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Russian Military Aircraft

Russian Military Aircraft

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A Collection Of Weapons Systems Obtained From The Federation Of American Scientists'
Military Analysis Network
A Collection Of Weapons Systems Obtained From The Federation Of American Scientists'
Military Analysis Network

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Published by: jb2ookworm on Nov 08, 2007
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FAS Military Affairs Network

Russian Military Aircraft

Su-7 FITTER A (SUKHOI)
The Sukhoi Su-7 is a single seat ground attack aircraft that was long a standard tactical fighter-bomber with the Soviet Air Force. The development of Su-7 began in the early 1950's. First prototype called S-1 "Strela" made its first flight in 1955. The Su-7 was unveiled to the West at the 1956 Soviet Aviation Day display at Tushino Airport outside Moscow. The prototype came out to be very promising and Su-7 went in production several years later, with modifications including the Su-7B and Su-7BKL. The airplane was exported to Czechoslovakia, Poland, Romania, China, and other countries. The Su-7 is armed with two 30mm NR-30 guns in wing roots, each with 70 rounds. Under-wing pylons allow two 742 kg or two 495 kg of bombs or rocket pods. The wings are mid- to low-mounted (wings are mounted below center of aircraft) with wide wing roots, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips. There is one engine in the body. There is a circular air intake in the nose and a large, single exhaust. The fuselage is a long, tubular body with a blunt nose and rear. There is a large, bubble canopy. The tail is swept-back and has a tapered tail fin with a blunt tip. It has swept-back and tapered flats mid- to lowmounted on the fuselage.

Specifications
Country of Origin Similar Aircraft Crew Role Length Span Weight Maximum Speed Maximum Ceiling Service Ceiling Maximum Range Cruise range Combat Range In-Flight Refueling CIS (formerly USSR) Lightning F-100 Super Sabre MiG-21 Fishbed One ground-attack 57 ft (17.38 m) 29 ft, 3 in (9 m) 13,387kg (loaded) 1.6 Mach Unknown 18 km 1,449 km 645nm 250-350 km (with drop tanks) No

Internal Fuel Payload Drop Tanks Sensors Armament

2350 Kg 1000kg 600 L drop tank with 479kg for 69 nm range Ferry tank with 719kg for 99nm range High Fix (SRD-5M) radar. two Cannon: NR-30 30mm FAB-500, UV-16-57 rocket bods, FAB-250, AA2,FAB-750, FAB-500 Afghanistan Algeria Bangladesh Czech Republic North Korea South Yemen.

Usesr Countries

Su-9/11 FISHPOT (SUKHOI)
The Su-9 was the Su-7's interceptor counterpart, serving exclusively with the Soviet PVO (air defence force). The tailed delta Su-9 was generally similar in configuration to the MiG-21, though larger and heavier. This aircraft was never exported outside the Soviet Union, and saw active duty for only a brief period before other aircraft developments moved the Su-9 into second line service. The Su-11 all-weather interceptor was a refinement of the Su-9 with a new engine, new radar and improved armament. The Sukhoi FISHPOT was withdrawn from Soviet service around 1980. The Su-9 FISHPOT should not be confused with the the SU-9(K), which was a Sukhoi re-design the German Me 262, superficially resembling the Me-262 though constituting a practically new design,

Specifications
Countries of Origin Similar Aircraft Crew Role Armament Engines Wing Span Length Height Empty Weight Max.Weight Speed Ceiling Range 1915km/h 16800m 8750kg CIS (formerly USSR) , MiG-21 one interceptor air superiority missiles gunpack 1 * 9060kg Lyulka Al-7F 8.43m 16.70m

Su-9

Su-11

Su-15 FLAGON (SUKHOI)
The Sukhoi Su-15 Flagon all-weather interceptor was withdrawn from Russian service about 1992. Although the aircraft was built in the 1950s, it remained a formidable aircraft with several upgrades, and was built in large numbers. Its speed is in excess of Mach 2.4 and carries large missiles on the outboard portion of the wings. The aircraft's wings are mid-mounted delta with square tips. There are two turbojets in the fuselage and two exhausts. The fuselage is rectangular from the air intakes to the tail. The nose is bullet-shaped nose and has a bubble canopy. The tail is swept-back and has a tapered fin with a square tip. The flats are swept-back, tapered, and mid-mounted on the fuselage.

Specifications
Country of Origin Similar Aircraft Crew Role Armament Length Span User Countries CIS (formerly USSR) MiG-21 Fishbed Super Etendard one Flagon C--two interceptor air superiority missiles gunpack 68 ft (20.7 m) 34 ft, 5 in (10.5 m) CIS Georgia Ukraine

Su-17,-20,-22 FITTER (SUKHOI)
The Su-17 Fitter with its variable sweep wings was developed from the fixed-wing Su7B. The first public demonstration of it was made in 1969. It was in production for a long time (1970-1990) and many modifications were built. Some of the modifications were Su-17M, Su-17M2, Su-17M3, and the Su-17M4 (low-altitude subsonic bomber), Su17UM (trainer). It was designed as a fighter-bomber, but it was used mostly as a bomber. The Su-17 remains an effective aircraft with capable avionics and impressive armament. Export versions of this aircraft are designated Su-20 and Su-22. The export versions can be distinguished by a deeper dorsal spine. The wings are mid- to low-mounted (wings are mounted below the center), variable, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips. There are wide wing roots. There is one turbojet engine in the fuselage and a circular air intake in the nose. There is a large, single exhaust. The fuselage is long and tubular with a blunt nose and rear section. It has a large bubble canopy. There is a prominent dorsal spine on top of the body from the cockpit to the tail fin. The tail is swept-back and has a tapered fin with a square tip. The flats are mid- to low-mounted on the fuselage and swept-back and tapered.

Specifications
Countries of Origin CIS (formerly USSR) MiG-21 Fishbed Su-7 Fitter A-7 Corsair II G-Y91 One ground-attack 61 ft, 6 in (18.76 m) 45 ft (13.8 m) Su-17 fitter C 18000 meters 590 nm No 3700 kg 3500 kg High Fix (Srd-5m) radar, RWR in both models. Su-22 Fitter F 18000 meters 945 nm No 3950 kg 3500 kg Terrain-following radar, RWR, Balistic Similar Aircraft

Crew Role Length Span Designation Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Sensors

Fitter D also has LRMTS, possible terrain-following radar. Balistic bombsight

bombsight

Drop Tanks

800 L drop tank with 639kg of 800 L drop tank with fuel for 51nm range 639kg of fuel for 76 1200 l ferry tank with 958kg nm of fuel for 76 nm range AS-10, AA-8, UV-32-57, FAB-500, TN-1000 nuclear bomb Azerbaijan Belarus Bulgaria CIS Czech Republic Germany Hungary Poland Slovakia Cannon: NR-30 30mm AS-7, AS-9, AS-10, AA-8, FAB-500 bombs Afghanistan Algeria Iran Iraq Libya North Yemen Peru South Yemen Syria Vietnam

Armament

User Countries

Su-17

Su-20

Su-24 FENCER (SUKHOI)
The wings are high-mounted, variable, swept-back, and tapered. There are twin turbofan engines. The air intakes are tapered away from the body, rectangular-shaped, and mounted on the body forward of the wings’ leading edges. There are twin exhausts. The fuselage is long, slender, with pointed, solid nose, and rectangular-shaped body from the air intakes to the exhausts. There are two belly fins and four pylons. There is a bubble canopy. The dorsal spine extends from the cockpit to the tail. The tail fin is swept-back and tapered with square tip. The flats are high-mounted on the fuselage, swept-back, and tapered with angular tips.

Variants
Later production marks may have different engines, POS R-29Bs @11500Kg.
     

Fencer A is initial production variant w/ squared off aft fuselage. Su-24B has rounded fuselage. Su-24C has changes in EW equipment. Su-24D can be inflight refueled and has longer nose. Su-24E is recon variant for navy; can also carry antiship weapons. Fencer F possible version; perhaps EW variant.

Specifications
Country of Origin CIS (formerly USSR) Tornado F-111 F-14 Tomcat F-15 Eagle MiG-23/-27 Flogger Two all-weather attack fighter-bomber strike cannon missiles bombs 69 ft, 6 in (20 m) 56 ft, 6 in (17.26 m) 16500 meters 1930nm

Similar Aircraft

Crew Role

Armament Length Span Ceiling Cruise range

In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Sensors Drop Tanks Armament

Yes 10385 kg 8000 kg Fencer radar, terrain-following radar, LRMTS, RWR, Advanced bombsight 3000 L drop tank with 2396kg of fuel for 233nm range Cannon: GSh-6N-30 30mm rotary AS-7/9/10/11/12/14, AA-8, FAB-500, TN-1000, AA11 Azerbaijan Belarus CIS Iran Kazakhstan Libya Syria Ukraine

User Countries

Su-25 FROGFOOT Grach (Rook) Su-39 FROGFOOT
The Su-25, which is no longer in serial production, made its first flight in 1979. This single seat ground attack aircraft is a very durable airplane - it is fairly heavily armored -and easy to service - all service equipment can be stored in a container and transported by the airplane itself. It is armed with one twin barrel 30mm gun in the bottom of the fuselage with 250 rounds. There are 8 pylons under the wings which can carry about 4,000 kg of air-to-ground weapons, including 57mm to 330mm rockets. There are two small outboard pylons for AA-2D/ATOLL or AA-8/APHID AAMs. The wings are high-mounted and back-tapered with straight trailing edges. There are pods mounted at the square tips. There are two turbojets mounted alongside the body under the wings. There are semicircular air intakes forward of the wings’ leading edges. There are exhausts to the rear of the wings’ trailing edges. The fuselage is long, and slender and has a rounded nose. The body tapers to the rear section that overhangs the exhausts. There is a stepped canopy. The tail is swept-back and fin is tapered with a square tip. The flats mid-mounted on the fuselage, unequally tapered with blunt tips. The Su-39 (also known as the Su-25T or Su-25TM) is a Frogfoot variant incorporating post-Afghanistan lessons-learned. It is based on the Su-25UB two-seat trainder, with the rear seat and cockpit replaced with a fuel cell and extra avionics. The Su-39 carries the Kopyo-25 multi mode radar in a pod under the fuselage. Armament includes ground attack missiles such as the AT-16 Vikhr , anti-ship missiles, and AAMs such as the R-27, R-27ER, R-60, R-73 and R-77. A four-fold reduction in thermal signature has been achieved through cooling intakes on the upper surface of aircraft, and a new center body which masks hot turbine blades. Only a few dozen of these aircraft have been built. Reports in the mid-1990s that the Su-39 designation had been assigned to a primary trainer derived from the Su-26 and Su-29 aerobatic competition aircraft, designed to replace the Yak-52, are apparently incorrect.

VARIANTS
      

Su-25 (Frogfoot A) -- Original production ground attack aircraft with R-95 engines Su-25K -- Export version of Su-25 Su-25UB (Frogfoot B) (UB - Uchebno-Boevoi, Combat Trainer) -- Two-seat combat trainer Su-25UBK -- Export version of Su-25UB Su-25UBP -- Naval trainer based on Su-25UB Su-25UT (Frogfoot B) (UT - Uchebno-Trenirovochnyi, Trainer) -- Unarmed primary trainer (sometimes referred to as Su-28) Su-25UTG (Frogfoot B) (UTG - Uchebno-Trenirovochnyi Gakovyi, Trainer Naval) -- Naval trainer based on Su-25UT

Su-25BM -- Enhanced ground attack aircraft with R-195 engines, this is the current production version, and the most numerous in Russian service  Su-25T (Su-25TM Tankovyi Modifitsirovannyi, Antitank) -- Proposed enhanced version with more armour, improved sensors, and possibly a new gun and engines [Su-25T's production designation is Su-39]  Su-25TK -- Proposed export version of Su-25T

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Russia SUKHOI A-6 Intruder Magister Alpha Jet Jaguar AMX A-10A Thunderbolt II One CAS ground-attack Su-25 47 ft, 6 in (14.6 m) 50 ft, 10 in (15.6 m) Su-39 14.52 m 15.33 m 2x Tumanski R-195 @ 44,1 kN 17,600kg (loaded) .8 Mach 7000 meters 7000 meters Unknown 750nm 1,250 km (with drop tanks) No 3500 kg 4400 kg 6000 kg 2500 km 650 - 900 km 21500 kg 950 km/h 10000 meters

Similar Aircraft

Crew Role VARIANT Length Span Engines Weight Maximum Speed Maximum Ceiling Service Ceiling Maximum Range Cruise range Combat Range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload

Sensors Drop Tanks

RWR, laser designator, LRMTS 600 L drop tank 479kg for 51nm range Cannon: 1 GSh-6-N-30 30mm rotary AS-7/9/11/12, AA-8 Aphid, FAB-250, UV-3257, FAB-500, 500kg LGB, FAB-250 Angola Azerbaijan Belarus Bulgaria CIS Czech Republic Iraq Georgia Hungary Iran North Korea Slovakia Ukraine

Armament

User Countries

Russia

Su-25

Su-39

Su-27 FLANKER (SUKHOI)
The introduction, in the mid-1970s, of the USAF F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fighting Falcon put the then Eastern bloc fighter pilots at a distinct disadvantage. The deployment of the Su-27 Flanker and MiG-29 Fulcrum in the mid-1980s leveled the playing field. Designed as a high performance fighter with a fly-by-wire control system, and the ability to carry up to 10 AAMs, the highly maneuverable Su-27 is one of the most imposing fighters ever built. The first 'Flanker-A' prototypes flew on May 20, 1977 and entered service as the 'Flanker-B' in 1984. The development of the Su-27 fighter plane was completed in the early 1980s, and the plane subsequently set more than 40 world records of altitude and take-off-speed. It was the forerunner of an entire family of planes, including the Su-27UB training plane, the Su-33 ship-based fighter, the Su-37 multi-mission plane and the Su32FN two-seat specialised plane. The Su-27UB is a two seat training version of Su-27, which first flew in March 1985. The Su-27 is in service not only in Russia and other CIS countries but also in China and Vietnam. China also bought a license for the production of its own Su-27 fighters. Sukhoi in 1997 signed an estimated $180-million contract with Vietnam to supply six Su-27 (of which two Su-27SK and four Su-27UB). It supplied four of them in 1996, and two were destroyed when the freighter carrying them crashed into an apartment block in Irkutsk at the end of last year. It is thought that Vietnam plans to buy a total of 24 Sukhoi warplanes for $800 million by the end of the century. By the end of 1997 Sukhoi had passed all of the blueprints over to license production of the Su-27SK in China, and negotiations on the sale of a further 55 Su-27 fighters to China also began. The wings are mid-mounted and semidelta with square tips. The LERX extends downward and forward of the wing roots. There are two turbojet engines in the fuselage. There are square, diagonally-cut air intakes mounted under the wings alongside the fuselage. The fuselage is rectangular from the air intakes to the tail. The nose is pointed and there is a bubble canopy. The tail fins are swept-back, tapered with square tips, and mounted outboard of the engines. The flats are mid-mounted, swept-back, and tapered.

Specifications
Country of Origin Similar Aircraft Crew Role Length CIS (formerly USSR) F-15 Eagle F-14 Tomcat MiG-29 Fulcrum one interceptor air superiority 69 ft (21 m)

Span

47 ft, 6 in (14.5 m) One 30 mm GSh-301cannon up to 6,000 kg payload of missiles and bombs including AA-10 (Alamo) air-to-air missiles AA-11 (Archer) air-to-air missiles FAB-100 No 6350 kg Drop tank with 1600kg for 126nm range 6000kg Flash Dance radar, IRST and TV sensors, RWR, Balistic bombsight Mach 2.35 30,000 kg 15240-18,000 m 1,500 km combat radius [typical] 1,800 km cruise radius 4,000 km maximum range Two 12,550 kg thrust Lyulka AL-31F Belarus CIS People's Republic of China Ukraine

Armament

In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Drop Tanks Payload Sensors Maximum speed Maximum weight Ceiling Range PROPULSION

User Countries

Su-30 (Su-27P) Su-32 Su-33 (Su-27K) Su-34 (Su-27IB) Su-35 (Su-27M) Su-37
The robust Su-27 platform has served as the basis for a number of improved variants for a diverse range of missions and users. Su-30 (Su-27P) is a two-seat long-range intercept fighter that first flew in December 1989, and that entered service with the Russian air forces in 1992. Largely based on the Su-27UB two-seat trainer, it has a new radiolocation system which can transmit the positions of 10 targets to four other fighters at the same time. The Su-30 is made in Irkutsk. Su-30M (MK-export version) is a standard Su-30 with the air-to-ground missiles which can carry twice the armament (8 tons) compared to the baseline Su-27. The Su-30 'export variant' of the formidable Su-27 'Flanker', can carry the latest Russian air-to-air missiles, including the medium-range R-27 family, the short-range R-73 and the new mediumrange R-77 'AMRAAM-ski'. The Sukhoi-30K has a range in excess of 3,000km, which means it can easily patrol offshore installations without requiring aerial refuelling. In June 1999 Russia agreed to sell 72 of these front-line Sukhoi-30 jet fighter-bombers to China. The aircraft building enterprise in Komsomolsk-on-Amur (KnAAPO) is likely to become the main supplier of a large lot of Su-30MKK fighter jets to China. The cost of one Su-30MKK fighter jet is estimated at $35 million - $37 million. At the same time, negotiations began for Moscow to grant a licence for the production of another 250 Sukhoi-30 fighters. The Su-30MKK for China is different in details from the Su-30MKI version designed for India. Sukhoi has a $1.5-$1.8 billion deal to supply 40 Su-30MK to India. In 1997, a total of eight aircraft were supplied under this contract, which should be completed at the end of 1999. Negotiations to license the production of the Su-30MKI to the Hindustan AeronauticsLimited (HAL) works of India continued in 1997. The Indians received feasibility plans, and it is thought that a final decision would be reached this year. Production in India would begin after 2001. In all, India might produce 100 warplanes in a contract worth more than $1 billion. However, as of mid-1999 negotiations on the contract for the licensed production of Su-30MKI fighter by HAL remained delayed due to the government crisis in India, which could not be resolved until after the Fall 1999 elections. The two sides had agreed on all the basic issues, including the value of the licensing contract. As of mid-2000 India had received only eight SU-30K air defence aircraft and none of the upgraded SU-30MK multi-role aircraft in the Rs

