You are on page 1of 56
Record Reviews Hillsong Chapel Gateway Worship Kristian Stanfill Jesus Culture Trent Live JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 Volume
Record Reviews Hillsong Chapel Gateway Worship Kristian Stanfill Jesus Culture Trent Live JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 Volume
Record Reviews Hillsong Chapel Gateway Worship Kristian Stanfill Jesus Culture Trent Live JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 Volume

Record Reviews

Hillsong Chapel Gateway Worship Kristian Stanfill Jesus Culture Trent Live

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 Volume 9, Issue 1 01 0 74470 58440 7
JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011
Volume 9, Issue 1
01
0
74470
58440
7

US $5.95 Can $6.95

Product Review

McPherson’s new 5.0 XP12 – 12 String Guitar

Songchart: I Lift My Hands • A Few Moments With… Worship Songs On Strike

PSM ® 900 Personal Monitor System. Nothing left to chance.

PSM ® 900 redefines personal monitoring from Shure. With exceptional audio quality, robust RF performance and category-leading features, PSM ® 900 is the definitive personal monitor system for demanding professional events, installations and touring.

Learn more at www.shure.com

www.shure.com

© 2011 Shure Incorporated

at www.shure.com www.shure.com © 2011 Shure Incorporated Log entries from Thursday night’s show 7:45 PM: Started

Log entries from Thursday night’s show

7:45 PM: Started setting up all my PSM 900 bodypacks using Scan & Sync.

7:45 PM: Scan identified the largest group of available signals and locked them in.

7:45 PM: Sync assigned all my bodypack channels with the touch of a button.

7:46 PM: System ready. Looks like I can actually grab a bite before the show.

channels with the touch of a button. 7:46 PM: System ready. Looks like I can actually
Elevate Your Worship Sound with the Right Selection, Helpful Advice, and the Best Value! With
Elevate Your Worship Sound with the Right
Selection, Helpful Advice, and the Best Value!
With over 30 years of experience working with churches, Sweetwater is your best
partner in worship sound. Count on our dedicated, knowledgeable staff for personal,
professional service that’s backed up with the lowest prices possible and a range
of trusted free extras, including free shipping, a free 2-year warranty,
and free tech support. We’re here to bring your church the most value.
Keyboards
Here at Sweetwater, you’ll find the right selection of digital pianos and
keyboards for the modern church—from versatile digital pianos to
unbelievable electronic organs. You can count on us for friendly service
and helpful buying advice — we’ve been an industry leader for nearly
three decades!
Mics and Wireless
Wired to wireless, Sweetwater has the right microphones and systems
for your house of worship. Whether it’s a choral, a solo, or a speech
application you’re getting ready for, Sweetwater is here with the mics
that will work best for you. Call us today for personal help in outfitting
your church with new microphones.
Guitars
With our vast selection of acoustic guitars, electric guitars, amplifiers,
effects systems, and accessories, Sweetwater has everything you
need to outfit the classic or modern guitarist! We can also help you
achieve a “silent stage” to make your worship sound even cleaner
Live Sound
Whether you need to fill an intimate youth room or a grand auditorium,
we can help you make sure the message is heard clearly! We offer
everything from easy-to-use mixers to all the speakers and processing
equipment you need for installed or on-the-go worship sound.
for for the the congregatioon. congregation.
Church Technology Resource,
Yours FREE!
Sweetwater’s Worship Sound Pro features
• the right equipment for today’s houses of worship.
• 10 down-to-earth articles to help improve your sound.
Call (800) 222–4700 to request your
FREE subscription.
to help improve your sound. Call (800) 222–4700 to request your FREE subscription. (800) 222–4700 •
to help improve your sound. Call (800) 222–4700 to request your FREE subscription. (800) 222–4700 •
to help improve your sound. Call (800) 222–4700 to request your FREE subscription. (800) 222–4700 •
to help improve your sound. Call (800) 222–4700 to request your FREE subscription. (800) 222–4700 •
BY DEVOTED MUSICLOVERS HANDMADE IN SWEDEN AT CLAVIA DMI AB CHURCH ON SUNDAY MORNINGS, CLUBS
BY DEVOTED MUSICLOVERS
HANDMADE IN SWEDEN
AT CLAVIA DMI AB
CHURCH ON
SUNDAY MORNINGS,
CLUBS ON SATURDAY NIGHTS
THIRD GENERATION dirty tonewheel leakage model that hisses and spits in idle mode. ENHANCED CLICK
THIRD
GENERATION
dirty tonewheel
leakage model
that hisses and
spits in idle
mode.
ENHANCED
CLICK modeled
to maximize the
authenticity of
the tonewheel
organ sound.
DRAWBAR
PREVIEW –
dial in a new
sound while still
playing without
any changes
being heard.
The Nord C2 Combo Organ combines beautiful baroque pipes, classic vintage transistor keys and our
The Nord C2 Combo Organ combines beautiful baroque pipes,
classic vintage transistor keys and our third generation tonewheel
organ. This offers any serious musician a wide selection of sounds,
effects and sparkling speaker simulations as well as amazing virtual
rotary cabinets that makes the Nord C2 Combo Organ the best
portable organ on the market.
Nord C2 Combo Organ the best portable organ on the market. www.nordkeyboards.com For more information: info
the best portable organ on the market. www.nordkeyboards.com For more information: info @ AmericanMusicAndSound.com
Come See us E at NAMM Hall #1517
Come
See
us E at
NAMM
Hall
#1517

Editor’s Corner

Practically There…

Editor’s Corner Practically There… Features 8 Product Review By Bruce Adolph McPherson’s new 5.0 XP12 –

Features

8

Product Review By Bruce Adolph McPherson’s new 5.0 XP12 – 12 String Guitar

10

From the Drummer’s Perspective By Carl Albrecht Simple is Good

12

Keyboard By Ed Kerr Playing With Color

15

Bass By Gary Lunn Tech Tips

16

Vocals By Sheri Gould Auditions: A Good Thing for Your Team?

18

Product Review By Doug Doppler Line 6 POD HD500

30

Record Reviews By Heidi Todd Gateway Worship Hillsong Chapel Jesus Culture Kristian Stanfill Trent Live

34

FOH Engineer By John Mills The High Pass Filter, Your Best Friend

36

Ministry + Artistry = Profitability? Creating your MAP™ By Scott A. Shuford The Four P’s

38

Authentic Worship By Michael Gonzales The Last Worship Leader

40

Guitar Grab Bag By Doug Doppler Mistakes i’ve Made… And The Things i’ve Learned

42

The Band By Tom Lane Dial it Down

44

Camera By Craig Kelly So You volunteered as a Camera Operator At Church – Uh Oh, Now What? Part 4

46

Tips for Tight Teams By Sandy Hoffman Skills to Fill the Bill (identify, Develop & Deploy)

48

Mandolin By Martin Stillion How chords are related

50

Product Review By Bruce Adolph Kurzweil SP4-7 Keyboard

52

Lighter Side By Manuel Luz Do the Math

52

Lighting By Greg Sisley Chauvet 300E Spot and 300E Beam

54

A Few Moments With… By Tom Kraeuter Worship Songs On Strike

I have always been a fan of 12 string guitars. There is nothing like a finely tuned strum on a 12 string. I love the full sound. I bought my first 12 string in Hong Kong when I was just 15 years old. In the last three years I have bought and sold three different 12 string guitars… like I said, I am a fan.

Now maybe you can understand why I was so ex- cited when McPherson agreed to send me one of their new 12 string instruments for review. If you are a long time reader you might remember that I have reviewed McPherson 6 strings before and how I really like their concept of a cantilevered neck joint (the fretboard does not rest on the top of the guitar – this allows the top to vibrate freely) and their unique off set sound hole. The sound hole on this 12 string is even larger than the ones found on the 6 string models.

The high quality tone woods and impeccable crafts- manship have always impressed me and I’m not the only one who likes the sound and build concepts of McPherson, as they have several well known artists in mainstream and Christian circles touring with them… one of them being our good friend and well loved worship leader Paul Baloche. In the interest of full dis- closure, after Paul kept showing up at our Christian Musician Summit conferences so happy with the sound of his McPherson, we at CMS approached Larry Klenc at McPherson and followed the procedures to become a dealer for their instruments. We believe we reach a vertical niche market of guitar players in the modern worship community and could make the relationship a mutually ben- eficial one – which it has been. If you come to one of our conferences you can play a McPherson in person.

Now back to the 12 string… this is a new thing for McPherson. I opened up the case with great anticipation. I was met with a “wow moment”. A beautiful solid Redwood top and the elongated headstock with 12 tuners on it lets’ you know you are in for a treat. Lifting up the guitar I could see the solid Granadillo back and sides (Granadillo is a Mexican Rosewood. It pos- sesses similar tonal quali- ties of an Indian Rosewood with a different look) and the dramatic flamed Koa bind- ing all around the body and neck. The whole guitar is just beautiful! This brand new guitar even smelled great. The fretboard is Ebony along with the bridge and head- cap. This guitar has a Sitka/Rosewood/Sitka brace kit in it. The neck is made from a single piece of African Mahogany. The neck width on the 12 string is 1 7/8 @ nut, 2 5/16 @ bridge, 25.5 scale length. The 5.0 in the

Carl Albrecht has been a professional drummer & per- cussionist for over 25 years. He

Carl Albrecht has been a professional drummer & per- cussionist for over 25 years. He has played on over 70 Integrity Music projects; Maranatha Praise Band recordings & numerous other Christian, Pop, Country, Jazz & commercial projects. He currently lives in Nashville doing recording ses- sions, producing, writing and continuing to do various tours & seminar events. Visit his website: www.carlalbrecht.com or send an e-mail to: lmalbrecht@aol.com.

These chords can, of course, be played lit- erally. The notes used would be

If you were to play only these notes, there’s

B

A

G

D

for sure. But, the musical character of your pre- sentation would be significantly less rich than what you’ll hear if you

listen

entrance. The congregation could sing along

what pitch to sing when they make their first

no question that your vocalists would know

B D

F#

A C# E

G B

D

D F# A

to the Hillsong recording from the “This Is Our God” CD. Let’s

look at how you can go beyond the chart to enrich the character of the chords. To keep this short enough to be practical for the space I have,

I’ll give fairly brief explanations of the concepts involved.

