Getting Started with PDMS
Version 11.6

pdms1160/Getting Started with PDMS
issue 211004

PLEASE NOTE: AVEVA  Solutions  has  a  policy  of  continuing  product  development:  therefore,  the  information contained in this document may be subject to change without notice.  AVEVA SOLUTIONS MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND WITH REGARD TO THIS  DOCUMENT,  INCLUDING  BUT  NOT  LIMITED  TO,  THE  IMPLIED  WARRANTIES  OF  MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  While every effort has been made to verify the accuracy of this document, AVEVA Solutions  shall  not  be  liable  for  errors  contained  herein  or  direct,  indirect,  special,  incidental  or  consequential  damages  in  connection  with  the  furnishing,  performance  or  use  of  this  material.    This manual provides documentation relating to products to which you may not have access  or which may not be licensed to you. For further information on which Products are licensed  to you please refer to your licence conditions. 
 

©    Copyright 1991 through 2004 AVEVA Solutions Limited  All rights reserved.  No part of this document may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval  system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying,  recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions.   The software programs described in this document are confidential information and  proprietary products of AVEVA Solutions or its licensors.        For details of AVEVAʹs worldwide sales and support offices, see our website at  http://www.aveva.com

AVEVA Solutions Ltd, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HB, UK  

 

Revision History
Date Version Notes New manual at this PDMS version  Updated to show new PDMS GUI features at this version.   Cover page amended.   

October 2003  11.5  Sept 2004    11.6   

VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS

 

Revision History   VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS   .

........................... 3‐7 3..........................................2............................... 2‐3 2..............................................2......................2............................................................................................................................................. 4‐4 4.......................................................................2 Drafting modules......1 Accessing and using the documentation ............. 2-1 PDMS and what it can do for you ............................................................................. 1-1 What it includes ..............3.............................3 1...............5 The scope of this guide .............. 3-1 The User Documentation......................................................... 1‐2 Text conventions ..............3........................................................... 3‐6 3.......... 4‐3 4...................................1 Accessing and using the help .4 Project administration modules ......................2..7 PROPERTIES database .................................................................................................................................................................................................2 1.... 2‐3 2..............2 The content of the documentation ..................................... 2‐7 3 3................................................... 4-1 Introduction..................................................... 1‐2 2 2.................................................................2 The PDMS databases................. 2‐4 2.........................................................2................................1 4..... 1‐1 What it excludes........................................................2 The help icons ...................................... 1‐2 How the manual is set out....... 4‐2 4.............................................2.....1 The Project ......................................6 LEXICON database .................................................................................................2 DESIGN database .............................3 PDMS functions........ 4‐1 The database types .................... 3‐6 3.................. 4‐3 4....... 1‐1 Who it is meant for ................................................2........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................4 1..............2......... 2‐6 2.2............................1 Design modules ............................................. 4‐4 4........................................................... 1‐1 1...............................................................................11 TRANSACTION database..................................................................... 4‐1 4.................................................................2 4 4.2 2........................3..............8 SYSTEM database ..........3 PADD database.......................................................................... 3‐1 3...........Contents Contents 1 1............... 4‐4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11............................................ 4‐3 4.2.............................................................1........... 2‐1 Using PDMS in the Plant Design process........... 3‐2 The online help.............. 4‐3 4.............. 2‐3 PDMS modules..................................................1 2...........................................1 Finding out more – the user documentation and the online help .........................................................................................................2............1 1......................................... 4‐1 4....... 4‐3 4..................1 Assumptions.....................5 CATALOGUE database........................................3.............................................. 4‐2 4...........................................................................3 Catalogue and specification management modules................................................2.....................................................................4 ISOD database..................3......... 3‐1 3...........................................6 Getting Started with PDMS contents-i .........................................................................................1.................10 MISC database ........................9 COMMS database............2.......................................................

......................4 OWNER .................................................................................... 6‐6 6............................1....3 6 6............... 6‐3 Internationalisation ................. 5‐2 5................................................................................................................................. 5‐5 5................................................... 7-1 Using the mouse ...................................................................... 6‐5 Customisation facilities................... 4‐7 5 5...............12 BRANCH (BRAN) ..................................................................................................1..................1 NAME ...............Contents 4............................ 5‐11 UDAs (User Defined Attributes) ......................6 PRIMITIVES ................. 5‐2 5........................2 TYPE . 7‐2 7...............................................1.....................................................................................................................................9 HEIGHT .9 SUB‐FRAMEWORK (SBFR) .....................5 SUB‐EQUIPMENT (SUBE) ........................................................................................................................... 5‐3 5...................13 PIPING COMPONENTS ........................................................................2 5.............2..............................................................................2................................................................1 Using PDMS..................8 FRAMEWORK (FRMW)................ 5‐4 5.1.....................2........................................................................1................................... 5‐4 5......... 5‐4 5............7 LEVEL ........................................................ 5‐6 Attributes in PDMS ....................................................2 Using drop‐down lists .............2.5 POSITION.......3............. 6‐2 6................ 5‐8 5................................................ 5‐2 5...........1...................................................................................................................................2 Changing to another module..........................1 7...1............................................................................ 7‐2 contents-ii VANTAGE PDMS Version 11..............1.................................... 4‐4 4..............................................2................................................................. 6‐2 Getting out of PDMS .............................4 7 7............... 5‐2 5...................................................................................................................2....... 5‐7 5........................................2 6...............................3 6............................................... 5‐5 5.......... 5‐10 5...........................................................3 4.... 5‐8 5..................2.......................................................................................................................................................................................6 ORIENTATION ............ 5-1 The Design database element types ....................................................... 4‐5 The relationships between databases .....................................................1.............................2 SITE............................................. 5‐2 5.....................................4 4...........4 EQUIPMENT (EQUI) ........................................ 5‐10 5......................... 5‐10 5....2............................................................... 5‐11 5....................................10 DIAMETER........................2................................. 7‐1 Using forms .................................................8 OBSTRUCTION ..............1.....................1 Using text boxes............................................1........................... 5‐8 5............................. 5‐9 5.....................................1 Other projects ............1.............7 STRUCTURES (STRU) ............................................................................... 6‐1 6........................................................................................................................2.......................................................... the programmable macro language.....5 PDMS project structure...................1................................................................................................................2 Basic GUI features .................................................................................. 5‐8 5... 7‐1 7....... 5‐5 5...........................2.......6 Getting Started with PDMS ........................1............ 6-1 Getting into PDMS................................................1....................................................... 5‐6 5................... 5‐11 5...11 PIPE ........................................... 4‐5 Multiple databases (MDBs) ...................................................................................................2..............................................................................................................................................1 WORLD...............1 How PDMS data is stored............10 STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS .................................................................3 LOCK........1 Working in a module .................3 ZONE ...............

......................................3 Using scrollable lists..............2................................................................8 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11..........................................2 VPRM Facilities......1 Why use command syntax? ..................... 8‐6 Modifying the content of a database................................................................................4 7..................... 8‐6 8...........7 7..........3 Basic operations in PDMS .......2 Introducing the VPE Workbench user interface .........2...................................................................................................1............................................................................................................ 7‐5 Dockable Windows..............3 VPE P&ID ..... 9‐1 9...1 The Model Management System core facilities......... 9‐6 9.....................6 7.......................................4 9............... Menu Bars and Tool Bars ....................................................... 9‐12 VANTAGE Plant Design Global........................2 8................................................................5 9........3.........2.........................6....... 9‐4 VANTAGE Plant Resource Management (VPRM) .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 9‐14 9.......................................4................. 7‐2 Using the toolbars..................................................................................................................... 7‐6 7................................8 7....................4 9 9.................................................................................................... 9‐5 9..............................................................3.............................................................Contents 7.... 7‐6 Using commands ............................1 VPRM Interfaces ......................2....................................................... 9‐11 9. 9‐1 9....................... 8‐7 8........................................9............................................ 9-1 VANTAGE Plant Enginerring (VPE) ............................ 7‐4 7...............2 9..........................................1.........................3 VPRM Architecture ....4 Introducing the VPRM user interface.......................................4 My Data.........................................4 Using action buttons ...........................................................3 Other Explorers........ 8‐4 8... 9‐13 VANTAGE Plant Design Review ................................................. 9‐10 9....................................................... 7‐3 Using the status bar ................................................................................. 7‐3 More on using forms .......................................6 Getting Started with PDMS contents-iii ....1 8...............1 Using option buttons..............5 7................................................................................ 9‐13 9....................... 8‐5 8...........................4...... 9‐7 9...................... 8‐1 Current element and current list position ..........6...................................................................................................... 9‐10 VANTAGE Plant Design Model Management................................................................................ 7‐4 7..........................6.............................. 9‐9 VPE and VPRM Interfaces ‐ Summary ...................................................................... 9‐12 VANTAGE Enterprise NET (VNET)......... 9‐13 The Data Exchange Interfaces ......................................................................................................................................... 7‐6 8 8.....................................2 The Members List ........................................................6.1........................ 9‐2 9......... 7‐4 7......................................3 9.. 7‐5 Responding to alert forms ....................1 The Design Explorer...............2 Using check boxes .... 8‐4 8.....................9 Using menus................7 9..................................................... 9‐8 9......3..............3 7........ 8-1 Querying .....1 Interfaces to other systems......................... 8‐2 Navigating to a given element.................................................1 VPE Workbench.......6..................................................................................................................................................................................................................3............1 The Transaction database ...............................................................6 9......................2 Introducing the Model Management System GUI ............................................. 7‐4 7......................................................

.

  1 1.  Facilities which apply only to a small proportion of PDMS modules.  1. For information about these. see the user documentation or online help for the relevant modules. You’ll find information on  these topics in the VANTAGE Plant Design Software Customisation User Guide and  Software Customisation Reference Manual. see your computer operating system manuals  or ask your system administrator.e.6 Getting Started with PDMS 1-1 .  See Chapter 3.  • • • 1.  The manual gives an introduction to what PDMS  does and how it does it. PDMS) for the first time  or  • migrating from a similar 3D system  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  Detailed information on any of the PDMS modules or databases  Facilities needed to create macros and use the Programmable Macro Language  (PML) to create ‘intelligent’ macros.1 The scope of this guide What it includes This manual is designed to introduce you to PDMS as a system and how it fits into  AVEVA’s VANTAGE product family. including introductions to:  • • • the PDMS modules and what they do  the PDMS databases  the PDMS user interface  More detailed information.  can be found elsewhere in the PDMS user documentation set. new interfaces etc.2 • What it excludes This manual does not include information about:  Facilities which are related to the computer operating system from which PDMS is  entered.3 Who it is meant for The manual is written for a new user who is:  • coming to a 3D Plant Design Management System (i. particularly on the PDMS modules and the databases they use. For information  about these.

  Appendix A is a glossary of PDMS terms and abbreviations. Direct references  may be made to topics within the online help.1 • • Assumptions It is assumed that the reader:  is familiar with typical Intel PC hardware and Microsoft Windows 2000 and/or XP  has a reasonable understanding of the principles and jargon of process plant design  1.5 Text conventions This guide uses the following text conventions:  Serif    Bold      for the majority of the text.  to highlight important information.  Chapter 3 describes the User Documentation set and the online help  Chapters 4 and 5 introduce the PDMS databases and the way data in PDMS is  structured and how it is stored  Chapters 6 to 8 describe how to get in to PDMS and use it perform simple operations.The scope of this guide Both types of user will probably.  Serif italic    Sans-serif    1-2 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  to denote keys on your keyboard. but not necessarily. For this information see the PDMS Design online help.  1. Creating a 3D View Window 1. which PDMS can  interface with.4 • • • • • • How the manual is set out The manual is organised as follows:  Chapter 2 introduces the basic steps to be taken to design a Process Plant using  PDMS.  Note that this guide does not always provide full details of menus and forms associated  with these topics. have attended a PDMS Basic Training  course. the following device being used to indicate  such references:  : The 3D View Window.      to denote internal cross references and citations.  Chapter 9 introduces the other products in the VANTAGE suite. and to introduce special  terminology.6 Getting Started with PDMS . and introduces the PDMS modules.3.

6 Getting Started with PDMS 1-3 .The scope of this guide Sans-serif bold    for menu names and options. the  following device being used to indicate such references:  : The Current Session Units form   VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  text output to the screen. and for the names of forms. but it will not always provide full  details of menus and forms associated with specific help topics. including text that you enter yourself using  the keyboard. Direct references may be made to topics within the online help. For this information see the  relevant online help. Also for text within a form  Typewriter Note that this manual may refer to the PDMS online help.

