Technical Manual 1

Design of Monopole Bases
By Daniel Horn, P.E.


Copyright 2004 C-Concepts, Inc.



Contents
Introduction 1
Organization .............................................................................................................. 1
Historical Perspective ............................................................................................... 2
AISC Method For Building Columns ..................................................................... 7
Flexible Base Plate ........................................................................................ 8
Example 1.1 ................................................................................................... 9
Stiff Plate Approach................................................................................... 12
Example 1.2 ................................................................................................. 14
Example 1.3 ................................................................................................. 17
Grouted Base Plates 19
Process Equipment Design Method...................................................................... 19
Example 2.1 ................................................................................................. 26
Lutz Modification.................................................................................................... 29
Example 2.2 ................................................................................................. 31
Complete Square Base Plate – Load On Diagonal .............................................. 33
Modification for Clipped Corners............................................................ 36
Example 2.3 ................................................................................................. 38
Example 2.4 ................................................................................................. 43
Complete Square Base Plate – Load Parallel ....................................................... 47
Example 2.4 ................................................................................................. 50
Complete Circular Base Plate Method ................................................................. 54
Example 2.5 ................................................................................................. 58
Ungrouted Base Plates 63
Determining Bolt Forces......................................................................................... 63
Example 3.1 ................................................................................................. 64
Example 3.2 ................................................................................................. 66
Example 3.3 ................................................................................................. 68
Determining Plate Stresses 71
Introduction.............................................................................................................. 71
Effective Width Based Upon Plate Theory .......................................................... 71
Process Equipment Methods ................................................................................. 72
Example 4.1 ................................................................................................. 74
Base Plates With Gussets........................................................................... 77
Alternate Method 1 ................................................................................................. 79
Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Contents • iii
Alternate Method 2 ................................................................................................. 79
Alternate Method 3 ................................................................................................. 79
Method of Slices....................................................................................................... 80
Example 4.2 ................................................................................................. 83
Alternate Method 1 – Square Base Plates............................................................. 87
Alternate Method 2 – Circular Base Plates .......................................................... 87
Boulos Method (New York Dept. of Transportation) ........................................ 87
Diagonal Loading Case.............................................................................. 90
Parallel Loading Case ................................................................................ 91
Owens Method (New York Dept. of Transportation) ........................................ 94
ASCE Manual 72 (Proposed 2003 Revision) ........................................................ 95
Example 4.3 ................................................................................................. 96
Anchor Bolts 99
Material Grades ....................................................................................................... 99
Anchorage .............................................................................................................. 101
Example 4.1 ............................................................................................... 103
Recommendations 105
Determining Base Plate Forces ............................................................................ 105
Grouted Base Plates ................................................................................. 105
Ungrouted Base Plates............................................................................. 105
Determining Base Plate Stresses.......................................................................... 105
Construction Details.............................................................................................. 107
Bibliography 108
References............................................................................................................... 108
Glossary of Terms 111
Index 113

iv • Contents Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 1
Introduction

Organization

The following chapters will cover the following topics:
1. An historical perspective including the AISC approach to base plate design for building columns.
2. Classical methods for determining bolt forces and concrete stresses for grouted base plates.
3. Classical methods for determining bolt forces for ungrouted base plates.
4. Evaluation of various methods currently being used to determine base plate bending stresses for
plain and stiffened plates


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 2
Historical Perspective
Monopoles have become increasingly popular for use in the telecommunication industry. The
advantages include architectural attractiveness and a minimal use of land. Poles are of two general
types, tapered polygonal poles and stepped pipe poles.
The tapered polygonal pole shown in Fig. 1-1, is custom manufactured to exact diameters required
for the design. Each section is joined using telescoping lap joints.

Fig. 1- 1

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 3
Pipe poles are made from large diameter pipe sections and joined by external or internal flange
connections as shown in Fig. 1-2.

Fig. 1- 2
While some poles may be directly buried into the earth, the most common method of attaching the
pole to the foundation is with a base plate.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 4
Base plates can be square with clustered anchor bolts as shown in Fig. 1-3 when overturning
moments are relatively light.

Fig. 1- 3

The clear space below the leveling nut is not limited by the TIA-222 Standard; however, the ASCE
Manual
(1)
suggests limiting the distance to two bolt diameters. AASHTO
(2)
limits this distance to
one bolt diameter. AASHTO also recommends that the minimum base plate thickness be equal to
the bolt diameter.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 5
Base plates can also be polygonal or circular to accommodate a larger number of bolts. The plate
may need to have gusset plates (stiffeners) in order to transfer forces due to axial and bending
moment to the pole. A typical example is shown in Fig. 1-4.

Fig. 1- 4
Poles have been used in the power transmision field since the 1960’s. Prior to that, poles were used
almost exclusively for flags
(3,4)
and for highway structures
(2)
. In recent years, poles have become
popular for both electric transmission towers and for telecommunication structures.
There is currently no industry standard for the design of pole base plates. Some state highway
departments (New York) have developed their own methods, but no national standard exists. As
such, the designer is left to arrive at appropriate methods based upon classical structural
mechanics. While some testing has been done on smaller pole base plates used in highway
construction (usually poles between 10 and 20 inches in diameter), no testing has been done on
larger diameter pole base plates such as used in the telecommunication industry (poles 36 to 72
inches in diameter). Therefore, such design techniques may or may not be appropriate. Recent finite
element studies
(5,6,7)
have indicated that current design practices used by pole manufacturers may
be under-designed by 20 to 30%.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 6
Although monopole failures are a relatively rare occurrence, a number of recent pole failures (see
Fig. 1-5) have increased interest in manufacturer’s design and manufacturing techniques.


Fig. 1- 5
The purpose of this report is to make available the various design techniques currently being used
in the industry in the hope that more reliable methods of design may be developed in the future.
To begin, let us examine the traditional methods that have been developed for designing building
columns subject to axial loads and moment.


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 7
AISC Method For Building Columns
Moment resisting base plates for building columns are covered in neither the AISC Specification
nor the Manual of Steel Construction. Engineers must therefore refer to textbooks or technical
papers for design methods although not all texts cover this topic.
Working stress methods for analyzing moment resistant base plate can be found in engineering
texts
(8,9,10,11,12)
. DeWolf
(13)
and Thambiratnam
(14)
compared methods of designing building columns
to test data.
The AISC method for designing axially loaded base plates defines the critical section as being at .95
times the depth of the structural members for shapes of rectangular cross-section such as wide
flanges and tubes. The critical section for pipe is defined at a location equal to .80 times the
diameter of the pipe.
Two different approaches have been taken to determine the distribution of forces on the base plate,
a flexible plate approach and a stiff plate approach.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 8
Flexible Base Plate
Relatively flexible base plates are incapable of maintaining a linear strain distribution and the
assumption is made that the compression force is centered beneath the compression flange of the
column.