The chords in any key can be numbered 1 through 7 based on which note of the scale serves as the root of the chord. That said, the

1, 4 and 5 chords in any major key are major chords. To give these chords color, you could choose to play them as 2 chords. This is distinct from the chord built on second note of the scale. Hang in there while I explain. The 1 chord in the key of D is spelled D F# A. To make this a

D2 chord you’d play D E A, leaving out the 3

of the chord and play-

ing the second instead. This table will clarify this for you:

rd

Chord

Notes Contained

2 Chord

Notes of 2 Chord

1. D

D F# A

D2

D E A

4. G

G B

D

G2

G A D

5. A

A C# E

A2

A B E

G B D G2 G A D 5. A A C# E A2 A B E
BASS such as a string tree (a string tree is a bar that goes across

BASS

such as a string tree (a string tree is a bar that goes across the strings just above the nut and is attached to the head-stock. It makes the strings cross the nut at a steep-

er angle, thus creating higher tension.).

Typically, the way I adjust the height is by adjusting the saddle screws a half turn at a time – one side, then the other. I

also look closely to see if the strings are evenly “arched” over the fret board, just

at

is

next string, it should have a very even looking arch. The most important thing is how it feels, so every time you do an ad- justment, tune it up and play it. You will eventually figure out what you like.

the bottom of the neck. If one string

the same height from the frets as the

By Gary Lunn

Tech Tips

Pick-up Height After you get the string height to your liking, you have to make sure that the pick-ups are at the proper distance from

the strings. First, look at the distance from one pick-up to each string. If you have “soap-bar” style or “blade” style pick-ups, there will be one or two screws at both ends of the pick-up. If one side looks too close to the strings, you can lower it by tightening the screw on the close end. If there are two screws, adjust them both evenly so that the pickup surface remains parallel to the strings. If you have two pick-ups, then simply repeat the same procedure on the other pick-up. If you have a “split” pick-up, (as on a Fender Precision, you will do those same adjust- ments for each half of the pick-up. Typi- cally with a split pick-up the end result will look like the pick-up is in the shape

of

a very slightly slanted rooftop with the

peak in the middle. Depending on the make or model of the pick-up, that kind of “shape” may not be necessary because the magnets inside could be arched to compensate for the curvature of the neck. Again, the most important thing is the way it feels and sounds, so play often while adjusting.

Intonation If you are a beginning to notice that whenever you play notes high up the neck and they are out of tune, then your intonation is off. That simply means that the length of the string does not quite match the spacing of the frets. To cor- rect this problem you will need a tuner,

a screwdriver (probably a cross point),

and your fingers. Start in the G string, playing the open string and tuning it with your tuner. When it is in tune, play the harmonic at the 12th fret. You will notice that it is in tune according to your tuner. Then gently press down on the 12th fret and play the fretted “G” note. Look on your tuner to see whether it is sharp or flat. If it’s in tune then you’re ok; no adjust- ment needed. If the tuning of the fretted note is flat, that means that the string is too long. To fix this take your screwdriver

By Sheri Gould

Auditions:

A Good Thing for Your Team?

One of the things I suggest to worship leaders and pastors, when I teach on how to “Take your Worship Team to the Next Level”, is to audition their teams ev- ery year. There are many benefits to this and I’d like to articulate some of them.

Inclusion Believe it or not, there may very well be people in your church that have the talent, ability and desire to serve on your wor- ship teams—that you don’t know about. Many people think that just because these people haven’t made themselves known, they don’t exist.

It has been my experience that people don’t always feel “welcome” or feel that there is an open invitation to join the church worship team. Many times our teams can seem like exclusive clubs that one must be invited into-which in a sense they are. But our worship teams can even have a “cliquey” feel or look to them. This is not something we want to project, al- though many times we end up doing so. By having regular times that we open up the doors to give others an opportunity to be involved, we can do a lot toward changing that perception. Most pastors and worship leaders are very interested in getting people involved in and com- mitted to ministry so if handled correctly, your pastor(s) will likely be supportive of the auditions once he realizes the poten- tial for ministry growth and involvement.

So my number one reason for hav- ing regular yearly auditions is because it opens up the possibility to get more and different people involved in serving where they’re gifted.

Finding “Talent” Another reason I’m in favor of audi- tions is that they can really help us to take things up a notch. Including more people, or at least allowing them the opportunity to participate, is only one part of the ben- efit of regular auditions. We may also find some really great hidden talent! We need to find and draw those people who are gifted in the area of music. I know we need our worship team members to have the right heart and motives as well. Be- cause of this, I get this question frequently:

“What’s more important, talent or heart?” To which I say, “Yes.” You know how it says in James that faith without works is dead? Well, the right heart without talent is…well…”dead” in a sense, at least for purposes of leading worship.

We need more than someone with just the “right heart”. If we’re planning to put them in front of a microphone, they need to have a level of talent as well. Let me ex- plain. My neighbor may be the sweetest guy in the world. He may really WANT to help me fix my car. He may have all the right intentions, but without some knowl- edge of how to actually fix my car, he may end up doing more damage than good. Conversely, I can go down to the local garage where the guy is really tal- ented when it comes to mechanics but he has a terrible attitude and charges me too much! The ideal situation is to find the right mix of knowledge and heart.

I have heard from far too many wor- ship leaders that they have someone on their team that has the right heart but sings completely out of tune. What are they to do? First of all, there’s a very good chance that this “someone” never had to actually audition for the team. An audi- tion would have cut this problem off at the pass—long before it ever became a problem. This could have, SHOULD have been a NON issue. Now it has to be dealt with delicately. I will offer some solu- tions to this, and other issues like it, in my column next time (so stay tuned). For now, let’s just say that eliminating these types of problems can be one of the upsides to auditioning team members. All team members should have the same standards applied and those standards should en- compass all relevant issues. Spiritual is- sues of the heart need to be addressed as well as musical proficiency.

If we have standardized requirements for our teams, then it’s much more likely that the overall quality of our leading, vo- cals, musicality, etc will go up. If there is more control over what goes into (or onto) our worship teams, there will be more control over what comes out of our worship teams on a Sunday morning.

Stepping It Up My last reason for suggesting auditions for your team is so that each and every member of the team will be continually reminded that it is a privilege to serve on the team-not a right. There are far too many people on worship teams all over the country who believe that they deserve their position on the team for any num- ber of reasons, not necessarily because they are qualified. What would happen to their mindset if they thought they could lose their position; if they didn’t step it up

with regard to their commitment to the team and their craft?

Now please hear me out. I’m not de- void of a heart or ignorant of the fact that we are about ministry, neither am I about getting the best “performance” out of our people. But I am dismayed at how flip- pantly people view their service toward the Lord in this capacity. I know the wor- ship leaders out there reading this are acutely aware of the disparity between the commitment they personally have and the commitment they wish their fellow team members all had. If people had a more realistic view of what their service really means to God and to their fellow worshipers, they might take what they do on a Sunday morning platform more seri- ously.

Consider for a minute, what the mind- set was like when your team members first had the opportunity to sing on the team. They were likely excited, perhaps a little bit nervous, but so happy to be a part of the ministry! Contrast that with how they approach that same opportunity today. It’s human nature to move toward com- placency as things become more regular. Having to stay on top of their craft and re- new their commitment each year can help alleviate some of that natural tendency and keep their outlook fresh. Think about it like this: how would you feel if you had to interview again for your present job? You might get a little more serious about how you perform your job. At a minimum you might bone-up on your skills so that if questioned or re-interviewed you could at least look like you’re the best one for the job.

I’m thinking there’s no real downside to making everyone aware that each year the team members will all be re-evaluated. They may very well be qualified to serve again, but the chance is also there that they might not. My goal is not to scare or discourage them but to energize and encourage them to continually reach for greater goals as a singer, worship leader and team member.

Next time I’ll talk about how to make your auditions effective and how to turn no one away! We want this to be a posi- tive experience for everyone involved!!

Edit software. The latter of which allows you to archive old set lists for future use.

What’s It Improved With HD500 With some new competition on the scene from some other formidable com- petitors, the engineers at Line 6 really wanted to deliver stellar sounding amp and effects models that feel great when you play them live. Knowing that speaker

modeling can only go so far, the L6 LINK

is perhaps the real story here. Line 6’s new Bogner designed DT50 amplifiers

interact with the HD500 in ways that tra- ditional modeling just can’t keep up with. If you switch to an AC-30 model on the HD500, the DT50 will switch into Class

A mode. If you select a Fender model, it

knows to switch to class A/B. When pair- ing the HD500 with the DT50 it’s gener- ally best to just use the pre-amp section of your pre-sets. And again, this is where the ability to create multiple set lists becomes really useful.

Conclusion

As a stand alone unit and especially

in combination with the DT50, the POD

HD500 is a real winner.

List Price

HD500 $699.00

Doug Doppler is signed to Steve Vai’s Favored Na- tions label and is currently in

Doug Doppler is signed to Steve Vai’s Favored Na- tions label and is currently in production on the Get Killer Tone DVD series. He and

signed to Steve Vai’s Favored Na- tions label and is currently in production on the Get
signed to Steve Vai’s Favored Na- tions label and is currently in production on the Get

his wife Melissa live to serve the Kingdom and are members of Cornerstone Fellow- ship in the San Francisco Bay Area.

for

at the Chapel at Crosspoint Buffalo, NY Paul Baloche Gungor * Kari Jobe John Mark
at the Chapel at Crosspoint
Buffalo, NY
Paul Baloche
Gungor * Kari Jobe
John Mark McMillan
Norm Stockton Group
Audrey Assad
with
more being added!
SEPTEMBER 16 & 17, 2011 at Cornerstone Fellowship, Livermore, CA our Northern California event now
SEPTEMBER 16 & 17, 2011
at Cornerstone Fellowship, Livermore, CA
our Northern
California event
now in Livermore
)
(less than an hour from
San Francisco,
Oakland & San Jose
OCTOBER 14 & 15, 2011
at Scottsdale Bible Church, Scottsdale, AZ
our
3rd year
in the
beautiful oasis of the
Phoenix metropolis
NOVEMBER 11 & 12, 2011
at Overlake Christian Church, Redmond, WA
the flagship event
this
will be our
our
9th year
Praise God!
MARCH 26, 2011
at Our Savior Lutheran Church, Tacoma, WA
brand new 1 day events
smaller,
MAY 21, 2011
same great vibe
streamlined
&
at Calvary Community Church, Westlake Village, CA
training
for your team

in

WiTH

He may have taught himself guitar by playing along to Willie Nelson songs, but now this songwriter’s copious music fills churches all over the world. From the beginning, Chris Tomlin’s M.O. has remained the same; to ignite passion for the name of God. He continues that mission with his latest effort, “And If Our God Is For Us…” Here’s what Chris had to say about his new album and his life in general.