6 Getting Started with PDMS .The scope of this guide 1-4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.

 VANTAGE Plant  Engineering (VPE) and VANTAGE Project Resource Management (VPRM) (see Chapter 9). There are many different output channels from  the databases through which information can be passed on. PDMS can interact  with the other two principal members of the VANTAGE suite.1 PDMS and what it can do for you PDMS (the Plant Design Management System) enables you to design a 3D computer model  of a process plant. size.6 Getting Started with PDMS 2-1 . to full  colour–shaded 3D walk–through capabilities which allow you to visualise the complete  design model.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  2 PDMS functions PDMS is part of AVEVA’s VANTAGE suite of Plant Design products. This model becomes a single  source of engineering data for all of the sections and disciplines involved in a design project. PDMS allows you to see a full colour–shaded representation of the plant  model as your design progresses.  2.  All this information is stored in databases. fully annotated and dimensioned engineering drawings. part numbers  and geometric relationships for the various parts of the plant. adding an extremely impressive level of realism to  traditional drawing office techniques.  Chapter 6 introduces the principles of using PDMS.  These range from reports on  data stored in the databases.  In the model you can store huge amounts of data referring to position.

 or simple alignment errors. which cannot be changed by the designer.  PDMS enables you to avoid such problems in two ways:  1. With PDMS. are compiled for the purpose of ensuring consistent. To meet this requirement.  Avoids component interferences  Despite a wealth of skill and experience in plant design. Hangers and Supports. allowing visual  checks on the model from different viewpoints. Without engineering drawings the  task of building a plant would be almost impossible. PDMS can check all  of these using data consistency procedures built into the system to check all or  individual parts of the design model. Design applications for Piping. the size of each  fitting must be decided before it can be drawn. incompatible flange ratings. This is a time‐consuming and error‐ prone process. traditional drawing office  techniques are still subject to human error.PDMS functions Figure 2‐1  Different types of output from PDMS  Even with the advanced features of PDMS. all piping component sizes and geometry are predefined  and stored in a catalogue.6 Getting Started with PDMS . inevitably  leads to clashes between elements. ranging from complex 3D illustrations to fully  annotated and dimensioned arrangement drawings and piping isometrics. where often the design errors are only found during the erection stage  of the project. By using the powerful clash checking facility within PDMS. By viewing the design interactively during the design process. Cable trays  and Steelwork all use specifications to assist component selection. safe and economic  design. the main form of communication between the  plant designer and the fabricator remains the drawings.  Ensures correct geometry and connectivity  There are many different ways of making design errors. This ensures  that all items are true to size and are consistent throughout the design.  Adheres to definable engineering specifications  Piping specifications and steelwork catalogues. This can be done interactively or retrospectively. PDMS contributes to the quality of the design in the  following ways:  • Ensures consistent and reliable component data  In a design environment which uses only 2D drawing techniques. stating precisely the components to  be used.  All the data in a PDMS design would be of little value without the ability to ensure the  quality of the design information.  2. Potential problems can thus be  resolved as they arise. PDMS can  produce numerous types of drawing. HVAC. no matter  how many users there are on the project. which will detect  clashes anywhere in the plant. Laying out complex pipe runs and  general arrangements in confined areas using conventional 2D methods. which are trying to share the same physical space.  • Annotation and dimensions obtained directly from the design database  • • • 2-2 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. such as incorrect fitting  lengths.

  assembly. information is constantly changing and  drawings need to be reissued. reports etc can be  updated and reissued with the minimum of effort.  2. such as arrangement drawings. Chapter 3 contains details of the PDMS user documentation. and piping and structural steelwork layouts)  can be created.3. drawings.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  Document the design in the form of drawings (general arrangement. reports and material lists (Draft and Isodraft modules).  Design the various parts of the plant.  All parts of the design (including equipment. Through the course of a project. Design enables a  full sized three‐dimensional plant model to be defined in the Design database. graphically driven constructor module within PDMS.1 Design  Design modules Design is the main. with selected  views of the current state of the design shown on the graphics screen as the design  progresses.2 • • • • • Using PDMS in the Plant Design process The sequence of operations (greatly simplified) in a new plant design project would be:  Create the project and set up administrative controls (using the PDMS Admin  module). construction.  Check the design for errors and inconsistencies (Design).PDMS functions Extracted information from the PDMS database. When this happens. which  describes the PDMS modules and how to use them. referencing items from the catalogues (using  the Design module).  You may also wish to transfer design data to or from other systems at various stages.  2.6 Getting Started with PDMS 2-3 .3 PDMS modules PDMS is split into a number of modules which are used at different stages in the plant  design process.  Create the Catalogue and Specification data from which standard design  Components can be selected (using the Paragon and Specon modules). will always be the latest available as it is stored only in  one source. Component selection is provided through Specifications that dictate which  Catalogue Components can be used.  2. and isometric). Each part of the design model can be displayed in  colour‐shaded ‘solid’ colour‐coded representations for ease of interpretation.  piping isometrics and reports.

PDMS functions Design can check for interferences (clashes) between items created in the design.  2-4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  Piping isometrics can be previewed in Design (without having to switch to the Isometric  generation module. It allows the designer to split the pipework design  into logical sections (spools) ready for fabrication. There is a  very flexible reporting capability that can be used to produce a wide variety of design  documents ‐ from bulk Material Take Off to detailed nozzle schedules.3. All information needed to create the drawing is accessible via a  single drawing database. The spool data can then be output as  isometric drawings using Isodraft (see below). Isodraft).    Figure 2‐2 A typical Design 3D View  Spooler  Spooler is used for pipework spooling.6 Getting Started with PDMS .  2.2 Draft   Drafting modules Draft enables dimensioned and annotated scale drawings of selected parts of the design  model to be produced. which extracts data to be used for dimensioning directly from the  Design database.

 tables. of specified sections of the plant pipework.    Figure 2‐3   A typical Draft annotated and dimensioned drawing  Isodraft  Isodraft produces automatically annotated and dimensioned piping isometric drawings.  Other facilities include:  • • • • Full material lists.6 Getting Started with PDMS .  Automatic spool identification.  Annotation attached to a Design data element on the drawing will move if the 3D position of  the element changes. The content and  style of the drawings can be chosen to suit the needs of pipe fabricators and/or erectors and  can include a wide range of optional features to suit local requirements. Dimensions are recalculated automatically every time the drawing is  updated.  User‐defined drawing sheets.PDMS functions Annotation can be in the form of labels attached to design elements.  A Design model 3D view can be previewed in Draft to aid assembly of a drawing in the 2D  view.  2-5 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. or drawing frames.  Automatic splitting of complex drawings. lines etc. or 2D annotation such  as drawing notes.  with associated material lists.

 where the design data is specific to a particular design.PDMS functions Figure 2‐4  A typical Isodraft piping isometric  2.  It should be noted that. with facilities for catalogue component  construction with visual control (including 3D colour‐shaded representations of the item  being designed). obstruction  and detailing data of steelwork.6 Getting Started with PDMS .3. piping.  2-6 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. For example. catalogues  and specifications may be specific to a company but general to a number of projects in that  company. which you would refer to when using conventional design methods. the same catalogue component may also appear in other designs  proceeding at the same time.3 Paragon  Catalogue and specification management modules Used to generate and modify catalogues.  The catalogues in PDMS serve a similar purpose to the manufacturers’  catalogues. The PDMS  component catalogue is used to specify the geometry. connection information. and HVAC and cable tray components.

 which holds details of those properties of  the components and materials which may be needed for stress analysis or safety auditing of  all or part of a design.  Enable enough designers to work in parallel with simultaneous access to carry out  their design tasks.4 Admin Project administration modules Large plants designed using PDMS will usually be broken down into individual areas  (either physical areas or design areas).  Specifications define the suitability of catalogue components for particular types of use.  Form reasonable design subdivisions with sensible match‐lines and design content. the breakdown of the PDMS Project into sections which:  • • • Are relevant to the needs of project reporting and control.3. On a large Project. complexity and  configuration of the plant.  Propcon  Used to create or modify the properties database. depending on the physical size.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. the System Administrator will first agree with  Project and Design Management.PDMS functions Figure 2‐5   A typical Paragon catalogue component display  Specon  Used to create or modify the component specifications within the catalogue database.6 Getting Started with PDMS 2-7 .  2.

 These Teams can consist of any  number of Users and can be organised by discipline or physical work areas. Attributes defined in  this way are held in a Lexicon (or dictionary) database and may then be assigned to  elements in other databases as required. This may be  necessary:  • • • to compact databases at intervals.  The main features are:  • • • • Access Control (Teams and Users)  Databases  Multiple Databases (MDBs)  Database management functionality  Admin includes a database integrity checking utility.  Admin also allows the System Administrator to reconfigure a project.). used to check for inconsistencies in the  contents of the databases and to derive statistical information about the use of the database  storage capacity.  PDMS has Teams. draughts people. freeing disk space   to upgrade PDMS projects when the database structure changes  to compare the contents of two similar databases. the members of which are called Users.PDMS functions In much the same way as in a design office (with its section leader. to create a  modification record  Lexicon  Used by the System Administrator to set up user‐defined attributes.  2-8 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. etc.6 Getting Started with PDMS . for example. UDAs allow additional information to be stored in  the databases and extracted into drawings and reports.

 printed and searched through using the Acrobat® Reader™   facilities.  3.pdf file called  iindex.pdf. the user documentation may be found at (for example)  C:\AVEVA\Pdms11.1 3. double‐ clicking on the   will give a display something like:  Using the mouse to point at one of the documents in the list and clicking the left‐hand  mouse button will display the selected document in the Acrobat® Reader™ window. From  here it can be read on‐screen.6 Getting Started with PDMS 3-1 .6\manuals\pdms116.pdf files on the PDMS product CD.  After installing PDMS.  Provided you have the Acrobat® Reader™ correctly installed on your workstation. which is a contents list for the documentation set. This chapter  explains how to access these resources and how to make the best use of them.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  3 Finding out more – the user documentation and the online help PDMS comes with an extensive set of user documents and online help files.1 The User Documentation Accessing and using the documentation The user documentation is provided as a set of Acrobat® .1. This folder will contain a .

  In the order of the . includes a hands‐on tutorial exercise.  Other manuals do not fit easily into either of the above classes. there are manuals which.  Tells you how to use PDMS to create pipe hangers and  supports.  Describes the command syntax available in the Monitor  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  Tells you how to use PDMS to create interconnected piping  networks.  3.Finding out more – the user documentation and the online help If you are unsure which document contains information on the topic you are interested in. This is accessed from the  ® ™  Acrobat  Reader toolbar. Volume 1  HVAC Design Using  PDMS.6 Getting Started with PDMS . for example the PDMS User  Bulletin. includes a hands‐on tutorial exercise. includes a hands‐on tutorial exercise.  Tells you how to use PDMS to create interconnected HVAC  networks. are not PDMS‐specific but which  are included in the PDMS user documentation set because they are still relevant to PDMS.  usually at module level.   button on the  use the Acrobat® catalogue search facility. Also.  Contains HVAC Design and Catalogue database reference  material  Tells you how to use the reporting facilities in PDMS. the documents are:  Title User Bulletin  Installation Guide  Structural Design Using  PDMS  Support Design Using  PDMS  Pipework Design Using  PDMS  HVAC Design Using  PDMS.  User Guides (including Tutorial guides) tell you how to use PDMS to perform a particular  task. includes  a hands‐on tutorial exercise.pdf document contents list. the supplied user documentation may be divided into three classes:  Reference Manuals  User Guides  Others  Reference Manuals contain detailed information about the PDMS databases and facilities. includes a hands‐on tutorial exercise.2 • • • The content of the documentation Broadly speaking. Volume 2  Reporting from PDMS  Monitor Reference Manual  3-2 Description Tells you about the new features and bug fixes in the current  version of PDMS  Tells you how to install the current version of PDMS  Tells you how to use PDMS to produce a connected steelwork  structure. and contain worked examples. strictly speaking.1. Typing a keyword to search for will result in a (selectable) list of  all the documents in the contents list which contain that keyword.

  write macros or set up batch files. For System Administrators.  Describes how (using the GUI) to set up and administer  PDMS projects. Intended for specialists  who are responsible for building up and maintaining the  standard Catalogue databases within a PDMS project team. and gives examples of plotfiles.Finding out more – the user documentation and the online help Title Description module.6 Getting Started with PDMS .  Aimed at experienced PDMS users and system  administrators.  Paragon Reference Manual  Describes the command syntax available for designing  catalogue components. if data inconsistencies  within a project are to be avoided. Useful if you wish to produce a customised interface. Also shows the  default symbol keys (SKEYs) that are used to plot the  drawings. useful for those  wishing to customise the interface or write macros.  Draft Administrator  Application User Guide  AutoDRAFT User Guide  Describes how to set up the Libraries used by the PDMS Draft  applications.  3-3 Isodraft Reference Manual  Plant Design Conventions  for Catalogues and  Specifications  Admin Command  Reference Manual  Admin User Guide  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  Explains the concepts underlying Isodraft and describes how  to tailor the options to meet your own requirements. mainly command  syntax but with many illustrated examples.  The definitive Draft reference manual. useful for those wishing to  customise the interface or write macros. includes a  PDMS  hands‐on tutorial exercise.  Isodraft User Guide  Introduces Isodraft. useful for those wishing to customise  the interface or write macros.   Describes the command syntax available to control the  production of isometric drawings. Written for System  Administrators who are already experienced Admin users  and who wish to write macros or use command input rather  than the GUI.   Describes the conventions to be adhered to when constructing  PDMS Catalogues and Specifications. Written for System Administrators. PDMS’s isometric plotting facility.  Draft User Guide  Drawing Production Using  Tells you how to use PDMS to create 2D drawings.  Describes how to use the AutoDRAFT AutoCAD® application  in conjunction with drawings produced by PDMS Draft and  Isodraft.  Describes the PDMS Admin commands for Standard (non‐ Global) and Global projects.