N
A
N'
D
P
M
T
fc
f
C
A/3

Fig. 1- 6 Flexible base plate force distribution
The following basic equations (B=plate width) define the static forces as shown in Fig 1-6.

c
f AB
T P C + = =
2


( )
c
PD
M
T
D
f
T P
f
AB

=
+
+
=
2
2
2


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 9
Example 1.1
Design a base plate for an axial load of 60 kips and a moment of 480 in-kips. Fy for the plate and
anchor bolts is 36 ksi and f’c is 3 ksi. The structural member is an 8-inch wide flange and the base
plate is 14x14. The bolts are 1.5” from the edge.

N=14"
A
N'=12.5"
8"
60 k
480 in-k
T
fc
5.5"
C
A/3

Fig. 1- 7

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 10

p c c
p
A
F . f . f . ks
A
′ ′
= = =
2
35 70 2 1 i

( )
c
kips
T . kips .
bolt
.
A
C T P . .
.
f . ksi . ksi o.k.
×

= = =
+

= × =
= + = + =
= = ≤
×
60 8
480
2
25 26 12 63
8
5 5
2
14 8
3 9
2
25 26 60 85 26
2 85 26
1 35 2 1
9 14

The thickness of the plate is determined by checking both the compression and tension sides. The
critical section is at

( )
cpl
in kip
pl in
pl
reqd
b
pl
b
b y
pl
.
b . in
.
f . . ksi
. . . . .
M .
W t
M
S , W "
F
M
t
F
F . F
.
t . in
.

− ×
= =

= =
− ×
= + =
×
= = =
=
=
×
= =
×
2 2
2
14 0 95 8
3 2
2
9 3 2
1 35 0 87
9
1 35 0 87 3 2 0 87 3 2
6 09
2 3
1
6
6
75
6 6 09
1 16
75 36



Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 11
The critical width on the tension side is defined by AISC as shown in Fig 1-8.

b
e
f
f
b=3.2"
1.5"
45°
14"
14"
8"
1
.
5
"

Fig 1-8

( )
( )
pl
eff
pl
M . . . . in ki
. . . . use .
b . . . . in
.
t . in
. .
= × − = −
− = >
= + − =
×
= = ≥
× ×
12 63 3 2 1 5 21 47
3 2 1 5 1 7 1 5 1 5
1 5 3 2 1 5 3 2
6 21 47
1 22 1 16
3 2 75 36
ps
.

Therefore the tension side controls.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 12
Stiff Plate Approach
Thicker, stiffer, base plates are capable of approaching a linear strain distribution and the base plate
is assumed to behave in a manner similar to reinforced concrete columns
(8)
.
N
A
N'
D
P
M
T
fc
f

Fig 1- 9 Stiff base plate force distribution
The following basic equations define the static forces as shown in Fig 1-9.

c
f AB
P T C + = =
2

where B=width of the base plate.

M
e
P
=

N A
e
T P
N A
f
l
− − l
l
=−
l
l
− +
l
l
2 3
2 3


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 13

c
s
TA
f
N
A n A f
=
(
·
− +

·
·
( )
2
)


s
TA B
P T
N
A n A f
+ =
(
·
− +

·
·
( )
2
2
2
)

Defining
( )
s
N
K e
nA
K f
B
N
K K
( )
·
= −

·
·
( )
= +
( )
·
=− +

·
·
( )
1
2
3 2
3
2
6
2
e
f

A K A K A K + + + =
3 2
1 2 3
0


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 14
Example 1.2
Design the same plate of Example 1.1 using the stiff approach and assuming 1 ¼” diameter bolts.


p c c
p
A
F . f . f . ks
A
′ ′
= = =
2
35 70 2 1 i

( )
s
e in
n .
A . .
K
. .
K .
K .
= =
= =
= × =
( )
·
= − =

·
·
( )
× ×
= +
( )
·
=− + =−

·
·
( )
1
2
3
480
8
60
29000
9 3
57 3000
2 969 1 94
14
3 8 3
2
6 9 3 1 94
5 5 8 104
14
14
104 5 5 1300
2
=


Solving for A by trial,

( )
c
A . in
.
kips
T . kips
.
bolt
.
. .
f . ksi . ksi
. . . .
=
l
− − l
l
=− = =
l
l
− +
l
l
×
= = ≤
× − +
7 3
7 3
7 8
3
60 20 5 10 25
7 3
7 5 5
3
20 5 7 3
1 6 2 1
9 3 1 94 7 7 3 5 5
.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 15
The thickness of the plate is determined by checking both the compression and tension sides. The
critical section is at


( )
cpl
in kip
pl in
pl
.
b . in
. .
f . . ksi
.
. . . . .
M
t . in
.

− ×
= =

= =
− ×
= + =
×
= =
×
2 2
14 0 95 8
3 2
2
7 3 3 2
1 6 0 90
7 3
1 6 0 90 3 2 0 90 3 2
7
2 3
6 7
1 25
75 36


The critical width on the tension side is defined by AISC as shown in Fig 1-10.

b=3.2"
1.5"
14"
14"
8"
1
.
5
"
45°
b
e
f
f

Fig 1-10

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 16

( )
( )
pl
eff
pl
M . . . . in kips
. . . . in side clearanace use . in
b . . . . in
.
t . in . in
. .
= × − = −
− = >
= + − =
×
= = ≤
× ×
10 25 3 2 1 5 17 43
3 2 1 5 1 7 1 5 1 5
1 5 3 2 1 5 3 2
6 17 43
1 10 1 25
3 2 75 36


Therefore the compression side controls.


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 17
Example 1.3
Re-design Example 1.2 for an 8” pipe column. A pipe would have the critical section defined as
.8xDiameter
b
e
f
f
1.5"
b=3.2"
45°
14"
14"
1
.
5
"

Fig 1-11
The analysis for bolt forces and concrete stress are identical to the wide flange base plate, however
the distance to the critical section is now

( )
cpl
in kip
pl in
pl
.
b . in
. .
f . . ksi
.
. . . . .
M .
.
t . in
.

− ×
= =

= =
− ×
= + =
×
= =
×
2 2
14 0 80 8
3 8
2
7 3 3 8
1 6 0 77
7 3
1 6 0 77 3 8 0 77 3 8
9 55
2 3
6 9 55
1 46
75 36



Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 18
Checking the tension side


( )
pl
eff
pl
M . . . . in kips
. . . . inside clearance use . in
b . . . in
.
t . in .
. .
= × − = −
− = >
= + =
×
= = ≤
× ×
10 25 3 8 1 5 23 58
3 8 1 5 2 3 1 5 1 5
1 5 2 3 3 8
6 23 58
1 17 1 46
3 8 75 36
in


Therefore the compression side controls.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 19
Grouted Base Plates
Process Equipment Design Method
Procedures for designing circular base plates with large openings (approaching the inner diameter
of the shell) have been used for over 75 years. The most common use has been for chimneys and
stacks used in the process equipment field. The method most often used was based upon the work
of Taylor, Thompson, and Smulski
(15).
. The following description of the method is taken from
Brownell and Young
(16)
, Troitsky
(17)
, Megyesy
(18)
, and Bednard
(19)
. The method was developed for
circular base plates; however the method can be conservatively used for polygonal plates and
square base plates by using the diameter across the flats of the plate. The method is based upon
reinforced concrete column theory using the Working Stress Design Method (WSD). Note that all
of the grouted base plate techniques that follow assume that the eccentricity is sufficiently large
enough to produce tension on a portion of the base plate.
f
s
c
d
(d-kd) kd
P
M
nf