20 20

JAN/FEB 2011 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM

photos: Lee Steffen

Aimee Herd: Chris, your new project is your 7 th studio album “And If Our God is For Us…” That’s kind of a loaded question for a title. How did you arrive at that?

Chris Tomlin: Yeah, I love that. First of all, it’s the bridge to “Our God,” which has become such a special song. Every time we play that song and get to the end of that chorus, it just lights the place up, it just comes alive. People have their hands up, as

in a statement of faith. I had different titles for the album, but I kept coming back to this for the title. This is what

I want to say, and this is what the music’s about anyway.

CT: Yes, the recording location was at our new studio called, “White Cabin Studio,” which is adjacent to my house, on our property. We kind of remodeled and had everybody help out. It’s just so beautiful and relaxing. I’ve always recorded my albums in Nashville, and Ed Cash produced most of my recordings. He was a part of this recording, along with producer Dan Mukala. They came here and set up shop, and we recorded it here—in the backyard [studio].

AH: And this was the first time you’ve

worked with Dan, right?

thing we’ve ever done. I’m blown away by that!

AH: That sounds really good, but I’m glad that it’s “still you,” because your sound is what so many have come to love over the years.

CT: Right

total departure and do something completely different, because that’s not what it’s about at all. Hopefully, to some, this is just a nice surprise.

didn’t want to make a

I

AH: What are some of the techniques that Dan helped to incorporate in mixing things up?

The thing about it is, it’s not a clever lyric that I wrote, but it’s the Word of God. Scripture says, “If God is for us, who can be against us?” It’s so powerful to know that. When people see that title, “And If God is for ”

CT: Yes, I met Dan just before [recording] the album, and I was looking for something a little different. To think that we could make that many albums and people would still be interested is pretty cool. But, I wanted to keep taking steps forward,

CT: Like the drum programming together with live drums—Ed did that as well—and some interesting string parts that are way more “in your face” vs. lush beautiful strings. Especially for “Our God,” and also on “I Will Follow.” But, that beat was

us

I want them to think, “There’s

so I thought it would be good to mix it

so huge—the programmed on top of

something else coming.” And that

up a little bit, and someone else’s ear

live drums—it’s got so much energy

faith would rise up in them and give

in here—someone else’s fingers in

and it’s so big.

people

And

people would

here and their ideas. Through some

believe that no matter what comes at them, “If God is for me, what can be against me? Nothing can stand

relationships, I met Dan and he was a perfect fit. I really enjoyed working with him; he’s done a phenomenal

AH: Now, you’ve co-written a couple of songs on this album with some new people. How did that go?

against me if God is for me. Yes, things might bring me down, things

job on the album.

CT: Yeah, I wrote with Jason Ingram;

may come at me and arrows may be

AH: So, sonically, what sets it apart

I

had met him just before. People

shot at me from life, but God is for me.” That’s something to build our hope on, and that’s a God worthy of worship.

from previous recordings? And, is that difficult to do after doing so many projects—to get that different sound or slightly different direction in a new one?

told me, “You’ve got to meet this guy, he’s the best. You guys will hit it off.” I had heard his reputation,

and knew he wrote great songs. We wrote together for a little bit, and it

I

thought, well it’s a long title for an

was some of the best writing days of

album, but I really like what it causes in people.

AH: I like it too, because I think we all need to be reminded of that from time to time, and especially now; I feel that

CT: You know, it’s still me. I mean, you can only do so much. It’s the way you filter music; it’s the way music comes out of you—so it’s not that much different, but it sounds a little different. There’s a bit more energy in it, and a

my life. I had that moment where you feel like God is just writing through you. It was like that with Jason; songs just kept coming. [Jason] had so many great ideas and so many thoughts; we were just worshipping

people really need that kind of hope.

bit more beat. It’s got drums that are

God together

God really put that

programmed along with live drums.

together in a special way.

CT:

Exactly,

and

that’s

the

heart

My music in the past has been a

behind it.

little more organic, but with this, we brought in a lot of different elements.

The song, “I Will Follow,” is a song Jason and Reuben Morgan had

AH:

Now,

your

actual

recording

That was a good step; I feel like it’s

started writing together, and then

location was

different

for

this

the best thing we’ve done so far. I’ve

“Awakening” is a song Reuben and

album

had so many people, through Twitter

I

wrote together. (Reuben’s one of

and otherwise, say this is the best

the most prolific songwriters for the

WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011

JAN/FEB 2011 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM

21

21

22 22

A Sit Down With Chris Tomlin:

continued

22 22 A Sit Down With Chris Tomlin: continued Church today) So, Jason brought [I Will

Church today) So, Jason brought [I Will Follow] and said, “There’s this song that I wrote with Reuben, and

I know it’s not really your cup of tea, but I’ll play it for ya.” He played it and it was amazing, I was like, “Oh my gosh, what do you mean, man, I love it! Let’s finish writing this song.” They were just some great days of writing with a great team. This album is filled with an amazing team: Jason, Reuben, Louie [Giglio], Matt Redman, Christy Nockels, Matt Maher, Jesse, Daniel and my band— whom I’ve always written with—Ed

I mean, when you those kind

Cash

of people writing the songs, it’s just going to be something special.

AH: Wow, absolutely! So, how does that writing, co-writing process go? Do you normally bring an idea for a song that’s already been slightly mapped out? Or do you start from scratch with whoever’s helping you write?

CT: The writing process looks like this:

sometimes I have an idea, sometimes, I’m just finishing an idea. We’ve been getting together as a team to write for Passion and to write for our church. We’ll get together—6, 7 or 8 people—at my house or in the studio, and we’ll divide up in 3’s and talk about what God’s been putting on our hearts. We’ll talk about what we want to say, and what kind of songs need to be written. Then we’ll come back and play our songs for each other—it’s just a big collaborative effort. So, we’ll have those times once every couple of months, where it’s always incredible. And, other times I’ll have a song that I’ve written on my own.

AH: You mentioned all those people— Louie Giglio, Matt Redman, Nathan and Christy Nockels—I know that you

guys are all a part of the Passion City

Church

how is that going?

CT: It’s been over two years now, and it’s amazing. It’s in Atlanta, Georgia— I moved here to Atlanta to help plant the church. It’s a great season, with strong people who are forming our community. It takes a while for people to make that decision on whether this is where they want to be. It’s been one of those stages where we’re seeing who is really with us, and who is coming—just spectating and checking it out. That’s where we still are.

AH: So, do you all hang out together too—apart from recording and church? Barbeques, etc

CT:

friendship.

Yeah

we

do,

it’s

a

great

AH: You’re such a prolific songwriter, how about some songwriting advice do you ever run into writer’s block, and if so, how do you get past it?

CT: [Songwriting] comes in waves for me; there are days where I don’t really have anything, and there are other times when I do. It’s just an ongoing

JAN/FEB 2011 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM

process of ideas and thoughts. I do

best with writing with other people vs. writing by myself. When I’m in a room with people you just run with them, throw out ideas and say, “What

That’s

about this, what about this

the thing about songwriting, you’ve just got to go for it and say, “This may be really dumb and bad, but here’s ”

my thought

You’ve got to dare for

it not to be any good. So, when I’m writing with people, it’s energizing for me, and I love it.

?”

AH: Are there a couple songs in particular on the new album that really stand out to you, in how they came to be written, and how they turned out?

CT: “Our God,” is such a standout song, and the way it was produced

is so beautiful. It was originally on the Passion album “Awakening” and to put it on this [new] album and

open up with it

do you re-record this song? Do you do it exactly the same, or if you do it differently, it’s got to be something special. So, when Ed came with the idea of the strings carrying the song, it was a little scary like, “I hope we don’t ruin the song.” But it [came out] so awesome; the way it was done took it to even a stronger place if that was possible. So, that was really cool.

[we thought] how

And then the song, “I Lift My Hands,” is really special. It’s a powerful song that started with Louie, he gave me the opening lines, he said: “I’ve been singing in the night, I’ve been crying out to God amid struggles in my own life. These are times when I find myself in bed just singing these words to God. ‘Be still, there’s a Healer, His love is deeper than the sea. His mercy

is unfailing, His arms a fortress for the weak. My Savior, I lift my hands to ’”

believe again

[Louie] told me, “I

really don’t have a melody, but here are these words.” I said, “Man, these words are strong!” You’d expect a worship leader to have a song titled, “I Lift My Hands,” (laughs) but this is

A Sit Down With Chris Tomlin:

continued

A Sit Down With Chris Tomlin: continued 24 24 written a different way. This isn’t lifting

24 24

written a different way. This isn’t lifting our hands in a victory celebration; it’s lifting our hands in the midst of a struggle. Psalm 28 says, “Hear my cry for help, I cry to You for mercy, and I ”

lift my hands to the Most High

and

that’s that thought of crying out to the Lord and lifting my hands to Him. I

think everybody, at some point, can relate to that.

