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Fiber
Super Nutrient for Life ........The Power of Fiber




We all know fiber is good for us. Not only can dietary fiber lower cholesterol, it also helps keep us
trim and feeling full.

So how do you get more fiber into your daily diet? Here are six painless ways to work in 25 grams
a day the recommended amount for someone eating 2,000 calories a day.
Before you start, keep a few things in mind: When you increase fiber, you should increase your
water intake along with it. Add fiber gradually to give your gastrointestinal tract time to adapt. And
if you have gastrointestinal diseases, including constipation, check with your doctor first.



1. Go for whole grains whenever possible. Check the ingredient list to make sure the whole grain
is the first or second ingredient on the list. Products that say "100% wheat" or "multigrain" are not
usually whole grain.
• 2 slices of whole-wheat bread = 4 grams of fiber
• 1 cup of cooked brown rice = 4 grams of fiber
• Reduced-Fat Triscuit crackers = 3 grams

2. Choose the right breakfast cereals. Some cereals have little whole grain. And some whole
grain cereals are loaded with unnecessary sugar.
• cup Fiber One = 14 grams of fiber
• 1 cup Raisin Bran = 7.5 grams of fiber
• 1 cup Frosted Shredded Wheat Spoon Size = 5 grams
• 1 cup Quaker Squares Baked in Cinnamon = 5 grams
• cup cooked oatmeal = 3 grams
*Recommended serving sizes.
3. Eat beans a few times a week. Beans offer more fiber than most plant foods, plus they're
loaded with healthy plant protein.
• 1 cup of canned minestrone soup = about 5 grams fiber
• 1/2 cup vegetarian or fat-free refried beans, used to make microwave nachos = about 6
grams
• 1/4 cup kidney beans, added to a green salad = 3 grams fiber
• Bean burrito at Taco Bell (or made at home) = 8 grams
4. Have several servings of fruit every day. You can add it to your morning meal, enjoy it as a
snack, and garnish your dinner plate with it. Or have it with or instead of dessert.
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• 1 large apple = 4 grams of fiber
• 1 banana = 3 grams
• 1 pear = 4 grams
• 1 cup strawberries = 4 grams



5. Every day, stir a tablespoon of ground flaxseed into your smoothie, soup, casserole, etc. One
tablespoon will boost your daily fiber by 3 grams. Flaxseed contains a balance of soluble and
insoluble fiber, too.



6. Have several servings of vegetables every day. Include a vegetable with lunch, have raw
veggies as an afternoon snack or pre-dinner appetizer, and enjoy a big helping with dinner. Make
a point of enjoying vegetarian entrees several times a week.
• 1 cup carrot slices, cooked = 5 grams of fiber
• 1 cup cooked broccoli = 4.5 grams
• 1 cup raw carrots = 4 grams
• 1 sweet potato = 4 grams
• 1 cup cauliflower, cooked = 3 grams
• 2 cups raw spinach leaves = 3 grams

















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Tips for Reaping the Benefits of Whole Grains

Here's how to select whole-grain foods and fit the recommended servings into your eating plan.


Will the real whole grain please stand up? Scan the bread aisle and virtually every package touts
some kind of nutritional whole-grain goodness. But few of them actually are whole grain.

We're surrounded by terms like multigrain, 100% wheat, cracked wheat, organic, pumpernickel,
bran, and stone ground. These all sound like whole grains, but none of these descriptions actually
indicate whole grain.

The amount of grains you need daily varies based on your age, sex, and physical activity level.
You can determine how much you need by diving into My Pyramid Plan.My Pyramid Plan. "My
Pyramid" sounds easy enough until you try to figure out what constitutes a whole grain.

WebMD got the skinny on whole grains along with suggestions on how to fit the recommended
servings into your healthy eating plan.
Know Your Whole Grains

A whole grain contains all edible parts of the grain, including the bran, germ, and endosperm. The
whole grain may be used intact or recombined as long as all components are present in natural
proportions. To recognize whole grains, keep this list handy when you go to the grocery store and
choose any of the following grains:
• Whole-grain corn
• Whole oats/oatmeal
• Popcorn
• Brown rice
• Whole rye
• Whole-grain barley
• Wild rice
• Buckwheat
• Triticale
• Bulgur (cracked wheat)
• Millet
• Quinoa
• Sorghum

Whole grains are not necessarily brown or multigrain or only found in adult cereals. They exist
throughout the food supply, including processed foods.
Don't be misled by the manufacturer's claims on the front of the package. Color, fiber, or
descriptive names on the package do not necessarily imply whole-grain goodness. Some
manufacturers strip the outer layer of bran off the whole kernel of wheat, use the refined wheat
flour, add in molasses to color it brown, and call it 100% wheat bread. That's true, but it is not a
whole grain.

The only way to really know if a whole grain is indeed "whole" is to check the ingredient list for the
word "whole" preceding the grain and recognize the above grains as whole grains. Ideally, the
whole grain will be the first or second ingredient in the list, indicating that the product contains
more whole grain than any other ingredient.
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And avoid products that say "refined" whole wheat. Again, that's not a true whole grain and much
of the health benefit has been stripped out by processing.

One simple way to find whole grains is to look for the FDA-approved health claim that reads, "In a
low fat diet, whole grain foods may reduce the risk of heart disease and some forms of cancers."
This is found on whole-grain products that contain at least 51% whole-grain flour (by weight) and
are low in fat, saturated fat, and cholesterol.

General Mills and the Whole Grains Council have submitted a petition to the FDA to require
consistency in labeling of whole grains. These groups are suggesting that a whole-grain stamp be
placed on products that provide either "good" servings (8-15 grams of whole grain) or "excellent"
servings (16 or more grams of whole grain). The whole-grain stamp is already showing up on
packages, making it easy to select whole-grain products. Eat three "excellent" or six "good"
servings daily to meet national guidelines.

Working more whole grains into your diet can be as simple as choosing whole-grain breads,
cereals, English muffins, waffles, bagels, pasta, rice, and crackers.
Like the champions, starting your day with a bowl of whole-grain cereal energizes you and helps
keep you trim. Successful "losers" from the National Weight Control Registry who have lost
substantial amounts of weight -- and kept it off -- swear by the importance of eating a nutritious
breakfast such as cereal each day.

Enjoy a sandwich at lunch with two slices of whole-grain bread and you are two-thirds of the way
toward meeting your goal. What could be easier than eating air-popped popcorn as a snack?

Step out of the comfort zone and experiment with unusual grains.
WebMD's "Recipe Doctor" Elaine Magee, MPH, RD, likes to blend whole-wheat flour with all-
purpose flour to boost the whole-grain content of her baked goods.

"Start where you are, find a whole-wheat or whole-grain bread or cereal that you like. Then work
your way into new adventures. Whole grains taste and feel different to the mouth, and therefore it
takes time to adjust to these new grains," advises Magee.
Other ideas from Magee include: Add barley to canned soup, and then boil to cook the barley; or
try blended pastas that contain a mix of whole and refined grains. Cook up a batch of brown rice,
eat it at dinner, and use the leftovers to add some pizzazz to yogurt, or mix it with vegetables for
a vegetarian snack or lunch. Visit your local health food market and try your hand at some of the
less familiar whole grains available.

Whole Grains on the Rise
Slowly but surely, restaurants and food manufacturers are responding to the demand for more
whole-grain products.

Visit PF Chang's and you will be delighted to see brown rice as an option at this oriental
restaurant chain. Mission whole-wheat tortillas are flying off the shelf, according to the company.
Kraft Foods recently unveiled its South Beach line of foods including pizzas made on whole-
wheat crusts, whole-grain cereals, and refrigerated sandwich wraps on whole-wheat tortillas. As
the trend continues, it will make it easier for consumers to enjoy at least three servings a day of
whole-grain goodness.



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Vegetables
The New Food Pyramid



Vegetables are one of the main food groups in the new Food Pyramid. Here's the information you
need to learn to start enjoying nutrient-packed vegetables.
What counts as a vegetable?

Any vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the vegetable group. Vegetables
may be raw or cooked; fresh, frozen, canned, or dried/dehydrated; and may be whole, cut up, or
mashed.

There are five different groups of vegetables, based on their nutrient content. Some commonly
eaten vegetables in each group are:
Dark green vegetables
bok choy
collard greens
dark green leafy lettuce
kale
mesclun
mustard greens
romaine lettuce
spinach
turnip greens
watercress
beets
Orange vegetables
acorn squash
butternut squash
carrots
hubbard squash
pumpkin
sweet potatoes
Dry Beans and Peas
black beans
black-eyed peas
garbanzo beans (chickpeas)
kidney beans
lentils
lima beans (mature)
navy beans
pinto beans
soy beans
split peas
Starchy vegetables
corn
green peas
lima beans (green)
potatoes
Other vegetables
artichokes
asparagus
bean sprouts
beets
Brussels sprouts
cabbage
cauliflower
celery
cucumbers
eggplant
green beans
green or red peppers
iceberg (head) lettuce
mushrooms
okra
onions
parsnips
tomatoes
tomato juice
vegetable juice
turnips
wax beans
zucchini
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tofu (bean curd made from soybeans)
white beans

How many vegetables do I need?

You should choose a variety of vegetables. It is not necessary to eat each type of vegetable daily.
However, over a week, try to eat the amounts listed from each group as a way to reach your daily
recommended amount.








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Fruit
The New Food Pyramid

What Counts as Fruit?

Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the fruit group. Fruits may be fresh, canned, frozen,
or dried, and may be whole, cut-up, or pureed.
Some commonly eaten fruits are:



Apples
Apricots
Avocado
Bananas
Berries:
Strawberries
Blueberries
Raspberries
Cherries
Grapefruit
Grapes
Kiwi fruit
Lemons
Limes
Mangoes
Melons:
Cantaloupe
Honeydew
Watermelon
Mixed Fruits:
Fruit Cocktail
Nectarines
Oranges
Peaches
Pears
Papaya
Pineapple
Plums
Prunes
Raisins
Tangerines
100% Fruit Juice:
Orange
Apple
Grape
Grapefruit


How Much Fruit Should I Eat?

The amount of fruit you need to eat depends on age, sex, and level of physical activity.
Recommended daily amounts are shown in the chart.









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Daily Recommendation*
Children 2-3 years old
4-8 years old
1 cup
1 to 1 ½ cups
Girls 9-13 years old
14-18 years old
1 ½ cups
1 ½ cups
Boys 9-13 years old
14-18 years old
1 ½ cups
2 cups
Women 19-30 years old
31-50 years old
51+ years old
2 cups
1 ½ cups
1 ½ cups
Men 19-30 years old
31-50 years old
51+ years old
2 cups
2 cups
2 cups


These amounts are for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of beyond normal daily
activities. Those who are more physically active may be able to eat more while staying within
calorie needs.


What Counts as a Cup of Fruit?
In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup
from the fruit group.

The new Food Pyramid lists daily recommendations of fruits in terms of cups.
In general, 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice, or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup
from the fruit group.

This chart provides examples of amounts of specific fruits that equal 1 cup.
Amount that counts
Apple
½ large (3.25" diameter)
1 small (2.5" diameter)
1 cup sliced or chopped, raw
or cooked
Applesauce 1 cup
Banana
1 cup sliced
1 large (8" to 9" long)
Cantaloupe 1 cup diced or melon balls
Grapes
1 cup whole or cut-up
32 seedless grapes
Grapefruit
1 medium (4" diameter)
1 cup sections
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Mixed fruit (fruit cocktail)
1 cup diced or sliced, raw or
canned, drained
Orange
1 large (3-1/16" diameter)
1 cup sections
Orange, mandarin 1 cup canned, drained
Peach
1 large (2 ¾" diameter)
1 cup sliced or diced, raw,
cooked, or canned, drained
2 halves, canned
Pear
1 medium pear (2.5 per lb)
1 cup sliced or diced, raw,
cooked, or canned, drained
Pineapple
1 cup chunks, sliced or
crushed, raw, cooked or
canned, drained
Plum
1 cup sliced raw or cooked
3 medium or 2 large plums
Strawberries
About 8 large berries
1 cup whole, halved, or sliced,
fresh or frozen
Watermelon 1 small wedge (1" thick)
Dried fruit (raisins, prunes,
apricots, etc.)
½ cup dried fruit is equivalent
to1 cup fruit
100% fruit juice (orange,
apple, grape, grapefruit,
etc.)
1 cup








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What Fruit Can Do for You

People who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a
reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Fruits provide vitamins and minerals vital for your body's
health.

Fruit is one of the main groups in the new Food Pyramid.
People who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a
reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Fruits provide vitamins and minerals vital for your body's
health.
Health benefits
• Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce risk for stroke and heart disease.
• Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce risk for type 2 diabetes.
• Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may protect against certain cancers, such as
mouth, stomach, and colorectal cancer.
• Diets rich in foods containing fiber, such as fruits and vegetables, may reduce the risk of
coronary heart disease.
• Eating fruits and vegetables rich in potassium may reduce the risk of developing kidney
stones and may help to decrease bone loss.
• Eating foods such as fruits that are low in calories per cup instead of some other higher-
calorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake.

Nutrients
Most fruits are naturally low in fat, sodium, and calories. None have cholesterol.
• Fruits are important sources of many nutrients, including potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin
C, and folate (folic acid).
• Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. Fruit sources of
potassium include bananas, prunes and prune juice, dried peaches and apricots,
cantaloupe, honeydew melon, and orange juice.
• Dietary fiber from fruits helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart
disease. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. It helps reduce constipation and
diverticulosis. Fiber-containing foods such as fruits help provide a feeling of fullness with
fewer calories. Whole or cut-up fruits are sources of dietary fiber; fruit juices contain little
or no fiber.
• Vitamin C is important for growth and repair of all body tissues, helps heal cuts and
wounds, and keeps teeth and gums healthy.
• Folate (folic acid) helps the body form red blood cells. Women of childbearing age who
may become pregnant and those in the first trimester of pregnancy should be sure to get
adequate folate, including folic acid from fortified foods or supplements. This reduces the
risk of birth defects called neural tube defects, including spina bifida and anencephaly.


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Tips to Help You Eat Fruit


Getting enough fruit in your diet may seem overwhelming. But a few simple tricks can help you
enjoy nutrient-packed, delicious fruit from day to day.
For tips on buying, preparing, and making fruit more appealing for children,

Getting enough fruit in your diet may seem overwhelming. But a few simple tricks can help you
enjoy nutrient-packed, delicious fruit from day to day.
Below are tips on buying, preparing, and making fruit more appealing to children.
Quick Tips for Buying, Preparing Fruit
• Keep a bowl of whole fruit on the table, counter, or in the refrigerator.
• Refrigerate cut-up fruit to eat later.
• Buy fresh fruits in season when they may be less expensive and at their peak flavor.
• Buy fruits that are dried, frozen, and canned (in water or juice, not syrup) as well as fresh,
so that you always have a supply on hand.
• Consider convenience when shopping. Buy precut packages of fruit (such as melon or
pineapple chunks) for a healthy snack in seconds. Choose packaged fruits that do not
have added sugars.
Picking the Best Fruit:
• To get the benefits of fiber, reach for whole or cut-up fruit rather than juice.
• Select fruits with more potassium often, such as bananas, prunes and prune juice, dried
peaches and apricots, cantaloupe, honeydew melon, and orange juice.
• When choosing canned fruits, select fruit canned in 100% fruit juice or water rather then
syrup.
• Vary your fruit choices to get a wide variety of nutrients.
Packing Fruit Into Meals:
• At breakfast, top your cereal with bananas or peaches; add blueberries to pancakes;
drink 100% orange or grapefruit juice. Or, try a fruit mixed with low-fat or fat-free yogurt.
• At lunch, pack a tangerine, banana, or grapes to eat, or choose fruits from a salad bar.
Individual containers of fruits like peaches or applesauce are easy and convenient.
• At dinner, add crushed pineapple to coleslaw, or include mandarin oranges or grapes in a
tossed salad.
• Make a Waldorf salad, with apples, celery, walnuts, and dressing.
• Try meat dishes that incorporate fruit, such as chicken with apricots or mango chutney.
• Add fruit like pineapple or peaches to kabobs as part of a barbecue meal.
• For dessert, have baked apples, pears, or a fruit salad.
Snack Time
• Cut-up fruit makes a great snack. Either cut them yourself, or buy pre-cut packages of
fruit pieces like pineapples or melons. Or, try whole fresh berries or grapes.
• Dried fruits also make a great snack. They are easy to carry and store well. Because they
are dried, ¼ cup is equivalent to ½ cup of other fruits.
• Keep a package of dried fruit in your desk or bag. Some fruits that are available dried
include apricots, apples, pineapple, bananas, cherries, figs, dates, cranberries,
blueberries, prunes (dried plums), and raisins (dried grapes).
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• As a snack, spread peanut butter on apple slices or top frozen yogurt with berries or
slices of kiwi fruit.
• Frozen juice bars (100% juice) make healthy alternatives to high-fat snacks.
Make fruit more appealing:
• Many fruits taste great with a dip or dressing. Try low-fat yogurt or pudding as a dip for
fruits like strawberries or melons.
• Make a fruit smoothie by blending fat-free or low-fat milk or yogurt with fresh or frozen
fruit. Try bananas, peaches, strawberries, or other berries.
• Try applesauce as a fat-free substitute for some of the oil when baking cakes.
• Try different textures of fruits. For example, apples are crunchy, bananas are smooth and
creamy, and oranges are juicy.
• For fresh fruit salads, mix apples, bananas, or pears with acidic fruits like oranges,
pineapple, or lemon juice to keep them from turning brown.
Turning Children Into Fruit Lovers:
• Set a good example for children by eating fruit everyday with meals or as snacks.
• Offer children a choice of fruits for lunch.
• Depending on their age, children can help shop for, clean, peel, or cut up fruits.
• While shopping, allow children to pick out a new fruit to try later at home.
• Decorate plates or serving dishes with fruit slices.
• Top off a bowl of cereal with some berries. Or, make a smiley face with sliced bananas
for eyes, raisins for a nose, and an orange slice for a mouth.
• Offer raisins or other dried fruits instead of candy.
• Make fruit kabobs using pineapple chunks, bananas, grapes, and berries.
• Pack a juice box (100% juice) in children's lunches versus soda or other sugar-
sweetened beverages.
• Choose fruit options, such as sliced apples, mixed fruit cup, or 100% fruit juice, that are
available in some fast-food restaurants.
• Offer fruit pieces and 100% fruit juice to children. There is often little fruit in "fruit-flavored"
beverages or chewy fruit snacks.
Avoid a Fruit Snafu
• Wash fruits before preparing or eating them. Under clean, running water, rub fruits briskly
with your hands to remove dirt and surface microorganisms. Dry after washing.
• Keep fruits separate from raw meat, poultry and seafood while shopping, preparing, or
storing.