6310-crore deal signed with Russia in 1996. There had been no deliveries after May 1997. India's Defence Research Development Organisation had failed to develop and supply key avionics sub-systems and failed to procure Western avionics to equip the SU30MK aircraft for its designated multi-role. Under the contract, the Irkutsk aircraft production association will deliver 40 Su-30s to the Indian air force. Within the framework of a contract worth $1.8bn Russia will deliver to India 40 military planes Su30 in different versions. At the end of 1999 Irkutsk aviation industrial association 'Irkut' was finishing the assembly of ten Su-30MK multifunctional long-range for India's Air Forces, equipped with aerial refuelling capabilities. After the deliveries are complete, HAL plans to launch production of new modifications of Su-30s under a Russian license in cooperation with Sukhoi. The Sukhoi-30 can be modified into a naval version, if the Indian Government decides to acquire an aircraft carrier. Su-32FN is the two-seat multi-role reconnaissance and strike export version of the Su-34 fighter-bomber. Su-33 (Su-27K) is a carrier-based variant that first flew in May 1985, and entered service in the Russian Navy in 1994. The air regiment comprising 24 fighters of the type was formed up on Russia's only operating aircraft carrier, the Admiral Kuznetsov. It has extra small wings near the pilots cabin which shorten the take-off distance and improve manoeuvrability. The Su-33 can also carry guided missiles such as the H-25MP, H-31 and H-41. The Su-33 is used in both night and day operations at sea, and operate with the command center ship and with the Ka-31 early-warning helicopter. With the R-27EM missiles it can intercept antiship missiles. Su-34 (Su-27IB - Istrebitel-Bombardirovshchik) is a two seat ("arm-to-arm") strike variant that first flew in 1990. It features frontal wings and a large flattened nose with sharp edges (like the SR-71) reduce radar cross-section. This new ship-borne fighter is fitted with two AL-31FP engines with vectored thrust. Using them allows either the takeoff distance or maximum take-off weight (MTOW) of the aircraft to be increased by 1015 per cent. The aircraft has a distinctive large "sting" in the rear which contains the NO14 radiolocation system, a radioelectronic countermeasures system, and a fuel tank. The Su-32 and Su-34 have been developed and are in serial production in Novosibirsk for the Russian Ministry of Defence. Su-35 (Su-27M) is a single-seat attack fighter that first flew in 1988. The Su-35 and Su37 are made in Komomolsk-na-Amure. Like the Su-33 it features small wings near the cabin to enhance manoeuvrability. It also has new digital pilot control and digital engine control systems, replacing the analog computers in the original Su-27. The radar, with a range of 400 km, can follow the position of 15 targets and fire at 6 of them at the same time. An improved "Zuk" ("Scarab") radar features a mobile (+/- 130 degree) antenna which can follow position of 24 targets with ability to fire to 8 of them. The rear "sting" has a radiolocation system, which moved back the center of gravity, and which along with other innovations improve its tactical ability. Armaments includee: R-77, R-73, KS172, R-27EM/AE, R-27E, R-27, H-31, H-29L/T, KAB-500L/KR, KAB-1500, H-15, H65, H-59M, S-25LD, 500kg and 250 kg bombs.

Su-37 Super Flanker is a single-seat and/or two-seat multi-role combat aircraft that was first shown in model form at 1991 trade shows. Some wind tunnel tests completed as the aircraft entered the basic design stage in 1992, with foreign partners being sought for development. Unlike the other twin-engine Su-27 derivatives, the Su-37 concept originally featured a single Soyuz/Tumansky turbofan engine rated at 180 kN (40500 lb st) thrust with afterburning. What finally emerged from the design process was a supermanoeuvrable version of the Su-35 with a pair of AL-37FU afterburning turbofans with axisymmetric, steerable nozzles and thrust vector control (TVC). When the Su-37 was shown at Farnbrough in 1996 it stole the show, performing an astounding aerobatic display. The Su-30s cost approximately $34 million each - considerably more than the F-16. India, for example, has agreed to buy 40 Su-30MK two-seat fighters for $1.2 billion. Indonesia's planned purchase of Russian fighters and helicopters has been postponed indefinitely owing to the country's economic crisis and the savage devaluation of the Rupiah. The Indonesia Department of Defence announced in 1997 that it would buy 12 Sukhoi Su-30K fighters in place of the F-16 Fighting Falcon fighters it originally planned to buy from the US. Indonesia already operates a squadron of 12 F-16s.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Su-34 1 GSh-30-1 30mm cannon with 150 rounds R-27/R-73 AAMs Kh-29T/Kh-31P/Kh-59M ASMs bombs, rockets, drop tanks ECM pods carried on twelve external points Su-37 1 x 30 mm gun: GSh-301 (150 rnds) 14 x Air-to-Air missiles: AA-10, AA-11, AA-12 Cost User Countries Su-33 Crew 2 Su-30M 2 Su30MKI 2 Su-34 2 Su-35 1 Su-37 1 approximately $35 million Russia Sukhoi

Armament

Dimensions, m Wing Span Length Height Wing Area, m2 Weights, kg empty Normal Maximum Payload, kg Maximum Normal Fuel, kg Maximum Normal Engine

7.4 + 14.70 21.94 5.93 62 30,000 6,500 1,400 -

14.70 21.94 6.36 62.04 24,000 33,500 8,000 1,400 5,090 9,400

14.70 21.94 6.36 62.04 17,700 25,670 34,000 8,000 1,400 5,090 9,400

14.70 23.34 6.36 62 39,000 45,000 8,000 1,400 12,100

14.70 22.20 6.43 62 18,400 25,700 34,000 8,000 1,400 11,000 13,400

14.70 22.20 6.43 62 18,500 25,670 34,000 8,000 1,400 11,000 13,400

2 Lyulka 2 Lyulka 2 Lyulka 2 Lyulka 2 Lyulka 2 Lyulka AL-31 AL-31 AL-31 AL- AL-37F AL-37FU afterburni afterburni afterburni 31MF afterburni afterburni ng ng ng afterburni ng ng turbofans turbofans turbofans ng turbofans turbofans turbofans, 27,557 lb thrust each

Speed, km/h Cruise Maximum [at 10 000 m] Maximum Speed, Mach Rate of Climb, m/s Ceiling, m Operating Range, km Normal Maximum Ferry Low Altitude Takeoff Distance, -

1,400 2,300 2.17 230 17,000

1,380 2,125 2.3 230 17,500

1,380 2,125 2.3 230 -

1,300 1,900 1.8 14,000 4000 (4500) 7000 600 (1300) 1260 -

1,400 2,500 2.3 230 18,000

1,400 2,400 2.3 230 18,000

3000 550

3000 5200 6990 550

3000 5200 6990 -

3200 6500 -

3200 6500 -

m Landing distance, m Maximum Turn, g +8 670 +9 670 +9 1100 (950) +7 +10 +9

Su-33 / Su-27K

Su-30

Su-32

Su-34

Su-35

Su-37
The Su-37 is a super-maneuverable thrust vectoring fighter derived from an Su-35 prototype. The Su-37 represents a new level of capability compared with the Su-27 and Su-35. The Su-37 test aircraft made its maiden flight in April 1996 from the Zhukovsky flight testing center near Moscow. This impressive single-seat all-weather counter-air fighter and ground attack aircraft, derived from the SU-27, has an updated airframe containing a high proportion of carbon-fibre and Al-Li alloy. The engines, avionics and armaments are also improvements on those originally installed in the SU-27. The AL37FU engines are configured for thrust vector control, with the axisymmetric steerable thrust vector control nozzle is fixed on a circular turning unit. The steel nozzle in the experimental engines is replaced in production engines by titanium units to reduce the weight of the nozzle. The nozzle only moves in the pitch axis, and the nozzles on the two engines can deflect together or differentially to achieve the desired thrust vector for a particular maneuver. The Su-37 has a variety of other innovative equipment such as a radar configured for simultaneous surveillance of airspace and the ground and a high-precision laserinertial/satellite navigation system. The all-weather digital multi-mode phased array radar operates in either air and ground surveillance modes or in both modes simultaneously. Ground surveillance modes include mapping (with Doppler beam sharpening), searchand-track of moving targets, synthetic aperature radar and terrain avoidance. The Su-37 is also equipped with a rearward facing radar in the tail stinger area of the fuselage. The Su37 features fly-by-wire and relaxed static instability, which along with 3D thrust vectoring give the aircraft tremendous agility. It incorporates state of the art ECM in wing-tip pods, allowing improved survivability in electronic warfare environments. The Su-37 can carry air-to-air and air-to-surface weapons on 12 stations. The number of missiles and bombs carried can be increased to 14 with the use of multi-payload racks. Sukhoi used payments earned in the sale of an Su-27 license to China to finance the Su37 development. Russia's Air Force has not ordered any Su-37s. Sukhoi is studying the possibility of developing a two-seat version of the Su-37 with enhanced strike capabilities.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length 15.16 m / 49 ft 9 in 21.94 m / 72 ft Russia Sukhoi Multi-role fighter

Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling

6.84 m / 22 ft 5 in 40,565 lb empty / 74,956 lb max. take off Two Lyulka AL-37FU vectored-thrust afterburning turbofans, 30,855 lb thrust each 2,440 km/h / 1,516 mph

3,500 km / 2,175 miles 59,000 ft One GSh-30-1 30mm cannon, plus up to 18,075 lb including R-73/R-77 AAMs, ASMs, bombs, rockets, drop tanks, and ECM pods carried on fourteen external points 1

Armament

Crew Cost User Countries

under development for Russia

S-37 Berkut
The S-37 Berkut [Golden Eagle] is a testbed for developing technologies for the next generation of aircraft. The basic dimensions and weight of the S-37 "Berkut" are similar to those of Su-37, although they are different aircraft, and the tail, nose and canopy are similar to those of the Su-35. The first two prototypes of this aircraft were evidently designated the S-32, and the S-37 designation was previously applied to an unrelated fighter project for a smaller delta wing single aircraft that was cancelled due to lack of funding. The S-37 features forward-swept wings, which promises a range of benefits in aerodynamics at subsonic speeds and at high angles of attack. The forward-swept wing, which enables the aircraft to increase its range and its manoeuvrability at high altitude, makes extensive use of composite materials. The aircraft has large canards mounted on the intake side, close to the leading edge of the wing. The vertical stabilizers are canted slightly outward [not inward, as previously believed], and two large auxiliary intake doors are visible on the center fuselage section. It is still unclear which engines are used on this aircraft. The two powerplants are at the moment D-30F6 turbojets which are normaly used at the MiG-31M, while the second prototype uses the Ljulka AL-37FU turbojet with thrust vectoring. The S-37 is an experimental programme for developing fifth-generation technologies, and any decision on serial production of this aircraft would be taken by the Ministry of Defence at a later date.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wingspan: Length overall: Height overall Weight empty, equipped : Max T-O weight : 15.16 m - 16.7 m 22.2 m - 22.6 m 6.36 m - 6.40 m 24,000 kg (52,910 lb) -- 26000 kg (57,320 lb) 34,000 kg (74,960 lb) 2 Perm Aviadvigatel D-30F6 (34,170 lbst), or 2 Saturn/Lyul'ka AL-37FU afterburning 142.2 kN (31,966 lb st) with afterburning thrust-vectoring in pitch -20o to 20o at 30o per second 2,500km/h (1,350 knots) Russia Sukhoi

Engines:

Max level speed at

height : Max level speed at S/L : Service ceiling : Range with max fuel at height : Number of hardpoints: Air-to-air : Air-to-surface: Crew: User Countries 1,400km/h (756 knots) 18,000 m (59,050 ft) 1,782 nm (3,300 km/2,050 miles) 14: 2 wingtip, 6-8 underwing, 6-4 conformal underfuselage R-77, R-77PD, R-73, K-74 X-29T, X-29L, X-59M, X-31P, X-31A, KAB-500, KAB-1500 1

MiG-15 FAGOT (MIKOYANGUREVICH)
The Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 was originally developed in the Soviet Union as an interceptor. The RD-45 turbojet powered it, which was a copy of the Rolls Royce Nene. Designed to shoot down heavy bombers, it carried one 37mm and two 23mm cannons. German experience in WWII had shown the need for cannons larger than 20 mm to bring down four-engine heavy bombers. The prototype MiG-15 first flew in December 1947. It began appearing in service in 1949 and by 1952 it had been provided to a number of Communist satellite nations, including North Korea where it was used extensively against United Nations forces. The MiG-15 was deployed against American Air Forces in December of 1950 in Korea. On November 8, 1950, 1st Lt. Russell Brown, flying an F-80, shot down a MiG-15 in the first all-jet dogfight in history. It was apparent, however, that the MiG-15 was superior to any aircraft then in the US inventory. Initial encounters with American aircraft led to the development of the MiG-15bis (improved). Its VK-1 engine had 1,000 lbs more thrust than the RD-45 engine of the earlier version, and had hydraulic ailerons. Although the MiG-15bis could climb faster and higher than the F-86, poor turning performance and high mach instability limited its dogfight performance. In aerial combat against the F-86, the MiG-15 suffered high losses, but against the B-29 it was very effective and prevented the heavy bombers from operating in daylight

Specifications
Span Length Height Weight Armament Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling 33 ft. 1 1/2 in. 33 ft. 3 5/8 in. 11 ft. 2 in. 11,270 lbs. max. Two 23mm cannons and one 37mm cannon, plus rockets or 2,000 lbs. of bombs VK-1 of 6,000 lbs. thrust (copy of British Rolls-Royce "Nene" engine) 670 mph. 525 mph. 500 miles 51,000 ft.

J-4

MiG-17 FRESCO J-5 FRESCO
The design of the MiG-17 was undertaken to correct the deficiencies that the earlier MiG15 had at higher speeds. It was the first Soviet fighter to have an afterburning engine, the Klimov VK-1. In 1949, the Mikoyan-Gurevich (MiG) design bureau began work on a new fighter to replace the MiG-15. Two features of the aircraft were a thinner wing of greater sweep and a redesigned tail that improved stability and handling at speeds approaching Mach 1 (speed of sound). Although similar in appearance to the MiG-15, the MiG-17 has more sharply swept wings, an afterburner, better speed and handling characteristics and is about three feet longer. The wings of the aircraft are mid-mounted, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips. They have wide wing roots. The engine is one turbojet inside the body and has a round air intake in the nose. It has a single, small exhaust. The fuselage is short, thick, cigar-shaped and tapered to the rear. It has a blunt nose and bubble canopy. The tail fin is swept-back and tapered with rounded tip. Flats are high-mounted on the tail fin, swept-back, and tapered. Flats and fin overhang the exhaust. The prototype MiG-17 (NATO code name Fresco) first flew in January 1950 and was reported to have exceeded Mach 1 in level flight. Production began in late 1951, but the aircraft were not available in sufficient quantities to take part in the Korean War. Deliveries to the Soviet Air Force began in 1952. Five versions of the aircraft eventually were produced. Early production MiG-17s were fitted with the VK-1 engine, a Soviet copy of the Rolls-Royce Nene. The VK-1F, an improved version with a simple afterburner and variable nozzle, was developed for the main production version, the MiG17F (Fresco C). In 1955 the radar equipped MiG-17PF (Fresco D) entered service as a limited all-weather interceptor. The MiG-17PFU was armed with four AA-1 "Alkali" radar-guided missiles, making it the Soviet Union's first missile armed interceptor. Even though it was considered obsolete by the mid-1960s, the MiG-17 gave a good account over Vietnam, being flown by most of the top North Vietnamese pilots, including the leading ace, Colonel Tomb. The MiG-17 served with nearly 30 air forces worldwide, including the Soviet Union, Warsaw Pact countries, China, Afghanistan, North Korea, Sri Lanka, Syria, Morocco, Cuba, Indonesia, and Cambodia. Though smaller than the USAF F-86 Sabre of Korean War fame, its weight and performance favorably compared to that aircraft. Soviet production of the MiG-17 ended in 1958 with over 6,000 produced. It continued to be built under license in Poland as the Lim-5P and in China as the J-5/F-4. China's first reproduced jet fighter plane, the J-5, successfully flew in Shenyang for the first time on 19 July 1956, and General Nie Rongzhen went in person to Shenyang to offer congratulations.

Specifications
Countries of Origin CIS (formerly USSR) MiG-19 Farmer G.91Y Su-17 Fitter, MiG-21 Fishbed One fighter bomber 650 kg 36 ft, 5 in (11.1 m) 31 ft, 7 in (9.64 m) 12 feet, 6 inches 14,770 lbs 3 NR-23 23mm Cannon 4 8x57mm rocket pods or 2 type 250kg bombs (729nm) 2 400 L drop tanks (936) One Valer Klimov VK-1 turbojet with 5,952 lbs. of thrust J-5 = Wopen TJ license-built Kilmov VK-1FTJ 696 mph 1,290 miles 52,366 feet / 15850 meters 1143 kg No 400 L drop tank with 325kg of fuel for 155nm range None Afghanistan Albania Algeria Angola Congo Cuba Ethiopia Similar Aircraft

Crew Role Payload Length Span Height Weight

Armament

Engine Maximum speed Range Service Ceiling Internal Fuel In-Flight Refueling Drop Tanks Sensors

User Countries

Guinea Republic Guinea-Bissau Madagascar Mali Mongolia North Korea (J-5) North Yemen People’s Republic of China (J-5) Romania Sri Lanka Somalia South Yemen Sudan Tanzania Vietnam

MiG-19 FARMER J-6 / F-6
The MiG-19 Farmer was the first supersonic fighter built in the former USSR. The MiG19 prototype made its first flight in September 1953 and was placed into production in 1955. It was the Soviet Union's primary fighter during the last half of the 1950's. Possibly as many as 10,000 MiG-19's, in various versions, were built by the Soviet Union, China, Poland, and Czechoslovakia. About 2,000 have been built in the People’s Republic of China. Many other countries used the MiG-19, including Cuba, North Vietnam, North Korea, Iraq, and most of the Warsaw Pact nations. The Soviet Union phased out the MiG19 in the early 1960s in favor of the more advanced MiG-21. However, the MiG-19 continued to be used by the other nations for many more years. The F-6 (Jianjiji-6 Fighter aircraft 6) is the Chinese version of the MiG-19, which as of the mid-1990s was still in production in China. The J-6, which began flight tests in 1958, was China's first supersonic jet fighter. The F-6 has six attachment points for external stores (three on each wing). The outboard wing stations can carry a 250 kg bomb. The outboard wing stations can also carry a 760 or 400 liter drop tank or the CAA-1b AAM. The inboard wing stations can carry practice bombs or rocket pods with either 8 x 57mm, 16 x 57mm, or 7 x 90mm rockets. The aircraft's wings are mid-mounted, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips. There are wing fences and wide wing roots. There are two turbojet engines mounted inside the body and a single, round air intake in the nose. Note that what appears to be a single air intake is actually separated on the inside with each engine drawing air from its own intake. Two aircraft that have a single air intake with two engines are the Lightning and the G.91Y. There are dual exhausts. The fuselage is long, tube-shaped, and tapers slightly to the blunt nose and widens to the exhausts. There is a bubble canopy well forward on the nose. The tail fin is sharply swept-back and tapered with blunt tips. Flats highmounted on the fuselage and swept-back with blunt tips.

Specifications
Countries of Origin Builder Similar Aircraft Crew Role Length Russia & China Mikoyan-Gurevich [Russia] @ Gorki & Novosibirsk ??? Aircraft [China] MiG-17 Fresco one interceptor capable of attacking ground targets 42 ft, 11 in (13.1 m)

Span Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Ceiling Range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Drop Tanks Payload

29 ft, 6 in (9 m) 12 ft. 0 in. 9,040kg (loaded) Two Tumansky RD-9 turbojets with 7,165 lbs. thrust ea. (with afterburner) 900 mph / 1,450 km/h/ Mach 1.35 590 mph /950 km/h / Mach 0.9 17900 meters 425 mi / 685 km radius hi-lo-hi w/ drop tanks 1,400 mi / 2,200 km ferry range No 1732 kg 800 L drop tank with 639kg of fuel for 138nm range 1140 L drop tank with 911kg of fuel for 197nm range 2 or 3 NR-30mm Cannon 2 Type 1 250 kg bombs or 8x57 rocket pod and 2 800 L drop tanks (923nm) 2 PL-2 AAM and 2 1140 L drop tanks (1029nm) 2 ARS 212 rockets and 2 800 L drop tanks (923 nm) Izmrud radar, RWR, Basic bombsight Albania (J-6) Bangladesh (J-6) Burma (J-6) Cambodia (F-6) Cuba Egypt North Korea (J-6) Pakistan (J-6) People’s Republic of China (J-6) Sudan Tanzania Zambia

Armament

Sensors

User Countries

J-6

MiG-21 FISHBED J-7 (Jianjiji-7) / F-7 YF-110
The MiG-21F is a short-range day fighter-interceptor and the first major production version of the popular MiG-21 series. It is but one of many versions of this aircraft that have served in the air arms of many nations around the world. The E-5 prototype of the MiG-21 was first flown in 1955 and made its first public appearance during the Soviet Aviation Day display at Moscow's Tushino Airport in June 1956. During the Vietnam War, MiG-21s were often used against U.S. aircraft. Between April 26, 165, and January 8, 1973, USAF F-4s and B-52s downed 68 MiG-21s. More than 30 countries of the world-including nations friendly to the U.S. -have flown the MiG-21. At least 15 versions of the MiG-21 have been produced, some outside the Soviet Union. Estimates place the number built at more than 8,000, a production total exceeding that of any other modern jet aircraft. The Soviets licenced the manufacture of the MiG-21F and its engine to China in 1961, and assembly of the first J-7 (Jianjiji-7 Fighter aircraft 7) using Chinese-made components began early 1964. The first flight of the Shenyang-built J-7 came on 17 January 1966, and Chengdu production of the J-7-I began in June 1967. Neither version was produced in large numbers. Subsequent modifications included development of the J7-II / J-7B which began in 1975 with production approved in September 1979. Development of F-7M and J-7 III started in 1981. The J-7 III is the Chinese equivalent of MiG-21MF. Substantially reworked from the J-7 II, the J-7 III first flight occured on 26 April 1984. Jointly developed by Chengdu and Guizhou (GAIC), the J-7 III entered PLA Air Force and Navy service beginning in 1992, with production continuing thereafter. Other development efforts extended through the F-7M Airguard which received a production go-ahead in December 1984. In 1988 China delivered the first 20 of 60 F-7M Skybolts to Pakistan. As upgrades, Karachi reportedly was leaning to a totally indigenous Chinese aircraft over the Grumman-influenced Sabre II, or F-7P. Development of the "Super 7" upgrade was terminated with the end of American technical assistance following the Tienanmen repression of 1989. The aircraft has mid-mounted delta wings with small square tips. There is one turbojet inside the body. There is a small round air intake in the nose. There is a single exhaust. The fuselage is a long, tubular body with a blunt nose and bubble canopy. There is one belly fin under the rear section. There is a large dorsal spine flush with the canopy. The tail fin swept-back and tapered with a square tip. The flats are mid-mounted on the body, swept-back, and tapered with square tips. The J-7FS modification adds a radar to a reconfigured air intake, while the "Super 7" upgrade would have completely reworked the front end of the aircraft, adding a much larger radar and ventral air inlets, along with various other less pronounced improvements.

By 1989 Chinese production was running at a rate of as much as 14 aircraft per month, primarily for export. The J-7 aircraft was the most widely produced Chinese fighter, replacing older J-6 fighters, the Chinese version of the MiG-19. In 1995 it was projected that J-7 production would continue for at least another decade, resulting in a total inventory of nearly 1000 aircraft by 2005, but in fact the PLAAF inventory has remained static since then at about 500 aircraft, suggesting that production has either been suspended or terminated. MiG-21 aircraft acquired by the United States under the Foreign Materiel Acquisition/Exploitation program are designated as the YF-110.

Specifications
Countries Russia / China of Origin Builder Mikoyan-Gurevich [Russia] Xian Aircraft [China] @ Shenyang, Chengdu & Guizhou MiG-21F Fishbed C MiG-21PF Fishbed D MiG-21PFM Fishbed F MiG-21R Fishbed H MiG-21S Fishbed H MiG-21RF Fishbed H MiG-21SM Fishbed J MiG-21M (Type 96/Hindustan Aeronautics-India) MiG-21PFMA Fishbed J MiG-21MF Fishbed J MiG-21SMT Fishbed K MiG-21SMB Fishbed K MiG-21bis-A Fishbed L MiG-21bis-B Fishbed N MiG-21U Mongol A MiG-21US Mongol B MiG-21UM Mongol B J-7 / F-7 Fishbed J-7 II / F-7B Fishbed J-7 III Fishbed F-7M Airguard F-7P Skybolt Fitters, all models, Mirage III/5, A-4 Skyhawk

Variants

Similar Aircraft

Role Span Length Height Weight Engines Crew

Ground-attack interceptor, trainer 23 ft. 6 in. 51 ft. 9 in. 15 ft. 9 in. 18,080 lbs. max. MiG-21 = Tumansky R-11F-300 @ 12,675 lbst w/afterburner J-7 III = Wopen-13 turbofan @ 14,550-lbst One

Maximum 1,300 mph. speed Cruising speed 550 mph. MIG-21 = 400 mi range MIG-21bis = 600 nm range J-7 = 230 mi / 370 km lo-lo-lo radius J-7B = 375 mi / 600 km radius w/ 2 PL-2 AAM + internal fuel J-7B = 450 mi / 750 km radius w/ 2 PL-2 AAM + drop tanks J-7M = 550 mi / 875 km radius w/ 2 PL-2 AAM + drop tanks J-7 III = 525 mi / 850 km radius hi-hi-hi air superiority w/ 2 AAM + drop tanks J-7 III = 340 mi / 550 km radius lo-lo-hi ground attack w/ 2 bombs + drop tanks J-7 III = 1,350 mi / 2,200 km ferry range 50,000 ft / 14000 meters 2277 kg MIG-21pfs 2364 kg MIG-21bis 869 kg J-8

Range

Service Ceiling Internal Fuel

In-Flight No Refueling Drop Tanks Take-Off Runway MIG-21bis = Drop tank with 391kg of fuel for 51nm range MIG-21bis = Drop tank with 631kg of fuel for 80nm range MIG-21bis = Drop tank with 391kg of fuel for 50nm range J-7 = 800 l drop tank with 639kg of fuel for 111nm range F-7M = 700-950 m (2,300-3,120 ft) J-7 III = 800 m (2,625 ft) with afterburning

Landing Runway Sensors

F-7M = 600-900 m (1,970-2,955 ft) with brake-chute J-7 III = 550 m (1,805 ft) with flap blowing, drag-chute and brakes MIG-21pfs = Spin Scan (R1L) radar, RWR, Balistic bombsight MIG-21bis = Jay Bird radar, RWR, Balistic bombsight J-7 = Type 222 ranging radar, RWR, Ballistic bombsight

One NR-30 30mm cannon plus Armamen MIG-21pfs = K-13 AA-2 atoll, FAB-500, FAB-250, UV-16-67 rocket pods t MIG-21bis = UV-69 57 rocket pods, AA-8 Aphid, FAB-250, FAB-500 J-7 = 2 PL-2 or PL-7 AAM and 1 800 L drop tank (685 nm) User Countries Afghanistan Cuba Albania (J-7) Czech Republic Algeria Republic Angola Egypt Azerbiajan Ethiopia Bangladesh Finland Bulgaria Germany Burma Gunea Cambodia Hungary China (J-7) India Congo Iran Croatia Iraq Kazakhstan Romania Laos Slovakia Libya South Yemen Madagascar Sri Lanka Mali Sudan Mongolia Syria Mozambique Tanzania Nigeria Vietnam North Korea Yugoslavia North Yemen Zambia Pakistan (J-7) Zimbebwe Poland

J-7 (Jianjiji-7 Fighter aircraft 7) / F-7

F-7FS

F-7P Sabre II "Super 7"

MiG-23 FLOGGER YF-113
Meant as a point defense fighter, the Flogger offered a powerful radar, an infrared search and track system, a selection of radar and infrared guided weapons and tremendous speed (Mach 2.35) to counter its adversaries. The MiG-23 was designed in 1964-66 as a successor to the MiG-21. In addition to a much more powerful engine, the MiG-23's most significant new feature was its variable sweep wing. Like the USAF's swing wing F-111, the sweep of the wings could be changed in flight. Fully spread, this gives a shorter takeoff/landing roll while carrying a heavier weapons load. With the wings fully swept back, the MiG-23 has greater speed. The wing has three sweep settings: 16, 45, and 72 degrees. The prototype first flew in April 1967 and MiG-23s began entering operational service in 1971. The aircraft is in widespread use in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. The MiG-23/27 FLOGGER series of aircraft has been used extensively by the former Soviet Union and its Warsaw Pact allies including Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria, East Germany, Rumania, and Czechoslovakia. Other countries including Libya, Syria, Egypt, India, Cuba, Algeria, Iraq, Afghanistan and North Korea have imported FLOGGERS. The MiG-23 series served as fighter-interceptors, with a secondary capability of ground attack. The MiG-23BN and MiG-27 were fighter-bomber variations. The Flogger B is a standard interceptor. Other versions of this aircraft are: C--two seater; G--improved interceptor; and E--export. The MiG-23MLD FLOGGER K version was a modification of the MiG23ML FLOGGER G and incorporated improved avionics, armament, and aerodynamic features. The MiG-23MLD is the most advanced version of the Flogger. It features a different identification-friend-or-foe system, a more advanced missile capability and a distinctive notch in the leading edge of the wing to improve flight characteristics. More than 4,000 MiG-23/27s are estimated to have been built. The wings are high-mounted, variable, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips. There is one turbofan engine inside the body. There are rectangular, box-like air intakes forward of the wing roots and a single exhaust. The fuselage is long and tubular, except where intakes give a box-like appearance. It has a long, pointed nose and a stepped canopy. There is a large, swept-back, and tapered belly fin under the rear section. The tail is swept-back, has a tapered tail fin, has a curved dorsal in the leading edge and an angular tip. Swept-back, tapered flats have angular tips and are high-mounted on the fuselage. MiG-23 aircraft acquired by the United States under the Foreign Materiel Acquisition/Exploitation program are designated as the YF-113.

Specifications
Country of Origin CIS (formerly USSR) MiG-23M Flogger B MiG-23MF Flogger B MiG-23UB Flogger C MiG-23UM Flogger C MiG-23MF Flogger E MiG-23MS Flogger E MiG-23BN Flogger F MiG-23BM Flogger F MiG-23B Flogger F MiG-23ML Flogger G MiG-23P Flogger G MiG-23BK Flogger H MiG-23BN Flogger H MiG-23MLD Flogger K MiG-24 (export MiG-23) MiG-27 Flogger D Tornado Su-24 Fencer F-111 one MiG-23U -- two MiG-23C -- two interceptor fighter 55 ft (16.6 m) 46 ft, 9 in (14.26 m) 18600 meters 970 nm No 4600 kg 2000 kg High Lark radar, RWR, IRST, Basic Bombsight 800 L drop tank with 639kg of fuel for 67nm range Cannon: GSh-23L 23mm

Variants

Similar Aircraft

Crew

Role Length Span Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Sensors Drop Tanks Armament

AS-7 Kerry, UV-16-57, FAB-500, AA-7, ,AA-8, AA10, AA-11 User Countries Afghanistan Algeria Angola Belarus Bulgaria CIS Cuba Czech Republic Germany Ethiopia Hungary India Iraq Kazakhstan Libya North Korea Poland Romania South Yemen Sudan Syria Ukraine Vietnam

MiG-25 FOXBAT (MIKOYANGUREVICH)
The Foxbat is a high-performance, high-altitude interceptor. There are several versions of this aircraft: A--basic interceptor; B--reconnaissance; C--two-seat trainer; D-reconnaissance with a modified radar; and E. The FOXBAT A aircraft, originally designed to counter high-altitude threats, has been converted to FOXBAT E, providing a limited low-altitude look-down and shoot-down capabilities somewhat comparable to FLOGGER. The wings are high-mounted, swept-back, and tapered with square tips. The aircraft has two turbojet engines and large rectangular air intakes below the canopy and forward of the wing roots. There are dual exhaust. The fuselage is long and slender with solid, pointed nose. The aircraft is box-like from the air intakes to rear section. It has a bubble canopy. On the tail are twin, sweptback, and tapered fins with angular tips. There are flats mid- to low-mounted on fuselage, swept-back, and tapered with angular tips.

Specifications
Countries of Origin CIS (formerly USSR) MiG-25P Foxbat A MiG-25RB Foxbat B MiG-25RBV Foxbat B MiG-25BBT Foxbat B MiG-25R Foxbat B MiG-25PU Foxbat C MiG-25RU Foxbat C MiG-25U Foxbat C MiG-25RBK Foxbat D MiG-25RBS Foxbat D MiG-25RBSh Foxbat D MiG-25RBF Foxbat D MiG-25PD Foxbat E MiG-25PDS Foxbat E MiG-25BM Foxbat F F-14 Tomcat F-15 Eagle MiG-31 Foxhound One intercepter reconnaissance 70 ft (21.34 m)

Variants

Similar Aircraft Crew Role Length

Span Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Sensors Drop Tanks Armament

41 ft (12.6 m) 24400 meters 1560 nm No 14200 kg

Foxfire radar na AA-6 Acrid AA-7 Apex AA-8 Aphid Algeria Azerbaijan Belarus Bulgaria CIS Iraq Syria Ukraine

User Countries

MiG-27 FLOGGER D, J (MIKOYANGUREVICH)
The MiG-27 Flogger D/J production was completed in the mid 1980’. They are flown by the former soviet tactical air force and naval aviation. The MiG-27 Flogger M, named Bahadur (Valiant) is built in India and is still being manufactured today. The wings are high-mounted, variable, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips. There is one engine inside the body and rectangular box-like air intakes forward of the wing roots. There is a single exhaust. The fuselage is long and tubular, except where air intakes give a box-like appearance. The aircraft has a long, downward-sloping, sharply pointed nose and a stepped canopy. There is a large, swept-back, and tapered belly fin under the rear section. The tail is swept-back and tapered tail fin with curved dorsal in leading edge and angular tip. The swept-back and tapered flats high-mounted on the fuselage with angular tips.

Specifications
Country of Origin CIS (formerly USSR) MiG-23 Flogger B/E/G F-111 Tornado Su-24 Fencer Mirage F1 Super Etendard Jaguar One ground-attack fighter 55 ft (16.6 m) 46 ft, 9 in (14.26 m) 15240 meters 950 nm No 4600 kg 3500 kg LRMTS, RWR, Advanced Bombsight

Similar Aircraft

Crew Role Length Span Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Sensors

Drop Tanks Armament

800 L drop tank with 639kg for 66nm range Cannon: GSh-6-N-30 30mm rotary AS-12, AS-14, AA-8, ECN Pod, UV-32-57 rocket pod, AA-8 Aphid, FAB-500 Belarus CIS India Kazakhstan

User Countries

MiG-29 FULCRUM (MIKOYANGUREVICH)
The MiG-29 is marketed worldwide and equals or surpasses the F-15C in several areas. The MiG-29's wings are swept-back and tapered with square tips. LERXs are wide and curved down to the front. LERX begins on the nose below the mid-mount point, and the wings’ trailing edges end at a high-mounted point. Twin jet engines are mounted low and to the sides of the fuselage. Diagonal-shaped air intakes give a box-like appearance. There is a large exhausts. The fuselage is made of a long, thin, slender body with long, pointed drooping nose. There is a high-mounted bubble canopy. The tail fins have sharply tapered leading edges, canted outward with angular, cutoff tips. Flats are highmounted on the fuselage, movable, swept-back, and tapered with a negative slant. The MiG-29 is a widely exported aircraft, flown by Iraq, Iran, North Korea and Cuba. The MiG-29 has a few advantages over its more electronically advanced American counterparts. At about 40 miles apart, the American planes have the advantage because of avionics. At 10 miles the advantage is turning to the MiG. At five miles out, because of the MiG weapons sight and better maneuverability, the advantage is to the MiG. The weapons sight is a helmet-mounted system that allows the missile to follow the line of sight of the pilot's helmet. Where the pilot looks is where it goes. The US Department of Defense of the United States of America and the Ministry of Defense of the Republic of Moldova reached an agreement to implement the Cooperative Threat Reduction accord signed on June 23, 1997, in Moldova. The Pentagon pounced on the planes after learning Iran had inspected the jets and expressed an interest in adding them to their inventory. Although Iran already flies the less-capable Fulcrum A, it doesn't own any of the more advanced C-models. Of the 21 Fulcrums the United States bought, 14 are the frontline Fulcrum C's, which contain an active radar jammer in its spine, six older A's and one B-model two-seat trainer. This agreement authorized the United States Government to purchase nuclear-capable MiG-29 fighter planes from the Government of Moldova. This is a joint effort by both Governments to ensure that these dual-use military weapons do not fall into the hands of rogue states. From Oct. 20 to Nov. 2, 1997, loadmasters and aerial port experts squeezed two MiGs apiece, sans wings and tails, into the cargo holds of C-17 Globemaster III transports from Charleston Air Force Base, S.C. The Charleston airlifters delivered the MiGs to the National Air Intelligence Center at Wright-Patterson AFB near Dayton, Ohio. If the NAIC can discover how the Fulcrum works, Air Force pilots might gain an edge if they face the Fulcrum in future combat. The MiG-29K was initiated in 1984 as a Russian Air Force development program for a multi-role fighter, and in 1989 - 1991 the MiG-29K underwent tests aboard the Admiral Kuznetsov aircraft-carrying cruiser. The MiG-29K differed from the MiG-29 production model, featuring a new multi-function radar, dubbed Zhuk; a cabin with monochrome display and use of the HOTAS (hands-on-throttle-and-stick) principle; the RVV-AE airto-air active homing missiles; antiship and antiradar missiles; as well as air-to-ground

precision-guided weapons. The MiG-29K program was revived in response to the decision of the Indian Navy to acquire the Admiral Gorshkov aircraft carrier. This called for the provision of the ship with a multi-role ship-based arrested- landing fighter of the MiG-29K size. The ship's combat group will include 12 MiG-29K planes. The aircraft has a remote control system, large-area (42 m2 vs 38 m2) folding wing, adjustable centerline air intakes with retractable screens protecting the engines during operation from ground airfields, reinforced landing gear, hook, corrosion- protected reinforced fuselage made specifically for deck-based aircraft.

Specifications
Country of Origin CIS (formerly USSR) F/A-18 Hornet F-16 Fighting Falcon F-15 Eagle Su-27 Flanker Moscow Air Production Organization all-weather single-seat counter-air fighter attack capability One Two Klimov/Sarkisov RD-33 turbofans 22,200 pounds 36 feet and 5 inches 15 feet and 6.25 inches 56 feet and 10 inches (empty): 24,030 pounds Mach 2.3, 1,520 mph 18400 meters 905 nm No 4000kg 4000kg Slot Back radar, IRST,RWR, Balistic bombsight Drop tank with 800kg of fuel for 90 nm range Ferry tank with 1500kg of fuel for 255nm range One 30mm GSh-30L cannon with 150 rounds Similar Aircraft

MANUFACTURER TYPE Crew Power Plant Thrust Wingspan Height Length Weight Maximum Speed Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Sensors Drop Tanks Armament

Six AAMs including a mix of SARH and AA- 8 Aphid (R60) AA-10 Alamo (R27T) AA-11 Archer (R73) FAB 500-M62, FAB-1000, TN-100, ECM Pods, S24 AS-12, AS-14 User Countries Russia Belarus Bulgaria CIS Croatia Cuba Czech Republic Germany Hungary India Iran Iraq Kazakhstan Malaysia Moldova North Korea Poland Romania Slovakia Syria Turkemenistan Ukraine Uzbekistan Yemen Yugoslavia

MiG-31 FOXHOUND (MIKOYANGUREVICH)
The most capable Russian air defense interceptor aircraft, the FOXHOUND has a multiple-target engagement capability and was the first Soviet fighter to have a true lookdown, shoot-down capability. The key to the MiG-31's effectiveness is the SBI-16 Zaslon fixed phased array antenna radar, codenamed 'Flash Dance' by NATO, which is said to be the world's most powerful fighter radar. The new Soloviev D-30F6 engine was specified for the MiG-31 in order to improve range, the key performance parameter for which an improvement over the MiG-25 was demanded. By 1987 over 150 FOXHOUNDs were operationally deployed at several locations from the Arkhangelsk area in the northwestern USSR to the Soviet Far East. The FOXHOUND is dedicated to the homeland air defense mission. The FOXHOUND carries the long-range AA-9 air-to-air missiles, and can engage 4 different targets simuitaneouly with the M-9. The wings of the aircraft are high-mounted and swept-back with square tips and a negative slant. There are four underwing pylons. There are two turbofan engines in the fuselage. There are rectangular and diagonal cut air intakes on sides of the fuselage. The exhausts extend beyond the tail plane. The fuselage is rectangular from the intakes to the exhausts and has a long, pointed nose. The aircraft has a bubble canopy. The tail fins are back-tapered with angular tips and canted outward. The flats are swept-back and tapered and mid- to low-mounted on the body. In 1992 the Chinese reached agreement with the Russian Federation to buy 24 MiG-31 Foxhound long-range interceptors. The MiG-31s were expected to be assembled at a newly set-up factory in Shenyang, with production at a rate of four per month expected by 2000. The last aircraft was to be delivered by the year 2000. According to some reports the agreement included a license to build as many as 700 aircraft, and some projection envisioned that at least 200 would actually be deployed by the year 2010. The first stage of tests of the upgraded MiG-31BM high-speed multifunctional longrange jet fighter were completed in mid-1999. The main difference between the MiG-31P (Foxhound, according to the NATO classification) and the new MiG-31BM multifunctional air strike system is that the latter is capable of destroying both air and ground targets. The designers and manufacturers of the MiG-31 hope that the new modification will result in international sales. The upgraded MiG-31BM is fitted with a powerful onboard computer system and a radar with a phased array which will allow the pilot to simultaneously activate the air-to-air and air-to-surface missile fire modes. When working with air targets, the MiG-31BM is capable of intercepting up to 24 targets simultaneously.

Specifications
Countries of Origin Similar Aircraft Crew Role Length Span Height: Wing span: Wing area: Maximum speed: Weight: (empty) Weight: (normal) Powerplant: Maximum Range: Service ceiling: Rate of climb: Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Drop Tanks Sensors Armament CIS (formerly USSR) MiG-25 Foxbat F-14 Tomcat F-15 Eagle Two interceptor air superiority 70 ft, 5 in (21.5 m) 45 ft, 9 in (14 m) 6.60 m 14.02 m 61.41 sq m Mach 2.83 22,000 kg 36,720 kg Two Tumanski R-15BD-300 afterburning turbojets rated at 49.78kN each 1,250 km 20,700 m 8 min 54 sec to 20,000 m 24400 meters 1620 nm No 14200kg 2000L drop tank with 1600kg of fuel for 91 nm range LD/SD TWS radar, possible IRST, RWR cannon R-33 AA-9 Amos AA-11 Archer

Typically two R-40 missiles Four R-60 missiles

MiG-35 / 1.42 Multirole Front-Line Fighter [MFI]
The new MiG Multirole Front-Line Fighter [MFI - Mnogofounksionalni Frontovoi Istrebiel ] was unveiled publicly on 12 January 1999. The project has been under development since 1986, is variously designated the 1.42, the 1.44, I-42 and I-44 - the "MiG-35" and "MiG-39" designations are informally applied by some observers. This multi-functional front-line fifth-generation fighter was developed by the MIG [Mikoyan & Gurevich] aviation scientific and production complex of the MAPO military-industrial corporation. The first prototype was delivered early in 1994, and in December 1884 taxitests were conducted following which further work was suspended due to a shortage of funds. The 35-ton fighter features a single under-fuselage air intake with two AL41F engines of 20 tons thrust each, and a top speed of over 2,500 km/h. The twin-tail "duck" planform features an all-moving canard-type foreplane with a wingspan of about 15 meters and a length of about 20 meters. The MAPO-MiG enterprise claims the new fighter would be able to outperform the F-22 Raptor, the most advanced US air-superiority fighter. Although the primary mission of the MFI is air-superiority, unlike the F-22 the MFI is also capable of performing strike mission, and thus in both conception and configuration is more directly comparable to the similar multi-role EFA2000 Eurofighter. Like the American F-22, the MFI has a thrust vectoring system that allows it to make sharp turns. It also has similar stealth capabilities, with the canard, wing and fuselage structures incorporating carbon-fiber and polymer composite materials. Other stealth features include radar-absorbing covering, screening of radar-visible structure elements, and reduced heat signature. The fifth-generation pulse-doppler radar has a phased-array andtenna with electronic scanning to simultaneously attack over 20 targets. The aircraft can carry long-range air-to-air and airto-surface guided missiles, and it is armed with a 30-mm cannon. In March 1997, military officials scrapped plans to manufacture the MFI because it was too expensive. The Defense Ministry supports the MFI development program, and will decide on production following flight tests that could take up to seven years. The Russian air force will not gain one new, state-of-the-art warplane before the year 2005 because of insufficient financing. No new warplanes have been acquired since 1996.

Specifications
Prime contractor Nation of origin Function Crew MiG-MAPO Russia Multi-role fighter 1

First Flight In-service year Engine Wing span Length Height Canard span Weight (approx.) Ceiling Speed Range Armament

1999? ? Two Lyulka AL-41F vectored-thrust afterburning turbofans, 39,340 lb thrust each 15 m / 49 ft 3 in 19 m / 62 ft 4 in 6 m / 19 ft 8 in 5 m / 16 ft 5 in 33,069 lb empty / 44,092 lb max. take off N/A @ altitude: In excess of 2,448 km/h / 1,521 mph @ supercruise: In excess of 1,224 km/h / 760 mph N/A Unknown but surely any AAMs in Russian arsenal

Yak-28 FIREBAR Yak-28 Brewer
The Yak -28 first entered service in the early 1960s. Four variants saw extensive: the Yak-28 attack version, the Yak-28P Firebar all-weather interceptor, the Yak-28R multisensor reconnaissance aircraft, and the Yak-28U dual control trainer. The Yak-28P Firebar interceptor was withdrawn in the 1980s. The wings are high-mounted, swept-back, and untapered from the engines to the large blunt tips. The wings have wide roots. There are two turbojet engines in pods under the wings. The pods extend well beyond the wings’ leading and trailing edges. The fuselage is long with pointed, glazed nose and is tapered to the rear section. There is a bubble canopy and a belly fin under the rear section. The tail fin is swept-back and tapered with a blunt tip. The tail flats are mid-mounted on the tail fin, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Similar Aircraft Crew Role CIS (formerly USSR) YAKOVLEV Il-28 Beagle Two fighter-bomber reconnaissance EW Jammer - Yak-28 Brewer E bombs cannons rockets 70 ft (21.36 m) 41 ft (12.06 m) 16750 meters 755 nm No 8500 kg Mushroom radar, ESM, Basic bombsight 1000 L slipper tank with 799kg of fuel for 53nm range

Armament Length Span Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Sensors Drop Tanks

Armament User Country

2 Chaff rocket pods or AS-9 CIS Ukraine

Yak-36 Freehand
The Yak-36 Freehand was a twin-engined VTOL fighter. Vertical thrust was exhausted through nozzles in the tail, each wing and from the front of the long probe on the nose. The first flight was in September, 1963.

Specifications
Country of Origin Similar Aircraft Crew Type Length Span Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Sensors Drop Tanks Armament User County CIS One Attack CIS (formerly USSR)

Yak-38 FORGER (YAKOVLEV)
Production of the Yak-38 Forger began in 1975 making it the world’s second operational VSTOL aircraft, after the Harrier series. The aircraft's wings are mid-mounted, deltashaped with blunt tips and a negative slant. There is one turbo engine and two lift jets. There are two exhausts on the bottom of the rear fuselage. Large, semicircular air intakes are below the cockpit well forward of the wings. The fuselage is long and has a pointed nose and tapered tail section. The Yak-38 has a bubble canopy. The tail is swept-back and the tail fin is tapered with a square angular tip and a small step in the leading edge. Flats are mid-mounted on the body, swept-back, and tapered with a negative slant.

Specifications
Country of Origin CIS (formerly USSR) AV-8B Harrier II Super Etendard Fantan A Mirage F1 One Forger B—two Attack 52 ft, 6 in (16 m) 24 ft, 7 in (7.5 m) 12200 meters 12200 meters No 2268 kg 1362 kg Ranging radar, laser rangefinder, nose IR sensor (possibly IRST). Advanced bombsight 600 L drop tank with 479kg for 42nm range AS-10, UV-32-57, FAB-500, AA-8 CIS Similar Aircraft

Crew Type Length Span Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Sensors Drop Tanks Armament User County

Yak-141 Freestyle
The Yak-141 (formerly Yak-41) was intended originally to replace Yak-38 for air defence of Kiev class carriers/cruisers, with secondary attack capabilities. Designed for carrier-borne operations as an air interceptor, close air combat, maritime and ground attack aircraft, the Yak-141 has the same multi-mode radar as the MiG-29, although with a slightly smaller antenna housed in the nose radome. It features a triplex full authority digital fly-by-wire system. The Yak-141 continues previous Soviet V/STOL principles, combining a lift and propulsion jet with two fuselage mounted lift jets in tandem behind the cockpit, with cruise power provided by a single Tumansky R-79 jet engine. The R-79 has a rear lift/cruise nozzle which deflect down for take-off while the two lift engines have corresponding rearward vector to ensure stability. The airframe makes extensive use of composites materials, with some 28 percent by weight constructed of carbon-fibre, primarily in the tail assembly, while the remainder of the structure is mainly aluminum lithium alloys. The project began in 1975, but was delayed by financial constraints as well as the protracted development of the engine, which meant the prototype did not fly until March 1989. This development program was cancelled due to termination of Defence Ministry funding. Yakolev OKB continued development in refined land-based and naval combat aircraft forms. Four prototypes were built, two continuing in flight testing until 1995, with the other two used for engine and structural testing. To facilitate sales of the Yak141, Yeltsin has issued decrees allowing tri- or quadripartite agreements with a number of interested organizations in Latin America and Asia.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Span wing area length overall height wheel track wheel base tailplane span Weights 33ft 1 1/2in (10.105m); folded, 19ft 4 1/4in (5.9m) 341.56ft(2) (31.7m(2)) 60ft 2 3/4in (18.36m) 16ft 4 1/4in (5m) 9ft lOin (3m) 22ft 9 1/4in (6.945m) 19ft 4 1/4in (5.9m) 25,684lb (11,650kg) Empty, equipped Russia Yakovlev air defence

34,833lb (15,800kg) VTO max take-off weight 42,990lb (19,500kg) STO max take-off weight Loads 2,204lb (1,OOOkg) VTO max external load 5,732lb (2,600kg) STO max external load 3,858lb (1,750kg) max external fuel 30 mm cannon AA-10 Alamo radar-guided medium-range AAM AA-11 Archer shortrange IR-guided missile bombs unguided rockets 50% fuel, 7g. Single pilot in a Zvezda K36V rocket-boosted zerozero ejection-seat. One Kobchenko/Soyuz R-79-300 vectored-thrust lift/cruise turbofan developing 34,170lb (15,500kg) with afterburning for conventional take-off, or 23,148.5lb (10,500kg) dry, plus two Rybinsk RD- 41 turbofan lift engines each rated at a maximum 9,039lb (4,100kg) 9,700lb (4,400kg) 675 kts (1,250km/hr) Max level speed, sea level 971 kts (1,800km/hr) at 36,089ft (11,OOOm) M=1.8 max achievable Mach number 49,213ft/min (250m/sec) over 49,000ft (15,000m+) 351nm (650km) VTO range at sea level, no external weapons 372nm (690km) with 4,409lb (2,000kg) weapon load and take-off run of 394ft (120m) 755nm (1,400km) at 32,808-39,370ft (10-12,000m) 1,133nm (2,100km) max range, with external fuel and short take-off 755nm (1,400km) with vertical takeoff and internal fuel

Armament

limiting load factor Accommodation

Power Plant

Max internal fuel capacity Maximum Speed vertical climb rate service ceiling

combat radius

Cost User Countries

AN-2 Colt AN-3 Colt Y-5 Colt
An-2 was initially developed as an agricultural aircraft. Hence, the initial project name was SKh-1 (Selskoe Khozaistvo - Agriculture). First prototype flew on August 31, 1947. The aircraft went in production in 1949 and over 5000 were built. China began producing the AN-2 aircraft in the early 70s and it is still used by the North Korean military for troop transport. The AN-2 Colt provides combat support and combat service support to include reconnaissance, airborne or airland resupply as well as airborne insertion of detachments. The crew consists of two pilots and can accomodate eight passengers. The AN-2 is night capable but the cockpit is not adapted for NVG use. The Y-5 is Chinese copy of the Antonov An-2. The An-3 is modification of the An-2 airplane, powered by a TVD-20 turboprop engine with the AV-17 three-blade propeller. The An-3 has new crew cabin design, heating and ventilation equipment, electrical engineering, flight/navigation equipment, alarm system, anti-fire equipment, and be used in the following versions: cargo, cargo/passenger, agricaltural, extinguishing forest fire, ambulance. The biplane are rectangular-shaped with curved tips, with one high-mounted and one low-mounted (shorter), connected and braced by two struts. A single radial piston engine (some versions are turboprop) is mounted in the nose. The fuselage is Short and thick with solid, blunt nose, a stepped cockpit, and fixed landing gear. The tail fin is tapered with a large, round tip. The flats are low-mounted on the tail fin and rectangular-shaped with curved tips.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length Height Light-transport (10 equipped troops), general utility U-6A Beaver, OV-1 Mohawk, OV-10 Bronco 59 ft, 8 in (18.19 m) 41 ft, 9 in (12.75 m) 4.1 m 3330 kg - empty 5500 kg - maximum takeoff 5800 kg - maximum takeoff [An-3] 1500 kg - maximum payload USSR, Poland

Weight

1800 kg - maximum payload [An-3] Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Runway Armament Crew Cost Afghanistan, Albania (Y-5), Angola, Benin, Bulgaria, Cambodia, CIS, Cuba, Germany, Iraq, Laos, Mali, Mongolia, Nicaragua, North Korea, People’s Republic of China (Y-5), Poland, Romania, Tanzania, Vietnam 1xASh-62 IR, 985 hp 1xTVD-10B, 959 hp [AN-3] 250 km/h 220 km/h / 220-260 km/h [AN-3] 1025 km - with maximum fuel 300 km - with maximum load 5000 m 650 m - dirt takeoff-landing strip 650 m - dirt takeoff-landing strip [An-3] 400 m - surfaced takeoff-landing Usually none Two

User Countries

An-12 CUB Y-8
An-12 is a development of the An-10. The first prototype flew in March of 1957, the same month as the An-10 prototype, which indicates the close relationship between the aircraft. The civilian version, the An-12B, first flew in 1961 and went in production in 1962. Over 900 An-12 Cubs were built before production ended in 1973. In the mid1990s large numbers of the Cub are still in service with the CIS air force. The wings are high-mounted with drooping outer wing panels, back-tapered leading edges, straight trailing edges, and blunt tips. Four turboprop engines are mounted under the wings’ leading edges. The round, slender body features a stepped cockpit and glassed-in nose, with landing gear pods which bulge at lower body midsection. The tail flats are unequally tapered with blunt tips and mounted high on the fuselage. The fin is tapered with a blunt tip and a step in the leading edge. Two 23-mm guns are mounted in a tail turret. The Shaanxi Y-8 is a licensed version of An-12 built in China. An AEW version has been reported to be under development. The Y-8MP, the maritime patrol version, is the first long-range maritime patrol aircraft deployed by the Peoples Liberation Army Navy [PLAN]. With a rrange of 5,600km, it consists of the Y-8/An-12 transport aircraft, equipped with a Litton APSO-504(V)3 surface search radar in an enlarged undernose radome along with additional navigational systems. About half a dozen Y-8Xs patrol aircraft are believed in service, and although the aircraft has the potential to carry a large load of weapons, it is believed at present to be un-armed. The Chinese Navy also reportedly is acquiring Skymaster AEW radars. While Chinese officials claim these radars will be used for search and rescue operations, they could be used in AEW and surface surveillance roles.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Crew Wingspan Length Height Wing area Empty weight Takeoff weight Russia ANTONOV Medium-cargo/transport, ECM, ELINT C-130 Hercules, C-160 Transall, G.222 3-6 38.0 m / 124 ft, 8 in 33.1 m / 121 ft, 4 in 10.53 m 121.7 sq. m 30500 kg 54000 kg

Max. takeoff weight Engines Max. speed Cruise speed Landing speed Ceiling Takeoff roll Landing roll Range Armament

61000 kg 4 AI-20M, 4250 hp each 640 km/h 600 km/h 170 km/h 10200 m 850 m 860 m 5500 km twin 23mm NR-23 cannons in tail 100 equipped troops vehicles and weapons 130 passengers or cargo 13.5 m x 2.6 m x 3.5 m (122.9 cu. m) cargo bay

Payload

Cost Angola, Afghanistan, Bulgaria, CIS, Czech Republic, Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Iraq, People’s Republic of China (Y-12), Poland, Slovakia, South Yemen, Sri Lanka, Syria (Y-12), Yugoslavia

User Countries

An-22 Antei Cock
The first An-22 flew on 24 February 1965, and it was publicly displayed at the Paris International Air Show at Le Bourget the same year. The largest transport aircraft of the time, An-22 set a number of world records. Despite orders for 100 An-22, only 48 aircraft were actually flying by 1983.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Crew Wingspan Length Height Wing area Empty weight Takeoff weight Engines Max. speed Cruise speed Ceiling Takeoff roll Landing roll Range Range with maximum payload Payload Cost User Countries 5-8 64.4 m 55.5 m 17.5 m 480.0 sq. m 116000 kg 250000 kg 4 NK-12MV, 14791 hp each 740 km/h 680 km/h 10000 m 1100 m 800 m 11000 km 5000 km 72500 kg in a 33 m x 4.4 m x 4.4 m (638.9 cu. m) cargo bay Russia Antonov heavy transport

An-24 COKE An-26 CURL Y-7
Development of the An-24 began in 1960 in response to an Aeroflot requirement for a cheap and simple transport to replace the Li-2 (licensed DC-3), Il-2, and Il-14 aircraft. Two prototypes flew in September 1962, and the An-24 Coke first entered service in 1962. The production version turned out to be a reliable aircraft - An-24 was shown to be able to maintain an altitude of 3000 m with full payload and only one working engine. The An-24RT transport aircraft features an additional RU-19-300 jet engine. The An-26 is a development of An-24RT. One of the main modifications was a rear loading ramp. More than 1,100 of this versatile transport aircraft were built before production ended in 1978. The Coke’s replacement, the An-26 Curl, has many of the same features as the Coke. The Xian Yunshuji Y-7 is a reverse-engineered Chinese version of the Antonov An-24. The wings are high-mounted and equally tapered from the engines to the blunt tips. Two turboprops are mounted in pods beneath the wings, which extend beyond the wings’ leading and trailing edges. The fuselage is long and slender with an upswept rear section and a solid, rounded nose featuring a stepped cockpit. The fin is back-tapered with a blunt tip and angular fairing. Flats are high-mounted on the body, back-tapered with blunt tips, and have a positive slant.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Russia, China ANTONOV Short haul, light-transport, paratroop - cargo An-32 Cline, IL-20 Coot, P-3C Orion, An-12 Cub An-24 COKE Crew Wingspan Length Height Wing area Takeoff weight Engines 2-3 29.2 m 23.5 m 8.3 m 72.5 sq. m 21000 kg 2 AI-24, 2514 hp each An-26 CURL 3 29.2 m 23.8 m 8.6 m 75.0 sq. m 24000 kg 2 AI-24T, 2783 hp

each 1 RU-19A-300 8.8 kN thrust Max. speed Cruise speed Landing speed Climb rate Ceiling Takeoff roll Landing roll Range Range with maximum payload Payload Cost Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Congo, CIS, Cuba, Czech Republic, Ethiopia, Germany, Hungary, Iraq, Laos, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nicaragua, North Korea, People’s Republic of China (Y-7), Poland, Romania, Slovakia, Somalia, South Yemen, Syria, Vietnam, Yugoslavia, Zambia. 8400 m 620 m 580 m 2280 km 750 km 24-50 passengers 500 km/h 165 km/h 540 km/h at 6000 m 430 km/h 175 km/h 3.3 m/s 7500 m 640 m 610 m 2550 km 980 km 38-40 passengers or 6000 kg of cargo

User Countries

An-24

An-26

Y-7

An-32 CLINE (ANTONOV)
The An-32 Cline is a direct development of the An-24 Coke. Major recognition differences of the Cline are the engines mounted over the wings, and a large belly fin beneath the tail section. The wings are high-mounted and equally tapered from the engines to the blunt tips. Two turboprops mounted in pods over the wings which extend beyond the wings’ leading and trailing edges. The fuselage is long and tubular, with upswept rear section and solid, rounded nose and stepped cockpit. The fin is unequally tapered with blunt tip and angular fairing. Flats are high-mounted on the body, backtapered with blunt tips, and have a positive slant.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries CIS, Cuba, India, Mongolia, Peru Usually none Five Short- to medium-range, light-transport, cargo (39 equipped troops, small vehicles), airdrop An-24 Coke, An-26 Curl 95 ft, 9 in (29.2 m) 78 ft (23.75 m) Russia

Antonov-70
The Antonov-70 is a new propfan powered medium-size wide-body short take-off and landing transport aircraft. Development of the An-70 program, which began in 1975, effectively stopped with the collapse of the Soviet Union. The first flight was on 16 December 1994, but the prototype was destroyed on 10 February 1995 in a midair collision. However, as of mid-1998 Germany reamined interested in evaluating a Westernized version of the An-70 to meet its airlift needs.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries Four ZMKB Ivchenko Progress D-27 propfans

An-72 COALER An-74 COALER
The An-72 Coaler is designed as a short takeoff and landing aircraft which can operate from unprepared airfields. The An-72 originated as An-32, but was later fitted with jet engines. The first prototype flew on December 22, 1977, and the aircraft entered service in 1979. The wings are high-mounted and back-tapered with blunt tips and a negative slant. Two turbofans are mounted in long pods mounted on top of the wings. Round air intakes extend from the front of the wings’ leading edges. The engines were placed on the leading edge of the wings to increase lift for STOL capability, with the jet exhausts blowing over titanium panels on the upper surface. The engine position also gives good Foreign Object Damage (FOD) protection. The fuselage is circular with round, solid nose, upswept rear section, and a flush cockpit. The rear fuselage has a hinged loading ramp with a rear fairing that slides backwards and up to clear the opening. Up to 7.5 tons can be airdropped, and there are folding side seats for 42 paratroops or 52 passengers. The swept-back, untapered fin features back-tapered flats high-mounted on the fin forming a T. The An-72P is a maritime patrol variant with bulged observation windows, liferaft provision, cameras as well as offensive armament, including underwing rocket pods, a podded cannon on the undercarriage sponson and bombs that can be mounted in the rear fuselage and dropped through the open rear ramp. The An-74 derivative of the An-72 featured improved avionics and radar together with an extended wingspan and increased range. It was designed to operate in the polar regions where it can land on ice floes for resupply or rescue work. The An-71 AEW aircraft also featured the extended wingspan, along with a large radar dish on top of the tail.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length Height Weight Russia ANTONOV Medium-transport, STOL C-160 Transall, G.222 84 ft, 9 in (25.8 m) 87 ft, 2 in (26.6 m) 8.2 m 26,500 kg takeoff weight 30,500 kg Max. takeoff weight

Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Landing speed Airfield Range Ceiling Armament Payload Crew Cost User Countries

2 Lotarev D-36, 62.8 kN thrust each

720 km/h 165 km/h Takeoff roll: 400-450 m Landing roll: 350-400 m 3200 km maximum 1200 km with maximum payload 11000 m maximum 8000 m cruise None 32 passengers or 5000 kg of cargo Three

An-124 CONDOR (ANTONOV)
An-124 was created in the tradition of An-22 to be the largest transport aircraft in the world. It is larger than the C-5B Galaxy, but smaller than the An-225 Mriya (NATO named Cossack) which carries the Russian space shuttle. The first prototype (SSSR 82002, Number 318) flew on December 26, 1982. The wings are high-mounted, sweptback, and tapered with curved tips and negative slant. Four turbofans are mounted on pylons under the wings. The fuselage is a thick oval in cross-section with a rounded nose and tapering to the rear. The tail fin is swept-back and tapered with rounded tips. Flats are swept-back, tapered, and mid-mounted on the body.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Payload Crew Cost User Countries 865 km/h 16,500 km maximum range 4,500 km with maximum payload 12000 m none 88 passengers or cargo in a 36.5 m x 6.4 m x 4.4 m (1027.8 cu. m) cargo bay Six--seven with loadmaster 405000 kg 4 - Lotarev D-18T, 229.9 kN thrust each Strategic transport C-5B Galaxy, C-17A Globemaster III 240 ft, 5 in (73.3 m) 226 ft, 3 in (69 m) Russia

Il-14 CRATE
Approximately 3,600 Il-14 Crates were produced for both military and civilian use. The Crate has been widely exported to other countries. The wings are low-mounted and have straight leading edges and forward-tapered trailing edges with blunt tips. Two piston engines are mounted in and extending beyond the wings’ leading edges. The fuselage is long, cigar-shaped, and tapered to the rear section, featuring a rounded, solid nose and stepped cockpit. The tail flats are mid-mounted on the body and back-tapered with rounded tips. The large fin is tapered, with a square tip and a small fairing in the leading edge.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries Afghanistan, Albania, Bulgaria, CIS, Chad, Cuba, Czech Republic, Iraq, North Korea, People’s Republic of China, Poland, Romania, South Yemen, Vietnam Usually none Five Russia ILYUSHIN Medium-transport, cargo (five equipped troops) DC-3 Dakota 104 ft (31.70 m) 73 ft, 2 in (22.3 m)

Il-76 CANDID Il-78 MIDAS
The Il-76 Candid entered service with the former Soviet air force in 1974. The wings are high-mounted, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips and a slight negative slant. Four turbofan engines are mounted on pylons under and extending beyond wings’ leading edges. The fuselage is long, round, and tapering to the rear, featuring a rounded nose with radome on the chin. The bottom portion of nose glassed-in. The tail flats are swept-back, tapered, and high-mounted on a swept-back, with the tapered tail fin forming a T. The ll-76MF(TF) is the latest development of the popular cargo aircraft and features a 6.6 meter fuselage extension which increases the size of the cargo compartment by 1.3 to 1.5 times, while new PS-90A-76 turbofans each provide 16 tonnes of thrust. The lower fuel consumption of the new engines increase fuel efficiency by 30%, permitting a 25% increase in range. Furthermore, the additional power increases the maximum take-off weight to 210 tonnes and the payload to 52 ton. Noise and emission levels meet ICAO standard. The ll-76MD and ll-76TD are unique in their class and they can carry cargo weighing up to 50 tonnes over ranges of up to 4000 km. In addition to the Candid, other versions of the aircraft include the A-50 Mainstay airborne early warning platform, and the Il-78 Midas aerial refueling tanker. The Midas is a three-point tanker probe and drogue based on (or converted from) the airframe of the Il76MD military freighter, carrying a maximum payload of 48,000 kg. This new aerialrefueling tanker aircraft began development in teh early 1980s. When deployed, the new tanker supported tactical and strategic aircraft and significantly improved the ability of Soviet aircraft to conduct longer range operations. The former Soviet Union's only operational Il-78M regiment was based in Ukraine, which retained the aircraft after independence. Only a handful remained in Russian hands.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length Height Weight Payload Weight Russia ILYUSHIN Heavy-transport, cargo (tanks, guns, and other equipment) C-141B Starlifter, C-5 Galaxy, C-17A Globemaster III 165 ft, 8 in (50.6 m) 152 ft, 10 in (46.6 m)

Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries CIS, Cuba, Iraq, India, Libya, Syria Rear gun turret on military model Seven

Il-76 CANDID

Beriev Be-42 / A-40 Albatros / MERMAID
The largest amphibian plane in the world, the A-40 Albatros military maritime patrol and surveillance aircraft, first flew in 1986 and entered service in limited numbers in 1990. Designed to replace old the Beriev Be-12 and Ilyushin Il-38 in Russian Navy aviation anti-submarine service, the A-40 was developed to provide access to remote areas in the east of the Soviet Union, transporting replacement maritime crews, anti-submarine operations, and SAR work. This product of the G.M.Beriev Taganrog Aviation Scientific-Engineering Complex, was detected by US intelligence in 1988 and designated MERMAID by NATO. The A-40 aircraft was publicly revealed at the Tushino airshow in August 1989. The Be-42 is a unique aircraft, with its high-aspect ratio, slightly swept wings, slender fuselage, and booster engines faired in beneath the main engines. The unmistakable shape features a high wing with two large motors placed over the wing, a "T" tail and a probe for the in-flight refueling. Despite a lack of production orders the Beriev A-40 Albatros has accumulated a number of world-wide performance records from its first flight in 1986. The Beriev BE-200 is a twin engine multiple amphibious aircraft derived from the much larger Beriev A-40. The Be-200 is intended for production in transport, passengercarrying, fire-fighting, patrol and search-and-rescue versions. The aircraft's maximum take-off weight of 42 ton is half that of the A-20. The Russian Ministry of Forests has expressed interest in 10 to 50 Be-200s for fire-fighting roles, although the required finance is unlikely to be available for some time. Production is being undertaken by Beriev's associated Irkutsk factory within IAPO, which also builds the two-seat Sukhoi Su-30 series, including the MKI versions for India. Interest has also been expressed by South Korea in a version of the Be-200 for maritime patrol.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span wing area Length Height Weight 135 ft 06 in ( 41.62 m ) 200.0m2 143 ft 10 in ( 43.80 m ) 36 ft 03 in ( 11.00 m ) 189,595 lb ( 86,000 kg ) Max T/O Russia Beriev Amphibious anti-submarine patrol aircraft

Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries

2 x Soloviev D-30KPV, 117.7 kN and 2 x Klimov RD-60K, 24.5 kN 472 mph ( 760 km/h ) 720 km/h range w/max.fuel: 5500 km range w/max.payload: 4100 km

6500kg of bombs, torpedos or mines Eight: two pilots; flight engineer; radio operator; navigator; three observers

none

Beriev A-50 Mainstay
The A 50 Mainstay SDRLO (Long Range Detection System) aircraft is based on a stretched Ilyushin IL-76 Transport in widespread service with Soviet Forces combined with an upgraded "Flat Jack" radar system. Developed to replace the TU-126 Moss (a variant of the Bear bomber), the Mainstay first flew in 1980 with about 40 produced by 1992. The Mainstay is not as sophisticated as its western counterpart, the E-3 Sentry, but provides Russian Fighter Regiments with an airborne control capability over both land and water. Mainstays have been used by the Russian Air Force at bases in the Kola Peninsula and for observing Allied air operations during the 1991 Gulf War from bases in Ukraine. In 1994 NATO proposed making the E-3 Sentry and the Beriev Mainstay interoperable to enable Russia to provide AEW&C support to future United Nations or coalition operations. The aircraft's wings are high-mounted, swept-back, and tapered with blunt tips. There are four turbofan engines mounted on pylons under and extending beyond the wings’ leading edges. The fuselage is long, round and tapered to the rear with a radome on the chin. There is a saucer type radome on top of the aircraft. There is a stepped-up cockpit. The fail flats are swept-back and tapered with blunt tips high-mounted on the swept-back, tapered fin, forming a T. The aircraft can stay aloft without refueling for four to six hours and can remain airborne for another four hours with mid-air refueling. The aircraft has a maximum range of 1,800 kilometers, while the radar has a detection range of up to 800 kilometers, and can track 200 targets simultaneously. In early April 2000 Russia reached preliminary agreement to lease two A-50 aircraft to the Indian Air Force to step up its aerial surveillance on the border with Pakistan. India conducted trials of the A50 in July 2000, and the results were reportedly satisfactory. In September 2000 it was reported that Rosvoorouzhenie, Russia’s arms-exporting company, had entered negotiations with China to lease a pair of A-50 aircraft, as a replacement for the Israeli Phalcon. The terms of the lease to China were expected to be finalized as soone as late November or December 2000.

Specifications
Countries of Origin Similar Aircraft Crew Role Armament Length CIS (formerly USSR) E-3 Sentry Seven AEW control tail turret 152 ft, 8 in (46.5 m)

Span

165 ft, 6 in (50.5 m)

An-71 Madcap
The An-71 Madcap was a modified An-72 with an AEW radome on the forward swept tailfin intended for service on the "Tbilisi" (AKA "Admiral Kuznetsov") aircraft carrier. The aircraft also featured substantially extended wingspan -- about six meters greater than the An-72 -- and other minor refinements. Three aircraft were built before the An-71 was cancelled in favor of the twin-turboprop Yak-44 [which was in turn cancelled in 1993].

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries Russia 6 2 D-436K turbofans + 1 RD-38A 650 km/h 530 km/h 31.9 m 23.5 m 9.2 m Russia Antonov AEW

Il-20 COOT-A (ILYUSHIN)
The Il-20 is a military version of the Il-18 passenger airplane, with electronic equipment and an array of external antennae. It is still used by the Russian Air Force as flying command post. This version is sometimes unofficially referred to as Il-20 or Coot-A in NATO code. A maritime reconnaissance and anti-submarine aircraft, the Il-38, was also developed from the Il-18.

GENERAL DATA Country of Origin. CIS (formerly USSR). Similar Aircraft. P-3C Orion, An-24 Coke, An-12 Cub. Crew. Five. Role. Electronics surveillance. Armament. None. Dimensions. Length: 117 ft, 9 in (35.9 m). Span: 122 ft, 7 in (37.4 m). WEFT DESCRIPTION Wings. Low-mounted and unequally tapered with blunt tips and positive slant. Engine(s). Four turboprops mounted in the wings and extending forward of the wings. Fuselage. Round, cigar-shaped tapered at the rear and a rounded nose. Stepped-up cockpit. Bulges on sides of fuselage aft of the cockpit. Pod carried on the fuselage bottom is a SLAR. Tail. Back-tapered fin with square tip. Equally tapered flats, mid-mounted on the fuselage. USER COUNTRIES Afghanistan (Il-18), CIS.

Il-38 May
The Ilyushin Il-38 May is a Soviet maritime patrol and anti-submarine aircraft developed from the Il-18. The Il-38 has a short front fuselage and a much longer aft-fuselage, and two bomb bays. It is powered by four Ivchenko Al-20 single-shaft turboprops and has a maximum speed of 450mph and a range of 4500 miles. The Il-38 was first flown in 1957, and about 100 were built.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Wing Span Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries 10 - 12 35,000 kg empty 65,000 kg Max take-off weight 9,000 kg Max payload 4 x turboprop engines (Ivchenko AI-20) @ 4200 hp 724 km/h 500 km/h 7,250 km 11,000 m 37.4 m 39.8 m reconnaissance/ASW Russia

Mi-1 HARE
The Mi-1 Hare entered series production in 1951. The Mi-1 remained in production until 1964. Poland built a version designated SM-1. The three-blade main rotor is mounted on a high hump on top of the fuselage midsection. The single radial piston engine is mounted beneath a hump on top of cabin. The fuselage, which is tadpole-shaped when viewed from bottom, features a rounded nose and rear sections with a stepped, glassed-in cockpit and a long, thin, tapered tail boom. The tail consists of a swept-back fin with a rotor on the right top. Small flats are equally tapered and mounted directly in front of the fin.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Rotor diameter Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries Usually none One Russia MIL Utility, liaison None 47 ft (14.36 m) 39 ft, 8 in (12.2 m)

Mi-2 HOPLITE
The MI-2 Hoplite provides transport and fire support. The MI-2 can conduct reconnaissance, resupply guerrillas and provide close air support with 57mm rockets. It can also have a smoke generator mounted to provide a wide area smoke screen in front of units, screening their movements. Additional missions include; direct air support, antitank, armed reconnaissance, transport, medevac, airborne command post, minelaying, and training. Although the Mi-2 Hoplite was developed by the Mil bureau in the former Soviet Union, the aircraft was produced exclusively in Poland by the PZL Swidnik aircraft factory. Several thousand of these aircraft were built and it remained in production until 1985. The three-blade main rotor is mounted on top of a large hump above the body midsection. Two turboshaft enginess are mounted side-by-side on top of cabin, forming a hump, with round air intakes above the cockpit and oval exhausts on the sides of the engines. The small, bus-like fuselage with fixed landing gear features a stepped-up cockpit and rounded nose, and a tadpole-shaped body when viewed from bottom. The tapered tail boom has small, unequally tapered flats and a thin, swept-back fin with a rotor on the right. The cabin door is hinged rather than sliding, which may limit operations. There is no armor protection for the cockpit or cabin. Ammo storage is in the aircraft cabin, so combat load varies by mission. Some Mi-2USs currently employ fuselage-mounted weapon racks rather than the 23-mm fuselage-mounted cannon which is removed. Some variants however, still employ the cannon. External stores are mounted on weapons racks on each side of the fuselage. Each rack has two hardpoints for a total of four stations.

VARIANTS
  

Mi-2R: Ambulance version that carries 4x litter patients. Mi-2T: Transport version that carries 8 personnel. Mi-2URN: Armed reconnaissance variant, employs 57-mm unguided rockets, and mounts a gunsight in the cockpit for aiming all weapons.  Mi-2URP: The antitank variant. Carries 4x AT-3 Sagger wire-guided missiles on external weapons racks, and 4x additional missiles in the cargo compartment.  Mi-2US: The gunship variant, employs an airframe modification that mounted a 23-mm NS-23KM cannon to the portside fuselage. Also employs 2x 7.62-mm gun pods on external racks, and 2x 7.62-mm pintle-mounted machineguns in the cabin.  PZL Swidnik: A Polish-produced variant under license from Russia. Same performance, characteristics, and missions.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Date of Introduction Role Similar Aircraft Blades Rotor diameter Length Height Weight Engines Maximum speed Cruising speed Fuel Russia MIL / PZL Swidnik 1965 Transport, cargo, reconnaissance, trainer, search and rescue, liaison, armed support Hirundo A109, Mi-8 Hip Main rotor: 3 Tail rotor: 2 47 ft, 6 in (14.6 m) rotors turning: 17.4 m / 57 ft fuselage: 11.9 m 3.7 m Maximum Gross: 3,700 kg Normal Takeoff: 3,550 kg Empty: 2,372 kg 2x 400-shp PZL GTD-350 (series III and IV) turboshaft 220 km/h 194 km/h Internal: 600 liters Internal Aux Tank: N/A External Fuel Tank: 238 liters ea. Maximum Load: 580 km Normal Load: 340 km With Aux Fuel: 790 km Service: 4,000 meters Hover (out of ground effect): 1,000 meters Hover (in ground effect): 2,000 meters 4.5 m/s Transports 6-8 troops or 700 kg internal cargo or 800 kg external load on 4x external hardpoints. 23-mm Automatic Cannon, NS-23KM: Range: (practical) 2,500 m Elevation/Traverse: None (rigidly-mounted) Ammo type: HEFI, HEI, APT, APE, CC Rate of Fire (rpm): (practical) 550

Range

Ceiling Vertical Climb Rate Standard Payload Armament

7.62-mm or Pintle-mounted Machinegun: (may be mounted in left-side cabin door) Range: (practical) 1,000 m Ammo type: HEFI, HEI, APT, APE, CC Rate of Fire (rpm): (practical) 250 OR 12.7-mm or Pintle-mounted Machinegun: (may be mounted in left-side cabin door) Range: (practical) 1,500 m Ammo type: API, API-T, IT, HEI Rate of Fire (rpm): (practical) 100 1 - 23-mm automatic cannon 1 - 7.62-mm or 12.7-mm MG 4 - AT-3c/SAGGER ATGM 4 - SA-7b/GRAIL missile 2 - 57-mm Rocket pods (16 each) Twin or single fixed 7.62-mm or 12.7-mm MG External fuel tanks (liters) AVIONICS Survivability Crew Cost User Countries Azerbaijan, Burma, Bulgaria, CIS, Cuba, Czech Republic, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Hungary, Libya, Nicaragua, Poland, Slovakia, Syria, Ukraine The cannon is pilot sighted, and fire is adjusted by controlling the attitude of the aircraft. The Mi-2 is primarily a daylight only aircraft. Main and tail rotor blades electrically deiced. 1 (pilot)

Mi-4 HOUND Z-5
The Mi-4 HOUND helicopter is a piston-engined aircraft developed for unarmed military transport. Approximately 3,000 Mi-4 Hounds were built before production ended in 1969. These piston-engined aircraft have been largely replaced by jet-powered helicopters in the transport and antisubmarine role. The large, four-blade main rotor is mounted on top of the fuselage midsection. The single piston engine is mounted within the nose section. The fuselage is short and oval with a solid rounded nose and stepped-up cockpit. It features a high-mounted, long, thin tail boom with a gun mount under the belly (oil pan) and four-wheeled landing gear. The tail is small, with a three-blade rotor attached to right side of the thin fin and small flats forward of the fin.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Rotor diameter Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost Afghanistan, Albania (Z-5), Algeria, Bulgaria, Cuba, Czech Republic, Egypt, Germany, Iraq, Mali, Mongolia, North Korea, North Yemen, People’s Republic of China (Z-5), Poland, Romania, Somalia , South Yemen, Sudan, Syria, Vietnam Machine gun pod, rockets Three Russia & China MIL Transport (12 to 16 equipped troops), armed support, trainer BO 105, Defender 500 69 ft (21 m) 55 ft (16.8 m) 17 ft. 17,200 lbs. / 1 x 1,700 shp Shvetson ASh-82V, air-cooled radial 99 mph

User Countries

Z-5

Mi-6 HOOK (MIL)
When first flown in 1957, the Mi-6 Hook was the world's largest rotary-wing aircraft. More than 800 of this heavy-lift helicopter were built before production ended in 1981. The large, five-blade main rotor is centered over the fuselage midsection. The stabilizing wings are unequally tapered with blunt tips, mounted high on the fuselage, and tilted upward to the front. Two turboshafts are mounted on top of fuselage midsection with round air intakes above cockpit. Oval-shaped exhaust ports on sides. The fuselage is long and bus-like, with a round, stepped-up cockpit and round, glassed-in nose section and fixed landing gear. The upswept rear section has a tapered tail boom. The swept-back fin is tapered with a small rotor on right and unequally tapered flats forward of the fin.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Rotor diameter Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries Algeria, CIS, Egypt, Iraq, Laos, Peru, Syria, Vietnam Machine gun Five Russia Mil Heavy transport (65 equipped troops), vehicles Mi-26 Halo, CH-3 Jolly Green Giant 115 ft (35 m) 109 ft (33.3 m)

Mi-8 HIP
The MI-8 HIP is a multi-role transport helicopter capable of carring troops or supplies as well as conducting armed attackes with rockets and guns. It is often used to resupply guerrillas, insert detachments or provide close air support to attacking units. Designed as a transport helicopter, the Mi-8 proved a multi-purpose machine. The cable external suspension, equipped with the weight-measuring device, makes it possible to carry large size cargoes weighing up to three tons. If required, it became both combat, rescue and artillery observation helicopter. The large, five-blade main rotor is mounted over the engine at the body midsection, while a weapon-carrying platform is mounted at the lower body midsection. External stores are mounted on weapons racks on each side of the fuselage. The HIP C has four external hardpoints; the HIP E, HIP H, have six; other variants have none. Not all available munitions are employed at one time, mission dictates weapon configuration. Twin turboshaft engines are mounted on top of the fuselage with two round air intakes just above the cockpit and rounded exhaust ports aft. The Mi-8 is capable of single-engine flight in the event of loss of power by one engine (depending on aircraft mission weight) because of an engine load sharing system. If one engine fails, the other engine’s output is automatically increased to allow continued flight. The fuselage consists of a long, buslike body with a rounded nose and glassed-in cockpit. Interior seats are removable for cargo carrying. The rear clamshell doors open, an internal winch facilitates loading of heavy freight. Floor has tiedown rings throughout. The aircraft carries a rescue hoist capable to 150 kg, and a cargo sling system capable to 3,000 kg. Two fuel pods are offset and mounted low on the body, which features an upswept rear section and tricycle landing gear. The tail boom tapers to the small, swept-back, and tapered fin with rotor on top right or left, with small flats mounted forward of the fin. The first Mi-8 flew in January of 1960, and by 1985, more than 1500 Mi-8 were built. Mil Moscow helicopter plant joint stock company is the major designer and producer of military transport, civil transport, heavy-lift,multi-role helicopters. Mil is associated with the Rostov and Kazan production enterprises. Kazan is the oldest helicopter manufacturing plant in Russia and makes Mi-8 and Mi-17 helicopters. the Mi-8 was exported to Czechoslovakia, Algeria, East Germany, Hungary, Bolivia, Poland, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia, Finland, and Ethiopia.

VARIANTS

Mi-8T: The HIP C is a medium assault/ transport version. The probable armament is 57-mm rockets, bombs, or AT-2C/ SWATTER ATGMs.  Mi-8VPK: The HIP D is an airborne com-munications platform with rectangular communication canisters mounted on weapons racks.  Mi-8TVK: The HIP E is used as a gunship or direct air support platform. Airframe modifications add 2x external hardpoints for a total of 6, and mount a

   

flexible 12.7-mm machinegun in the nose. The probable armament is 57-mm rockets, bombs, or AT-2/SWATTER ATGMs. Mi-8MT/MTV/MTB/-171-17: The HIP H is an upgraded medium assault/ transport version. The designation Mi-17 is for export; the Russian armed forces called it Mi-8MT. The Mi-17 can be recognized because it has the tail rotor at the starboard side, instead of the port side. See separate Mi-17 entry. Mi-8SMV: The HIP J is an airborne jamming platform characterized by small boxes on the left side of the fuselage. Mi-8PPA: The HIP K is an airborne jamming platform characterized by 6x “X”shaped antennas on the aft fuselage. Mi-9: The HIP G is an airborne command post characterized by antennas, and Doppler radar on tailboom. The Mi-14 is a modification of Mi-8 for naval applications, mainly used against submarines. Mi-14 has a boat-like lower fuselage with pontoon on either side, retractable landing gear, a radar dome under the nose, and an internal weapons bay.

Comparison
Variant Engine Weight Maximum speed Cruising speed Service Ceiling Mi-8 Mi-17 Hip H 2 TV2-117, 1482 hp each 2 TV3-117VM 1900 hp each 11100-12000 kg 230-250 km/h 225 km/h 4500 m 13000 kg 250 km/h 220 - 240 km/h 6000 m

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Date of Introduction Role Similar Aircraft Blades Rotor diameter Length Russia Mil 1967 Armed assault-transport Puma, Mi-2 Hoplite, Super Frelon Main rotor: 5 Tail rotor: 3 Main Rotor : 21.3 meters [70 ft] Tail Rotor : 3.9 meters Length (rotors turning): 25.2 m Length (fuselage): 18.2m [61 ft]

Height Width Cargo Compartment

18 ft 6 in ( 5.65 m) 2.5 m Floor Length: 5.3 m Width: 2.3 m Height: 1.8 m Maximum Gross: 12,000 kg Normal Takeoff: 11,100 kg Empty: 6,990 kg 2 TV2-117, 1482 hp each 230-250 km/h 122 kts (140 mph; 225 km/h) Maximum Load: 350 km Normal Load: 460 km With Aux Fuel: 950 km Internal: 445 liters Internal Aux Tank: 915 liters ea. External Fuel Tank: 745 liters in port tank, 680 liters in starboard tank Service: 4,500 meters Hover (out of ground effect): 800 meters Hover (in ground effect): 1,900 meters 9 m/s HIP C: 24 troops, or 3,000 kg internal or external loads on 4x hardpoints. HIP E: 24 troops, or 4,000 kg internal or 3,000 kg external on 6x hardpoints. HIP J/K: antennas on aft section of fuselage. HIP E mounts a flexible 12.7-mm machinegun in the nose 2 - 7.62-mm or 1x 12.7-mm MG 4-6 - AT-2C Swatter or AT-3 Sagger ATGMs 4-6 - 57-mm rocket pods (16 each) 2 - 80-mm rocket pods (20 each) 4 - 250-kg bombs 2 - 500-kg bombs 2 - 12.7-mm MG pod 2 - Twin 23-mm gun pods

Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range

Fuel

Service Ceiling Vertical Climb Rate

Standard Payload

Armament

1,830 liters Additional fuel tanks Loaded combat troops can fire personal weapons through windows from inside cabin. Main and tail rotor blades electrically Survivability/Countermeasures deiced. Infrared jammer, chaff and flares. AVIONICS Crew Cost The Mi-8 is equipped with instruments and avionics allowing operation in day, night, and instrument meteorological conditions. 3 (2x pilots, 1x flight engineer) $900,000 (1991 used) $3,200,000 (new) At least 54 countries -- Armenia, Azerbaijan, Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Belarus, Bulgaria, Cambodia, CIS, Croatia, Cuba, Czech Republic, Egypt, Germany, Guyana, Hungary, Iran, Iraq, Madagascar, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nicaragua, North Yemen, People’s Republic of China, Slovakia, SouthYemen, Sudan, Syria, Ukraine, Vietnam, Yugoslavia, Zambia

User Countries

Mi-14 Haze
The Mi-14 Haze is a shore-based, navalized version of the Mi-8 'Hip' with a float bottom and ASW equipment. There are alsa SAR and mine-sweeping versions. In addition to its multirole capability, the Mi-14 features high flight performance: a 900 to 1,000 km range and four-hour endurance on internal fuel only. Currently, the only competitor to the Mi14GP is the Eurocopter AS 332L1 Super Puma. The Mi-14 can land on water, drop liferafts overboard and take at least 20 survivors aboard. It can be employed for search, transport and rescue (dropping 20 liferafts).

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Variants Similar Aircraft Rotor Span Length Height Weight Payload Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Cruise range Service Ceiling Armament Sensors Crew Cost User Countries 1135km 432 nm 3500-5000 m E45-75A torp or B-1, Nuclear DB MAD, dipping sonar, 20 sonobuoys, Radar type unknown 2 9000kg Empty 14000kg Maximum 2000 kg 2 Isotov TV3-117 230km/h 21.2m 25.3m A is ASW B is MCm variant(unarmed)

Mi-17 [Mi-8MT] HIP H
The MI-17 is a multirole helicopter used to resupply CLF guerrillas or insert PSOC detachments. It can also be very heavily armed with an extensive array or rockets, misslies and guns. It is often used to air assault infantry forces to attack the point of penetration, reinforce units in contact or disrupt counterattacks. Additional missions include; attack, direct air support, electronic warfare, airborne early warning, medevac, search and rescue, and minelaying. The Mi-17 helicopter, developed at the Mil Design Bureau from the Mi-8 helicopter, is in serial manufactured at the Kazan Helicopter Production Association. The designation Mi17 is for export; the Russian armed forces called it Mi-8MT. The Mi-17 can be recognized because it has the tail rotor at the starboard side, instead of the port side. The Mi-17 added a number of improvements to its predecessor, including a vibration damper to increase comfort for crew members and passengers. The helicopter features a high thrust-to-weight ratio pair of TVZ-117MT or TVZ-117VM shaft-turbine engines with a takeoff power of 1,900 hp. The Mi-17 is capable of single-engine flight in the event of loss of power by one engine (depending on aircraft mission weight) because of an engine load sharing system. If one engine fails, the other engine’s output is automatically increased to allow continued flight. The Mi-17 is capable of carrying cargoes in the cabin (including long cargo) with halfopen or removed doors, external loads, or passengers (24 people). The Mi-17 can carry up to 30 troops and up to 20 wounded; it can also be used for in-flight unloading of special cargoes. The transport version of the MI-17 helicopter is intended to carry cargoes (loads) in the cargo compartment, including long-size cargo with partially- opened or removed cargo doors, external loads, or executives (up to 24 persons). Interior seats are removable for cargo carrying. The rear clamshell doors open, an internal winch facilitates loading of heavy freight. Floor has tiedown rings throughout. The aircraft carries a rescue hoist capable to 150 kg. External stores are mounted on weapons racks on each side of the fuselage. The Mi-17 has six external hardpoints. The Mi-17 is provided with missiles, bombs, small arms and cannons. It carries four missile launchers of the B8V20 type, with missiles launched with the aid of an on-board PUS-31-71 electrical fire control system. The BDZ-57KRVM bomb carrier is used for the attachment of bombs up to 500kg. Not all vailable munitions are employed at one time, mission dictates weapon configuration. The helicopter carries four UPK-23-250 gun containers with GSh-23L 23mm guns and pivoted mounts (eight units). The forward and aft hemispheres are protected by PKT machine-guns with independent power supply and remote control circuits. The helicopter may be provided with longrange communication equipment and a radar, and it can carry equipment with phased-array antennas for suppression of enemy electronic attack and air defence facilities, such as airborne radars, air defence (artillery) weapons control radars, surveillance and target detection radars and missile radar homing

heads. The ECM equipment can work both in the reconnaissance and ECM modes or in the reconnaissance mode.

VARIANTS

Mi-17: A mid-life upgrade of the widely proliferated Mi-8 HIP H medium assault/ transport helicopter. Initially, only the export version was known as the Mi-17. The only visible differences between this variant and the older Mi-8s is that the tail rotor is on the portside rather than the starboard side, and crew armor plating.  Mi-17P: A descendent of the HIP K airborne jamming platform characterized by large rectangular antennas along the aft fuselage. The Mi-17P (Mi-8MTPB `HipK derivative') is provided with long-range communication equipment and a radar, and it can carry equipment with phased-array antennas for suppression of enemy electronic attack and air defence facilities, such as airborne radars, air defence (artillery) weapons control radars, surveillance and target detection radars and missile radar homing heads. The ECM equipment can work both in the reconnaissance and ECM modes or in the reconnaissance mode.  Mi-171/-17M/-17V: Also known as Mi-8MTV, and a descendent of the HIP H. The engines are upgraded to 2x 2,070-shp Klimov TV3-117VMAs to allow greater rates of climb and hover ceilings, yet performance characteristics remain virtually unchanged from the baseline Mi-17.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Date of Introduction Role Similar Aircraft Length Height Width Main Rotor Diameter Tail Rotor Diameter Cargo Compartment Dimensions Weight Length (rotors turning): 25.4 meters Length (fuselage): 18.4 meters 5.7 meters 2.5 meters 21.3 meters 3.9 meters Floor Length: 5.3 meters Width: 2.3 meters Height: 1.8 meters Maximum Gross: 13,000 kg Normal Takeoff: 11,100 kg Russia Mil 1981 (as Mi-17)

Empty: 7,100-7,370 kg (variant dependant) Blades Engine Main rotor: 5 Tail rotor: 3 2x 1,950-shp Isotov TV3-117MT turboshaft Internal: 445 liters Internal Aux Tank: 915 liters ea. External Fuel Tank: Port Tank: 745 liters Starboard Tank: 680 liters 250 km/h 240 km/h Normal Load: 495 km With Aux Fuel: 1,065 km Service: 5,000-5,700 meters (variant dependant) Hover (out of ground effect): 1,760 meters Hover (in ground effect): 1,900-3,980 meters (variant dependant) 9 m/s 2x 7.62-mm or 1x 12.7-mm MG 4-6 - AT-2C or AT-3 ATGMs 4-6 - 57-mm rocket pods (16 each) 2 - 80-mm rocket pods (20 each) 4 - 250-kg bombs 2 - 500-kg bombs 1 - 12.7-mm MG pod 2 - Twin 23-mm gun pods 1,830 - Additional fuel tanks (liters) Most Probable Armament: fitted with 2x 7.62-mm machineguns or possibly 2x 23-mm GSh-23 gun packs in cabin, 57-mm rockets, and AT3/SAGGER ATGMs. Loaded combat troops can fire personal weapons through cabin windows from inside cabin. Internal load: 4,000 kg External on sling only: 3,000 kg Transports 24 troops and cargo, or armaments on 6x external hardpoints.

Fuel

Maximum speed Cruising speed Range

Ceiling

Vertical Climb Rate

Armament

Standard Payload

Main and tail rotor blades electrically deiced. Survivability/Countermeasures Infrared jammer, chaff and flares. The Mi-17 is equipped with instruments, avionics, Doppler radar, and a fully functioning autopilot for operation in day, night, and instrument meteorological conditions. 3 (2x pilots, 1x flight engineer)

AVIONICS

Crew Cost User Countries

At least 22 countries

Mi-24 HIND Mi-25 HIND D Mi-35 HIND E
The Mi-24, the first helicopter to enter service with the Russian Air Force as an assault transport and gunship, was developed on the basis of the Mi-8's propulsion system. Additional missions include direct air support, antitank, armed escort, and air to air combat. The helicopter was used extensively in the Afghanistan War, becoming the "signature" weapon of the conflict. The Mi-24 is a close counterpart to the American AH64 Apache, but unlike this and other Western assault helicopters it is also capable of transporting up to eight troops. The Russians have deployed significant numbers of HINDs in Europe and have exported the HIND to many third world countries. The five-blade main rotor is mounted on top of fuselage midsection, while short, stubby, weapon-carrying wings are mounted at the fuselsage midsection. Two turboshaft engines are mounted above body midsection with two round air intakes located just above the cockpit and exhaust ports on the sides of engines. The Hind A fuselage consists of a large, oval-shaped body with a glassed-in cockpit, tapering at the rear to the tail boom. The Hind D fuselage features nose modification with tandem bubble canopies, and a chin-mounted turret. The swept-back tapered tail fin features a rotor on the right on some models, with tapered flats on a boom just forward of the fin. External stores are mounted on underwing external stores points. Each wing has three hardpoints for a total of six stations. A representative mix when targeting armor formations would be eight AT-6 ATGMs, 750x 30-mm rounds, and two 57-mm rocket pods. The aircraft can store an additional ammunition basic load in the cargo compartment in lieu of carrying troops. Armored cockpits and titanium rotor head able to withstand 20-mm cannon hits. Every aircraft has an overpressurization system for operation in a NBC environment. The HIND’s wings provide 22% to 28% of its lift in forward flight. In a steep banking turn at slower airspeeds, the low wing can lose lift while it is maintained on the upper wing, resulting in an excessive roll. This is countered by increasing forward airspeed to increase lift on the lower wing. Because of this characteristic, and the aircraft’s size and weight, it is not easily maneuverable. Therefore they usually attack in pairs or multiple pairs, and from various directions.

VARIANTS
Nearly all of the older HIND A, B and C variants have been upgraded or modified to the HIND D or E standard.
  

Mi-24D/HIND D: Direct air support. Mi-24V/HIND E: Direct air support. Most proliferated version. Mi-24P/HIND F: Direct air support. The fixed twin gun cut the turret profile, and empty weight to 8,200 kg, while boosting maximum gross weight to 12,000 kg.

    

Mi-24R/HIND G-1: NBC sampling. It has mechanisms to obtain soil and air samples, filter air, and place marker flares. Mi-24K/HIND G-2: Photo-recon, and artillery spotting. Has a camera in cabin, gun, rocket pods, but no targeting system. Mi-25: Export version of the HIND D. Mi-35: Export version of the HIND E. The Mi-35M has a twin barrel 23-mm gun. Mi-35P: Export version of the HIND F.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Date of Introduction Role Similar Aircraft Blades Rotor diameter Wing span Length Height Russia MIL 1976 (HIND D) Assault, gunship, antitank AH-1 Cobra (all models), UH-60 Black Hawk, AH-64 Apache, Mangusta A129 Main rotor: 5 Tail rotor: 3 Main Rotor : 17.3 meters Tail Rotor: 3.9 meters 6.5 meters Length : 21.6 m (rotors turning) Length : 17.5 m (fuselage) 13 ft., 11 in. 6.5 meters (gear extended)

Floor Length: 2.5 meters Cargo Compartment Width: 1.5 meters Dimensions Height: 1.2 meters Weight Maximum Gross: 11,500 kg Normal Takeoff: 11,100 kg Empty: 8,500 kg Internal: 1,840 liters Internal Aux Tank (in cabin): 1,227 liters External Fuel Tank: 500 liters ea. 2 x 2,200 shp Isotov TV-3-117 turbines 168 mph / 335 km/h 295 km/h Normal Load: 450 km

Fuel Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range

With Aux Fuel: 950 km Service Ceiling Hover Vertical Climb Rate Max “G” Force Standard Payload Armament 4,500 meters out of ground effect: 1,500 meters in ground effect : 2,200 meters 15 m/s 1.75 g Internal load: 8 combat troops or 4 litters External weapons load: 1,500 kg External load (no weapons): 2,500 kg 12.7-mm 4x Barrel Machinegun, YaKB-12.7: Range (m): (practical) 1,500 Elevation/Traverse: 20° up to 60° down/ 120° Ammo Type: HEFI, APT, Duplex, DuplexT Rate of Fire (rpm): up to 4,500 (pilot selectable) 30-mm Twin Barrel Cannon, GSh-30K: Range (m): (practical) 4,000 Elevation/Traverse: None (rigidly mounted) Ammo Type: HEFI, HEI, APT, APE, CC Rate of Fire (rpm): 300, or 2,000 to 2,600 750 - 1x twin 30-mm gun, or 1,470 - 12.7-mm 4 barrel turret gun 2-12 - AT-2C or AT-6C Spiral ATGMs 2-4 - 80-mm S-8 rocket pods (20 ea.) 2-4 - 57-mm S-5 rocket pods (32 ea.) 940 - GSh-23L twin 23-mm MG pods 4 - 250-kg bombs FAB-250 2 - 500-kg bombs 500 liters External fuel tanks Most Probable Armament HIND D: Turret-mounted 4-barrel 12.7-mm Gatling type machinegun, 57-mm rockets, AT-2C/ SWATTER ATGMs. HIND E: Turret-mounted 4-barrel 12.7-mm Gatling type machinegun or twin barrel 23-mm turret gun, 57mm rockets, AT-6C/ SPIRAL ATGMs. HIND F: Fixed 30-mm twin gun on the right fuselage side, 57-mm rockets, AT-6C/ SPIRAL ATGMs. Loaded combat troops can fire personal weapons through cabin windows. FLIR, RWR, laser designator The ATGM targeting system uses a low-level light

Sensors AVIONICS

TV, a laser designator, FLIR, air data sensor, and a missile guidance transmitter. HIND D versions are primarily daytime aircraft only. Some HIND E and Mi-35 series export versions have upgraded night and weather capabilities, better avionics, weather radar, autopilot, HUD, GPS, NVG compatibility, more armor, and an increased weapons load provided by the French company Sextant Avionique. Survivability Main and tail rotors electrically deiced. Infrared signature suppressors can be mounted on engine exhausts. Radar warning receivers, IFF, Infrared jammer, rotor brake, chaff and flares. Armored cockpit. Two (pilots in tandem cockpits)

Crew Cost

User Countries

At least 34 countries -- Armenia, Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Belarus, Bulgaria, Cambodia, CIS, Cuba, Czech Republic, Ethiopia, Georgia, Germany, Hungary, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Mongolia, Mozambique, Nicaragua, North Korea, Peru, Poland, Slovakia, South Yemen, Syria, Ukraine, Vietnam

Mi-26 HALO
The Mi-26 helicopter, the heaviest and most powerful helicopter in the world, was designed for carrying large-size cargoes weighing up to 20 tons. It is the result of an early 1970s specification for a transport helicopter whose empty weight, without fuel, was not to exceed half of its maximum take-off weight. It can be used for construction projects ranging from bridges to power transmission lines. The combination of high load-carrying capacity and high cruise speed makes the use of the helicopter economically efficient. The helicopter is loaded through the cargo hatch in the tail of the fuselage with lowered ladder and subladders. The cargo cabin is equipped with two electric hoists and lifting and loading devices ensuring loading and carrying along the cabin of cargoes weighing up to 5 tons. Mil Moscow helicopter plant joint stock company is the major designer and producer of military transport, civil transport, heavy-lift,multi-role helicopters. Mil is associated with the Rostov and Kazan production enterprises. Rostov makes the Mi-26 heavy-lift helicopters. The Mi-26 is the first helicopter with an eight-blade main rotor, which is mounted above the fuselage midsection on a hump. Two turboshaft engines are mounted on top of the cabin with round air intakes above and behind the cockpit and exhaust ports at the sides of the engines. The long, bus-like body with fixed tricycle landing gear tapers to the nose and rear, with an upswept rear section and rounded nose and stepped-up cockpit. The tail is swept-back with a slightly tapered fin with large rotor on right side. The flats are forward-tapered and low-mounted on leading edge of the fin. The HALO A has no armament. The load and lift capabilities of the aircraft are comparable to the US C-130 Hercules transport aircraft. The length of the landing gear struts can be hydraulically adjusted to facilitate loading through the rear doors. The tailskid is retractable to allow unrestricted approach to the rear clamshell doors and loading ramp. The cargo compartment has two electric winches (each with 2,500 kg capacity) on overhead rails can move loads along the length of the cabin. The cabin floor has rollers and tie-down rings throughout. The HALO has a closed-circuit television system to observe positioning over a sling load, and load operations. The Mi-26 is capable of single-engine flight in the event of loss of power by one engine (depending on aircraft mission weight) because of an engine load sharing system. If one engine fails, the other engine’s output is automatically increased to allow continued flight.