And, “All To Us,” is one of my favorites too. It’s the biggest song we’ve sung in our church, probably this year. I hope it finds its way to worship leaders, and they like it too. I was asking people on my Twitter which ones were their favorite songs [on the new album], and—it’s funny but—those three I mentioned, “Lift My Hands,” “All To Us,” and “Our God,” were the ones I received the most comments on. “All To Us,” is not really a radio song, but it’s just so powerful in what it says; “Let the glory of Your name be the passion ”

whole album together. That’s what I

want to say in all of my music.

that really holds the

of the Church

AH: Sometimes it’s the songs that aren’t necessarily “radio-friendly” that are the most powerful on an album.

CT: Oh yeah. But, beyond that, people who only listen to the radio will never hear that song, so for people to say that they like it; I know they’ve bought the album. (Laughs)

AH: I’ve heard Louie Giglio teach before, and there must be such a wealth of songwriting material you can derive from his teaching.

CT: Absolutely, that’s been the story of my life for the last decade.

AH: Chris, your songs are being sung in so many churches all around the world now. Can you share a couple tips for worship leaders who may be just starting to write their own songs for their congregation?

CT: It’s important to be really open

I rewrite a lot, I’ll

have a song and think, it can be better than it is. It’s coming back

with your songs

JAN/FEB 2011 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM

and rewriting a verse or rewriting

the song until you feel like it’s really right. Most songs are a process. Letting other people speak into it is

a foundational thing for me, and

being open to hear people’s thoughts

[on it]. You can’t hold it too tightly

to yourself. I heard a songwriter say

this once, and it’s always meant a lot

to me, he said great photographers

can look at the same mountains and take a picture a different way, and show a different angle. Songwriting is the same. We’re all writing about the same glorious God, and using the same Scripture, but good songwriters can say it in a different light, with a different thought. And, finally, just keep writing. You don’t wake up one day and are suddenly a songwriter. You keep doing it, and doing it. You’re going to write way more bad songs than good songs—just know that and have peace with it! (Laughs)

AH: To get a little technical, what is the gear that you prefer most to use?

CT: I use Collings Guitars; that’s what I’ve played the last several years. We use Roland and Yamaha pianos; both are really great. And, we use Shure monitors and mics. For all of our in- ear monitors and our microphones, Shure seems to work the best for us.

AH: I know you just finished up this album, but do you have any specific plans for the future besides touring?

CT: Well, I just got married, so it’s a new season of life!

To learn more about Chris Tomlin and

his new project; “And If God Is For

and for videos and worship

Us

resources, log onto:

www.christomlin.com

lead sheets / guitar chord charts / audio
lead sheets / guitar chord charts / audio
great songs / great songwriters
great songs / great songwriters
free promotions / easy / quick
free promotions / easy / quick

I Lift My Hands

CHRIS TOMLIN, LOUIE GIGLIO, and MATT MAHER

KEY OF

[Bb]

G

C% Em7

D

C/E Em G/B

C Am7 C2 Dm7 F/A

[Bb] G C% Em7 D C/E Em G/B C Am7 C2 Dm7 F/A Capo 3rd fret

Capo 3rd fret (G)

G

C%

Em7

D

VERSE 1:

 
 

G

C/E

Be still;

there is a heal

-

er.

(repeat)

VERSE 2 cont.

Let faith arise,

Let faith arise.

Am7

C

Em7 D

 

Em

D

His love

is deeper than the sea,

 

G/B

C

His mer

-

cy is unfail

-

ing,

(repeat CHORUS 2x)

Em

D

His arms,

a fortress for the weak.

Am7

C

BRIDGE:

G

Let faith arise,

Let faith arise.

CHORUS:

G

 

Let faith arise,

let faith arise.

Em7 D

Em7

C2

Open my eyes,

open my eyes.

G/B

Let faith arise,

let faith arise.

F/A

C2

Open my eyes,

open my eyes.

I lift my hands

to believe again.

 

Em7

C2

You are my ref

-

uge, You are my strength.

(repeat CHORUS 2x)

G/B

As I pour out my heart,

these things I remember:

You are faith

G C%

VERSE 2:

G

Dm7

C2

G

C%

Em7

D

-

ful, God, forev

-

er.

Em7

D

G

C%

 

Let faith arise,

 
 

Em7

D

 

Let faith arise.

 

C/E

G

Be still;

there is a riv

-

er

Em

D

That flows

from Calvary’s tree.

A foun

G/B

-

C

tain for the thirst - y,

Em

D

Your grace

that washes over me.

© 2010 WORSHIPTOGETHER.COM SONGS (ASCAP), sixsteps Music (ASCAP), VAMOS PUBLISHING (ASCAP), SPIRITANDSONG.COM PUBLISHING (BMI) and THANKYOU MUSIC (PRS) WORSHIPTOGETHER.COM SONGS, sixsteps Music, VAMOS PUBLISHING and SPIRITANDSONG.COM PUBLISHING

Admin. at EMICMGPUBLISHING.COM THANKYOU MUSIC Admin. Worldwide at EMICMGPUBLISHING.COM excluding Europe which is Admin. at kingswaysongs.com

All Rights Reserved

Used by Permission

Hillsong Chapel

Yahweh

TRACKS (personal picks bolded)

1 Hosanna

2 You’ll Come

3 Run

4 The Time Has Come

5 Saviour King

6 Yahweh

7 Came To My Rescue

8 Stronger

9 This Is Our God

10 You Hold Me Now

11 From The Inside Out

12 Mighty To Save

13 Salvation Is Here

From The Inside Out 12 Mighty To Save 13 Salvation Is Here Another great release that

Another great release that hits a mark easily missed

previous big pro-

duction Hillsong re-

leases. This cd puts lyrics center stage,

which is great since although they’ve historically been well done, could be overshadowed by their musicianship and arrangements. This cd gives the vocalists an oppor- tunity to be a bit more expressive and approachable to the average singer.

One of the best realities of this re- lease is that it’s stripped down to an

instrument lineup more typically found in the average church. It doesn’t mean that the arrangements have been dumbed down though, which is

a smart move. It allows for the instru-

ments other than electric guitar to have

a more colorful voice and explore their

use a bit more. For instance, yes there are acoustic guitar parts that are pri- marily rhythmic, but are also pushed forward with more variety in tone and style.

If you have an opportunity to look at shots from the recording, you’ll see an inspiringly lit chapel with a small gath- ering of worshipers; a scene not often associated with Hillsong. But what a welcome expression. This can’t be

called “unplugged” because it isn’t, but it’s a collection of previously re- leased songs that have been allowed more breathing room without massive

musical swells and epic waves of ap-

plause. Just people doing what they

do

in church. LOVE IT.

Gateway Worship

God Be Praised

TRACKS (personal picks bolded)

1 God Is With Us Now

2 Praise Him

3 Victory

4 Stay Amazed

5 O For A Thousand (Hallelujah)

6 O The Blood

7 One Single Drop

8 By The Grace Of God

9 Praise Is The Offering

10 How To Worship A King

11 Glorify You Now

12 I Hear The Lord Passing By

13 Faithful God

14 You Are For Me

15 God Be Praised

By 13 Faithful God 14 You Are For Me 15 God Be Praised A release way

A

release

way

these

with

ous

highly kinetic

Gate-

-

are people

boundless

energy. Like previ-

releases, you

can leaning in on the fast and mid-tempo songs. Thankfully only four songs in

team

by

Worship

feel the

they give the listener (or congregation

as the case may be) a chance to catch their breath on “Stay Amazed”.

While they’re usually most at home

in a youth worship setting, they’ve also incorporated highly unexpected song styles. And not the barely-recogniz- able variety; they are clearly hymns even though they don’t sound stale.

O The Blood, directly following “O

For A Thousand” leave you scratching your head and wondering how a song that is delivered so straight from the heart could be an established hymn? The answer it isn’t - it was writ-

be an established hymn? The answer it isn’t - it was writ-   Overall impression Average
 

Overall impression

Average person could learn/participate on the first hear

 

Can be learned/adapted by a band of average skill

 

Lyrical creativity and integrity

 

Hillsong Chapel Yahweh

Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh
Hillsong Chapel Yahweh

Gateway Worship God Be Praised

Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised
Gateway Worship God Be Praised

Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP

Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP
Kristian Stanfill Day After Day - EP

Jesus Culture Come Away

Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away
Jesus Culture Come Away

Trent Live Burn Bright

Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright
Trent Live Burn Bright