Fig. 2- 1

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 20
Defining the modular ratio as
=
s
c
E
n
E

Fig. 2-1 is a sketch representing the loading condition for the anchor bolts of the monopole base
plate. The method assumes that the bolt circle is in the center of the bearing plate, which is typically
the case when the shell of the pole runs through the base plate. The wind load and the dead weight
load of the pole result in a tensile load on the upwind anchor bolts and a compressive load on the
downwind anchor bolts. Denoting f
c
as the compressive stress in the concrete, the induced
compressive stress in the steel bolts is given by


s
f n =
c
f
Considering the stress to be directly proportional to the distance from the neutral axis, a straight
line may be drawn from f
s
to nf
c
as shown in Fig. 2-1. The neutral axis is located at a distance kd
from the downwind side of the bearing plate and at a distance (d – kd) from the upwind side. This
assumption is valid only if the base plate can be considered rigid.
By similar triangles

( )
s
f
d kd kd
=

c
nf

therefore

( )
c
s
c s
c
nf
k
f
nf f
nf
= =
+
+
1
1

The area of bolts can be expressed in terms of an equivalent ring of steel of thickness t having the
same total cross-sectional area of steel as shown in Fig. 2-2. This assumption would only be valid if
there are a sufficient number of bolts uniformly spaced around the bolt circle. Polygonal plates can
be assumed to be a circular ring equal to the flat diameter of the polygon.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 21
δθ
ts
tc
θ
α
r
=
d
/
2
Ft
Fc
N
e
u
t
r
a
l

a
x
i
s
kd
l1 l2
jd
zd
Ft
Fc

Fig. 2- 2

The location of the neutral axis from Fig. 2-2 can be defined in terms of the angle α.

d kd
cos k
d

α = = −
2
1 2
2

And
( cos k

α = −
1
1 2 )

A differential element of the steel ring is measured by dθ. The area of this element is

s s
dA t rd = θ

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 22
where
r d = 2
The distance from the neutral axis to this differential element is
r(cos cos ) α+ θ
Denoting the maximum steel stress as f
s
, the stress in the element is

( )
( )
s s
r cos cos
f f
r cos
α+ θ

=
+ α 1

The force in the element is therefore

( )
( )
t s s s s
cos cos
dF dA f f t r
cos
α+ θ

= =
+ α 1

The total tensile force is therefore

( )
( )
( )
( ) ( )
t t s s
s s
cos cos
F dF f t r
cos
f t r cos sin
cos
π π
α α
α+ θ
= = θ
+ α
d
l
l
= π−α α+ α
l
+ α
l
∫ ∫
2 2
1
2
1


s s t
f t rC =
where

( )
( ) (
t
C cos
cos
l

= π−α α+ α

+ α
l
2
1
) sin
l
l

The c.g. of the tensile force, l
1
, can be located by first determining the moment on the tension side
and then dividing by F
t
. The moment of the differential element is

( )
( )
(
( )
( )
)
t t
s s
s s
dM dFr cos cos
cos cos
f t r r cos cos d
cos
cos cos
f t r d
cos
= α+ θ
l
α+ θ
l
= α+ θ θ
l
+ α
l
l
α+ θ
l
= θ
l
+ α
l
l
2
1
1

Integrating

( )
( )
( ) ( ) ( )
t s s
s s
cos cos
M f t r d
cos
cos sin cos
f t r
cos
π
α
α+ θ
= θ
+ α
l
π−α α+ α α + π−α
l
=
l
+ α
l

2
2
2
3 1
2 2 2
2
1
2
1


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 23
Dividing

( ) ( ) ( )
( )
t
t
cos sin cos M
l r
F cos sin
l
π−α α+ α α + π−α
l
= =
l
π−α α+ α
l
2
3 1
2 2
1

The values of α, C
t
and l
1
are constants for a given value of k.
Values for the compression area follow a similar formulation. The width of the compression ring is
defined as . The differential element for a compression ring of thickness t
c pl
t b t = −
s
)
c
is

c c
dA t rd = θ
The distance from the neutral axis to this element is
( r cos cos θ− α
The maximum distance from the neutral axis is
( ) r cos − α 1
The element stress is directly proportional to the distance from the neutral axis

( )
( )
c c
r cos cos
f f
r cos
θ− α

=
− α 1

The compressive stress in the steel is

( )
( )
sc c
cos cos
f nf
cos
θ− α

=
− α 1

The force is determined by multiplying by the element areas

c c c c c
cos cos
dF f dA f t r d
cos
l θ− α

= = θ l
l − α
l
1


sc sc s c s
cos cos
dF nf dA nf t r d
cos
l θ− α

= = θ l
l − α
l
1

The total is therefore
( )
ctot c s c
cos cos
dF t nt rf d
cos
l θ− α
= + θ l
l − α
l
1

Integrating

( )
( )
( )
c c s c
c c s c
cos cos
F t nt rf d
cos
sin cos
F t nt rf
cos
α
θ− α
= + θ
− α
l
α−α α
l
= +
l
− α
l

0
2
1
2
1

( )
c c s c
F t nt rf C = +
c
Conversely

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 24

( )
c
c
c s
F
f
t nt rC
=
+
c


Where

c
sin cos
C
cos
l α−α α
= l
l − α
l
2
1

The c.g. of the compressive force, l
2
, can be located by first determining the moment on the
compression side and then dividing by F
c
. The moment of the differential element is

( )
( )
(
( )
)
c c
c s c
dM dF r cos cos
cos cos
t nt r f d
cos
= θ− α
θ− α
= + θ
− α
2
2
1

Integrating

( )
( )
( )
( )
c c s c
c s c
cos cos
M t nt f r d
cos
cos sin cos
t nt f r
cos
α
θ− α
= + θ
− α
l
α− α α + α
l
= +
l
− α
l

2
2
0
2
3 1
2 2 2
2
1
2
1

Dividing

( )
c
c
cos sin cos M
l r
F sin cos
l
α α− α α + α
l
= =
l
α−α α
l
2
3 1
2
2
2

The total distance between the forces F
t
and F
c
is equal to l
1
+l
2
. Defining the dimensionless ratio j as

( ) ( )
( )
l l
j
d
cos sin cos sin cos cos
cos sin sin cos
+
=
l
l
π−α α+ π−α + α α α− α α+α α
l
l
= +
l
l
π−α α+ α α−α α
l
l
1 2
2 2 1 3 1 3
2 2 2 2 1 1
2 2

The distance from the neutral axis to the centerline of the pole is

d
cosα
2

and the distance zd is equal to

d
zd l cos = + α
2
2

The quantity, z is therefore

sin cos cos
z cos
sin cos
l ( )
α− α α+α α
·
= α+
·

· ·
α−α α ( )
l
2
1 3
2 2 1
2
l
l


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 25

The values of C
c
, l
2
, j and z are constants for a given value of k.
The two equilibrium conditions that must be met are

wind t
wind
t
t c
c t
M Pzd F jd
M Pzd
F
jd
F P F
F F P
− − =

=
+ − =
= +
0
0

Substituting

wind
s
t s
t
s t
M Pz
f
C jdA
F
t rC
d
l

l
= π
l
l
=
2


( )
s
c
kdf
f
n d kd
=


The peak bearing stress, at the outer edge of the base plate is

pl
cmax c
kd b
f f
kd
( ) +
·
=
·

·
·
( )
2
2

Where b
pl
is the width of the bearing plate.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 26
Example 2.1
Analyze a grouted base plate for a 55” diameter pole that runs through the base plate. The bolt
circle is 64” with (20) 2-1/4” bolts. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780
in-kips). The thickness of the base plate is 2-1/4”. The outer diameter of the base plate is 73”. The
concrete has a strength of 3000 psi.

s
c
E
n .
E
= = =
29000
9 29
57 3000

( )
s
A . = =
2
20 3 25 65in
r i = =
64
32
2
n

s
t . = =
π
65
323
64
in


c
t .