Finding out more – the user documentation and the online help Title SAINT Reference Manual  Access Stairs and Ladders  User Guide  Description Describes. Can be used for the creation of interfaces to  other software packages. Useful for those who  wish to write macros or use command input rather than the  GUI.  Introduces the graphical facilities available in both the Model  Editor 3D View and the Model Editor itself. the PDMS Structural Analysis Interface module.  Describes how to allow data consistency checking software  written in AVEVA’s Programmable Macro Language (PML)  to be added to PDMS Design. includes a hands‐on tutorial exercise.  Tells you how to use PDMS to produce Pipework Spools from  existing Pipework data. which are used. and for exporting Design data to  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. and querying and  navigating around the Design database. pipe stress.  Describes general Design commands. for  example.  Contains details of all the elements which can be created in  the Design database. used for  the stress analysis of structural steelwork. for setting up the display.  as produced by a number of AVEVA (and third party)  programs. their position in the database hierarchy  and their attributes. includes a hands‐on tutorial exercise.g.  Tells you how to use the facilities provided in PDMS for the  creation of Design Templates.  Describes the use of a set of FORTRAN 77 subroutines which  may be incorporated into user‐written software for the  purposes of navigating and manipulating the data held within  a PDMS project. an  interface to the GTSTRUDL and STAAD‐III packages.6 Getting Started with PDMS Data Access Routines User  Guide  Plot User Guide  Data Checker Utility User  Guide  Pipework Spooling Using  PDMS  Introduction to PDMS  Design Templates  Design Graphical Model  Manipulation User Guide  Design Reference Manual  Part 1  Design Reference Manual  Part 2  Design Reference Manual  Part 3  Design Reference Manual  3-4 .  isometrics. includes a hands‐on tutorial  exercise.   Tells you how to add access features to structural steelwork  created using PDMS. e.  Explains how to use the Plot stand‐alone graphical plotting  utility to interpret plotfiles in a range of pseudo‐code formats.  Describes the commands for creating database elements and  setting their attributes. etc. material take‐off.  Describes the Design Utilities for data consistency checking  and clash detection.

 includes a  hands‐on tutorial exercise.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. Should be used together with the Plant Design  Software Customisation Reference Manual.  Describes how to create user‐defined attributes (UDAs) for  use in the Design.  Describes the commands for creating and editing the  Properties database.Finding out more – the user documentation and the online help Title Part 4  Industrial Building Design  Using PDMS  Propcon Reference Manual  Specon Reference Manual  Lexicon Reference Manual  Plant Design Software  Customisation Guide  Plant Design Software  Customisation Reference  Manual  Description programs such as Review.  Describes the commands for creating used to create or modify  Specification (SPEC) elements in Catalogue Database. intended for users who are  already familiar with PML.  The Reference Manual for PML.6 Getting Started with PDMS 3-5 . Draft and Catalogue databases.  Tells you how to use PDMS to carry out the design and  documentation of interconnected walls and floors. AVEVA’s Programmable Macro  Language.  Describes how to use PML.

  3.) The online help does not attempt to provide a structured narrative.6 Getting Started with PDMS . Monitor.1 Accessing and using the help Online help exists for all PDMS modules with a graphical user interface. down to form level.  3-6 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. Paragon and Spooler. (See Chapter 7 for more details of forms and  menus.Finding out more – the user documentation and the online help 3.  Design. namely Admin. Isodraft. which gives you the following choices from its  submenu:  Help>Contents This displays the Help window with the Contents tab at the front. so that you can find all topics  relevant to a selected keyword. so that you can find the  required topic from the hierarchical contents list.2.  Most bar menus end with a Help option.2 The online help The online help exists to provide you with assistance with a particular feature of PDMS as  you are using that feature. Draft.  Help>Index This displays the Help window with the Index tab at the front. although much  reference material does exist within the help.

  Help>About This displays information about the current operating system on your computer and about  the versions of PDMS and its applications to which you have access. Double‐clicking the    icon will bring a list of the  help topics (and/or other ‘books’) contained within the book. Double‐clicking the    icon will bring up the content of the book and a list of the help topics (and/or  other ‘books’) contained within that book.  3. so that you can search for  instances of a keyword across all the help topics.  Keyword search.6 Getting Started with PDMS 3-7 . Provides help specific to the form you are using.  Pressing the F1 key at any time will display the help topic for the currently active window. Finds all topics which contain a user‐specified word or phrase.  Index search.  The    symbol indicates a ‘book with own content and topics’. Finds all topics relevant to a selected keyword.  The    symbol is a ‘normal book’.  The   symbol indicates an ‘ordinary’ help topic • • • • VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. but double‐clicking the    icon will bring up the content of the book.  The    symbol indicates a ‘reference topic’ giving supplementary information.2 The help icons        Note: not all of the icons listed below will necessarily appear in all PDMS helps  • • The    symbol indicates a ‘book with own content’.2. The ‘how to’ will jump to a sequence of  steps telling you how to perform the task you have selected.Finding out more – the user documentation and the online help Help>Search This displays the Help window with the Search tab at the front. Pick from a list of “how to’s”. This ‘book’ does not contain any  help topics.  The help attempts to provide you with information in a variety of ways:  • • • • ‘How to’ help.  The    symbol indicates an ‘ordered steps’ topic (typically a ‘How to’ topic).  Context‐sensitive help.

.

  There are 10 different types of database which can go to make up a complete Project:  Design and Drawing Databases:  • • • • • • DESIGN database  PADD database  ISOD database  Reference Databases:  CATALOGUE database  DICTIONARY database  PROPERTIES database  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. allocated by the Project  Administrator when the project is first initiated. This name is used to identify the project to  the system whenever you wish to work in the project using PDMS.  This chapter describes  • • • The purpose of each type of database  How the detailed project information is held in each  How the separate databases are related to each other  4. This is identified by a three‐character name.1 The PDMS databases Introduction The overall purpose of PDMS is the controlled creation of a complete three–dimensional  process plant design model using computer–simulation techniques.2 4. is stored in a series  of hierarchical databases. This allows access rights  and use of system resources to be monitored and controlled.  4 4.1 The database types The Project A PDMS Project consists of the complete collection of information which relates to a single  design project. Use of the various PDMS modules allows you to create. modify  and extract information from these databases.2. see the VANTAGE PDMS Admin and Monitor Reference Manuals.6 Getting Started with PDMS 4-1 . whether administrative or technical. For further details of these  functions. All information which  exists about a PDMS design project.

  4. include:  • • • • Equipment design (process vessels. see the PDMS Draft User Guide.  Each user is normally allowed to modify the Design databases which relate to his function in  the plant design team. stairways etc.The PDMS databases Administration Databases: • • • • SYSTEM database  COMMS database  MISC database  TRANSACTION database  (See section 4.  The functions of each type of database are summarised in the following subsections. and will often have permission to look at other Design databases so  that his work is compatible with that of other designers. Part 3. which support and give  access to the operational equipment and pipework)  Hangers and Supports (specialised pipe support structures)  The compositions of the principal types of Design database are described in the PDMS  Design Reference Manual.2 DESIGN database The Design databases contain all information needed to create a full‐scale three‐dimensional  representation of the plant.  4.  Typical design functions.2. pumps. heat exchangers etc. beams.  4-2 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. It therefore holds a complete specification of  the contents of a drawing.  For further information. walls. New databases can only be created by the Project Administrator. each of which may use a different Design database.4 for more background information on Reference databases)  Each PDMS module requires access to one or more specific database types.6 Getting Started with PDMS .)  Pipework design (the interconnecting pipes between the various equipment items)  Structural design (the columns.2. Its use is specific to the interactive drawing module Draft. storage vessels. Part 1.  see the PDMS Admin Reference Manual for details. and entry to the  module may be prevented if appropriate databases do not exist or if you don’t have the  appropriate access rights.3 PADD database (PADD is an acronym for Production of Annotated and Dimensioned Drawings)  This type of database holds data about both the pictorial content of drawings and about  their annotation and dimensional information.

6 Getting Started with PDMS 4-3 .  not allowed for by the standard attributes.6 LEXICON database The Lexicon (or Dictionary) database is a project–specific database which is used to hold the  definitions of user‐defined attributes (UDAs). but it will more commonly  contain a general catalogue plus one or more specialised catalogues specific to particular  design functions. see the PDMS Propcon Reference Manual. It holds administrative  information about the composition and use of the project. ducting.  4. which define the conditions of use for each type  (maximum pressure. See  Pipework Spooling Using PDMS for more details of Spooler. who can legally access the  databases. and only one.2.  4. Its use is specialised and will not be described further in this manual. which may be needed to  supplement Catalogue and Specification data for some design functions such as stress  analysis.8 SYSTEM database There is one. identified by name and password. Catalogue or Draft database.The PDMS databases 4.2.  4.4 ISOD database The ISOD database holds pipework spool drawings generated by the Spooler module. The UDAs are used to hold any information. temperature etc. It includes:  • • • Dimensional details for each component  Details of permissible connections between different components and of the bolts  needed to assemble flanged components  Specifications of the components. see the PDMS Lexicon Reference Manual.)  A Catalogue database may contain a single ‘universal’ catalogue. hangers and supports or structural steelwork. and the operating Team(s) to which they are assigned  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.2.5 CATALOGUE database This contains a catalogue of the standard components which you may select when designing  pipework. including the following:  • • A list of databases of all categories which are usable in the project  A list of all users.2.  For further information. about elements which are themselves part of  either a Design. System database in each Project Folder.7 PROPERTIES database This is available for storing data about material properties.  4.  For further information.2.

 but only when they are sending  messages or writing inter‐database macros. This  database can only be opened in write mode by one user at a time. Transaction  messages are generated in the database each time the progress of the command changes.2.2.3 PDMS project structure A project is identified by a 3‐character name. All users can  read from the database at any time. Each user has a separate area of the COMMS database. PDMS  Global stores details of issued commands in a TRANSACTION database.6 Getting Started with PDMS . but many users can read  from it.  4. See  Chapter 9  and the PDMS Admin Reference Manual for details of Global.11 TRANSACTION database To enable the System Administrator to monitor the progress of Global commands. or deleting messages and macros. which can be  accessed in write mode.   Transaction databases are only present when PDMS incorporates the Global product.  4. The structure of the project folder is shown below:    Figure 4‐1  Project SAM structure  4-4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  4. All users need to be able to write to this database. For example. the sample project supplied with  PDMS is project SAM. and so can find out about other users in the project. and inter‐database macros.10 MISC database The MISC database is used to store inter‐user messages. which defines those databases which are accessible to any  specific user and whether he may modify them or only look at them  4. and so can record module changes etc.9 COMMS database The COMMS database stores the information about who is using which module and which  databases are current. Each user has read access to  the other users’ areas.The PDMS databases • • A list of PDMS modules available for use in the project  Access control data.2.

