JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 VOL. 32 • NO. 1 • $4.

00
“ V O I C E O F T H E C O N S T R U C T I O N I N D U S T R Y ”
IN THIS ISSUE:
CONCRETE
The Art of Concrete
Underway at MSU’s
Broad Museum
Creating Greener,
More Sustainable Buildings
and Infrastructure
GREEN PROJECT
OF THE YEAR
Michigan’s Most Outstanding
Sustainable Design and
Construction Projects
TOOLS
Making Life on the
Jobsite Easier with
the Latest Hand Tools
MICHIGAN
CONSTRUCTION
& DESIGN
TRADESHOW
A Sure Bet at
MotorCity Casino Hotel
Plus: Renovating and Expanding MSU’s Wharton Center for Performing Arts
CONSTRUCTION
SAFETY
Beefing Up Your
Safety Culture
Health and Safety
Hazards Working in
Dilapidated Buildings

BOOTH
215
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SHOPPING FOR GROUP HEALTH INSURANCE?
LET US PROVIDE YOUR COMPANY WITH
A COMPETITVE QUOTE!
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This program complies with the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)
also referred to as Federal Health Care Reform.
Rob Walters • CAM Administrative Services
Phone: 248.233.2114 • Fax: 248.827.2112
Email: rwalters@camads.com
The CAM Benefit Program is underwritten by
CAM BENEFIT PROGRAM
GROUP HEALTH INSURANCE
CAM BENEFIT PROGRAM
GROUP HEALTH INSURANCE
J.-/77), -¹¹O´¯-37/77) -w¯ SOLID´´O7¢C77Ow
Large medical expenses can be financially devastating. That’s why your
Association sponsors the CAM Benefit Program Group Health
Insurance for you and your employees.
By combining our responsive local claims service with
our well-known local and national PPO networks and effective cost
containment programs, we are able to help you manage your
health care costs.
4 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
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CONSTRUCTION SAFETY
26 Beefing Up Your Safety Culture
What Happens on the Jobsite
When No One is Looking
29 Greenprint for the Future
Health and Safety Hazards of Working in
Dilapidated Buildings
30 Tradeshow 2011 Show Preview
31 Tradeshow 2011 Floorplan
32 Exhibitor Booth Listings
33 Alphabetical Exhibitor Directory
42 CAM Magazine Green
Building Awards
54 2011 CAMTEC Catalog
“ V O I C E O F T H E C O N S T R U C T I O N I N D U S T R Y ”
FEATURES
10 Letter from the President
Optimism for 2011 and 2010 in Review
19 AIA Detroit Announces Honor
Award Winners
MEMBER FEATURE
22 Constructing Success
Experienced Contractor Launches John DeMattia
Construction, LLC

• •
vvv.vtcíns.com
GRIFFIN, SMALLEY & WILKERSON, INC.


vvv.gsvíns.com
V1C lNSLRANCL CRCLl
Representíng












































































































































































































6 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
CONCRETE
66 The Art of Concrete
Concrete Work in Progress
at MSU’s Broad Museum
70 Using Concrete to Create Greener,
More Sustainable Buildings and
Infrastructure
CONSTRUCTION HIGHLIGHT
72 Double Feature
Renovating and Expanding MSU’s
Wharton Center for Performing Arts
DEPARTMENTS
12 Industry News
18 Safety Tool Kit
76 Product Showcase
79 People in Construction
81 Construction Calendar
82 CAM Welcomes New Members
82 Advertisers Index
“ V O I C E O F T H E C O N S T R U C T I O N I N D U S T R Y ”
FEATURES
CONSTRUCTION TOOLS
58 Tools of the Trade
Making Life on the Jobsite Easier
with the Latest Hand Tools
62 Hilti to
the Rescue
Reducing Down Time and Costs
8 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
PUBLISHER Kevin N. Koehler
EDITOR Amanda M. Tackett
ASSOCIATE EDITORS Mary E. Kremposky
David R. Miller
PRODUCTION DIRECTOR Matthew J. Austermann
GRAPHIC DESIGN Marci L. Christian
DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Gregg A. Montowski
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Cathy A. Jones
DIRECTORS
OFFICERS
Chairman R. Andrew Martin,
FH Martin Constructors
Vice Chairman Brian D. Kiley,
Edgewood Electric, Inc.
Vice Chairman John O’Neil, Sr.,
W.J. O’Neil Company
Treasurer James C. Capo,
DeMattia Group
President Kevin N. Koehler
DIRECTORS Gregory Andrzejewski,
PPG Industries
Stephen J. Auger,
Stephen Auger + Associates Architects
M. James Brennan,
Broadcast Design & Construction, Inc.
Kevin French,
Poncraft Door Company
Frank G. Nehr, Jr.,
Davis Iron Works
Donald J. Purdie, Jr.,
Detroit Elevator Company
Kurt F. Von Koss,
Beaver Tile & Stone
Jacqueline LaDuke Walters,
LaDuke Roofing & Sheet Metal
Michigan Society of
Association Executives
2002, 2004, 2005 & 2007
Diamond Award
2003, 2006 Honorable Mention
Gallery of Fine Printing
2002 Bronze Award
MARCOM International
Creative Awards
2005 Gold Award
The Communicator
International
Print Media Competition
Overall Association Magazine
Magazine Writing
CAM Magazine (ISSN08837880) is published monthly by the Construction Association of Michigan, 43636 Woodward
Ave., P.O. Box 3204, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204 (248) 972-1000. $24.00 of annual membership dues is allocated to
a subscription to CAM Magazine. Additional subscriptions $40.00 annually. Periodical postage paid at Bloomfield Hills, MI
and additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER, SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: CAM MAGAZINE, 43636 WOODWARD AVE.,
BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI 48302-3204.
For editorial comment or more information: magazine@cam-online.com.
For reprints or to sell CAM Magazine: 248-972-1000.
Copyright © 2008 Construction Association of Michigan. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without
permission is prohibited. CAM Magazine is a registered trademark of the Construction Association of Michigan.
2006
GRAPHIC DESIGN USA
AMERICAN INHOUSE
DESIGN AWARD






































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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Founded and chartered in September of 1974,
to serve the members of the construction trades
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10 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
January 2011
Dear CAM Members:
In a year that’s been filled with economic struggle and continued unemployment, it remains a challenge for the construction
industry in Michigan to stay positive. Here at CAM, we have done our best to continue working hard to offer you, our members,
the products, services, information and opportunities you need to keep succeeding.
In 2010 we celebrated CAM’s 125th anniversary as an association. In recognition of this achievement the association
received Certificates of Tribute from several public officials including Governor Granholm, Lieutenant Governor Cherry and
several U.S. Senators and Congressmen.
2010 was a good year for our Construction Project News department. Upgrades to operating software and our network
gave users improved access speed and enhanced functionality. Four new easy-to-use computer stations with large monitors
were installed in the planroom along with FREE wireless Internet access for all members. CAM continues to be the premier
construction news organization in Michigan, now and in the future.
CAM Magazine broadened its scope of readership through online social networking. The magazine now has nearly 400
online subscribers and has received over 100,000 online hits and reads to date. CAM and CAM Magazine have 800+ followers
on Twitter and Facebook and over 700 views on YouTube and Constructube. In fact, our staffers are so well versed in social
media techniques they have been asked to instruct classes on the subject.
CAMSAFETY remained the leader in training and educating Michigan’s construction workforce. We offered 64 training
sessions, as well as 14 OSHA classes reaching over 500 workers. CAMTEC trained nearly 1,000 people in classes, seminars and
on-site sessions. Popular new classes included Lead Renovator and LEED Prep Training.
In November, we launched the CAM Construction Activity Index, in an effort to keep a pulse on the construction industry in
Michigan. We plan to track and chart the results of these surveys and present the data to the media and the CAM Membership.
Watch for our 1st quarter results.
In January 2011 CAM launched the Michigan Construction Marketplace - a one-stop online e-commerce center for
equipment dealers, suppliers, materials providers and the public. The Michigan Construction Marketplace connects those who
are looking to sell with those who are looking to buy. The site features 22 different categories of Construction Equipment and
several categories of Building Materials and Supplies, Real Estate, Vehicles, and General/Other. This is available to the public and
is not limited to the CAM Membership. Our motto is: Find It, Sell It, Buy it. Check it out online @ www.cam-online.com.
In February 2011 CAM will introduce the all-new Michigan Construction & Design Tradeshow at a new and exciting venue:
MotorCity Casino Hotel in Detroit. This one-day event will take place on Wednesday, February 2, 2011 from 10:00 am to 5:00
pm. Response has been very positive, and by the time you read this, booth space will be sold-out. The CAM 125th Annual
Meeting will be held at Sound Board inside MotorCity, along with the CAM Magazine Special Issue awards, Green Project
Awards, and something new this year: the Project of the Year Award. The event will be hosted by actor/comedian Dwayne Gill
and is definitely a Don’t Miss. Watch for your Annual Meeting invitation in the mail. Or register for the show on our website.
See you at the show and Annual Meeting.
Sincerely,
Kevin N. Koehler
President
Construction Association of Michigan
A Letter from the President
ONE INDUSTRY
ONE RESOURCE
ONE
Curtis Glass
Edwards Glass Co.
Glasco Corp.
Huron Valley Glass Co.
Madison Heights Glass
Modern Mirror & Glass
Peterson Glass Co.
Universal Glass & Metals
GCA
GLAZING
CONTRACTORS
ASSOCIATION
43636 Woodward Ave.
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302
(248) 972-1132
GCA MEMBERS
www.gcami.com
GCA
GLAZING
CONTRACTORS
ASSOCIATION
“A Continued Search for Industry Excellence”
AN ASSOCIATION OF QUALIFIED, KNOWLEDGEABLE,
DEPENDABLE AND RESPONSIBLE CONTRACTORS,
OUR MEMBERS STAND COMMITTED:
• To maintain the highest industry-wide standards
of personal and professional conduct
• To promote and provide dialogue among other
construction professionals
• To advise the membership with important
information and changes within the industry
• To hold training seminars on products, techniques
and application
• To provide social gatherings for members to
exchange informal ideas and questions related
to the industry
• To promote the advancement of the association
at local and state levels, supporting its goals
and objectives
12 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Dumke Announces Retirement
from AIA Michigan and AIA
Detroit; Sido Named as New
Executive Director
The American Institute of
Architects (AIA) Michigan and
AIA Detroit announced the
retirement of Executive
Director Rae J. Dumke, Hon.
AIA, at the end of 2010. Barb
Sido, CAE, has been named as
Dumke’s successor.
Dumke has been involved with the AIA since
1967, starting as a secretary before progressing
to her role as executive director in 1984. The
Grosse Pointe Farms and Leelanau County
resident has been deeply committed to
architecture and the profession, leading AIA
Michigan, managing AIA Detroit and the
Michigan Architectural Foundation (MAF) and
providing support to AIA’s nine chapters
throughout Michigan. She will continue to
serve on the MAF Board of Directors.
Under Dumke’s leadership, AIA purchased
and renovated a historically significant
building in downtown Detroit, the Beaubien
House, which currently serves as AIA
Michigan/AIA Detroit and the Michigan
Architectural Foundation headquarters. She
also expanded advocacy efforts; furthered the
practice of architecture in the state; established
innovative programming, partnerships and
public outreach; and created guides and books.
Dumke was awarded the prestigious AIA
Honorary Membership by AIA Detroit in 1984,
AIA Michigan in 1987 and AIA National in 1990.
In 2009, she was inducted into the Michigan
Association Hall of Fame, the highest honor
bestowed upon an association executive by
the Michigan Society of Association Executives
(MSAE).
“Rae Dumke has been a pivotal force for
architects in the state, AIA Michigan and its
chapters in more than 43 years of service,” said
AIA Michigan President Alan Cobb, FAIA. “Her
ability to connect with outside groups and
create collaborative opportunities with AIA
through events and continuing education
programs has provided a tremendous benefit
to our members.”
Sido has more than 20 years of experience
running non-profits and associations,
specializing in strategic management of
resources. She is recognized within AIA and the
architecture community for her commitment
to leveraging the profession’s knowledge and
skills in continuing education, conferences,
contract documents, publishing and
government affairs.
A Certified Association Executive (CAE), Sido
previously served with the AIA National Office
in Washington, D.C., where she was the vice
president of knowledge and professional
practice for the past nine years. She also has
held positions as chief knowledge officer and
foundation director for the School Nutrition
Association, and as deputy executive director
at Business and Professional Women/USA.
Sido holds a Bachelor’s degree in journalism
from the University of Missouri, and a Master’s
degree from the McDonough School of
Business at Georgetown University. “We
eagerly look forward to having Barb Sido join
AIA Michigan,” said Cobb. “With her addition,
we anticipate being capable of continuing the
growth of our education programs and
advancement of our government affairs
initiatives in Lansing.” For more information,
please visit www.aiami.com.
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
MCA Conference and Concrete Workshop
February 16-17, 2011
Marriott Centerpoint, Pontiac Michigan
This year’s agenda will focus on the newly developed speci¿cations, new concrete products, safety, base design,
concrete testing, regulations, construction issues, round table discussions, sustainability and ride quality.
R
e
g
is
te
r
N
o
w
!
Tailored to address the demanding needs of concrete professionals at all levels in the industry
Registration form is available on line at
www.miconcrete.org. To request a registration mailed to your
address, call MCA of¿ces toll free at 800.678.9622 or 517.347.7720
Sponsors and exhibitors welcome. Contact MCA by e-mail at
cruthig@miconcrete.net or by phone at 517-347-7720
Who Should Attend
•Concrete Field Personnel
•Inspectors
•Contract Managers
•Project Engineers
•Designers
•Producers
•Road Agency Personnel
•Executives
•Senior Managers
•Owners
Sido
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 13 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
The Michigan Construction
Industry Roundtable Dispels
the Myths of School
Construction to Local Board of
Education Officials
The Michigan Construction Industry
Roundtable took the message of responsible
contracting to the annual Michigan
Association of School Boards (MASB)
conference held in Grand Rapids in early
November 2010. Exhibiting at the MASB
conference with over 500 board of education
officials in attendance offered the Michigan
Construction Industry Roundtable members
the opportunity to increase awareness of
responsible contracting policies. A
Responsible Contracting Policy is a set of
enforceable qualifications adopted by building
owners to help ensure that work is performed
by competent and qualified construction firms.
One market segment of responsible
contracting is school construction. The
Roundtable members firmly believe in
responsible contracting for the betterment of
the industry as well as the quality of school
construction. To dispel the myths of school
construction was the primary focus and
message shared with attendees at the
conference.
A key marketing handout was the Top Five
Myths of School Construction. Attendees were
encouraged to review the information before
beginning their school construction projects.
Providing the information to make sound
decisions and adopting responsible
contracting polices during school construction
is essential to a quality project for the school,
the construction industry and the community
at large.
The Michigan Construction Industry
Roundtable is comprised of various
construction trade associations, labor-
management groups and unions who are
working together to promote responsible
contracting throughout all facets of the
construction process, regardless of the type of
project.
Millennium Park Receives
Keep Michigan Beautiful
Award
Keep Michigan Beautiful, Inc. recently
awarded the President’s Plaque to the Kent
County Parks and Recreation Department for
the Millennium Park Recreation Core in
Kalamazoo. O’Boyle, Cowell, Blalock &
Associates, Inc. (OCBA), Kalamazoo, led the site
design team from preliminary design through
construction administration.
The annual awards program recognizes
programs and projects that contribute to
clean-up, site restoration, historic preservation,
earthmoving, LLc
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residential development
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14 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
and environmental enhancement in Michigan.
Millennium Park was formerly a 200-acre gravel
pit that now has been transformed into a
regional destination serving as many as 10,000
visitors per day. Once all phases are complete
Millennium Park will be one of the largest
urban parks in the country, more than twice the
size of New York City’s Central Park.
OCBA has also designed and constructed a
spray park and several phases of trail
development throughout the park. The firm
has provided landscape architecture, urban
design, waterfront planning, land planning, and
site design services to Kalamazoo, Grand
Rapids and communities throughout Michigan
for over 46 years.
Christman Headquarters
Becomes World’s First Triple
Platinum LEED® Certified
Building
Construction Services Firm Achieves
New Milestone in Mission of ‘Walking
the Talk’ to Help Clients With Own
Green Building Goals
The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)
recently certified The Christman Building, the
national headquarters of The Christman
Company in downtown Lansing, as LEED for
Existing Buildings (LEED EB) at the Platinum
level. Platinum is the highest rating attainable
under LEED (Leadership in Energy and
Environmental Design), the third-party rating
system for designing, constructing and
operating the world’s greenest, most energy-
efficient buildings.
Christman’s headquarters is now the world’s
first building project to achieve a triple
Platinum distinction. In 2008, the building
became the world’s first building to achieve
dual platinum, having been certified LEED
Platinum for Commercial Interiors (LEED CI)
and Core and Shell (LEED CS).
According to the USGBC, The LEED EB rating
system helps building owners and operators
measure operations, improvements and
maintenance on a consistent scale, with the
goal of maximizing operational efficiency
while minimizing environmental impacts.
LEED EB addresses whole-building cleaning
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
Lawyers Specializing In Construction Litigation
Patrick A. Facca Gerald J. Richter Bruce M. Pregler
Michael A. Hassan
6050 LI VERNOI S • TROY, MI 48098
PH. 248-813-9900 • FAX 248-813-9901
WWW. F R P L A W. C O M
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Contract Disputes
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CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 15 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
and maintenance issues, such as chemical use,
waste stream management, exterior
maintenance programs, and systems upgrades.
“Of the 29 buildings worldwide with LEED
for Existing Buildings Platinum certification,
only the Christman Building has achieved
‘triple Platinum’ status,” said Rick Fedrizzi,
president, CEO and founding chair of USGBC.
“Cutting-edge green buildings like the