= − =
73 55
323 8 677
2
.

Assuming a trial value of k of 0.30…
( ) ( ) cos k cos . . rad
− −
α = − = =
1 1
1 2 4 1 1593

( ) ( ) ( )
( )
c
sin . . cos .
C .
cos .
l

l
= =
l

l
l
1 1593 1 1593 1 1593
2 1 5093
1 1 1593


( )
( ) ( ) ( )
t
C . cos . sin . .
cos .
l
= π− + =
l
+
2
1 1593 1 1593 1 1593 2 442
1 1 1593

( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
. sin . cos . . cos .
z cos . .
sin . . cos .
l
( )
− +
·
l

· = + =

l ·

· −
( ) l
l
2
1 3
2 2
1
2
1 1593 1 1593 1 1593 1 1593 1 1593
1 1593 4376
1 1593 1 1593 1 1593



( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
. cos . . sin . cos .
j
. cos . sin .
. sin . cos . . cos .
.
sin . . cos .
l
π− + π− +
l
= +
l
π− +
l
l
− +
l
=
l

l
2
1 3
2 2
1
2
2
1 3
2 2
1
2
1 1593 1 1593 1 1593 1 1593 1 1593
1 1593 1 1593 1 1593
1 1593 1 1593 1 1593 1 1593 1 1593
781
1 1593 1 1593 1 1593



t
.
F k
.
− × ×
= =
×
42780 46 4376 64
830
781 64
ips

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 27

c
F k = + = 830 46 876 ips

s
f .
. .
= =
× ×
830
32 88
323 32 2 442
ksi

( )
c
f .
. . . .
= =
+ × ×
876
1 55
8 677 9 29 323 32 1 5093
ksi

calc
k .
.
. .
= =
+
×
1
305
32 88
1
9 29 1 55

Calculate a new value for k,

. .
k .
+
= =
3 305
3025
2

The next loop

c
t
t
c
s
c
calc
.
C .
C .
z .
j .
F .
F .
f .
f .
k .
α =
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
1 165
1 516
2 4366
437
781
829 8
875 8
32 92
1 546
303


Which is sufficiently accurate to proceed to final calculations

bolt s bolt
P f A . . ki = = × = 32 92 3 25 107 ps

cmax
. .
f . ksi .
.
( ) −
·
× × × +

·
·
( )
= = ≤ × × =
× ×
73 55
1 546 2 3025 64
2
1 78 7 3 1 33 2 8
2 3025 64
. . ksi o.k.

The maximum bending moment in the plate is actually due to a trapezoidal stress distribution,
however most process equipment designers use the average stress at the bolt circle for ease of
computation. The stress on the compression side is


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 28

c
max
max
in kip f l .
M .
in
M .
f . ksi . . ksi n.g.
bt .
− ×
= = =
×
= = = ≥ × × =
×
2 2
2 2
1 546 9
62 6
2 2
6 6 62 6
74 2 75 36 1 33 36
1 2 25


The stress on the tension side is


max
max
M Pa . in kip
.
f ksi . . ksi n.g.
.

= = × = −
×
= = ≥ × × =
π
2
64 55
107 481 5
2
6 481 5
66 75 36 1 33 36
55
2 25
20


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 29
Lutz Modification
One of the major assumptions in the Process Equipment Method is that the center of pressure is
coincident with the steel bolt ring. Should the compression ring extend inside the pole and the bolt
circle is not centered on the outstanding leg of the base plate or, based upon the relative stiffness of
the base plate, it is deemed that the center of compression will be at or near the pole diameter, then
the results will be in error.
Lutz
(20)
extended the theory to account for the fact that the compression ring may have a different
diameter than the steel tension ring.
δθ
ts
θ
r
=
d
/
2
Ft
Fc
N
e
u
t
r
a
l

a
x
i
s
kd
jd
zd
Ft
Fc
t
c
r
c
=
D
c
/
2
(d-Dc)/2
α
1
α
r
o

Fig. 2- 3

Lutz observed that a simple correction using two values of k would yield the correct result.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 30


c c
t
r r r
k
r

= +
1
2
k
( )
c
" jd" j d r = − +
1
2


( )
wind
t
c
M Pz
F
d
j d r

=
− +
1
2


c
c
c s c
c
F
f
r
t nt r C
r
=
( )
·
+
·

·
·
( )
c


( )
c
s
c
r
r
k
f
nf
( )
·
+
·

·
·
( )
=
+
1
2
1
1

The peak bearing stress, at the outer edge of the base plate, with radius , is
o
r

o c
cmax c
kd r r
f f
kd
( ) + −
·
=

·
·
( )
2
2

The value is calculated using k while the values for C , z and j are then calculated using the
value of . Note that when r then k and the results are identical to the Process
Equipment Method.
c
C
t
t
k
c
=r k
t
=


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 31
Example 2.2
Analyze a grouted base plate with an inner diameter of 48” and an outer diameter of 73”. The bolt
circle is 64” with (20) 2-1/4” bolts. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780
in-kips). The thickness of the base plate is 2-1/4”. The concrete has a strength of 3000 psi.


s
c
E
n .
E
= = =
29000
9 29
57 3000

( )
s
A . = =
2
20 3 25 65in
r i = =
64
32
2
n

( )
c
r .
+
= =
73 48 2
30 25
2
in


s
t . = =
π
65
323
64
in


c
t .

= − =
73 48
323 12 177
2
.

Assuming a trial value of k of 0.2773…
( ) cos . . rad

α = − × =
1
1 2 2773 1 109
( ) ( ) ( )
( )
c
sin . . cos .
C .
cos .
l

l
= =
l

l
l
1 109 1 109 1 109
2 1 447
1 1 109


t
. .
k .