6 Getting Started with PDMS 4-5 .4 The relationships between databases Although each type of database contains its own specific type of data. See the  ADMIN Reference Manual for further details.  samiso sampic sammac  DFLTS The directory which stores files needed by Isodraft.  • • VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. some of the data items  in one database are derived from cross–references to data items in other databases. all other types of database are created using the ADMIN module.  4.  PROPERTIES databases.  The directory which stores inter‐database connection macros. It is created (using the MAKE macro) when a new project is  set up. particularly those containing piping or structural steelwork  design data. or the rest of the sample project will  become unusable.  samnnnn_sammmmm  Database files which contain the actual model data. if used. and connectivity data. nnnn has a  maximum value of 8188.  In particular you should note the following points:  • A SYSTEM database must exist before you can access any other type of database in  which you wish to work. It is  therefore sensible. your PDMS install CD will include the MAS and IMP projects:  MAS (Master) provides the sample project data in read‐only databases.The PDMS databases sam000  samsys  samcom  sammis  The project directory. This information includes dimensional data.  The MISC database.  IMP is an (empty) project set to use Imperial units • 4.   The PDMS defaults directory.  DESIGN databases. and sometimes essential. derive information about the individual design components from the  CATALOGUE databases. The files under sam000 are:  The SYSTEM database. are referenced by CATALOGUE and DESIGN  databases. This data  should not be deleted or changed in any way. specifications  for use. A CATALOGUE database must therefore be built up  before you try to work in a DESIGN database.  The directory which stores picture files produced by Draft.1 • Other projects Besides SAM.  The COMMS database.3. to build up the various types of database in a  logical order.

6 Getting Started with PDMS . each user will refer to a common set of data for the project. As this data is common to all  users of each discipline. A DESIGN database.  Generally multi‐discipline projects are executed using discipline‐specific designers who will  use specific applications in PDMS to construct the model components for their discipline. therefore.  When constructing the model. may consist of a number of Design databases for each discipline. CATALOGUE or PADD databases. property and user defined attribute data. the Design and  Reference databases are grouped together into a Multiple Database. for  graphical representation.5  for more details of Multiple Databases. should therefore exist before you try to work in a PADD database. See section 4.  The cross‐references that exist between the various types of database (excluding the  administration databases) are illustrated in Figure 4‐2. or MDB. and hence a CATALOGUE  database. A  project.  LEXICON (DICTIONARY) databases hold definitions which are referenced from  DESIGN. In order that each user can see the required design components modelled by other users and  refer to the common catalogue. property and user‐defined  attribute data that are held in different types of databases.The PDMS databases • • PADD databases normally incorporate references to parts of the design model.  4-6 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. These  databases are collectively known as Reference databases. as well as self–contained information for drawing  annotation and administration. references are made to catalogue.

 These accessible databases are known as the current databases. This is essential if new data is to be added to an empty database.6 Getting Started with PDMS 4-7 . the members of any design team will need  access to those databases containing the parts of the design data for which that team is  responsible plus some of the Catalogue and Drawing databases. This allows the database with write access to be placed at the start of the  MDB.5 Multiple databases (MDBs) When a PDMS project is set up by the Project Administrator. is  described in the PDMS ADMIN Reference Manual. but in most situations it is recommended that there is  one MDB per user. only 300 of these may be accessed at  any one time. An alternative  approach is to have a single MDB for many users. each defining specific groups of databases.  The way in which an MDB is set up. groups of databases are  defined for particular purposes. Databases may be transferred  between current and deferred status at any time. Such a group of databases  is known as a Multiple Database or MDB. There would usually be several MDBs for a  project.The PDMS databases PROPERTIES DB CATALOGUE DB DICTIONARY DB DESIGN DB PADD DB ISOD DB Figure 4‐2   Relationships between the database types  4.  Many users can access the same MDB.  Although an MDB may contain up to 1000 databases. and then use the Monitor module to move  the required database to the front of the list. For example. for users with different tasks to perform. in terms of its constituent databases and access rights. all others  within that MDB are said to be non‐current or deferred. VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.

.

g.  Note:   the hierarchy below illustrates the (simplified) Design database hierarchy. ISOD. Elements that are owned by another element. The ZONE is a  member of the SITE. Lexicon and Properties databases also have a hierarchical  structure. the database is structured in a very simple  and logical form.  Figure 5‐1 The PDMS Design database hierarchy  In this hierarchical structure all the database elements are owned by other elements. are said to be members of the owning element. a tree like structure.6 Getting Started with PDMS 5-1 .  5 How PDMS data is stored Despite the huge power and potential of PDMS. e.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. The database is hierarchical. PADD.g. as illustrated below. e. with  the exception of the WORLD. but the  Catalogue. a ZONE is  owned by a SITE.

 such as a  piping system in one ZONE.3 ZONE The next level below a SITE is a ZONE.  5. or a Vessel.  Every database has its own WORLD element as the first element in the hierarchy. and so on.e. It may. There can be as many SITEs within a PDMS project as required for data  organisation. it is more likely to store similar types of item for easy reference.1 The Design database element types WORLD When the database is first built. The  primitives may be owned directly by the EQUI element or by a Sub‐Equipment element. the second level of the hierarchy is the SITE. A SITE may be considered  as a significant collection of plant.2 SITE Below the WORLD. i.1 5.1. Again. the elements depend on which discipline you are modelling.6 Getting Started with PDMS . it is empty except for a single element named the WORLD. or one part of a  large Project. Each piece of  Equipment can comprise any number of primitive shapes positioned to form the item.4 EQUIPMENT (EQUI) Equipment items are built up in PDMS using elements known as primitives. Below ZONE level the hierarchy is  discipline dependent.    5.1.  5-2 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.1.1. An  Equipment would typically be a Pump.  but by practical considerations.  SITE and ZONE elements are common to all disciplines. for example be the whole Project. whose size is not necessarily determined by physical area.How PDMS data is stored 5. related equipment in another. There can be as many  ZONEs owned by a site as required for data organisation. The Box and Cylinder primitives are  clearly visible in the Pump Equipment shown in Figure 5‐2.  5. a ZONE is not necessarily used to define a  physical area.

5 SUB-EQUIPMENT (SUBE) A SUBE is an optional element to further sub‐divide an EQUI. with a SUBE  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.How PDMS data is stored Figure 5‐2 A Pump EQUI element  5. The SUBE can also own  primitive elements.  Figure 5‐3 A Vessel EQUI.1.6 Getting Started with PDMS 5-3 .

 by copying a complete  FRMW.  and allow the plant structures to be separated for ease of modelling and reporting. they exist to own FRAMEWORK elements. i.1. Structural components may also be owned by a Sub‐Framework element.  which when combined with other primitives can represent complex shapes.1. e. to be done more efficiently.6 PRIMITIVES Primitives are the basic building blocks of PDMS.e.How PDMS data is stored 5.8 FRAMEWORK (FRMW) FRMW elements are used to store structural components in the model. A complex structure  can be divided into logical frameworks. each with its own features.6 Getting Started with PDMS . box (BOX). Dividing the structure in this way allows structural  modelling. There are many types of primitive.7 STRUCTURES (STRU) STRU elements are administrative elements. and also reporting.1.  5.  Figure 5‐4 A pipe rack FRMW element  5-4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. They are used by other disciplines to  create catalogue components. cylinders (CYLI) and pyramids (PYRA). Examples of  primitives are nozzle (NOZZ).g.  5.

 showing Branches  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.1.11 PIPE Pipes may be considered like lines on a flowsheet. I‐section profile  sizes are selected using a Section Specification that references standard catalogue data for  section sizes complying with various national standards.  5.6 Getting Started with PDMS 5-5 .9 SUB-FRAMEWORK (SBFR) A SBFR is an optional element that can own structural components.How PDMS data is stored 5. Subframeworks are  used to further sub‐divide complex projects or for modelling sub‐assemblies within a  framework.1.10 STRUCTURAL COMPONENTS Structural profiles are represented in PDMS by section (SCTN) elements. They may run between several end  connection points and are usually grouped by a common specification and process.  5. Plates are represented by panel  (PANE) elements and curved profiles are modelled using a general section (GENSEC)  component.  Figure 5‐5 A Pipe element.1.

 In PDMS  the start and finish points are called the Head and Tail. each time you want to use a 100mm bore elbow. Heads and tails may be connected to  nozzles.6 Getting Started with PDMS . The data for this remains constant no  matter how many 100mm bore elbows are used in the design. etc. elbows (ELBO). For example. which have known start and finish points.13 PIPING COMPONENTS A BRAN can own a wide variety of components such as gaskets (GASK).How PDMS data is stored 5.1. or left  open ended. tees or other Heads and tails.    5. PDMS always  accesses the data for it from the component catalogue. These form the shape and geometry of the  BRAN and ultimately the pipeline itself. valves (VALV).        Figure 5‐6  A selection of piping components    5-6 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. flanges (FLAN).1. depending on the configuration of the pipe.  tees (TEE).  Piping components are selected using Piping Specifications that reference standard  catalogue data.12 BRANCH (BRAN) Branch elements are sections of a pipe.

 For example. a cylinder (CYLI) has Height and Diameter  attributes whilst the size of a box (BOX) is determined by Xlength.How PDMS data is stored 5. a cylinder has the following attributes:  Attribute Name  Type  Lock  Owner  Position  Default Value Name if specified or hierarchy description  CYLI  false (the element is not locked)  the name of the owning element or its hierarchy description  N 0mm E 0mm U 0mm (relative to its owner)  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  The attributes will vary according to the type of element but essentially the process is the  same.2 Attributes in PDMS Every element in a PDMS database has a fixed set of properties known as its attributes. For example.  Some attributes are common throughout the range of elements while others differ according  to the type of element involved. Ylength and Zlength  attributes. a set of appropriate attributes are entered into the database. as illustrated below:  Figure 5‐7  Cylinder and Box attributes  When you create an element.6 Getting Started with PDMS 5-7 .

 The WORLD  has a special name in PDMS. its LOCK attribute is set to the value TRUE.3). then a hierarchy  description will be displayed in the Design Explorer or Members List (see section 8. and all cylinders in the database will have  precisely the same number of attributes.2.  All PDMS names begin with a forward slash character (/).g. Whether named or not every element will have a  unique system‐generated reference number.2.How PDMS data is stored Attribute Orientation  Level  Obstruction  Diameter  Height  Default Value Y is N and Z is U (relative to its owner)  0 10 (this is a representation level setting)  2 (it is a solid hard element for clashing purposes)  0 mm  0 mm  These are all of the attributes of a cylinder. Elements in a PDMS database are unique. /E1302A is a different  name from /E1302a or /e1302A. all of the forms you encounter will  add the forward slash for you when you press the Enter key after typing a name.1 NAME Every element in PDMS can be named.2.  5.e.3 LOCK The LOCK attribute determines if an element may be changed or not.2.6 Getting Started with PDMS . EQUI is an Equipment type.  Internally PDMS uses the reference number since this cannot change.  5-8 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. A table of names  against reference numbers is maintained for this purpose. LOCK is false. they cannot  have the same name or reference number.  Names cannot contain spaces and are case sensitive. e.  By default. i.  5. An  EQUI will have ZONE as its owner. /*. For example. In order to save you the effort of typing this.4 OWNER The different levels in the hierarchy are maintained by an Owner‐Member relationship. If an element is  locked.  5.2 TYPE This attribute refers to the specific type of element it is. while a CYLI might well be one of the EQUI’s members. preventing it from being modified until  unlocked. If a name is not specified. which is considered to be part of  the name. The  forward slash character is not shown in the Design Explorer or Members List.   5.

 The lower level elements are Members of the  owning element.6 Getting Started with PDMS 5-9 . as shown in the diagram below:  Figure 5‐8  A simple ownership structure  The element on the upper level is the Owner of those elements directly below it. e. the  equipment (EQUI) owns the primitive (CYLI).  5. As each primitive has a different Point of Origin changing the position attribute will  have the effect of moving the cylinder to some other position with its point of origin  positioned on the new co‐ordinates. the EQUI is a member of the ZONE.g.5 POSITION Many items in a database have a POSITION attribute which is the position of the element in  relation to its owner.g.How PDMS data is stored The owner is that element which is directly related to the current element at the next level  up in the hierarchy.2. e.   VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. All primitives have a position attribute which relates to its point of  origin.

How PDMS data is stored

Figure 5‐9 Point of Origin of a CYLI 

5.2.6

ORIENTATION

By default, a cylinder is created in a vertical direction; that is, with one of its ends facing up.  The orientation attribute allows this to be changed to any angle on any axis. 

5.2.7

LEVEL

PDMS can produce different representations of an item, depending on how it has been  modelled and the representation levels used. The default level is 0 to 10 but levels can be set  beyond this range if needed.   For example, steelwork profiles can be represented by centreline (stick representation) only  or by the full detail of the section profile. By manipulating level settings it is, therefore,  possible to have simple or complex representation of elements for Design display or Draft  drawings. 