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Meat & Beans
The Food Pyramid

Meat and beans make up one of the main food groups in the new Food Pyramid. But this group is
about more than just meat and beans.
What foods are included in the meat & beans group?

All foods made from meat, poultry, fish, dry beans or peas, eggs, nuts, and seeds are considered
part of this group. Dry beans and peas are part of this group as well as the vegetable group.

Most meat and poultry choices should be lean or low fat. Higher fat choices, such as regular
ground beef (75 to 80% lean) or chicken with skin, add on extra fat and calories.
Fish, nuts, and seeds contain healthy oils, so these foods are good substitutions for meat or
poultry.

Select fish rich in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, trout, and herring, more
often.

Sunflower seeds, almonds, and hazelnuts (filberts) are the richest sources of vitamin E in this
food group. To help meet vitamin E recommendations, make these your nut and seed choices
more often.


What to Watch Out For

Frying chicken in shortening or frying eggs in butter or stick margarine also packs on significant
fat and calories.

Liver and other organ meats are high in cholesterol. Egg yolks are also high in cholesterol, but
egg whites are cholesterol-free.

Processed meats such as ham, sausage, frankfurters, and luncheon or deli meats have added
salt. Fresh chicken, turkey, and pork may be enhanced with a salt-containing

solution.

Check the product label for statements such as "self-basting" for a sign that there may be added
salt.












How much do I need from the meat & beans group?
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The amount you need to eat depends on age, sex, and level of physical activity. Most Americans
eat enough food from this group, but need to make leaner and more varied selections of these
foods. Here are the recommended daily amounts.
Daily recommendation*
Children 2-3 years old
4-8 years old
2 ounce equivalents**
3-4 ounce equivalents**
Girls 9-13 years old
14-18 years old
5 ounce equivalents**
5 ounce equivalents**
Boys 9-13 years old
14-18 years old
5 ounce equivalents**
6 ounce equivalents**
Women 19-30 years old
31-50 years old
51+ years old
5 ½ ounce equivalents**
5 ounce equivalents**
5 ounce equivalents**
Men 19-30 years old
31-50 years old
51+ years old
6 ½ ounce equivalents**
6 ounce equivalents**
5 ½ ounce equivalents**

*These amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate
physical activity, beyond normal daily activities. Those who are more physically active may be
able to eat more while staying within calorie needs.

**Below is information on what counts as one ounce equivalent in the meat and beans group.




What counts as an ounce in the meat & beans group?

In general, 1 ounce of meat, poultry or fish, ¼ cup cooked dry beans, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon of
peanut butter, or ½ ounce of nuts or seeds can be considered as 1 ounce equivalent from the
meat and beans group.
For specific amounts that count as 1 ounce equivalent in the meat & beans group towards your
daily recommended intake,


What Meat & Beans Can Do for You

Foods in the meat, poultry, fish, eggs, nuts, and seed group provide vital nutrients. However,
choosing foods from this group that are high in saturated fat and cholesterol may cause illness.

For more information on the nutrients found in the meat & beans group

Foods in the meat & beans group can be very healthy. But choosing the right types of foods is
key for staying healthy.
For tips on which foods to reach for and menu ideas

Vegetarian Choices
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• Vegetarians get enough protein from this group as long as the variety and amounts of
foods selected are adequate.
• Protein sources from the meat and beans group for vegetarians include eggs (for ovo-
vegetarians), beans, nuts, nut butters, peas, and soy products (tofu, tempeh, veggie
burgers).













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Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese
The Food Pyramid



One of the main food groups in the new food pyramid is milk, yogurt, and cheese.
All liquid milk products and many foods made from milk that retain their calcium content are
considered part of this food group. Foods made from milk that have little to no calcium, such as
cream cheese, cream, and butter, are not. Most milk group choices should be fat-free or low-fat.

Some common choices in the milk, yogurt, and cheese group are:
Milk* Cheese*
All milk:
Fat-free (skim)
Low fat (1%)
Reduced fat (2%)
Whole milk
Flavored milks:
Chocolate
Strawberry
Lactose-reduced milks
Lactose-free milks
Milk-based desserts*
Puddings made with
milk
Ice milk
Frozen yogurt
Ice cream
Hard natural
cheeses:
cheddar
mozzarella
Swiss
parmesan
Soft cheeses:
ricotta
cottage cheese
processed cheeses
American
Yogurt*
All yogurt
Fat-free
low fat
reduced fat
whole-milk yogurt

Choose fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese.
Sweetened milk products (flavored milk, yogurt, drinkable yogurt, desserts) have added sugars
and extra calories.

For those who are lactose intolerant, lactose-free and lower-lactose products are available. These
include hard cheeses and yogurt. Also, enzyme preparations can be added to milk to lower the
lactose content. Calcium-fortified foods and drinks such as soy beverages or orange juice are
other sources of calcium but may not provide other necessary nutrients.


How much do I need from the milk group?
The amount of food from the milk group you need to eat depends on age. Recommended daily
amounts are shown below.




Daily Recommendation
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Children 2-3 years old
4-8 years old
2 cups
2 cups
Girls 9-13 years old
14-18 years old
3 cups
3 cups
Boys 9-13 years old
14-18 years old
3 cups
3 cups
Women 19-30 years old
31-50 years old
51+ years old
3 cups
3 cups
3 cups
Men 19-30 years old
31-50 years old
51+ years old
3 cups
3 cups
3 cups



What counts as 1 cup in the milk group?

In general, 1 cup of milk or yogurt, 1 ½ ounces of natural cheese, or 2 ounces of processed
cheese can be considered as 1 cup from the milk group.
For a list of specific food amounts that count as 1 cup in the milk group,

What Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese Can Do for You

People who have a diet rich in milk, yogurt, and cheese can reduce the risk of low bone mass
throughout the life cycle and help prevent osteoporosis. Foods in the milk group provide vital
vitamins and minerals, including calcium, potassium, vitamin D, and protein. Calcium-fortified
foods and drinks such as soy beverages or orange juice also contain calcium but may not provide
other necessary nutrients.
For more information on the health benefits of the milk group, including how these nutrients can
make you healthier,


Tips to Help You Get More Milk
Not many of us sit around drinking milk with dinner anymore. But a few simple tricks can help you
enjoy nutrient-packed, milk and other dairy foods from day to day.
For tips on getting more milk and what to do if you can't or don't want to drink milk




Tips to Help You Get More Milk


Milk and milk products are one of the main food groups in the Food Pyramid.
Not many of us sit around drinking milk with dinner anymore. But a few simple tricks can help you
enjoy nutrient-packed, milk and other dairy foods from day to day.
Making Milk a Habit
• Include milk as a beverage at meals. Choose fat-free or low-fat milk.
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• If you usually drink whole milk, switch gradually to fat-free milk, to lower saturated fat and
calories. Try reduced-fat (2%), then low-fat (1%), and finally fat-free (skim).
• If you drink cappuccinos or lattes, ask for them with fat-free (skim) milk.
• Add fat-free or low-fat milk instead of water to oatmeal and hot cereals.
• Use fat-free or low-fat milk when making condensed cream soups (such as cream of
tomato).
• Have fat-free or low-fat yogurt as a snack.
• Make a dip for fruits or vegetables from yogurt.
• Make fruit-yogurt smoothies in the blender.
• For dessert, make chocolate or butterscotch pudding with fat-free or low-fat milk.
• Top cut-up fruit with flavored yogurt for a quick dessert.
• Top casseroles, soups, stews, or vegetables with shredded low-fat cheese.
• Top a baked potato with fat-free or low-fat yogurt.
Not Into Milk?
If you're lactose intolerance, the most reliable way to get the health benefits of milk is to choose
lactose-free alternatives, such as cheese, yogurt, or lactose-free milk. You can also take the
enzyme lactase before eating or drinking milk products.
Calcium choices for those who do not consume milk products include:
• Calcium-fortified juices, cereals, breads, soy beverages, or rice beverages
• Canned fish (sardines, salmon with bones), soybeans, and other soy products (soy-
based beverages, soy yogurt, tempeh), some other dried beans, and some leafy greens
(collard and turnip greens, kale, bok choy). The amount of calcium that can be absorbed
from these foods varies.

For more information on the health benefits of the milk group, including how these nutrients can
make you healthier


People who have a diet rich in milk and milk products can reduce the risk of low bone mass
throughout the life cycle. Foods in the milk group provide vital nutrients, including calcium,
potassium, vitamin D, and protein.
Build Stronger Bones
• Diets rich in milk and milk products help build and maintain bone mass. This may reduce
the risk of the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis.
• Milk products are especially important to bone health during childhood and adolescence,
when bone mass is being built.
• Diets that include milk products tend to have a higher overall nutritional quality.
• Calcium-fortified foods and drinks such as soy beverages or orange juice are other
sources of calcium but may not provide other necessary nutrients.
Vitamins and Minerals
• Calcium helps build stronger bones and teeth. Milk products are the primary source of
calcium in American diets. Diets that provide 3 cups or the equivalent of milk products per
day can improve bone mass. Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood
pressure. Milk products, especially yogurt and milk, provide potassium.
• Vitamin D functions in the body to maintain proper levels of calcium and phosphorous,
thereby helping to build and maintain bones. Milk that is fortified with vitamin D is a good
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source of this nutrient. Other sources include vitamin D-fortified yogurt and vitamin D-
fortified ready-to-eat breakfast cereals.
• Low-fat or fat-free milk products provide little or no fat.
Lean Towards Fat-Free or Low-Fat
Choosing foods from the milk group that are high in saturated fats and cholesterol can affect
heart disease risk.
Diets high in saturated fats raise LDL "bad" cholesterol levels in the blood. High LDL cholesterol,
in turn, increases the risk for heart disease. Many cheeses, whole milk, and products made from
them are high in saturated fat. To help keep blood cholesterol levels healthy, limit the amount of
these foods you eat. In addition, eating a lot of fats makes it difficult to avoid getting more calories
than you need.







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Oils
The New Food Pyramid

It's true. Oils are one of the main food groups in the new Food Pyramid. Here's the information
you need to be sure you're getting the right amount and the right kind of oils.
What Are Oils?

Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature, like the vegetable oils used in cooking.

Oils come from many different plants and from fish. Some common oils are:
• Canola oil
• Corn oil
• Cottonseed oil
• Olive oil
• Safflower oil
• Soybean oil
• Sunflower oil
Some oils are used mainly as flavorings, such as walnut oil and sesame oil.
A number of foods are naturally high in oils, like:
• Nuts
• Olives
• Some fish
• Avocados
Healthier Oils

Foods that are mainly oil include mayonnaise, certain salad dressings, and soft (tub or squeeze)
margarine with no trans fats. Trans fats are strongly linked to heart disease. Amounts of trans fat
will be required on labels as of 2006. Many products already provide this information.

Most oils are high in healthier fats called monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats, and low in
unhealthy fats called saturated fats. Oils from plant sources (vegetable and nut oils) do not
contain any cholesterol. In fact, no foods from plants sources contain cholesterol.

A few plant oils, however, including coconut oil and palm kernel oil, are high in saturated fats and
should be limited in your diet.

How Much Oil Should I Get Each Day?
Depending on your sex and age, the amount can range from 5 teaspoons to 8 teaspoons a day.
A 60-year-old woman that doesn't exercise needs 5 teaspoons a day. A 30-year-old man who
exercises more than 60 minutes a day should get 8 teaspoons a day.
Limit Solid Fats

Most solid fats are high in saturated fats and/or trans fats and have less monounsaturated or
polyunsaturated fats. Animal products containing solid fats also contain cholesterol.
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Trans fats can be found in many cakes, cookies, crackers, icings, margarines, and microwave
popcorns. Foods containing partially-hydrogenated vegetable oils usually contain trans fats.

Saturated fats, trans fats, and cholesterol tend to raise LDL "bad" cholesterol levels in the blood,
which in turn increases the risk for heart disease. To lower risk for heart disease, cut back on
foods containing saturated fats, trans fats, and cholesterol. Look for foods that are low in
saturated fats, trans fats, and cholesterol, to help reduce your risk of heart disease.

Solid fats are fats that are solid at room temperature, such as butter and shortening. Solid fats
come from many animal foods and can be made from vegetable oils through a process called
hydrogenation. Some common solid fats are:
• Butter
• Beef fat (tallow, suet)
• Chicken fat
• Pork fat (lard)
• Stick margarine
• Shortening
Foods high in solid fats include:
• Many cheeses
• Creams
• Ice creams
• Well-marbled cuts of meats
• Regular ground beef
• Bacon
• Sausages
• Poultry skin
• Many baked goods (such as cookies, crackers, donuts, pastries, and croissants)
In some cases, the fat in these foods is invisible. Regular cheese and whole milk are high in solid
fat, even though it is not visible.

How do I count the solid fats I can eat?

For quick guide on the amount of solid fats in some common foods.














Here's a quick guide on the amount of solid fats in some common foods.
Amount Amount of solid Calories Total
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of food fat
teaspoons/grams
from
solid fat
calories
Solid fats:
Shortening 1 Tbsp 3 tsp/13 g 115 115
Butter 1 Tbsp 2 1/2 tsp/12 g 100 100
Coconut or
palm kernel
oil
1 Tbsp 3 tsp/14 g 120 120

Foods rich in solid fats:
Heavy cream 1 Tbsp 1 tsp/5 g 50 50
Half and half
cream
1 Tbsp 1/2 tsp/2 g 15 20
Sour cream 1 Tbsp 1/2 tsp/2 g 20 25
Whole milk 1 cup 2 tsp/8 g 70 145
Cheddar
cheese
1 1/2 oz 3 tsp/14 g 125 170
Ice cream,
chocolate
1 cup 3 tsp/14 g 125 285
Bacon,
cooked
2 slices 1 1/2 tsp/6 g 55 85
Pork sausage
2 links (2
ounces)
3 tsp/14 g 120 165
Hamburger,
regular (80%
lean)
3 ounces
cooked
3 tsp/14 g 120 205
Prime rib
roast, lean
and fat (1/8"
trim)
3 ounces
cooked
6 tsp/29 g 255 340
Prime rib
roast, lean
only
3 ounces
cooked
3 1/2 tsp/16 g 140 250
Croissant
1 medium
(2 ounces)
3 tsp/12 g 105 230
Biscuit
1 small
(2.5"
diameter)
1 1/2 tsp/6 g 50 125
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Pound cake
1/12 of
12-ounce
cake
1 1/2 tsp/6 g 50 110
Cheese
Danish
1 pastry
(2 1/2
ounce)
3 1/2 tsp/16 g 135 265
Chocolate
creme pie
1/6 of 8"
pie
5 tsp/22 g 195 345









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Physical Activity
The New Food Pyramid



Physical activity has made its way into the new food pyramid. But it's not just about going to the
gym. You can be active in many different ways.