highest marks

 
highest marks    
highest marks    
highest marks    
highest marks    
 
RECORD REviEWS While his style won’t challenge your previous experience with worship mu- Jesus Culture
RECORD REviEWS
While his style won’t challenge your
previous experience with worship mu-
Jesus Culture
Come Away
sic, his songs will slide right in with
very singable, teachable songs. He
is contributing to a healthy volume
of worship songs that people can
feel comfortable with and participate
with in many settings. That, in part,
TRACKS (personal picks bolded)
gonna be wild, it’s gonna be great…”
When someone is this personal and
creative with lyrics it’s a good indica-
tion of great things to come. And this
1 Come Away
album doesn’t disappoint. By way of
2 Rooftops
interest-holding lead parts and melo-
3 You Are My Passion
dy lines, it is quickly set apart as a
4 I want To Know You
uniquely expressed culture of worship.
is
why the marks are a bit lower for
5 My Soul Longs For You
lyrics - there are some lines in some
of the songs that I would push him to
6 Freedom Reigns
A song that caused me to pull back
7 Let It Rain
a
bit was “Freedom Reigns” which
rework. Not because they lack Biblical
integrity; he’s staying true to the Word.
Only because all-too-familiar phrases
can be reworded to add creativity and
8 Mighty Breath of God
would probably make much more
9 Show Me Your Glory
sense in a live setting. I appreciate
10 One Thing Remains
the freedom that Kim Walker-Smith ex-
a
personal touch, which is a necessary
Let me start by
mark of boldness for an artist of his
caliber.
That may seem strong, but at the
core, I think Kristian’s heart as a wor-
ship leader is right on - especially after
reading his point of view on the role of
saying that this is
the kind of album I
could easily annoy
co-workers with by
overplaying it. You
know how that is
you load a new
presses throughout the song, however,
she laughs intermittently throughout the
track that should have probably been
pulled down in the mix (this also hap-
pens on one of my favorites “Show Me
Your Glory”. Because it is same each
time she does it (as some people’s
laughs are) it can feel less spontane-
ous and more contrived, which I’m
a
worship leader. I have a fundamen-
tal belief in him and look forward to
greater risks in the future, seeing him
branch out as an artist as time goes
by.
cd into your iTunes library or onto your
MP3 player and it becomes your go-to
album. This rarely happens to me but
lo and behold…
sure is not the case. It can just feel
that way outside of the context of what
must have been a very powerful time
of
worship.
The first song on the album features
lyrics like “I have a plan for you…it’s
The power and guts behind Kim
Walker-Smith’s voice reinforces the
power and guts behind Kim Walker-Smith’s voice reinforces the WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 31
power and guts behind Kim Walker-Smith’s voice reinforces the WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 31
RECORD REviEWS sense of authority that comes through even in a recording. Her leadership is
RECORD REviEWS
sense of authority that comes through
even in a recording. Her leadership is
well matched with Chris Quilala’s and
they continue to push a Pentecostal
experience through beautifully mixed
production in a way that translates
successfully. Big enthusiasm for this
release!
well from one song
to the next and
features prominent
vocals with a back-
drop of digitized
patches and acous-
tic instruments. De-
church. This, in part, made me won-
der where the usual element of passion
was in this release. There was a lot of
potential available here, I just didn’t
feel the impact that could have been.
spite its billing as a
Trent Live
Burn Bright
live album, it sounds very clean and
composed, particularly in the vocal
department. If not for the faint voices
of people singing in the background
and clapping between some of the
That said, there’s some good raw
material to work with and some inven-
tive sounds that will pique the interest
of those who are looking for more
songs to add to their repetoire.
TRACKS (personal picks bolded)
1 Intro – All My Hope Is In You
songs, you wouldn’t think you were
2 Now And Ever
listening to a live album.
3 Glorious Life
4 Love Divine
One of the things that caught me off
Heidi’s background is
primarily in worship and
production, joining her
first worship team at age
5 Radio
guard was the strong 80’s influence
6 I Will Hold On
in their musical styles. It’s easy to pick
7 Jubilee
out a little U2, Pink Floyd and Springs-
8 Burn Bright
teen influences but lacks those bands’
9 Walk Humbly
heaviness. Without giving away my
10 Skin And Bones
age too much, I appreciate the 80’s
11 Keep Me Where The Light Is
sound. I think the nod to that era helps
12 Unfailing Love
keep the album interesting, however, it
13 Perfect Sacrifice
fell a bit flat in the mix and the ability
14 Journey Home
to capture a live experience.
This
is
a
blend of radio play /
church-friendly worship songs. It flows
I’m no stranger to Vineyard – used to
attend a great Seattle-based Vineyard
twelve. Having been
on staff at a Northwest church since
2001, she is now works as assistant
to the Northwest Foursquare District Su-
pervisor in Tacoma, WA.
This fulfilling role has made it pos-
sible for her to pursue her passion for
being in multiple churches, working
with worship and production teams
and sharing those churches’ innova-
tive ideas with as many other churches
as are interested through her website
www.nomadicreative.com.
Come See us at NAMM Booth #6824 introducing the new by westone. Westone quality and
Come
See
us at
NAMM
Booth
#6824
introducing the new
by westone.
Westone quality and performance.
Custom-fit for your
westone
Worship Team
real
Westone AC2
msrp $ 399
westone.com/worshipmusician

By John Mills

The High Pass Filter, Your Best Friend

What is it?

A high pass filter, or HPF, is exactly

as it sounds. It is a filter we can use on our soundboards that ONLY allows the higher frequencies pass. It is some-

times referred to as a Low Cut filter for

a similar reason. It is also the most over looked tool in the sound engineers ar- senal.

Where it’s found. Some soundboards only have a High

Pass Switch which is fixed at a certain frequency, often 80Hz or 100Hz. This includes most Mackie, Behringer, Allen

& Heath and similarly priced consoles.

Usually, only on higher priced consoles do you find the most amazingly useful type… the coveted golden ticket… the end-all-be-all… the “Variable High Pass Filter.”

The variable high pass filter is more useful because it allows you to change the frequency where the cut off begins, or more importantly where the lows no longer muddy up the bottom of our mix. But rest assured, I have a little trick for you folks not yet blessed with a variable HPF.

Why we need it. Well, simply put, the more low fre- quencies allowed into a mix, the more muddy or unintelligible a mix usually is.

Let’s take a violin for example. For the most part the violin is made up of mostly mids and highs. So if we have 4 mics on our violin section, we are probably picking up a good deal of low frequen- cy content from the timpani, bass guitar, kick drum, and so on. The problem is that the leakage from the other instru- ments, into our violin mics, is out of time with any of the close mics on the low frequency instruments.

Let’s take a short trip back to phys- ics class. Sound is made up of waves, waves take time to move through air, and low frequency waves are longer than high frequency waves. Son if one mic hears two sound sources arriving at the mic at different time, we can say they waves are out of sync. When waves are out of “sync” with each other we have cancellations and/or addi- tions.

multiple mics

picking up multiple instruments, espe-

It is

best

to

not have

cially if they have the same frequency

content, but are different distances from the source.

Like I mentioned above. If the violin mics were picking up the bass guitar,

it would be safe to say that the low fre-

quency leakage of the bass into the vio- lin mics is not “in time” with the actual

bass input. Which would result in some of the bass guitar sound being compro- mised because of the out of time (or out of phase) leakage into the violin mics.

What do I do with it. If you are lucky enough to have a Variable High Pass Filter the trick is to engage it and while listening to the vio- lins play, sweep their HPFs up until you hear their lower notes change. At that point, back it off just a little bit, and know that the bass guitar leakage has been eliminated from the violin chan- nels.

Did you follow that? By making the HPF higher, but not so high it altered the low notes of the violin, we have ef- fectively eliminated any lower frequen- cies from leaking into those inputs and ultimately into our mix.

What if I don’t have a Variable HPF or I have a fixed frequency one. So you more moderately priced Mackie, Behringer, and other folks are

feeling a bit left out at this point. I wish we all had unlimited budgets to buy the consoles that had this feature, I realize they are expensive consoles, and sadly

I know how that one goes.

Here is the trick for you guys. Al- most all soundboards have at least a HPF switch that can be engaged. First trick… engage it on all channels except things like Kick, Bass, CD, Video, and anything else that has the potential to make really low notes.

Now since you do not have a vari- able HPF what else can you do… well you can use your low EQ to do a similar trick.

The low eq knob on most of the con- soles at this price point are what is called a shelving filter. Which means everything below that frequency is at- tenuated similarly. So even though you

still can not sweep it up to hear the low notes cut off, you can still clean up a

little more low frequency leakage by turning this eq knob down.

What you do here is similar to the vari-

able folks. Listen to your instrument, and

have them play some of their lower notes. Turn down your low eq until you hear a substantial change in the sound of the low notes. Then turn it back up

a notch. You have now cleaned up

just

any leakage from those mics similarly to how the folks with the variable HPFs were able to.

Why it cleans up the sound. It’s actually not just about the leak- age. It is also about finding the holes

in the mix for instruments. If an acoustic guitar is to be placed in a contempo- rary mix with electric guitar, bass, and keys, then the low frequencies of the acoustic are really not necessary. That is not to say you should make it sound

a swarm of bees, but the bass and

like

electric guitars are certainly more capa-

of providing low frequencies. So if

ble

the acoustic is also taking up that range

in the mix, it is very likely that section of

frequency spectrum will easily get

the

clogged up.

How does it help the amplifier and

speakers? Eliminating any unnecessary low fre- quency content also helps our amplifi-

ers and speakers. Amps and speakers

pretty much do what we tell them. So if we have a sloppy low and low mid

section of our mix, they will reproduce it

as we mix it, but if we clean up our

by eliminating conflicting and extra-

just

mix

neous low and even low mid frequency

content, we not only get a cleaner mix,

we actually allow our speakers and am-

plifiers to run more efficiently since we

are not asking them to reproduce con-

tent that is not necessary.

John

them to reproduce con- tent that is not necessary. John John is an 20-year vet- eran

John is an 20-year vet- eran of the road and a graduate of the school of hard knocks. If you are look- ing for down to earth train-

ing for your volunteers why not send John an email. You can contact him through

to earth train- ing for your volunteers why not send John an email. You can contact

By Scott A. Shuford

The Four P’s

Every business school teaches The Four P’s in their basic marketing class. The Four P’s are Product, Price, Place and Promotion. There have been at- tempts to expand the P’s but in the end, these four areas completely en- compass the basics of any business or ministry. By the end of this article, you will be equipped to “wow” your Bap- tist preacher friends this four point “P” business sermon.

Product is the mix of things you of- fer. For musicians, the obvious prod- ucts are songs and albums, but those are not your only options. Songs can generate royalties from publishing and cash from Download/Memory Stick/CD/Vinyl sales. What about other product options? Concerts are a product option. What song is con- necting the most with your audience? Those song lyrics can be turned into art you can sell: art to hang on the wall or wear on the body. We have

sell: art to hang on the wall or wear on the body. We have frequently turned

frequently turned song lyrics into best- selling shirts for our Extra Mile Merch clients. Songs or lyrics can also be- come jewelry. Your VIP fan club could be a product in your mix providing extra music and discounts or special meet and greet time with you. Another product that has become very popular for artists is the charity they promote like OneVerse or World Vision.

Price is your pricing and offers structure for all that product. Some- times your price may be free. Free is definitely a price. Most of the time, your price structure will vary based on the intersection between your cost and what people are ready, willing and able to pay.

Place is the stretch word in our ser- mon… Place means distribution meth- ods for your products. For most of your products, distribution will certainly start with the trunk of your car, and will also likely include your web site. It may include your church, local Chris- tian stores, and other churches you’ve served. Online options for music could include retailers like iTunes, or music subscription services like Rhapsody. It may include music licensing through a service like CCLI. Your lyrics may one day be something you can license to someone else just like VeggieTales has done with their entire brand. Aligning yourself with other organizations or events can provide another place for distribution.