5.2.8

OBSTRUCTION

The OBSTRUCTION attribute is used to declare whether an element is solid or not.  Obstructions can be declared as Hard, Soft or No Obstruction, depending on the value of the  OBSTRUCTION attribute. The default value of 2 results in a Hard obstruction, 1 results in a  Soft obstruction (used for walkways, maintenance access etc.) and 0 is for No Obstruction  (used to save computing time when elements are enclosed in another element which acts as  an overall obstruction).   
5-10
VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS

How PDMS data is stored

5.2.9

HEIGHT

The height of the cylinder. 

5.2.10 DIAMETER
The diameter of the cylinder. 

5.3

UDAs (User Defined Attributes)

This type of attribute is defined and assigned to elements using the Lexicon module by the  System or Project Administrator. A UDA is just like any other attribute but may be specific  to the company or the particular project. The setting of the UDA is up to the user, although it  may have been set to a default value. Changing this is the same as with all other attributes.  Their current values may be found by querying the items attributes. A UDA can be  recognised by the colon placed in front of it:  COLOUR    HEIGHT    (User Defined Attribute)  (Normal Attribute) 

VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS

5-11

How PDMS data is stored

   

5-12

VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS

 Type in. pressing Enter in each case. or select from the pull‐down  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  Username will have been allocated to you by your System Administrator.  Module   is the PDMS module that you wish to use. SAM).6 Getting Started with PDMS 6-1 .   To enter PDMS. Type in. The VANTAGE PDMS Login  form that appears requires you to specify a number of details at the outset of your session.   Project is the project you will be working on (for example. pressing Enter in each case. or select from  the pull‐down list. Make sure that you  leave the Read Only box unchecked if you wish to modify the database as you  work. start PDMS by selecting  (for example) Start>Programs>AVEVA>VANTAGE PDMS 11.  MDB is the multiple database within the given Project that you wish to use. pressing Enter in each case.6>Run PDMS. pressing Enter in each case. type in. you must first click on the PDMS Login form to make it active. Type in.  list. or  select from the pull‐down list.1 Using PDMS Getting into PDMS Assuming PDMS has been correctly installed on your workstation. Type in. or select  from the pull‐down list.  Password will have been allocated to you by your System Administrator.  6 6. two  command windows and a ‘splashscreen’ will appear briefly.

9.1 Working in a module Once you have entered a module you can carry out any valid operations (normally reading.  adding to or modifying the data stored in the current databases. for the Design module:  6-2 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.   The example below shows that user STRUC has entered PDMS to access MDB STRUC from  the Design module. such as external files or hardware devices.   6.1. as described in section 7. For example.2 Changing to another module Each PDMS module has a Modules submenu enabling you to switch to any other module to  which you have access rights. so as to reflect any design changes  you’ve made while working in the current module. You can transfer data from PDMS to parts of your computer network which are not  part of the PDMS database.  6.6 Getting Started with PDMS . and you can also give  non‐PDMS commands directly the computer operating system. see Chapter 8) by using the  GUI (see Chapter 7) or by using the command syntax for that module as described in the  relevant Reference Manual.   You can update your writeable databases at any time. loading the initial setup from in‐built macro files. You can choose either the  application default settings (Load from Macro Files) or a customised  setup saved during an earlier session (Load from Binary Files).Using PDMS Use Load from to specify which setup files to load at startup.  Click on the    button to enter the Design module.  You can usually change the databases to which the module has access from within the  module.1.

6 Getting Started with PDMS 6-3 . You may either save all work done in the current module before leaving or you  may quit directly without updating any databases. the one shown below being for Design:  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  6.Using PDMS An option form will be displayed asking you whether you wish to save the changes you  have made in the current module before entering another one.  All the modules have an Exit menu selection.2 Getting out of PDMS You will normally leave PDMS directly from the application module in which you are  working.

 If you have done a SAVEWORK (and made no subsequent changes).Using PDMS If you have made changes prior to selecting Exit (and if you have not carried out a  SAVEWORK operation). or if you have  made no changes at all during your Design session.6 Getting Started with PDMS . when you leave PDMS you will be returned to the operating system at the  point from which you entered PDMS. then Exit will display a message which  merely asks you to confirm that you wish to leave Design:    In every case.   6-4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. you will be asked if you first wish to save your changes to the  appropriate database:  Clicking YES at this point would be the equivalent of doing a SAVEWORK (and then a  QUIT).

  PDMS must know if you are using a non‐Latin‐1 language in order to display characters  correctly on drawings.3 Internationalisation Microsoft produces many localised variants of Windows.  By default. comprising:  Albanian    Hungarian       Czech   English    German  Polish   Rumanian  Slovene  Serbo‐Croatian     Slovak   Latin-Cyrillic. In some cases. comprising:  Danish  Finnish  Spanish  Swedish  Dutch  French  German  Italian  English    Faroese  Irish  Portuguese  Icelandic    Norwegian   PDMS can also support the following groups of languages:  Far Eastern.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. reports etc. there is also a need  to localise or translate the user interface. AVEVA provides limited facilities that vary  somewhat between products. though they do not currently support the use of all the  local languages. your PDMS project can use any language whose characters are contained within  the Latin-1 character set. VANTAGE products are designed  to work in English on all of these. comprising:  Japanese  Simplified Chinese  Korean  Traditional Chinese  Latin-2.6 Getting Started with PDMS 6-5 . At the time of writing. nor does it support the mixing of  any of the above except the mixing of one Far Eastern language with English. The same data are also required in other products  such as VANTAGE Plant Design Review.Using PDMS 6. comprising:  Bulgarian     Macedonian  Byelorussian   English  Serbo‐Croatian   Ukrainian  Russian  PDMS does not support any other character set/language.  To use an alternative character set/language:  • You must use an appropriate version of Windows and a suitable keyboard.  Users of PDMS need to enter data (text and names) using their local language and output  the same onto deliverables such as drawings.

 The last one to describe PML 1  fully was dated October 1995. However. the PML 1 expressions package. known as PML 1. The interfaces provided with  PDMS are designed to apply to a wide range of situations and business needs. Almost all the facilities available in PML 1 and  the older Forms and Menus facilities are present in PML2. To minimise this risk.  Before you begin customising a GUI.  . It  cannot guarantee to solve problems caused by software which you have written yourself. which  is used within PDMS for writing rules and defining report templates. you must have a good working knowledge of the  command syntax for the module you are working with.   For full details of PML.  For further details. since  they are no longer under AVEVA’s control. as  you become more experienced with PDMS you may wish to design an interface which is  more closely related to your requirements. and the newer one. for example if you are maintaining old code.  PML 2 has not completely replaced PML 1. If you need a full description of  PML 1.6 Getting Started with PDMS .Using PDMS • You must select the appropriate options from the Windows  Regional Options. it is most important that your in‐house  customisation policies constrain any changes which you make to the Applications so that  they retain maximum compatibility with the standard product at all times. The commands are described in  detail in the reference manuals for the modules. Your own Applications may diverge from future  standard versions and may not take advantage of product enhancements incorporated into  the standard product.4 Customisation facilities. the older one. you will need to refer to previous  versions of the Plant Design Software Customisation Guide.  There are two versions of PML. the programmable macro language Most PDMS modules make use of a GUI to drive the software. Remember that  AVEVA can give you full technical support only for products over which it has control. You do this using AVEVA’s programmable  macro language (PML). and there are some tasks which are carried out  more efficiently using PML 1 facilities. known  as PML 2. see the PDMS Installation Guide. refer to the VANTAGE Plant Design Software Customisation Guide and  the Plant Design Software Customisation Reference Manual. also the PDMS Admin User Guide for  details of font families. PML 2 has been specifically designed for writing and customising the Forms and  Menus of PDMS and other AVEVA products.  The ability to customise individual Applications to suit your own specific needs gives you  great flexibility in the ways in which you use your system. But it also introduces the risk that  your modified macros may not be compatible with future versions of the software.  6. In particular. 6-6 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.

 where the pointer is positioned.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. the design item  on which you want to carry out the next operation).  Text boxes and drop‐down lists are explained below.  and the position within the window. This chapter describes those GUI features which are specific  to PDMS.  The left‐hand mouse button has three functions:  • On a graphical view. the effect varies according to what you select. clicking the left‐hand button with the pointer over a design  element results in that element becoming the current element (that is.  7.   In a sequence of menus.   On a form. The appearance of the  pointer changes according to the type of display item that is underneath it.6 Getting Started with PDMS 7-1 . The buttons perform different tasks depending on the type of window.  7 Basic GUI features PDMS uses a GUI using forms (dialog boxes) and menus with which Microsoft Windows  users should not be unfamiliar.1 Using the mouse You use the mouse to steer the pointer around the screen and to select or pick items by using  the mouse buttons.  • • The middle mouse button is used primarily to manipulate a graphical view.  7. the right‐hand  button is used to access the menu options specific to the graphical view window. dragging with the left‐hand button activates the command  represented by the highlighted menu option when the button is released.2 • • • • • • Using forms Forms can include any of the following:  text boxes  drop‐down lists  option buttons  check boxes  scrollable lists  action buttons. the remainder are explained later in  this chapter.

 The list will usually  have a label to tell you what you are setting and will show the current selection. display a subsidiary menu that offers   a further range of options.2.Basic GUI features 7.  Any text box with an unconfirmed setting is highlighted by a yellow background. and entries with the wrong type of data are not accepted.  Type in the required data.  7.2 Using drop-down lists Drop‐down lists let you choose one option from a multiple selection.)  When you have finished.2.  When you first open a form which contains text boxes. click on the down arrow or button face to reveal the full list of  available options. then pick the required option.    Options followed by a pointer.  To enter data into a text box:  • • • Click in the box to insert the text editing cursor.6 Getting Started with PDMS .        7-2 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. editing any existing entry as necessary.  They typically have the following appearance:    To change the setting.  7. A text‐box often  contains a default entry (such as unset) when first displayed.3 Using menus Menu options in pull‐down or pop‐up menus can be in any of three formats:      Standalone options initiate an action immediately. (You may need to  delete the existing entry first. confirm the entry by pressing the Enter (or Return) key.    Options followed by three dots display a form. Some text boxes accept only  text or only numeric data. the first text‐box on the form is  current and a text editing cursor (a vertical bar) is displayed in the box.1 Using text boxes Text boxes are the areas where you type in alphanumeric data such as names or dimensions.  A text box will usually have a label to tell you what to enter.

5 Using the status bar   The status bar displays messages telling you what actions the application is carrying out.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. Click on the name of a  toolbar to add or remove it from the display as required. you must press the Esc key when you have finished to  indicate that you are ready to move to the next operation. related selections from menus are abbreviated form using the >  symbol as a separator.  Note:  Toolbars can be switched on or off by right‐clicking on a tool bar or the menu bar.  7.  Some modules are provided with several toolbars. Select Position from the bar men.   7.   The actions of the buttons are explained in the online help. especially if the system appears to be waiting for you to do  something.  2.  The names of all the toolbars available for the module will then be listed. you click on it. Toolbars contain a number of icon  buttons which let you carry out common tasks without searching for the options in the  menus. Move the pointer to the right and select Explicit from the resultant submenu.6 Getting Started with PDMS 7-3 . If you hover the cursor over a  button.  If the prompt lets you repeat a task an unspecified number of times. a tool‐tip pop‐up box will remind you of the function of the button. Toolbars  currently displayed will have a tick next to their names. such as picking a  selection of items using the cursor.  You should look at it frequently. since it will always prompt you for any input or action which is required to carry  out the next step of your current activity. To activate a  button.4 Using the toolbars Toolbars are displayed immediately below the main menu bar in the application window.Basic GUI features Throughout this guide. For example:  Select Position>At>Explicit means:  1. Select At from the resulting pull‐down menu  3.

  Unlike option buttons.6. The selection is mutually exclusive. and only one.  7.Basic GUI features 7.6. you can change a setting.6.6 Getting Started with PDMS .  They typically have the following appearance:      Option selected  Option not selected  To change the selected option button in a group.3 Using scrollable lists   7-4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.   While you have access to a form. click the required button.  7.  from a group of options. according to  the nature of the form.1 Using option buttons Option buttons (sometimes referred to as radio buttons) are used to select one. text‐boxes. so that selecting one option  deselects others in that group automatically. they do not interact. so that you can set any combination of check  boxes at the same time. accept  and act on the current data. return to the initial values. and scrollable lists. Input  to a form is usually via a combination of mouse and keyboard.  They typically have the following appearance:      Set  Unset  7. or cancel the form without applying any changes. typically set and unset.2 Using check boxes Check boxes are used to switch an option between two states.6 More on using forms Forms are used both to display information and to let you enter new data. Forms typically  comprise an arrangement of buttons of various types.