VARIANTS
  

Mi-26MS: Medical evacuation version. Mi0-26T: Freight transport. Mi-26TZ: Fuel tanker with an additional 14,040 liters of fuel in 4x internal tanks and 1,040 liters of lubricants, pumped through 4x 60-meter long refueling nozzles for refu-eling aircraft, and 10x 20-meter long hoses for refueling ground vehicles. Fuel transfer rate is 300 liters/minute for aviation fuel, and 75-150 liters/minute for diesel fuel. The refueling system can easily be removed to allow the aircraft to perform transport missions.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Date of Introduction Role Similar Aircraft Blades Rotor diameter Length Length (rotors turning) Length (fuselage) Width Height Tail Rotor Diameter Cargo Compartment Dimensions Russia MIL 1983 Heavy cargo-transport Mi-6 Hook, HH-3E Jolly Green Giant Main rotor - 8 Tail rotor - 5 105 ft (32 m) 111 ft (33.8 m) 40 meters 33.5 meters 8.2 meters 26 ft., 5 in. / 8.1 meters 7.6 meters 12 meters - Floor Length 3.3 meters - Width Height variable from 2.9 to 3.2 meters 49500 kg - Normal takeoff weight 56000 kg - Maximum takeoff weight 28200 kg - empty weight 20000 kg - Load-lifting capacity (100+ equipped troops, armored vehicles) 2 x 11,400 shp Lotarev D-136 turbines 295 km/h 183 mph / 255 km/h 1200 km with Aux Fuel 800 km with maximum fuel reserve 475-800 km with maximum loading 4600 m 1,800 m Hover (out of ground effect) 4,500 m Hover (in ground effect) 11,900 liters Internal 20,000 kg Internal or external load

Weight

Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range

Service Ceiling Fuel Standard Payload

over 80 troops, 60 litters, or 2x BRDM-2 scout cars, or 2x BMDs, or 1x BMP or, 1x BTR-60/70/80 or, 1x MT-LB Armament Usually none

Main and tail rotor blades electrically deiced. Infrared signature suppressors on engines. Survivability/Countermeasures Infrared jammers and decoys; flares. Self-sealing fuel tanks. The avionics and navigational package, a Doppler weather radar, and a fully functioning autopilot allow for day/night allweather operation. 5 (2x pilots, 1x navigator, 1x flight engineer, 1x loadmaster)

AVIONICS

Crew Cost User Countries

At least 5 countries - India, CIS

Mi-28 HAVOC
The Mi-28 Havoc is a new-generation attack helicopter that functions as an air-to-air and air-to-ground partner for the Mi-24 Hind and Ka-50 Hokum. The five-blade main rotor is mounted above the body midsection, and short, wide, tapered, weapon-carrying wings are mounted to the rear of body midsection. Two turboshaft engines in pods are mounted alongside the top of the fuselage with downturned exhausts. The fuselage is slender and tapers to the tail boom and nose. It features a tandem, stepped-up cockpits and a cannon mounted beneath the belly, with fixed landing gear. The tapering tail boom with a sweptback fin has a flat high-mounted on the fin and a rotor mounted on right. The Mi-28N and Kamov Ka-50 are competing to fulfil the Russian Army Aviation requirement for a night-capable anti-tank helicopter, a replacement to the Mi-24 created 25 years ago. The Mi-28N is based on the Mi-28A, a daylight helicopter first flown in December 1982. In comparison with the AH-64D Longbow Apache, the 10,5-ton Mi28N is some 2.5 tons heavier, partly due to its more powerful cannon. In general the two helicopters have similar flight performance. Two Klimov TV-3-117 engines of 2,200 hp each allow the Russian aircraft to show a maximum level speed of 300 km/h and maximum climb at sea-level of 13.6 meters per second.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Rotor diameter Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Range Service Ceiling Armament Crew Cost User Countries AAMs, antitank missiles, cannon, rockets Two Russia MIL Attack Mangusta A129, AH-64 Apache, AH-1F Cobra 56 ft (17.04 m) 57 ft (17.4 m)

Ka-25 Hormone
The deployment of the Polaris naval strategic nuclear missile system in the USA acted as a catalyst accelerating development of aircraft carrying ships in the USSR. The Ka-25 Hormone helicopter was developed to meet a Soviet Naval Air Force specification for an anti-submarine helicopter for ship or shore-based use. The first Ka-25 prototype flew in 1961. Designed by the world's leading pioneer of co-axial helicopters, Nikolai I. Kamov (1902-1973) this Soviet AV-MF (naval aviation) anti-submarine warfare rotary wing aircraft was assigned to the Soviet Helicopter Carrier Moskva. The Hormone is powered by twin turbines, installed side-by-side above the cabin, that drive two, three-bladed coaxial, contra-rotating rotors. The contra-rotating rotors eliminated the need for an antitorque tail rotor, and made a very compact design possible, with obvious benefits for shipboard operations. Hormone cannot hover or dip at night.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role ASW, Rcce A is ASW: B is OTH targeting; C is utility / SAR B and C are unarmed

Variants

Similar Aircraft Rotor Diameter Length Height Weight Engine Maximum speed Cruising speed Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Sensors 51 ft., 8 in. / 15.7m 32 ft., 3 in. / 9.8m 17 ft., 7 in. / 5.4m 16,100 lbs. / 7100kg 2 x 900 shp Glushnekov GTD-3 137 mph / 220kph / 195kph 3500 meters 216nm No na 600 kg A: Dipping sonar; 3 sonobuoys, MAD, Mushroom

radar, EO sensor estimated to be FLIR. B: Big Bulge radar, ESM data link Drop Tanks Armament Crew Cost User Countries none E45-75A torp or B-1 DC. Nuclear DB

KA-27 Helix A KA-29 Helix B KA-32 Helix
Ka-27 was designed to replace Ka-25. The first prototype flew in December 1974. Variants include the Ka-27PS search and rescue version and Ka-28 ASW model. The Ka29 combat/transport helicopter and Ka-31 surveillance variant are in operational service. The primary function of the KA-29 Helix B amphibious assault helicopter is delivery of percision-guided weapons, weapons designation, and troop transport. There are two versions of the Ka-32 helicopter: transport Ka-32T and shipborne Ka-32C. The Ka-32T version is designed for transporting cargoes inside the cabin and and externally (for oversized cargoes), passenger transportation, logging in hard access areas, to fulfill civil engineering and installation work, construction, search/rescue missions, medevac and off-shore oil rings servicing operations and various types of aerial survey. The Ka-32C version is designed for carrying out ice prospecting during the steering of the convoys of ships, their unloading, performance of rescue operations at sea and acting as ambulances. The Ka-32 has two TVZ-117 turboprop engines which provide higher power and safety under extreme conditions. Transport version, KA-32T, is devoted to carry cargoes both internally

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft KA-27 Helix A is ASW KA-27 Helix C is utility / SAR. KA-29 Helix B is amphibious assault Ka-32T transport Ka-32C shipborne 51.64 ft/15.75 m 34 ft/10.4 m 18 ft/5.5 m 11,000 kg TB 3-117 VM 260 km/h Max. allowable flight speed 205 km/h Cruising speed at 1,500 m with 9,600 kg

Variants

Rotor Span Length Height Weight Engine Speed

weight 115 km/h Economy speed at 1,500 m with 9,600 kg weight Ceiling Cruise range In-Flight Refueling Internal Fuel Payload Crew 5000 meters 432 nm No 432 kg 800 kg 1 minimum KA-27 Helix A : Radar; MAD; dipping sonar; 12 sonobuyoys, RWR KA-29 Helix B : RWR, directional ESM, dorsal EW pod na KA-27 Helix A : E45-7A torp or B-1 DC, Nuclear DB KA-29 Helix B : UB-20 rocket pods, AT-6 Spiral $1,500,000

Sensors

Drop Tanks Armament Cost User Countries

KA-27 Helix A

KA-29 Helix B

KA-32 Helix

Ka-50 HOKUM Ka-52 HOKUM B Black Shark / Werewolf
The KA-50 is a state-of-the-art and powerful battle helicopter which is in limited service with the Russian Air Force. This aircraft is not fielded. Only a handful of prototypes exist, and it has not yet been approved for full-scale production. There are two versions of the Hokum. The Ka-50 Hokum-A is a single seat close support helicopter and the Ka52 Hokum-B two seat trainer and combat version. The Mi-28N and Kamov Ka-50 are competing to fulfil the Russian Army Aviation requirement for a night-capable anti-tank helicopter, a replacement to the Mi-24 created 25 years ago. The coaxial, contrarotating, three-blade main rotors are widely separated with swept-back tips, and there is no tail rotor. The equally tapered, short, stubby, weapon-carrying wings with end plates are mounted on the streamlined fuselage, which tapers to the front and rear. The fuselage, which is flat-bottomed except for the underbelly gun pod and sensor, features a flat plated glassed-in canopy. The tail is thick with a tapering tail boom and back-tapered tail fin with a square tip. The tail flats are high-mounted on the tail boom with end plates, and located forward of the fin. Twin turboshaft engines are mounted high on the fuselage above the stubby wings, with semicircular air intakes and exhausts that are turned outward. The helicopter has a number of unique characteristics including single seat to increase combat and flight characteristics and reduce operational costs. It was designed for remote operations, and not to need ground maintenance facilities for 2 weeks. The airframe is 35% composite materials with a structural central 1m 2 keel beam of kevlar/ nomex that protects critical systems and ammunition. The fully armored pilot's cabin can withstand 23-mm gunfire, and the cockpit glass 12.7-mm MG gunfire. The Zvezda K-37-800 pilot ejection system functions at any altitude, and enables a successful ejection at low altitude and maximum speed. External stores are mounted on underwing external hardpoints. Each wing has two hardpoints for a total of four stations. A typical mix for targeting armor formations is 12x AT-16 ATGMs, 500x 30-mm cannon rounds, and 2x 20-round pods of 80-mm folding fin unguided rockets. The 30-mm cannon is the same as on the BMP-2. It also carries guided air-to-air missiles IGLA-V (Needle C), already extensively tested and sold to buyers abroad. The Shark's avionics is largely in line with what is the norm for one-seater fighters and ground attack jets. It's most remarkable feature is a remote targeting system with a capability to provide for a sudden deadly attack from a distance that rules out direct visual contact with the target. The firing computer will turn the aircraft to keep the gun on target. It is equipped with downlink to provide information from the battlefield. The targeting and control system and weaponry enable accurate target engagement at ranges of up to 10km.

The KA-50 features unique maneuvrability and operating characteristics due to the contra-rotating co-axial rotors. The coaxial counter-rotating rotor system negates the need for a tail rotor and its drive system. Because of this, this aircraft is unaffected by wind strength and direction, has an unlimited hovering turn rate, and gives a smaller profile and acoustic signature, while allowing a 10-15% greater power margin. The HOKUM is fully aerobatic. It can perform loops, roll, and “the funnel”, where the aircraft will maintain a concentrated point of fire while flying circles of varying altitude, elevation, and airspeed around the target.

VARIANTS
 

Ka-50A/HOKUM A: Standard direct air support variant. Ka-50N/HOKUM N: Night attack variant fitted with a nose-mounted FLIR. The cockpit is fitted with an additional TV display, and is NVG compatible.  Ka-52/HOKUM B: The “Alligator” is a side-by-side, two-seat cockpit variant of the Ka-50. The gross weight of the aircraft is greater, so the performance is marginally degraded. But airframe characteristics, dimensions, and armaments are relatively similar. It includes a mast-mounted millimeter wave radar covering the front quadrant only. It is used as an attack aircraft, and as a trainer for the Ka-50. Beginning in 1997 Kamov company, in partnership with IAI, began competing in the tender for a $4 billion contract for the supply of 145 combat helicopters to the Turkish Army. In compliance with the tender requirements, KAMOV/IAI group submitted the required documentation on the Ka-50-2 Erdogan tandem twin-sitter in November 1999. On 06 March 2000, Bulent Ecevit, the Prime Minister of Turkey, announced that Boeing and Eurocopter, French/German company, would be excluded from the list of the Bidders for the combat helicopters supply contract. Among the remaining competitors for the contract award are KAMOV/IAI (Israel Aircraft Industries Ltd.) group with its Ka-50-2 Erdogan, Agusta company from Italy with its A129 Mongoose and Belltextron company from the USA with its AH-1Z King Cobra.

Specifications
Country of Origin Builder Role Similar Aircraft Blades Rotor diameter Wing span Russia KAMOV Antihelicopter and gunship Hirundo A109, Mangusta A129, AH-64 Apache, AH-1F Cobra Main rotor: 6 (2 heads, 3 blades each) Tail rotor: None 14.5 meters 7.34 meters

Length Height Cargo Compartment Dimensions Engines Weight

rotors turning: 16 meters fuselage: 15.0 meters gear extended: 4.93 meters gear retracted: 4 meters Negligible 2x 2,200-shp Klimov TV3-117VK turboshaft Maximum Gross: 10,800 kg Normal Takeoff: 9,800 kg Empty: 7,692 kg External weapons load: 2,500 kg on 4 underwing stores points. Maximum (level): 340 km/h (est.) Cruise: 270-310 km/h Sideward: 100+ km/h, Rearward: 100+ km/h unlimited +3 to +3.5 g Service: 5,500 meters Hover (out of ground effect): 4,000 meters Hover (in ground effect): 5,500 meters 10 m/s Internal: INA External Fuel Tank: 500 ea. (max 4x) Maximum Load: INA Normal Load: 460 With Aux Fuel: INA 1x 2A42 30-mm cannon [250 HE-Frag + 250 AP] 2 - AT-16 VIKhR ATGM (6 each) 2 - 80-mm rockets (20 each) 2 - Twin 23-mm gun pods [940 rounds] 4 - 500-kg bombs 2 - AA-11/ARCHER AAM External fuel tanks (500 liters) 30-mm Automatic Cannon, 2A42: Range: effective 3,000 m Elevation: -45° to +10° Traverse: ±15° Ammo type and rate of fire is selectable by

Standard Payload

Speed Turn Rate Max “G” Force Ceiling Vertical Climb Rate Fuel (liters)

Range (km) Armament

pilot (HE or AP, 350 or 600) Most Probable Armament: Fuselage-mounted 30-mm cannon on right side 80-mm rockets AT-16 VIKhR ATGMs [ATGM racks can depress to 12°] AVIONICS The HOKUM uses a low-light level TV or thermal sighting, a laser range-finder (10 km), FLIR, air data sensor, and digital datalink which interface with a fire control computer, an autopilot, a helmet sighting system and HUD for target location, acquisition, designation, and firing. Night/Weather Capabilities: This aircraft’s avionics package ensuring a full day/night, all weather capability. If it is to be employed at night in an attack role, it must be fitted with a night targeting pod. This pod includes a FLIR, a millimeter wave radar, and an electro-optical sight takes up one of the underwing pylons. The Ka-50N, and Ka-52 are capable of performing attack missions in day/night, and all-weather conditions. The French companies Thomson-CSF, and Sextant Avionique offer nav/attack systems, which can be fitted to export variants.

Survivability/Countermeasures Main rotors and engines electrically deiced. Infrared signature suppressors can be mounted on engine exhausts. Radar warning receivers, IFF, chaff and flares. Armored cockpit and self-sealing fuel tanks. Pilot ejection system. Crew Cost User Countries Preproduction in Russia. An initial fielding plan is for 2 per year for 14 years. 1 (pilots, 2 in Ka-52)

Ka-52

DR-3 / M-141 REYS (TUPOLEV)
The Reys (voyage) was developed by the Tupolev design bureau in the 1970s. The DR-3 is very similar to the DR-5. GENERAL DATA Country of Origin. CIS. Similar Aerial Platform. DR-5, Banshee, Crecerelle. Role. Tactical reconnaissance UAV. Armament. None. Dimensions. Length: 23 ft (7.3 m). Span: 9 ft 10 in (3 m). WEFT DESCRIPTION Wings. Low-mounted and delta-shaped with square tips. Small, swept-back canards. Engine(s). Large, jet on top rear of fuselage. Large air intake. Fuselage. Long, slender, tapers to the front, blunt rear. Pitot tube. Tail. Short, swept-back fin on top of engine. Tail cone. USER COUNTRY CIS.

SHMEL-1 Yak-061 (YAKOVLEV)
Shmel-1 was designed for day and night surveillance and monitoring operations. This system has been exported to other countries under the name of Malakhit. GENERAL DATA Country of Origin. CIS. Similar Aerial Platform. None. Role. Remote terrain observation. Armament. None. Dimensions. Length: 9 ft, 1 in (2.78 m). Span: 10 ft, 6 in (3.25 m). WEFT DESCRIPTION Wings. High-mounted and straight with blunt, negative slanted tips. Engine(s). Prop-engine and has a round enclosure at the rear in the opposing position. Fuselage. Rounded, bullet nose. Pads on feet of four curved legs for landing. Tail. Three swept-back stabilizers on rear of craft forming the engine housing. USER COUNTRIES CIS, Syria.

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