Walking, gardening, briskly pushing a baby stroller, climbing the stairs, playing soccer, or dancing
the night away are all good examples of being active. For health benefits, physical activity should
be moderate or vigorous and add up to at least 30 minutes a day.
What Is Moderate and Vigorous Activity?


Moderate physical activities include:
• Walking briskly (about 3 1/2 miles per hour)
• Hiking
• Gardening/yard work
• Dancing
• Golf (walking and carrying clubs)
• Bicycling (less than 10 miles per hour)
• Weight training (general light workout)
Vigorous physical activities include:
• Running/jogging (5 miles per hour)
• Bicycling (more than 10 miles per hour)
• Swimming (freestyle laps)
• Aerobics
• Walking very fast (4 1/2 miles per hour)
• Heavy yard work, such as chopping wood
• Weight lifting (vigorous effort)
• Basketball (competitive)
Some physical activities are not intense enough to help you meet the recommendations. Although
you are moving, these activities do not increase your heart rate, so you should not count these
toward the 30 or more minutes a day that you should strive for. These include walking at a casual
pace, such as while grocery shopping, and doing light household chores.

Make Physical Activity Work for You
Being physically active is a key element in living a longer, healthier, happier life. It can help
relieve stress and can provide an overall feeling of well-being. Physical activity can also help you
achieve and maintain a healthy weight and lower risk for chronic disease. The benefits of physical
activity may include:
• Improving self-esteem and feelings of well-being
• Increasing fitness level
• Helping to build and maintain bones, muscles, and joints
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• Building endurance and muscle strength
• Enhancing flexibility and posture
• Helping to manage weight
• Lowering risk of heart disease, colon cancer, and type 2 diabetes
• Helping to control blood pressure
• Reducing feelings of depression and anxiety
Physical activity and nutrition work together for better health. Being active increases the amount
of calories burned. As people age their metabolism slows, so maintaining energy balance
requires moving more and eating less.
Some types of physical activity are especially beneficial:
• Aerobic activities speed heart rate and breathing and improve heart and lung fitness.
Examples are brisk walking, jogging, and swimming.
• Resistance, strength building, and weight-bearing activities help build and maintain bones
and muscles by working them against gravity. Examples are carrying a child, lifting
weights, and walking. They help to build and maintain muscles and bones.
• Balance and stretching activities enhance physical stability and flexibility, which reduces
risk of injuries. Examples are gentle stretching, dancing, yoga, martial arts, and tai chi.
How Much? How Long?

At a minimum, do moderate intensity activity for 30 minutes most days, or preferably every day.
This is in addition to your usual daily activities. Increasing the intensity or the amount of time of
activity can have additional health benefits and may be needed to control body weight.

About 60 minutes a day of moderate physical activity may be needed to prevent weight gain. For
those who have lost weight, at least 60 to 90 minutes a day may be needed to maintain the
weight loss. At the same time, calorie needs should not be exceeded. Children and teenagers
should be physically active for at least 60 minutes every day, or most days.

While 30 minutes a day of moderate intensity physical activities provide health benefits, being
active for longer or doing more vigorous activities can provide even greater health benefits. They
also use up more calories per hour. No matter what activity you choose, it can be done all at once
or divided into two or three parts during the day. Even 10-minutes bouts of activity count toward
your total.

Do I Need to See a Doctor?
Most adults do not need to see their doctor before starting to exercise at a moderate level.
However, men over the age of 40 and women over the age of 50 planning to start vigorous
physical activity should consult a health care provider. Individuals with one of the conditions
below should also consult a health care provider for help in designing a safe program of physical
activity.
• A chronic health problem such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes,
osteoporosis, asthma, or obesity.
• High risk for heart disease, such as a family history of heart disease or stroke; eating a
diet high in saturated fat, trans fat and, cholesterol; smoking; or having a sedentary
lifestyle.

Burn Up the Calories

This chart will help you determine how many calories you burn during various activities.
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A 154-pound man (5'10") will use up about the number of calories listed doing each activity
below. Those who weigh more will use more calories, and those who weigh less will use fewer.
The calorie values listed include both calories used by the activity and the calories used for
normal body functioning.


Burn Up the Calories






Physical activity is now a part of the new Food Pyramid. To learn more about physical activity and
how much you need, click here. [physical activity food pyramid]
This chart will help you determine how many calories you burn during various activities.
A 154-pound man (5 feet 10 inches) will use up about the number of calories listed doing each
activity below. Those who weigh more will use more calories, and those who weigh less will use
fewer. The calorie values listed include both calories used by the activity and the calories used for
normal body functioning.

Approximate calories used by a
154-pound man
Moderate physical activities: In 1 hour In 30 minutes
Hiking 370 185
Light gardening/yard work 330 165
Dancing 330 165
Golf (walking and carrying
clubs)
330 165
Bicycling (less than 10 miles
per hour)
290 145
Walking (3 ½ miles per hour) 280 140
Weight training (general light
workout)
220 110
Stretching 180 90
Vigorous physical activities:
Running/jogging (5 miles per
hour)
590 295
Bicycling (more than 10 miles
per hour)
590 295
Swimming (slow freestyle
laps)
510 255
Aerobics 480 240
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Walking (4 ½ miles per hour) 460 230
Heavy yard work (chopping
wood)
440 220
Weight lifting (vigorous
effort)
440 220
Basketball (vigorous) 440 220
It's important to keep in mind that the number of calories you actually burn from exercising is
likely higher than this. This is how much you burn while actually doing the exercise. Exercise
increases your metabolism and helps you burn more calories throughout the rest of the day.




Tips for Increasing Physical Activity

Make physical activity a regular part of the day. Fitting activity into a daily routine can be easy --
such as taking a brisk 10 minute walk to and from the parking lot, bus stop, or subway station. Or
join an exercise class.
Keep it interesting by trying something different on alternate days. What's important is to be
active most days of the week and make it part of daily routine. For example, to reach a 30-minute
goal for the day, walk the dog for 10 minutes before and after work, and add a 10 minute walk at
lunchtime. Or swim 3 times a week and take a yoga class on the other days. Make sure to do at
least 10 minutes of the activity at a time; shorter bursts of activity will not have the same health
benefits.
To be ready anytime, keep some comfortable clothes and a pair of walking or running shoes in
the car and at the office.








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Estimated Calorie Requirements

Estimated amounts of calories needed to maintain energy balance for various gender and age
groups at three different levels of physical activity. The estimates are rounded to the nearest 200
calories and were determined using the Institute of Medicine equation.
Gender
Age
(years)
Sedentary
b
Moderately Active
c
Active
d

Child 2-3 1,000 1,000-1,400 1,000-1,400
Female 4-8
9-13
14-18
19-30
31-50
51+
1,200
1,600
1,800
2,000
1,800
1,600
1,400-1,600
1,600-2,000
2,000
2,000-2,200
2,000
1,800
1,400-1,800
1,800-2,200
2,400
2,400
2,200
2,000-2,200
Male 4-8
9-13
14-18
19-30
31-50
51+
1,400
1,800
2,200
2,400
2,200
2,000
1,400-1,600
1,800-2,200
2,400-2,800
2,600-2,800
2,400-2,600
2,200-2,400
1,600-2,000
2,000-2,600
2,800-3,200
3,000
2,800-3,000
2,400-2,800







a
These levels are based on Estimated Energy Requirements (EER) from the Institute of Medicine
Dietary Reference Intakes macronutrients report, 2002, calculated by gender, age, and activity
level for reference-sized individuals. "Reference size," as determined by IOM, is based on median
height and weight for ages up to age 18 years of age and median height and weight for that
height to give a BMI of 21.5 for adult females and 22.5 for adult males.
b
Sedentary means a lifestyle that includes only the light physical activity associated with typical
day-to-day life.
c
Moderately active means a lifestyle that includes physical activity equivalent to walking about
1.5 to 3 miles per day at 3 to 4 miles per hour, in addition to the light physical activity associated
with typical day-to-day life
d
Active means a lifestyle that includes physical activity equivalent to walking more than 3 miles
per day at 3 to 4 miles per hour, in addition to the light physical activity associated with typical
day-to-day life.



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Getting Started on Losing Weight Long Term

Losing weight and keeping it off is not easy. Before you get started on a weight loss program,
consider the following tips. They should help you reach your goal of obtaining and maintaining a
healthy weight.

Set the Right Goals
Setting effective goals is an important first step. Most people trying to lose weight focus on just
that one goal: weight loss. However, the most productive areas to focus on are the dietary and
exercise changes that will lead to long-term weight control. Successful weight managers are
those who select two or three goals at a time that they are willing to take on.

Keep in mind that effective goals are specific, attainable, and forgiving. For example, "exercise
more" is a wonderful goal, but it's not specific. "Walk five miles everyday" is specific and
measurable, but is it attainable if you're just starting out? "Walk 30 minutes every day" is more
attainable, but what happens if you're held up at work one day and there's a thunderstorm during
your walking time another day? "Walk 30 minutes, five days each week" is specific, attainable,
and forgiving.


Reward Success (But Not With Food!)
Rewards that you can control can be used to encourage you to attain your weight control goals,
especially those that have been difficult for you to reach.
An effective reward is something that is desirable, timely, and contingent on meeting your goal.
Rewards may include treating yourself to a movie or music CD or taking an afternoon off from
work or just an hour of quiet time away from family. Keep in mind that numerous small rewards,
delivered for meeting smaller goals, are more effective than bigger rewards, requiring a long,
difficult effort.

Balance Your (Food) Checkbook
This means that you should monitor your eating behavior by observing and recording some
aspect of your eating behavior, such as how many calories you eat in a day, how many servings
of fruits and vegetables you eat per day, how often and for how long you exercise, etc., or an
outcome of these behaviors, such as weight.
Doing this can really help you determine how you are doing and what you need to do to meet
your weight control goals.

Avoid a Chain Reaction
Identify those social and environmental cues that tend to encourage undesired eating, and then
work to change those cues. For example, you may learn that you're more likely to overeat while
watching television, or whenever treats are on display by the office coffee pot.

Then work to sever the association of eating with the cue (don't eat while watching television),
avoid or eliminate the cue (leave coffee room immediately after pouring coffee). In general, visible
and accessible food items are often cues for unplanned eating.
Get the (Fullness) Message

Changing the way you go about eating can make it easier to eat less without feeling deprived. It
takes 15 or more minutes for your brain to get the message you've been fed. So slow down the
rate that you eat food. That will allow satiety (fullness) signals to begin to develop by the end of
the meal. Eating lots of vegetables or fruit can also make you feel fuller. Another trick is to use
smaller plates so that moderate portions do not appear meager. In addition, changing your eating
schedule, or setting one, can help you reach your goal, especially if you tend to skip, or delay,
meals and overeat later.
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Plan Your Day to Lose Weight





You're running late, flying out the door. You might skip breakfast: the cereal box is empty, and the
milk's gone sour. Forget taking lunch: there's peanut butter in the jar, but you are out of bread.
Exercise before work? You've got to be kidding. It's a typical hectic morning, at the beginning of a
typical jam-packed day. What happened to those resolutions to exercise more, eat healthier, lose
weight? It's easy for them to get lost in the daily shuffle.
In a perfect world, we could accomplish all this by the time our busy day starts:
• Jump out of bed by 6:30 (or earlier).
• Get a good chunk of exercise, 20 minutes or more.
• Eat a satisfying but healthy breakfast: fresh fruit, high-fiber cereal, low-fat milk.
• Brown-bag a wholesome lunch: more fresh fruit, low-fat yogurt, whole-wheat bread,
homemade vegetable soup (maybe that you prepared last night).
It's true -- with a little planning, this could be your reality. Your morning rush would go more
smoothly, and your weight loss efforts would stay on track. You bounce out of bed, knowing what
your next move is - all day, all week, all year.
"If you leave exercise and healthy eating to chance, it's not going to happen," says Milton Stokes,
RD, MPH, chief dietitian for St. Barnabas Hospital in New York City. "You're responsible for you.
Use your personal digital assistant to set your day - gym time, dinner. Make these things pre-
meditated - so it's not like a surprise, you've got an extra hour, should you go to the gym or watch
TV. If you don't plan it, you won't do it."



Planning for Weight Loss
Planning helps you build new habits, says Barbara J. Rolls, PhD, the Guthrie Chair in Nutrition at
Pennsylvania State University in Pittsburgh and author of The Volumetrics Weight Control Plan.
"Without planning, you're always going to be struggling - trying to figure out how to eat what you
should. You'll end up making yourself eat things you don't want to eat. Eating will always feel like
work."
Indeed, planning involves discipline - and that is a key trait that is evident among the "successful
losers" who belong to The National Weight Control Registry. They have maintained a 30-pound
weight loss for at least a year - and many have lost much more, and kept it off for much longer.
"It is very difficult to lose weight and keep it off - and people who succeed must have discipline,"
says James O. Hill, PhD, the Registry's co-founder and director of the Center for Human Nutrition
at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. "People who are most successful plan their
day to ensure that they stick to their eating plan and get regular physical activity. It takes effort to
be successful in long-term weight management."


Goal No. 1: Plan Your Daily Food
First, take note of every bite of food you have during the day. Don't forget that run through the
supermarket - all those tasty samples you couldn't pass up. "A food journal is the single best thing
you can do," says Gary Foster, PhD, clinical director of the weight and eating disorders program
at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. "You become more conscious of what
you're doing. It helps you monitor yourself, and make corrections in mid-course."

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Dietitians call it a food journal. But really, it's research for your plan of action, he explains. You'll
see where you need improvement. "Plans work better than platitudes," Foster tells WebMD.
"Instead of 'I'll exercise more,' make it 'I'll walk tomorrow morning at 7 a.m.'"
Keep it simple. Journals don't have to be labor-intensive, he says. Focus on your high-risk time
slots when you're most likely to get off course. Example: You know you eat junk at night, or that
you snack after 3 p.m., or between lunch and dinner. Just keep notes during that time period.
You'll quickly see problem habits: banana split vs. banana, the whole container of nuts vs. a
handful.


Set specific goals. You can't just tell yourself to eat less junk food after 8 p.m. Be specific - 'I'm
going to substitute popcorn for potato chips.' That way you know exactly what to do. There's no
question.


Use weekends wisely. "When things are a little quieter on weekends, you can think about the
upcoming week," says Stokes. "Decide what you're going to eat. Go to the market, so you're a
little ahead of the game. You can even prepare food on the weekend and freeze it, then pull it out
during the week."

Consider your options. Keep lists of healthy foods and meals you love, and plan accordingly,
adds Elisabetta Politi, RD, MPH, nutrition manager at the Duke Diet & Fitness
Center at Duke University Medical School. "I advise people to think of five different breakfast,
lunch, and dinner options. Then you'll have some freedom - you can choose from your favorites.
But your eating will be more structured. That's what's important."


Shop wisely. A well-stocked fridge and pantry can make it easier to grab a healthy snack or
prepare delicious meals that are also good for you. Keep basics like these on hand: low-fat milk
and yogurt, eggs, peanut butter, a variety of fresh fruits (include berries and grapes) and
vegetables (include carrots and celery), soybeans, garlic, whole grain pasta/bread, fish, and high-
fiber cereal.

Plan healthy treats. Low-fat cheese or yogurt, hummus with veggies, and fresh fruit are great
choices. Keep them at home; take them to the office. That will help you eat the right foods when
you're starving - especially in the late afternoon, during drive time -- and when you finally get
home at night.

Do it yourself. These are great prepare-ahead healthy meals that will keep you feeling full and
help you control your weight:
• Make a dried-fruit-and-nut mix for emergency snacking. (Be wary of granola, since it
typically has lots of sugar, says Stokes.) Pack small amounts in a little plastic bag - great
for the car or office.
• Cook a big pot of homemade vegetable soup, which can be frozen for several lunches or
dinners.
• Try smoothies - blend low-fat yogurt and fruit - for a grab-and-go meal.
• Mix up big salads or a pasta primavera with lots of veggies and whole-wheat pasta.
Prepare large quantities so you can have a moderate-sized helping for dinner and then
have leftovers for lunch the next day.
Buy healthy frozen entres. "These have really improved," says Rolls. "They have more whole
grains in them now, and they seem to be getting tastier. If I'm traveling and can't get to the
grocery store, I make sure I have frozen entrees on hand."
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Don't limit yourself. It's OK to eat breakfast food for snacks, lunch, or dinner. "You can eat a hard-
boiled egg or cereal any time, not just breakfast," Stokes advises


Goal No. 2: Plan Your Exercise
First, talk to your doctor - especially if you are overweight or are at high risk for heart disease,
advises Thompson. Your doctor may suggest that you ask a fitness trainer to develop a workout
plan that best suits your needs.
Analyze your morning schedule. "You'll find there's a lot of free time there," says Gerald Endress,
ACSM, fitness director at Duke Diet & Fitness Center at Duke University Medical Center. "People
tell me it takes them two hours to get ready for work. It's not that they're prettying themselves up -
they're basically just wasting time. But when they start exercising in the morning, they find they
use their time better. One guy told me he got to work 20 minutes earlier on days he exercised. If
you've got a structured period of activity, you know to keep things moving."