  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.7 Responding to alert forms Alert forms are used to display information such as error messages.  The common action buttons are:    Tells PDMS to accept the current form settings. Other lists let you make multiple selections. by clicking on it again (repeated clicks toggle a selection).Basic GUI features A scrollable list is displayed as a vertical list of options within a form.4 Using action buttons Most forms include one or more action buttons. or  by clicking on the control buttons on the form (usually an OK or Cancel button).    Closes the form.6.  7. The action is indicated by the name of the button (such Add or Remove). and leaves the form displayed   for further use.  7. You should respond by carrying out the task prompted for. with all  selected options highlighted simultaneously.              Tells PDMS to accept the current form settings. and closes the form. keeping the current settings. and leaves the form displayed   for further use. prompts and requests  for confirmation of changes. You use these to tell PDMS what to do with  the details you have entered in the form.  Some scrollable lists let you make only a single selection. To select an option. so that selecting any option  deselects all others automatically. with vertical and  horizontal scroll bars along its sides. click on the line you want.   Cancels any changes you have made to the form.6 Getting Started with PDMS 7-5 . The  selected line is highlighted. and closes the form.  Cancels any changes you have made to the form.  Some forms contain more specific types of control button which carry out particular  command options. You can deselect a highlighted option in a  multiple‐choice list.

Menu Bars and Tool Bars help topic. you may want to:  • Create macros to automate repetitive procedures (see the Plant Design Software  Customisation Guide and Reference Manual)  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. Paste.6 Getting Started with PDMS 7-6 . The scrollable list shows the command(s) entered and any resulting output from  PDMS (including error messages).Basic GUI features 7.8 Dockable Windows. by using commands  you may be able to streamline your methods of working and save you time on repeated  tasks.1 Why use command syntax? For most purposes you will want to use PDMS via the GUI. Copy.9.  Command syntax in the Command> box can be edited using the Delete and  Backspace keys in the normal way. For full details  of these facilities see the PDMS online help (for the “graphical” modules). and press  Enter.NET forms” where windows are “dockable” and  “undockable”. Dockable Windows. and where other window manipulation facilities are available.  7.   7. click in the Command> text entry box.  Undo). In particular.  Command editing aids are available:  • • • Clicking on a line in the scrollable list area copies that line to the Command > box. Menu Bars and Tool Bars PDMS uses a number of Microsoft “. which gives the Command Window:  To give a command. However. Delete. type in the command.  Highlighting some or all of the text in the Command> box and pressing the right  mouse button gives useful Windows editing commands (Cut.9 Using commands PDMS commands can be typed in when using PDMS via the Display>Command Line…  menu selection.

 For example:  Q MEM  Q ATT  ‐ list the members of the current element  ‐ list the attributes of the current element  Note that you should always use the GUI to create elements.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS 7-7 .Basic GUI features • Design and create new forms and menus for your graphical user interface that match  your working needs precisely (see the Plant Design Software Customisation Guide and  Reference Manual)  In some cases it can be slightly quicker to use commands rather than the GUI for simple  operations.

6 Getting Started with PDMS .Basic GUI features     7-8 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.

 you may need to find out  about any of the following:  • • • • • The current usage of the program in terms of users. You must therefore be  able to tell PDMS:  • which database(s) you want to access  • which elements in the database hierarchy you want to access  • what changes. when working in PDMS.6 Getting Started with PDMS 8-1 . the current setting of an  attribute or the list of member elements owned by a specific element  The elements which match specific selection criteria entered by you  Each module incorporates a Query pull‐down menu which allows you to ask about some of  these topics. either to add. if any. you want to make to the database’s contents  This chapter tells you how to do these things  8.  8 Basic operations in PDMS Work in any PDMS module is mostly about manipulating the elements and their attributes  in one or more databases. read or delete data. change. the scope of the facility being dependent upon the particular module which you  are using.1 Querying You will often find. modules and databases  The unique code which identifies the process you are running and the station you are  running it from (useful for generating unique workfile names)  The current setting of a command option  The contents of part of a particular database. for example. that you need to check existing information  about some aspect of the program’s operations. For example. the Query pull‐down menu for Design is:  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. For example.

 The members of  the current element will be show. PDMS also considers you to be at a  specific pointer. that is.2 Current element and current list position Chapter 5 explained the principles of database structures and the concept of owners and  members.  To check the Current Element and its Member List (in numeric order) at any time. See the PDMS Design  Reference Manual Part 1 for details.  The Member List of any element comprises a list of pointers to those elements directly  below it in the database hierarchy. As soon as you access a  new element. the QUERY command must be used. to those elements which it owns. This section introduces two new concepts which apply to all aspects of database  navigation when you are using a constructor module.  Pointer to Current List Position Current Element Members of Current Element 1 2 3 4 List Position in Member List Figure 8‐1 Current Element. For  these other (general) options.  Not all of the querying operations available from PDMS can be accessed using the GUI. This element is known as the Current Element. identified by numbered positions in the list (see Figure 8‐1). Member List and Current List Position  As you move about within a database. This position is known as the Current List Position. this becomes the Current Element. the Current Element and Current List Position are  continuously updated so that PDMS always knows where you are.   8. simply  click the   box next to the desired current element in the Design Explorer.  When you are working in any database.Basic operations in PDMS The querying operations available from the GUI are fully explained by the online help for  the module in question. PDMS always considers you to be located at a  specific element in that database. For example:  8-2 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. These pointers  have a definite order. In  addition to being notionally at the Current Element.6 Getting Started with PDMS .

Basic operations in PDMS Alternatively. give the commands:  Q CE   Q MEM  ‐ to display the current element  ‐ to display the members list of the current element  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS 8-3 .

  • • • The current element can be identified in the Design Explorer as the highlighted item in the  tree view and is displayed in the History list in the main menu bar. graphical method of exploring the Design  Database.6 Getting Started with PDMS .  8-4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.3 Navigating to a given element You would normally navigate to an element by means of the Explorer or the Members list.      8. delete.3.1 The Design Explorer The Design Explorer provides an easy‐to‐use.  navigation to database elements in Design databases  the ability to manage items in the display using the Draw List (a separate window  listing the displayed items)  the ability to query the attributes of. The History list contains  a list of recently visited items. copy and paste Design database  elements.  Design Explorer replaces most of the functions of the Members List in PDMS Design. It has the following features:  • A Tree View display of Design database elements (which can be expanded and  contracted by clicking the   or   icons) in the current MDB. The icons in the tree  view represent the different Design database element types.Basic operations in PDMS 8. rename.  The  Members List is still available from the Display menu.

 If the current element were a nozzle (NOZZ) then Goto>Reference would allow  navigation inside the catalogue database via the NOZZ’s Catref attribute. are owned by  another element.    PDMS databases may contain many thousands of elements. then select the  Owner option. only one element can  be accessed at a time.  8-5 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. First select this menu. it can be  reinstated by selecting Display>Design Explorer from the main menu bar.  8. As all elements. with the exception of the WORLD. a  ZONE.e. say. For example. this will navigate to the owner of the CE. deleting.  Full details of these forms and how to use them are given in the online help.  Choosing the Goto>Reference option will give a list of further options depending on the  Current Element. Selecting   would move to the   would move back to the previous EQUI element. the Members List displays the database elements in the  current MDB.3. The   and   arrows at  the top of the Members List allow navigation up and down the list at the level of the current  element.   The Goto menu at the top of the form can also be used. however. i. If you dismiss it. selecting  next EQUI element in the list. if positioned at an EQUI element.  There are a number of ways to navigate from one item to another. a ZONE would cause everything owned by that ZONE to be  deleted as well.6 Getting Started with PDMS . Goto>Reference at EQUI level will only navigate to its owner.Basic operations in PDMS The Design Explorer will be displayed on entry to Design.2 The Members List As with the Design Explorer.

3.Basic operations in PDMS 8.  8.3 Other Explorers Besides the Design Explorer (to navigate the Design database).3.4 My Data My Data provides a ‘scratchpad’ facility. Spooler and Isodraft (to navigate the ISOD (spool  drawings)) database.  8-6 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. there are similar explorers  in Draft (to navigate the Draft database). enabling you to assemble collections of data and  transfer them from one module to another.6 Getting Started with PDMS .

  General application:  Full details of these menus and how to use them are given in the online help.6 Getting Started with PDMS 8-7 . For example. by means of the  Create. for the Design module. The options available depend on the module  that you are in and the application that is loaded. modify or delete elements using the GUI. Modify and Delete pull‐down menus.Basic operations in PDMS 8.     VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.4 Modifying the content of a database You would normally create.

.

 

9

Interfaces to other systems

PDMS is a member of AVEVA’s VANTAGE Plant Design family of products, the others  being VANTAGE Plant Engineering (VPE), VANTAGE Project Resource Management  (VPRM), and VANTAGE Enterprise Net (VNET). This chapter introduces these products  and gives an overview of the ways in which PDMS interfaces with them. 

9.1

VANTAGE Plant Enginerring (VPE)

The VPE products store and manage the engineering data for a plant design project. There  are two VPE Products:  • • VPE Workbench  VPE P&ID 

9.1.1

VPE Workbench

VPE Workbench is a project data store based around an Oracle database. The database is  capable of storing all the engineering data required to design, build and commission a  process plant.  VPE Workbench interfaces with a wide range of applications including PDMS, VPE P&ID  and VPRM. Together with these applications, VPE Workbench can be used from the start of  plant conceptual design all the way through to plant operation.  
VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS

9-1

Interfaces to other systems

One of the greatest strengths of VPE Workbench is its data management capabilities. These  include access control, security, issue control, validation, change monitoring and the audit  trail.   VPE Workbench can be used to produce a range of deliverables including datasheets  (specifications) and schedules. If VPE Utilities and Business Objects are used with VPE  Workbench, this range of deliverables can be extended to include diagrams and all manner  of ad hoc reports. VPE Workbench maintains a log of deliverables that it produces but does  not control these outside of itself.   Clients are able to receive deliverables in electronic format and there are various tools  available such as Data Mapper that can take client data and import it into VPE Workbench.   Using VPE Workbench:   • Provides controlled, multi‐user access to managed engineering data resulting in  improved data accuracy and less time spent waiting for data or looking for the latest  release;   Results in less rework, because up‐to‐date data is always available;   Leads to improved data accuracy and validation with in built expertise;   Enables comprehensive audit trails to be maintained which record the time that  changes were made and by whom;   Provides electronic deliverables and flexible reporting output;   Enables a common system to be established in every office, permitting multi‐office  project execution with global working across a wide area network, and enabling  efficient transfer of engineers between offices with minimal re‐training;   Enables rapid start up of new projects, as data held in a database for an existing  project can be copied to a new project;   Automatically highlights data changes;   Provides advanced query facilities;   Facilitates implementation of STEP standards for data exchange;   Presents the user with an interface common with other Windows software already in  use and hence reduces learning times.   Quick and easy reporting of UDA data from PDMS.  

• • • • •

• • • • • •

VPE Workbench is made up of modules, five of which are based on engineering disciplines.  They are Process, Instrumentation, Mechanical, Electrical and Piping. The user interface  for each of these modules is tailored to suit the user’s role and normal work activities. The  structure of the underlying data store remains completely hidden. There is one further  module, the Administration module, which is used to set up data for all the modules.  

9.1.2

Introducing the VPE Workbench user interface

The VPE Workbench entry screen is as shown below: 

9-2

VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS

Interfaces to other systems

You access data via forms. Regardless of the number of users concurrently accessing the  system, VPE Workbench ensures that data duplication is eliminated, and that the full data  history is preserved.  VPE Workbench automatically tracks and highlights all data changes and provides an  effective mechanism for configuring the controlled approval and release of data, and  associated change notification.  A typical VPE/Oracle form is: 

VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS

9-3

  9-4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. instrument indexes.6 Getting Started with PDMS .  The P&ID Loader is  one such interface.  Specific data interfaces exist between VPE P&ID and VPE Workbench.Interfaces to other systems 9.  Typical  documents are drawing lists. which enables a set of files. optimised for producing Process and Instrumentation  diagrams (P&IDs).  Also.  VPE P&ID can also be used to build ʹschematic onlyʹ or ʹfirst passʹ flow diagrams quickly  without the necessity to enter project data. and selected equipment design information to be automatically included in a  P&ID. Data from VPE Workbench can also be imported into  VPE P&ID. provided by the user that is associated with the drawing symbols (AutoCAD blocks or  Microstation cells). to  draw intelligent P&IDs quickly and accurately. to be loaded and reloaded whenever necessary.  This data.  VPE P&ID is an application that can be combined with either AutoCAD or Microstation.1. piping line lists. containing various categories of engineering  data. can  be transferred to VPE Workbench.  The intelligence of each P&ID consists of the  data. the two‐way transfer of  information between VPE P&ID and VPE Workbench enables loop numbers. which may not be available at the time. I/O  information. equipment lists. valve  lists and lists of special piping items. VPE  P&ID uses the data on P&IDs to generate lists of process information that can then be used  to automatically create documents via an interface with a data management system. together with the graphical information of the drawing.3 VPE P&ID VPE P&ID is a 2D‐drafting system.