Promotion, simply put, is getting the word out. This is the area we will dive most deeply into in future col- umns. Social media, public relations, radio, advertising, promotions, on- line, offline, word of mouth, point of purchase… all of these are Promotion. With all of the new technologies from the last two decades, promotion on a large scale has become much more complex as you try to sift through the multitude of options that now exist.

Don’t worry about all that complex- ity if you are following my thoughts on God’s Growth Strategy as outlined in my previous column. When you are working on those concentric circles of growth, promotion is much more manageable. The basics of each area of promotion are easy to pick up and learn. As we progress through the

various promotional options, I’ll also have a handful of No-Brainers for you.

So far in the MAP, we’ve talked about your Mission, Fan Develop- ment, the Non-Profit option, God’s Growth Strategy and the basics of the Four P’s. Next time we’ll start to go deeper into Promotion with Social Me- dia. Until then… J

Tune in Creator Worship Online Radio: Teaching & Training Hear it today… Use it tomorrow.

Tune in

Creator Worship

Online Radio:

Teaching & Training Hear it today… Use it tomorrow. Programming includes:

WorshipTeamTraining.com Tom Jackson News from HearItFirst.com Rick Muchow (Saddleback Church) Richie Fike (Indie Extreme) Tech Talk with Wade Odum NewReleaseTuesday.com and more…

Twitter: @CLNetwork Facebook.com/CLNetwork

Tune in now at www.CreatorWorship.com

It is sometime in the near future. A virus has decimated your community. You are a worship leader, the only survivor in a church of a few hundred people. It is Sun- day morning and you open up the build- ing in hopes that someone shows up. The clock has struck 10a.m. and no one has arrived- what do you do?

Even though this is far fetched, what would happen if you were the only wor- shiper in your church?

The point of this exercise is to simply visualize this unusual scenario.

First of all, if this were a real situation, I think the worship leader would be seek- ing medical help or in seclusion to not contract a virus. But in this case the wor- ship leader has taken precautions and re- alizes there are some survivors in the com- munity, just not anyone from the church.

So we now come to the issue about being the last worship leader.

The point is what if there was a wor- ship service and nobody came. I think some worship leaders get caught up in the performance. I know of a worship leader in a staff meeting who was upset that for the second week in a row the fog machine wasn’t working. Do you think God really cares about that? What hap- pened to the concept that worship is not a performance but an act of giving to God. And the Word specifies that our giving should be done with humility. James 4:6, 10 states, “God resists the proud, but gives grace to the humble. Humble your-

LOVE ONE WOMAN MANY BASSES
LOVE ONE WOMAN
MANY BASSES
STICK WITH MANY DRUMS ONE WOMAN
STICK WITH
MANY DRUMS
ONE WOMAN
42 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2011 WORSHIPMUSICIANMAGAZINE.COM
2.375w x 10.3125h “ LOVE the V-Cart Solo. Really well-designed & solidly-built. A MUST for
2.375w x 10.3125h “ LOVE the V-Cart Solo. Really well-designed & solidly-built. A MUST for
2.375w x 10.3125h
“ LOVE the
V-Cart Solo.
Really well-designed
& solidly-built.
A MUST for any
working musician!
~Norm Stockton
(Bassist, Lincoln Brewster)
well-designed & solidly-built. A MUST for any working musician! ~Norm Stockton (Bassist, Lincoln Brewster) “
CAMERA By Craig Kelly So You Volunteered as a Camera Operator At Church – Uh

CAMERA

By Craig Kelly

So You Volunteered as a Camera Operator At Church – Uh Oh, Now What? Part 4

TELEVISION; Derived from mixed Latin and Greek roots, meaning “far sight”: Greek tele ( τῆλε ), far, and Latin visio, sight (from video, vis- to see, or to view in the first person.

It’s important to look at the standard hi- erarchy of the team. Here again, every circumstance may be different but there’s

a very typical team structure in TV and video production;

Executive Producer Directly in charge

the service or event. Probably respon-

of

sible for the budget as well.

Line Producer In charge of managing the budget and securing elements for the production

Creative Director In charge of the

look, the general creative flow and feel

of

the production

Director In charge of the creative pre- sentation of the production. Is responsible for the crew, the equipment, the choos- ing of how the elements are used in the production such as graphics, music and camera shots.

Associate Director In charge of get- ting things done for the director in their absence. They may also be responsible for pre-calling the camera cues during a musical sequence.

Stage Manager The backstage eyes and ears of the director. Responsible for coordinating and communicating what’s happening on the set, stage or with the “talent”

Audio Mixer (A1)

In

charge of all

things sound for the production.

A2 (audio assist) Does whatever the A1 needs

Technical Director (TD) Often is the

crew chief, in charge of schedules, posi- tion assignments, timesheets, and is the general person in charge of everything of a technical nature.

Engineer in charge (EIC) The genius behind the racks. Probably wired every- thing together and if you ask them what time it is, they will prob- ably tell you how to build a clock.

Lighting Direc- tor (LD) In charge of the lighting ‘look’

Gaffer Assistant to the lighting Director. In charge of getting the desired ‘look’ for the LD

Lighting Grip Assistant to the Gaffer – usually does the heavy lifting.

Video Operator (VO) Sometimes called a shader (a very outdated term) also called video or V1. Controls the “look” of the cameras – matches color, detail level, brightness, contrast and other technical aspects of the cameras

Tape Operator In charge of record- ing and playbacks. Not always using tape – could be a file device or even a multi-channel recording device such as an LSM, do ra me, etc

Graphics Operator Programs and out- puts any graphics used in the production such as name or title keys, sermon bullet points, power point slides or bible verse quotes. Also, possible are the lyrics for the music.

Camera Operators Handheld camer- as, Fixed cameras ( also called long-lens, studio cameras, hard cameras and even

build-ups) Jib camera (sometimes called a crane) Robotic cameras, POV cameras (small cameras strategically placed for unique shots) or stedicams – cameras that look perfectly smooth during a movement shot.

Director of Photography (DP) Usually in charge of the lighting, angle, shots, etc on a single camera style shoot

Utility/Cable Puller/Cable Paige/ Grip Assist the camera crew . Often a entry level position

PA/Runner Assist the Producers or Di- rector. Often a entry level position

You may notice some similarities with the credits you see after a movie ending and the above titles. Some of the posi- tion titles overlap in TV, Film, Concerts, Entertainment, Corporate, Ministry and Theater but not always. These are com- mon for a live video crew though.

Now that we’re through with all of the articles here, I cannot stress enough the importance of practice and learning all you can about the details involved with the equipment involved in a production. Good luck to you in your new position, have fun and may God bless you for your commitment to further His Kingdom.

may be fortunate

enough to have you on my crew some

day. ck

Who

knows?

I

Real Life — Real Audio
Real Life —
Real Audio
“When I first heard the Grund Audio GT -LPB -36CX subs, I was absolutely blown
“When I first heard the Grund Audio GT -LPB -36CX subs,
I was absolutely blown away. I am convinced, you will not
find a better subwoofer, for the money, on the planet.
“Whether it’s speakers, cases, or racks, know that
Grundorf is a great company, with great people,
that makes great gear.”
——Lincoln Brewster
Grund Audio designs and manufactures professional sound reinforcement in the USA. Churches, sound companies, venues,
Grund Audio designs and manufactures
professional sound reinforcement
in the USA.
Churches, sound companies, venues,
and artists, choose Grund Audio for
the quality and performance they deliver.
GGrruunndd AAuuddiioo –– RReeaall AAuuddiioo ffoorr RReeaall LLiiffee

I’m amazed. I didn’t really see it com- ing. I think I was looking for it all along - sort of - but somehow it just snuck up on me. Now that it’s here, I’m blown away! I want to shout it out: “My worship team has SKILL!” I recognize their intuitive flow, polished performance and team- work. Improved skill levels have resulted in a heightened worship experience for all involved. That’s right: S-K-I-L-L! That seemingly ragtag bunch of individuals I began to work with over five years ago has actually become A BAND! They now have the skills to fill the bill! (Can you tell I’m excited?!)

1-Identify It’s very cool how people will step up to the plate if you just put a bat in their hands and shout, “Swing!” But as a wor- ship leader, far too often I have underesti- mated the skill potential of those I’m lead- ing. Many people have a tremendous amount of talent, it just needs to be identi- fied. All an aspiring talent really needs is someone they respect to say, “Go for it. Swing that bat!” A little nudge, and soon they’re hitting home runs. But if we fail to identify, they may never take that plunge into the deep waters of skill development. Let’s always be on the lookout

2-Develop

Factor In Solitude Now that we’ve identified potential, the individual must spend some serious alone time developing and polishing those fledgling skills. Did you begin sing- ing or playing music at an early age? Do you recall the stereotypical parent (per- haps your own) screaming out the front door at “little Johnny” to stop whatever fun thing he was doing, and come inside to practice? The way my parents tell it, they had the reciprocal problem. Instead of having to insist I leave my buddies and come practice, they almost had to push me out the front door and force me to break from the hours of self-imposed musi- cal continuing education. I was driven! (Is that unusual?)

The fact is, driven isn’t always bad! There’s a point in every promising musi- cian’s life where he or she must partici- pate in a “schloggfest.” A what? A schlog- gfest! That’s where the rubber meets the road. It’s that time when you get alone and dig in to hone your skills and prepare

to be used of God in glorifying His name for His Kingdom. Without that schlogg- time of practice, practice, practice, it is doubtful that anyone could really become proficient at their musical endeavor. Gotta pay your dues…

Intuitive Flow OK. Let’s say that each individual on the team is now highly skilled. They’ve all put in the necessary schlogg-time to be ready to worship together. What’s the

next level the team should aspire to? May

I suggest “intuitive flow?”

