You are on page 1of 4

Ima Student

SPC 1301 Persuasive Speech


December 14, 2010

THESIS STATEMENT: (written here, but that is not part of the speech outline)

Specific Purpose: To convince my listeners...(complete the thought)

Type of Proposition: (state this, according to info from class notes and text)

Organization Pattern: (state which of the four your outline and speech follows)

INTRODUCTION (what goes where varies by speech and speaker’s goals)

I. Single Sentence Thesis Statement

II. Clear Statement of Specific Purpose

III. Statement designed to catch attention

A. Subordinate Point 1 as needed (citation as needed)

B. Subordinate Point 2 as needed

IV. Statement that is an overview of speech

TRANSITION STATEMENT: Then write the sentence that acts as a transition


into the body here.

BODY

I. Main Point 1 written here as a sentence

A. Subordinate point to Main Point 1 written as a sentence here (Adams,


2009).

B. Subordinate point 2 to Main Point 1 written as a sentence here


(Johnson, 2008). (Note that these names are last names of
authors of sources the information refers to—see the References
List.)

C. Subordinate point 3 to Main Point 1 written as a sentence here


(Baker, 2010).
TRANSITION STATEMENT: Then write the sentence that acts as a
transition / connective from Main Point 1 to Main Point 2 here.

II. Main Point 2 written here as a sentence

A. Subordinate point to Main Point 2 written as a sentence here (Smith,


2007).

1. Second level subordination phrase or sentence here—this would


break down Subpoint A of Main Point II further

2. For every I you have to have a II, for every A you have to have
a B, and for every 1 you have to have a 2. This is subpoint 2 that
breaks down Subordinate Point A

B. Subordinate point 2 to Main Point 2 written as a sentence here


(Adams, 2009).

C. Subordinate point 3 to Main Point 2 written as a sentence here


(Zelezny, 2008).

TRANSITION STATEMENT: Then write the sentence that acts as a


transition from Main Point 2 to Main Point 3 here.

III. Main Point 3 written here as a sentence

A. Subordinate point to Main Point 3 written as a sentence here (Smith,


2007).

B. Subordinate point 2 to Main Point 2 written as a sentence here


(Adams, 2009).

1. Second level subordination phrase or sentence here—this would


break down Subpoint A of Main Point II further

2. For every I you have to have a II, for every A you have to have
a B, and for every 1 you have to have a 2. This is subpoint 2 that
breaks down Subordinate Point A

C. Subordinate point 3 to Main Point 2 written as a sentence here


(Johnson, 2006).
1. Second level subordination phrase or sentence here—this would
break down Subpoint C of Main Point III further

2. For every I you have to have a II, for every A you have to have
a B, and for every 1 you have to have a 2. This is subpoint 2 that
breaks down Subordinate Point C

TRANSITION STATEMENT: Then write the sentence that acts as a


transition from Main Point 3 to Conclusion here.

CONCLUSION (what goes where varies by speech and speaker’s goals)

I. Restatement of Specific Purpose

II. Statements designed to drive purpose home and conclude

A. Subordinate Point 1 as needed

B. Subordinate Point 2 as needed

III. Statement that is a review of speech just presented

IV. ‘Clincher’

then at the end, a separate page that has REFERENCES centered at the top, followed by
an APA style reference list that lists all sources cited in the speech. NOTE: For the
Informative and Persuasive speech there must be a minimum of 10 references used, and
at least five of those must be from retrievable (NON-INTERNET URL) sources. A
speech that does not use sources as assigned is typically a ‘D’ speech, at best.
REFERENCES

Adams, J. Q. (2007). A speaker’s guide to where to live., in five simple steps. Journal of

Speaking, 2(4), 22-26.

Johnson, E. M. (2006). So this is the way APA looks: A beginner’s guide to use of the

stylebook. The Online Guide to Speeches. Retrieved July 12, 2008 from

http://www.someaddress.com/full/url/

Smith, T. V. (2007). My speech and how I did it. Cambridge, MA: Wadsworth.

Zelezny, R. A. (2008, April 9). Legal issues in setting up and presenting your speech.

U. S. News & World Report, 2, 14.

the reference page would start on a new pages, with References centered at the top
APA style help at: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/

STAPLE ALL LOSE PAGES TOGETHER BEFORE COMING TO CLASS—HAVE


THE OUTLINE READY TO TURN IN AT 9:00 – AND KEEP YOUR OWN
SEPARATE COPY IF NEEDED. NO OUTLINE = NO SPEECH.