= + =
1 30 25 32 30 25
2773 2895
2 32
.
( ) cos . . rad

α = − × =
1
1
1 2 2895 1 1362

( )
( ) ( ) ( )
t
C . cos . sin . .
cos .
l
= π− + =
l
+
2
1 1362 1 1362 1 1362 2 4482
1 1 1362

( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
. sin . cos . . cos .
z cos . .
sin . . cos .
l
( )
− +
·
l

· = + =

l ·

· −
( ) l
l
2
1 3
2 2
1
2
1 1362 1 1362 1 1362 1 1362 1 1362
1 1362 4399
1 1362 1 1362 1 1362



Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 32

( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
. cos . . sin . cos .
j
. cos . sin .
. sin . cos . . cos .
.
sin . . cos .
l
π− + π− +
l
= +
l
π− +
l
l
− +
l
=
l

l
2
1 3
2 2
1
2
2
1 3
2 2
1
2
1 1362 1 1362 1 1362 1 1362 1 1362
1 1362 1 1362 1 1362
1 1362 1 1362 1 1362 1 1362 1 1362
7807
1 1362 1 1362 1 1362


( )
t
.
F .
. . .
− × ×
= =
− +
42780 46 4399 64
860 42
7807 5 64 30 25
kips
ps


c
F . . ki = + = 860 42 46 906 42

s
.
f .
. .
= =
× ×
860 42
33 97
323 32 2 4482
ksi

c
.
f .
. . . . .
.
= =
( )
·
+ × ×

·
·
( )
906 42
1 349
32
12 177 9 29 323 30 25 1 447
30 25
ksi

calc
.
k .
.
. .
( )
·
+

·
·
( )
= =
+
×
1
2
32
1
30 25
277
33 77
1
9 29 1 349

Which is sufficiently accurate to proceed to final calculations

bolt s bolt
P f A . . . ki = = × = 33 97 3 25 110 4 ps

cmax
. . . .
f .
.
× × × + −
= =
× ×
1 349 2 2773 32 36 5 30 25
1 70
2 2773 32
ksi


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 33
Complete Square Base Plate – Load On Diagonal

The Process Equipment Method assumes that the bolts can be idealized as a ring of steel and that
the compression area can be idealized as a ring with the center of pressure at the center of the ring.
Often base plates are encountered that have as few as four bolts. These cases can result in
significant errors when calculating pressures and bolt forces. Base plates that extend inside the pole
will also have a triangular stress distribution that may differ from the assumed ring theory.
Horn
(21)
, developed a method for square base plates with a circular opening which takes into
account individual bolt locations. Circular or polygonal plates can be analyzed using the Complete
Circular Base Plate Method discussed in the next section.
B
q
y
e=M/P
n.a.
di

Fig. 2- 4

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 34

The method is valid when there is net tension on the section, a condition that occurs when

i
i
B d
e
d
. B B
π

>
( )
π
·

·

·
( )
4 4
2
2
12 64
707
4

The method will make use of transformed areas of the bolts. Bolts that are in the tension zone will
have their areas transformed by

bolt b
A n = A
A
Bolts within the compression zone will have their areas transformed by
( )
bolt b
A n = −1
The method will calculate moment of inertia of the areas and the moment areas about the “e” line .
The moment of inertia divided by the moment area will then be the location of the neutral axis. The
process iterates on the value of q until it is determined to a sufficient degree of accuracy.
Defining

i
i
c
max
c
T T
d
r
y . B e
n
f
Py
f
qA Q
=
= − +
=

=

2
707
29000
57
q
b


( )
T c b
comp tens
A A A A n A nA = + + + − +
∑ ∑ 1 2
1
The area of the triangular wedge is defined as

y y
A y
×
= =
2
1
2
2

Should the neutral axis (n.a.) fall below the diagonal of the plate, two wedge areas will have to be
subtracted

y y . B
A if y
y if y
= −
= ≤
=− >
2
2 2
2
2 2
707
0 0
2 0

Should the neutral axis fall below the top of the circular opening, the area of the semi-circle must be
deducted

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 35
( )
i
i i
i
c i i
i
l r e q
y max r l, r
y r
A y r y r sin ,
r

= − +
= − −
( )
π
·
=− + − + >
·

·
·
( )
0
2
2 2 2 1 0
0 0
0
2
l
bolts

The moment area is defined as

T c
Q Q Q Q Q = + + +
1 2

y
Q A q
y
Q A q
( )
·
= −

·
·
( )
( )
·
= −

·
·
( )
1 1
2
2 2
3
3


( )
c
.
i
c
y , if l
r y
A
= <
− −
=
1
1 5
2 2
0
0 0
2
3

( )
c c
Q A e
c
y = −
1


( )
( )
( )
j ntens j ncomp
bolts b j b j
j j
Q nA e y n A e y
= =
= =
= − + − −
∑ ∑
1 1
1
The moment of inertia of the areas is defined as

T c
I I I I I = + + +
1 2 bolts

y y
I A q
y y
I A q
( )
l
·

· = + − l

·

l ·
l ( )
( )
l
·

· = + − l

·

l ·
l ( )
2
2
1 1
2
2
2 2
2 2
18 3
18 3



( )
( )
i
i
i i i i
c c c c c
y
r sin
y r y
r y r y r r
I A

l
( )
·
l

·

l · − ·

π ( )
l
=− + − − − + −
l
l
l
l
l
4 1 0
3
2 2
2 2 2
4
0 0 2
0 0 2
1 1
8 2 4 4
y A e y

( )
bolt
bolts bolt j
A
I A e y
l
l
= + −
l
π
l

2
2
4


T
T
I
q
Q
=

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 36
Modification for Clipped Corners
When the corners of a square base plate are clipped as shown in Fig. 2-5, there are “negative” areas
that must be removed from the analysis.

B
q
y
e=M/P
n.a.
di
c

Fig. 2- 5


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 37
The previous equations may be used with the addition of the following terms

A c
c
l q y
Q A l
c
I A l
=−
= − +
=
( )
·
= +
·

· ·
( )
2
3
3
3 3 3
2
2
3 3
2
3
18
3


( )
y if y . B c
min y . B c, c
= ≤ −
= − +
4
0 707
707 2


A y
y
l e c
Q A l
y
I A l
=−
= − +
=
( )
·
= +
·

·
·
( )
2
4 4
4
4
4 4 4
2
2 4
4 4
2
3
18
4


( )
y if y . B
min y . B, c
= ≤
= −
5
0 707
707


( )
( )
T c
comp tens
T c
T c bolts
c
t t
A y
y
l e
Q A l
y
I A l
A A A A A A A n A nA
Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q
I I I I I I I I
P y c
f
qA Q
=
= +
=
( )
·
= +
·

·
·
( )
= + + + + + + − +
= + + + + + +
= + + + + + +

=

∑ ∑
2
5 5
5
5
5 5 5
2
2 5
5 5 5
1 2 3 4 5
1 2 3 4 5
1 2 3 4 5
3
18
1
b b
bolts



Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 38
Example 2.3
Analyze the bolt forces on a grouted square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle of
64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5”. The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate has
a diameter of 58”. The plate is 2.25” thick, A36 plate. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is
3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips). The concrete strength is f’
c
=3000 psi.

M
e i
P
= = =
42780
930
46
n

68"
q
y
e=930"
n.a.
58"

Fig 2- 6


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 39
The actual process requires iterating on q until a calculated value of q agrees to the fifth decimal
place with the previous cycle. The final iteration of q yields q=911.33267.

Calculate the bolt values as follows
32
31.68
4.485
4.5"
8.0575°

Fig. 2-7

.
.
( )
·
θ = =

·
·
( )
π
4 5
360 8 0575
64
°
n = =
29000
9
57 3000


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 40

Bar # ybolt n Abolt nAbolt Qbolt Ibolt
1 0 9 3.25 29.25 27202.5 25298393
2 0 9 3.25 29.25 27202.5 25298393
3 32 8 3.25 26 23348 20966558
4 -32 9 3.25 29.25 28138.5 27069305
5 4.485 9 3.25 29.25 27071.31 25054975
6 4.485 9 3.25 29.25 27071.31 25054975
7 -4.485 9 3.25 29.25 27333.69 25542988
8 -4.485 9 3.25 29.25 27333.69 25542988
9 31.684 8 3.25 26 23356.22 20981316
10 31.684 8 3.25 26 23356.22 20981316
11 -31.684 9 3.25 29.25 28129.26 27051524
12 -31.684 9 3.25 29.25 28129.26 27051524
Totals 341.25 317672 295894256

Calculating the plate areas

( )
( )
y . .
A . .
y max , . .
A
= × − + =
= =
= − × =
=
2
1
2
2
707 68 930 911 33267 29 41
29 41 864 85
0 29 41 707 68 0
0
.

Calculating the deduction for the area of the hole

( )
i
i i
c
r
l . .
y max r l, r .
.
A . . sin

= =
= − + =
= − − =
( ) π
·
=− + − + =−

·
·
( )
0
2
2 2 2 1
58
29
2
29 930 911 33267 10 33
18 67
29 18 67
18 67 29 18 67 29 318 61
2 2
.
9
.


T
A . . . = + + − = 864 86 0 341 25 318 61 887 49
Calculating the moment areas

.
Q . .
Q
( )
·
= − =

·
·
( )
=
1
2
29 41
864 85 911 33267 779690
3
0


( )
( )
.
c
.
y .
.
− −
= =

1 5
2 2
1
2 29 18 67
22 87
3 318 61

( )
c
Q . . =− − =− 318 61 930 22 87 289020

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 41

T
Q = + − + = 779690 0 289020 317672 808342
Calculating the moments of inertia

. .
I . .
I
( )
l
·

= + − = · l

·

· l
l ( )
=
2
2
1
2
29 41 29 41
864 85 911 33267 702954883
18 3
0


( )
( ) ( )( )
c
c
.
sin
. .
. .
I
. . . .
I

l
( )
·
l

·
− ·
π − (
=− + − − l
l
l
l
l
− − + − −
=−
4 1
3
2 2
4 2 2 2
2
2
18 67
29
18 67 29 18 67
29 29 18 67 29 18 67
29
8 2 4 4
318 61 22 87 318 61 930 22 87
262180695

)l


T
T
calc
T
I
I
q .
Q
= + − + =
= = =
702954883 0 262180695 295894256 736668444
736668444
911 33267
808342

Therefore, another iteration is not necessary and we can calculate final concrete and bolt stresses.

cmax
T T
pole
cpole
bc
bc
Py .
f .
qA Q . .
y . .
.
f .
. .
y . .
.
f .
. .
×
= = =
− × −
= − + =
×
= =
× −
= − + =
×
= =
× −
46 29 41
2 95
911 33267 887 49 808342
911 33267 930 29 10 33
46 10 33
1 04
911 33267 887 49 808342
911 33267 930 32 13 33
46 13 33
1 34
911 33267 887 49 808342
ksi
ksi
ksi


( )
( )
( ) ( )
( )
( )
( )
( )
bolt
bolt b
T T
bolt
bolt
compr
compr
P e y q
P nA
qA Q
.
P .
. .
P . kips (tension)
.
P .
. .
P . kips compression
− −
=

− − −
= ×
× −
=
− −
= ×
× −
=−
46 930 32 911 33267
9 3 25
911 33267 887 49 808342
148 7
46 930 32 911 33267
8 3 25
911 33267 887 49 808342
34 8


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 42
Likewise, for all of the bolts,

Bar # ybolt n Pbolt
1 0 9 54.8084
2 0 9 54.8084
3 32 8 -34.79381
4 -32 9 148.76
5 4.485 9 41.6406
6 4.485 9 41.6406
7 -4.485 9 67.9763
8 -4.485 9 67.9763
9 31.684 8 -33.96912
10 31.684 8 -33.96912
11 -31.684 9 147.832
12 -31.684 9 147.832

The maximum plate stress using the maximum pressure over a 4.5” strip is then

( ) ( )( )
max( c)
bmax
max( t )
bmax
. . . . . . .
M .
f ksi . . ksi n.g.
. .
M . in kips
f . ksi ksi n.g.
. .
× × − × − × −
= + + × = −
×
= = ≥ × × =
×
= × = −
×
= = ≥
×
2 2
2
2
4 5 1 04 707 68 29 4 5 2 95 1 04 707 68 29
34 8 3 1998
2 3
6 1998
526 75 36 1 33 36
4 5 2 25
148 8 3 446
6 446
117 5 36
4 5 2 25
in kips

As can be seen, using the maximum stress over the plate results in an extremely high stress. This
can only be achieved if the plate is extremely stiff. A more reasonable approach would be to modify
the method to discount a portion of the plate similar to if the plate had a “clipped” corner.


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 43
Example 2.4
Modify Example 2.3 to discount a portion of the plate. Assuming that the bolt circle is at the mid-
point between the pole and the clipped edge, the amount to be clipped would then be 13 inches
from the top of the plate.
68"
q
y
e=930"
n.a.
58"
64"
35"
13"

Fig. 2- 7
The previous equations may be modified using the clipped corner adjustments. After iterating, the
new value for q is 915.860.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 44
Calculate the bolt values as follows

Bar # ybolt n Abolt nAbolt Qbolt Ibolt
1 0 9 3.25 29.25 27202.5 25298393
2 0 9 3.25 29.25 27202.5 25298393
3 32 8 3.25 26 23348 20966558
4 -32 9 3.25 29.25 28138.5 27069305
5 4.485 9 3.25 29.25 27071.31 25054975
6 4.485 9 3.25 29.25 27071.31 25054975
7 -4.485 9 3.25 29.25 27333.69 25542988
8 -4.485 9 3.25 29.25 27333.69 25542988
9 31.684 8 3.25 26 23356.22 20981316
10 31.684 8 3.25 26 23356.22 20981316
11 -31.684 9 3.25 29.25 28129.26 27051524
12 -31.684 9 3.25 29.25 28129.26 27051524
Totals 341.25 317672 295894256

Calculating the plate areas

( )
( )
y . .
A . .
y max , . .
A
= × − + =
= =
= − × =
=
2
1
2
2
707 68 930 915 86 33 94
33 94 1151 64
0 33 94 707 68 0
0
.


A
l . . .
Q . .
I .
. B y . . .
y
=− =−
×
= − + =
=− × =−
( )
·
=− + =−
·

· ·
( )
× − = × − = ≥
∴ =
2
3
3
3
2
2
3
4
13 169
2 13
915 86 33 94 890 59
3
169 890 59 150509 82
13
160 890 59 134044230
18
707 707 68 33 94 14 13 13
0

Calculating the deduction for the area of the hole

( )
i
i i
c
r
l . .
y max r l, r .
.
A . . sin

= =
= − + =
= − − =
( ) π
·
=− + − + =−

·
·
( )
0
2
2 2 2 1
58
29
2
29 930 915 86 14 86
14 14
29 14 14
14 14 29 14 14 29 535 68
2 2
.
9


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 45

T
A . . . = + − + − = 1151 64 0 169 341 25 534 68 789 21 .
Calculating the moment areas

.
Q . .
Q
Q .
( )
·
= − =

·
·
( )
=
=− × =−
1
2
3
33 94
1151 64 915 86 1041713
3
0
169 890 59 150509 82 .


( )
( )
.
c
.
y .
.
− −
= =

1 5
2 2
1
2 29 14 14
20 24
3 534 68

( )
c
Q . . =− − =− 534 68 930 20 25 486428

T
Q = + − − + = 1041713 0 150510 486428 317672 722447
Calculating the moments of inertia

. .
I . .
I
I .
( )
l
·

= + − = · l

·

· l
l ( )
=
( )
·
=− + =−
·

· ·
( )
2
2
1
2
2
2
3
33 94 33 94
1151 64 915 86 702954883
18 3
0
13
169 890 59 134044230
18


( )
( ) ( )( )
c
c
.
sin
. .
. .
I
. . . .
I

l
( )
·
l

·
− ·
π − (
=− + − − l
l
l
l
l
− − + − −
=−
4 1
3
2 2
4 2 2 2
2
2
14 14
29
14 14 29 14 14
29 29 14 14 29 14 14
29
8 2 4 4
534 68 20 24 534 68 930 20 24
442542378

)l


T
T
calc
T
I
I
q .
Q
= + − − + =
= = =
942352607 0 134044230 442542378 295894257 661660255
661660255
915 86
722447

Therefore, another iteration is not necessary and we can calculate final concrete and bolt stresses.

max
cmax
T T
pole
cpole
y y c . .
Py .
f .
qA Q . .
y . .
.
f .
. .
= − = − =
×
= = =
− × −
= − + =
×
= =
× −
33 94 13 21 94
46 21 94
2 67
915 86 789 21 722447
915 86 930 29 14 86
46 14 86
1 90
915 86 789 21 722447
ksi
ksi


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 46

( )
( )
( ) ( )
( )
( )
( )
( )
bolt
bolt b
T T
bolt
bolt
compr
compr
P e y q
P nA
qA Q
.
P .
. .
P . kips (tension)
.
P .
. .
P . kips compression
− −
=

− − −
= ×
× −
=
− −
= ×
× −
=−
46 930 32 915 86
9 3 25
915 86 789 21 722447
171 8
46 930 32 915 86
8 3 25
915 86 789 21 722447
35 96

Likewise, for all of the bolts,

Bar # ybolt n Pbolt
1 0 9 -52.6568
2 0 9 -52.6568
3 32 8 59.11848
4 -32 9 -171.822
5 4.485 9 -35.9551
6 4.485 9 -35.9551
7 -4.485 9 -69.3585
8 -4.485 9 -69.3585
9 31.684 8 58.07247
10 31.684 8 58.07247
11 -31.684 9 -170.645
12 -31.684 9 -170.645

The maximum plate stress using the maximum pressure over a 4.5” strip is then

( ) ( )( )
max( c)
bmax
max(t )
bmax
. . . . .
M .
.
f . ksi . . ksi n.g.
. .
M . in kips
f . ksi ksi n.g.
. .
× − × − −
= + + × = −
×
= = ≥ × × =
×
= × = −
×
= = ≥
×
2 2
2
2
4 5 1 90 35 29 4 5 2 67 1 90 35 29
35 96 3 303 4
2 3
6 303 4
79 9 75 36 1 33 36
4 5 2 25
171 8 3 515
6 515
135 6 36
4 5 2 25
. in kips




Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 47
Complete Square Base Plate – Load Parallel
The Process Equipment Method assumes that the bolts can be idealized as a ring of steel and that
the compression area can be idealized as a ring with the center of pressure at the center of the ring.
Often base plates are encountered that have as few as four bolts. These cases can result in
significant error when calculating pressures and bolt forces. Base plates that extend inside the pole
will also have a triangular stress distribution that may differ from the assumed ring theory.
Horn
(21)
, developed a method for square base plates with a circular opening which takes into
account individual bolt locations. Square plates with clipped corners or polygonal plates can be
analyzed using the Complete Circular Base Plate Method discussed in the next section.

di
y
q
e=M/P
B

Fig. 2-8
The method is valid when there is net tension on the section, a condition that occurs when

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 48

i
i
B d
e
B d
B
π

>
( )
π
·

·

·
( )
4 4
2
2
12 64
2 4


The method will make use of transformed areas of the bolts. Bolts that are in the tension zone will
have their areas transformed by

bolt b
A n = A
A
Bolts within the compression zone will have their areas transformed by
( )
bolt b
A n = −1
The method will calculate moment of inertia of the areas and the moment areas about the “e” line.
The moment of inertia divided by the moment area will then be the location of the neutral axis. The
process iterates on the value of q until it is determined to a sufficient degree of accuracy.
Defining

i
i
c
max
c
T T
d
r
y . B e q
n
f
Py
f
qA Q
=
= − +
=

=

2
5
29000
57


( )
T c b
comp tens
A A A n A nA = + + − +
∑ ∑ 1
1
b
The area of the rectangle is defined as
A yB =
1

Should the neutral axis fall below the top of the circular opening, the area of the semi-circle must be
deducted
( )
i
i i
i
c i i
i
l r e q
y max r l, r
y r
A y r y r sin ,
r

= − +
= − −
( )
π
·
=− + − + >
·

·
·
( )
0
2
2 2 2 1 0
0 0
0
2
l
bolts

The moment area is defined as

T c
Q Q Q Q = + +
1

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 49

y
Q A q
( )
·
= −

·
·
( )
1 1
2


( )
c
.
i
c
y , if l
r y
A
= <
− −
=
1
1 5
2 2
0
0 0
2
3

( )
c c
Q A e
c
y = −
1


( )
( )
( )
j ntens j ncomp
bolts b j b j
j j
Q nA e y n A e y
= =
= =
= − + − −
∑ ∑
1 1
1
The moment of inertia of the areas is defined as

T c
I I I I = + +
1 bolts

By y
I A q
( )
·
= + −

·
·
( )
2
3
1 1
12 3



( )
( )
i
i
i i i i
c c c c c
y
r sin
y r y
r y r y r r
I A

l
( )
·
l

·

l · − ·

π ( )
l
=− + − − − + −
l
l
l
l
l
4 1 0
3
2 2
2 2 2
4
0 0 2
0 0 2
1 1
8 2 4 4
y A e y

( )
bolt
bolts bolt j
A
I A e y
l
l
= + −
l
π
l

2
2
4


T
T
I
q
Q
=


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 50
Example 2.4
Analyze the bolt forces on a grouted square base plate loaded parallel to the edge and a bolt circle
of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5”. The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate
has a diameter of 58”. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips). The
concrete strength is f’
c
=3000 psi.