Christman Building are game-changers in the
way they remind us day in and day out of the
importance of living sustainably. We are proud
of the example they have set for others to
follow.”
STEPS TO SUSTAINABILITY
Listed on the National Register of Historic
Places, the ca.1929 building, formerly known as
The Mutual Building and located across the
street from Michigan’s state Capitol, has
become an iconic example of a sustainable
“green” historic building. Reusing an existing
structure is often considered the highest form
of sustainable design and construction. The
Christman Company’s rehabilitation of the
building in 2008 introduced green features and
practices into this historic structure, including
water use reduction, optimized energy
performance, waste stream management,
materials selection, a focus on daylighting, a
healthy indoor environment, and offsetting
100 percent of its carbon footprint.
The effort to achieve LEED EB was a year-
long, team-based initiative by Christman staff
intent on focusing and fine-tuning the
company’s green practices within the building,
including energy and water consumption,
technology use and implementation, purchase
of consumable and durable goods, use of
cleaning practices and products, managing
indoor air quality and waste, and
implementing innovation in building
operations. Steve Roznowski, LEED AP,
Christman chief executive officer, notes that
the LEED EB effort, which cost $22,000 to
implement, will yield a total annual net savings
of nearly $50,000 in addition to the environ-
mental and other benefits experienced.
During its quest for LEED EB, Christman also
earned the prestigious Energy Star Award from
the United States Environmental Protection
Agency (EPA) in June 2010, placing it in the top
17 percent of facilities in the nation for energy
efficiency, with 44 percent energy use
reduction, 50 percent less carbon dioxide
released into the atmosphere and a current
rating of 83 (75 or above is required to become
an Energy Star facility).
Christman has announced it will be
providing one or more free Building Owners
LEED Workshops in early 2011 to help
demystify the process of going green,
including an overview of LEED certification for
buildings, a presentation of the steps followed
in the greening of the Christman Building
(including building tours), and an opportunity
to ask questions and gain a greater knowledge
base about sustainable construction and
building operations.
Interested building owners can pre-register
to receive further information on-line at
www.christmanco.com/workshop. For more
information, including a comprehensive case
study on this project, visit
www.christmanco.com. For information on
sustainability, please visit www.usgbc.org and
www.energystar.gov.
CSI Acquires Building Systems
Design, Inc.
The Construction Specifications Institute
(CSI) recently acquired Building Systems
Design, Inc. (BSD). Under the acquisition, BSD
will continue as a separate, for-profit enterprise
with its current management and employees
remaining in place.
16 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
CSI was founded more than 60 years ago by
volunteers dedicated to the mission of
improving communication between all
members of the construction project team. CSI
has been the driving force in the creation of
industry standards and formats used in the
production of building construction specifi-
cations and other construction
documentation, including MasterFormat®,
SectionFormat™, UniFormat, and OmniClass™.
In recent years, CSI has increased its focus on
creating practice tools that improve communi-
cation and the development of construction
documentation in day-to-day construction
work all as a means of better addressing the
needs of its members and the construction
community. The acquisition of BSD is the next
logical step in providing useful products that
advance CSI’s mission and improve how
construction is executed by individual practi-
tioners and in firms around the world.
Founded in 1983, BSD produced cost
estimating software for use on personal
computers; the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
was its first client. In 1996, BSD launched the
initial version of BSD SpecLink®, an automated
specification writing system that is now in its
third generation as BSD SpecLink-E. The
company recently introduced BSD LinkMan™-
E, a product that links SpecLink with Autodesk’s
Revit, he industry’s leading building
information modeling (BIM) software. Plans
include extending LinkMan’s interoperability
to BSD CostLink®-E, a next generation cost
estimating product now in development.
CSI will continue to develop and maintain
industry standards in an open and inclusive
manner, using consensus-based processes. All
interested industry organizations will continue
to have access to CSI’s intellectual property,
serve on CSI committees and task teams, and
license CSI’s formats for use in their products.
CSI members will directly benefit through
increased access to BSD’s master specifications
software and additional building information
management tools through special discounts
on the purchase of BSD products and services.
Special BIM and interoperability-related
education sessions will also be available to CSI
members as a result of the acquisition.
For more CSI information, visit
www.csinet.org, or call 800.689.2900.
For more BSD information, visit
www.bsdsoftlink.com or call 888.273.7638.
United Association of
Plumbers and Pipe Fitters
Launches Veterans in Piping
Initiative at Camp Douglas
A successful partnership that trains veterans
for careers in the plumbing and pipefitting
industry is expanding to Wisconsin, according
to William P. Hite, general president of the
United Association of Journeymen and
Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipe Fitting
Industry of the United States and Canada.
Hite recently signed a memorandum of
agreement with the Wisconsin Army National
Guard and the Department of Workforce
Development to bring the Veterans in Piping
(VIP) program to Camp Douglas. Hite was
joined by Colonel Kenneth Koon and Secretary
Roberta Gassman.
Approximately 2 million of our nation’s
veterans have served since the attacks of Sept.
11, 2001. “Historically, our veterans have always
been underemployed,” said Anne St. Eloi, UA
Special Representative for Training. “If they can
find work, it’s usually something low-paying
that doesn’t match any of the skills they’ve
learned in the military. That needs to change –
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and that’s why General President Hite has
created the VIP Program.”
VIP offers 20 weeks of training necessary to
become an apprentice, including two intensive
weeks of transitional reintegration and work
readiness to help veterans return to civilian life.
Judae Bost’n, Ed.D leads the free training. Job
placement is guaranteed upon successful
completion.
Russell Kies is one of 16 veterans who will be
a member of the inaugural class in January. He
is eager to get started. “The union and the
military train front-line leaders,” Kies said. “They
have people standing next to you that you can
go to for help. They both train hard.”
Camp Douglas is the third VIP site
nationwide. The first operates in conjunction
with the Washington National Guard, Workforce
Development and the Department of Veterans
Affairs with support from Washington Governor
Chris Gregoire. VIP launched in March 2009 at
Camp Pendleton, California, training active
Marines before their discharge. Mike Arndt,
Director of Training for the UA, is pleased to
offer training to veterans in Wisconsin,
Minnesota and Illinois. “We are delighted to
have the VIP program expanding to this very
strategic area of the country,” said Arndt.
“Our service members give so much to our
country,” Hite said. “We want to ensure they
have the training and support necessary for a
successful career, and life, after their time in the
military. Our vision of making the VIP program
available to men and women nationwide is
happening with this much-anticipated
expansion to Wisconsin. We are honored to
have the hard-working and dedicated veterans
of the U.S. military as members of our UA
Family.”
For more information about the VIP program,
please visit to www.uavip.org.
Southeast Michigan
Sustainable Business Forum
Recognizes Outstanding
Sustainable Business Practices
The Southeast Michigan Sustainable
Business Forum (SMSBF) honored three organi-
zations for adopting sustainable business
practices at the SMSBF's inaugural Sustainable
Business Awards held at NSF International’s
office in Ann Arbor in mid-November 2010.
One winner was selected in three different
categories, including nonprofit/institutions,
retail/manufacturing and service/consulting.
The program was developed as a tool to help
businesses understand how to become more
sustainable. The 10 criteria included business
model, operations, land use, waste, energy,
water, transportation, risk reduction, and work
place and community relations.
PBS's Tim Skubick, of "Off the Record,"
addressed the crowd with a speech entitled,
"Really Off the Record: Where Environmental
Issues are Headed." Skubick discussed the
changes he foresees on the environmental
front based on the election. The event was
hosted by Andrew Humphrey, the Emmy Award
winning meteorologist for WDIV Local 4 News
in Detroit.
The winners and finalists in each category are
listed below.
NONPROFIT/ INSTITUTIONS
• Winner - University of Michigan: Led by
the University president, The University of
Michigan’s comprehensive institutional plan
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18 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
for sustainable operations is defined by
reducing energy by more than 30 percent
below the newest energy code and by
aspiring for LEED® Silver buildings on its
campus.
• Finalist - Clarkston Community Schools:
Clarkston is saving operational costs for the
school district with an energy management
program and by working towards further
comprehensive improvements by
measuring and tracking environmental
metrics. The program is serving as a model
for other school districts in the area.
RETAIL/MANUFACTURING
• Winner - Great Lakes Recycling: GLR has
built the first two single-stream recycling
facilities in Michigan, supporting over a
thousand businesses in the firm’s recycling
efforts and processing over 100,000 tons of
material. In addition, GLR has invested in an
extensive education center at its newest
facility.
• Finalist - Wellspring Land Company, LLC:
This local landlord utilized programs from
the Ann Arbor DDA, DTE and the federal
government to assist them in conserving
energy and water. Wellspring adopted
"green cleaning" practices and is managing
waste through recycling programs and
purchase plans.
SERVICE/CONSULTING
• Winner - Planet Footprint: This recent
member of the Michigan business
community is bringing a global perspective
to providing energy and environmental
scorekeeping services to public entities in
Australia and across the U.S.
• Finalist - Resource Recycling Systems:
RRS is a consulting company providing
sustainable solutions for reducing waste.
Internally, RRS is maximizing the use of
resources with strong Zero Waste and
Environmentally Preferable Purchasing
policies, in addition to employing landscape
and stormwater management techniques
and encouraging low emission transit.
For more information, please visit
www.smsbf.org.
Whirlpool Corporation Ranks
Among the Top 500 U.S.
Companies in Newsweek’s
2010 Green Rankings
Whirlpool Corporation has once again been
recognized as one of the top 500 U.S.
companies in Newsweek’s second annual Green
Rankings, which lists the greenest large
companies in the U.S. and globally. Whirlpool
ranked 116th on the list.
“It is a privilege to be named to Newsweek’s
Green Rankings list for the second straight year,"
said Jeff M. Fettig, chairman and CEO, Whirlpool
Corporation. “Our innovation and long-term
commitment to the environment make this
distinction possible.”
The rankings are divided among industries,
with Whirlpool being recognized in the
Consumer Products category. Out of a possible
100, Whirlpool Corporation’s overall green score
for 2010 is 77.41, ranking it 11th in this category.
Nearly 40 years ago, Whirlpool Corporation
established a corporate office for environ-
mental control. In 2003, the company became
the world's first appliance manufacturer to
announce a global greenhouse gas reduction
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
A
fter years of managing safety programs for both general
industry and construction, it’s clear that excuses for not
working safely are almost homogeneously the same
regardless of the industry. “I forgot” or “I didn’t know” or
“This will only take a second” are a few of my favorites. Also great are,
“I am in a hurry” or “Yeah, but the job has to get done” or, “I don’t have
time to do it the safe way.” But, my all time favorite, and perhaps the
crux of all other excuses, is, “I have always done it this way and haven’t
been hurt!” History is an excellent teacher. Humans will naturally
find a way to do a job—it may not be the best, safest or most efficient
way to do something overall, but as long as we don’t get hurt, fail, die
or are taught/learn a better way, we will keep doing it that way.
Practice doesn’t make perfect, practice makes permanent; a big
difference.
Unfortunately for thousands of workers annually, that last excuse
can’t be used once he or she is injured or killed on the job, doing “it”
the same way it’s always been done. The excuse should be, “I have
always done it this way and haven’t been hurt YET!” It is not a matter
of IF you will get hurt, but WHEN (your luck runs out). Being lucky is
awesome, but relying on luck to get you home at the end of the day
is foolish. So stop with the excuses already. Nearly all of us know
that if our son or daughter were standing there watching, we would
go get our safety glasses or fix the machine guard or find a safer way
to do the job, instead of making some lame excuse that basically
says to that child, “It’s okay to work unsafely and, if I’m lucky, I might
see you later for dinner….oh, and don’t watch what I am about to do
right now.”
Stop making excuses! Always make the decisions that get you home
safely – never donate your life or your body parts to your employer;
generally, we don’t want them anyway. Stay safe out there!
No Excuses for 2011
By Carl Granger, Safety Director, WOODS Construction Inc.
SAFETY TOOL KIT
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 19 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
target. With common standards and appropriate incentives in place,
Whirlpool Corporation’s goal is to make all of its electronically controlled
appliances produced around the globe capable of receiving and
responding to signals from smart grids by 2015.
The Newsweek Green Rankings 2010 measures the environmental
performance of the 500 largest U.S. and 100 largest global companies, in
terms of revenue, market cap and number of employees. The list was
launched in 2009 as the first objective ‘green’ analysis of the largest U.S.
companies. The 2010 list was published in Newsweek’s October 2010 issue
and on the web, and is the first to include a global companies category.
The rankings are completed with the help of ASAP Media, Newsweek’s
editorial partner. Its research partners on the rankings are RiskMetrics
Group, TruCost and CorporateRegister.com. Each research partner provides
specific scoring data to be weighted for the overall score of each company.
For more information about the 2010 Newsweek Green Rankings, visit
www.newsweek.com/green. For more information on Whirlpool
Corporation and its offerings for building professionals, please visit
www.insideadvantage.com or call 1-800-952-2537.
AIA Detroit Announces Honor Award Winners
The annual Celebration of Architecture for the Detroit Chapter of the
American Institute of Architects took place in late November 2010 at the
School of Architecture Gallery at Lawrence Technological University.
Detroit Chapter President Ray Cekauskas, AIA, recognized 10 design
projects and five individuals for their contributions to architecture.
SmithGroup Incorporated headlines the recipients. The downtown
Detroit-based organization became the first firm since the awards
program was inaugurated in 1928 to earn six design awards from the
chapter in the same year.
The five individuals honored at the recent Detroit Chapter ceremony are:
• Gold Medal - AIA Detroit’s highest
honor was awarded to Birmingham
architect Victor A. Saroki, FAIA, for
his consistent, high-quality, award-
winning designs for a variety of
building types.
• Honorary Affliliate Member – This
honor went to William Dunn, a
longtime sponsor of the awards
program and other AIA efforts who heads Dunn Blue
Reprographics Technologies in Clawson.
• Charles Blessing Award – The award created to
honor the legendary Detroit City Planner was
presented to Robert L. Ziegelman, FAIA, for his
continuing influence on his home city of Birmingham,
Michigan.
• Young Architects of the Year - Cory C. Lavigne, AIA
LEED® AP and Janice L. Suchan,
AIA LEED® AP, were honored as
Young Architects of the Year, an
accolade awarded to accomplished
architects who have yet to reach the
age of 40 years. Both recipients are
from award-winning firms that
earned design awards this year.
Lavigne is a design architect with
INFORM Studio in Northville. Suchan is a project architect and partner at
SHW Group in Berkley.
Dunn Saroki
Ziegelman
Suchan Lavigne
Concrete
Foundations
&Flatwork
Commerci al
I ndust r i al
I nst i t ut i onal
Par ki ng Decks
WWW.AMALIOCORP.COM
6655 COTTER
STERLING HEIGHTS MICHIGAN 48314
586.731.6804 586.731.3732 FAX
20 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
For the Honor Awards, plaques also were
awarded to the firms that created the work and
to the building owners whose cooperation and
understanding made creative solutions possible.
A panel of distinguished architects, chaired by
San Francisco architect Dan Winey, FAIA, LEED AP,
managing principal of Gensler’s Northwest
Region, chose the winning buildings from
among 46 anonymous entries. The Detroit AIA
2010 Honor Award recipients are:
inFORM Studio, Northville
Withers Swash District Plan, Myrtle Beach,
South Carolina
Category: Urban Design
Owner: City of Myrtle Beach
SHW Group, Berkley
Richard J. Mazurek, MD Medical Education
Commons, Detroit
Category: Urban Design
Owner: Wayne State University - School of
Medicine
Contractor: Walbridge
Albert Kahn Associates Inc., Detroit
A. Alfred Taubman Center for Design
Education, Detroit
Category: Building
Owner: College for Creative Studies
Contractor: Walbridge
Constantine George Pappas AIA
Architecture/Planning,
Royal Oak
First Congregational Church Sanctuary
Addition, Rochester
Category: Building
Owner: First Congregational Church Sanctuary
Addition
Contractor: Frank Rewold and Son, Inc.
SmithGroup Incorporated’s six winning
entries include two in the unbuilt category,
two interiors, one building category and one
twenty-five year award.
West Virginia University Art Museum and
Rare Book Room, Morgantown, West
Virginia
Category: Unbuilt
Owner: West Virginia University
Cameron Memorial, Cameron, Louisiana
Category: Unbuilt
Owner: National Hurricane Museum and
Science Center
Western Michigan University Frostic
School of Visual Arts
Kohrman Hall Renovations, Kalamazoo
Category: Interior Architecture
Owner: Western Michigan University
Contractor: CSM Group
Michigan State University Owen Hall
Renovations, East Lansing
Category: Interior Architecture
Owner: Michigan State University
Contractor: Triangle Associates
I N D U S T R Y N E W S
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 21 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
Madonna University, Franciscan Center
for Science and Media, Livonia
Category: Building
Owner: Madonna University
Contractor: Clark Construction
The Guardian Building, Detroit
Category: 25 Year
Owner: Wayne County
Contractor: Sachse Construction & Tooles
Contracting Group
For more information on The American
Institute of Architects Michigan and AIA Detroit,
visit www.aiadetroit.org.
‡ ‡
800-664-3697