Interfaces to other systems Information is validated online as it is entered into VPE P&ID by a conformance check  against validation lists.  The data may then be exported to separate files outside of AutoCAD  or Microstation. as  required.  These files can then be imported by a database and manipulated. which integrates with the AutoCAD or Microstation  display and software.2 VANTAGE Plant Resource Management (VPRM) The VPRM Workbench product provides Project Control and Resource Management  facilities covering the key Project Variables of:  • • • • Materials  Documents  Progress  Costs  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. a command window. pulldown  menus and. optionally. tablet (digitiser) menus.  9.  The interface also incorporates dialogue or list boxes.6 Getting Started with PDMS 9-5 . in the case of  Microstation.  The VPE P&ID user interface comprises customised menus. toolbars and.

 EDM covers the  document storage and distribution. VPRM provides  ICARUS with historical data on which to base estimates.   VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  VPRM imports engineering design data from VPE. and to ensure the compatibility of  this transfer. enabling timely decisions to be made. registering. while continuing to use the functionality of KMS for  other purposes.6 Getting Started with PDMS • • • • • • • 9-6 . EDMʹs search and retrieval facilities are  available from within VPRM. GPI provides  VPRM with a standard for categorising materials.   PRIMAVERA Planning System   PRIMAVERA provides VPRM with activity and milestone details and planned dates. and with other  strategic systems. progressing etc. cost and  commitment values and information on vendors and the materials received from  them. such as MS Excel and Word.2. known as GMC (Global Material  Category). materials. to enable GPI to be a source of information on  world‐wide best prices and availability of equipment and materials.g. VPE imports reference data from VPRM. and VPRM covers the organisation of document  numbering. MTO details are derived from these drawings and imported into  VPRM. PENTA)   VPRM provides a financial system such as PENTA with budget.   Financial Systems (e.   GPI (Global Procurement Information) System   VPRM provides GPI with details of globally strategic vendors.  9. The financial system provides VPRM with information on expenditure and  actual hours worked.   PDMS and PDS 3D Modelling Systems   These systems can import VPRM Specification Data for use in the production of  isometric drawings.  EDM (Enterprise Document Management) System   EDM and VPRM operate in conjunction to manage documentation.  VPRM provides PRIMAVERA with forecast and actual completion dates. bids  received and purchase orders placed.Interfaces to other systems VPRM enables Project Management to identify and access information relating to the above  variables.1 VPRM Interfaces VPRM interfaces with general office systems. for example:   • VANTAGE Plant Engineering (VPE).   KMS Management System   Interfaces between KMS and VPRM enable users of KMS to utilise VPRM for  material management activities.  ICARUS Estimating System   ICARUS provides VPRM with original budget data for a project.

 a vendor database and an estimating database. materials and documents.2.6 Getting Started with PDMS . VPRM interrelates with EDM  for handling of the actual documents.   Project Management   VPRM presents a high‐level view of the status and overall health of each project.2 VPRM Facilities Once installed in an office. The  presented information covers costs. the allocation of access rights  to screens and reports presented by VPRM. is continuously  available for ongoing related processes. variances between  forecast and budget values. within and between projects. progress. VPRM incorporates an access control facility. Progress of individual design  documents is included. VPRM can be used to control many projects. expenditure and commitment values and other data for the  management of project costs.   Cost Management   VPRM presents budget. are displayed.Interfaces to other systems Extensive interfaces between these systems ensure that data. productivity and scheduling  of work carried in the “home office” for each project.   The facilities provided by VPRM are summarised below:  • Data Security   To safeguard the held data. VPRM provides  facilities for:   9-7 • • • • • VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. The information is presented as ʹto‐dateʹ and for  specified periods. This  involves allocation of passwords to the various VPRM ʹSystem Usersʹ and. progress. VPRM provides ʹCorporateʹ facilities.  9. Overall project man‐hour requirements for the duration of  the project are computed. To highlight potential management problems.  depending on the functional role of the particular user. tagged items and bulk materials  (summarised here as materials) throughout the life of the project. To support  operation of the projects.   Progress Measurement   VPRM presents information on the budgets. once created. and between expenditure to date and commitment  values.   Document Control   VPRM provides facilities for controlling documents produced for the design and  construction of the project (Design Documents) and documents that support the  purchased items and materials (Vendor Documents). consisting of a material  catalogue.   Engineering and Materials Management   For the control of all major equipment. Critical data  is highlighted. The support of projects by  corporate facilities ensures consistent referencing and identification of materials and  vendors.

 Vendors are identified as supplying materials of particular categories. the material catalogue can  provide descriptions in other languages. In addition to the standard versions. and maintaining records of them when in  stores.6 Getting Started with PDMS . and then  placing purchase orders.   Sending enquiries to potential vendors.   Organising the transit of consignments from vendors to site. In future. and reference numbers specified by a  particular client or defined by the user. consisting of:  An Oracle Database server. which contains the data and some of the application  logic. where appropriate.   A Client tier that provides the user interface.   An Oracle Internet Application server (iAS). with the server‐side tiers. and  quality assurance and quality control performance. This communicates with the Database  server and contains the bulk of the application logic as well as the iAS aspects.   9-8 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.3 • • • VPRM Architecture VPRM uses an Oracle 3‐tier architecture. taking into account the availability  of the required materials and.   Planning and scheduling construction work. analysing the resultant bids.2.Interfaces to other systems • • • • • • • • Specifying which materials are permitted for use.   Systematically analysing the project design information with regard to the  materials required for construction (Material Take Off). assigning them to  subcontractors.   Requisitioning the materials in a logical and controlled manner.   Vendor Database   The VPRM vendor database is a single source of information on vendors and sub‐ contractors.   • • 9.  It  communicates with the iAS by direct socket connection.  The PCs run Web browsers. the database will  also provide facilities to produce the estimates themselves and will also contain  standard costs for construction activities.   Expediting and organising inspection of materials prior to despatch from  vendors.  and data is available regarding past bid and purchase order performance. via PCs.   Recording receipt of materials at site.   Estimating Database   The VPRM estimating database contains bulk material price information for use in  the production of estimates for future VPRM projects.   • Material Catalogue   The VPRM material catalogue facilitates the logical identification of materials and  purchasable items and is the source of all standard VPRM descriptions and  references for them.

 with a typical selection. Note the toolbar. A typical  screen (Identity Code Details) is shown below:  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.4 Introducing the VPRM user interface VPRM uses a standard MS Windows “forms and menus” user interface. inserted.6 Getting Started with PDMS 9-9 . modified or deleted. These  items form a structure in which data can be queried. All VPRM sessions  are displayed in a standard browser window.  The data entry screens within VPRM are produced using a number of database items.2.Interfaces to other systems 9. is  shown below. The main menu bar.

 equipment and instruments. The Model Management System provides  facilities for controlling data related to engineering objects designed in 3D using PDMS.3 VPE and VPRM Interfaces . See the user  documentation for Isodraft. as input using VPE Workbench. The VANTAGE Plant Design Model Management product constitutes a much  more extensive set of interfaces between the above (and other) products. This structure ensures  9-10 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  9.Interfaces to other systems 9. The  facilities encompass creating and maintaining the PDMS data from 2D engineering data for  lines.4 VANTAGE Plant Design Model Management Model Management (which requires PDMS and VPE to be present) integrates PDMS and  VPE into the Model Management product. See below.Summary The interfaces between AVEVA’s VANTAGE Plant Engineering and VANTAGE Plant  Resource Management packages can be summarised by the diagram below:  Bulk Material Control and Procurement MTO data PDMS Spec data VPRM Engineering Data Tray Access and E&I position data VPE The PDMS → VPRM interface takes place from the PDMS Isodraft module.6 Getting Started with PDMS . and the online guides for the VPE and VPRM products for more  details.

 components  and equipment of the designed process plant are represented consistently by the P&IDs and  the 3D model in PDMS. or  by mapping the data from a spreadsheet. Connectivity Manager ensures that the pipes.  The system provides reports on clashes and enables a  status. mainly for reporting purposes and drawing control  facilities.1 The Model Management System core facilities Model Object Manager manages the build and attribute comparison of 3D objects against  the 2D data content in VPE Workbench. and associated reports to be produced.6 Getting Started with PDMS 9-11 .   The PDMS Design database is the central storage point for 3D design objects and associated  attribute data.  Connectivity Manager manages the connectivity comparison of pipelines in the 3D model  with the counterpart 2D P&ID lines. Model Object Manager provides facilities for  controlling data for all engineering objects designed in 3D using PDMS.  The Data Storage area of VPE is the central repository for 2D objects and associated data. Clash Manager can be  used to process the 3D data and generate clash data when two or more items that are not  connected occupy the same 3D space. and the 3D  design model. and certain attributes that  affect the 3D design. namely VPD Deliverable Manager. The 3D design objects are created and managed during a PDMS session.  The  status of each controlled object is managed through VPD Model Management.  Clash Manager manages the resolution of clashes in the 3D model. Connectivity Manager and  Clash Manager products. and also provides facilities for building 3D pipelines  and components from 2D data. the 2D P&IDs.  Facilities are available for viewing the lists of engineering data.   The 2D objects can be created by importing data from a P&ID.Interfaces to other systems that there is consistency between the specified engineering data. control and monitor the work involved in the resolution of all clashes. The Connectivity Manager GUI displays information on the  occurrences of connectivity mismatches.4. and modifying design data to bring it into line with  engineering data. history and responsible discipline to be allocated to each one.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. VPE data storage also holds the 3D data for 3D  objects that correspond to every controlled design object in PDMS. comparing  design data with engineering data. This enables a  comparison of the data to be made between the engineering data and design data within  VPE itself. and for creating design data based on engineering data. by direct entry into VPE. maintaining records  of 3D objects that mirror those in PDMS.  This enables the PDMS  user to prioritise. Bespoke products can also be provided as part of the Model  Management System. Area‐Based Automatic Drawing  Production and Multi‐Discipline Supports. and can graphically display the physical positions  of them.  9.   Model Management also includes the Model Object Manager.

 3D models.5 VANTAGE Enterprise NET (VNET) VANTAGE Enterprise NET (VNET) is an application‐independent. irrespective of tasks or  discipline.  9-12 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.6 Getting Started with PDMS . documents and data from any application can be browsed in context and with  full intelligence. An  example Connectivity Manager screen is shown below. giving the most comprehensive profile of plant data. web‐enabled platform  for collaboration and mark‐up of engineering information. it is the ʹwindow on the worldʹ for projects or plants.2 Introducing the Model Management System GUI The Model Management System uses a ‘forms and menus’ GUI like other VPD Products.  schematics.    For its users.Interfaces to other systems   9. Through VNET.  9.4.

 the command is placed in  a transaction database at that location for later processing.  Global is a System Management product rather than a “user” product. The advantage of this mode  of operation in Global is to prevent a slow long‐transaction command from blocking the  user.6 VANTAGE Plant Design Global Global is an optional PDMS facility which is used to synchronise the databases between  different sites (which may be at different locations and in different time zones) working on  the same project. and local copies of PDMS databases.  The visualisation facilities in Review include:  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. In principle. commands are processed one at a time so that the next command cannot  begin until the previous one has finished. The project’s distributed nature is largely invisible to the users.  9. A small number of commands.  Some may  roll back. the state of the system is therefore  always known. Global takes the form of extra forms and  menus in the Admin module. bypass the transaction database and are stored in a pending  file for later processing. The PDMS users in the different locations access the same  PDMS project.Interfaces to other systems 9.7 VANTAGE Plant Design Review Plant design model files created using PDMS Design can be exported to VANTAGE Plant  Design Review for visualisation. In a PDMS  installation that incorporates the Global product. while others may just fail.  If a remote command traversing the Global network becomes held up at a particular location  (for example due to a comms line fault) then. The use of the transaction database and the pending file means that  commands are guaranteed to complete. remote commands are processed in parallel and so the next  command may be initiated before the previous one has finished. you cannot design things in Review.  known as ‘kernel’ commands. Its disadvantage is that the user needs to work in a new way to exploit this parallel  nature of Global. It is important to realise that Review is a visualisation  product.6. Each location  has its own local copy of the PDMS product. the project databases are automatically checked and incremental  updates are issued across all project sites.1 The Transaction database In standard PDMS.6 Getting Started with PDMS 9-13 .  9. In Global. but some commands may not succeed.  You can split a project so that its data is distributed across a number of locations by making  the project into a Global project. To ensure  the integrity of data. for most commands.

