A Useful Revision ploy - Passing the Buck An example of using this strategy is when students have been given

a practice exam question to tackle in class, usually one of the more complex ones that require a more extended answer.
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The students work in pairs I ask them to start to bullet point ideas, phrases and sentences they would include in the answer. They could also do it as a mind map or flow diagram, so an A3 sheet is a good idea After an appropriate time, say 5 mins., the students pass their ideas to another pair and receive one in return. Having read the ideas in front of them, they should add their own ideas to the list and edit the ones already there, so improving the sentences or adjusting their order. Repeat this process a couple of times (keep an eye on progress so you don't pass the buck a step too far) Return the sheets to their original owners who now jointly draft a completed answer. You could then apply some AfL to the process where students review other answers and suggest ways to improve them using some success criteria or mark scheme. (You could ask each pair to add something different e.g.: Pair 1 -the cause of a problem, Pair 2 - the effect it has and Pair 3 - the possible solutions.)

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This activity will help develop recall, help them recognise what is relevant to add to an answer, encourage them to structure and answer more effectively and show that with a little thought first , they can come up with more detailed answers than they first realised. For those less confident at writing, this will give them a confidence boost by working collaboratively. It will also help them recognise what an examiner is looking for in an answer. As well as exam preparation you could use these techniques in essay writing, story writing, and various design situations in ICT, ART or D&T. This activity will also help develop: Thinking, Interdependence, Group work, Speaking & Listening, Writing

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