www.nadc1.com
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Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton has stood for strength,
experience, dedication and teamwork for more than five decades. We provide
comprehensive construction, business, transactional, and litigation services
to the business community. As a client of our law firm, you will work with a
team of lawyers whose experience and knowledge are especially suited to your
specific legal and industry needs. You will be an integral part of that team
because you know your business better than anyone else.
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Construction Law Practice Group Leader
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Speak Up!
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invite comments from
our readers.
Send your remarks to:
CAM Magazine
43636 Woodward Ave.
P.O. Box 3204
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204
Or email us at:
editor@cam-online.com
22 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
M E M B E R F E A T U R E
C
O
N
S
T
R
U
C
T
I
N
g
S
U
C
C
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S
S
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 23 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
B
uilding a sustainable business
in an anemic economy may
seem like mission impossible.
But John M. DeMattia is successfully
building a sustainable company both
in a business and an environmental
sense. The newly launched firm’s
largest project to date is for First
Solar, a solar panel manufacturer and
glass recycling company based in
Perrysburg, OH just south of Toledo.
In part, John DeMattia Construction
LLC seems to be growing steadily by
going “green.”
DeMattia began full-blown
construction in December 2010 on
this exciting new project for First
Solar, one of the fastest growing
manufacturers of solar modules in the
world. With corporate headquarters
in Tempe, AZ, First Solar maintains
offices across the globe and manufac-
turing facilities in Germany, Malaysia and the United States. Work at the
Perrysburg manufacturing facility is yet another example of the
expanding “green” marketplace.
For DeMattia, this $8 million project involves installing new process
work to recycle damaged and not to spec solar panels through the
process of acid etching. (Acid etching extracts the metals from the tinted
glass for reclamation.) “It is a large mechanical and electrical job that we
are working on as design/build general contractor with Saline-based
Process Results, the mechanical and electrical engineering firm on the
project,” said John M. DeMattia, owner and president of John DeMattia
Construction.
The First Solar project is a demonstration of DeMattia’s business plan
in action. The plan clearly shows that DeMattia knows how to build both
a building and a business. He launched his new firm on a solid
foundation of business relationships and experience cultivated over the
course of almost 30 years in the construction industry. “I have been
working with Process Results for about 15 years,” said DeMattia. “Since
we have a long history together, they asked me on board with their
team. Process Results is the lead on the project.”
The value of close teamwork and experience is evident on the First
Solar project. “The advantage I have with Process Results is they can
spec the equipment, and we can pre-order it ahead of time to make sure
the schedule works,” said DeMattia. “I know they have the knowledge
and experience to go into the facility and accurately assess the
equipment and conveyor needs. They do it all on paper, and then we can
order the long lead items for a project
with full assurance that it will be
accurate.”
As demonstrated on this
project, forging alliances to obtain
the project and working as a team
throughout the job was a win-win for
the companies and the client. At the
end of the day, this showcase project
also will enable DeMattia to
demonstrate his firm’s abilities to
other clients undertaking similar
expansions in the emerging “green”
economy. The project will help
DeMattia carve out a specialty niche
and become the first one knocking
on this particular door of
opportunity. “All contractors look at
what market can be gained by being
the first one to reach an owner,” said
DeMattia.
PLACING DEEP FOUNDATIONS
DeMattia has deep foundations in the construction industry, having
entered the field unofficially at the age of 13 as a part-time general
helper at his father’s construction company called Lerner-Linden. He
learned the business from all angles, earned a Bachelor of Science
degree in civil engineering at Michigan Technological University, and
worked at Lerner-Linden for almost 14 years, first as a laborer, layout
engineer and superintendent and ultimately as an estimator, project
manager and vice president.
DeMattia worked for several large construction firms for the next 15
years in business development and as a vice president before deciding
to strike out on his own. His impressive portfolio of past projects
includes work on the campus of Domino’s Farms, General Motors Tech
Center, and the University of Michigan’s Med Sports Relocation.
Other project experience includes work at the BorgWarner Sterling
Heights dynamometer facility, and various wastewater treatment plant
expansions for the cities of Bad Axe, Wixom, South Lyon and Richmond.
DeMattia has also performed work for major industrial giants such as
General Dynamics, General Motors, Chrysler, TAQA Industries, Taubman
Cos. and Detroit Diesel. Add work for the Charter Township of Plymouth,
the City of Southfield Eight Mile Road Pumping Station expansion, and
the Detroit Metropolitan Airport Pump Station to his roster of successful
projects.
His extensive experience and knowledge is the bedrock and
foundation of his new general contracting, construction management
By Mary E. Kremposky, Associate Editor Photos Courtesy of John DeMattia Construction, LLC
Experienced Contractor Launches
John DeMattia Construction, LLC
DeMattia handled all architectural and structural work on the complex
renovation of two pump stations for the Ypsilanti Community Utility
Authority (left). Work on the Sentinel Chiller Plant (above) is another
part of the firm’s project portfolio.
24 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
work on a complex renovation project that had to be phased with
operational shutdowns,” said DeMattia.
As on the First Solar project, building a strong network of business
alliances seems to be the master key with the power to open multiple
doors of opportunity. “My alliance with some subcontractors makes me
a little more diverse,” said DeMattia. “I am aligned with some specialty
contractors in going after certain projects. We work together and bid as
a team. We are basically looking for work for each other.” Working with
established, “field-tested” firms leads to even more opportunities, as well
as access to valuable contacts and a reduction in project risk.
This framework of collaboration and trust continues throughout the
actual project. “I believe owners and architects need to perform with the
contractor as a team to achieve a successful project,” said DeMattia. “We
work with the project team step-by-step to formulate and implement
cost and construction strategies.”
DeMattia’s project portfolio in his firm’s inaugural year includes
renovation work for Black & Veatch in Ann Arbor, as well as site work,
preparation and estimating for Hope Lutheran Church in Farmington
Hills. Other projects on DeMattia’s list include work for Best Block, La-Z-
Boy, Dhake Industries, Christ the King Lutheran Church, and Holy
Redeemer Catholic Parish.
Launching a new business in today’s rough economic seas takes
above par navigation skills. With construction talents cultivated virtually
over a lifetime, John DeMattia’s expertise as a businessman and
contractor is steering his new company in the right direction – a path
marked by projects steadily growing in size and by enterprises that are
part of the expanding “green” economy.
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and design-build firm officially launched in August 2009. “Although new
in business, I have been in the industry a long time,” said DeMattia. “I
have had good feedback from different owners.”
Domino’s Farms is only one of many satisfied clients. “John is a very
conscientious person,” said Van Belanger, facilities superintendent,
Domino’s Farms Corporation, as part of a Web testimonial
(www.demattiaconstruction.com). “He has our company’s highest
respect through his integrity and commitment to our projects.”
Clearly, DeMattia learned more from his father than how to construct
a building. He is following in his father’s footsteps by conducting his
own business using an approach based on integrity and hard work. “It’s
all about doing the hard work the owner expects,” DeMattia said. A
professional approach and a personal touch complete his business
philosophy. “It’s all about personally tending to an owner’s construction
needs,” said DeMattia. “I am always available for an owner.”
BUILDING A STRONG STRUCTURAL FRAME
Working on a strong foundation of experience and a sound business
approach, DeMattia is structuring his fledgling company for steady
controlled growth, stepping up the size and expanding the type of
projects in increments and in alliance with contractors in other
disciplines. Similar to building a bonfire beginning with small kindling,
the firm’s first projects are modest in scope and mainly fueled by private
sector referrals.
The firm’s first project was renovating two pump stations for the
Ypsilanti Community Utilities Authority. “We worked with J.F. Cavanaugh
as general contractor, and we handled all architectural and structural
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26 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
diners will not enjoy the final result unless the
meat is prepared well.
Likewise, a company’s safety culture is the
“meat” of their safety program. Every company
has a safety culture, which can best be defined
as what happens on a jobsite when no one is
B
uilding a safety program is a lot like
making a hamburger. Jalapeños, sharp
cheddar or bacon might make a better
sandwich for some tastes, but it simply is not a
burger without a beef patty in the middle. No
matter what other ingredients are used, most
C O N S T R U C T I O N
S A F E T Y
looking. Most employees will wear hardhats
when safety managers can see them, but what
happens when they work on their own?
Companies can spice up their safety efforts
with incentive programs and training, but none
of this will be effective if workers do not
understand the risks and take the initiative to
mitigate them for themselves. Members of the
Construction Association of Michigan (CAM)
Safety Committee recently gathered together
to explain how they have beefed up the safety
culture where they work.
WORKING WITH MANAGEMENT
Good safety managers strive to improve the
safety culture where they work. The best ones
realize that they cannot do this alone.
“In my opinion, the safety director has very
little influence over the safety culture,” said Joe
Forgue, CAM’s director of education and safety
services.
The reason for this is simple. A safety
director can visit jobsites and cite safety
violations, but it is ultimately management that
will either hold employees accountable or let
them off the hook. Repeating safety
instructions to employees who have learned
that they can ignore them will have little effect.
The only way to improve the safety
performance in this case is to convince
management that safety has value.
““There needs to be an understanding
across an entire organization that safety and
profitability go hand-in-hand,” said Carl
Granger, safety director for Woods
Construction, Inc., Sterling Heights. “When I see
a well-run project where everyone, from the
superintendent to the tradesman to the
apprentice are all working together and
holding each other accountable to make sure
we are not just getting the job done, but
getting the job done safely, I can guarantee
that we will be working towards a profit.”
In other words, Granger’s work to make
every Woods Construction jobsite safe is also
an effort to improve the company’s
profitability. Upper management at Woods
Construction understands this concept, but a
safety director needs to work with all levels of
management in order to be effective.
“There is a lot of trust between our safety
department and our project managers,” said
Dennis Quinn, safety director for John E. Green
Co., Highland Park. “Many of our project
managers come from the field, so they are
respected on the jobsite and they are key
individuals within our organization. If they tell
people how things need to be done, the
journeymen usually follow pretty well. If the
message doesn’t come down from the project
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 27 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
managers, the journeymen will do whatever they want.”
Although the various levels of management are key players in creating
a good safety culture, the importance of a safety professional’s role
should not be minimized. There are many things that a safety
professional can do on a jobsite to encourage good safety practices.
PROMOTING SAFETY ON THE JOBSITE
Safety professionals can communicate management’s commitment to
safety in a variety of ways on the jobsite - sometimes just by being there.
“Just having us [safety professionals] there is an investment,” said
Granger. “Most of our jobs are out of state right now, so having me go out
and do a safety visit is a sizeable investment of money and time. I don’t
think that goes unnoticed down at the journeyman level.”
Eugene Rupp, vice president of safety for Adamo Demolition, also
rarely goes unnoticed. In fact, he becomes a constant fixture in the lives
of every employee as soon as they are hired. Instead of merely finding
out that a new hire is allergic to bee stings, Rupp has learned the
importance of asking follow-up questions like, “What happens if you get
stung?” Many people with allergies carry medication, but this will not
help them if they are too ill to take it
themselves. A supervisor can save a
life when this happens, but only one
who knows where the medicine is and
how to administer it. Rupp simply will
not leave a jobsite until he knows that
this knowledge is in place. Of course,
Adamo Demolition has many jobsites,
and only one Rupp, so safety
professionals need to have some
degree of confidence that people still
work safely when they are gone.
“You need to make everyone a
resource,” said Granger. “Train your
people to be their brother’s keeper
and everyone on the job will be a
lifeguard.”
Even when everyone is watching
out for everyone else, complacency
can set in. Every task involves hazards
that need to be considered
beforehand. Members of the CAM Safety Committee were quick to point
out that soft tissue injuries to the back were the most costly injuries for
construction companies. Unlike the specific injuries associated with
elevated work or trenching, a strained back can strike someone moving
a table across a jobsite trailer. Because any activity can involve risks,
crews at Adamo Demolition have learned to never tell Rupp that they are
“just” moving some furniture, sorting demolition debris, or doing any
other basic task.
“When I hear people use the word ‘just,’ I get really worried,” he said.
“Right off the bat, that tells me that they are thinking that something is
run of the mill, standard operating procedure, or not worthy of special
attention.”
Safety professionals realize that there is a process that should be
followed to keep workers safe, no matter how simple a task is.
“Whether you have two people working or 100, the process should be
the same in a good safety culture,” said Quinn. “The process should keep
people safe.”
Of course, not everyone agrees with exactly what this process should
entail. When asked to identify the least productive thing that a safety
professional can do on the jobsite, getting drawn into an argument
about safety procedures topped the list of everyone interviewed for this
article. Avoiding these situations is not as easy at it sounds, especially
when people who do not fully understand a hazard honestly believe that
their actions are safe. Some workers also incorrectly believe that there is
no way to perform certain tasks in compliance with MIOSHA. Setting an
anchor point to tie off from often comes up in these discussions, as some
workers are convinced that, since there is no obvious anchor point, there
is no way to provide fall protection. They then don’t take the time to
consider a variety of safe techniques by which to establish an anchor
point, including the possibility of working at ground level with reach
extenders to perform this task.
Taking the time to help these people understand the risks of their
actions and educating them on proper techniques can be good use of a
safety professional’s time, or it can be a complete waste of breath.
Knowing which type of conversation is taking place is not a skill that can
be learned overnight.
“It comes from experience,” said Quinn. “You need to have been
through the process enough times to know where the stopping point is
or when you won’t gain anything by taking it further. You need to keep
it black and white: Here is the rule
and here is how it will apply to your
situation. Debating safety rules
never goes anywhere.” When
confronted with arguments that
simply will not be resolved, safety
professionals need to know when to
stop arguing and just tell workers
that they will perform a task a certain
way. They can take their concerns to
company management or a union
steward - but the discussion is over.
Getting drawn into unproductive
arguments is only one way that even
an experienced safety professional
can spend time with very little to
show for it.
SPINNING WHEELS ON SAFETY
Determining if their efforts are
actually making a difference ranks
among the most difficult tasks for a safety professional. Everyone may
adopt safe work habits while they are being watched, but how can a
safety professional really know if a good safety culture has taken root?
Many red flags signaling a problem may exist are easy to spot.
“If everyone stops working when you show up, it is a pretty good
indication that people don’t feel comfortable working around you,” said
Granger. “It also isn’t a good sign if everybody knows you are coming
before you get there.”
Even if work continues as normal when the safety director arrives,
safety professionals can still get a feel for the safety commitment
without talking to anyone or looking at a single document.
“You can’t hide housekeeping,” said Quinn. “If I see a well-organized
site, I at least know that someone is putting some thought into things.”
Even with trades like demolition, which is an inherently messy
business, crews can still create orderly piles of debris and maintain safe
walking paths throughout the site. Most safety professionals would like
to spend all day on jobsites to make sure things are running smoothly,
but other responsibilities bring them back to the office.
“Just getting the ability to bid the work can be time consuming,” said
Quinn. “The prequalification forms that we are filling out are getting
Members of the CAM Safety Committee recently gathered
together to explain how they have beefed up the safety culture
where they work.
28 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
more extensive.”
Members of the CAM Safety Committee see
this as a mixed blessing. They are happy to see
the emphasis on safety, but the ever-
expanding heaps of paperwork can keep them
out of the field. Owners and construction
managers may demand site specific safety
plans, each with different requirements. The
lack of consistency can catch safety
professionals off guard, while some
requirements can seem arbitrary and illogical.
One committee member interviewed for this
article cited a requirement to have workers tie-
off while working from the bed of a pickup
truck, while another needed to submit a plan
for working with benzene – even though no
contact with the chemical was anticipated. The
Internet is a valuable tool in complying with
unusual safety requirements, but CAM
Members should not overlook another benefit
that comes from paying their dues.
“Generally, nothing in safety needs to be
reinvented,” said Quinn. “Safety professionals
need to share information and not be
competitive with it. That is where an
organization like CAM really helps out.”
A quick conversation with another safety
professional who has faced a similar
requirement and is willing to share can often
yield a quick solution to a prequalification
issue that would have otherwise required
extensive research. Diverse member groups
like CAM’s can also provide access to specialty
contractors who may face specific safety
requirements that would not apply to most
contractors, while the membership also can
provide a unified voice to encourage more
consistency in safety requirements.
It should be noted that no one interviewed
for this article suggested that safety
prequalifications should be eliminated, nor do
they view time at the office filling out forms
and performing other tasks as wasted time. In
fact, many stressed the importance of
analyzing operations to look for trends. A
sudden spike in a particular type of injury, for
example, can illustrate a need for more training
or better protective equipment, but only if
someone identifies the trend. This type of
detailed oversight can only occur when a
safety professional has time away from the
jobsite to see the whole picture.
Safety professionals can work on beefing up
a company’s safety culture in a variety of ways
in the office and in the field, while always
working toward the goal of an injury-free
workplace. If they can create a safety culture
where everyone works to keep everyone else
safe, the result of their efforts will be easy to
swallow.
C O N S T R U C T I O N
S A F E T Y
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Commercial – Industrial
Experienced Innovative Timely
13840 Intervale St. (313) 836-3366
Detroit, MI. 48227 (313) 836-3367 fax
www.detroitdismantling.com info@detroitdismantling.com
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 29 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
specifically prohibited from entering
such structures alone.
Assessment/sampling activities or
renovation/demolition activities in
dilapidated buildings should be
conducted by a minimum of two
appropriately trained personnel,
commonly referred to as “The Buddy
System.” The Buddy System helps
keep track of project team members
and provides for more timely
notification of accidents/injuries and
response to such incidents. Use of
The Buddy System can help prevent
individuals from becoming lost,
isolated, or stranded within a
dilapidated building due to a
debilitating injury or further
structural degradation, such as the
collapse of a walkway or floor. Prior
to entry, the team must review
potential safety concerns, entry/exit procedures, communication methods
between entrants, and emergency evacuation routes.
Flooded lower level areas such as basements, sub-basements and
mechanical tunnels should be avoided during initial assessment and
demolition/decommissioning activities until the flooded areas are
dewatered. If confined spaces, such as enclosed ceiling spaces, tunnels,
pits, vessels, and duct systems, are present, appropriate confined space
entry procedures are required to assess or work in those spaces.
Consultant and construction personnel should exercise caution when
entering areas of a building with roof leaks or damaged pipes, or any areas
where leaking water may have impacted building materials. Waterlogged
surfaces will decompose rapidly and lose structural integrity, so areas with
water-impacted floors or ceilings should be assessed for structural stability
prior to entry. Following adequate assessment of unsound areas,
appropriate entry procedures and precautionary measures can be
implemented to safely enter and work in such areas.
Construction is high-risk industry. Working in dilapidated buildings
increases the risks and requires adequate assessment, planning, and
protective equipment to safely complete the project.
W
orking inside
buildings on
Brownfield sites
during either the initial
assessment stage or
redevelopment activities can
present significant health and
safety concerns for consultants
and construction personnel.
Many Brownfields are
occupied by derelict or
dilapidated buildings that may
harbor health risks in the form
of deteriorated building
materials and/or equipment
containing asbestos, lead,
mercury, and polychlorinated
biphenyls (PCBs); naturally
occurring molds, fungi or
bacteria; and physical hazards
associated with structural
deterioration.
Brownfield projects frequently involve entering abandoned,
deteriorated structures that have been shuttered or neglected for so long
that they pose significant health and safety concerns to personnel
entering the structures to assess for the presence of hazardous materials
and to conduct renovation or demolition/decommissioning activities.
Dilapidated buildings often have structural deficiencies such as floor or
ceiling supports weakened by moisture or decomposition. Large holes in
floors, flooded basements and mechanical areas, and collapsed ceilings are
a few more structural safety issues associated with vacant, abandoned
buildings. Other concerns include exposed asbestos-containing materials,
oils and hydraulic fluids leaking from equipment, dielectric fluids in older
electrical equipment that could contain PCBs, deteriorated building
materials containing asbestos and lead, fluorescent light tubes and
thermostats or gauges containing mercury, microbial and bacterial
growth, rodents, and containers of chemicals or waste materials left
behind by the previous occupant or clandestinely dumped in the building
after closure.
Certain precautionary measures should be implemented when working
in dilapidated buildings. Consultant or construction personnel should be
G R E E N P R I N T
F O R T H E F U T U R E
HEALTH AND SAFETY
HAZARDS OF WORKING IN
DILAPIDATED BUILDINGS
BY MARK A. HALLOWAY, OHST, SOI L AND MATERI ALS ENGI NEERS, I NC.
Working in dilapidated buildings increases risks and requires adequate
assessment, planning, and protective equipment to safely complete the
project.
30 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
30 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Welcome to
T
he Michigan Construction & Design Tradeshow will be held
at MotorCity Casino Hotel in Detroit on February 2, 2011.
The 27th edition of this event for industry professionals is
sponsored by the Construction Association of Michigan (CAM).
This year, during this one-day construction event, CAMTEC will
get the day started with educational programs beginning a 9:00
am; the Tradeshow opens at 10:00 a.m. and runs to 5:00 p.m.
Many exhibitors plan to launch new construction-related
equipment, tools and services. Contractors, designers, and
construction buyers will be able to actually see, test and learn
about the newest equipment, products and services available.
CAM will be celebrating its 126th Anniversary during the 125th
Annual Meeting, by invitation only, at the Sound Board beginning
at 11:30 a.m.
The CAM Magazine Special Issue Awards will take place during
the 125th CAM Annual Meeting. The architects and general
contractors whose projects were featured in the 2010 Special
Issue will be receiving a commemorative plaque. This year, for the
first time, CAM Magazine will be presenting the Special Issue
Project of the Year Award, as voted upon by the readership of
CAM Magazine. The Green Project of the Year Awards for 2010
will also be presented immediately after the Special Issue Awards.
CAMTEC, the educational division of the CAM, will present three
blocks available to Tradeshow attendees: Project Bonding – The
Financial Perspective; Indoor Air Quality During Construction; and
Present Your Business in the Best Light. Seminar registration
information is available by calling CAMTEC at 248-972-1000.
Tickets to the tradeshow can be picked up at CAM Headquarters.
However, the most convenient way to get tickets is to pre-register
online now at CAM's website: www.cam-online.com. Attendees
pre-registering before January 15th will have their name badges
mailed, and those pre-registering after January 15th can pick up
their badges at the door of Michigan Construction & Design
Tradeshow.
There is still time for exhibitors to join the show. Call CAM
Tradeshow Sales at (248) 972-1000.
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 31 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
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32 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
Tradeshow 2011
EXHI BI T OR L I S T AS OF 12/ 23/ 2010
ABTEK Financial
ARC/Dunn Blue
AZZ Galvanizing Service
Ace Cutting Equipment & Supply
Adaptive Environments, Inc.
Aluminum Supply Co., Inc.
BAC Trowel Trades
BD Electrical
The Blue Book
Broner Glove & Safety
C.A.S.S. Sheet Metal
CRS Technologies, Inc.
CTS-Construction Tool & Supply
Cipriano Coating Technology
Contractors Hot Line
Cougar Sales & Rental, Inc.
Delta Thermal Imaging (DTI)
Detroit Carpentry JATC
Efficiency Production
EnergyBright, LLC
Energy Shield, Inc.
FastSigns of Birmingham
Fortis Payment Systems
Foundation Software
M.C. Gutherie Lumber Co.
Hansen Marketing Services, Inc.
Hartland Insurance Group, Inc.
Hilti, Inc.
Homrich
Insulex Panel Systems, Inc.
Jeffers Crane Service
Johns Manville
Kerkstra Precast
Larson's Insurance Solutions
Agency, Inc.
F. Lax Construction
Marshall Sales, Inc.
Mazzella Lifting Technologies
McCoig Materials, LLC
Michigan Glass Coatings
National Association Of Women
In Construction, (NAWIC)
Oakland Metal Sales, Inc.
Olson Architectural Products
Operating Engineers Local 324
JATF, Inc.
PPG Pittsburgh Paints
Pactiv Building Products
Plumbing Professors
Power Vac of Michigan
Precision Vinyl Corp.
R.S. Dale Co.
Rainbow Hi-Tech
Ronald B. Rich & Associates
SMRCA/149 Labor Management
Safety Services, Inc.
Wm. H. Scarlet & Associates
Simpson Strong-Tie
Speedway SuperfleetState of
Michigan/MIOSHA
Sterling Cleaning Services, Inc.
Teletrac, Inc.
TruFab, Inc.
Unique Metal Products
Urban's Partition &
Remodeling Co.
Uretek Great Lakes
V & S Detroit Galvanizing
Venture Grafix
Gardiner C. Vose, Inc.
ABTEK Financial
5841 Andersonville Rd
Waterford, MI 48329
Contact: Jaclyn Tocco
(248)623-4430
(248)623-4444 Fax
jaclyn@abtekusa.com
www.abtekusa.com
Products on Display: Credit Card Processing,
Gifts Cards - See Our Ad on Page 38
ARC/Dunn Blue
1009 W Maple Rd
Clawson, MI 48017
Contact: Ken Van Portfliet
(248)288-5600
(248)288-1198 Fax
ken.vanportfliet@dunnblue.com
www.dunnblue.com
Products on Display: Plotters, Project
Collaboration, Document Mangement, Remote
Print, Iship Documents, Tracking, Canon, Kip, Xerox,
Oce, HP - See Our Ad on Page 33
AZZ Galvanizing Service
7825 S Homestead Dr
Hamilton, IN 46742
Contact: Jim Getz
(260)488-4477
(260)488-4499 Fax
jimgetz@azzgalv.com
www.azzgalvanizing.com
Products on Display: Hot Dip Galvanizing
Structural Steel, Gratings, Handrailings, Industrial
Fasteners, Anchor Bolts
Ace Cutting Equipment & Supply
25806 Novi Rd
Novi, MI 48375
Contact: Ron Measel
(248)449-4944
(248)449-4946 Fax
sales@acecutting.com
www.acecutting.com
Products on Display: Market's Most Innovative &
Powerful Range Of Concrete & Masonry Cutting
Equipment, Diamond Blades & Core Bits &
Specialty Tools - See Our Ad on Page 24
Adaptive Environments, Inc.
43600 Utica Rd
Sterling Heights, MI 48314
Contact: Derek Nowak
(586)739-9300
(586)739-6220 Fax
derek@adaptive-environments.com
www.adaptive-environments.com
Products on Display: Residential Elevators,
Wheelchair Lifts, Stairlifts, Overhead Patient
Transfer Systems
Aluminum Supply Co., Inc.
14359 Meyers Rd
Detroit, MI 48227
Contact: Nancy Marshall
(313)491-5040
(313)491-6380 Fax
nmarshall@aluminumsupply.com
www.aluminumsupply.com
Products on Display: Fabricator/Distributor
Architectural Building Products, Sheet Metal
Service Center, Copper, Stainless, Galvinizing,
Aluminum, Metal Wall & Roof Systems
See Our Ad on Page 8
BAC Trowel Trades
21031 Ryan Rd
Warren, MI 48091
Contact: Mark King
(586)754-0888
(586)754-5889 Fax
mark@bricklayers.org
www.bricklayers.org
Products on Display: Education, Training, Brick,
Tile, Cement, Stone, Terrazzo, Safety, Codes, Design
BD Electrical
1684 Hydraulic Dr
Howell, MI 48855
Contact: Jeff Layer
(517)552-8701
(517)552-8706 Fax
jeff@bdelectrical.com
www.bdelectrical.com
Products on Display: Supplier Of New &
Remanufactured Electrical Distribution
Equipment; Custom Build & Repair Services Also
Available
The Blue Book
PO Box 500
Jefferson Valley, NY 10535
Contact: Jodi Germain-Tolliver
(800)431-2584
(810)844-2488 Fax
info@thebluebook.com
@thebluebook.com
www.thebluebook.com
Products on Display: Free Digital Work Flow
Solutions
Broner Glove & Safety
1750 Harmon Rd
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
Contact: Todd Jones
(800)521-1318 or (248)391-5000
(800)276-6372 Fax
safety@broner.com
www.bronersafety.com
Products on Display: Safety Equipment &
Supplies
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 33 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Equipment
Cost
Analysis
Rentals
Tech
Services
Service &
Supplies
Trade-Ins
Project Plan Printing
In your office!
248-
288-
5600
www.dunnblue.com
See us in booth 311
Fulfill your plotting needs
for one low monthly price!
We Can Save You Money!
WORKERS’
COMPENSATION
PLAN
A group self-insured Workers’
Compensation plan
providing participants with
programs and services
superior to those available
through the traditional
insurance approach.
COMPARE THE
DIFFERENCE!
For further information and
comparative cost proposal —
Call Dee Macy at CAM-COMP
(586) 790-7810
Fax (586) 790-7929
Toll Free (888) 867-4764
18645 Canal Road, Suite 4
Clinton Twp., MI 48038
34 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Cougar Sales & Rental, Inc.
46845 12 Mile Rd.
Novi, MI 48397
Contact: Marty Schmitt
(248)348-8864
(248)348-4494 Fax
cougar@cougarsalesrental.com
www.cougarsalesrental.com
Products on Display: Contractors Equipment &
Supplies; Sales, Parts, Service, Rentals
Delta Thermal Imaging (DTI)
P.O. Box 640
Walled Lake, MI 48390
Contact: Contact: Jerry Marquette
(248)303-6603
(248)522-1226 Fax
jmarquette@deltathermalimaging.com
www.deltathermalimaging.com
Products on Display: Thermal Scans & In-Depth
Reporting By A Certified Thermographer
Detroit Carpentry JATC
1401 Farrow Ave
Ferndale, MI 48220
Contact: Don Kissel
(248)541-2740
(248)541-1660 Fax
don@detcarpapp.org
www.detcarpapp.org
Products on Display: Carpenter Training Facility
- See Our Ad on Page 35
Efficiency Production
685 Hull Rd
Mason, MI 48854
Contact: James McRay
(517)676-8800
(517)676-0373 Fax
jmcray@epi-shields.com
www.efficiencyproduction.com
Products on Display: Trench Shielding &
Shoring
EnergyBright, LLC
PO Box 495
Laingsburg, MI 48848
Contact: Mary Steele
(517)651-6007
options@energybrightoptions.com
www.energybrightoptions.com
Products on Display: Affordable Green
Marketing Materials & Products
Energy Shield, Inc.
138 W Pike St
Pontiac, MI 48341
Contact: Karl Fritzinger
(248)332-2910
(248)332-4777 Fax
karlf@myflatroof.com
www.energyshield.net
Products on Display: Spray Foam Insulation &
Roofing Contractor, Roof Coatings
C.A.S.S. Sheet Metal
5641 Conner
Detroit ,MI 48213
Contact: Glenn Parvin
(313)571-2277
(313)571-1954 Fax
glenn@casssheetmetal.com
www.casssheetmetal.com
Products on Display: Custom Architectural
Sheet Metal Installation & Fabrication - See Our
Ad on Page 39
CRS Technologies, Inc.
26401 Northline Rd
Taylor, MI 48180
Contact: Herbert Harris
(734)947-9111
(734)947-9428 Fax
hharris2@hseintegrated.com
www.hseintegrated.com
Products on Display: HSE/CRS Provides
Industry With A Cost-Effective Suite Of Services &
Equipment For Workers, Assets & The Community
CTS-Construction Tool & Supply
20866 Dequindre Rd
Warren, MI 48091
Contact: Bill Parkhill
(586)757-3330
(586)757-5399 Fax
ctsbillparkhill@comcast.net
Products on Display: Fire Stop, Concrete
Anchors, Drilling Equipment, Masonry Bits, Spring
Steel Clips - See Our Ad on Page 50
Cipriano Coating Technology
6538 Arrow Dr.
Sterling Heights, MI 48314
Contact: Jim Cipriano
(586)726-2900
(586)726-2624 Fax
info@ciprianocoatings.com
www.ciprianocoatings.com
Products on Display: Provider of Quality
Resinous Floor Coatings & Concrete Polishing
Systems - See Our Ad on Page 38
Contractors Hot Line
1003 Central Ave
Fort Dodge, IA 50501
Contact: Shannon Bushman
(515)955-1600
(515)955-6636 Fax
sales@contractorshotline.com
www.contractorshotline.com
Products on Display: Industry-Specific
Publications For Heavy Construction, Parts,
Attachments, Heavy Hauling, Auctions & Services
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 35 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Homrich
200 Matlin Rd • Carleton MI 48117
Contact: Jeff Rider
(734)654-9800 x603
(734)654-3116 Fax
jeffr@homrichinc.com
www.homrichinc.com
Products on Display: Demolition &
Environmental Services
Hilti, Inc.
21890 Schoolcraft Rd • Livonia MI 48150
Contact: Jerry Blackstone
(734)522-7631 • (734)249-5333 Fax
gerald.blackstone@hilti.com • www.hilti.com
Products on Display: Hilti: An Industry Leader
With Innovative Tools & Fastening Systems,
Helping Improve Jobsite Productivity, Worker
Safety & Your Overall Bottom Line - See Our Ad
on Page 34
FastSigns of Birmingham
33322 Woodward
Birmngham, MI 48009
Contact: Jack Winslow
(248)642-9911 • (248)642-7184 Fax
212@fastsigns.com
www.fastsigns.com
Products on Display: Full Service Sign Shop;
Construction Signs, Channel Letters, LED, Light
Box & Monument Signs - See Our Ad on Page 52
Fortis Payment Systems
43155 Main St Ste 2208
Novi, MI 48375
Contact: Samir Pimputkar
(248)761-5777 • (248)232-6128 Fax
sp@quantummgroup.com
www.fortispayments.com
Products on Display: MasterCard & Visa Credit
Card Processing Services, Gift Cards
Foundation Software
150 Pearl Rd
Brunswick, OH 44212
Contact: Debra Smole
(330)220-8383 x251
(330)220-1443 Fax
dsmole@foundationsoft.com
www.foundationsoft.com
Products on Display: Foundation Software
Offers Two Products For Construction:
Foundation For Windows Job Cost Accounting
Software & An Online Payroll Processing Service
M.C. Gutherie Lumber Co.
12152 Merriman Rd
Livonia, MI 48150
Contact: Mike Mahoney
(734)513-5777
(734)513-5785 Fax
mmahoney@gutherielumber.com
www.gutherielumber.com
Products on Display: Engineered Wood
Products, Lightweight Steel Beams
Hansen Marketing Services, Inc.
1000 Decker Rd
P.O. Box 640
Walled Lake, MI 48390
Contact: Jerry Marquette
(248)669-2323
(248)669-1204 Fax
jmarquette@hansenmarketing.com
www.hansenmarketing.com
Products on Display: Wholesale Distributor Of
Building Materials
Hartland Insurance Group, Inc.
691 N. Squirrel Rd Ste 190
Auburn Hills, MI 48326-2863
Contact: Peggy Wessler
(248)377-0082
(248)377-0082 Fax
www.hartlandinsurancegroup.com
Products on Display: Discounted Insurance For
CAM Members - See Our Ad on Page 25
36 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Johns Manville
21867 Nottingham Ct
Woodhaven MI 48183
Contact: Sue Baumberger
(734)675-7535
(734)675-6355 Fax
baumbergers@jm.com
www.jm.com
Products on Display: Commercial & Industrial
Roofing System Solutions
Kerkstra Precast
3373 Busch Dr
Grandville MI 49418
Contact: Steve Haskill
(616)224-6176
(616)224-2651 Fax
shaskill@kerkstra.com
www.kerkstra.com
Products on Display: Precast Concrete Building
& Utility Products
Larson's Insurance Solutions Agency, Inc.
37625 Pembrooke
Livonia, MI 48152
Contact: Karen Larson
(248)939-2224
(248)381-5027 Fax
karenlarson@larsonsinsuranceagency.com
www.larsonsinsurance.com
Products on Display: Commercial Insurance,
Services Include Benefit & Health Services
F. Lax Construction
651 Livernois
Ferndale, MI 48220
Contact: Carol Green
(248)547-1914 or (800)547-1914
(248)547-1842 Fax
cgreen@flaxco.com
www.flaxco.com
Products on Display: Universal Design &
Construction, Barrier-Free Home Modifications,
CAPS Certified Architects & OT’s
Marshall Sales, Inc.
14359 Meyers Rd
Detroit, MI 48227
Contact: Nancy Marshall
(313)491-1700
(313)491-6462 Fax
nmarshall@marshallsales.com
www.marshallsales.com
Products on Display: Full-Line Stocking
Distributor Of Construction, Industrial,
Automotive Fasteners, Tooling, 3M, Paint, Etc.,
Application/Engineering Services Available, Tool
Repair Center - See Our Ad on Page 8
Jeffers Crane Service
P.O. Box 807 • Detroit, MI 48357
Contact: Vince Voetberg
(248)207-6944
(248)681-6504 Fax
vincev@jefferstoledo.com
www.allcrane.com
Products on Display: Sales & Rentals Of
Manlifts, Material Handlers, Boom Trucks, Cranes,
Tower Cranes - See Our Ad on Page 37
Insulex Panel Systems, Inc.
506 E. Chapin St.
Cadillac MI 49601
Contact: Scott Martin
(231)779-3991
(231)779-3991 Fax
scott@insulexpanels.com
www.insulexpanels.com
Products on Display: Structural Insulated
Building Systems
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
Using our signatory contractors guarantees a customer gets
the best trained masons for the best quality workmanship.
Do not settle for inferior training!
Our brick, tile, and cement masons undergo rigorous
education in these training areas:
Built on Training
Built on Quality
MASONRY SCIENCE I
MASONRY SCIENCE II
BLUE PRINT I
BLUE PRINT II
JOURNEYMAN UPGRADING SEMINARS
WELDING CERTIFICATION ~ MCC
OSHA 500
OSHA 10 HOUR 1926
OSHA 30 HOUR 1926
GROUT CERTIFICATION
CPR/FIRST AID
ACI – Cement Certifications
AAC – Block Training
JAHN STONE PATCHING
SUSPENDED SCAFFOLD COMPETENT PERSON
TRAINING
SCAFFOLD USERS TRAINING
MUST SAFETY MODULES & DRUG SCREENING
SELF RESCUE ROPE TRAINING
STONE UPGRADING CLASS
TILE UPGRADING CLASS
MARBLE UPGRADING CLASS
TERRAZZO UPGRADING CLASS
TERRAZZO TERRA TOP CERTIFICATION
FOREMAN TRAINING
SUPERVISOR TRAINING
FLASHING CERTIFICATION
CONFINED SPACE TRAINING
HYDROMOBILE USER AWARENESS
MASONRY WALL BRACING/RESTRICTED AREA
TRAINING
BRICKLAYERS AND ALLIED CRAFTWORKERS UNION
Local #1 • 21031 Ryan Road • Warren, MI 48091
ph. 586-754-0888 • www.bricklayers.org
Sponsored by: Bricklayers Labor Management,
Bricklayers /Cement Masons Apprentice Training
Committee, Tile Marble Terrazzo Labor Management, and
the Tile Marble Terrazzo Apprentice Training Committee.
BOOTH
219
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 37 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Michigan Glass Coatings
1120 Doris Rd
Auburn Hills MI 48326
Contact: Ed Golda
(248)364-6667
(248)364-6670 Fax
sgoga@michgc.com
www.michiganglasscoatings.com
Products on Display: Michigan Glass Coatings Is
A Leading Provider In Glass Coatings With Over
30 Years Experience; We Provide Solar, Security &
Decorative Films
National Association Of Women In
Construction, (NAWIC)
13019 Pauline Dr
Shelby Township MI 48315
Contact: Laurel Johnson
(586)731-3100
(586)731-3582 Fax
ljohnson@sme-usa.com
www.nawicdetroit.org
Products on Display: Non-Profit Organization
Enhancing The Success Of Women In
Construction
Mazzella Lifting Technologies
31623 Stephenson Hwy
Madison Heights, MI 48071
Contact: Steve Ressler
(248)752-5361
(248)588-8776 Fax
sressler@mazzellalifting.com
www.mazzellalifting.com
Products on Display: Manufacture Chain, Wire
Rope, Nylon & High-Performance Synthetic
Slings; Engineer, Design & Manufacture Cranes,
Lift Devices, Die-Related Products & Special
Fabricated Items
McCoig Materials, LLC
40500 Ann Arbor Rd E., Ste. 200
P.O. Box 6349
Plymouth MI 48170
Contact: Mike Hyland
(734)680-5494
(734)414-0447 Fax
mhyland@mccoig.biz
www.mccoigmaterials.com
Products on Display: Ready-Mix Concrete
Producer Based In Detroit With 6 Plant Locations
Strategically Located To Service & Deliver
Ready-Mixed Concrete - See Our Ad on Page 7
© ALL Erection & Crane Rental Corp.,
an Equal Opportunity Employer.
We’re always building on our reputation.
Equipment + Service + Safety + Location
Anyone can just rent you a crane. But does the buck stop there? At Jeffers,
safety is one of the most valuable services we offer our customers, beginning
with equipment that is properly maintained and operators who are trained
to the highest standards. Our complete Safety Management System
includes lift planning, crane selection and inspection, personnel
training, and performance monitoring.
Get the package deal: equipment, safety, and
service. Give us a call.
Detroit, Michigan
248-207-6944
888-758-8041
www.allcrane.com
A member of The ALL Family of Companies
See us at booth 227.
38 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Oakland Metal Sales, Inc.
2430 N. Opdyke Rd.
Auburn Hills, MI 48326
Contact: Don McCoy
(248)377-8847
(248)377-4196 Fax
info@oaklandmetalsales.com
www.oaklandmetalsales.com
Products on Display: Copper, Brass, Aluminum,
Stainless Steel, Galvanized, Zinc, Painted Steel &
Aluminum, Gutter Systems, Snow Guards, Andek
Roof Coating, Fabrication Services - See Our Ad
on Page 40
Olson Architectural Products
P.O. Box 88
Sylvania OH 43560
Contact: Tom Olson
(734)777-6788
(734)538-6080 Fax
tolson7295@aol.com
www.oap-sws.com
Products on Display: Fire-Rated Glass, FRP
Doors, Translucent Panels, Custom Railing
Systems, Composite Panels, Louvers, Sunshades
Operating Engineers Local 324 JATF, Inc.
275 E Highland Rd
Howell, MI 48843
Contact: Mary Smith
(517)546-9610
(517)546-9793 Fax
mary.smith@iuoe324.org
www.oe324jatf.org
Products on Display: Heavy Equipment
Journeyman & Apprentice Training School - See
Our Ad on Page Inside Front Cover
PPG Pittsburgh Paints
Southfield, MI
Contact: Vic West
(248)357-4817
(248)357-4543
victor.west@ppg.com
www.ppg.com
Products on Display: Pittsburgh Paints, Olympic
Stains, Lacquers, Graco, Wagner, MegaSeal,
Computor Color Matching, Eleven Locations In
Metro Detroit
Pactiv Building Products
9505 Arbor Lane
Goodrich, MI 48438
Contact: Sheryl Meerman
(810)241-4423
(810)636-4773 Fax
smeer@centurytel.net
www.green-guard.com
Products on Display: GreenGuard Commercial
Air Barrier & Building Wraps, Flashings &
Accessories, Extruded Polystyrene Insulation &
Protection Board, Drainage Mat
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
GIVE YOUR BUSINESS A COMPETITIVE EDGE.
ENHANCE YOUR CREDIBILITY.
INCREASE YOUR BOTTOM LINE.
ABTEK Financial is a local Michigan full service provider of
electronic payment solutions focusing solely on your business.
Visit booth #102 at the
2011 Michigan Construction & Design Tradeshow
and see how
ABTEK can help
increase your sales
ABTEK Financial
...educating merchants since 1986
www.abtekusa.com
DIRECT: 248.623.4430
TOLL FREE: 800.544.9145
Cipriano Coating Technology installs state of the art protective & decorative coatings for
Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional facilities. Providing concrete Polishing Systems,
we can create highly durable and low maintenance floors from your existing concrete.
We combine our years of experience with today’s technology to provide the proper
surface preparation and coating system to match each clients need.
Call the coating contractor of choice today, and ask for your free consultation!
1-888-726-3322 or 586-726-2900
Visit us online today at www.ciprianocoatings.com
POLISHED CONCRETE BEFORE AFTER DECORATIVE
YOUR SINGLE SOURCE
COATING CONTRACTOR
BOOTH
410
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 39 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
SMRCA/149 Labor Management
3560 E. 9 Mile Rd. • Warren, MI 48091
Contact: Heather Hadley
(586)759-2140, (586)759-0528 Fax
heather.hadley@smrca.org
www.smrca.org
Products on Display: Labor Management
Working Together To Build The Best Roofs - See
Our Ad on Page 47
Plumbing Professors
7966 N. Lilley Rd.
Canton, MI 48187
Contact: Peter Cunningham
(734)416-4221
(734)416-4238 Fax
pete@plumbingprofessors.com
www.plumbingprofessors.com
Products on Display: We Are A Full Service
Plumbing Company That Specializes In Sewer &
Pipe Lining - See Our Ad on Page 59
Power Vac of Michigan
44300 Grand River Ave
Novi, MI 48375
Contact: Paul Olesnavage
(248)912-9974
(248)912-9975 Fax
service@yourworkorder.com
www.yourworkorder.com
Products on Display: Vactor Jet Trucks, Camera,
Electrical, Plumbing, HVAC, Boilers
Precision Vinyl Corp.
28780 Reilly Rd
New Hudson, MI 48165
Contact: John Knapp
(248)446-0766 • (248)446-0655 Fax
javsknapp@comcast.net
www.precisionvinylcorp.com
Products on Display: Inflatable Work Domes,
Covers For Industry & Home,
Liners/Underlayments
R.S. Dale Co.
6090 Wall St
Sterling Heights MI 48312
Contact: Tom Thompson
(586)264-1962 • (586)264-2165 Fax
tthompson@rsdale.com
www.rsdale.com
Products on Display: Michigan's Specialists In
Hanging, Mounting & Supporting Needs For
Electrical, HVAC, Fire Protection & Interior Finish
Contractors - See Our Ad on Page 45
Rainbow Hi-Tech
16706 Telegraph Rd
Detroit MI 48219
Contact: Linda Kaiser
(313)794-7355 • (313)794-7368 Fax
linda@rainbowhi-tech.com
www.rainbowhi-tech.com
Products on Display: LED Digital Message
Boards/Signs
Ronald B. Rich & Associates
30665 Northwestern Hwy Ste 280
Farmington Hills, MI 48334
Contact: Ronald Rich
(248)851-4411 •
(248)851-1094 Fax
rbr@letuscollect.com
www.letuscollect.com
Products on Display: Legal Services, Lien
Services
SPECIALIZING IN THE CONSULTING, DESIGN AND
INSTALLATION OF ARCHITECTURAL SHEET METAL
WORK; COPPER ROOFING; SLATE AND CLAY TILE
CASS SHEET METAL
(313) 571- C.A.S.S.
5641 CONNER • DETROIT, MI 48213 - www.casssheetmetal.com
NEW CRANBROOK OBSERVATORY
HENRY FORD ESTATE
WAYNE STATE BONSTELLE THEATER
STATE CAPITOL
SPECIALIZING IN THE CONSULTING, DESIGN AND
INSTALLATION OF ARCHITECTURAL SHEET METAL
WORK; COPPER ROOFING; SLATE AND CLAY TILE
CRANBROOK KINGSWOOD
WAYNE STATE BONSTELLE THEATER
CRANBROOK KINGSWOOD
STATE CAPITOL
NEW CRANBROOK OBSERVATORY
HENRY FORD ESTATE
Are You Connected?
Stay connected with
CAM Magazine and
the Constuction
Association of
Michigan by following
us on these popular
social media sites.
40 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Safety Services, Inc.
5286 Wynn Rd • P.O. Box 3539
Kalamazoo, MI 49048
Contact: Kathryn Bowdish
(800)632-2955 x2004
(800)851-7233 Fax
info@safetyservicesinc.com
www.safetyservicesinc.com
Products on Display: Construction
Safety Distributor: PPE Safety,
Health, Environmental, Homeland
Security, Fall Protection, Gas
Monitors, Contractor Supplies,
Rental, Repair, Service - See Our Ad
on the Back Cover
Wm. H. Scarlet & Associates
24431 Telegraph Rd.
Southfield MI 48033
Contact: Bob Scarlet
(248)354-0424
(248)354-0568 Fax
whscarlet1@aol.com
www.c-sgroup.com
Products on Display: Construction
Specialties: Acrovyn Wall Protection,
Doors, Corner Guards, Hand Rails,
Crash Rails, Cubicle Curtains/Track,
Expansion Joint Covers, Entrance
Mats
Simpson Strong-Tie
2600 International St.
Columbus, OH 43228
Contact: Jerry Tuggle
(800)999-5099
(614)876-0636 Fax
jtuggle@strongtie.com
www.strongtie.com
Products on Display: Connectors,
Anchors, Fasteners For Wood, Steel &
Concrete Construction
Speedway Superfleet
885 E. Oakridge Ct.
Midland, MI 48640
Contact: Tom Farnham
(989)615-2736
(989)837-8604 Fax
tcfarnham@ssallc.com
www.superfleet.net
Products on Display: Free
Discount Fleet Fuel Program Good
At Any Speedway Or Marathon
Location
State of Michigan/MIOSHA
7150 Harris Dr.
P.O. Box 30643
Lansing, MI 48909
Contact: Sheila Ide
(517)322-1809
(517)322-1374 Fax
ides@michigan.gov
www.michigan.gov/miosha
Products on Display: Consultation,
Education & Training Materials For
Construction Safety
Sterling Cleaning Services, Inc.
1080 Naughton Dr
Troy, MI 48083
Contact: Jim Gallagher
(248)457-9300
(248)457-0520 Fax
jgallagher@sterling-cleaning.com
www.sterling-cleaning.com
Products on Display: Commercial
Janitorial Services/Supplies
Including Carpet Cleaning, Floor
Care Of All Types, Window &
Construction Cleaning, Water
Restoration
Teletrac, Inc.
7391 Lincoln Way
Garden Grove, CA 92841
Contact: James Fantich
(248)343-2222
(248)295-4444 Fax
jfantich@teletrac.net
www.teletrac.net
Products on Display: More Than
100,000 Vehicles Using Our
GPS-Based Technology To Manage
Their Mobile Resources In Real Time
To Maximize Productivity & Control
Costs
TruFab, Inc.
25150 Thomas Dr
Warren MI 48091
Contact: James Halanski
(586)757-6969
(586)757-9769 Fax
trufabinc@sbcglobal.net
www.trufabinc.com
Products on Display: Custom
Metal Fabricator, Stainless Steel,
Copper, Brass, Aluminum, Arch
Design, Hoods, Railings, Tops,
Cabinets, Backsplashes, Corner
Guards
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
Oakland
Metal
Sales, Inc.
Distributor of:
COPPER
• Cold Rolled Copper Sheet and Coil in 12oz-.125
• Revere Evergreen Pre-Patinated 16 & 20oz
• Freedom Gray Z-T Alloy Coated Copper, 16 & 20oz
• Copper Bar
ALUMINUM
• Mill Finish .025-.125
• Anodized Aluminum .032-.125
• Kynar 500 Painted Sheets .032-.063
STAINLESS STEEL
• 10 ga-28ga Sheets 2B & #4 Finishes
KYNAR 500/HYLAR 5000
PRE-PAINTED STEEL SHEETS
• Roofing and Wall Systems in Many Profiles from
Different Manuafacturers
GALVANIZED, GALVALUME,
BONDERIZED STEEL SHEETS
RHEINZINK SHEET & COIL
LEAD SHEETS
GUTTER SYSTEMS
• Copper: American & European Styles
• Rheinzink
• Pre-Finished Steel & Aluminum
CUSTOM FABRICATED BREAK METAL
ANDEK ROOFING & WALL COATINGS
ADDITIONAL STOCK ITEMS
• Snow Guards • Solder-Flux-Irons
• Copper Roofing Nails • Copper & Stainless
Steel Nails-Driven & Collated
Contact Us Today for All
Your Metal Needs!!
www.OaklandMetalSales.com
Phone (248) 377-8847
Fax (248) 377-4196
info@oaklandmetalsales.com
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1984
Oakland
Metal
Sales, Inc.
Distributor of:
COPPER
• Cold Rolled Copper Sheet and Coil in 12oz-.125
• Revere Evergreen Pre-Patinated 16 & 20oz
• Freedom Gray Z-T Alloy Coated Copper, 16 & 20oz
• Copper Bar
ALUMINUM
• Mill Finish .025-.125
• Anodized Aluminum .032-.125
• Kynar 500 Painted Sheets .032-.063
STAINLESS STEEL
• 10 ga-28ga Sheets 2B & #4 Finishes
KYNAR 500/HYLAR 5000
PRE-PAINTED STEEL SHEETS
• Roofing and Wall Systems in Many Profiles from
Different Manufacturers
GALVANIZED, GALVALUME,
BONDERIZED STEEL SHEETS
RHEINZINK SHEET & COIL
LEAD SHEETS
GUTTER SYSTEMS
• Copper: American & European Styles
• Rheinzink
• Pre-Finished Steel & Aluminum
CUSTOM FABRICATED BRAKE METAL
ANDEK ROOFING & WALL COATINGS
ADDITIONAL STOCK ITEMS
• Snow Guards • Solder-Flux-Irons
• Copper Roofing Nails • Copper & Stainless
Steel Nails-Driven & Collated
Contact Us Today for All
Your Metal Needs!!
www.OaklandMetalSales.com
Phone (248) 377-8847
Fax (248) 377-4196
info@oaklandmetalsales.com
FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1984
BOOTH
210
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 41 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
Uretek Great Lakes
8457 Andersonville Rd
Clarkston, MI 48346
Contact: Brad Haugk
(248)709-1136
(248)625-7710 Fax
bhaugk@uretekgreatlakes.com
www.uretekgreatlakes.com
Products on Display: Concrete Lifting, Soil
Stabilization Company Using Expanding Polymer
Place A 10 Year Warranty On Material
V & S Detroit Galvanizing
12600 Arnold St.
Redford ,MI 48239
Contact: Tim Woll
(313)535-2600
(313)535-0862 Fax
timw@hotdipgalvanizing.com
www.hotdipgalvanizing.com
Products on Display: Hot Dip Galvanizing of
Steel
Unique Metal Products
1921 Hilton
Ferndale, MI 48220
Contact: Frank Zammit
(248)545-4566
(248)545-2767 Fax
fzammit@uniquemetals.com
www.uniquemetals.com
Products on Display: Custom Fabricators
Specializing In High End Metals; Architectural,
Residential, Security; Iron, Brass, Copper, Bronze,
Aluminum, Stainless Steel
Urban's Partition & Remodeling Co.
19430 Gerald
P.O. Box 5289
Northville, MI 48167-5289
Contact: Rod Vasold
(248)348-1180
(248)348-7858 Fax
rod@urbanspartition.com
www.urbanspartition.com
Products on Display: Modernfold Operable
Partitions