  Animations can be defined by setting up a progressive sequence of views.  Material definition. giving a  ‘walkthrough’ effect. giving even greater realism.).Interfaces to other systems • • • • • View control.  Sea and Sky backgrounds can be included.  9. smoothness and texture. The position that the observer is looking from.  Lighting facilities allow the positions. Selected model elements can be given ‘material’ display  properties such as shininess. and the viewing angle can all be controlled.6 Getting Started with PDMS .  A typical Review picture is shown below (courtesy of Paragon Engineering Services Inc. the point through  which the observer is looking. the orientation of the model with respect to the  viewer. colours and intensities of light sources to be  controlled.8 The Data Exchange Interfaces A variety of VANTAGE Plant Design interface products exist as separate ‘add‐on’ packages  to PDMS:  9-14 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.

aveva. see the AVEVA website  www.   Enables design data in the Intergraph Standard File Format (ISFF)  or MicroStation DGN and DRV formats to be imported into PDMS  and Review products.  Exports piping information to Coade’s Caesar II pipe‐stress  program  Exports piping information to AAA Technology’s Triflex pipe‐ stress program  Exports PDMS model data to the CABSYS Cable routing package  Exports PDMS model data to the STAAD III stress analysis  package  ImPLANT‐I  ImPLANT‐STL  ExPLANT‐I  RetroView  STRESS‐C  STRESS‐T  PDMS to CABSYS  PDMS to STAAD III  For more details of these products.  Enables geometry data from PDMS to be exported into the 3D  geometry DGN format.  Enables the PDMS model to be adjusted to as‐built status by  comparison with photogrammetric data from Offset’s Magan  product.6 Getting Started with PDMS 9-15 .com/engineeringit/world/ VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.Interfaces to other systems Product Name OpenSteel  Function Provides a bi‐directional interface between PDMS and leading steel  detailing packages such as StruCAD. SteelCad and X‐Steel using  the SDNF file format.  Imports STL‐format data from third party mechanical CAD  packages into PDMS Design.

.

 which provides a method of switching to it. with  expansions to their full derivations. The opposite is Interactive Mode.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. or a list of instructions combined into a single  input line. overnight.  Crosshairs ‐ A crosshair cursor. for example pipework design. A command word often requires a qualifying argument.2 Definitions Add‐in ‐ An add‐in provides a means of adding functionality. The command inputs are stored in a file and then read sequentially into  the computer.6 Getting Started with PDMS A-1 .  Batch Mode ‐ A method of running a computer program without user intervention. A horizontal and a vertical line on a display screen whose  intersection represents the cursor position. with which you are assumed to be  familiar. A  command may comprise a single instruction. for  example. Algebraic syntax conforms closely to the  way in which the expression to be calculated would be written as an ordinary mathematical  function.  Command ‐ An instruction to the computer program to carry out a specific action.  A.1 • • Introduction This glossary comprises:  Technical terms relevant to PDMS. An element is fully specified by combining all its attributes.  It does not list general process engineering terms.  Applicationware (‘Appware’) – A suite of forms and macros designed for use with a specific  design task. An add‐in application  appears on the applications menu.  Abbreviations and acronyms used throughout the PDMS documentation. with brief explanations of their meanings.   Algebraic Notation ‐ The form of syntax used in current versions of PDMS for entering  values and operators into numerical calculations.  Attribute ‐ A specific item of data which defines one of the properties of an element in a  database.  Current Element ‐ The element in a database at which you are notionally situated at a given  stage of database navigation.  Application Macro ‐ A predefined macro which allows you to enter sequences of commands  which simplify specific types of design work.    Appendix A Glossary of terms and abbreviations A.

 Data may be added  to and removed from a file. a printer. usually with  prompting text which shows you what to enter at each location. If the distance from the pointer position to the intended location is larger  than the hit radius.  Graphics File ‐ see Plotfile.Glossary of terms and abbreviations   Database ‐ A related set of data stored in a logically‐accessible format in a computer system.  GROUP ‐ A collective element which can be used to form temporary links between  otherwise unrelated elements in a database.  Expression ‐ A mathematical or logical definition. the location will not be identified.6 Getting Started with PDMS .  File ‐ An identifiable part of the computerʹs memory used to store data.  Folder (also referred to as a Directory) ‐ An administrative grouping of files in the  computerʹs memory to make logical access to any individual file easier. The opposite is Batch Mode. the calculated result of which is to be used  as a command argument.  Interactive Mode ‐ The method of operation whereby you perform an operation using the  mouse and/or keyboard and wait for PDMS to interpret and act upon it before you perform  the next operation.  Docking/Dockable ‐ This describes forms and menu bars that can be attached in  appropriate places to the frame of the main PDMS window.  Element ‐ A discrete item of data held in a database.  Any single item of data can be retrieved by defining a unique route to its location.   Drag‐and‐drop ‐ Select with mouse and then drag (holding the mouse button down) to a  different place.g.  Filename ‐ The name of a file in the computerʹs operating system.  Default ‐ An option selected automatically if you do not specify any particular choice from  an available range of commands or attribute settings.  Head ‐ The input end of a BRANCH (under normal flow conditions). plotter or terminal). When referenced from  within PDMS the filename must be preceded by a / symbol.  Device Driver ‐ An interface which translates the output from a computer into a form which  can be input to another device (e.  Form (also referred to as a Dialog Box) ‐ That part of a graphical user interface screen into  which you may enter the settings of parameters or command arguments.  Hit Radius ‐ The maximum acceptable error in identifying a point on a screen using a  graphics pointer. identified by number and/or name and  defined by its attributes. or may be manipulated as a whole by operations on the  complete file.  A-2 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. this symbol is not part of the  filename as defined by the computerʹs operating system.

 An owner is a special case of a parent. A member is a special case of an offspring.  Name ‐ A name in PDMS is an element identifier which you allocate to it.  Mouse ‐ A device for positioning the pointer on a workstation screen. It is an  alphanumeric string prefixed by a / symbol.  Level (hierarchic) ‐ The vertical position at which a given type of element is situated in a  database structure.  Offspring ‐ A lower‐level element linked anywhere below another element (one of its  parents) in a database hierarchy.  Owner ‐ One higher‐level element linked directly above another element (one of its  members) in a database hierarchy.  Parameter ‐ A ‐variable item of information (value. You can only access a database if you have access rights to an MDB which  contains it. which is a parent but not its owner.  Parent ‐ A higher‐level element linked anywhere above another element (one of its  offspring) in a database hierarchy.  VANTAGE PDMS Version 11. which defines part of a complex  piping system.   Multiple Database (MDB) ‐ A group of databases linked together administratively for a  specific purpose. A Group Member is an exception in that it is  linked only indirectly to the GROUP. This identifier is always additional to the  elementʹs reference number.  Macro ‐ A sequence of commands stored as a text file. comprising an assembly of BRANCHes. The term has a specific meaning in PDMS which may not correspond with its  usual engineering meaning. which is allocated automatically by PDMS.  Module ‐ A subdivision of the overall PDMS program which is used to carry out a particular  type of operation on the databases. text etc. When the macro is called from within  PDMS.  Member (of a Team) ‐ A named PDMS user who is linked with other users (as a team) who  share common access rights to one or more databases.  My Data – a storage area for remembering PDMS data for future use. Typically used to copy  collections of elements from one module to another.  Menu ‐ A predefined list of options displayed as part of the Graphical User Interface. The levels to be  drawn are specified as part of the plotting command.6 Getting Started with PDMS A-3 . the command processor reads each line of the file in turn and behaves as if the  commands were being directly entered.  Member (of an Element List) ‐ A lower‐level element linked immediately below another  element (its owner) in a database hierarchy. analogous to a generation in a family tree.) which must be defined before a  command can be executed unambiguously. Each module has its own name within the program suite.Glossary of terms and abbreviations   Level (drawing) ‐ An attribute of an element in a Design database which defines whether or  not the corresponding item is to be shown when a drawing is plotted.  PIPE ‐ An element.

  Primitive ‐ A fundamental design shape (box.g. containing its title. Used to end each typed command  line and send its contents to the command processor. Also referred to as the Return key. A P‐line is a p‐ point extruded in a specific direction.  Enter (key) ‐ The carriage return key on the keyboard.  Textual Expression – An expression which manipulates text simply as strings of  alphanumeric characters without regard to their overall meaning.  Shortcut Menu – a context‐sensitive menu activated by the secondary (usually right‐hand)  mouse button. an arrowhead) identifies a location or an element in the  depicted part of the design model.  Read/Write ‐ An access category that allows you to look at the contents of a database or file  and to modify them. The fileʹs contents can be unspooled  to a plotter or graphics screen when the corresponding drawing is to be generated.  Toolbar – A collection of GUI icons.  Read‐only ‐ An access category that allows you to look at the contents of a database or file  but not to modify them.  A-4 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.  A graphics pointer (e.  Pointer (2) ‐ A link between elements or attributes.Glossary of terms and abbreviations   Plotfile ‐ A file which contains encoded graphics data.g. indicating the path by which information  is transferred logically between the various parts of the databases.  Selection – A selection of objects defined using the 3D graphical view.  Team ‐ An administrative grouping of PDMS users who share common access rights to one  or more databases.  Title bar – The top of a window. Syntax is usually  specified by using diagrams to show the valid command sequences. used to trigger the GUI actions.  Tail ‐ The output end of a BRANCH (under normal flow conditions). a flashing block or bar) shows where the next input character  will appear.6 Getting Started with PDMS . cylinder etc.  P‐point (Principal Point) ‐ An imaginary location and direction used to manipulate and  interconnect elements which represent physical entities in the design model.  Pointer (1) ‐ An indicator (also referred to as the cursor) on a display screen which identifies  one of two types of location:  • • An alpha pointer (e.) used to build up the design of a  physical entity in the design model or component catalogue.  Syntax (Of Commands) ‐ the rules which define precisely how a command line must be  entered so that PDMS can interpret your instructions unambiguously.

  User‐Defined Attribute – A database attribute whose name and type of content are defined  by the user rather than by the default PDMS structure. always allocated the symbol /* as its  PDMS name.3 Abbreviations and Acronyms Abbreviations which are thought to be self‐explanatory.  ADE   ASCII      ASCII Decimal Equivalent  American Standard Code for Information Interchange  Catalogue Reference  Current Element  Centreline  Connection Compatibility  Central Processor Unit  Connection Reference  Circular (cross‐section) Torus  Database Constructor  Database  Data Definition Language  Drawing Exchange Format (as used by AutoCAD®)  Generic Type  Graphical User Interface  Hewlett Packard Graphics Language  Input/Output  International Graphics Exchange Specification  Lap Joint Stub End  A-5 CATREF    CE    CL    COCO  CPU    CREF  CTORU              DABACON  DB    DDL   DXF    GTYP  GUI    HPGL  I/O    IGES   LJSE                     VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.Glossary of terms and abbreviations   Unspooler – A translation program which allows graphical output files (plotfiles) produced  by a computer program to be input to an offline plotter.  WORLD – The highest level element in any database. are not listed. Each combination of output format  and plotter type requires a specific unspooler. The position  and (unless the window is non‐resizable) of the window may be redefined interactively. particularly those which are simply  the first few letters of an obvious word.  A.  Window – A part of a display which is allocated a specific area of the screen.6 Getting Started with PDMS .

6 Getting Started with PDMS .Glossary of terms and abbreviations   MDB   OS    Pn                            Multiple Database  Operating System  P‐point n (where n is an integer)  P‐Arrive or Arrive P‐point  Plant Design Management System  Pipe Head  Piping and Instrumentation Diagram  Piping and Instrumentation Diagram  P‐Leave or Leave P‐point  Programmable Macro Language  Polyhedron  Pipe Tail  Percent (%) Variable Translator  Preferred Volume or Penalty Volume  Query  Reference Number (of an element in a database)  Rectangular (cross‐section) Torus  Standard Hookup  Symbol Key  Specification Component  Specification Reference  Symbol Type  User‐Defined Attribute  View Definition Matrix  Weld Neck  Two‐ or Three‐dimensional  Crosshair cursor location  PA    PDMS  PH    P&ID  PID    PL    PML   POHED  PT    PTRANS    PVOL  Q                            Refno  RTORU  SHU   SKEY  SPCOM  SPREF  STYP  UDA   VDM  WN    2D or 3D    @      A-6 VANTAGE PDMS Version 11.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful