torah in Forest Hills, NY. He is a member of the International Board of Governors of the Mesorah Heritage Foundation. Stephen has also represented the OU as a scholar-in-residence at numerous synagogues across the US. Mr. Savitsky is president and board chairman at ATC Health Care Services, a nationwide provider of temporary medical staffing. He also founded and served as CEO and board chairman at Tender Loving Care–Staff Builders, one of the nation’s largest providers of home health care services. He received an MBA from Bernard Baruch Graduate School of Business, CUNY, with a specialization in finance and marketing. The new OU president is married to Genie (Regina Tennenbaum) YH,’68S. They have four children: Julie YH,’89S (married to Shabsi Schreier YH,’85Y), Avi ’93Y (married to Cheryl Stein), Penina YH,’97 (married to Zvi Wiener), and Estie (married to Yehuda Berman). The Savitskys have 12 grandchildren.

Rabbi Elisha Citroen ’71Y and wife Barbara, of Metar, Israel, celebrated the birth of a grandson, Harel Natan. Mazal tov to Joan Gail Schecter Dulitz ’70S and husband Aaron on the marriage of sons Levi to Jessica Gerson of Queens, NY, and Akiva to Sharon Arfa, of Los Angeles. Robin (Klein) ’79S and Simon Kahn ’77Y announce the birth of second daughter Bat Shachar. Mazal tov to Bernie Kastner ’78Y and wife Iva, and to Rabbi Anshel Rosby ’68Y and wife Sarah, on the birth of a grandson, Natan Aharon. Mazal tov to Rabbi Yerachmiel Roness ’78W and wife Dina on the birth of a grandson.

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grandparents Rabbi Charles Spirn ’47Y,R and wife Dr. Regina.
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’90s
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Pam (Schlanger) YH,’94S and Dov Bluth ’88Y celebrated the birth of triplets, Yisrael Aryeh, Baruch, and Dovid. Mazal tov to Dr. Joshua Brickman YH,’81Y and wife Sharon on the bat mitzvah of daughter Nicole Gabrielle, in Israel. Mazal tov also to grandparents Rabbi Seymour Brickman ’53Y,R and wife Devora. Dr. Rose (Russo) ’95W and Adam Gleicher ’86Y, YU investment accounting manager, announce the birth of son Max Joseph. Rochelle (Baum) ’79TIW and Rabbi Stanley Gordon ’80R celebrated the bar mitzvah of son Hillel. Mazal tov also to grandparents Rabbi James I. Gordon ’44Y,R and wife Malka, and Rabbi Eli H. Baum ’54R and wife Margo. Ronit (Ben-Ami) ’91S and Adam Greenblum ’88Y, of Alon Shevut, Israel, announce the birth of fifth child Yitzchak. Mazal tov to Rabbi Nathaniel Helfgot YH,’85Y,AG,R and Rachel Brenner, a 2003 graduate of the YU Graduate Program for Women in Advanced Talmudic Studies, on the birth of third child Nehemia Devir. Mazal tov also to grandmother Dr. Rosa Perla Resnick Helfgot ’76W. Daniel Katsman ’81Y,R,B and wife Hannah, of Petach Tikva, Israel, celebrated the bar mitzvah of son Hayim Yeshurun. Mazal tov also to grandparents Rabbi Phillip Katsman ’51Y,R, Dr. Ben Zion Wacholder ’51Y,R, and Elizabeth Krukowsky. Batia Lampert-Clark ’89S and husband Vincent, of Savannah, GA, announce the birth of fifth child Jaiden Aaqil. Judy (Klipper) ’86S and Reuven Rosenstark ’88Y,AG,R celebrated the bar mitzvah of third son Yechezkel Shlomo. Richard Saffern ’89SB and wife Stefanie announce the birth of their first sabra, Netanel Yisrael.

Adam J. Berner ’90SB,B,C,R, CSL adjunct professor teaching mediation, was named president of the Family and Divorce Mediation Council of Greater New York. This nonprofit organization is dedicated to developing family mediation in and around NYC. David Borowich ’91Y is one of four US winners of the inaugural 2004 Herzl Award, presented by the Department for Zionist Activities of the World Zionist Organization for exceptional volunteer efforts on behalf of Israel and the Zionist cause. David was cited for his activist days at YU when, in 1991, he helped organize Operation Torah Shield, which brought 400 YU students to Israel during the Persian Gulf War. Also, the award acknowledged his creating the J2J Network, which links young Jewish business people and strengthens ties to Israel, and Dor Hadash, which links young Israelis and American Jews. Tsipi (Goffen) YH,’92W and Dr. Jerry Hawk ’90Y, an orthodontic surgeon, live in Silver Spring, MD, with their four children. He has been working at Bethesda Naval Hospital in Washington, DC. Rabbi Benjamin G. Kelsen ’94Y,C,R, an attorney, was scholar in residence during Hanukkah in the GiffnockNewlands Synagogue in Glasgow, Scotland. Also, he was guest rabbi at the Yorkville Synagogue, where he spoke on the halakhic response to the death of one’s enemies. Shea Z. Lerner ’99W is director of development, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine/New York Institute of Technology, the second largest medical school in the US. He resides in Plainview, NY, with wife Pamela and son Noah Jacob. Yosef Levine YH,’99SB and wife Chaya Rivka were honored with the Young Leadership Award at the Anshei Lubavitch Outreach Center inaugural dinner, in April. Moshe Milevsky ’90Y, of Toronto, won the annual My One and Only stockpicking contest sponsored by The Globe and Mail three years in a row. A

finance professor at York University and author of financial books, he was featured in the lead article of a recent issue of Lifestyles magazine.
I Personal News

Ezra (and Deborah Shapiro) Feuer ’70Y; and Harriet Feuer. Aryeh (Lawrence) Sanders ’99Y announces his marriage to Dr. Dvora Shmulewitz. Mazal tov also to parents Gail (Aranoff) Sanders ’70S and husband Chaim. Nava (Bardash) ’94S and Avie Schreiber ’95Y announce the birth of a son, Tzvi Nachum. Esti (Rosen) ’97S and Adam Snukal ’97Y celebrated the birth of son Yaakov Moshe. Adam is executive vice president and general counsel at Spiral Solution, LTD., an international advertising agency and developer of mobile technology based in Israel.

Miriam (Gaisin) ’93S and Rabbi Elchanan Adler ’95AG, rosh yeshiva at MYP/RIETS, announce the birth of a son, Yaakov Meir. Mazal tov to Aliza Berger-Cooper ’92B and husband Dov, of Jerusalem, on the birth of their bekhor, Dvir Barnea. Rivka (Rosenzweig) ’96S and Dr. Scot Chudnoff ’96Y,A announce the birth of third child Chananel Shimon. Mazal tov also to grandparents Dr. Peter Rosenzweig ’71Y and wife Bobbie, and Mark and Shirley Chudnoff. Cindy (Wagner) Haynes ’92S and husband Joshua announce the birth of daughter Jessica Aliza (Leora Aliza). Laurie (Katzman) YH,’95S,C and Natan Hecht YH,’95Y,C announce the birth of daughter Rena Rachel in June ’04. Mazal tov to Melissa (Gabel) ’94S and Jay Keehn YH’90 on the birth of fourth child Atara Olivia. Also, Jay received a PhD in education leadership and counseling from Barry University, FL. The family lives in Boca Raton. Mazal tov to Rabbi Uriel Lubetski YH,’96Y,B, acting assistant principal last year at YUHS, on his marriage to Shani Brukner. Mazal tov also to parents Prof. Edith Lubetski ’68B, head librarian at SCW’s Hedi Steinberg Library, and husband Dr. Meir; and Harry Brukner YH’72 and wife Linda. Heshy Neuman YH,’99SB and wife Liba celebrated the birth of daughter Malka Raizel. Mazal tov also to grandparents Ann (Hook) YH’62 and Rabbi Gary Pollack YH,’64Y,R,F. Dr. Donald L. Paine ’97W announces his marriage to Deborah E. Goodwin, an educator in Gibraltar. He is a certified clinical marriage and family therapist with a private practice (www.parakalein.org). Dr. Zippora (Feuer) Razin ’95S and husband Ely celebrated the birth of second child Yehuda Simcha Leib. Mazal tov also to grandparents Stuart Razin ’63Y,I,F, Canadian Friends of YU national director, and wife Marsha; Dr.

Serena (Iglicki) YH’90, an attorney, and Aaron J. Solomon ’97SB celebrated the birth of triplets in 2004. Yehuda Wolfe, Haddassah Gittel, and Arianna Bella were also welcomed by sister Shoshana Dafna. Aaron is vice president of Goldman Sachs in fixed income technology. Tzippy (Metzger) ’02S and Mark Staum ’99Y,W celebrated the birth of second child Eli. David Swidler ’97Y and wife Naomi announce the birth of a son, Eliezer Zvi. Mazal tov also to grandparents Simon Swidler YH’63 and wife Sonja. Mazal tov to Rachel Teitelbaum ’99A and husband Gil on the bar mitzvah of son Eli. Gil Yoshor ’88Y and wife Hdar celebrated the birth of a daughter, Adira. Faige (Zavin) ’95S and Michael Trapunsky ’94SB celebrated the birth of twin boys, Eli and Yehuda. Benjamin Waltuch YH,’92SB and wife Debbie announce the birth of second daughter Adira Michal. Mazal tov also to grandparents Rabbi Marvin Waltuch ’66Y,R and wife Rosalie.

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Remembering Coach Wettstein 1922–2004
For those who knew him, Hyman Wettstein was a renaissance man. He began coaching the MTA (YUHS-Boys) basketball team in 1938. From 1939 to 1941 he also coached the YU Mighty Mites team, compiling a 20–18 record. In 1941, Coach Wettstein joined the US Navy and worked with men who became disabled in battle. After the war, he was appointed chief of corrective therapy at the Bronx VA Hospital, and directed and produced “Courage Takes the Wheel,” a film about a paraplegic Israeli war vet who Coach taught to drive. Both the US Veterans Administration and the Israeli Minister of Defense presented Coach with a special award for his efforts. In 1945, he returned to YUHSB, leading its hoopsters for the next 28 years and cofounding the Metropolitan Jewish High School League. From 1951 to 1954, Coach’s teams won 60 games and lost just 5, capturing three consecutive championships and three playoff titles. In 1953 and 1954, YUHSB posted a record of 19 –1, which included victories of 106–19 (the school’s first 100-point game) and 103–37. The team’s lone loss was a 70–69 heartbreaker. Coach Wettstein compiled a lifetime record at YUHSB of 413 –170. Hy Wettstein passed away Dec. 6, 2004 in Port Washington, NY, at the age of 92. He is survived by sons Howard ‘65YC and Joel, daughter Ellen Sokol, eight grandchildren, and two great-grandchildren.

Benji Zimmerman YH’96 and wife Alisa announce the birth of son Yisroel Dov. Mazal tov also to grandparents Sherry Zimmerman ’74S and husband Saul, and Tova Rhein YH’67 and Danny Rhein ’70Y,R. Zippy (Ellenbogen) Zwiebel ’91SB,C and husband Tomi announce the birth of third child Lea Talia Sara, born in 2004.

Allan Friedman YH,’68Y, of Hashmonaim, Israel, on the loss of his mother, Sylvia. Paula (Goldstein) From ’71S SCAA past president, on the loss of her father, Jacob. Rabbi Ira YH,’69Y,R,B, and Abba Kronenberg YH’72, and Evelyn Heller on the loss of their mother, Gertrude. Dr. Abraham M. Mann ’59Y,B,R, director of development for RIETS; Dr. Jonah Mann YH,’54Y,R,BS, and Esther Snyder ’65S on the loss of their father, Rabbi Jacob Mann. With his late wife, Isabelle, Rabbi Mann established scholarships at YC and SCW and was a Guardian of YU. Menno and Helen Ratzker, YU Guardians, on the loss of his mother, Paula. Dr. Howard, YH,’66Y, Dr. Stephen ’63Y,A, and Dr. Nathan YH,’71Y,A Rothman on the loss of their mother, Anita; and to Jerry Rothman on the loss of his wife. Michael and Fiona Scharf, YU Benefactors, on the loss of his mother, Blanche. Rabbi Label Sharfman ’87B on the loss of his father, Rabbi Zalman (Solomon). Larry ’71Y, Rabbi Joshua ’00Y Strulowitz and Sari Kahn ’02S on the loss of their mother and grandmother, Gertrude. Shevi (Werner) Yudin YH,’64TIW and Judi (Werner) Goldberg YH’64 on the loss of their mother, Sarah. Rabbi Dov Zakheim ’70Y,R on the loss of his father, Rabbi Jacob.

’00s
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Mazal tov to Rena (Rosenzweig) ’02S and Ahron Glazer ’04Y on the birth of a daughter, Ariana Yakira. Mazal tov also to grandparents Dr. Peter Rosenzweig ’71Y and wife Bobbie, and Jeffrey and June Glazer, senior writer/editor in YU’s Communications and Public affairs department. Raizy Gorfinkel ’03S announces her marriage to Aryeh Yanofsky. Mazal tov also to parents Phyllis (Zimilover) ’78TIW and Paul Gorfinkel ’75Y. Mazal tov to Anne (Mogilevich) ’01C and Alexander Lumelsky ’01C on the birth of son Samuel Michael.

CONDOLENCES
Rabbi Saul Aranov ’59Y,R,B on the loss of his father, Louis. Dr. Karen (Kermaier) Bacon ’64S, The Dr. Monique C. Katz Dean, SCW, Dr. Alan ’64Y, and Bruce YH’71 Kermaier on the loss of their mother, Esther. Roz (Shelkowitz) Berlin YH’59 on the loss of her brother, Bennett. Steven Billauer ’72Y, Linda Derovan ’72S and Barbara Price on the loss of their father, Stanley. Paul Brusiloff, CSL board member, on the loss of his father, Eugene. Rabbi Jacob Hoenig ’70Y,R and Fredda Finkelstein YH,’68TIW on the loss of their brother, Hershy. He was the son of the late Prof. Sidney B. Hoenig YH,’31R, former BRGS dean. Ed Fox ’75Y,CTI, deputy to YU president, on the loss of his father, Stanley.

A, AECOM Albert Einstein College of Medicine • AG Azrieli Graduate School of Jewish Education and Administration • BG, BGSS Belfer Institute for Advanced Biomedical Sciences • B, BRGS Bernard Revel Graduate School of Jewish Studies • BSJM Philip and Sarah Belz School of Jewish Music • CTI Cantorial Training Institute • C, CSL Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law • F, FGS Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology • I, IBC Isaac Breuer College of Hebraic Studies • J, JSS James Striar School of General Jewish Studies • MSDCS Max Stern Division of Communal Services • Y, MYP Yeshiva Program/Mazer School of Talmudic Studies • SBMP Irving I. Stone Beit Midrash Program • R, RIETS Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary • S, SCW Stern College for Women • SG Sue Golding Graduate Division of Medical Sciences • SB, SSSB Sy Syms School of Business • T, TI Teachers Institute • T, TIW Teachers Institute for Women • W, WSSW Wurzweiler School of Social Work • Y, YC Yeshiva College • YH, YUHS Yeshiva University High Schools (MSTA The Marsha Stern Talmudical Academy) (SWHSG Samuel H. Wang Yeshiva University High School for Girls)

WE MOURN
Lisa (Goldenberg) Altman YH,’93C, in Oct. ’04. Condolences to her husband, Michael, her parents, Phillip Goldenberg ’64Y and his wife Idella, brother David ’96Y, and sister Debra. Rabbi Henry Hanoch Book YH,’60Y, R,W, in March ’05. Condolences to his wife, Esta (Weinreb) YH,’65TIW; children Chaim YH,’87Y, Mordechai ’92Y,C, Dr. Samuel (Ephraim) YH,’93Y, Yitzchak and Miriam Maron; siblings Dr. Joseph YH,’56Y,A, and Norma Bruckner YH’63.

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Rabbi Isaac Ciechonowicz ’43Y,R, in Jerusalem. Harold Feld, in Feb. ’05. He was a YU Guardian with his wife, Isabel. Together they established the Gerald Feld Memorial Fund in memory of their son. Condolences to his daughter, Stephanie, and grandson Ben Harris. Dr. Charles W. Frank, AECOM professor of medicine, in Nov. ’04. Among the earliest Einstein faculty members, he set up a cardiac catheterization laboratory there and became one of the preeminent teachers of clinical cardiology and cardiovascular physiology. Condolences to the entire family. Rabbi Morris S. Friedman YH,’44I, in Feb. ’05. He was rabbi emeritus of Temple Hillel in North Woodmere, NY, and past president of the NY Board of Rabbis. Condolences to his wife, Adelaide, and to the entire family. Rabbi Moshe Gershinsky YH,’44Y, in March ’05. Condolences to his wife, Devorah ’73F, and children Ahituv YH,’75Y,W, Shoshana Solow YH’67, Shulamith Fass YH,’66TIW, and Ziva Shapiro ’83S. Dr. Morton Gordon ’47R,B, in March ’05. He served for several decades as spiritual leader of Temple Torah of Little Neck, NY. Condolences to his wife, Anna, and children Jonathan and Sandra. Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe ’39TI,’43Y, in Aug. ’04. He was senior rabbi of Temple Beth El in Hollywood, FL, 1958–91, and rabbi of Temple Shaarei Shalom in Boynton Beach, FL, 1991–99. An author and lecturer, he was associate professor of religion at Barry University and a lecturer in Jewish history at Miami–Dade Junior College. He held the Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffe Chair in Jewish Studies at BarIlan University. Condolences to his wife, Edythe, and children Michele Katz ’86W, Arvin, and Joshua. Rabbi Michael Katz YH,’45Y,B, RIETS rosh yeshiva for 59 years, in Feb. ’05. He was the first rosh yeshiva appointed to the Bible faculty at YC. Also, he was spiritual leader of Cong. Petach Tikvah, Bronx, NY, for 20 years. Condolences to his wife, Rebbetzin Hinda, children Zahava Jeff YH,’70S and Yitzchak Katz, grandchildren, and great grandchildren.

Max Phillip Milians in Feb. ’05. He and his wife, Ruth, established a scholarship fund and provided generous support at RIETS. Condolences to her, and to his siblings, Shep Milians, Ida Goldstein, and Muriel Siegel. Aaron Rosenbaum ’34Y, in March ’05. A businessman and NJ Jewish communal leader, the Yeshiva of North Jersey was renamed in his honor last Jan. Condolences to his wife, Rosalind; children Chana Senter ’58S,F, Rabbi Yitzchak ’60Y,R,B, Esther Scharf ’70S, and Yehuda ’75Y,B,R; and brother Cantor Jacob H. Rosenbaum, a RIETS Board of Trustees member. Marcus Rosenberg, in Feb. ’05. A philanthropist and leader of the Jewish community in Dallas, TX, he was a YU Guardian with his wife, Ann. They established the Marcus and Ann Rosenberg Scholarship Fund. Condolences to Ann; to his children Helen Waks; Steven; Sheri P. Rosenberg, CSL clinical professor of law; and Lizzy Greif; to Randy Pulitzer, widower of Margot Rosenberg; to his grandchildren; and to siblings Emanuel Rohan, David Rosenberg, and Erica Sigal. Jerome Rosenblum ’41Y, in Feb. ’05. Condolences to his wife, Sylvia, and to his children Nina Cohen ’67S,W, Jay ’70Y,A, Neil ’73Y, Estee Shor ’76S, and Aviva Romras ’84S. Pauline Shapiro, in Feb. ’05. With her husband, the late Louis Shapiro, she was a YU Guardian. Among their contributions were the establishment of a large Reading Room in the Mendel Gottesman Library, scholarship funds, and sponsorship of YC publications and of the annual Mishnayos Bekiyus Competition at YUHS. Condolences to her children, Martin, Harvey, and Sheila Rosler. Rabbi Herbert Witkin YH’51,R. Condolences to his wife, Pearl; children Joshua YH,’76Y,C, Aviva Akerib ’91S, Haskel, Marilyn, Mordecai, and Rachel; and to brother Rabbi Jerry Witkin ’61R. Diana Zborowski, in Dec. ’04. She and husband Eli, both Polish Holocaust survivors, established the Eli and Diana Zborowski Professorial Chair in Interdisciplinary Holocaust Studies, the first academic chair in that field in the US.

Judah S. Harris ’87Y, a photojournalist and fine-art photographer, debuted his new Web site, www. judahsharris.com. He invites fellow alumni and friends to visit it and view his work.

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The Gift That Matters
Honoring the memory of loved ones
hneidman nd Ida Sc kie, Lou, a Jac

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t wasn’t long after the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917. The Russian Communists prohibited males over age 13 from leaving the country, so Lou Schneidman escaped under a load of hay in a horse-drawn cart. When he got to America, the handsome, 6'2" Lou espied the diminutive Ida Rappaport and eventually married her, much to the chagrin of the taller girls, says their daughter, Toby McErlean . Lou and Ida dedicated their lives to hard work and believed in education. Toby and her brother David established the Schneidman Undergraduate Student Scholars Program at Yeshiva University in 2005 to honor the memory of Lou and Ida, and also their late brother, Jackie. Lou passed away in 1962 and Ida died in 2004. YU Review spoke with Toby recently about the Scholars Program.

father was simply a very giving and gentle man in all facets of his life.
YUR: A key to the Scholars Program is that the students be in need of financial help. It sounds like helping children was one of your mother’s priorities. TM: Both my parents felt strongly that assistance should go to children whose parents could not afford the cost of a good education.

like to say about Jackie is that he had a talent for living. By that I mean he loved life so much. He had plans to move to Colorado, but decided to spend one last year in New York and had a heart attack and died on the streets of city when he was only 39.
YUR: Had your mother or father ever expressed an interest in endowing an educational scholarship? Why did you and David establish one at YU? TM: Oh, this would surpass their wildest dreams. My father felt very strongly about Jewish education. He wanted kids to learn about Jewish life and Jewish law and the Hebrew language. He played an active role in Shaaray Tefila, his synagogue in Far Rockaway, where he was very much influenced by the wonderful Rabbi Emanuel Rackman [former YU provost]. To the amazement of Hebrew teachers, my father spent a good deal of time visiting their classrooms, encouraging them in every possible way. After my father died, my mother established a scholarship in his name at Shaaray Tefila. As for choosing YU, the main reason was its tie to Judaism. Jewishness was so important to my parents and YU was like a shining star to them. Anyone who went to YU had reached beyond the pale. Tears come to my eyes when I think of how humbled but proud they would be to have a scholarship at YU to honor their names.

YUR: How were your parents involved in the community? What type of work did they do? TM: My mom was a Red Cross volunteer during World War Two. She was very warm. Very vivacious. Very kind. In later years, she volunteered at hospitals in Pensacola [Florida] and Far Rockaway [New York]. She did whatever was asked, from carrying bedpans to clerical work. She also taught English-as-a-SecondLanguage at Pensacola Junior College. And she sponsored poor children from abroad and stayed in contact with many of them for years. She’d send money and gifts and cards. My

“ Jewishness was so important to my parents and YU was like a shining star to them.”
Your parents are the primary inspiration behind the Schneidman scholarships. But your deceased brother is also honored through them. Tell us about him. TM: My brother’s name was Charles Jacob, but we called him Jackie. When he was in the US Air Force, they called him Charlie. What I
YUR:

FOR INFORMATION ABOUT ESTABLISHING A SCHOLARSHIP OR ENDOWMENT AT YESHIVA UNIVERSITY TO HONOR A LOVED ONE, PLEASE CONTACT HENRY T. RUBIN, JD, DIRECTOR OF PLANNED GIVING, TOLL FREE AT 877-983-3857 OR 212-960-0870; FAX TO 212-960-0869; E-MAIL HRUBIN@YU.EDU

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