chit , Ar tural truc e S et oncr ast C ec Pr
al tur ec chit ar • e or c w hollo
double • olumns c • beams • panels
tanks septic • manholes •
erkstra.com • 800.434.5830 • inf .k w w w

ts oduc y Pr tural & Utilit ec chit
els spandr • panels all w
elev & stair • stadia • ees t double
ellaneous misc • tanks geothermal •
erkstra.com o@k 30 • inf fo@k

all w al tur uc str •
stairs • ers w o t or t a elev
ts oduc pr ast ec pr ellaneous

Venture Grafix
47757 West Rd Ste C-105
Wixom, MI 48393
Contact: Ray Kalosis
(248)703-1787
(248)449-1337 Fax
ray@venturegrafix.com
www.venturegrafix.com
Products on Display: Large Format Digital
Printing, Signs & Banners
Gardiner C. Vose, Inc.
832 Crestview Ave
Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302
Contact: Kurt Schwarz
(248)332-7000
(248)332-7073 Fax
kschwarz@gardinervose.com
www.gardinervose.com
Products on Display: Operable Partitions,
Access Flooring, Demountable Partitions, Sound
Panels, Union Carpenters
42 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
tangible link to the living world to help
people understand the importance of these
efforts. Construction manager Granger
Construction Company, Lansing, and
architect Neumann/Smith Architecture,
Southfield, led the team that delivered this
fine example of sustainable design and
construction.
picturesque oasis. Exterior sun shades and
tall translucent glass windows celebrate the
rural countryside with spectacular views
while providing abundant natural light
inside. The 73,000-square-foot facility, for
which LEED Gold-Level certification is
anticipated, not only conserves valuable
natural resources – it also provides a
M
any facilities are designed with
sustainable goals in mind, but the
Centurion Medical Products
Corporate Headquarters Building,
Williamston, is literally outstanding in the
field. Not only has the structure been
recognized as CAM Magazine’s 2010 Green
Building of the Year, it also sits nestled in a
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
Centurion Medical
Products Corporate
Headquarters:
2010 GREEN PROJECT OF THE YEAR
By David Miller, Associate Editor Photography by Justin Maconochie
Visit us at www.cam-online.com
recycled material for the facility – with recycled content accounting
for almost 28 percent of all materials used.
Many of the elements that make the new Centurion Medical
Products facility green will probably go unnoticed by the people
who visit the facility, but the reasons behind them are made
abundantly clear by a design that celebrates harmony with the
facility’s natural surroundings.
UNDERSTANDING WHY
The Centurion Medical Products Corporate Headquarters sits on a
bucolic 37-acre site. The building blends into the site with a low
profile that reduces visibility from the road and this is augmented
with landscape berms that screen the delivery area while shielding
the building. Future outdoor amenities will include a soccer field, a
picnic area and a fitness trail which will run around the entire
property. A six foot band of wild flowers lines one side of the entry
drive and wraps around the building while separating lawn areas
from natural grasses. Eventually, workers will need to enter the
building to complete their tasks, but they need not leave this natural
splendor behind when they do.
"The owners of Centurion Medical Products wanted to create an
open, inviting, flexible and enjoyable work environment for their
employees,” said Stanley E. Cole, RA, LEED AP, principal at
Neumann/Smith and project manager and LEED administrator for
the project. “Through the use of vision glass, translucent windows
and clerestories, the building was designed to allow a lot of natural
light into the building and provide great views for 98% of the
normally occupied spaces."
Natural light flows over the vibrant interior spaces highlighting the
creative talents of Jamie Millspaugh, NCIDQ, LEED AP, interior designer
for Neumann/Smith. Clerestory glass in the centrally located main
atrium brings natural light into interior spaces. Daylight is also
harvested along the building
perimeter and interior column
uplights, frequently allowing
for lighting fixtures to be
dimmed or turned off entirely.
Efficiency is further enhanced
by a flexible system that lets
individual users set lighting
levels to suit their needs and
preferences. The conference
center alone features four
separate lighting zones that
can be individually set.
Generous portions of
natural light coupled with
outdoor views create a
tangible connection to nature
that reinforces the strong
commitment to sustainability
already in place at Centurion.
The company embraces a
corporate recycling policy
with multiple bins placed to
provide easy access from
offices and loading dock
areas. Company leaders also
selected linear fluorescent
lighting over compact
UNDERSTANDING HOW
Many sustainable features at the Centurion Medical Products
Corporate Headquarters are easy to see, but a thorough
understanding of the structure is needed to understand the depth of
the commitment. An energy efficient exterior envelope delivers an
insulation R value that is 28 percent higher than what is required by
code, while the building’s mechanical and electrical design
incorporates numerous efficient design strategies to perform 18
percent better than the base model for a similar structure. These
savings were confirmed through an advanced building
commissioning process that will be maintained over time to
document long-term results.
Water usage was also given careful consideration through
water-efficient plumbing fixtures. Native and drought resistant
plants were used to reduce irrigation needs. When irrigation is
required, water will be delivered by drip line systems and a
SmartLine controller delivers only what is needed. As natural
resources become scarcer, the sophisticated techniques used at
Centurion Medical Products will become more common.
“Green building is, in essence, about being responsible whether
you are the owner, architect, engineer or builder,” said Christine
Costa, LEED AP, LEED coordinator and project architect for
Neumann/Smith. “It is a responsibility to the public and to the
environment that everyone on this project took seriously, which is
what led to its successful realization as a green building. To
recognize it as such, as well as other responsible projects, will
continue to move the industry in that direction and ultimately the
‘green building movement’ will become standard practice.”
Before the green building movement can become standard
practice, construction and design professionals must address the
challenges associated with it. Although this can require a different
mindset from contractors, many have found that tangible benefits
accompany green building
practices.
“I don’t think that we did
anything unusual on this
project,” said Jeff Tuley,
project manager for Granger
Construction Company. “We
try to reuse and recycle as
much as we can – from
concrete and masonry waste,
to cardboard, paper,
Styrofoam, wood and metal.
We have recognized that
there is a cost savings
because we are sending less
material to landfills.”
Tuley admits that not every
contractor has discovered the
benefits of recycling, but it is
standard operating
procedure on every project
for Granger Construction
Company. Over 466 tons of
materials were diverted from
landfills on the Centurion
Medical Products project. The
project team also specified
significant quantities of
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 43
44 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
THE FOLLOWING SUBCONTRACTORS
AND PROFESSIONAL CONSULTANTS
CONTRIBUTED THEIR SKILLS TO THE
PROJECT:
• Blinds and Shades – Bayvue Drapery,
Burton
• Concrete, Foundations, Flatwork and
General Trades – Granger Construction
Company, Lansing
• Doors and Hardware – S.A. Morman &
Company, Grand Rapids
• Electrical – Superior Electric of Lansing
• Elevator – Thyssenkrupp Elevator, Grand
Rapids
• Fire Protection – American Fire
Protection, Lansing
• Flooring – Lansing Tile & Mosaic, Inc.,
Lansing
• Furniture – DBI Business Interiors, Lansing
• Glass and Curtainwall – Huron Valley
Glass, Inc., Ypsilanti
• HVAC – Myers Plumbing & Heating, Inc.,
Lansing
• IT Infrastructure – Netech Corp., Grand
Rapids
• Landscape Architect – Landscape
Architects and Planners, Lansing
• Landscaping – Hundred Acre Woods, Inc.,
Williamston
• Masonry – Leidal and Hart Mason
Contractors, Livonia
• Mechanical and Electrical Engineer –
Peter Basso Associates, Inc., Troy
• Metal Studs and Drywall – DSI Acoustical
Co., Lansing
• Painting – Detail Painting, Grant
• Paving – American Asphalt, Inc., Lansing
• Raised Access Floors – Data Supplies,
Plymouth
• Raised Access Flooring – Haworth, Inc.,
Holland
• Roofing – Borner Restoration, Lansing
• Siding – Architectural Metals, Inc.,
Portland
• Signage – Valley City Sign Company,
Comstock Park
• Sitework – Woodhull Construction Co.,
Inc., Laingsburg
• Steel – Valley Steel Company, Saginaw
Subcontractors and professional consultants listed
in this feature are identified by the general
contractor, architect or owner.
project team.
"It is our hope that by informing the
public about green ideas and why it is
important to be good stewards of the earth
that one day it will be commonplace
thinking and sound design practice with
materials that are ecologically friendly,” said
Emil R. Sdao, RA, LEED AP, project designer
and design director at Neumann/Smith.
fluorescent lighting whenever possible and
the company also instituted a recycling
program for any used lamps that might
contain mercury.
The final result of this successful project is
a building that is truly worthy of the title,
“Green Building of the Year.” The CAM
Magazine staff sincerely hopes that others
will follow the example of this dedicated
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
Kotz, Sangster,
Wysocki and Berg, P.C.
Construction Law Specialists
Solving corporate and litigation problems
for the construction industry
WWW.KOTZSANGSTER.COM
• LITIGATION
• ARBITRATION
• CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION
• EMPLOYMENT AND LABOR
• CORPORATE TRANSACTIONS
• REPRESENTING
- GENERAL CONTRACTORS
- SUBCONTRACTORS
- DEVELOPERS
- OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT COMPANIES
Detroit
400 Renaissance Center
Ste. 3400, Detroit, MI 48243
Telephone: (313) 259-8300
Facsimile: (313) 259-1451
Birmingham
300 Park St., Suite 265
Birmingham, MI 48009
Telephone: (248) 646-1050
Facsimile: (248) 646-1054
Buchanan
400 East Front St., Suite G
Buchanan, MI 49107
Telephone: (269) 697-4863
Facsimile: (269) 697-4867
Grand Rapids
61 Commerce S.W.
Grand Rapids, MI 49503
Telephone: (616) 940-0230
Facsimile: (616) 285-7215
46 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
GREEN PROJECT OF THE YEAR
HONORABLE MENTION
Dearborn Town Center
Parking Deck
Photography by Matt Austermann, CAM
The Dearborn Town Center Parking Deck is
a new five-level, 525-car precast structure
located near the intersection of Schaeffer and
Michigan Avenues. While the parking deck
itself is not a LEED certified project, many of
its green components were used in the LEED
calculations for the new medical office
building, to which it is attached by a
glass-enclosed skywalk.
The deck was constructed on a previously
developed site that was nearly 100 percent
impervious and provided no stormwater
controls. Redevelopment of this site
conserves undeveloped land while
significantly reducing the overall footprint by
stacking parking spaces instead of spreading
them out over a surface lot. The new deck
also provides 100 percent stormwater runoff
treatment through a combination of
methods.
The deck includes Photo Voltaic Solar
Panels and an energy efficient fluorescent
lighting system that can be controlled by a
laptop computer. Lights also be programmed
to dim during low-use hours and instantly
activated by motion sensors. An estimated 62
percent decease in energy consumption over
typical parking deck lighting systems is
expected and the deck also includes electric
vehicle charging stations.
MADONNA UNIVERSITY – FRANCISCAN
CENTER FOR SCIENCE AND MEDIA
Owner – Madonna University, Livonia
Construction Manager - Clark Construction
Co., Lansing
Architect and Engineer - SmithGroup
Incorporated, Detroit
Owner’s Representative – Charles R. Bisel,
Focus Facility Consulting Services, Inc.,
West Bloomfield
• Access Flooring – Data Supplies Company,
Plymouth
• Carpentry, Casework, Fumehoods Metal
Studs, Drywall, EIFS and General Trades –
Nelson Mill Company, Southfield
• Controlled Environmental Room – Detroit
Technical Equipment Co., Troy
• Concrete (Site and Building Flatwork) –
Contek, Inc., Ann Arbor
• Electrical – LaBelle Electric, Macomb
Township
• Elevators – Schindler Elevator Corp.,
Livonia
• Fire Protection – Interstate Fire Protection,
Milford
• Floor Covering and Wall Tile – Artistic
Installation, Inc., Warren
• Foundations – E.L.S. Construction, Inc.,
Orion Township
• Glass, Glazing and Aluminum – Harmon,
Inc., Livonia
• Landscaping – KLM Landscape, Romeo
• Masonry – Baro Contracting, Clinton
Township
• Mechanical (HVAC and Plumbing) – John
E. Green Company, Highland Park
• Metal Wall Panels – Universal Wall
Systems, Grand Rapids
• Painting – Niles Construction Services,
Flint
• Painting, Striping and Exterior Signage –
Nagle Paving Company, Novi
• Roofing – J.D. Candler Roofing, Livonia
• Sitework and Underground Utilities –
W.P.M., Inc., Grand Blanc
• Soils Testing – Soil and Material Engineers,
Inc., (SME), Plymouth
• Structural Steel – Kirby Steel, Inc., Burton
• Waterproofing & Joint Sealants – Western
Waterproofing Co., Livonia
GREEN PROJECT OF THE YEAR
HONORABLE MENTION
Madonna University Franciscan
Center
Photo by Jim Haefner Photography
During the Green Design Charrette for
the new Franciscan Center at Madonna
University, Sister Rose Marie Kujawa,
university president, first voiced the four
words that became a mantra for the entire
team: “Good, Growing, Gorgeous and
Green.” Achieving Gold-Level certification
under USGBC’s LEED rating system was a
natural extension of this commitment.
Energy efficiency emerged as an early
challenge for the team, as certain activities
in laboratory and broadcasting spaces
involved a “process load” that was largely
dictated by the equipment that was used.
HVAC loads, on the other hand, could be
greatly reduced and three separate HVAC
units were installed, helping the project
team achieve seven out of 10 possible
energy points under LEED.
Goals for diverting waste from landfills
and using materials with recycled content
were also exceeded on the project. Other
green highpoints include the green roof
above the broadcasting studio, a white PVC
roof over other portions of the building,
irrigation and plumbing fixtures designed
to reduce water usage, FSC-Certified lumber
used for timber frame construction, and a
comprehensive indoor air quality
management plan.
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 47 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
GREEN PROJECT OF THE YEAR
HONORABLE MENTION
Greenleaf Trust
Photography by Jeff Garland
This five-story, 67,000-square-foot,
building on a formerly blighted corner lot in
a designated Brownfield redevelopment
area houses an upscale restaurant, high-end
• Glass and Glazing – Modern Mirror and
Glass Company, Inc., Roseville
• HVAC/Plumbing – Limbach Company, LLC,
Pontiac
• Landscaping/Greenscreen – Donato
Landscape, Shelby Township
• M/E Engineer – Peter Basso Associates,
Inc., Troy
• Painting – Duross Painting Company,
Warren
• Piling – E.C. Korneffel Co., Trenton
• Precast – National Precast Inc., Roseville
• Roofing – Royal Roofing Company, Inc.,
Orion
• Security Cameras – Center Line
Technologies, Inc., Center Line
• Site Concrete – Albanelli Cement
Contractors, Inc., Livonia
• Sitework – Dan’s Excavating, Inc.,
Shelby Township
• Steel – Cadillac Iron Inc., Oxford
• Structural Engineer – Ehlert/Bryan, Inc.,
Southfield
DEARBORN TOWN CENTER
PARKING DECK
Owner – City of Dearborn
General Contractor – The Dailey Company,
Lake Orion
Architect – Hobbs + Black, Inc., Ann Arbor
Developer – REDICO Management, Inc.,
Southfield
• Carpentry – Jasman Construction,
Whitmore Lake
• Caulking/Waterproofing – RAM
Construction Services, Livonia
• Civil Engineer – Professional Engineering
Associates, Inc., Troy
• Concrete – ELS Construction, Inc., Orion
Township
• Doors/Windows – KVM Door, Clinton
Township
• Electrical – Edgewood Electric, Madison
Heights
• Elevators – Schindler Elevator
Corporation, Livonia
• Fencing – Industrial Fence, Detroit
• Fire Protection – Professional Sprinkler,
Inc., Wixom
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48 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
• Greenleaf Trust Interior and Zazios
Restaurant)
• Elevators – Thyssen Krupp Elevator
Company, Livonia (Core and Shell)
• Fire Alarm – Riverside Integrated
Systems, Grand Rapids (Core and Shell)
• Fire Protection – Advanced Fire
Protection, Lansing (Core and Shell,
Greenleaf Trust
• Interior and Zazios Restaurant)
• Fire Protection – Westland Fire
Protection, Livonia (Core and Shell,
Greenleaf Trust
• Interior and Zazios Restaurant)
• Fire and Smoke Protection – William E
Harnish Accoustical, Inc., Redford (Core
and Shell)
• Food Service Equipment – Great Lakes
Hotel Supply, Detroit (Zazios Restaurant)
• General Trades – City Renovation & Trim,
Inc., Auburn Hills (Core and Shell)
• Glazing – Madison Heights Glass,
Ferndale (Core and Shell, Greenleaf Trust
Interior and Zazios Restaurant)
• Hard Tile Flooring – F.D. Beradino Tile,
Eastpointe (Core and Shell and Greenleaf
Trust Interior)
• Hard Tile Flooring – Wolverine Stone
Company, Warren (Zazios Restaurant)
• Landscaping – Donato Landscape,
Shelby Township (Core and Shell)
• Mechanical – Pro Services, Portage (Core
and Shell, Greenleaf Trust Interior and
Zazios Restaurant)
• Painting – Somerset Painting and
Commercial Services, Washington (Core
and Shell,
• Greenleaf Trust Interior and Zazios
Restaurant)
• Siding (Metal Panels) – Architectural
Metals, Inc., Portland (Core and Shell)
• Roofing – Stephenson & Sons Roofing,
Flint (Core and Shell)
• Site Remediation – Bierlein Companies,
Inc., Midland (Core and Shell)
• Security Cameras – SecurAlarm Systems,
Grand Rapids (Core and Shell, Greenleaf
Trust
• Interior and Zazios Restaurant)
• Specialty Doors and Frames – Overhead
Door of Jackson, Jackson (Core and Shell)
• Special Foundations, Load Bearing
Elements and Auger Cast Piles – Schnabel
• Foundation Company, Cary IL (Core and
Shell)
• Structural Steel and Metal Fabrication –
Kirby Steel, Burton (Core and Shell)
office space and luxury residential units. The
design and construction team created a
landmark façade and revitalized a busy
Birmingham corner while following LEED
guidelines, with Silver-Level Certification as
the primary target. All future tenant
improvements will be required to meet the
same standards.
The building will encourage walking over
driving by providing easy access to public
transportation, a post office, library, fire
station, police station, park, bank, places of
worship, school, movie theater and
supermarket. Construction plans also
addressed soil erosion, waterway
sedimentation, dust control and waste
management. Vegetated and high Solar
Reflective Index roofing, low-e insulated
glass, along with high-efficiency plumbing,
heating, cooling, lighting and building
automation systems were installed.
Over 10 percent of the building materials
used was sourced within 500 miles of the
building site and recycled materials are also
featured prominently throughout the
facility. All of these sustainable elements,
and many more, come together to create a
building that minimizes its impact to its
surroundings.
GREENLEAF TRUST
Owner – Catalyst Development, Kalamazoo
Construction Manager – CSM Group,
Kalamazoo
Architect – Eckert Wordell, LLC, Kalamazoo
• Carpet and Specialty Flooring – SCI
Floorcovering, Southfield (Core and Shell,
• Greenleaf Trust Interior and Zazios
Restaurant)
• Concrete Flatwork, Structural and Floor
Slabs – Ideal Contractors, Detroit (Core
and Shell)
• Concrete Forming and Accessories –
Albanelli Cement Contractors, Livonia
(Core and Shell)
• Conveying Equipment – Connelly Crane
Rental Corporation, Detroit (Core and
Shell)
• Drywall, Acoustical Ceilings and General
Trades – Jasman Construction, Whitmore
Lake
• (Core and Shell, Greenleaf Trust Interior
and Zazios Restaurant)
• Earth Moving – Site Development, Inc.,
Madison Heights (Core and Shell)
• Electrical and Fire Alarm – Edgewood
Electric, Madison Heights (Core and Shell,
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
• BONDS
• CONTRACTORS
INSURANCE
• ENVIRONMENTAL
INSURANCE
• LIFE & HEALTH
(248) 355-4411
www.zervosgroup.com
24724 Farmbrook Rd.
Southfield 48034
Gus E. Zervos
CEO
Steve M. Zervos
President
Angelo G. Zervos, VP
Dave Lang
Dominic Nicita
Michael G. Zervos, VP
Jim Gargaro
Don Burden
(586) 757-7100
Endorsed Service Provider
ADVANTAGES OF USING
YOUR EVS
BUYING SERVICES:
COST SAVINGS
FINANCING
CONVENIENCE
(Everything Very Simple)
Automotive Sales
& Leasing
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 49 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
• Structured Cabling – TeL Systems, Ann
Arbor (Zazios Restaurant)
• Traffic Coatings – D.C. Byers, Grand Rapids
(Core and Shell)
• Traffic Signals – Rauhorn Electric,
Macomb (Core and Shell)
• Unit Masonry – Leidal & Hart, Livonia
(Core and Shell and Zazios Restaurant)
GREEN PROJECT OF THE YEAR
HONORABLE MENTION
Ferndale Library
Photography by Stefanie Decker of BP
Studio
This 7,761-square-foot addition and
11,941 renovation of an existing library is
currently seeking LEED Gold-Level
Certification. The north and west additions
of the building are accentuated by living
green roofs with aesthetically pleasing
vegetative material that will allow the
membrane underneath to last for nearly a
century. The vegetative roof also reduces
interior noise, stormwater runoff and helps
to mitigate the “heat island” effect.
A vertical, closed-loop geothermal system
with 28 geo wells drilled to a depth of 450
feet handles heating and cooling in the
building. While more expensive in
installation, the system is expected to pay for
itself in approximately seven years. Roof
runoff is stored in a 26,000-gallon underwater
tank then pumped out for various uses,
including irrigation and water efficient toilets,
through a gray water system.
Nearly 40 percent of the products used,
including structural steel and acoustical
decking, concrete, vegetative and
supplemental roofing materials, millwork
50 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
• Painting and Vinyl – Auburn Painting Co.,
Rochester
• Paving – Nagle Paving Co., Novi
• Plumbing – USA Plumbing and Sewer
Service, Inc., Ray Township
• Projection Screen – Progressive Plumbing
Supply Co., Warren
• Resilient Floor and Carpet – SCI Floor
Covering - Southfield
• Roofing – Molnar Roofing, Inc., Riverview
• Signs – I-Sign LLC, Warren
• Signs – Images Unlimited LLC, Rochester
• Skylights – Architectural Building
Components, Oak Park
• Structural Steel – Cadillac Iron, Inc.,
Oxford
• Toilet Partitions and Accessories – Steel
Equipment Co., Pontiac
GREEN PROJECT OF THE YEAR
HONORABLE MENTION
Crystal M. Lange College of
Nursing & Health Sciences
Building
Photos by Christopher Lark Photography
This facility is on track to achieve LEED
Silver-Level Certification and it is tied into an
aqua-thermal system – the largest pond
closed loop geothermal system in Michigan.
The water-to-water heat pump system
utilizes only seven heat pump units and has
no negative impact on the pond’s aquatic
life, while using the water’s 40 degree F
temperature to provide 130 degree hot
water heating and 42 degree chilled water.
A photovoltaic system will also generate
between 45,000 and 50,000 (kWHr) annually,
approximately 2.5 percent of the anticipated
and masonry, were manufactured within 500
miles of the site. Over 30 percent of the
material used in the facility was recycled,
while the project team was also able to
recycle 90 percent of the demolished
material and construction debris.
FERNDALE PUBLIC LIBRARY
Owner – City of Ferndale
Construction Manager – Frank Rewold and
Son, Inc., Rochester
Architect – Penchansky Whisler Architects,
Ann Arbor
• Blinds and Shades – The Sheer Shop,
Shelby Township
• Carpentry – Wally Kosorski and Company,
Inc., Clinton Township
• Caulking and Sealants – DRV Joint Sealant
Contractors, Shelby Township
• Ceramic Tile – The Stuart Company,
Macomb
• Concrete Flatwork – K & W Concrete, Inc.,
Romeo
• Drywall and Light Gauge Framing –
Hudson Interiors, Inc., Shelby Township
• Earthwork – Earth-Con Excavating, Inc.,
Romeo
• Electrical – Advantage Electric and
Controls, Shelby Township
• Fencing – American Fence and Supply Co.,
Inc., Warren
• Fire Protection – TriStar Fire Protection,
Plymouth
• Fireplace – FireClass LLC, Wixom
• Floor Mats – Construction Specialties, Inc.,
Boston, MA
• Folding Partitions - Urbans Partition and
Remodeling, Northville
• Footings – McCarthy Construction Co.,
Walled Lake
• Geothermal and Earth LP Piping –
Executive Heating and Cooling, Shelby
Township
• Glass and Glazing – Rochester Hills
Contract Glazing, Rochester Hills
• Hallow Metal Doors and Hardware –
LaForce, Inc., Green Bay, WI
• HVAC – Multi-Mechanical, Sterling Heights
• Landscaping and Irrigation – Shades of
Green, Rochester Hills
• Masonry – HMC Mason Contractors,
Shelby Township
• Millwork – Troy Millwork, Inc., Rochester
Hills
• Overhead Doors – Overhead Door West -
Waterford
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
Specialists in:
Concrete Anchors
Spring Steel Clips
Fire Stopping Systems
The CTS Fastening Center
is designed to better
accommodate both normal
and emergency needs—for
unexpected changes if a
breakdown occurs, or if
you’re just out-of-stock.
We’re loaded with quality
concrete anchors, masonry
bits, rotary hammer drills,
fire stopping materials and
spring steel clips, including
many hard to find items.
Our central location in the
Detroit Metro area makes
pickup only minutes away
from your jobsite.
OUR PHONE NUMBER IS
586/757-3330
Fax 586/757-5399
20866 Dequindre
Warren, MI 48091
BOOTH
126
Construction
Tool & Supply
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 51 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
electrical power for the new building. The
facility was also sited to maximize
daylighting, with every occupied space
including a window. The building envelope
is designed to reduce solar gain through
shading devices and low-e insulated glass.
Fabrics and furnishings were selected
with sustainability in mind. Green goals
were addressed with Air Quality and
Construction Waste Management Plans. The
building also supports a variety of
alternative transportation possibilities and
includes many features designed to reduce
water consumption.
CRYSTAL M. LANGE COLLEGE OF
NURSING AND HEALTH SCIENCES
BUILDING
Owner – Saginaw Valley State University,
University Center
Construction Manager – Spence Brothers,
Saginaw
Architect – TMP Architecture, Inc.,
Bloomfield Hills
• Lab Consultant – Ballinger, Philadelphia,
PA
• Mechanical and Electrical Engineer –
Peter Basso Associates, Troy
• Asphalt Paving – Pyramid Paving,
Essexville
• Athletic Flooring – Star School Flooring
Corp., Hastings
• Audio Visual – ICI, Saginaw
• Concrete Foundations – Fessler &
Bowman, Inc., Flushing
• Concrete Slabs – Spence Brothers,
Saginaw
• Drywall – William Reichenbach Co.,
Lansing
• Electrical – Maryland Electric Company,
Clinton Township
• Elevator – Schindler Elevator, Grand
Rapids
• Fire Protection – Winninger Fire
Protection, Birch Run
• General Trades – Serenus Johnson
Construction, Bay City
• Glass and Glazing – Architectural Glazing
Systems, Mt. Morris
• Hard Tile and Soft Flooring – Standard
Tile, Saginaw
• Irrigation – Marlo Company, Saginaw
• Lab Casework – Detroit Technical
Equipment Company, Troy
• Landscaping – Bell Landscaping, Saginaw
• Lockers – Rayhaven Group, Southfield
52 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
• Terrazzo Flooring – Artisan Tile, Inc.,
Brighton
• Testing and Balancing – International Test
& Balance, Inc., Southfield
• Underground Electrical – Halligan
Electric, Flint
• Underground Mechanical – R.C. Martin,
Bay City
• Waterproofing and Joint Sealants – RAM
Construction Services of Michigan,
Livonia
• Window Treatments – Creative Windows,
Ann Arbor
Subcontractors and professional consultants
listed in this feature are identified by the
general contractor, architect or owner.
• Masonry – Leidal Hart Masonry, Livonia
• Masonry Foundations – Boettcher
Masonry, Bay City
• Mechanical – Remer Plumbing & Heating,
Saginaw
• Painting – Hock Painting, West Branch
• Resinous Flooring – DC Byers, East
Lansing
• Security System – Electronic Security
Systems, Warren
• Site Concrete – A.J. Rhemus & Son, Bay
City
• Sitework – Fisher Contracting, Midland
• Sitework – Mead & Sons Contracting,
Saginaw
• Smart Podium – Three Rivers, Midland
• Structural Steel – Delta Steel, Saginaw
• Technology – SPI Innovations, Freeland
• Temporary Electrical – Nuechterlein
Electric, Frankenmuth
• Temporary Fencing – Noble Fence,
Armada
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1






















T

Ì Ì






“I already have a tax return, why do I need a financial
s






54 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
BLUEPRINT READING 1 / BASIC
Learn the basics of how to read and understand construction blueprints
from actual project drawings. This is a basic course is a foundation for the
Intermediate and Advanced Blueprint Reading courses offered by
CAMTEC.
Instructor: Chuck Bovair
BLUEPRINT READING 2 / INTERMEDIATE
This course provides experience in exploring residential and light
commercial construction documents. Fundamentals of Blue print
Reading Part 1 are reinforced and used in the review and study of
specific projects.
Emphasis is placed on three major evaluations.
1. Understanding the project scope and intent. What is being
constructed and how the Architect/Engineer is explaining the project.
2. Understanding how the documents are formatted. How the
Architect/Engineer conveyed information by symbols, lines, words and
drawing organization.
3. Understanding where individual components or trades are indicated.
Where are specific elements such as structure, plumbing or electrical
shown or indicated.
Five sets of documents are discussed over the length of the course by
way of class discussion and review followed by assignments on the
specific project with follow up and clarifications. The associated chapters
in the text also explain the individual projects. The projects are a
single-story Brick Veneer Residence, a two-story Commercial Building, a
four-story Multi-family Dwelling, a single-story Branch Bank, and a
Wendy’s Restaurant. Prerequisite: Blueprint Reading 1 or prior experience
reading blueprints needed.
Instructor: Chris Dow - URS Corporation
CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY TECHNICIAN
Developed by Clemson University and administered nationally, this
course is ideal for new personnel or anyone interested in obtaining a
broad knowledge of the construction industry. Upon completion, a
standardized test will be given and sent to Clemson for grading. Students
who achieve a passing score will become Certified Industry Technicians,
and entitled to use the designation "CIT" after their name.
Instructor: Richard Scheck - Frank Rewold & Son, Inc.
CONSTRUCTION CONTRACTS & SUBCONTRACTS
Learn to review a contract with an owner or a subcontractor with a
general contractor, without being an attorney. Know how to check for
key provisions. What is a ‘pay when paid’ clause? How will disputes and
claims be handled? What can I negotiate? Know before you start the
work.
Instructor: Marty Burnstein, Law Offices of Marty Burnstein
LIST OF CLASSES:
• Accounts Receivable Management & Collections
• AIA Contracts
• AIA Contracts & Contracts and Subcontracts (Combined class)
• Blueprint Reading I/Basic
• Blueprint Reading II/Intermediate
• Construction Industry Technician (CIT)
• Contracts and Subcontracts
• Estimating I
• Excavations the Grave Danger
• Fall Protection
• First Aid, CPR and AED (combined class)
• Lien Law/Payment Bonds
• OSHA 10-Hour
• OSHA 30-Hour
• MIOSHA 10-Hour
• Preparing Documents to Preserve Construction Liens and
Payment Bond Claims
• Project Management Commercial/Residential Construction
• Scheduling & Planning
• Techniques for Controlling and Working on Delayed
Projects: Scheduling and Legal Perspectives
ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE MANAGEMENT & COLLECTIONS
This seminar will take you through the four phases of the debt collection
process:
1. Debt is created. 2. The delinquency period. 3. Litigation. 4.
Post-judgment collections. Learn how to set up a project so that you get
paid. We'll look at everything from the first call to the day you cash the
check. Why sell if you can't collect? The goal of this seminar is to assist
you in creating more agreeable terms for your credit sales and teach you
techniques to collect debts in-house. You will also gain an understanding
of the litigation and judgment collection process. The seminar is
recommended for business owners and those responsible for the
monitoring of delinquent accounts.
Instructors: Ronald B. Rich - Ronald B. Rich & Associates and Mark
Merlanti, Esq. – Finkel Whitefield Selik
AIA CONTRACTS
This seminar instructs contractors and subcontractors on the use of AIA
contracts, including design-build, construction management, and
subcontract agreements. Special attention is paid to AIA A201, the most
commonly used set of general conditions in the industry. Other topics
include: contractual assignment of risk; owner, architect, contractor and
subcontractor obligations; dispute resolution procedures; change orders;
and key differences between the AIAs A201 and the new Consensus
DOCs 200. This course is directed at those who negotiate and manage
contracts, such as company owners, senior managers, and project
managers.
Instructors: R. Edward Boucher/ Barry Jensen - Kotz, Sangster, Wysocki
and Berg, P.C.
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
RESERVE YOUR CLASS IN ADVANCE!
Questions? Call 248-972-1000




9:00 a.m. – 11:15 a.m. - BLOCK 1
Project Bonding- The Financial Perspective
Banking and Bonding in a slow construction market.
FASB-The Financial Accounting Standards Board
Proposed Changes
How construction contractors recognize revenue. Disclosure of
potential withdrawal liability for contractors who contribute to a
Defined Benefit Plan.
Guy Hurley Blaser & Heuer LLC Insurance
& Surety Services - Mark Madden
Doeren Mayhew - Aaron Partridge
11:30 a.m. – 1:45 p.m. - BLOCK 2
Indoor Air Quality During Construction
How to identify and evaluate indoor airborne hazards during the
construction process. Hazards such as asbestos, lead, mold and
other toxic compounds will be discussed.
This session will identify many of the most common sources and
identify practical hazard control methods.
Nova Environmental - Kary Amin


Class Date
& Location:
Class Date
& Location:
Company ______________________________________________________________________________
First Name ____________________________________________________________________________
Last Name ____________________________________________________________________________
Address ______________________________________________________________________________
City ________________________________________ State_______________ Zip Code ______________
Phone __________________________________________ E-mail ________________________________
Block Choice(s): Ì Block #1 Ì Block #2 Ì Block #3
Credit Card Number ________________________________________________Exp. Date ____________
Name on Card __________________________________________________________________________
Billing Zip Code______________________________Security Code ______________________________
Please Check One Ì Company Card Ì Personal Card
2:15 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. - BLOCK 3
Present Your Business in the Best Light: How Preparing a Financial Statement Helps Get You Prequalified.
Topics Discussed: The top 5 things that are a bust in your financial statement; “I already have a tax return, why do I need a financial
statement?”; What your bank and bonding company are looking for in your financial statement; How your financial statement helps
get you prequalified.
UHY Advisors MI, Incorporated - Rob Scope & John J. Gallo
Tuition Fee $20.00 Per Block - Deadline January 26, 2011
Mail Registration Form and Payment to: CAMTEC
43636 Woodward Avenue, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-2304
OR Fax to 248-972-1135
Construction
Tradeshow
Classes
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 55 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
56 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
MIOSHA 10-HOUR
This 10-hour program presents an overview of MIOSHA regulations for
the construction industry. Detailed information is presented to enable
the participant to develop an accident prevention plan as required by
Rule 114 of MIOSHA Construction Safety Standard Part 1, General Rules.
An overview of MIOSHA inspection procedures is presented, as well as
the most frequently cited MIOSHA violations in the construction
industry. Participants gain detailed information regarding construction
and health standards relative to the industry. Students will receive both
MIOSHA and OSHA 10-Hour cards upon successful completion of the
class.
Instructor: Bryan Renaud, Construction Safety Consultant - MIOSHA
PREPARING DOCUMENTS TO PRESERVE CONSTRUCTION LIENS AND
PAYMENT BOND CLAIMS
This class will provide hands-on document preparation to make sure that
proper documentation is completed and issued to protect and enforce
construction liens and rights to payment under project payment bonds.
This course also provides some helpful review of the key requirements of
the Michigan Construction Lien Act and Michigan law governing claims
under project payment bonds. The benefits of this class can be enhanced
by taking the Construction Lien Law/ Payment Bond class first.
Instructor: Dennis Schultz - Varnum
PROJECT MANAGEMENT COMMERCIAL / RESIDENTIAL
CONSTRUCTION
This class is designed for new project managers and field personnel
seeking to become project managers. All areas of project management
will be covered.
Instructor: Michael Woodhouse - United Consulting Services
SCHEDULING & PLANNING
This class addresses the consequences of poor planning and the benefits
of proper planning. This session discusses the procedures to follow in the
development of a detailed construction schedule, including: project
phasing, activity lists, logic ties (predecessor and successor activities),
activity duration, progress updates and revisions, and more. Also, the
Primavera Sure-Trak Scheduling Program will be demonstrated during
the class.
Instructor: Michael Woodhouse - United Consulting Services
TECHNIQUES FOR CONTROLLING AND WORKING ON DELAYED
PROJECTS: SCHEDULING AND LEGAL PERSPECTIVES
This course provides attendees with practical techniques for managing
delayed projects. Special attention is paid to CPM scheduling, the
enforceability of modified schedules, and the contractual obligations of
contractors, subcontractors, and owners. Topics include: Using the CPM
schedule to overcome, mitigate or account for delay; subcontractor
obligations under modified schedules; preserving your rights to recover
delay costs; project record keeping requirements and techniques; time
impacts of change orders and change directives; obtaining
compensation through the lien and bond acts; the delay claim process.
Instructors: R. Edward Boucher/Barry Jensen - Kotz, Sangster, Wysocki &
Berg, P.C.
ESTIMATING I / BASIC
Course Summary: Provides students with solid foundation in the
academics of construction cost estimating. Prerequisite: Blueprint
Reading I & II, or thorough blueprint reading experience.
Instructor: Michael Woodhouse - United Consulting Services
EXCAVATIONS: THE GRAVE DANGER
This workshop will provide an overview of MIOSHA Part 9, Excavations,
Trenching and Shoring. In addition, the electrical hazards and applicable
regulations associates will be discussed as well as identifying hazards at
their workplace associated with mobile equipment. This will be followed
by a question and answer session.
Instructor: Bryan Renaud - Construction Safety Consultant MIOSHA
FALL PROTECTION
Attendees will review the MIOSHA Part 45 Construction Safety Standard
for Protection including the latest OSHA and MIOSHA interpretations.
Examination of recent fatal falls in construction and discussion of the
latest fall protection techniques for construction will be covered. This will
be followed by a question and answer session.
Instructor: Bryan Renaud - Construction Safety Consultant MIOSHA
FIRST AID, CPR & AED
This course, presented and certified by the National Safety Council,
teaches the principles of basic life support for adults, children, and
infants. The course details how to perform one-rescuer CPR and rescue
breathing, and how to manage choking in a conscious person. It also
addresses infection control. The AED portion of the program details key
precautions. It explains how AEDs work and why they’re a critical part of
emergency cardiac care.
Instructor: Safety Council of SE Michigan
LIEN LAW / PAYMENT BONDS
Attorney Marty Burnstein will explain the step-by-step approach to
protecting contractor, subcontractor and supplier payment rights on
private work under the Michigan Construction Lien Act and on Public
work under the Michigan Bonding Act with an explanation of how to fill
out all forms.
Instructor: Marty Burnstein - Law Offices of Marty Burnstein
OSHA 10-HOUR
This program is designed to provide participants with a basic
understanding of the hazards present in most construction projects.
Participants will be able to identify, and then avoid, reduce, or eliminate
job hazards. In addition, they will become more familiar with required
record keeping and MIOSHA enforcement procedures. Special emphasis
is placed on those areas that are the most hazardous. Upon completion
of the course, the student will receive an OSHA Construction Safety and
Health 10-Hour course completion card.
Instructor: Joe Forgue – CAM Safety
OSHA 30-HOUR
This course is for construction industry personnel and will cover OSHA
policies, procedures and standards, as well as construction safety and
health principles. Topics include the scope and application of the OSHA
construction standards. Special emphasis is placed on those areas that
are the most hazardous, using OSHA standards as a guide. Upon
completion of the course, the student will receive an OSHA construction
safety and health 30-Hour course completion card.
Instructor: Joseph Forgue - CAMTEC Safety
T R A D E S H O W 2 0 1 1
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 57 Visit us at www.cam-online.com
AVOIDING ELECTROCUTION IN CONSTRUCTION
Putting one’s finger in a light socket does not make a lot of sense. Going
into a 'charged' workplace can almost be as dangerous. Avoid the
obvious and not so obvious as we clarify some of the cautions you may
be aware of on the jobsite.
Developing a Construction Safety & Health Management System (SHMS)
Are your workers wearing shorts to the jobsite? Are they wearing sporty
or comfy shoes or the recommended OSHA-regulation steel-toed boots?
Do your workers utilize fall protective bungees while working on tall
beams? This course will change your view of safety and safe work habits
forever. Fact-finding in this class will show that safe work habits will not
only save you time and money, but life and limbs, as well.
When MIOSHA Visits: Top 25 Serious Violations in Construction
Session instructs those to spot employees and jobsites for key violations.
This will be followed by a question and answer session.
MIOSHA RECORDKEEPING
Whether you have injuries or not, when you have 10 or more employees
you are covered under MIOSHA Administrative Rules Part 11:
Recordkeeping and Reporting of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses. This
session is designed to help you ensure that your organization complies
with MIOSHA recordkeeping requirements. We'll discuss what makes an
injury recordable, and actually fill out information to calculate rates and
how to interpret them.
CERTIFIED LEAD RENOVATOR TRAINING
PREVAILING WAGE - POWER LUNCH
3-HOUR RESIDENTIAL CONTINUED COMPETENCY (CE) COURSE
REGISTRATION THROUGH BUILDERS LICENSE TRAINING INSTITUTE
www.licensetobuild.com/Michigan.aspx
60-HOUR RESIDENTIAL BUILDERS PRELICENSE PROGRAM
Two-week fast-track
REGISTRATION THROUGH BUILDERS LICENSE TRAINING INSTITUTE
www.licensetobuild.com/Michigan.aspx
ADDITIONAL CLASS OFFERINGS:
These classes are not routinely scheduled but are available either at
CAMTEC or at member locations or jobsites:
ASBESTOS AWARENESS TRAINING
Construction trades routinely renovate and demolish buildings that were
built prior to 1980. These construction activities often result in contact
with asbestos-containing materials. Asbestos Awareness Training is
required annually for employees whose work activities may involve
contact but not disturbance of asbestos-containing materials (ACM) or
presumed asbestos-containing materials (PACM). A "2-Hour" Awareness
card will be given to each participant.
Single Ply, BUR, Slate, Shingles, Green and Vegetative Roof Systems,
Architectural Metals, Air Barriers, Roof Audits, Complete Roof Service
and Roof Guardian Maintenance Programs
www.ceigroupllc.com
Services provided in the United States
and internationally.
2140 INDUSTRIAL STREET
HOWELL, MI 48843
517-548-0039 (P)
517-548-0182 (F)
• Firestone and GAF Master Contractor
• Johns Manville Peak Advantage Contractor
• Union Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractor
• Government Cleared Work Crews for Secured Sites
Built on integrity…
growing through Service and reliaBility
58 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
cutting. For more information, please visit
Ace Cutting & Equipment Supply, Inc. at
Booth No. 309 at CAM’s Michigan
Construction & Design Tradeshow.
used for utility, commercial infrastructure,
fire & rescue, underwater and general
construction applications. PowerGrit
technology allows access to the entire cut
from one position, which not only reduces
the amount of excavation required, but also
dramatically reduces the difficulty of doing
this type of job.
In addition, because of its unique type of
chain design, PowerGrit provides positive
control of the saw and cut, plus resistance to
breakage and kickback, according to the ICS
video. Never cut pipe the same way again!
In short, PowerGrit offers single-point
access and reduces excavation, labor time
and operator effort, plus provides improved
operator safety and ease of control while
Down in the Trenches with
PowerGrit ®
Ace Offers Cutting-Edge Xtreme Diamond
Chain
PowerGrit® is not just a new chain. This
exciting new cutting product is designed to
change the way the job gets done. This
faster, easier and safer utility saw chain cuts
ductile iron, PVC and HDPE pipe. Beyond
cutting pipe, the PowerGrit cuts costs. The
PowerGrit actually lowers job costs by up to
half, according to an ICS online product
video available at www.acecutting.com.
Novi-based Ace Cutting Equipment &
Supply, Inc. is Michigan’s only ICS warranty
service center and PowerGrit supplier.
This innovative, patent-pending chain is
C O N S T R U C T I O N
T O O L S
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 59 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
built-up paint. The scraper attachment can
be used to remove any peeling paint and
dried-out glazing compound. Added
Parkhill, “In many cases, the contractor is also
trying to save the glass for reinstallation
after the wood is restored, which again is
somewhat of a delicate operation.”
The saw tooth attachment is a wonderful
tool for restoring the window frames of
yesteryear that are far more decorative than
today’s frames. Paint may have filled the
crevices and recesses created by the old
frames’ decorative flourishes. The saw tooth
attachment can easily remove the paint and
reveal the original beauty of these historical
window frames. In addition, the Multi X tool
can easily handle tile and grout repair.
This versatile tool also has many
applications in new construction, such as
recessing an electrical box into wood
cabinetry. The Multi X tool’s capabilities
remove the electrician’s common dread of
ruining an expensive cabinet during this
maneuver. In addition, cutting wood
molding to allow for the height of ceramic
tile or hardwood on a floor is quick and easy
with this tool. “Lastly, the Multi X tool can
safely cut off rusted bolts in places where
the user doesn’t want to create sparks from a
grinding tool, say around a kitchen where
food is being prepared,” added Parkhill.
For more information, please visit CTS –
Construction Tool & Supply Company at
Booth No. 126 at CAM’s Michigan
Construction & Design Tradeshow.
Multi-Tasking with the PS50
Multi X Tool
CTS - Construction Tool & Supply
Company, Warren, is offering an amazingly
versatile tool, a veritable Swiss Army knife
for contractors. Multi-tasking on the jobsite
is easy, thanks to the diverse applications of
Bosch’s PS50 Multi X tool. The PS50 can be
used either as a saw, sander, scraper or
grinding tool, all because of its unique
oscillating action. As a further bonus, “the
head size of the different accessories allows
the Multi X tool to access confined areas that
other power tools cannot reach,” said Bill
Parkhill, CTS president. Plus, the tool is
cordless and can get the job done without
an extension cord.
The Multi X is ideal for contractors
performing restoration work on historical
homes, churches and other structures.
“Restoration contractors can’t just thumb
through a catalog to find a replacement
window, door or other items that were
custom made possibly 50 to 100 years ago,”
said Parkhill.
Fortunately, the beauty of these difficult-
to-replace decorative pieces can be gently
restored with the Multi X tool. “The Multi X
tool is powerful enough to handle some
tough jobs but delicate enough not to
destroy the original item, primarily because
of its variable speed feature,” said Parkhill.
Restoration of a window frame is a prime
example of the tool’s versatility and its light
touch. First, the triangular sanding pad can
access tight corners and remove years of
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"Serving the Construction
Industry for Over 20 Years"
Financial Statements
Banking, Bonding & Equipment
Tax Planning & Preparation
Offers in Compromise, Payment Plans
& Audit Representation
Valuations
Bookkeeping
QuickBooks Training
www.AounCPA.com
(734) 261-9800
29701 Six Mile Rd. • Suite 120
Livonia, MI 48152-8602
cpa@aouncpa.com
AOUN & CO., P.C.
CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS
60 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
alongside a moving line or where
compressed air is not available. This battery
operated cordless tool is the perfect
portable rivet setting tool for use anywhere.
The tool includes:
Li-Ion Battery 14.4V battery
Battery Charger for Li-Ion 14.4V battery
Tool with four nosepieces and a wrench
Professional grade metal case
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We specialize in standards, specials, and
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visit Marshall Sales at Booth No. 105.
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C O N S T R U C T I O N
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62 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
C O N S T R U C T I O N
T O O L S
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 63 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
• Lithium ion battery check: In a few short
minutes, Hilti can test a battery to make
certain it performs to Hilti’s high
standards. The Center can analyze and
condition Hilti lithium-ion batteries on the
spot. In addition, each tool has a two-year
“No Cost” period. If the battery, tool or
approximately 80 tools per month in its
Michigan facilities.
URGENT CARE FOR TOOLS
Each Hilti Diagnostic Service Center offers
a host of services.
L
ess downtime is a boost to the
bottom line. A failed drill bit, poor
battery performance or an
inaccurate laser tool can all throw a
wrench into jobsite productivity. Same-day
service – or even a minor repair within
minutes - would be a godsend. Enter Hilti’s
new Diagnostic Service Centers. “Customers
are astonished by the fact that they can
bring a tool in for repair or calibration and
go back to work in a matter of minutes,” said
Andy Coe, senior manager retail operations.
While Hilti already has the best tool repair
turnaround in the industry, the new
diagnostic centers’ swift work on minor tool
repair and maintenance promises to boost
this enviable rate even further. “Hilti
averages three to four days for tool repair
turnaround, which is much better than the
industry standard of two weeks,” said Coe.
“With the addition of diagnostic centers we
are able to take our repair service to the next
level and offer our customers even less
turnaround time.”
Hilti opened several pilot centers in 2009
before the grand opening of 106 facilities
across the nation in Spring 2010. Michigan
has two Hilti Diagnostic Service Centers, one
in Grand Rapids and the other in Livonia.
“The response has been overwhelmingly
positive,” said Coe. “The reduction in down
time and the cost savings are huge,
especially relevant in today’s economy.” Coe
estimates that Hilti has serviced over 23,000
transactions nationally and close to 1,000 in
Michigan from Spring through mid-
November 2010. According to the
company’s North American office in Tulsa,
OK, Hilti generally performs 1,700 repairs or
checks per month in its Diagnostic Centers
across the country, and services
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“The reduction in down
time and the cost savings
are huge, especially
relevant in today’s
economy.”
Andy Coe, Hilti senior manager,
Retail Operations
64 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
• Warranty evaluation of carbide drill
bits and chisels: Hilti places a wear mark
on its premium drill bits. If a drill bit fails
with the wear mark present, the Hilti
Center representative will replace the drill
bit at no charge to the customer.
charger fails within this two-year “No
Cost” period, Hilti will repair or replace it
over-the-counter at no charge.
• Laser calibration check: All Hilti Center
locations in North America can verify the
calibration of Hilti laser tools.
C O N S T R U C T I O N
T O O L S
• Cord and switch replacement on most
corded tools: Hilti Centers can replace
cords and switches for most of its corded
tools. This also helps determine if a
problem is caused by something other
than a cord or switch. If so, customers are
notified that the tool needs to be sent to a
Hilti Tool Repair Center.
• Powder Actuated Tool (PAT) cleaning –
Many times Powder Actuated Tools need
to be cleaned rather than repaired. Hilti
Center representatives can train
customers on the proper cleaning of Hilti
PAT tools to help customers stay
productive.
Hilti is the only tool manufacturer with
this type of Diagnostic Center. This
innovative company is currently piloting the
lithium battery service in Hilti Pro Shops at
The Home Depot. “Hilti is always setting a
new standard for the industry,” said Coe.
“Just watch what we do next.” Please visit
Hilti at Booth No. 216 at CAM’s Michigan
Construction & Design Tradeshow.
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 65 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
CAM Magazine is a monthly publication covering construction news
throughout the state of Michigan, highlighting interesting construction projects,
personnel news and industry happenings. In-depth feature articles focus on a
variety of industry trade segments and on key management and economic
issues, keeping pace with the Michigan construction scene. Since 1985, CAM
Magazine has been known as the “Voice of the Construction Industry”. Now,
in addition to being printed and mailed to over 3,600 industry professionals
each month, thousands more are able to access the entire magazine online,
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Call or e-mail to find out how CAM Magazine can help put your company in
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66 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
A RARE APPLICATION
The interior concrete is groundbreaking in both form and material
composition, being one of the first examples of self-consolidating
concrete in an architectural application in the country. “There are only
about a dozen buildings in the United States that have used self-
consolidating concrete to achieve an architectural finish,” said Darryl
R. Massa, Granger executive vice president, operations.
Self-consolidating concrete is typically used in structural concrete
applications, particularly in areas of tightly congested re-steel.
Flowing as easily as liquid, self-consolidating concrete fills heavily
reinforced areas that have no room for conventional mechanical
vibration, explained Massa. (Mechanical vibration is commonly used
in conventional concrete to fill crevices and corners in the formwork
and to reduce voids in the concrete.)
Appearance is immaterial in seldom-exposed structural concrete,
but is the heart and soul of an architectural application. “The reason
they are using it at the Broad Museum is because self-consolidating
concrete offers the desired finish,” said Massa, “and it gives sharper,
T
hinking outside the box is part of the very definition of art.
Constructing a building far beyond the conventional box is
turning concrete into an art form at a masterpiece of a
museum currently under construction on the East Lansing
campus of Michigan State University. As concrete subcontractor,
Granger Construction Company, Lansing is pouring its expertise and
passion for this building material into the construction of the concrete
interior walls of the amazing Eli and Edythe Broad Museum.
The museum interior will feature three levels of angled walls, some
tilted at 70 degrees and others at 75 degrees, with a few vertical but
virtually none parallel or even perpendicular to each other. The
provocative design of world-renowned architect, Zaha Hadid, will be a
perfect showcase for the works of contemporary artists who
challenge convention as part of their basic job description. Barton
Malow Company, Southfield, is the construction manager, and
Integrated Design Solutions, LLC, Troy, is the executive architect of this
46,000-square-foot museum in the making already destined to put
MSU on the map.
C O N C R E T E
CONCRETE WORK IN PROGRESS AT MSU’S BROAD MUSEUM
By Mary E. Kremposky, Associate Editor Photos Granger Construction Company
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 67 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
analyzed mix primed for placement in the field. One of the pivotal
ingredients is a super plasticizer in the polycarboxylate family. Massa
explains in brief: “Conventional concrete might slump at four to five
inches. That is a pretty stiff mix. Adding a super plasticizer to the mix
will make the concrete slump at nine to 11. This polycarboxylate is a
super plasticizer on steroids. It makes the concrete flow like water,
and that’s what makes it self-consolidating.” During a traditional
cone test, the polycarboxylate actually produced an amazing spread
of 30 inches – a pancake of liquid-like concrete that is a far cry from
the average slump of conventional concrete.
Air entrainment was added to block aggregate segregation. “This
mix is so fluid that it is subject to having the larger aggregates sink to
the bottom instead of being suspended and consistent throughout
the whole mix,” explained Lange. A small amount of air entrainment
did the trick. “As we are pouring, the aggregate actually bobs like a
cork in the mix,” added Massa.
The core mix is pea stone embedded in a matrix of sand, cement
and 30 percent fly ash. “The pea stone is as big of an aggregate that
we have in the mix,” said Lange. This custom mix has 800 lbs. per yard
of cementitious material versus the 500 to 600 lbs. of cement per yard
in a conventional concrete mix. “The reason is that for an architectural
mix you have to have a high cementitious content, because you need
those fine particles to fill in all those corners nicely,” said Massa.
At the end of the day, this mix became part of the quest to create a
wall with both a beautiful smooth finish and an inherent strength.
With an actual strength of 10,000 psi, the mix actually exceeded the
required strength of 5,000 psi, added David G. McAlvey, PE, Granger
senior estimator, project manager.
FORMWORK AS AN ART FORM
The Granger team had to buck conventional wisdom in navigating
a project whose path led the team into unexplored territory and
through difficult terrain. Beyond Warren the Wizard’s miracle mix, a
crisper details and cleaner corners.”
At the Broad Museum, the goal is to create a concrete wall with a
surface as smooth and unmarred as an artist’s blank canvas. “The idea
is to pull the forms down and have a wall with nothing to patch and
without any bug holes or voids,” said Massa. “Having three bug holes
in 10 square feet that are the size of a dime might be considered
reasonable on a job. On this project, the goal is not to have any bug
holes bigger than the tip of a pen. The requirements are incredibly
stringent.”
Granger’s mission is to create an almost perfect canvas of
concrete, complete with putting in place angled joints and a specific
pattern of tie holes - the round openings remaining in the concrete
after the removal of the tie rods in the formwork. Adding further
complexity, the joints must be slightly slanted or skewed, meaning
the plywood of each form has to run at angle. “Basically, we are
trying to place the tie layout correctly on a panel layout that is
skewed and on a wall that is leaning backwards,”
summarized Massa. “At times, it was a 3D nightmare.”
Massa compares Granger’s cutting-edge work to the
television show called Extreme Challenge, for no one in
Michigan has tackled a job with such stringent concrete
standards and requirements as the Eli & Edythe Broad
Museum. “Even nationally, it is very hard to find a project
with the requirements of this complex job,” said Robert
Lange, Granger project manager.
Granger is deeply committed to the task of forming
these complicated concrete walls in a museum composed
of a lower level and two upper levels. The firm has a history
of successfully tackling some very tough and complex
concrete projects, such as the North Quad at U of M and the
Grand River Avenue Parking ramp for MSU.
CONCRETE WIZARDRY
This rare application took three months of testing and
experimentation. Granger tested about 24 different test
mixes and poured roughly 70 different test panels. The
quest for the perfect concrete mix continued for two
months in the summer of 2010. As the weeks went by, the
number of test panels grew until rows of concrete
rectangles lined the length of Granger’s yard in Lansing.
The quest was an adventure for a company that is a true
concrete connoisseur. “We live, breathe, and sleep
concrete,” said Massa. “We love concrete. It is pretty cool
stuff.” Other concrete pioneers on the project included Consumers
Concrete Corporation, a Kalamazoo-based ready-mix supplier, and
Euclid Chemical Company of Cleveland, Ohio. Euclid’s project
consultant serves on the American Concrete Institute’s self-
consolidating concrete board.
The actual pour of a mockup panel, which still towers over the
Granger yard today, took place in the third month of the test period.
Granger consulted a cadre of national concrete experts after the
lower wall panel did not meet the project’s impeccable standards.
But this concrete riddle of a project stumped even national experts
in the field. “This is something that has never been done,” said Massa.
“The project had elements that were new to everybody.”
Some national advice was useful, but ultimately Euclid delivered a
mix with some positive results. Euclid’s Warren McPherson, aka
Warren the Wizard, created a miracle mix that is aiding the cause of
meeting the stringent requirement of this rare project.
The test results at the end of a long, hot summer yielded a much-
Above is a mock-up of the main interior wall corner being constructed in Granger’s
yard in Lansing.
68 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
concrete rises in the wall form. This approach
avoids turbulence.”
This testing period was an intense
engagement with every aspect of concrete
and then some. “Every time we poured a
panel, we were testing about 12 different
items,” said McAlvey. The test period was only
a fleeting three months on this challenging
masterwork. “We were basically pouring test
panels at least every other day,” added Lange.
ON THE JOBSITE
Granger actually commenced work in the
field at the end of August 2010 and will
continue work through February 2011. The
project will require about 17 different
architectural pours, each with a pre-pour
meeting complete with a review of a quality
control plan and checklist signed off by MSU,
Barton Malow and Granger.
Work in the field is as unique, demanding
and specialized as the mix design and
rigorous testing process. This labyrinth of
angled and vertical walls, placed askew rather
than parallel, had to be poured in a specific
sequence. “In some cases, we couldn’t pour
one wall until we poured and stripped the
form an adjacent one, because the wall
braces of one would be in the way,” said
Lange.
Granger used a robotic layout device –
another first for this pioneering company –
and a total station to layout the labyrinth of
formwork that will hold the shape and place
of the final wall. “The walls have extremely
tight tolerances,” said Massa. “A quarter-of-an-
inch would be normal tolerances, but we had
to be 1/32-of-an-inch, which is as slight as a
few sheets of paper.”
Before the actual pour, Granger often had
to vacuum the form interior to remove either
rainwater or leaves from nearby trees to avoid
marring the final architectural wall. “We had
to vacuum the rainwater out of the form,
because we were afraid to just push the water
up as we poured,” said Massa. “Stains and/or
inconsistencies might appear in the wall.”
Granger even meticulously tended to the
concrete in the post-pour period. After form
removal, Granger installed a protective layer
of plywood to prevent any damage from
subsequent work on the site. The crew even
placed plastic sheets or bonnets on the re-
steel projecting from the walls. “If the rain
falls on that re-steel and it rusts, the rust
would run down the face of the wall and stain
the concrete,” said Massa.
Granger clearly has pushed the envelope in
this experiment in concrete. The project
remains a work in progress as challenges and
finish only. Some walls have a drywall finish
on one side, requiring only one plywood
layer.
POURING A COLD ONE
The unending analysis of every project
detail continued throughout the long, hot
summer of 2010. The intensive test period
included analysis of four or five different
caulks in the joints. “The test was undertaken
because some of the caulks reacted in
different ways with the concrete,” said Massa.
“We also had to try different types of ties and
tie caps to achieve the desired tie hole
patterns and spacings.”
This rigorous testing phase was not yet
finished. Granger also had to determine how
best to pour the concrete and at what rate.
Granger used a pump, pouring the liquid self-
consolidating concrete with all the care of a
beer lover pouring a cold glass of craft brew.
For the test panels and on the jobsite, the
head of the pump was actually submerged in
the rising concrete to avoid turbulence just as
a good bartender tilts the glass and carefully
pours to avoid a head of foam.
“The form itself has to be 10 to 20 times
stronger than a conventional form, because
the concrete is poured fast and the form must
hold a full liquid head,” said Massa. “The
liquid goes from zero to 17 feet – the full
height of the wall. With our job being liquid
all the way, we actually did think of how a
beer is poured. If you just open the spigot,
bubbling foam will fill your glass. Our pump
isn’t 12 feet up and dropping concrete. The
pump discharge point is underneath the level
of the concrete, and we raise the pump as the
host of other parameters had to be tested,
investigated and analyzed to create these
experimental architectural walls. For
example, Granger had to scrutinize every
facet of the plywood formwork, including the
type of form oil. “Form oil is a release agent
applied to the plywood before the pour so
the concrete comes out without sticking to
the plywood,” said Lange. “It has a large
impact on the finish left behind on the
concrete.”
Granger tested three or four different types
of form oil as part of the 70 sample panels.
Next Granger had to select the timing and
the number of applications. “We figured out
that we needed to apply the form oil two
weeks prior to actually pouring the concrete
into the form in order to season the
plywood,” said Lange. “We then applied it
again right before we poured into the form.”
Granger even had to analyze and test the
type of plywood used for this incredibly
detailed project. Double-baked HDO (high-
density overlay) was the plywood of choice.
“Double-baked means the overlay is run
through a type of oven twice, once to make it
adhere and the second time to remove any
lingering yellow residue on the plywood that
might find its way to the concrete surface,”
said Lange.
In this case, the HDO is being placed over
MDO (medium-density overlay) structural
plywood. “The HDO is fastened to the
formwork by back screwing through the
structural plywood into the finish plywood, so
any hint of a screw imprint will not be seen in
the finished wall,” he added. The HDO is used
only on walls that call for an architectural
C O N C R E T E
Granger tested about 24 different mixes and poured roughly 70 different test panels over the
course of several months.
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 69 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
issues arise in the course of tackling a project
that has never before been attempted. But
Granger is working on the jobsite with the
same sense of creative problem-solving and
intense engagement in seeking the right
solutions as the firm brought to the elaborate
testing phase. Clearly, this concrete
connoisseur is deeply committed to
ultimately realizing the grand vision of this
world-class museum in the making.
Once unveiled, the University and the
general public will enjoy this amazing new
museum whose striking visual power is a
work of art, itself. “It’s a very difficult project,
but it has been a great learning experience,
and we wouldn’t give the job back for
anything,” said Massa. “It is satisfying to
perform a job that is above and beyond what
you’ve ever done before and one that pushes
you to achieve. For as difficult as it has been,
it is gratifying to think that this could possibly
be the nicest self-consolidating architectural
concrete in the United States.”
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HIGH
EXPOSURE
Construction of the architectural concrete for this iconic building is underway on the campus of
Michigan State University.
70 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
ground for the basement, and Heron Manor,
a Baptist Church in Grand Rapids that used
ICF through the whole building. Even the
Waverly Animal Hospital in Lansing was able
to use ICF for an addition to their facility.
Another distinct advantage of utilizing ICF
construction is safety. With a structure that
is now completely encased in concrete, a
building is created that is almost
impermeable to the damage often caused
by hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes.
In addition, these structures also possess
superior acoustic characteristics by not only
muting sounds from adjacent rooms, but
also by virtually eliminating exterior noise.
The culmination of these factors makes ICF
construction the obvious building method
of choice in projects desiring sustainability,
safety and a quality environment.
PERVIOUS CONCRETE
Once an ICF structure is in place, we can
now turn our eye towards the exterior of the
development. Utilizing pervious concrete in
conjunction with a concrete parking area
allows developers to not only control their
stormwater runoff on site, but also to cut
down on what is known as the urban heat
island effect. Concrete parking areas have
both parking areas and roadways leading up
to new developments, all while capturing
LEED credits and maximizing sustainability.
Whether we chose to discuss minimizing
heating and cooling costs, controlling
stormwater runoff or creating long-lasting
quiet surfaces, the most utilized building
material in the world offers solutions that
are both affordable and sustainable.
ICF CONSTRUCTION
Let’s start our new development by
looking at how concrete construction can
save money and lives. Insulated Concrete
Form (ICF) construction is the process in
which hollow foam blocks are stacked upon
one another, creating a channel in which
ready-mix concrete can be placed. This
construction process known as ICF has been
shown to be very efficient, often times
allowing a construction crew to finish the
structure more quickly than it could by
utilizing a stick-built frame.
ICF also provides substantial savings on
heating and cooling over the duration of the
building’s existence. Michigan has several
examples of this technology, including
Mallard Cove, an assisted living facility in
Traverse City that only used ICF below
O
ver the last 10 years, the “green
movement” has grown from being
a small group of environmentally
aware individuals to becoming
the mainstream standard for new
development and construction. Over this
span of time, concrete has been there every
step of the way in order to allow for
economically feasible and environmentally
friendly building. Now more than ever,
concrete is in the forefront and is leading the
way in the arena of environmentally friendly,
sustainable construction.
In recent years, we have become acutely
aware of the need to control heating costs
and to create interior building environments
that are cleaner and safer than those
previously designed. Going hand-in-hand
with our newfound desire to upgrade the
sustainability of the structures we place in
newly developing areas, we have also
realized the need to handle stormwater
within a given area in a more sustainable
manner. Finally, we are seeing the benefits of
using longer lasting paving materials while
developing the streets and local roads
comprising our infrastructure.
At the end of the day, concrete can be
utilized in a building’s construction and in
C O N C R E T E
Using Concrete
to Create Greener,
More Sustainable
Buildings and
Infrastructure
By Aaron R. Harris, Michigan Concrete Association
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 71 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
will last on average 26 years with little
maintenance. At the same time, the
concrete supplies a surface that will reflect
the sun’s rays and help prevent the warming
of urban areas, therein helping to reduce
smog, as well as the health risks that are
associated with these low-lying pollutants.
This is just one more example of how
concrete plays a major role in protecting our
environment and promoting sustainable
development.
At the end of the day, concrete’s use in
buildings, parking areas and roadways give
designers and developers affordably priced
and sustainable options for construction.
With ICF and tilt-up construction, one can
quickly design and construct safe, energy-
efficient and long-lasting buildings and
structures. Through the use of concrete
parking areas in conjunction with pervious
concrete, we can reduce the need for
lighting in a parking area by 25 to 30
percent, while managing stormwater run-off
and avoiding the absorption and trapping of
radiant energy that leads to higher cooling
bills. Finally, by installing concrete roadways,
one can improve the safety and longevity of
our highways and roads by using a
recyclable pavement that has withstood the
test of time. So next time you think green
construction, call your local concrete
contractor for grey solutions to your green
questions.
About the Author
Aaron R. Harris is the Engineering/Promotion
Director-Private Market for the Michigan
Concrete Association.
recently become cost-
efficient on an initial cost
basis. Due to this factor,
we have seen more and
more developments
choose to utilize a
concrete parking area in
their environmentally
conscious developments.
Not only does the 100
percent recyclable
concrete parking lot last
considerably longer than
other paving materials, it
also reflects the sun’s ray
thereby preventing the
pavement surface from
heating up. This leads to
a cooler environment
and a lower air-
conditioning bill for the
building owner.
Finally, if the concrete parking area is used
in conjunction with pervious concrete often
developers can minimize or even eliminate
the need for retention/detention ponds.
This not only saves money, but also frees up
additional space to be utilized as green
space or for additional development.
Pervious concrete is an open-graded
material that allows stormwater to pass
through it and into a recharge bed located
below the pavement surface. This recharge
bed allows water to be taken back into the
earth and replenish the groundwater table.
All of these reasons, coupled with the low
maintenance of concrete parking areas, have
led many Michigan developers to begin
utilizing concrete in their parking areas.
CONCRETE ROADWAYS
We now turn our gaze to the highways,
streets and local roads that bring
employees, clients and customers to our
doorstep. A newly constructed concrete
roadway not only utilizes recycled concrete
in its construction, but also meets the solar
reflective index necessary for residential
developments to reach LEED® standards.
Over the past several years, we have seen
more and more federal and municipal
projects choose to utilize concrete
pavement due not only to its reputation for
longevity, but also its contribution to a
greener, cleaner environment.
Concrete roadways contribute to the
environment in many ways, but first and
foremost by the material’s longevity and
durability. By putting a concrete roadway in
place, concrete can provide a surface that
With its pervious concrete, this pleasant courtyard is a showcase
of “green” concrete.
P
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A
S
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SPARTAN
SPECIALTIES
LTD
Soil
Stabilization
Solutions
GROUND
TECHNOLOGI ES
Jet Grouting
Compaction Grouting
Chemical Grouting
Micro Fine Cement
CONCRETE REPAI R
Preplaced Aggregate
Epoxy Injection
Fabric Form Grout Bags
Gunite
PI LES
Mini Piles
Soil Nailing
Earth and Rock Anchors
(586) 826-8811
6250 Sims
Sterling Heights, MI 48313
72 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
M
ichigan State University’s Wharton Center for Performing
Arts was recently the site of two spectacular performances,
though neither occurred on stage. A team of design and
construction professionals played the starring role by
delivering a breathtaking four-story addition to enhance the
experience of patrons, while simultaneously accommodating
backstage improvements in a separate addition on the opposite site of
the facility. Construction manager, The Christman Company, Lansing,
architect, TMP Architecture, Inc., Bloomfield Hills, and Michigan State
University led a talented cast through this double feature that drew
rave reviews.
CENTER STAGE
Before the expansion and renovation project began, the Wharton
Center already housed two theaters, both of which were regarded as
premiere regional attractions. Spaces outside the two theaters, on the
other hand, left something to be desired. The front addition caters to
all theatergoers with a new box office, expanded lobby and a new gift
shop, while the needs of financial supporters are met with two new
patron lounges. Access to restrooms was also problematic, especially
for female patrons, who were limited to a scant six stalls. The project
team addressed this by adding 17 women’s stalls, and they also created
an office suite to accommodate the center’s administrative needs.
Creating a new image for the center was another goal. Instead of a
place to see and be seen, the Wharton Center was an all brick building
hidden among nearby trees. The front addition’s new glass façade
generates excitement by letting people see inside while making the
reconfigured landscaping an asset by offering ample views of a
picturesque natural setting. Glass also contributed to sustainability
goals by reducing the need for artificial light and the design includes a
distinctive inset section that will accommodate backlit banners to
promote future shows.
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T
Double Feature
BY DAVID R. MILLER, ASSOCIATE EDITOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY IKE LEA
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 73 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
“We thought about other materials, but it
seems like we kept coming back to a glassy
expression,” said Tim Casai, FAIA, president of
TMP Architecture. “We wanted people to be
able to see the activity going on inside the
building and we wanted people in attendance
to see out and engage with more of the
campus.”
Building this massive addition in close
proximity to two operational theaters
involved more extensive planning than most
stage productions. The shows not only
needed to go on, as the old saying goes, they
also needed to be an enjoyable experience.
Casai summed it up best when he said, “No
one wants to get dressed up, go out to the
theater, and suck on some dust.” Separation
between construction areas and occupied
spaces was a critical issue.
“We put up a temporary wall and finish
painted it to make it look like a finished
product,” said William Mackay, project
manager for The Christman Company. “An
artist was hired to paint a mural on it and it
blended in so well that people who had been
going to the center for years said that the wall
had always been there.”
Accommodating the new patron lounges
was another design challenge, as both
needed to provide barrier free access to
existing bathroom facilities, lobbies that were
located on different levels, and a warming
kitchen, as well as a new passenger elevator.
Many traffic patterns were proposed before a
workable solution was found. Of course,
efficiency was not just a concern for public
spaces, the backstage addition needed to
function like a well-oiled machine.
BEHIND THE CURTAIN
The backstage addition at the Wharton
Center was geared primarily towards
accommodating bigger and more complex
shows. These productions often involve many
semi-trailers full of scenery, costumes, lighting
and sound gear, along with busses filled with
performers and support personnel, all of
which will be better accommodated by a new
freight elevator and expanded space for cast
and crews. In spite of the glitz and glamour
found in the front portion of the building, the
back portion is often far busier.
“Before I started this job, I had no idea how
busy the center was,” admitted Mackay.
“When I put the schedule together, I had a
copy of the event schedule in front of me and
I tried to pick and choose times in-between
events. I quickly realized that everyone
would need to work together to sequence
this job while keeping the Wharton Center
fully functional, because they had events
every single day.”
The donor wall seen here is found in the Wharton Center’s renovated lobby.
This conference room supports newly created
office spaces. The brick wall on the left was the
exterior of the existing structure.
74 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Fortunately, everyone was willing to invest the extra planning to
help ensure the success of the project. In addition to hands-on
management from The Christman Company and TMP Architecture, the
project team had high praise for the subcontractors who were willing
to look ahead on the schedule in an attempt to identify issues relating
to their respective trades before they reached the problem stage.
Diane Baribeau, general manager of the Wharton Center was also
credited for her accessibility and her thorough knowledge of the
building’s complex systems. Her input was particularly important as
the project team worked on the backstage addition.
“The back-of-the-house addition, while not sexy or glamorous, was
the toughest part of the project in many ways,” said Casai.
Soils throughout the site were mixed with organic material and
water was found 20-25 feet below grade. These conditions combined
to create low bearing capacity mandating deep foundations. Plans to
underpin an existing 70-foot tall brick veneer/masonry block wall
adjacent to the backstage addition were scrapped in favor of an auger-
cast retention wall to support the existing structure. The layout of the
basement needed to be completely reconfigured mid-project to
accommodate this change.
A fine cast of industry professionals addressed this challenge, along
with countless more, to raise the curtain on a unique double feature
that delivered two separate additions to the Wharton Center for
Performing Arts. They may never receive star billing, but theater
patrons will enjoy the fruits of their labor for years to come.
THE FOLLOWING SUBCONTRACTORS AND PROFESSIONAL
CONSULTANTS CONTRIBUTED THEIR SKILLS TO THE PROJECT:
• Architectural Specialties – Contract Specialties, Hudsonville
• Auger Cast Piles – Hardman Construction, Ludington
• Carpet and Resilient Tile – Bouma Interiors, Okemos
• Cast Concrete Paving – Mid Michigan Turf Care, Owosso
• Civil Engineer – Beckett & Raeder, Ann Arbor
• Cleaners – Clean Investments, Lansing
• Controls – Siemens Building Technologies, Inc., Plymouth
• Decorative Ornamental Railings – Courterior Iron Craft, Comstock
Park
• Earthwork and Site Utilities – Sandborn Construction, Portland
• Electrical – Superior Electric, Lansing
• Elevator – Otis Elevator Company, Lansing
• Exterior Window Cleaning – Great Lakes Window Cleaning, Lansing
• Fire Protection – Dynamic Piping, Hemlock
• Glass and Glazing, Curtain Wall and Aluminum Entrances – Lansing
Glass, Lansing
• Hard Tile – Lansing Tile & Mosaic, Lansing
• Interior Glass and Glazing – Calvin & Company, Flint
• Masonry – Schiffer Masonry Contractors, Holt
• Mechanical and Electrical Engineer – Peter Basso Associates, Troy
• Mechanical Systems – Gunthorpe Plumbing & Heating, East
Lansing
• Metal Panels and Column Enclosures – Architectural Metals,
Portland
• Operable Partitions – Payne Rosso, Lansing
• Overhead Doors – Overhead Door of Lansing, East Lansing
• Painting and Wallcovering – Lake State Decorating, Lansing
• Plaster, Drywall, Acoustical, Insulation, Temporary Partitions and
Temporary Stairs -
• William Reichenbach Co., Lansing
• Pollution Control – Pollution Control Services, Kalkaska
• Roofing – Stephenson & Sons, Flint
• Sheet Metal – Dee Cramer, Holly
• Site Concrete, Curbs and Concrete Paving – Fessler & Bowman,
Flushing
• Structural Concrete, General Carpentry, Millwork and Doors –
Christman Constructors,
• Lansing
• Structural Engineer – Desai/Nasr Consulting Engineers, West
Bloomfield
• Structural Steel, Deck and Stairs – Howard Structural Steel, Saginaw
• Temporary Construction Drive, Soil Erosion and Site Demolition –
Genesee-Bay
• Constructors, Davidson
• Temporary Fence – Nationwide Construction Group, Chesterfield
• Temporary Power – Superior Electric, Inc., Lansing
• Testing – Soil and Materials Engineers, Inc., Lansing
• Trailer Electric – Superior Electric, Lansing
• Waterproofing/Dampproofing – D.C. Beyers, East Lansing
• Window Treatments – Creative Windows, Ann Arbor
• Wood Flooring – Star School Flooring, Hastings
Subcontractors and professional consultants listed in the Construction Highlight
are identified by the general contractor, architect or owner.
C O N S T R U C T I O N H I G H L I G H T


































































































































































































































































































































































Flexibility was a key consideration with patron lounges. The sturdy curved bar on the ceiling accommodates a variety of lighting configurations
for different uses.
Members receive discounted
credit card processing, no set-up
fees and no account minimums.

$ISCOUNT#REDIT#ARD
0ROCESSING3ERVICE
Call Tina Allcorn at (248) 623-4430
Call William Jeffrey at (248) 723-6400
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comprehensive construction industry
directory are distributed. Marketing
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76 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
Anti-Slip Solutions Unveils
Invisatread® “Contractor’s
Toolkit”
Anti-Slip Solutions, LLC unveiled its
InvisaTread “Contractor’s Toolkit”. InvisaTread
is a new, safe-to-self-install anti-slip product
available through national, regional and local
distributors; the low-cost Contractor’s Toolkit
has been developed to offer tile and stone
professionals an additional, affordable
business line.
InvisaTread increases the coefficient of
friction (COF) of most hard-mineral surfaces
while preserving their look and feel. The
InvisaTread Traction System has been
designed as an ongoing program that
maintains increased traction for a number of
years. And while the products are available to
the DIY market, homeowner and commercial
landlords may prefer to engaging contractors
as surface experts.
The InvisaTread Contractors Toolkit, at a
$75 suggested retail price, includes over $50
in product and provides a training and
certification program to ensure that tile and
stone professionals have the skills and tools
needed to sell the program, safely install the
product, and provide guidance to their
customers for ongoing traction
management. The Kit includes product
samples, surface spec sheets, marketing and
demo tools, and, more importantly, support
from distributors and Anti-Slip Solutions
customer support line.
More information is available at
http://www.invisatread.com/.
Create Strong Clamps for
Concrete Footings with Quick
Rebar Clamp™ Valets from M.B
Tools
The Quick Rebar Clamp valets from
M.B Tools are forged steel pieces that, when
used with a piece of standard #4 or #6 rebar,
create a strong, temporary clamp that
reduces the need for lumber in concrete
forming. These valets can be used for
multiple applications. They replace
wood stakes used for batter boards,
footings and edge boards in
concrete construction.
The clamping mechanism
(valet) is based off of a traditional
Roman clamp that relies on
pressure created by angling metal
pieces in a binding action, rather
than nails and lumber or other
connecting methods, to form a
clamp. The Quick Rebar Clamp
valet is shaped like a long, bent
rod of metal that begins on
one end with a hole in which to
insert the appropriately sized
rebar, continues into a curved “arm,” and
ends with a flattened area called the
“hand” that sits on the surface to be clamped.
Because this method reduces and can even
eliminate the need for nails and lumber, the
Quick Rebar Clamp™ valets can provide a
reusable, green method for concrete forming.
The Quick Rebar Clamp is made by
using two valets (#4 or #6) and standard
round #4 or #6 rebar respectively. Oblong
shaped rebar will not work. The rebar should
be cut at least 6 inches longer than the length
of the object(s) to be clamped for proper use.
Once the valets are placed on the rebar,
the hand of the valet (the flat end) is placed
along the surface to be clamped (an edge
board, for example). The hand has a nail hole
that can be used in certain circumstances
(vertical and overhead use) with a nail to hold
the hand in place. Finally, the user hammers
the valet’s strike surface along the arm (see
illustration in photo 3 on this press release) to
angle the valet along the rebar to create
pressure that forms the final
clamping mechanism.
The clamping pressure and
resistance of the Quick Rebar Clamps
vary tremendously – from 25 pounds
(hand pressure) to thousands of
pounds for the #6 valets on #6 rebar
when appropriately placed and set. The
size, length and flexion of the rebar
employed are among the other
parameters that must be taken into
consideration before use.
The valets were first designed in
2006 and called Quick Strike Clamp™
valets. These were meant to be used on 1/2-
inch and 3/4-inch smooth square and round
steel rods. The patent for
this was filed in 2007
and obtained in
2010.
In
2009, this
technology was
tested and validated on
standard round #4 and #6
rebar.
The #4 valet measures six inches end to
end, weighs five ounces, and costs $77.88 for
one dozen valets. The #6 valet measures nine
inches end to end, weighs 19 ounces and
costs $119.88 for one dozen valets. Valets are
made from high carbon forged steel.
For more information, please contact: M.B
TOOLS, INC. (U.S. Contact), Will Reed, inventor,
Cell phone (720) 226-9176, or e-mail
mbtoolsinc@gmail.com.
New Drywall Repair Tool
Provides Easier, Faster and
Less Expensive Repairs for
Knock-Down Drywall
Treatment
Template, LLC, has introduced a
revolutionary product to simplify the messy,
costly and time consuming process of
repairing drywall knockdown treatment. The
Drywall Repair Tool is a flexible plastic
P R O D U C T S H O W C A S E
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 77 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
template with a random knockdown pattern
that enables the user to replicate the
knockdown texture on the rest of the wall
after a drywall repair has been made, using
the template, some spackle and a putty knife
to re-apply the knockdown pattern to the
repaired wall.
The process can be much cleaner and
faster than using a professional sprayer or a
retail spray can treatment because there is no
over-spray and no need to tape off the area to
protect the surrounding surfaces. The benefit
to drywall professionals is that they can make
multiple repairs more quickly after
contractors have completed their work, and
move on to other paying jobs faster than with
other knockdown treatment repair methods.
Professional contractors, maintenance
professionals and installers of home theater,
fire and security systems can use the Drywall
Repair Tool to complete drywall repairs for
their clients without having to bring in a
drywall contractor or leave the mess behind
for the client to repair. The Drywall Repair
Tool can be re-used on multiple projects,
making it extremely cost-effective for those
who perform frequent drywall repairs.
The Drywall Repair Tool is available in three
patterns to ensure a good match with the
three types of knockdown patterns that exist
in commercial and residential construction
across the United States. Customers can
purchase just one template or a pack
including all three, which is recommended for
professionals who are likely to encounter
multiple knockdown patterns on jobsites. A
single template is available in fine, medium or
heavy texture to match the wall’s current
knockdown pattern for $17.99 each. The
Drywall Repair Tool 3-Pack includes all three
textures and costs $35.99.
The Drywall Repair Tool is available at
select retail home improvement stores or
online at www.drywallrepairtool.com.
1-PART
TM
Pourable Sealant
Gets Added Ease of Use
Contractors who
are already familiar
with the highly
dependable
performance of
Chem Link’s solvent-
free, polyether
pourable sealant in
the ChemCurbTM
Penetration Seal
System will
appreciate the latest
features added for
their convenience.
They are already aware that it bonds
aggressively to virtually any type of roof with
a 20-minute skin over time, with no out
gassing or shrinkage – and no special tools
required. Low slope contractors not familiar
with this system will want to check out how
much easier their work can get on their next
project.
Foil containers in a new, more user friendly
shape and a new 4” nozzle in every package
will make using and pouring 1-PART even
quicker and easier. The new half-gallon foil
containers are shorter and wider and can sit
upright when taken out of the package. If the
whole amount is not used, the nozzle can be
replaced with the original cap and reused
when needed.
The new containers still come four to a
carton or four to a rigid plastic field pack. 1-
PARTcomes in Gray or White to match the
ChemCurbs and is also still available in two
cartridge sizes and a 5-gallon pail. The 28-oz
tube has been upgraded from foil to plastic.
For more information visit,
www.chemlinkinc.com, or call Contractor Hot
Line at (800) 826-1681
AGC’s U4 Window Technology
Delivers R5 Glass Package
Performance in a Double-
Glazed Window Unit
AGC Flat Glass North America has
introduced a leading-edge glass technology
called U4 4th Surface Technology™, which
dramatically improves the performance and
energy efficiency of double glazed window
units without adding more glass panes.
By adding U4 4th Surface Technology,
double-glazed window systems are now able
to achieve the same levels of efficiency as
costlier triple-glazed units. Traditionally,
adding more panes of glass to a window was
the only way to improve their performance
and energy efficiency. However, the U4 4th
Surface Technology system has
revolutionized the industry by incorporating
a patent-pending pyrolytic low-E hard
coating that can be installed on the fourth
surface of an insulated glass unit (IGU). This
unique coating technology enables
manufacturers to use two low-E coatings in
one double-glazed unit, resulting in an R5-
rated glass package in a double glazed unit.
Adding U4 4th Surface Technology to an
AGC double-glazed IGU reduces the center of
glass U-factor by as much as 20 percent
compared to standard IGU configurations
with one low-E coating. More importantly,
the U-factor reduction gained with a U4 glass
package improves the whole window
performance (Uw) by 16 percent when
compared to a standard glass package.
In standard double-glazed units with one
low-e coating on the inside of the gap
between the glass panes, the low-e coating
permits the window to reflect solar energy
outwards when the sun is shining and to
reduce heat loss when it is cold outside.
However, because there is no coating on
the room-surface of the inner pane, some
heat from the room is lost to the gap
between the glass panes. This heat loss can
significantly lower a window’s thermal
performance. With the addition of the U4 4th
Surface Technology coating to the room-
surface of the inner pane (surface #4), the
window is able to reflect energy to the inside
as well as to the outside. This reduction
improves the overall insulating properties of
a U4 IGU by as much as 15 to 20 percent over
conventional IGUs.
In addition to the energy performance
advantages of U4 technology, the double-
glazed system also eliminates many of the
drawbacks of costlier triple-glazed window
units. First, the manufacturing process of
triple glaze windows requires additional
capital investments and new production
processes. By contrast, U4 technology can be
easily integrated into current double-glazed
manufacturing processes. In addition, the
manufacturing cost of triple glazed IGUs is 50
to 60 percent more than the cost of adding
U4 technology to a double glazed window.
U4 offers the performance and durability
benefits of traditional pyrolytic glass
products, providing an unlimited shelf-life
with no performance loss. U4 is easy to
fabricate, requires no special tools, is
extremely durable, and is easy to handle.
Moreover, it requires no edge deletion and
can be tempered or heat-strengthened when
needed.
U4 4th Surface Technology is backed by
industry leader AGC’s outstanding customer
78 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
service and support, plus a 10-year warranty
against cracking, chipping, peeling, flaking
and deterioration. To learn more about U4
4th Surface Technology, as well as other
innovative AGC offerings, call (800) 251-0441
or visit www.U4glass.com.
Asphalt Drum Mixers Improves
Control Vans
Asphalt Drum Mixers, Inc. (ADM) has
improved the design and availability of its
control vans for its full line of asphalt
plants by shifting the
production of these
components completely in-
house.
ADM’s new control
vans boast
heavier-duty tubing
construction and high-
tempered tinted safety
glass, and they are fully insulated for any
climate. Furthermore, the new control vans
continue to feature the same reliability and
state-of-the-art controls found in previous
models.
For more information, contact ADM,
1 ADM Parkway, Huntertown, IN 46748;
260-637-5729; fax 260-637-3164; e-mail
sales@admasphaltplants.com; or go to
www.admasphaltplants.com.
APEM Introduces P65 Series of
Rotary Code Switches
APEM Components has introduced the P65
series of rotary switches, a high temperature
version of APEM’s PT65 DIP coded rotary
switch. The P65 series DIP Rotary Switch is
specifically designed for high temperature
soldering. Typical applications include
security systems, laboratory instrumentation,
telecommunications equipment and
computer peripherals.
The P65’s temperature resistance ranges
from -65°C to more than +135°C. The P65
series is rated for 30,000 steps or position
changes at 42 VDC and 200mA.
APEM’s P65 Series DIP Coded Rotaries are
available in surface mount and through-hole
configurations and are manufactured with
lead-free, pure matte tin plating. Switches are
available in 10 and 16 positions in four output
code configurations; BCD, BCD complement,
hexadecimal and hexadecimal complement.
The DIP Rotary Switches feature three
actuator styles; screw driver, spindle and
slotted spindle. The round switch surface
allows for a convenient and cost saving
round/drilled panel cut-out. Installation in
square cut-outs is also possible. These
switches are designed to meet the RoHS
(Restriction of Hazardous Substances in
Electrical and Electronic Equipment)
Directive (2002/95/EC).
For more information about APEM or its
broad line of products, contact APEM
Components, Inc., 63 Neck Road, Haverhill, MA
01835; 978-372-1602; or visit the company’s
website at www.apem.com.
P R O D U C T S H O W C A S E
OR THIN
DETROIT TERRAZZO
CONTRACTORS
ASSOCIATION
terraZZo can be thick or thin,
heavy or light, textured or smooth,
exotic or conservative, plain or col-
orful, interior or exterior. no matter
what your flooring requirement is
terraZZo has the answer.
artisan tile (810) 220-2370 l boston tile (313) 535-7700
THICK
CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 79 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
Jasman Construction, an
interior contractor based in
Whitmore Lake, recently
announced the addition of
William Thomas as vice
president of the firm.
Thomas brings extensive
construction knowledge
and estimating experience to complement
Jasman’s expertise in interior building
construction and cold formed metal framing.
Steven K. Cretsinger, an
accredited environmental
professional with 13 years
experience, has joined
Testing Engineers &
Consultants, Inc. (TEC),
Ann Arbor, in their Industrial
Hygiene Services
Department as a senior
environmental health & safety consultant.
TEC has offices in Troy, Ann Arbor and Detroit.
Somat Engineering, Inc.,
an international
engineering consulting firm
headquartered in Detroit,
has hired Khyzer Malik, PE,
MSc, civil engineer, and
Nicole Park, geologist, to its
staff. Malik joins the firm’s
Cleveland, OH office as a
staff engineer. Park, G.I.T.,
joins the firm as a field
geologist for environmental
services.
G2 Consulting Group
recently announced that
Heather Sandor has
earned the federal definition of an
Environmental Professional (EP) by meeting
experience, education and certification
standards specified by the Environmental
Protection Agency. This qualifies her to
conduct the all appropriate inquiry (AAI)
environmental due diligence investigations
required to exempt commercial real estate
purchasers from cleanup liability for past
contamination of a site. G2 Consulting Group
is a full-service engineering firm providing
geotechnical, environmental and
construction engineering services. They have
offices in Troy, Brighton, and suburban
Chicago.
Willis, a global insurance broker, has
named Nicole Giddings account executive of
its Human Capital Practice in Farmington
Hills. Willis of Michigan, Inc. has offices in
Farmington Hills, Port Huron and Grand
Rapids, and specializes in the sectors of
automotive manufacturing, construction,
financial institutions and retail. Giddings will
be responsible for client management and
service delivery with a special focus in the
underwriting of financial risk and analysis of
benefit plan designs for large groups.
Bloomfield Hills-based
Plunkett Cooney senior
environmental attorney
Saulius K. Mikalonis has
been appointed vice chair
for the American Bar
Association’s Section of
Environment, Energy and
Resources Climate Change,
Sustainable Development and Ecosystems
Committee. This is the leading forum for
attorneys engaged in the national and
international regulatory and legal aspects of
climate change. He will serve a one-year term.
Mikalonis is also a member of the Plunkett
Cooney Energy Industry and
Corporate/Transactional practice groups, and
practices primarily in the areas of
environmental, natural resources and energy
law with particular emphasis on greenhouse
gases, renewable energy and green
building/LEED.
Architect Joseph A.
Gonzalez, FAIA, has joined
Ghafari Associates in its
Chicago office as its global
director of design. Gonzalez,
with over 30 years
experience, brings a wealth
of diverse project
experience, distinguished
by design excellence and industry
recognition. As Ghafari’s global director of
design, he will be responsible for overseeing
all aspects of the firm’s design work.
C O R P O R A T E N E W S
Hobbs+Black Associates, Inc. is proud to
celebrate 25 years of providing architectural
and engineering services to clients from its
Lansing office. In the mid-’80s Hobbs+Black
established a Lansing office to service the
Mid-Michigan market; predominately
working with state government agencies,
colleges, universities, and the auto
industry. Today, Hobbs+Black designs
dominate the Lansing skyline with iconic
buildings such as the Lansing Convention
Center, Grand Tower, and the Abbott Center.
Hobbs+Black also has offices in Ann Arbor
and Arizona.
Schonsheck, Inc., Wixom, was recently
awarded a Design/Build contract for a new
medical office building in Lenox Township.
Preliminary plans call for a state-of-the-art,
20,000-square-foot building. In addition to a
family practice, the facility will include areas
for physical therapy, diagnostics, laboratories,
and a pharmacy. Construction is slated to
begin in the spring of 2011.
Ameri-CAD, Inc., a Texas-based ITW
Company, has posted new Building
Information Modeling (BIM) education videos
to their VisionREZ Channel on YouTube.
These education videos are free and
designed to help viewers understand how to
migrate from CAD to BIM in a successful
manner. Topics currently available on the
VisionREZ Channel include: Transition Legacy
CAD to BIM; The Impact of Architectural BIM
on Estimating; BIM Architectural Deliverables
and Component Design; and Migrating from
Layers to Layer Keys in BIM.
Clark Construction, Lansing, recently
served as construction manager for the new
Central Michigan University (CMU) Student
Events Center, which recently celebrated its
grand opening. The Center includes a
redesigned arena with 5,300 seats and
contoured bleachers; retractable seating to
accommodate multiple arena configurations
including athletics, concerts,
P E O P L E I N C O N S T R U C T I O N
Thomas
Cretsinger
Malik
Park
Mikalonis
Gonzalez
For Advertising Information Call 248.972.1115
Or email at jones@cam-online.com
CAM Magazine is a publication of the Construction Association of Michigan.
43636 Woodward Ave. • Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204 • www.cam-online.com
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(continued)
80 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
commencements, speakers, and community
events; modern restrooms, marketing areas
and concessions spaces; and a dedicated
gymnasium featuring a regulation-size court
to serve as a staging area for major arena
events. The new facility also features a
10,000-square-foot lobby and reception area,
as well as a comprehensive overhaul of the
exterior appearance of the building.
Tooles Contracting Group, Detroit, and
Clark Construction Company, Lansing, have
been selected by Detroit Public Schools as
Design Builder for construction of the new
$46.3 million Finney Crockett High School in
Detroit. They have formed a Tooles/Clark joint
venture for the project. Albert Kahn
Associates, Elton Anderson Associates, LLC
and Giffels Webster Engineering Inc. will
provide architectural/engineering services
for the project. The new 221,000-square-foot
Finney Crocket facility will accommodate up
to 1,200 students in a move that will
consolidate both campuses when the school
opens for the 2012-2013 academic year. The
existing structure on Southampton Street will
be demolished and a new facility will be built
on the site. The new school will be a LEED
Gold Certified state-of-the-art facility
featuring four wings for eight science
laboratories, a high-tech media center,
athletic area with a community health clinic,
and a performing arts section.
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CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 81 Visit us online at www.cammagazineonline.com
Jan. 31 – 34th Annual SOURCE Awards
Entries Due
Entries for SOURCE Awards must be
postmarked on or before January 31, 2010.
The competition is open to all lighting
designers, architects, engineers, professional
designers, and consultants who use Cooper
Lighting fixtures in an interior or exterior
design project. Winners will be announced
in May 2011.
To download a complete list of rules, visit
the company website at
www.cooperlighting.com or e-mail
TalkToUs@CooperIndustries.com.
Feb. 2 – Michigan Construction & Design
Tradeshow
CAM is pleased to announce that their
tradeshow this year will be held at MotorCity
Casino Hotel in Detroit. Along with
numerous exhibits for construction
products and services, the one-day event
will include CAMTEC educational programs;
the CAM Magazine Special Issue / Green
Building of the Year Awards; the 125th CAM
Annual Meeting; and much more!
Visit www.cam-online.com for more
information, or call (248) 972-1000.
Feb. 24-26 – CSI Academies
The Construction Specifications Institute
(CSI) announced that it will hold The CSI
Academies at the Adolphus Hotel in Dallas,
TX, to help construction professionals
develop skills and improve their job
performance through a better
understanding of the roles and
responsibilities of construction teams.
Visit www.csinet.org/academies for more
information.
Feb. 24-27 – Cottage and Lakefront Living
Show
Every aspect of cottage and lakefront
living for cottage and lakefront property
owners or those looking to buy, build or rent
will be on display at this event at the Rock
Financial Showplace in Novi.
Information is available at 800-328-6550
and www.NoviCottageShow.com. The show
can also be followed on FaceBook or Twitter.
Mar. 11-13 – Michigan Home and Garden
Show
Attendees will find inspiration from the
latest trends in landscaping, gardening and
home improvement at this event at the
Pontiac Silverdome.
Information is available at 800-328-6550
and www.SilverdomeHomeShow.com. The
show can also be followed on FaceBook or
Twitter.
Mar. 17 – Helical Foundations and
Tiebacks Seminar
The Deep Foundations Institute (DFI) is
holding this seminar in Dallas, TX, in
conjunction with GeoFrontiers 2011.
For more information, call DFI at 973-423-
4030.
CAMTEC Class Schedule
CAMTEC, the training & education center
of the Construction Association of Michigan,
has announced its 2011 class schedule.
To register, obtain a class listing, or for
more class information, please visit
www.cam-online.com.
Jan. 11 OSHA 30-Hour
Jan. 19 First Aid, CPR & AED
Jan. 25 AIA Contracts
Feb. 8 Blueprint Reading
Feb. 10 Blueprint Reading I/Basic
Feb. 15 Construction Contracts and
Subcontracts
Feb. 16 Project Management
Comm./Residential
Feb. 22 Techniques for Delayed Projects
Mar. 2 Excavations the Grave Danger
Mar. 8 Accounts Receivable Mgmt. and
Collections
Mar. 9 Construction Industry Technician
(C.I.T.)
Mar. 9 Scheduling & Planning
Mar. 16 First Aid, CPR & AED
Mar. 21 Lien Law/Payment Bonds
Mar. 22 OSHA 10-Hour
C O N S T R U C T I O N C A L E N D A R
CONSTRUCTION
CALENDAR
F
e
b
Please submit all calendar items no less than six weeks prior to the event to:
Calendar Editor, CAM Magazine, P.O. Box 3204, Bloomfield Hills, MI 48302-3204.
82 CAM MAGAZI NE JANUARY / FEBRUARY 2011 “Voice Of The Construction Industry”®
ALL AMERICAN DECORATIVE
CONCRETE
WARREN
BARLEN CONTRACTING INC
FARMINGTON HILLS
BOLYARD LUMBER
ROCHESTER HILLS
BP3 AND ASSOCIATES LLC
WEST BLOOMFIELD
CHELSEA TRIMMERS
YPSILANTI
CLARK BROTHERS PAINTING INC
YPSILANTI
CRAWFORD PILE DRIVING LLC
BLOOMFIELD HILLS
CRS COMPANIES LLC
SHELBY TWP
EAST MICHIGAN TRAILER SALES
DETROIT
GIORGI CONCRETE LLC
DETROIT
ICS INTEGRATION SERVICES LLC
WESTLAND
JMC ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR LLC
ST CLAIR SHORES
J & S LIVONIA INC DBA JAIMES
INDUSTRIES INC
LIVONIA
MASONRY MAINTENANCE INC
SHELBY TWP
MAZZELLA LIFTING TECHNOLOGIES
CLEVELAND
MICHIGAN MAGNA INC
MILFORD
MILLBROOK PRINTING COMPANY
GRAND LEDGE
NASH CLEANING SERVICE INC
FARMINGTON HILLS
OSTRANDER CO. INC, JOHN N
BIRMINGHAM
PEERLESS MIDWEST INC
MISHAWAKA
PRECISION CARE LLC
EAST CHINA
PRESTIGE BUILDERS INC
YPSILANTI
ROCHESTER GLASS WORKS
TROY
SHR DEVELOPMENT INC
DETROIT
STRIKE GROUP, LLC
DETROIT
SUMMIT BUILDING INC
YPSILANTI
TOWNSEND NEON INC
ROCKWOOD
URETEK GREAT LAKES
CLARKSTON
VISION COLLISION LLC
LANSING
WALKER FLUKE & SHELDON PLC
HASTINGS
WESTLAND FIRE PROTECTION
LIVONIA
N E W C A M M E M B E R S / A D I N D E X
ABTEK Financial ......................................................................................................................38
ARC/Dunn Blue ......................................................................................................................33
Ace Cutting Equipment ......................................................................................................24
Aluminum Supply Company/Marshall Sales ..................................................................8
Amalio Corporation..............................................................................................................19
Aoun & Company ..................................................................................................................59
Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers Union Local #1 ..................................................36
CAM Administrative Services ..............................................................................................3
CAM Affinity Programs ........................................................................................................75
CAM Comp ..............................................................................................................................33
CAM ECPN ..............................................................................................................................53
CAM Membership..................................................................................................................61
CAM Magazine ......................................................................................................................65
CAMSAFETY ............................................................................................................................65
C.A.S.S. ....................................................................................................................................39
C.E.I. ....................................................................................................................................57
C.F.C.U. ......................................................................................................................................9
Cipriano Coatings..................................................................................................................38
Cochrane Supply & Engineering ......................................................................................81
Connelly Crane Rental Corp. ..............................................................................................14
Construction Tool & Supply Co. ........................................................................................50
Curran Crane Co., J.J. ............................................................................................................65
DCC Construction..................................................................................................................17
D&R Earthmoving, LLC ........................................................................................................13
Detroit Carpentry JATC........................................................................................................35
Detroit Dismantling..............................................................................................................28
Detroit Terrazzo Contractors Association......................................................................78
DiHydro Services ..................................................................................................................49
Doeren Mayhew ....................................................................................................................80
Engineered Buildings, Inc. ..................................................................................................37
Executive Vehicle Sales, Inc. ..............................................................................................48
Facca Richter & Pregler, P.C. ................................................................................................14
FastSigns of Birmingham....................................................................................................52
Fishbeck, Thompson, Carr & Huber, Inc...........................................................................52
G2 Consulting Group ..........................................................................................................28
Glazing Contractors Association ......................................................................................11
Hartland Insurance Group, Inc. ........................................................................................25
Hilti ....................................................................................................................................34
IBEW Local 252 ......................................................................................................................13
Jeffers Crane Service, Inc. ....................................................................................................37
Kerkstra Precast......................................................................................................................41
Klochko Equipment Rental Company ..........................................................................IBC
Kotz, Sangster, Wysocki and Berg P.C. ............................................................................44
MasonPro, Inc. ........................................................................................................................63
McCoig Materials ....................................................................................................................7
Michigan Concrete Association........................................................................................12
Next Generation Services Group......................................................................................51
North American Dismantling Corp..................................................................................21
Oakland Companies ............................................................................................................16
Oakland Metal Sales, Inc. ....................................................................................................40
Operating Engineers Local 324-JATF ............................................................................IFC
Plante & Moran PLLC............................................................................................................60
Plumbing Professors ............................................................................................................59
Plunkett Cooney ....................................................................................................................64
R.L. Deppmann Co. ................................................................................................................15
R.S. Dale Co. ............................................................................................................................45
SMRCA ....................................................................................................................................47
Safety Services ......................................................................................................................BC
Sani-Vac ....................................................................................................................................69
Scaffolding Inc. ......................................................................................................................80
Spartan Specialties ..............................................................................................................71
Sullivan, Ward, Asher & Patton, P.C. ..................................................................................21
Valenti Trobec Chandler Inc/Griffin Smalley & Wilkerson ..........................................5
Woods Construction ............................................................................................................52
Zervos Group..........................................................................................................................48
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