Set your program. Decide what works best for you, such as 8 a.m. on Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday. "You don't let anything interfere with that," advises Thompson. "That's not to say once a
month something comes up you can't exercise. That's OK. It's when you're making excuses
three, four, five days in a row -- that's a problem. It's got to be the highest priority because it's
your health."
Know your options. What kind of exercise - or physical activity - will get you out of bed in the
morning? A yoga video, walking, a workout session at the YMCA? Figure out what will motivate
you.

Tackle roadblocks. Is inertia a problem for you in the morning? "When the alarm clock sounds, it's
easy to hit the snooze button," says Bryant. A workout buddy can provide motivation. "If you know
someone is waiting for you, counting on you, you'll go. Once you go, you're happy you went.
Once you get past that inertia, you're glad you did the workout."

Don't think of it as "early". It's a mindset issue, says Foster. Setting the alarm 30 minutes early
should not be a negative in your day. Give it a positive spin. "Quit thinking of it as getting up early.
Your day starts when the alarm goes off. That's how you should think of it."

Remind yourself. Put yellow sticky notes on the fridge or the computer - like "get off the bus four
stops early - Mon., Wed., Fri."

Reward yourself. "Establish a goal for your workouts - daily, weekly, monthly goals,"

Bryant advises. "When you've done those workouts, accomplished those goals, pat

yourself on the back." He suggests going out and buying a favorite DVD or CD, or even getting
yourself that iPod you wanted! "Rewards help keep you motivated," says Foster.
"Planning helps you overcome the unpredictability of daily life," says Foster. "Having any plan,
even if it's a bad or ineffective plan, increases your confidence in accomplishing the task at hand.
Just the fact that you've thought it through means it will have some effect."





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Tips on Diet Foods for Summer

If you want to lose weight this summer once and for all, forget about diets. Instead, try these
nutritionally rich, low-calories foods each day to help you slim down this summer. And don't forget
to drink plenty of water!

Tomatoes and Peppers
Colorful fruits and vegetables of the vine get their wide range of vivid colors from health-
protecting substances such as lycopene, vitamin C and vitamin A. Use them generously in dishes
to enhance nutrients with very few calories.

1. Choose firm, well-shaped tomatoes that are fragrant and intensely colored, store at room
temperature and enjoy within a few days.

2. Keep canned petite diced tomatoes on hand for a low-calorie and nutritious addition to salads,
pastas, soups, casseroles or dips.

3. Roasted peppers do wonders for any dish or alone as a side dish. Roast them yourself or buy
them already roasted in a jar for added color and nourishment.

Recipe idea: Oven-dry grape tomatoes by slicing in half and placing cut side up on a cookie
sheet. Sprinkle with salt and drizzle lightly with olive oil. Bake at 250 F for two hours. Toss oven-
dried tomatoes into pasta, salads or enjoy as an appetizer with goat cheese.

Berries
Blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, black raspberries, blackberries -- these delicious colorful
berries contain a powerhouse of antioxidants that help prevent cellular damage. They are also an
excellent source of fiber and very low in calories. Eat them by the handful or work more of them
into your diet.

1. Get your day started with a healthy dose of fiber and antioxidants. Enjoy whole-grain cereal,
pancakes, or waffles topped with fresh or frozen blueberries.
2. Skip the decadent dessert and satisfy your sweet tooth with a bowl of fresh mixed berries.
3. Mix fresh berries into a spinach or mixed green salad for a refreshing and filling first course.

Recipe idea: Toss toasted slivered almonds, sliced strawberries, sliced scallions, grilled chicken
strips, and salad greens with a light raspberry vinaigrette for a healthy summer supper.

Yogurt
Yogurt and other low-fat dairy products are powerhouses of calcium and protein. They may also
help you lose weight. Research suggests that dairy food, when part of a reduced-calorie diet, can
enhance weight loss while strengthening bones and keeping you feeling full and satisfied.

1. Substitute low-fat frozen yogurt for premium ice cream for added nutrition and fewer calories.
2. Whip up a quick batch of smoothies for a nourishing family breakfast or snack using any fresh
or frozen fruit, plain low-fat yogurt, 100% fruit juice, and ice.
3. Read the label and find healthy, low-calorie portable yogurt smoothies for meals on the go.
Recipe idea: Dazzle your friends and family with a beautiful, low-calorie parfait made by layering
fresh fruit, low-fat vanilla yogurt, and granola for a quick meal, snack or dessert.

If you want to lose weight this summer once and for all, forget about diets. Instead, try these
nutritionally rich, low-calories foods each day to help you slim down this summer. And don't forget
to drink plenty of water!
Tomatoes and Peppers
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Colorful fruits and vegetables of the vine get their wide range of vivid colors from health-
protecting substances such as lycopene, vitamin C and vitamin A. Use them generously in dishes
to enhance nutrients with very few calories.

1. Choose firm, well-shaped tomatoes that are fragrant and intensely colored, store at room
temperature and enjoy within a few days.
2. Keep canned petite diced tomatoes on hand for a low-calorie and nutritious addition to salads,
pastas, soups, casseroles or dips.
3. Roasted peppers do wonders for any dish or alone as a side dish. Roast them yourself or buy
them already roasted in a jar for added color and nourishment.
Recipe idea: Oven-dry grape tomatoes by slicing in half and placing cut side up on a cookie
sheet. Sprinkle with salt and drizzle lightly with olive oil. Bake at 250 F for two hours. Toss oven-
dried tomatoes into pasta, salads or enjoy as an appetizer with goat cheese.

Berries
Blueberries, strawberries, raspberries, black raspberries, blackberries -- these delicious colorful
berries contain a powerhouse of antioxidants that help prevent cellular damage. They are also an
excellent source of fiber and very low in calories. Eat them by the handful or work more of them
into your diet.

1. Get your day started with a healthy dose of fiber and antioxidants. Enjoy whole-grain cereal,
pancakes, or waffles topped with fresh or frozen blueberries.

2. Skip the decadent dessert and satisfy your sweet tooth with a bowl of fresh mixed berries.

3. Mix fresh berries into a spinach or mixed green salad for a refreshing and filling first course.

Recipe idea: Toss toasted slivered almonds, sliced strawberries, sliced scallions, grilled chicken
strips, and salad greens with a light raspberry vinaigrette for a healthy summer supper.

Yogurt
Yogurt and other low-fat dairy products are powerhouses of calcium and protein. They may also
help you lose weight. Research suggests that dairy food, when part of a reduced-calorie diet, can
enhance weight loss while strengthening bones and keeping you feeling full and satisfied.

1. Substitute low-fat frozen yogurt for premium ice cream for added nutrition and fewer calories.

2. Whip up a quick batch of smoothies for a nourishing family breakfast or snack using any fresh
or frozen fruit, plain low-fat yogurt, 100% fruit juice, and ice.

3. Read the label and find healthy, low-calorie portable yogurt smoothies for meals on the go.
Recipe idea: Dazzle your friends and family with a beautiful, low-calorie parfait made by layering
fresh fruit, low-fat vanilla yogurt, and granola for a quick meal, snack or dessert.





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Summertime Nutrition Tips

Summertime, and the living is easy -- that is, until you notice the havoc all that fun in the sun has
wrought on your body. Fortunately, summer also brings an abundance of tasty and nutritious
foods, including berries (loaded with antioxidants), tomatoes, sweet bell peppers (good vitamin C
source), and protein-filled grilled fish and burgers. And by simply choosing the right ones to add
to your daily diet, you can help prevent or alleviate the following common hot-weather woes:

Dry or Damaged Skin
What causes it: You sweat more in the summer, so skin is less supple; plus, saltwater and
chlorine have a drying effect. Sunburns and bug bites are also saboteurs of healthy skin.
What to eat: Help heal weathered skin with foods like raspberries, blueberries, and strawberries,
which are rich in antioxidants and vitamin C. Protein, in the form of lean meats, beans, nuts, and
seeds, is also key. Keep dryness at bay by drinking lots of water, which Lona Sandon, RD, calls
"the forgotten nutrient." Sandon is a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. She
recommends that women drink 92 ounces (8-10 cups) of water in the summer and men 125
ounces to prevent dehydration. Since calcium can also be lost through sweating, it's a good idea
to replace it by eating low-fat dairy products like skim milk, yogurt, and cottage cheese.

Yeast Infections
What causes them: Sitting around in a wet bathing suit provides a perfect environment for yeast
overgrowth.
What to eat: To make conditions less hospitable for yeast to take hold in the first place, cut back
on sugary foods, advises Leanne Ely, CNC, author of Saving Dinner: The Menus, Recipes, and
Shopping Lists to Bring Your Family Back to the Table. Once you've got an infection, be sure to
eat lots of yogurt -- the kind that contains live, active cultures.


Parched Hair
What causes it: Overexposure to sun, saltwater, and chlorine.
What to eat: Toss some burgers or shrimp kabobs on the grill, or make a three-bean salad or
other protein-rich meal because hair consists of protein fibers called keratin. Eating foods rich in
vitamin B-5 (found in yogurt and California avocadoes), vitamin B-8 (in liver and cooked eggs),
folic acid (in fortified cereals and beans), calcium (in milk and yogurt), and zinc (in meat and fish)
can reduce hair loss and replace dull hair with shiny hair. Theses nutrients also play a role in
maintaining healthy skin.

Muscle Cramps
What causes them: Too many games of beach volleyball (or other outdoor exercise). Muscle
cramps result from overexertion and dehydration. When you don't have enough fluid in your
system, it leads to an electrolyte imbalance that causes your muscles to cramp up. Sodium,
calcium, and potassium are the main electrolytes lost through sweating during exercise.

What to eat: Replenish electrolytes with a sports drink that contains them and drink water.
Potassium-rich foods include bananas, raisins, potatoes, and spinach.
Eye Damage

What causes it: Age-related macular degeneration is the most common cause of vision loss and
blindness in people over the age of 55. This occurs when the central part of the retina (macula)
becomes damaged.

What to eat: The retina is actually made up of vitamin A, Ely tells WebMD. Thus, foods rich in this
vitamin -- along with beta-carotene, zinc, and Vitamins C and E -- are beneficial to the eyes.
Good sources are dark green vegetables like kale, chard, and mustard greens, plus bell peppers,
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carrots, and blueberries. Eat eggs for their high dose of lutein, an important antioxidant that also
helps prevent eye damage.

Cold Sores
What causes them: Sun exposure can trigger cold sores in people who are prone to them.
What to eat: The amino acid L-lysine has been shown in some small studies to help, but larger
studies are needed to confirm these findings. Sandon says a deficiency in B vitamins and
riboflavin can make you usceptible to cold sores. She recommends eating fortified cereals and
bread or taking a B-complex vitamin





Using a food guide for people with diabetes

Introduction


A food guide is a tool for planning a balanced diet. A healthful diet provides the nutrients your
body needs and decreases your risk for heart disease and other conditions. Most people use the
food guide pyramid to plan a balanced diet.
Key points
• People with diabetes can use a modified version of the food guide pyramid to spread
carbohydrate throughout the day. This helps prevent high blood sugar after meals.
• A food guide contains the same foods your family eats. You do not have to eat special
foods.
• You can successfully follow this method by:
o Planning your family meals ahead of time so you can enjoy the same foods as
other family members.
o Providing lots of variety in the foods you eat so it's easier to follow your plan.
o Testing your blood sugar after meals to see what effect different foods have on
your blood sugar level.
• Women with diabetes who are pregnant or breast-feeding need the same nutrition as
pregnant or breast-feeding women who do not have diabetes. Pregnant women need
extra calcium, iron, protein, and folic acid. During the second and third trimester, you also
need about 300 calories per day more than you did before pregnancy. Regular meals and
snacks are important to prevent low blood sugar during pregnancy and breast-feeding.
Talk to your registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator about changes you may
need to make to your food plan.


SInusILIs

SInusILIs reIers Lo un InIIummuLIon oI LIe mucous membrune IInIng LIe purunusuI
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sInuses. ¡L oILen IoIIows u common coId, InIIuenzu, und oLIer generuI InIecLIons.
¡nIecLIng germs someLImes IInd LIeIr wuv InLo sInuses or cIumbers on eILIer sIde
oI LIe nusuI pussuge, IeudIng Lo sInus LroubIe.

SInusILIs svmpLoms
ConsLunL sneezIng, IeuducIes und Iow grude Iever
TIe svmpLoms oI sInusILIs ure excessIve or consLunL sneezIng ; u runnIng nose;
bIockuge oI one or boLI nosLrIIs; IeuducIes und pressure uround LIe Ieud, eves,
und Iuce. SInus IeuducIes ure usuuIIv IeIL In LIe IoreIeud und In LIe Iuce jusL
beIow LIe eves.TIe puLIenL muv suIIer Irom Iow grude Iever, Iuck oI uppeLILe, und
dIIIIcuILv In breuLIIng

SInusILIs cuuses
¡nIIummuLIon oI LIe sInus pussuges
SInusILIs resuILs Irom LIe InIIummuLIon oI LIe sInus pussuges und oversecreLIon oI
mucus bv LIe membrunes IInIng LIe nose und LIrouL


Home RemedIes Ior SInusILIs
SInusILIs LreuLmenL usIng Mungo
TIe IIberuI use oI mungoes durIng LIe seuson Is consIdered un eIIecLIve remedv
Ior prevenLIon und LreuLmenL oI sInusILIs. Mungoes conLrIbuLe Lowurds IormuLIon
oI IeuILIv epILIeIIum, LIerebv prevenLIng IrequenL uLLucks oI common InIecLIons
IIke sInusILIs. TIIs Is uLLrIbuLubIe Lo u IIgI concenLruLIon oI vILumIn A In LIe IruIL

SInusILIs LreuLmenL usIng GurIIc und OnIon
TIe use oI pungenL Ioods IIke gurIIc und onIon Is one oI LIe mosL eIIecLIve
remedIes Ior sInus probIems. One sIouId begIn wILI smuII mIId doses und
Increuse LIem gruduuIIv. BeneIIcIuI resuILs cun uIso be ucIIeved bv uddIng LIese
Ierbs In moderuLe umounLs Lo reguIur meuIs

SInusILIs LreuLmenL usIng ¡enugreek
TIe seeds oI Ienugreek ure unoLIer eIIecLIve remedv Ior sInusILIs. A Leu prepured
bv boIIIng one Leuspoon oI seeds In z=o mI oI wuLer LIII IL Is reduced Lo IuII, wIII
IeIp LIe bodv Lo produce perspIruLIon, dIspeI LoxIcILv, und sIorLen LIe perIod oI
Iever In LIe ucuLe sLuge oI LIe dIseuse. UpLo Iour cups sIouId be Luken duIIv. TIe
quunLILv sIouId be reduced us LIe condILIon Improves

SInusILIs LreuLmenL usIng CumIn Seeds
A Leuspoon oI bIuck cumIn seeds LIed In u LIIn coLLon cIoLI cun provIde reIIeI
wIen InIuIed. TIe condILIon cun uIso be reIIeved bv LukIng u mIxLure oI 1oo gm oI
rousLed und ground cumIn seeds und zoo gm oI pure Ionev

SInusILIs LreuLmenL usIng VegeLubIe JuIces
CurroL juIce, Luken sepuruLeIv or In combInuLIon wILI juIces oI beeL und
cucumber, or wILI spInucI juIce, Ius been Iound beneIIcIuI In LIe LreuLmenL oI
sInus LroubIe. ¡n LIe cuse oI combIned juIces, 1oo mI eucI oI beeL und cucumber
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juIces, or zoo mI oI spInucI juIce, sIouId be mIxed wILI ¤oomI oI curroL juIce Lo
muke =oo mI or IuII u IILre oI LIe mIxed juIce

SInusILIs LreuLmenL usIng VILumIns A und C
A dIeL rIcI In vILumIn A Is LIe besL Insurunce uguInsL coId und sInus LroubIe.
VILumIn A Is LIe 'membrune condILIoner' und IL IeIps buIId IeuILIv mucous
membrunes In LIe nose und LIrouL. Some oI LIe vuIuubIe sources oI LIIs vILumIn
ure wIoIe mIIk, curds, egg voIk, pumpkIn, curroLs, IeuIv vegeLubIes, LomuLoes,
mungoes, und pupuvu. WIen LIe sInus LroubIe Ius uIreudv deveIoped, reIIeI cun
be obLuIned bv LukIng vILumIn A In Iurge LIerupeuLIc doses oI z=,ooo ¡U per duv.
VILumIn C Ius uIso proved beneIIcIuI In LIe LreuLmenL oI sInusILIs und LIe puLIenL
sIouId Luke one grum oI LIIs vILumIn per duv In Lwo LIerupeuLIc doses oI =oo mg
eucI


DIeL Ior SInusILIs
¡resI IruIL und vegeLubIe juIces wILI wuLer
¡n LIe ucuLe sLuge oI LIe dIseuse, wIen Iever Is presenL, LIe puLIenL sIouId ubsLuIn
Irom uII soIId Ioods und drInk onIv IresI IruIL und vegeLubIe juIces dIIuLed wILI
wurm wuLer on u =o:=o busIs

WeII-buIunced dIeL
AILer LIe Iever subsIdes, Ie muv udopL u Iow-cuIorIe, ruw IruIL und vegeLubIe dIeL
wILI pIenLv oI ruw juIces. Once LIe ucuLe svmpLoms ure over, LIe puLIenL muv
gruduuIIv emburk upon u weII-buIunced dIeL, wILI empIusIs on seeds, nuLs,
gruIns, vegeLubIes, und IruILs. ¡n persIsLenL cIronIc condILIons, repeuLed sIorL
juIce IusLs muv be underLuken Ior u week or so uL InLervuIs oI Lwo monLIs

AvoId IrIed und sLurcIv Iood
TIe puLIenL sIouId uvoId IrIed und sLurcIv Ioods, wIILe sugur, wIILe IIoor, rIce,
mucuronI producLs, pIes, cukes, und cundIes


OLIer SInusILIs LreuLmenLs

HoL und coId wuLer uppIIcuLIon
A coId uppIIcuLIon over LIe sInus wIII gIve greuL reIIeI, wIIIe uILernuLe IoL und
coId uppIIcuLIons uIso prove beneIIcIuI. Tuke puns oI IoL und coId wuLer, buLIe LIe
wIoIe Iuce wILI IoL wuLer us IoL us vou cun beur-und LIen uppIv coId wuLer Ior u
sIorL duruLIon

¡nIuIuLIon oI sLeum, proper sIeep und udequuLe resL

NusuI InIuIuLIon oI sLeum Ior IIve mInuLes everv Iour wIII uIso gIve reIIeI. PIenLv
oI sIeep, udequuLe resL, und IresI uIr ure essenLIuI In LIe LreuLmenL oI sInus
LroubIe

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AvoId perIumes und scenLed IuIr oII
PuLIenL sIouId uvoId LIe use oI perIumes und sLrongIv scenLed IuIr oII.