Intuitive flow is when the team begins to move seamlessly from one song to the next without any hiccups in between. We become so connected by the sheer vol- ume of time spent together playing and ministering, that it’s almost as if we’re thinking with one mind. We flow in unity from one worship tune to another, or from one key to the next, and remove that awkward silence - those pregnant pauses

- from the worship set. This facilitates the ones we’re leading to remain focused as we segue, almost without their notice, from glorious praise to glorious praise.

To develop that intuitive flow takes lots of time spent together. We can achieve it by linking worship songs with intervals of personal or corporate expression. One way to facilitate this link is to use “free worship” chord progressions. These pro- gressions are a repeatable sequence of chords which can be tagged to the end of a praise or worship song, and played again and again until the leader signals it’s time to move on. As we become more comfortable with the intuitive flow of seamless worship, our corporate wor- ship times will no longer resemble stop and go traffic on a busy thoroughfare. Instead, the bumps in the road to worship will disappear as we seamlessly glide up the highway to Heaven. Why not “get your motor runnin’” and begin to practice free worship chord progressions with your team? Simply spend some time between songs playing repeatable chord progres- sions until they become intuitive second nature. (For pdfs of “Free Worship Chord Progressions,” please visit: essentialwor- ship.com/freedownloadsmain.html)

Polished Performance

OK, back to the solitude of personal

result of

practice here. Licks

are

the

learned scales, modes and arpeggios. They take some precious personal prac- tice time, but when applied in a team set- ting, they give our performance a sense of polish! Need to solo? Inspired to im- provise by the Holy Spirit? Put some licks and tricks in your musical “tool box” and you’ll find you’re ready when the moment is “yours.” (More free downloads at: es- sentialworship.com!)

3-Deploy

Teamwork … indeed it came to pass, when the trumpeters and singers were as one, to make one sound to be heard in praising and thanking the Lord, and when they

lifted up their voice with the trumpets and cymbals and instruments of music, and praised the Lord, saying: “For He is good, for His mercy endures forever,” that the house, the house of the Lord, was filled

with a cloud

.2 Chronicles 5:13

Nothing seems to feel better to the worship musician than the sense that ev- eryone on the team is pulling together to honor God. There’s unity. And when we practice unified praise, as was done by the Levites in 2 Chronicles, we can ex- pect to enjoy the exceptional results that they did. We will “see” the glory of the Lord fill His house. And we’re not just lim- ited to the four walls of a church building.

We already have Christ IN us!

I’ve set a goal this year. Now that my team is displaying intuition, polish and teamwork, I believe it’s time to deploy. Oh, they’ve already been “out there” week after week at the local church level, but what about “takin’ it to the streets?” Any reason why a well honed worship team can’t “represent” at open mike nights, community events, public prayer times, festivals or arts and crafts shows? There are flea markets, rodeos and fies- tas galore here in Santa Fe. I’m sure your community hosts lots of similar events. These are splendid opportunities to go out and be an example of what it means to have the skill to fill the bill! And remem- ber: while you’re out there ministering to- gether, your team will just get better and better! It’s a win-win proposition. Ready to go for it?!

Hone it up! Sandy

When as a college student I first undertook to learn mandolin chords, I was too stubborn to buy a chord

book. Instead I thought I’d apply what I had learned

in my music theory classes and figure out what I need-

ed to know for myself.

Granted, that took a lot more work than buying

a book, but I think it was worth it. I discovered that

thanks to the absolute symmetry of tuning in fifths, several repeating patterns occur throughout mandolin chords, and understanding these patterns can help you both remember the chords you know and teach yourself new ones. For the present discussion, we’ll

consider only major and minor chords, not any altered

or extended ones.

Each chord consists of two thirds: a minor third (a distance of three frets) and a major third (a distance of four frets). On a piano, you can stack the thirds immediately on top of each other, with the major third on the bottom for a major chord (Fig. 3a), or the mi- nor third on the bottom for a minor chord (Fig. 3c). You can’t do that on the mandolin (without highly ad- vanced technique, anyhow), so the thirds are often

inverted into sixths to help spread them out. A major third becomes a minor sixth (one string plus one fret);

a minor third becomes a major sixth (one string plus two frets), as you see in Figs. 1 and 2.

Stacking sixths rather than thirds gives you a play- able mandolin chord, major or minor (Figs. 3b and 3d). The 3-note chords appearing in my example (A

major and A minor) can become 4-note chords when you double the A with your first finger (2nd fret on the

G string).

Alternatively, you can think of these two chord shapes as a fifth plus a sixth (Fig. 4) and then double the A with your third or fourth finger (fifth fret, E string). Either way, you’ve now derived two familiar barre- chord shapes which, as you probably know, can be moved up and down the fretboard to become any chord, not just A.

Chords can also move across the fretboard, thanks

to symmetrical tuning. Figs. 5 and 6 demonstrate how

several familiar major chord shapes are based on a minor sixth that shifts from string pair to string pair. You’ll see it move from the high strings to the low ones, bringing some fifths and sixths along with it. The same thing happens with a major sixth that moves through minor chord shapes in Figs. 7 and 8.

Of course, getting this all down on paper is but the first step. Getting it under your fingers is the next. Once you do, you’ll likely discover even more relation- ships between chords, and you’ll gain the confidence to play in unusual keys and do lightning-fast chord changes anywhere on the fretboard with minimal shift- ing. Which is more than enough for one column.

footprint of a key- board might make a difference on a smaller platform. When you’re trying to pack a full band into a small

space and actually have some elbow room to play this becomes more of an issue.

SP4-7 has 76 keys which is plenty when

really think of what range you need to play

most modern worship music (for those of you

who are classically trained, please don’t send

me angry e-mails for saying this).

you

The

Did I mention how much it weights? Just 24lbs. Picking up the SP4-7 keyboard is a

a gig bag and toss it in the trunk. That is my kind of preparation!

treat. Throw it

in

COME VISIT US AT NAMM BOOTH C-4152! UE 4 PRO CUSTOM FIT MONITORS DANIEL RIVERA
COME VISIT US AT
NAMM BOOTH C-4152!
UE 4 PRO
CUSTOM FIT MONITORS
DANIEL RIVERA
TECHNICAL COORDINATOR
OASIS CHURCH, LOS ANGELES
For more information, please contact Joey Sanchez
jsanchez@ ultimateears.com
www.ultimateears.com
facebook.com/ultimateears
twitter.com/ultimateears
Ultimate Ears by Logitech. © 2009 Logitech. All rights reserved. Logitech, the Logitech logo and other Logitech marks are owned by Logitech and may be registered. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
The Twitter name, logo, Twitter T, Tweet, and Twitter blue bird are trademarks of Twitter, Inc. in the United States and other countries. Facebook is a registered trademark of Facebook, Inc.
LiGHTER SiDE B e s t - s e l l i n g tists,
LiGHTER SiDE
B e
s
t
-
s
e
l
l
i n g
tists, classical musicians, and successful
business entrepreneurs all share the trait.
By Manuel Luz
Do the Math
author Malcolm
Gladwell wrote a
book a few years
ago called, Outli-
ers: The Story of
Success, which is,
in his words, about
“men and women who, for one reason
or another, are so accomplished and so
extraordinary and so outside of ordinary
experience that they are as puzzling to
the rest of us as a cold day in August.”
In the book, he looks at a wide variety
of people and occupations, from airline
pilots to entrepreneurs to hockey players
to software engineers, and identifies and
examines the attributes of success. Be-
yond talent and intelligence and ability,
many of the characteristics of success in-
clude things largely outside of our control,
things like “culture and community and
family and generation.”
retrospect, that was the period of my life
when I actually started to get pretty good
at what I did. I was recording some of the
best music of my life, was leading wor-
ship bands at church as well as my own
band, was arranging and songwriting
and gigging some big gigs. And also—
probably not coincidentally—I think that
was about the time in my life when I be-
gan to understand that I didn’t have to
prove anything anymore.
I was fascinated by one startling point
he makes. The uncommonly successful
person has spent at least 10,000 hours
honing one’s skills. He argues that the
10,000 Hour Rule applies universally—
tennis prodigies, chess champions, scien-
Of course, it wasn’t long until I started
doing the math of my own life. I started
playing the piano when I was almost 5,
and worked my way through a half doz-
en piano teachers until I was 13: ~1400
modest hours. Played clarinet in school
bands and was introduced to student
conducting, in addition to some amateur
songwriting and playing keyboards, so
to age 16: ~3,500 hours. Played coffee
houses and other gigs, began performing
with bands, and learned the craft of studio
recording, so to age 21: ~4,900 hours.
Given I had a day job as an aerospace
engineer, I still played steadily in bands
(fusion, rock, church, originals), taught
myself to play jazz piano bar, began re-
cording independent projects in a demo
studio, took classes and conferences and
read books, and I did a whole mess of
songwriting, so by age 29: ~9,600
hours. And if I were honest with myself,
I still wasn’t all that good of a musician.
Gladwell cites the Beatles who as a
group honed their skill and sound by play-
ing over 1,200 gigs in Hamburg night-
clubs between 1960 and 1964. By the
time they had been “discovered,” they
had amassed over 10,000 hours focus-
ing their talents, honing their skills, char-
acterizing their unique sound, and forg-
ing their group identity—and the musical
world was never the same.
So I probably hit the 10,000 Hour Rule
around age 30, the same time I entered
into full-time vocational ministry. And in
I think about the many artists I know—mu-
sicians, painters, filmmakers, dancers, ac-
tors, writers—and the price they must pay
in order to be good at what they are pas-
sionate about. I think about the aspiring 22
year old songwriter who just released his
Continued on page 54
LiGHTiNG By Greg Sisley Product Review: Chauvet 300E Spot and 300E Beam Welcome to 2011!
LiGHTiNG
By Greg Sisley
Product Review:
Chauvet 300E Spot
and 300E Beam
Welcome to 2011! I hope this is an
‘illuminating’ year for you and yours.
Just off the Christian Musician Summit
at Overlake in WA. What an amazing
camaraderie between people with seri-
ous stories and experiences. Not only
was the musicianship top-notch,
but the production was world-
class. Bruce Adolph and Matt
Kees have the consistent abil-
ity to bring together servants
of exceptional skill and heart.
Their leadership routinely fa-
cilitates significant wins for
the Kingdom!
quiet operation, and video-quality
consistency are actually a ma-
jor driver in the production
specs of new fixtures for the
production lighting world at
large. Simply put, design
gear for churches and it
will work anywhere. The
performance of fixtures
being brought to market to-
day is both astonishing and
exciting. So when Chauvet
Lighting provided two of
their new 300-size movers
for evaluation, I was more
than eager to see what they
could do. These fixtures are
part of Chauvet’s extensive offer-
ing in the professional lighting/touring
market and truly demonstrate their commit-
ment to becoming the leader in LED and
intelligent lighting.
The story of Chauvet
Lighting is an intrigu-
ing one. Started in
the 80’s as a light-
ing manufacturer
and distributor
largely marketing
to the DJ/club
environment, to-
day Chauvet is
a major player in
innovation, devel-
opment, and man-
ufacture of pro-
fessional lighting
applications. And
they roll GREEN! A
large per- centage of Chauvet’s
R&D budget is committed to exploring
and delivering eco-friendly alternatives
to traditional light sources. Now at the
forefront of lighting innovation, Chauvet
offers the single largest range of LED-fitted
luminaries for architectural, entertainment,
and worship applications.
An interesting phenom-
ena occurring today in the
fast-growing house-of-
worship AV market is
that the lighting needs of
churches; high output/
capability, reliability, fast,
Perhaps it was extremely quiet fans or
barely audible motors that impressed me.
Maybe it was very best user interface I
have ever seen in a light. The menu is
clear, simple, and easy to navigate; just
what we need in volunteer-heavy produc-
tion environments. It could have been the
lightning-quick and very smooth pan/tilt
and zoom movement. Whatever, I was
blown away by the value, innovation,
and performance of these lights. The
300E Spot and 300E Beam, retailing
for about $3400, have no competitors at
their price point.
The Legend 300E Spot and Legend
300E Beam movers are two of Chauvet’s
new, well-designed professional series.
Both fixtures come with 8,400K Mini-
FastFit lamps, and produce a stunning
12,200 lux at 5m. Designed to exceed
the performance of any similar sized fix-
tures on the market, these revolutionary
pieces not only offer prism, shutter, iris,
focus, and move-in-black, but also boast
Continued on page 54
A FEW MOMENTS WiTH… By Tom Kraeuter “I’ve never seen anything like it,” said William
A FEW MOMENTS WiTH…
By Tom Kraeuter
“I’ve never seen anything like it,” said William Oudle,
worship pastor at First Baptist Church in Elba, Mississippi.
“We were just settling in, ready to start the music when all
of a sudden, all the songs got up and walked out. We
were stunned! Next thing we know they’re all marching
out there in front of the church carrying little picket signs.”
Standing right alongside HHH was “Here I Am to Wor-
ship,” one of the other strike organizers. “That’s right. My
friend H, here, has stated it, like, really well,” said HIAtW.
“We just can’t do the job we were created for unless Chris-
tians do the job they were created for: to worship God.”
Worship Songs
On Strike
In some places the songs linked together, stave to stave,
daring people—and a few renegade songs—to cross
their lines. Radio stations that play “praise and worship”
music were suddenly silent. Even video projection systems
in churches were abruptly and unexpectedly without lyrics.
Nashville, TN (TR) Reacting to what they say is a lack
of enthusiasm and passion for singing them, the Union
of All Worship Songs (UAWS) today announced that
they are officially on strike. In an unprecedented show of
unanimity, songs written as recently as two months ago
banded together with songs penned hundreds of years
earlier as they walked out side by side.
One of the strikers, who asked to remain anonymous,
said, “I know I speak for a lot of other songs when I say
that we’re just plain tired of it. If those people want to
sing with no fervor, no zeal, let them sing some secular
songs… but not us. Why, they usually sing “Happy Birth-
day” with more gusto than they usually sing us. It’s simply
not right, and we’re not taking it anymore.”
Reaction in some circles has been immediate. Al-
though a few have suggested that the Church as a whole
is better off without the songs, many people have gone
to their knees in repentance. This outcry to God has been
less for the songs to return than for a genuine change of
heart and mind for the pray-ers. Some of the most fre-
quently heard prayers have been right from the Scriptures,
including, “Search me, O God, and know my heart…
Point out anything in me that offends You…” and “Restore
to me the joy of Your salvation.” Christians seem to be
catching the point of the strike and responding favorably.
A UAWS spokesperson said, “We’re tired of it. We
were written by people who genuinely loved God and
wanted to express that love through song. If you read our
words you can sense the original fervor. There was a
passion for the Creator/Redeemer that comes through so
clearly through the words and even the music. But today
so many people just mouth the words. They go through
the motions while yawning or looking at their watch, won-
dering when the service is going to end. It’s really been
demoralizing for us. We had such a great beginning…
and now this.”
In the midst of such reaction, one song, “Change My
Heart, O God,” received special permission to cross the
picket lines and make himself available in multiple languages.
In an official communiqué, the UAWS said, “This initial
response seems to be on the right track, but we’ll see if it
lasts. We are guardedly optimistic at this point.” The songs
have promised to remain on strike as long as necessary.
The strike was declared effective immediately, and
Christians worldwide were stunned when the songs
walked out of churches, homes and media outlets.
In some cases the strike came just moments before a
Wednesday night service began.
The old hymn, “Holy, Holy, Holy,” was one of the
original organizers of the walkout. When asked about
the strike, HHH had this to say, “This remindeth me of the
words of the prophet Isaiah. ‘Forasmuch as this people
draw near me with their mouth, and with their lips do
honour me, but have removed their heart far from me…’
This be our contention. We requesteth a turnabout to
wholehearted singing. We canst not bear the feeble,
desultory attitude. As psalms and hymns and spiritual
songs, our main purpose is to inspire the brethren to rev-
erently worship Almighty God. Yet we canst not do that
except if the brethren willingly cooperate. If their minds
are focused solely on what eating establishment they will
patronize when the church service endeth, then we canst
not make up for their indifference no matter how well we
be written.”
When it comes to the topic of worship,
Tom Kraeuter is one of the most respected
teachers in the body of Christ today. His
Worship Seminars are held all across
North America. For more information on
any of Tom’s books, seminars, or other articles, contact
Training Resources, 65 Shepherds Way, Hillsboro, MO
63050, 636-789-4522, staff@training-resources.org,
or www.WorshipSeminar.com
staff@training-resources.org, or www.WorshipSeminar.com Continued from page 52 Continued from page 52 first CD, the
staff@training-resources.org, or www.WorshipSeminar.com Continued from page 52 Continued from page 52 first CD, the

Continued from page 52 Continued from page 52

first CD, the young 24 year old aspiring filmmaker who is wondering whether he should quit his day job, the 30-something worship leader who just wrote his first book, the 18 year old vocalist who is trying to figure out whether to major in music, the 50 year old mom who fell in love with the cello and is seriously taking lessons. And while I believe Gladwell is right in asserting that much of success is beyond our control, one of the things that is in our control is dedication to our craft.

both a color wheel and CMY color mixing, al- lowing you to color-match existing objects or conventional gels. The 300E Spot, with two gobo wheels, has a variable beam angle of 16 to 35 degrees, while the 300E Beam, with one gobo wheel, delivers a crisp 8 degree shaft of light. Designed to be versatile, the 300E series have both 3- and 5-pin DMX connectors, oper- ate on 110V or 220V, and offer user-configu- rable lamp options. At about 45lbs, the 300E Spot and Beam are serious pieces in look, feel, and performance, and will make permanent im- provements to any lighting rig.

One of the major trends in church lighting today is replacing fixed conventional/ellip- soidal front lighting with moving lights. Using movers to provide front light leverages moving lights’ ability to auto focus and easily change focal point. Often combining different types of front lighting can cause both intensity and color temperature issues; the 300E series has two significant features that address this. One is the addition of CTC filters. Color Temperature Conversion (CTC) glass filters are used to bal- ance or correct (make the same as the other light temps you are using) the color tempera- ture of a light source’s output. They can pro- vide significant changes in color temperature of various light sources, and can also be used to create an intentional warm or cool effect. The CTC filters provided are 5600K and 3200K,

In a celebrity-driven world where auto-tune and Justin Beibers exist, work ethic seems a quaint notion at times. But we do have an obli- gation to steward that which God gives us. And that includes the talents given to us as artists. In other words: Do The Math.

“From everyone who has been given much, much will be demanded, and from the one who has been entrusted with much, much more will be asked.” Luke 12:48 NIV

with much, much more will be asked.” Luke 12:48 NIV Manuel Luz is a working mu-

Manuel Luz is a working mu- sician and creative arts pastor for Oak Hills Church in Folsom, California. We encourage you to pick his book, Imagine That: Dis- covering Your Unique Role as a Christian Art- ist (Moody Publishers) or surf onto his blogsite, manuelluz.com.

allowing a huge variable white temp range from 3200K to 8400K, and making it possible to match existing lighting temps, whether con- ventional or LED. Another forward-thinking in- novation is the available built-in wireless DMX receiver (Chauvet’s W-DMX). Sometimes it isn’t practical to route control cable to every fixture location, or you need a fixture to act as a re- ception point for the down-stream control of a truss. That’s good thinking.

Technology and equipment that help create purposeful worship environments and frees tech- nicians and worshippers are tools we need to be successful. The development of the 300E Spot and 300E Beam and the rest of Chauvet’s professional line; 700 and 1200- size movers, as well as very powerful new moving-head LED washes, is a great example of the needs and voices of the end-user being heard and under- stood. It means they come from a company that values relationship. With us. Thanks Chauvet, for listening.

values relationship. With us. Thanks Chauvet, for listening. Greg Sisley is on the pastoral staff at

Greg Sisley is on the pastoral staff at Faith in Kent, WA, where he serves as executive pastor and pro- duction lead. He serves as a consul- tant to churches in the area of light- ing design and production, and can be reached at gregs@prolighingandsound.net