Some for information On sinus

Sinusitis means inflammation of the sinuses. The sinuses are air-filled cavities
in the bones of our face that improve the resonance of our voices. Each of us
has five pairs of sinuses all of which are interconnected and which also
connect with the nasal passages.

Symptoms

When infection gets into the body the special mucous-producing cells that line
the sinuses and the nose swell and produce excess mucus causing that
'blocked up' feeling. Because the mucus can't escape into the nose, the build-
up of pressure results in the throbbing pain that's felt over the cheeks and
forehead, particularly if someone coughs or bends over. These areas of the
face are also tender to the touch.

Other symptoms that may accompany sinusitis are a high temperature,
greenish-yellow nasal discharge and a loss of taste and smell.

When this happens it's called acute sinusitis and usually needs treatment with
antibiotics, strong painkillers, decongestant nose drops or sprays, and the
inhalation of steam - adding some drops of eucalyptus oil helps.

After an acute infection some people develop chronic sinusitis where similar,
although less severe, symptoms may recur from time to time or be
permanently present. In addition to the medical treatment described earlier an
operation to drain the sinuses is sometimes recommended.

Smoking, or being in a smoky environment, and some dental infections make
sinusitis more likely. So does having a deviated nasal septum which may
result after any trauma to the nose.
Major Signs

The three major signs indicating sinusitis and/or a sinus infection are:

Your cold has lasted more than seven days and is accompanied by cough,
fever, headache, toothache, facial pain, green or gray nasal drainage, or
postnasal drip.

You have lost your sense of smell and taste and have bad breath
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accompanied by chronic congestion.

In children, increased irritability and vomiting occurs with gagging on mucus
and/or a prolonged cough

Tips on taking care of sinusitis

Get plenty of rest. Lying down can make your sinuses feel more stopped-up,
so try lying on the side that lets you breathe the best.

Sip hot liquids and drink plenty of fluids.

Apply moist heat by holding a warm, wet towel against your face or breathing
in steam through a cloth or towel.

Talk with your doctor before using an over-the-counter cold medicine. Some
cold medicines can make your sinus infection worse or cause other problems.

Don’t use a nose spray with a decongestant in it for more than 3 days. If you
use it for more than 3 days, the swelling in your sinuses may get worse when
you stop the medicine.

Super Nutrient for Life ........The Power of Fiber

Fiber

We all know fiber is good for us. Not only can dietary fiber lower cholesterol, it also helps keep us trim and feeling full. So how do you get more fiber into your daily diet? Here are six painless ways to work in 25 grams a day the recommended amount for someone eating 2,000 calories a day. Before you start, keep a few things in mind: When you increase fiber, you should increase your water intake along with it. Add fiber gradually to give your gastrointestinal tract time to adapt. And if you have gastrointestinal diseases, including constipation, check with your doctor first.

1. Go for whole grains whenever possible. Check the ingredient list to make sure the whole grain is the first or second ingredient on the list. Products that say "100% wheat" or "multigrain" are not usually whole grain. • • • 2 slices of whole-wheat bread = 4 grams of fiber 1 cup of cooked brown rice = 4 grams of fiber Reduced-Fat Triscuit crackers = 3 grams

2. Choose the right breakfast cereals. Some cereals have little whole grain. And some whole grain cereals are loaded with unnecessary sugar. • • • • • cup Fiber One = 14 grams of fiber 1 cup Raisin Bran = 7.5 grams of fiber 1 cup Frosted Shredded Wheat Spoon Size = 5 grams 1 cup Quaker Squares Baked in Cinnamon = 5 grams cup cooked oatmeal = 3 grams *Recommended serving sizes.

3. Eat beans a few times a week. Beans offer more fiber than most plant foods, plus they're loaded with healthy plant protein. • • • • 1 cup of canned minestrone soup = about 5 grams fiber 1/2 cup vegetarian or fat-free refried beans, used to make microwave nachos = about 6 grams 1/4 cup kidney beans, added to a green salad = 3 grams fiber Bean burrito at Taco Bell (or made at home) = 8 grams

4. Have several servings of fruit every day. You can add it to your morning meal, enjoy it as a snack, and garnish your dinner plate with it. Or have it with or instead of dessert.

• • • •

1 large apple = 4 grams of fiber 1 banana = 3 grams 1 pear = 4 grams 1 cup strawberries = 4 grams

5. Every day, stir a tablespoon of ground flaxseed into your smoothie, soup, casserole, etc. One tablespoon will boost your daily fiber by 3 grams. Flaxseed contains a balance of soluble and insoluble fiber, too.

6. Have several servings of vegetables every day. Include a vegetable with lunch, have raw veggies as an afternoon snack or pre-dinner appetizer, and enjoy a big helping with dinner. Make a point of enjoying vegetarian entrees several times a week. • • • • • • 1 cup carrot slices, cooked = 5 grams of fiber 1 cup cooked broccoli = 4.5 grams 1 cup raw carrots = 4 grams 1 sweet potato = 4 grams 1 cup cauliflower, cooked = 3 grams 2 cups raw spinach leaves = 3 grams

Tips for Reaping the Benefits of Whole Grains
Here's how to select whole-grain foods and fit the recommended servings into your eating plan. Will the real whole grain please stand up? Scan the bread aisle and virtually every package touts some kind of nutritional whole-grain goodness. But few of them actually are whole grain. We're surrounded by terms like multigrain, 100% wheat, cracked wheat, organic, pumpernickel, bran, and stone ground. These all sound like whole grains, but none of these descriptions actually indicate whole grain. The amount of grains you need daily varies based on your age, sex, and physical activity level. You can determine how much you need by diving into My Pyramid Plan.My Pyramid Plan. "My Pyramid" sounds easy enough until you try to figure out what constitutes a whole grain. WebMD got the skinny on whole grains along with suggestions on how to fit the recommended servings into your healthy eating plan. Know Your Whole Grains A whole grain contains all edible parts of the grain, including the bran, germ, and endosperm. The whole grain may be used intact or recombined as long as all components are present in natural proportions. To recognize whole grains, keep this list handy when you go to the grocery store and choose any of the following grains: • • • • • • • • • • • • • Whole-grain corn Whole oats/oatmeal Popcorn Brown rice Whole rye Whole-grain barley Wild rice Buckwheat Triticale Bulgur (cracked wheat) Millet Quinoa Sorghum

Whole grains are not necessarily brown or multigrain or only found in adult cereals. They exist throughout the food supply, including processed foods. Don't be misled by the manufacturer's claims on the front of the package. Color, fiber, or descriptive names on the package do not necessarily imply whole-grain goodness. Some manufacturers strip the outer layer of bran off the whole kernel of wheat, use the refined wheat flour, add in molasses to color it brown, and call it 100% wheat bread. That's true, but it is not a whole grain. The only way to really know if a whole grain is indeed "whole" is to check the ingredient list for the word "whole" preceding the grain and recognize the above grains as whole grains. Ideally, the whole grain will be the first or second ingredient in the list, indicating that the product contains more whole grain than any other ingredient.

bagels. Like the champions. Successful "losers" from the National Weight Control Registry who have lost substantial amounts of weight -. and therefore it takes time to adjust to these new grains. General Mills and the Whole Grains Council have submitted a petition to the FDA to require consistency in labeling of whole grains. These groups are suggesting that a whole-grain stamp be placed on products that provide either "good" servings (8-15 grams of whole grain) or "excellent" servings (16 or more grams of whole grain). Visit PF Chang's and you will be delighted to see brown rice as an option at this oriental restaurant chain. pasta. Whole grains taste and feel different to the mouth. Cook up a batch of brown rice. find a whole-wheat or whole-grain bread or cereal that you like. Kraft Foods recently unveiled its South Beach line of foods including pizzas made on wholewheat crusts. One simple way to find whole grains is to look for the FDA-approved health claim that reads. English muffins. Eat three "excellent" or six "good" servings daily to meet national guidelines. . As the trend continues. RD. and cholesterol.swear by the importance of eating a nutritious breakfast such as cereal each day. restaurants and food manufacturers are responding to the demand for more whole-grain products.and kept it off -. waffles. cereals. Visit your local health food market and try your hand at some of the less familiar whole grains available. saturated fat. whole-grain cereals." advises Magee. "Start where you are. Then work your way into new adventures. and use the leftovers to add some pizzazz to yogurt. Again. whole grain foods may reduce the risk of heart disease and some forms of cancers. Mission whole-wheat tortillas are flying off the shelf. likes to blend whole-wheat flour with allpurpose flour to boost the whole-grain content of her baked goods. "In a low fat diet. Other ideas from Magee include: Add barley to canned soup. Whole Grains on the Rise Slowly but surely. Working more whole grains into your diet can be as simple as choosing whole-grain breads. and then boil to cook the barley." This is found on whole-grain products that contain at least 51% whole-grain flour (by weight) and are low in fat. Enjoy a sandwich at lunch with two slices of whole-grain bread and you are two-thirds of the way toward meeting your goal. WebMD's "Recipe Doctor" Elaine Magee. it will make it easier for consumers to enjoy at least three servings a day of whole-grain goodness. eat it at dinner. and refrigerated sandwich wraps on whole-wheat tortillas. or try blended pastas that contain a mix of whole and refined grains. starting your day with a bowl of whole-grain cereal energizes you and helps keep you trim. that's not a true whole grain and much of the health benefit has been stripped out by processing. and crackers. according to the company. making it easy to select whole-grain products. or mix it with vegetables for a vegetarian snack or lunch.And avoid products that say "refined" whole wheat. MPH. rice. The whole-grain stamp is already showing up on packages. What could be easier than eating air-popped popcorn as a snack? Step out of the comfort zone and experiment with unusual grains.

What counts as a vegetable? Any vegetable or 100% vegetable juice counts as a member of the vegetable group.Vegetables The New Food Pyramid Vegetables are one of the main food groups in the new Food Pyramid. Vegetables may be raw or cooked. Some commonly eaten vegetables in each group are: Dark green vegetables bok choy collard greens dark green leafy lettuce kale mesclun mustard greens romaine lettuce spinach turnip greens watercress beets Orange vegetables acorn squash butternut squash carrots hubbard squash pumpkin sweet potatoes Dry Beans and Peas black beans black-eyed peas garbanzo beans (chickpeas) kidney beans lentils lima beans (mature) navy beans pinto beans soy beans split peas Starchy vegetables corn green peas lima beans (green) potatoes Other vegetables artichokes asparagus bean sprouts beets Brussels sprouts cabbage cauliflower celery cucumbers eggplant green beans green or red peppers iceberg (head) lettuce mushrooms okra onions parsnips tomatoes tomato juice vegetable juice turnips wax beans zucchini . Here's the information you need to learn to start enjoying nutrient-packed vegetables. frozen. cut up. or mashed. and may be whole. or dried/dehydrated. based on their nutrient content. fresh. There are five different groups of vegetables. canned.

try to eat the amounts listed from each group as a way to reach your daily recommended amount. It is not necessary to eat each type of vegetable daily. . However. over a week.tofu (bean curd made from soybeans) white beans How many vegetables do I need? You should choose a variety of vegetables.

or dried. sex. Some commonly eaten fruits are: Apples Apricots Avocado Bananas Berries: Strawberries Blueberries Raspberries Cherries Grapefruit Grapes Kiwi fruit Lemons Limes Mangoes Melons: Cantaloupe Honeydew Watermelon Mixed Fruits: Fruit Cocktail Nectarines Oranges Peaches Pears Papaya Pineapple Plums Prunes Raisins Tangerines 100% Fruit Juice: Orange Apple Grape Grapefruit How Much Fruit Should I Eat? The amount of fruit you need to eat depends on age. cut-up. . and may be whole. Fruits may be fresh. or pureed. and level of physical activity.Fruit The New Food Pyramid What Counts as Fruit? Any fruit or 100% fruit juice counts as part of the fruit group. canned. frozen. Recommended daily amounts are shown in the chart.

1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice. In general.5" diameter) 1 cup sliced or chopped.Daily Recommendation* Children 2-3 years old 4-8 years old Girls Boys 1 cup 1 to 1 ½ cups 9-13 years old 1 ½ cups 14-18 years old 1 ½ cups 9-13 years old 1 ½ cups 14-18 years old 2 cups Women 19-30 years old 2 cups 31-50 years old 1 ½ cups 51+ years old 1 ½ cups Men 19-30 years old 2 cups 31-50 years old 2 cups 51+ years old 2 cups These amounts are for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of beyond normal daily activities. Amount that counts Apple Applesauce Banana Cantaloupe Grapes Grapefruit ½ large (3. What Counts as a Cup of Fruit? In general.25" diameter) 1 small (2. Those who are more physically active may be able to eat more while staying within calorie needs. 1 cup of fruit or 100% fruit juice. raw or cooked 1 cup 1 cup sliced 1 large (8" to 9" long) 1 cup diced or melon balls 1 cup whole or cut-up 32 seedless grapes 1 medium (4" diameter) 1 cup sections . or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the fruit group. The new Food Pyramid lists daily recommendations of fruits in terms of cups. or ½ cup of dried fruit can be considered as 1 cup from the fruit group. This chart provides examples of amounts of specific fruits that equal 1 cup.

drained 2 halves. cooked. cooked. raw. halved. apricots. drained 1 large (3-1/16" diameter) 1 cup sections 1 cup canned. or sliced. or canned. grapefruit.5 per lb) 1 cup sliced or diced. or canned. drained 1 cup sliced raw or cooked 3 medium or 2 large plums About 8 large berries 1 cup whole. etc. canned 1 medium pear (2.) . drained 1 cup chunks. fresh or frozen 1 small wedge (1" thick) ½ cup dried fruit is equivalent to1 cup fruit 1 cup Pear Pineapple Plum Strawberries Watermelon Dried fruit (raisins. raw or canned. apple. raw. prunes. sliced or crushed. etc. drained 1 large (2 ¾" diameter) 1 cup sliced or diced. cooked or canned. grape. mandarin Peach 1 cup diced or sliced.Mixed fruit (fruit cocktail) Orange Orange. raw.) 100% fruit juice (orange.

Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. including potassium. and calories. Most fruits are naturally low in fat. Health benefits • • • • • • Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce risk for stroke and heart disease. Whole or cut-up fruits are sources of dietary fiber. and orange juice. sodium. fruit juices contain little or no fiber. vitamin C. Fruits provide vitamins and minerals vital for your body's health. including spina bifida and anencephaly. such as fruits and vegetables. Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may protect against certain cancers. honeydew melon. stomach. Diets rich in foods containing fiber. and keeps teeth and gums healthy. Eating foods such as fruits that are low in calories per cup instead of some other highercalorie food may be useful in helping to lower calorie intake. including folic acid from fortified foods or supplements. helps heal cuts and wounds. Fruits provide vitamins and minerals vital for your body's health. People who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Eating fruits and vegetables rich in potassium may reduce the risk of developing kidney stones and may help to decrease bone loss. It helps reduce constipation and diverticulosis. may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. and colorectal cancer. Eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables may reduce risk for type 2 diabetes. and folate (folic acid). dietary fiber. Fiber-containing foods such as fruits help provide a feeling of fullness with fewer calories. Folate (folic acid) helps the body form red blood cells. None have cholesterol. • • • Fruits are important sources of many nutrients. This reduces the risk of birth defects called neural tube defects. such as mouth. dried peaches and apricots. Fiber is important for proper bowel function. prunes and prune juice. Fruit is one of the main groups in the new Food Pyramid.What Fruit Can Do for You People who eat more fruits and vegetables as part of an overall healthy diet are likely to have a reduced risk of some chronic diseases. Women of childbearing age who may become pregnant and those in the first trimester of pregnancy should be sure to get adequate folate. Nutrients • • . Dietary fiber from fruits helps reduce blood cholesterol levels and may lower risk of heart disease. Fruit sources of potassium include bananas. Vitamin C is important for growth and repair of all body tissues. cantaloupe.

or include mandarin oranges or grapes in a tossed salad. Individual containers of fruits like peaches or applesauce are easy and convenient. and orange juice. Because they are dried. Buy fruits that are dried. not syrup) as well as fresh. delicious fruit from day to day. drink 100% orange or grapefruit juice. walnuts. At dinner. dried peaches and apricots. reach for whole or cut-up fruit rather than juice. Below are tips on buying. try whole fresh berries or grapes. Snack Time • • • Cut-up fruit makes a great snack. prunes and prune juice. top your cereal with bananas or peaches. dates. celery. pineapple. At lunch. frozen. bananas. Refrigerate cut-up fruit to eat later. Select fruits with more potassium often. or buy pre-cut packages of fruit pieces like pineapples or melons. and canned (in water or juice. Try meat dishes that incorporate fruit. banana. Buy precut packages of fruit (such as melon or pineapple chunks) for a healthy snack in seconds. Preparing Fruit • • • • • Keep a bowl of whole fruit on the table. Consider convenience when shopping. pack a tangerine. But a few simple tricks can help you enjoy nutrient-packed. preparing. Some fruits that are available dried include apricots. and making fruit more appealing for children. When choosing canned fruits. add blueberries to pancakes. and making fruit more appealing to children. Or. ¼ cup is equivalent to ½ cup of other fruits. For dessert. or in the refrigerator. Buy fresh fruits in season when they may be less expensive and at their peak flavor. . try a fruit mixed with low-fat or fat-free yogurt. pears. blueberries. counter. Either cut them yourself. or choose fruits from a salad bar. honeydew melon.Tips to Help You Eat Fruit Getting enough fruit in your diet may seem overwhelming. figs. Getting enough fruit in your diet may seem overwhelming. preparing. Picking the Best Fruit: • • • • To get the benefits of fiber. Choose packaged fruits that do not have added sugars. But a few simple tricks can help you enjoy nutrient-packed. Make a Waldorf salad. such as bananas. cranberries. prunes (dried plums). For tips on buying. or grapes to eat. or a fruit salad. Dried fruits also make a great snack. Add fruit like pineapple or peaches to kabobs as part of a barbecue meal. select fruit canned in 100% fruit juice or water rather then syrup. and raisins (dried grapes). Keep a package of dried fruit in your desk or bag. cherries. They are easy to carry and store well. and dressing. with apples. delicious fruit from day to day. Quick Tips for Buying. Vary your fruit choices to get a wide variety of nutrients. so that you always have a supply on hand. Packing Fruit Into Meals: • • • • • • • At breakfast. Or. have baked apples. add crushed pineapple to coleslaw. apples. cantaloupe. such as chicken with apricots or mango chutney.

or storing. children can help shop for. apples are crunchy. Decorate plates or serving dishes with fruit slices. While shopping. Under clean. or cut up fruits. poultry and seafood while shopping. For fresh fruit salads. bananas are smooth and creamy. that are available in some fast-food restaurants. Depending on their age. such as sliced apples. or lemon juice to keep them from turning brown. peaches. Choose fruit options. or 100% fruit juice. Try different textures of fruits. Pack a juice box (100% juice) in children's lunches versus soda or other sugarsweetened beverages. Avoid a Fruit Snafu • • Wash fruits before preparing or eating them. running water. There is often little fruit in "fruit-flavored" beverages or chewy fruit snacks. spread peanut butter on apple slices or top frozen yogurt with berries or slices of kiwi fruit. Keep fruits separate from raw meat. Offer children a choice of fruits for lunch. Turning Children Into Fruit Lovers: • • • • • • • • • • • Set a good example for children by eating fruit everyday with meals or as snacks. and an orange slice for a mouth. Try bananas. Frozen juice bars (100% juice) make healthy alternatives to high-fat snacks. and berries. allow children to pick out a new fruit to try later at home. mix apples. For example. or other berries. Make fruit kabobs using pineapple chunks. Make a fruit smoothie by blending fat-free or low-fat milk or yogurt with fresh or frozen fruit.• • As a snack. and oranges are juicy. pineapple. Make fruit more appealing: • • • • • Many fruits taste great with a dip or dressing. preparing. grapes. raisins for a nose. bananas. . Try low-fat yogurt or pudding as a dip for fruits like strawberries or melons. peel. Dry after washing. bananas. or pears with acidic fruits like oranges. Try applesauce as a fat-free substitute for some of the oil when baking cakes. Offer fruit pieces and 100% fruit juice to children. clean. Top off a bowl of cereal with some berries. Or. make a smiley face with sliced bananas for eyes. strawberries. mixed fruit cup. rub fruits briskly with your hands to remove dirt and surface microorganisms. Offer raisins or other dried fruits instead of candy.

trout. such as salmon. Select fish rich in heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. and pork may be enhanced with a salt-containing solution. frankfurters. Check the product label for statements such as "self-basting" for a sign that there may be added salt. Sunflower seeds. Liver and other organ meats are high in cholesterol. But this group is about more than just meat and beans. Fish. and seeds contain healthy oils. What foods are included in the meat & beans group? All foods made from meat. poultry. add on extra fat and calories. Egg yolks are also high in cholesterol. sausage. Most meat and poultry choices should be lean or low fat. so these foods are good substitutions for meat or poultry. nuts. Processed meats such as ham. and seeds are considered part of this group. eggs. more often. nuts. almonds. Dry beans and peas are part of this group as well as the vegetable group. Fresh chicken. dry beans or peas. but egg whites are cholesterol-free. What to Watch Out For Frying chicken in shortening or frying eggs in butter or stick margarine also packs on significant fat and calories. such as regular ground beef (75 to 80% lean) or chicken with skin. How much do I need from the meat & beans group? . turkey. and luncheon or deli meats have added salt. and hazelnuts (filberts) are the richest sources of vitamin E in this food group. make these your nut and seed choices more often. fish. and herring. To help meet vitamin E recommendations. Higher fat choices.Meat & Beans The Food Pyramid Meat and beans make up one of the main food groups in the new Food Pyramid.

eggs. 1 egg. ¼ cup cooked dry beans. Most Americans eat enough food from this group. nuts. and level of physical activity. For more information on the nutrients found in the meat & beans group Foods in the meat & beans group can be very healthy. **Below is information on what counts as one ounce equivalent in the meat and beans group. For tips on which foods to reach for and menu ideas Vegetarian Choices . 1 tablespoon of peanut butter. fish. Those who are more physically active may be able to eat more while staying within calorie needs. However. beyond normal daily activities. Daily recommendation* Children 2-3 years old 4-8 years old Girls Boys 2 ounce equivalents** 3-4 ounce equivalents** 9-13 years old 5 ounce equivalents** 14-18 years old 5 ounce equivalents** 9-13 years old 5 ounce equivalents** 14-18 years old 6 ounce equivalents** Women 19-30 years old 5 ½ ounce equivalents** 31-50 years old 5 ounce equivalents** 51+ years old 5 ounce equivalents** Men 19-30 years old 6 ½ ounce equivalents** 31-50 years old 6 ounce equivalents** 51+ years old 5 ½ ounce equivalents** *These amounts are appropriate for individuals who get less than 30 minutes per day of moderate physical activity. but need to make leaner and more varied selections of these foods. 1 ounce of meat.The amount you need to eat depends on age. What Meat & Beans Can Do for You Foods in the meat. What counts as an ounce in the meat & beans group? In general. Here are the recommended daily amounts. But choosing the right types of foods is key for staying healthy. poultry. or ½ ounce of nuts or seeds can be considered as 1 ounce equivalent from the meat and beans group. sex. For specific amounts that count as 1 ounce equivalent in the meat & beans group towards your daily recommended intake. choosing foods from this group that are high in saturated fat and cholesterol may cause illness. poultry or fish. and seed group provide vital nutrients.

tempeh.• • Vegetarians get enough protein from this group as long as the variety and amounts of foods selected are adequate. veggie burgers). peas. . nuts. nut butters. Protein sources from the meat and beans group for vegetarians include eggs (for ovovegetarians). beans. and soy products (tofu.

lactose-free and lower-lactose products are available. These include hard cheeses and yogurt. For those who are lactose intolerant. Recommended daily amounts are shown below. and cheese. yogurt. Yogurt. enzyme preparations can be added to milk to lower the lactose content. yogurt. yogurt. and cheese group are: Milk* Cheese* All milk: Fat-free (skim) Low fat (1%) Reduced fat (2%) Whole milk Flavored milks: Chocolate Strawberry Lactose-reduced milks Lactose-free milks Milk-based desserts* Puddings made with milk Ice milk Frozen yogurt Ice cream Hard natural cheeses: cheddar mozzarella Swiss parmesan Soft cheeses: ricotta cottage cheese processed cheeses American Yogurt* All yogurt Fat-free low fat reduced fat whole-milk yogurt Choose fat-free or low-fat milk. Most milk group choices should be fat-free or low-fat. Foods made from milk that have little to no calcium. and Cheese The Food Pyramid One of the main food groups in the new food pyramid is milk. All liquid milk products and many foods made from milk that retain their calcium content are considered part of this food group. cream. Calcium-fortified foods and drinks such as soy beverages or orange juice are other sources of calcium but may not provide other necessary nutrients. desserts) have added sugars and extra calories. such as cream cheese. yogurt.Milk. and cheese. Also. Sweetened milk products (flavored milk. drinkable yogurt. are not. How much do I need from the milk group? The amount of food from the milk group you need to eat depends on age. Daily Recommendation . and butter. Some common choices in the milk.

What Milk. milk and other dairy foods from day to day. . But a few simple tricks can help you enjoy nutrient-packed.Children 2-3 years old 4-8 years old Girls Boys 2 cups 2 cups 9-13 years old 3 cups 14-18 years old 3 cups 9-13 years old 3 cups 14-18 years old 3 cups Women 19-30 years old 3 cups 31-50 years old 3 cups 51+ years old 3 cups Men 19-30 years old 3 cups 31-50 years old 3 cups 51+ years old 3 cups What counts as 1 cup in the milk group? In general. and Cheese Can Do for You People who have a diet rich in milk. and cheese can reduce the risk of low bone mass throughout the life cycle and help prevent osteoporosis. But a few simple tricks can help you enjoy nutrient-packed. 1 ½ ounces of natural cheese. Not many of us sit around drinking milk with dinner anymore. potassium. Choose fat-free or low-fat milk. Foods in the milk group provide vital vitamins and minerals. Calcium-fortified foods and drinks such as soy beverages or orange juice also contain calcium but may not provide other necessary nutrients. Tips to Help You Get More Milk Not many of us sit around drinking milk with dinner anymore. or 2 ounces of processed cheese can be considered as 1 cup from the milk group. 1 cup of milk or yogurt. and protein. including how these nutrients can make you healthier. Yogurt. yogurt. Making Milk a Habit • Include milk as a beverage at meals. vitamin D. For more information on the health benefits of the milk group. including calcium. milk and other dairy foods from day to day. For tips on getting more milk and what to do if you can't or don't want to drink milk Tips to Help You Get More Milk Milk and milk products are one of the main food groups in the Food Pyramid. For a list of specific food amounts that count as 1 cup in the milk group.

This may reduce the risk of the bone-thinning disease osteoporosis. cereals. or vegetables with shredded low-fat cheese. including how these nutrients can make you healthier People who have a diet rich in milk and milk products can reduce the risk of low bone mass throughout the life cycle. Try reduced-fat (2%). Calcium-fortified foods and drinks such as soy beverages or orange juice are other sources of calcium but may not provide other necessary nutrients. Diets rich in potassium may help to maintain healthy blood pressure. For more information on the health benefits of the milk group. thereby helping to build and maintain bones. soybeans. salmon with bones). Calcium choices for those who do not consume milk products include: • • Calcium-fortified juices. ask for them with fat-free (skim) milk. Top a baked potato with fat-free or low-fat yogurt. Diets that include milk products tend to have a higher overall nutritional quality. and finally fat-free (skim). Add fat-free or low-fat milk instead of water to oatmeal and hot cereals. then low-fat (1%). potassium. You can also take the enzyme lactase before eating or drinking milk products. such as cheese. vitamin D. to lower saturated fat and calories. Vitamin D functions in the body to maintain proper levels of calcium and phosphorous. and some leafy greens (collard and turnip greens. including calcium. especially yogurt and milk. yogurt. If you drink cappuccinos or lattes. Diets that provide 3 cups or the equivalent of milk products per day can improve bone mass. Use fat-free or low-fat milk when making condensed cream soups (such as cream of tomato). Vitamins and Minerals • Calcium helps build stronger bones and teeth. the most reliable way to get the health benefits of milk is to choose lactose-free alternatives. Not Into Milk? If you're lactose intolerance. Top cut-up fruit with flavored yogurt for a quick dessert. Milk products are especially important to bone health during childhood and adolescence. or rice beverages Canned fish (sardines. tempeh). soy yogurt. For dessert. soups. breads. The amount of calcium that can be absorbed from these foods varies. and other soy products (soybased beverages. and protein. Have fat-free or low-fat yogurt as a snack. switch gradually to fat-free milk. when bone mass is being built. Make fruit-yogurt smoothies in the blender. or lactose-free milk. Milk products. Milk that is fortified with vitamin D is a good • . Make a dip for fruits or vegetables from yogurt. Milk products are the primary source of calcium in American diets. Foods in the milk group provide vital nutrients. some other dried beans. bok choy).• • • • • • • • • • • If you usually drink whole milk. Build Stronger Bones • • • • Diets rich in milk and milk products help build and maintain bone mass. Top casseroles. provide potassium. soy beverages. make chocolate or butterscotch pudding with fat-free or low-fat milk. stews. kale.

To help keep blood cholesterol levels healthy. Low-fat or fat-free milk products provide little or no fat. Diets high in saturated fats raise LDL "bad" cholesterol levels in the blood.• source of this nutrient. High LDL cholesterol. limit the amount of these foods you eat. . in turn. increases the risk for heart disease. Other sources include vitamin D-fortified yogurt and vitamin Dfortified ready-to-eat breakfast cereals. In addition. and products made from them are high in saturated fat. whole milk. Lean Towards Fat-Free or Low-Fat Choosing foods from the milk group that are high in saturated fats and cholesterol can affect heart disease risk. Many cheeses. eating a lot of fats makes it difficult to avoid getting more calories than you need.

Limit Solid Fats Most solid fats are high in saturated fats and/or trans fats and have less monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats. no foods from plants sources contain cholesterol. . A few plant oils.Oils The New Food Pyramid It's true. Oils are one of the main food groups in the new Food Pyramid. Animal products containing solid fats also contain cholesterol. and soft (tub or squeeze) margarine with no trans fats. and low in unhealthy fats called saturated fats. Here's the information you need to be sure you're getting the right amount and the right kind of oils. certain salad dressings. A 60-year-old woman that doesn't exercise needs 5 teaspoons a day. Many products already provide this information. like the vegetable oils used in cooking. such as walnut oil and sesame oil. like: • • • • Nuts Olives Some fish Avocados Healthier Oils Foods that are mainly oil include mayonnaise. Trans fats are strongly linked to heart disease. A number of foods are naturally high in oils. including coconut oil and palm kernel oil. Oils from plant sources (vegetable and nut oils) do not contain any cholesterol. Most oils are high in healthier fats called monounsaturated or polyunsaturated fats. How Much Oil Should I Get Each Day? Depending on your sex and age. Some common oils are: • • • • • • • Canola oil Corn oil Cottonseed oil Olive oil Safflower oil Soybean oil Sunflower oil Some oils are used mainly as flavorings. are high in saturated fats and should be limited in your diet. Oils come from many different plants and from fish. A 30-year-old man who exercises more than 60 minutes a day should get 8 teaspoons a day. however. Amounts of trans fat will be required on labels as of 2006. the amount can range from 5 teaspoons to 8 teaspoons a day. In fact. What Are Oils? Oils are fats that are liquid at room temperature.

and cholesterol tend to raise LDL "bad" cholesterol levels in the blood. which in turn increases the risk for heart disease. margarines. Saturated fats. crackers. even though it is not visible. to help reduce your risk of heart disease. and cholesterol. Amount Amount of solid Calories Total . and croissants) In some cases. trans fats. donuts. Here's a quick guide on the amount of solid fats in some common foods. trans fats. the fat in these foods is invisible. such as butter and shortening. cut back on foods containing saturated fats.Trans fats can be found in many cakes. To lower risk for heart disease. Solid fats are fats that are solid at room temperature. and microwave popcorns. suet) Chicken fat Pork fat (lard) Stick margarine Shortening Foods high in solid fats include: • • • • • • • • • Many cheeses Creams Ice creams Well-marbled cuts of meats Regular ground beef Bacon Sausages Poultry skin Many baked goods (such as cookies. icings. Regular cheese and whole milk are high in solid fat. trans fats. crackers. How do I count the solid fats I can eat? For quick guide on the amount of solid fats in some common foods. Look for foods that are low in saturated fats. cookies. Solid fats come from many animal foods and can be made from vegetable oils through a process called hydrogenation. and cholesterol. pastries. Some common solid fats are: • • • • • • Butter Beef fat (tallow. Foods containing partially-hydrogenated vegetable oils usually contain trans fats.

of food Solid fats: Shortening Butter Coconut or palm kernel oil 1 Tbsp 1 Tbsp 1 Tbsp fat teaspoons/grams 3 tsp/13 g 2 1/2 tsp/12 g 3 tsp/14 g from calories solid fat 115 100 120 115 100 120 Foods rich in solid fats: Heavy cream Half and half cream Sour cream Whole milk Cheddar cheese Ice cream. lean only Croissant Biscuit 1 Tbsp 1 Tbsp 1 Tbsp 1 cup 1 1/2 oz 1 cup 2 slices 2 links (2 ounces) 3 ounces cooked 3 ounces cooked 3 ounces cooked 1 medium (2 ounces) 1 small (2. lean and fat (1/8" trim) Prime rib roast. cooked Pork sausage Hamburger. regular (80% lean) Prime rib roast. chocolate Bacon.5" diameter) 1 tsp/5 g 1/2 tsp/2 g 1/2 tsp/2 g 2 tsp/8 g 3 tsp/14 g 3 tsp/14 g 1 1/2 tsp/6 g 3 tsp/14 g 3 tsp/14 g 50 15 20 70 125 125 55 120 120 50 20 25 145 170 285 85 165 205 6 tsp/29 g 255 340 3 1/2 tsp/16 g 3 tsp/12 g 1 1/2 tsp/6 g 140 105 50 250 230 125 .

Pound cake Cheese Danish Chocolate creme pie 1/12 of 12-ounce cake 1 pastry (2 1/2 ounce) 1/6 of 8" pie 1 1/2 tsp/6 g 50 110 3 1/2 tsp/16 g 5 tsp/22 g 135 195 265 345 .

You can be active in many different ways. or dancing the night away are all good examples of being active. For health benefits. briskly pushing a baby stroller. such as while grocery shopping. playing soccer. muscles. such as chopping wood Weight lifting (vigorous effort) Basketball (competitive) Some physical activities are not intense enough to help you meet the recommendations. Although you are moving. physical activity should be moderate or vigorous and add up to at least 30 minutes a day. climbing the stairs. But it's not just about going to the gym. These include walking at a casual pace. so you should not count these toward the 30 or more minutes a day that you should strive for. Physical activity can also help you achieve and maintain a healthy weight and lower risk for chronic disease. gardening. Walking. Make Physical Activity Work for You Being physically active is a key element in living a longer. healthier. these activities do not increase your heart rate. happier life. It can help relieve stress and can provide an overall feeling of well-being. and joints . The benefits of physical activity may include: • • • Improving self-esteem and feelings of well-being Increasing fitness level Helping to build and maintain bones.Physical Activity The New Food Pyramid Physical activity has made its way into the new food pyramid. What Is Moderate and Vigorous Activity? Moderate physical activities include: • • • • • • • Walking briskly (about 3 1/2 miles per hour) Hiking Gardening/yard work Dancing Golf (walking and carrying clubs) Bicycling (less than 10 miles per hour) Weight training (general light workout) Vigorous physical activities include: • • • • • • • • Running/jogging (5 miles per hour) Bicycling (more than 10 miles per hour) Swimming (freestyle laps) Aerobics Walking very fast (4 1/2 miles per hour) Heavy yard work. and doing light household chores.

lifting weights. so maintaining energy balance requires moving more and eating less. While 30 minutes a day of moderate intensity physical activities provide health benefits. and weight-bearing activities help build and maintain bones and muscles by working them against gravity. Do I Need to See a Doctor? Most adults do not need to see their doctor before starting to exercise at a moderate level. trans fat and. do moderate intensity activity for 30 minutes most days. such as a family history of heart disease or stroke. As people age their metabolism slows. asthma. Individuals with one of the conditions below should also consult a health care provider for help in designing a safe program of physical activity. Balance and stretching activities enhance physical stability and flexibility. • • A chronic health problem such as heart disease. and walking. calorie needs should not be exceeded. Examples are brisk walking. Resistance. They also use up more calories per hour. jogging. diabetes. high blood pressure. and type 2 diabetes Helping to control blood pressure Reducing feelings of depression and anxiety Physical activity and nutrition work together for better health. Some types of physical activity are especially beneficial: • • • Aerobic activities speed heart rate and breathing and improve heart and lung fitness. Children and teenagers should be physically active for at least 60 minutes every day. eating a diet high in saturated fat. dancing. This is in addition to your usual daily activities. High risk for heart disease. at least 60 to 90 minutes a day may be needed to maintain the weight loss. Being active increases the amount of calories burned. How Much? How Long? At a minimum. For those who have lost weight. Burn Up the Calories This chart will help you determine how many calories you burn during various activities. No matter what activity you choose. At the same time. being active for longer or doing more vigorous activities can provide even greater health benefits. smoking. strength building. Even 10-minutes bouts of activity count toward your total. or preferably every day. . About 60 minutes a day of moderate physical activity may be needed to prevent weight gain. or obesity. and tai chi. cholesterol. it can be done all at once or divided into two or three parts during the day. which reduces risk of injuries. Examples are gentle stretching. and swimming. or having a sedentary lifestyle. colon cancer. men over the age of 40 and women over the age of 50 planning to start vigorous physical activity should consult a health care provider. yoga. Examples are carrying a child. osteoporosis. However. or most days.• • • • • • Building endurance and muscle strength Enhancing flexibility and posture Helping to manage weight Lowering risk of heart disease. martial arts. They help to build and maintain muscles and bones. Increasing the intensity or the amount of time of activity can have additional health benefits and may be needed to control body weight.

To learn more about physical activity and how much you need.A 154-pound man (5'10") will use up about the number of calories listed doing each activity below. Those who weigh more will use more calories. click here. A 154-pound man (5 feet 10 inches) will use up about the number of calories listed doing each activity below. and those who weigh less will use fewer. The calorie values listed include both calories used by the activity and the calories used for normal body functioning. The calorie values listed include both calories used by the activity and the calories used for normal body functioning. and those who weigh less will use fewer. Burn Up the Calories Physical activity is now a part of the new Food Pyramid. Those who weigh more will use more calories. [physical activity food pyramid] This chart will help you determine how many calories you burn during various activities. Approximate calories used by a 154-pound man Moderate physical activities: Hiking Light gardening/yard work Dancing Golf (walking and carrying clubs) Bicycling (less than 10 miles per hour) In 1 hour 370 330 330 330 290 In 30 minutes 185 165 165 165 145 140 110 90 Walking (3 ½ miles per hour) 280 Weight training (general light 220 workout) Stretching Vigorous physical activities: Running/jogging (5 miles per 590 hour) Bicycling (more than 10 miles 590 per hour) Swimming (slow freestyle laps) Aerobics 510 480 180 295 295 255 240 .

walk the dog for 10 minutes before and after work. Make sure to do at least 10 minutes of the activity at a time. Tips for Increasing Physical Activity Make physical activity a regular part of the day. Keep it interesting by trying something different on alternate days.Walking (4 ½ miles per hour) 460 Heavy yard work (chopping wood) Weight lifting (vigorous effort) Basketball (vigorous) 440 440 440 230 220 220 220 It's important to keep in mind that the number of calories you actually burn from exercising is likely higher than this. This is how much you burn while actually doing the exercise. to reach a 30-minute goal for the day. For example. Or join an exercise class. keep some comfortable clothes and a pair of walking or running shoes in the car and at the office. Exercise increases your metabolism and helps you burn more calories throughout the rest of the day. and add a 10 minute walk at lunchtime. . What's important is to be active most days of the week and make it part of daily routine. To be ready anytime. Or swim 3 times a week and take a yoga class on the other days. shorter bursts of activity will not have the same health benefits. Fitting activity into a daily routine can be easy -such as taking a brisk 10 minute walk to and from the parking lot. bus stop. or subway station.

Gender Child Age (years) 2-3 Sedentaryb 1.5 to 3 miles per day at 3 to 4 miles per hour.800 2.000-1. a ." as determined by IOM. c Moderately active means a lifestyle that includes physical activity equivalent to walking about 1.800 2.000-2.600 2.000 1.000 2.600 1.600-2.400 Actived 1.400 1.800 2. is based on median height and weight for ages up to age 18 years of age and median height and weight for that height to give a BMI of 21.200 2.800 2.400-1.000 2. 2002. b Sedentary means a lifestyle that includes only the light physical activity associated with typical day-to-day life.600 1.200 2.200 2.600-2.Estimated Calorie Requirements Estimated amounts of calories needed to maintain energy balance for various gender and age groups at three different levels of physical activity.400 2.600 1.5 for adult males.000 2.000-2.000-2.400-1.800-3.200 2.200 2. The estimates are rounded to the nearest 200 calories and were determined using the Institute of Medicine equation.000 2.600 2.000 Moderately Activec 1.400-2.000-1.800 1.400-1. "Reference size.400 2.400-2.800-2.600-2.800-2. in addition to the light physical activity associated with typical day-to-day life. age. and activity level for reference-sized individuals.800 1. calculated by gender.000 2.400 2.800-3.000 1.800 Female 4-8 9-13 14-18 19-30 31-50 51+ Male 4-8 9-13 14-18 19-30 31-50 51+ These levels are based on Estimated Energy Requirements (EER) from the Institute of Medicine Dietary Reference Intakes macronutrients report.200-2. in addition to the light physical activity associated with typical day-to-day life d Active means a lifestyle that includes physical activity equivalent to walking more than 3 miles per day at 3 to 4 miles per hour.200 2.400 1.200 1.400 1.600 1.200 3.200 1.800 1.5 for adult females and 22.400-2.000 1.

Get the (Fullness) Message Changing the way you go about eating can make it easier to eat less without feeling deprived. That will allow satiety (fullness) signals to begin to develop by the end of the meal. the most productive areas to focus on are the dietary and exercise changes that will lead to long-term weight control. but what happens if you're held up at work one day and there's a thunderstorm during your walking time another day? "Walk 30 minutes. For example. meals and overeat later. how often and for how long you exercise. or setting one. So slow down the rate that you eat food. such as how many calories you eat in a day. Reward Success (But Not With Food!) Rewards that you can control can be used to encourage you to attain your weight control goals. . "exercise more" is a wonderful goal. Eating lots of vegetables or fruit can also make you feel fuller. Then work to sever the association of eating with the cue (don't eat while watching television). such as weight. attainable. attainable. difficult effort. They should help you reach your goal of obtaining and maintaining a healthy weight. Before you get started on a weight loss program.. are more effective than bigger rewards. but it's not specific. timely. For example. but is it attainable if you're just starting out? "Walk 30 minutes every day" is more attainable. or an outcome of these behaviors. or whenever treats are on display by the office coffee pot. especially those that have been difficult for you to reach. and forgiving. In addition. It takes 15 or more minutes for your brain to get the message you've been fed.Getting Started on Losing Weight Long Term Losing weight and keeping it off is not easy. consider the following tips. avoid or eliminate the cue (leave coffee room immediately after pouring coffee). and contingent on meeting your goal. five days each week" is specific. However. can help you reach your goal. Avoid a Chain Reaction Identify those social and environmental cues that tend to encourage undesired eating. Another trick is to use smaller plates so that moderate portions do not appear meager. etc. or delay. Rewards may include treating yourself to a movie or music CD or taking an afternoon off from work or just an hour of quiet time away from family. and forgiving. how many servings of fruits and vegetables you eat per day. Balance Your (Food) Checkbook This means that you should monitor your eating behavior by observing and recording some aspect of your eating behavior. Keep in mind that effective goals are specific. and then work to change those cues. An effective reward is something that is desirable. Successful weight managers are those who select two or three goals at a time that they are willing to take on. requiring a long. especially if you tend to skip. "Walk five miles everyday" is specific and measurable. Set the Right Goals Setting effective goals is an important first step. delivered for meeting smaller goals. Keep in mind that numerous small rewards. Most people trying to lose weight focus on just that one goal: weight loss. you may learn that you're more likely to overeat while watching television. Doing this can really help you determine how you are doing and what you need to do to meet your weight control goals. In general. visible and accessible food items are often cues for unplanned eating. changing your eating schedule.

Rolls. and your weight loss efforts would stay on track. homemade vegetable soup (maybe that you prepared last night). the Guthrie Chair in Nutrition at Pennsylvania State University in Pittsburgh and author of The Volumetrics Weight Control Plan. you're always going to be struggling .and people who succeed must have discipline. Eating will always feel like work.Plan Your Day to Lose Weight You're running late. "It is very difficult to lose weight and keep it off . What happened to those resolutions to exercise more. clinical director of the weight and eating disorders program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. RD. chief dietitian for St." Indeed. It helps you monitor yourself. lose weight? It's easy for them to get lost in the daily shuffle. high-fiber cereal. Barnabas Hospital in New York City. you've got an extra hour. and the milk's gone sour. PhD.with a little planning. whole-wheat bread. and kept it off for much longer. MPH. "You're responsible for you. and make corrections in mid-course. Make these things premeditated . it's not going to happen. It's true -. Your morning rush would go more smoothly. PhD. low-fat milk.and that is a key trait that is evident among the "successful losers" who belong to The National Weight Control Registry. Brown-bag a wholesome lunch: more fresh fruit. all year. You might skip breakfast: the cereal box is empty. should you go to the gym or watch TV.trying to figure out how to eat what you should. but you are out of bread. Eat a satisfying but healthy breakfast: fresh fruit. It takes effort to be successful in long-term weight management. knowing what your next move is . In a perfect world. says Barbara J.gym time. Forget taking lunch: there's peanut butter in the jar. "Without planning.and many have lost much more.all those tasty samples you couldn't pass up." ." says James O.so it's not like a surprise. Hill. "People who are most successful plan their day to ensure that they stick to their eating plan and get regular physical activity. take note of every bite of food you have during the day. we could accomplish all this by the time our busy day starts: • • • • Jump out of bed by 6:30 (or earlier). 1: Plan Your Daily Food First. low-fat yogurt. at the beginning of a typical jam-packed day. planning involves discipline . eat healthier. You'll end up making yourself eat things you don't want to eat. Get a good chunk of exercise." Planning for Weight Loss Planning helps you build new habits. "If you leave exercise and healthy eating to chance. "A food journal is the single best thing you can do. flying out the door.all day. "You become more conscious of what you're doing. It's a typical hectic morning. you won't do it. the Registry's co-founder and director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. this could be your reality. dinner. Use your personal digital assistant to set your day . Don't forget that run through the supermarket ." says Milton Stokes. You bounce out of bed. PhD. Exercise before work? You've got to be kidding. 20 minutes or more." Goal No. If you don't plan it." says Gary Foster. They have maintained a 30-pound weight loss for at least a year . all week.

These are great prepare-ahead healthy meals that will keep you feeling full and help you control your weight: • • • • Make a dried-fruit-and-nut mix for emergency snacking.. Use weekends wisely. You'll see where you need improvement. A well-stocked fridge and pantry can make it easier to grab a healthy snack or prepare delicious meals that are also good for you.for a grab-and-go meal. Low-fat cheese or yogurt.especially in the late afternoon. But your eating will be more structured. Then you'll have some freedom . Buy healthy frozen entres. fish." . a variety of fresh fruits (include berries and grapes) and vegetables (include carrots and celery). lunch. You can't just tell yourself to eat less junk food after 8 p. adds Elisabetta Politi. banana. hummus with veggies. Keep them at home. peanut butter. Keep lists of healthy foods and meals you love. and dinner options.you can choose from your favorites. he says. "I advise people to think of five different breakfast. That will help you eat the right foods when you're starving ." says Rolls. "Instead of 'I'll exercise more. soybeans. "Plans work better than platitudes. "These have really improved. a handful. That's what's important.m. "When things are a little quieter on weekends. Just keep notes during that time period. which can be frozen for several lunches or dinners. (Be wary of granola. But really. Do it yourself. says Stokes. I make sure I have frozen entrees on hand. Journals don't have to be labor-intensive. Try smoothies .' That way you know exactly what to do. since it typically has lots of sugar. Set specific goals. "They have more whole grains in them now. If I'm traveling and can't get to the grocery store. You'll quickly see problem habits: banana split vs. garlic. RD. nutrition manager at the Duke Diet & Fitness Center at Duke University Medical School. then pull it out during the week. whole grain pasta/bread. Plan healthy treats. MPH.m. eggs." Consider your options." Foster tells WebMD. Go to the market. Prepare large quantities so you can have a moderate-sized helping for dinner and then have leftovers for lunch the next day. or that you snack after 3 p.great for the car or office.and when you finally get home at night. You can even prepare food on the weekend and freeze it. Example: You know you eat junk at night.m.'I'm going to substitute popcorn for potato chips. so you're a little ahead of the game. and fresh fruit are great choices. Mix up big salads or a pasta primavera with lots of veggies and whole-wheat pasta. you can think about the upcoming week. and plan accordingly.) Pack small amounts in a little plastic bag . Be specific . and they seem to be getting tastier. and highfiber cereal.' make it 'I'll walk tomorrow morning at 7 a. Focus on your high-risk time slots when you're most likely to get off course.Dietitians call it a food journal." says Stokes. during drive time -. the whole container of nuts vs. Cook a big pot of homemade vegetable soup. or between lunch and dinner. take them to the office.'" Keep it simple. Keep basics like these on hand: low-fat milk and yogurt. "Decide what you're going to eat. he explains.blend low-fat yogurt and fruit . it's research for your plan of action." Shop wisely. There's no question.

walking. If you've got a structured period of activity.will get you out of bed in the morning? A yoga video.Mon. Tackle roadblocks.Don't limit yourself. you're glad you did the workout." advises Thompson. Give it a positive spin. Your day starts when the alarm goes off. monthly goals. "If you know someone is waiting for you." . It's when you're making excuses three.daily.that's a problem. lunch. "You don't let anything interfere with that. or dinner. Decide what works best for you. "When you've done those workouts.m. 2: Plan Your Exercise First." Set your program. Once you get past that inertia. you're happy you went. increases your confidence in accomplishing the task at hand. accomplished those goals. It's OK to eat breakfast food for snacks. such as 8 a." says Foster. on Monday." says Foster. "You'll find there's a lot of free time there. Setting the alarm 30 minutes early should not be a negative in your day. "You can eat a hardboiled egg or cereal any time. Is inertia a problem for you in the morning? "When the alarm clock sounds. What kind of exercise . Wed.. even if it's a bad or ineffective plan. It's got to be the highest priority because it's your health. a workout session at the YMCA? Figure out what will motivate you. Wednesday. Fri. they find they use their time better." Know your options. But when they start exercising in the morning. That's OK. fitness director at Duke Diet & Fitness Center at Duke University Medical Center." Don't think of it as "early". and Friday. "That's not to say once a month something comes up you can't exercise. "People tell me it takes them two hours to get ready for work. Your doctor may suggest that you ask a fitness trainer to develop a workout plan that best suits your needs.or physical activity . Once you go. One guy told me he got to work 20 minutes earlier on days he exercised. five days in a row -." Reward yourself. four." says Gerald Endress. weekly. Just the fact that you've thought it through means it will have some effect. "Planning helps you overcome the unpredictability of daily life. counting on you. you'll go. you know to keep things moving." Remind yourself. A workout buddy can provide motivation." says Bryant.like "get off the bus four stops early . it's easy to hit the snooze button. "Quit thinking of it as getting up early. pat yourself on the back. "Having any plan. talk to your doctor . It's not that they're prettying themselves up they're basically just wasting time. "Establish a goal for your workouts ." Stokes advises Goal No." He suggests going out and buying a favorite DVD or CD. Analyze your morning schedule." Bryant advises. That's how you should think of it. says Foster.. Put yellow sticky notes on the fridge or the computer .especially if you are overweight or are at high risk for heart disease. It's a mindset issue. advises Thompson. not just breakfast. or even getting yourself that iPod you wanted! "Rewards help keep you motivated. ACSM.

3. vitamin C and vitamin A. can enhance weight loss while strengthening bones and keeping you feeling full and satisfied. Recipe idea: Oven-dry grape tomatoes by slicing in half and placing cut side up on a cookie sheet. Instead. strawberries. Keep canned petite diced tomatoes on hand for a low-calorie and nutritious addition to salads. Eat them by the handful or work more of them into your diet. low-calories foods each day to help you slim down this summer. Substitute low-fat frozen yogurt for premium ice cream for added nutrition and fewer calories. If you want to lose weight this summer once and for all. and ice. when part of a reduced-calorie diet. plain low-fat yogurt. raspberries. Get your day started with a healthy dose of fiber and antioxidants. Toss ovendried tomatoes into pasta. Berries Blueberries. Whip up a quick batch of smoothies for a nourishing family breakfast or snack using any fresh or frozen fruit. store at room temperature and enjoy within a few days. 3. 2. Instead. 1. low-calorie parfait made by layering fresh fruit. low-fat vanilla yogurt. soups. forget about diets. salads or enjoy as an appetizer with goat cheese. Mix fresh berries into a spinach or mixed green salad for a refreshing and filling first course. well-shaped tomatoes that are fragrant and intensely colored. blackberries -. try these nutritionally rich. sliced scallions. black raspberries. Sprinkle with salt and drizzle lightly with olive oil. sliced strawberries. grilled chicken strips. and salad greens with a light raspberry vinaigrette for a healthy summer supper. and granola for a quick meal. And don't forget to drink plenty of water! Tomatoes and Peppers . casseroles or dips. snack or dessert. Recipe idea: Dazzle your friends and family with a beautiful. Read the label and find healthy. And don't forget to drink plenty of water! Tomatoes and Peppers Colorful fruits and vegetables of the vine get their wide range of vivid colors from healthprotecting substances such as lycopene. 2. try these nutritionally rich. They are also an excellent source of fiber and very low in calories.Tips on Diet Foods for Summer If you want to lose weight this summer once and for all. 3. Enjoy whole-grain cereal. 2. low-calorie portable yogurt smoothies for meals on the go. Recipe idea: Toss toasted slivered almonds. forget about diets. low-calories foods each day to help you slim down this summer.these delicious colorful berries contain a powerhouse of antioxidants that help prevent cellular damage. Research suggests that dairy food. 1. They may also help you lose weight. 100% fruit juice. Use them generously in dishes to enhance nutrients with very few calories. Yogurt Yogurt and other low-fat dairy products are powerhouses of calcium and protein. pancakes. 1. pastas. Bake at 250 F for two hours. Roasted peppers do wonders for any dish or alone as a side dish. Choose firm. Skip the decadent dessert and satisfy your sweet tooth with a bowl of fresh mixed berries. Roast them yourself or buy them already roasted in a jar for added color and nourishment. or waffles topped with fresh or frozen blueberries.

Bake at 250 F for two hours. Mix fresh berries into a spinach or mixed green salad for a refreshing and filling first course. pastas. They may also help you lose weight. Yogurt Yogurt and other low-fat dairy products are powerhouses of calcium and protein. low-fat vanilla yogurt. sliced strawberries. casseroles or dips. Berries Blueberries.Colorful fruits and vegetables of the vine get their wide range of vivid colors from healthprotecting substances such as lycopene. black raspberries. Recipe idea: Oven-dry grape tomatoes by slicing in half and placing cut side up on a cookie sheet. 2. and ice. 3. Whip up a quick batch of smoothies for a nourishing family breakfast or snack using any fresh or frozen fruit. 1. Toss ovendried tomatoes into pasta.these delicious colorful berries contain a powerhouse of antioxidants that help prevent cellular damage. 1. Use them generously in dishes to enhance nutrients with very few calories. low-calorie portable yogurt smoothies for meals on the go. sliced scallions. 100% fruit juice. 3. Get your day started with a healthy dose of fiber and antioxidants. Keep canned petite diced tomatoes on hand for a low-calorie and nutritious addition to salads. well-shaped tomatoes that are fragrant and intensely colored. Research suggests that dairy food. vitamin C and vitamin A. and salad greens with a light raspberry vinaigrette for a healthy summer supper. snack or dessert. low-calorie parfait made by layering fresh fruit. store at room temperature and enjoy within a few days. Substitute low-fat frozen yogurt for premium ice cream for added nutrition and fewer calories. Recipe idea: Toss toasted slivered almonds. They are also an excellent source of fiber and very low in calories. Read the label and find healthy. Skip the decadent dessert and satisfy your sweet tooth with a bowl of fresh mixed berries. can enhance weight loss while strengthening bones and keeping you feeling full and satisfied. plain low-fat yogurt. 2. Roasted peppers do wonders for any dish or alone as a side dish. raspberries. Enjoy whole-grain cereal. when part of a reduced-calorie diet. Sprinkle with salt and drizzle lightly with olive oil. Recipe idea: Dazzle your friends and family with a beautiful. soups. Eat them by the handful or work more of them into your diet. 1. blackberries -. . pancakes. Roast them yourself or buy them already roasted in a jar for added color and nourishment. Choose firm. strawberries. and granola for a quick meal. 2. salads or enjoy as an appetizer with goat cheese. 3. or waffles topped with fresh or frozen blueberries. grilled chicken strips.

Ely tells WebMD. foods rich in this vitamin -.the kind that contains live. and mustard greens. Eye Damage What causes it: Age-related macular degeneration is the most common cause of vision loss and blindness in people over the age of 55. CNC. blueberries. Potassium-rich foods include bananas. vitamin B-8 (in liver and cooked eggs). What to eat: The retina is actually made up of vitamin A. Protein. you can help prevent or alleviate the following common hot-weather woes: Dry or Damaged Skin What causes it: You sweat more in the summer. Theses nutrients also play a role in maintaining healthy skin. potatoes. or make a three-bean salad or other protein-rich meal because hair consists of protein fibers called keratin. yogurt. nuts.Summertime Nutrition Tips Summertime. saltwater and chlorine have a drying effect. so skin is less supple. chard. until you notice the havoc all that fun in the sun has wrought on your body. calcium. This occurs when the central part of the retina (macula) becomes damaged. which Lona Sandon. in the form of lean meats. Fortunately. calcium (in milk and yogurt). cut back on sugary foods. Yeast Infections What causes them: Sitting around in a wet bathing suit provides a perfect environment for yeast overgrowth. Keep dryness at bay by drinking lots of water. Sodium. beans. including berries (loaded with antioxidants). And by simply choosing the right ones to add to your daily diet. . Muscle Cramps What causes them: Too many games of beach volleyball (or other outdoor exercise)." Sandon is a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. She recommends that women drink 92 ounces (8-10 cups) of water in the summer and men 125 ounces to prevent dehydration. What to eat: Help heal weathered skin with foods like raspberries. which are rich in antioxidants and vitamin C. tomatoes. and Vitamins C and E -. RD. plus. summer also brings an abundance of tasty and nutritious foods. Since calcium can also be lost through sweating. What to eat: To make conditions less hospitable for yeast to take hold in the first place. saltwater. is also key. Thus. Recipes. zinc. author of Saving Dinner: The Menus. it leads to an electrolyte imbalance that causes your muscles to cramp up.that is. What to eat: Toss some burgers or shrimp kabobs on the grill. and chlorine. advises Leanne Ely.are beneficial to the eyes. calls "the forgotten nutrient. Parched Hair What causes it: Overexposure to sun. and strawberries. sweet bell peppers (good vitamin C source). and seeds. Sunburns and bug bites are also saboteurs of healthy skin. When you don't have enough fluid in your system. Muscle cramps result from overexertion and dehydration. it's a good idea to replace it by eating low-fat dairy products like skim milk. and Shopping Lists to Bring Your Family Back to the Table. and protein-filled grilled fish and burgers. Eating foods rich in vitamin B-5 (found in yogurt and California avocadoes). raisins. and potassium are the main electrolytes lost through sweating during exercise.along with beta-carotene. Good sources are dark green vegetables like kale. be sure to eat lots of yogurt -. active cultures. folic acid (in fortified cereals and beans). and spinach. plus bell peppers. and the living is easy -. What to eat: Replenish electrolytes with a sports drink that contains them and drink water. and cottage cheese. and zinc (in meat and fish) can reduce hair loss and replace dull hair with shiny hair. Once you've got an infection.

Key points • • • People with diabetes can use a modified version of the food guide pyramid to spread carbohydrate throughout the day. iron. and folic acid. o Providing lots of variety in the foods you eat so it's easier to follow your plan. She recommends eating fortified cereals and bread or taking a B-complex vitamin Using a food guide for people with diabetes Introduction A food guide is a tool for planning a balanced diet. A food guide contains the same foods your family eats. During the second and third trimester. What to eat: The amino acid L-lysine has been shown in some small studies to help. You can successfully follow this method by: o Planning your family meals ahead of time so you can enjoy the same foods as other family members. • . Most people use the food guide pyramid to plan a balanced diet. you also need about 300 calories per day more than you did before pregnancy. This helps prevent high blood sugar after meals. Women with diabetes who are pregnant or breast-feeding need the same nutrition as pregnant or breast-feeding women who do not have diabetes. but larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. an important antioxidant that also helps prevent eye damage. and blueberries. Regular meals and snacks are important to prevent low blood sugar during pregnancy and breast-feeding. You do not have to eat special foods. A healthful diet provides the nutrients your body needs and decreases your risk for heart disease and other conditions. Talk to your registered dietitian or certified diabetes educator about changes you may need to make to your food plan. protein. Eat eggs for their high dose of lutein. Pregnant women need extra calcium. o Testing your blood sugar after meals to see what effect different foods have on your blood sugar level. Cold Sores What causes them: Sun exposure can trigger cold sores in people who are prone to them. Sandon says a deficiency in B vitamins and riboflavin can make you usceptible to cold sores.carrots.

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These areas of the face are also tender to the touch. symptoms may recur from time to time or be permanently present. although less severe. You have lost your sense of smell and taste and have bad breath .& 9 Some for information On sinus Sinusitis means inflammation of the sinuses. and some dental infections make sinusitis more likely. The sinuses are air-filled cavities in the bones of our face that improve the resonance of our voices. So does having a deviated nasal septum which may result after any trauma to the nose. or being in a smoky environment.adding some drops of eucalyptus oil helps. Symptoms When infection gets into the body the special mucous-producing cells that line the sinuses and the nose swell and produce excess mucus causing that 'blocked up' feeling. the buildup of pressure results in the throbbing pain that's felt over the cheeks and forehead. headache. Major Signs The three major signs indicating sinusitis and/or a sinus infection are: Your cold has lasted more than seven days and is accompanied by cough. Each of us has five pairs of sinuses all of which are interconnected and which also connect with the nasal passages. greenish-yellow nasal discharge and a loss of taste and smell. decongestant nose drops or sprays. Because the mucus can't escape into the nose. fever. particularly if someone coughs or bends over. or postnasal drip. Other symptoms that may accompany sinusitis are a high temperature. strong painkillers. In addition to the medical treatment described earlier an operation to drain the sinuses is sometimes recommended. and the inhalation of steam . green or gray nasal drainage. Smoking. facial pain. toothache. When this happens it's called acute sinusitis and usually needs treatment with antibiotics. After an acute infection some people develop chronic sinusitis where similar.

Lying down can make your sinuses feel more stopped-up. increased irritability and vomiting occurs with gagging on mucus and/or a prolonged cough Tips on taking care of sinusitis Get plenty of rest. so try lying on the side that lets you breathe the best. Don’t use a nose spray with a decongestant in it for more than 3 days. In children.accompanied by chronic congestion. the swelling in your sinuses may get worse when you stop the medicine. Sip hot liquids and drink plenty of fluids. Apply moist heat by holding a warm. Talk with your doctor before using an over-the-counter cold medicine. . wet towel against your face or breathing in steam through a cloth or towel. Some cold medicines can make your sinus infection worse or cause other problems. If you use it for more than 3 days.

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