M
e i
P
= = =
42780
930
46
n

58"
y
q
930"
68"

Fig.2-9

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 51
The actual process requires iterating on q until a calculated value of q agrees to the fifth decimal
place with the value from the previous cycle. The final iteration of q yields q=911.6964.

Calculate the bolt values as follows
25.58"
22.63"
19.23"

Fig. 2-10
.
.
( )
·
θ = =

·
·
( )
π
4 5
360 8 0575
64
°
n = =
29000
9
57 3000


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 52

Bar # ybolt n Abolt nAbolt Qbolt Ibolt
1 25.58 8 3.25 26 23514.92 21267418
2 25.58 8 3.25 26 23514.92 21267418
3 -25.58 9 3.25 29.25 27950.72 26709212
4 -25.58 9 3.25 29.25 27950.72 26709212
5 22.63 8 3.25 26 23591.62 21406382
6 22.63 8 3.25 26 23591.62 21406382
7 -22.63 9 3.25 29.25 27864.43 26544558
8 -22.63 9 3.25 29.25 27864.43 26544558
9 19.23 8 3.25 26 23680.02 21567106
10 19.23 8 3.25 26 23680.02 21567106
11 -19.23 9 3.25 29.25 27764.98 26355418
12 -19.23 9 3.25 29.25 27764.98 26355418
Totals 331.5 308733 287,700,186

Calculating the plate areas

y . .
A . .
= × − + =
= × =
1
5 68 930 911 6964 15 70
68 15 70 1067 36
.

Calculating the deduction for the area of the hole

( )
i
i i
c
r
l . .
y max r l, r .
.
A . . sin

= =
= − + =
= − − =
( ) π
·
=− + − + =−

·
·
( )
0
2
2 2 2 1
58
29
2
29 930 911 6964 10 7
18 3
29 18 3
18 3 29 18 3 29 334 88
2 2
.
9
.


T
A . . . = + − = 1067 34 331 5 334 88 1063 98
Calculating the moment areas

.
Q . .
( )
·
= − =

·
·
( )
1
15 70
1067 36 911 6964 964727
2


( )
( )
.
c
.
y .
.
− −
= =

1 5
2 2
1
2 29 18 3
22 66
3 334 88

( )
c
Q . . =− − =− 334 88 930 22 66 303848

T
Q = − + = 962727 303848 308733 969612
Calculating the moments of inertia

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 53

. .
I . .
( ) ×
·
= + − =

·
·
( )
2
3
1
68 15 7 15 7
1067 36 911 6964 871988746
12 2


( )
( ) ( )( )
c
c
.
sin
. .
. .
I
. . . .
I

l
( )
·
l

·
− ·
π − (
=− + − − l
l
l
l
l
− − + − −
=−
4 1
3
2 2
4 2 2 2
2
2
18 3
29
18 3 29 18 3
29 29 18 3 29 18 3
29
8 2 4 4
334 88 22 66 334 88 930 22 66
275697158

)l


T
T
calc
T
I
I
q .
Q
= − + =
= = =
871988756 275697158 287700186 883991774
883991774
911 6964
969612

Therefore, another iteration is not necessary and we can calculate final concrete and bolt stresses.

cmax
T T
Py .
f .
qA Q . .
×
= = =
− × −
46 15 7
1 75
911 6964 1063 98 969612
ksi

( )
( )
( ) ( )
( )
bolt
bolt b
T T
bolt
bolt
P e y q
P nA
qA Q
. .
P .
. .
P . kips
− −
=

− − −
= ×
× −
=
46 930 25 58 911 6964
9 3 25
911 6964 1063 98 969612
143 1

Likewise, the other bolt forces are

Bar # ybolt n Pbolt
1 25.58 8 -21.08987
2 25.58 8 -21.08987
3 -25.58 9 143.091
4 -25.58 9 143.091
5 22.63 8 -12.53961
6 22.63 8 -12.53961
7 -22.63 9 133.472
8 -22.63 9 133.472
9 19.23 8 -2.685071
10 19.23 8 -2.685071
11 -19.23 9 122.386
12 -19.23 9 122.386



Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 54
Complete Circular Base Plate Method
The Process Equipment Method assumes that the bolts can be idealized as a ring of steel and that
the compression area can be idealized as a ring with the center of pressure at the center of the ring.
This assumption was valid for larger diameter pole with a relatively large number of bolts. Often
base plates are encountered that have as few as four bolts. These cases can result in significant error
when calculating pressures and bolt forces. Base plates that extend inside the pole will also have a
triangular stress distribution that may differ from the assumed ring theory.
Horn
(21)
, developed a method for circular or polygonal base plates with a circular opening which
takes into account individual bolt locations. Square plates using the Complete Base Plate Method
were discussed in the last two sections.


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 55
di
q
e=M/P
y
B

Fig.2-11
The method is valid when there is net tension on the section, a condition that occurs when

( )
( )
i
i
B d
e
B B d

>

4 4
2 2
8

The method will make use of transformed areas of the bolts. Bolts that are in the tension zone will
have their areas transformed by

bolt b
A n = A
A
Bolts within the compression zone will have their areas transformed by
( )
bolt b
A n = −1

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 56
The method will calculate moment of inertia of the areas and the moment areas about the “e” line.
The moment of inertia divided by the moment area will then be the location of the neutral axis. The
process iterates on the value of q until it is determined to a sufficient degree of accuracy.
Defining

i
i
c
max
c
T T
d
r
y . B e q
n
f
Py
f
qA Q
=
= − +
=

=

2
5
29000
57


( )
T c b
comp tens
A A A n A nA = + + − +
∑ ∑ 1
1
b
The area of the outer circle is defined as

B
r
l r e q
y r l
y r
A y r y r sin
r

=
= − +
= −
( ) π
·
= − − −

·
·
( )
0
0 0
2
2 2 2 1 0
1 0 0
2
2

Should the neutral axis fall below the top of the circular opening, the area of the semi-circle must be
deducted
( )
i
c i i
c i
c c i c i
i
l r e q
y max r l, r
y r
A y r y r sin ,
r

= − +
= − −
( )
π
·
=− + − + >
·

·
·
( )
2
2 2 2 1
0
2
l
bolts

The moment area is defined as

T c
Q Q Q Q = + +
1

( )
.
c
r y
y
A

=
1 5
2 2
0
1
2
3

( ) Q A e y = −
1 1 1


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 57

( )
c
.
i c
c
y , if l
r y
A
= <
− −
=
1
1 5
2 2
0 0
2
3

( )
c c
Q A e
c
y = −
1


( )
( )
( )
j ntens j ncomp
bolts b j b j
j j
Q nA e y n A e y
= =
= =
= − + − −
∑ ∑
1 1
1
The moment of inertia of the areas is defined as

T c
I I I I = + +
1 bolts


( )
( )
y
r sin
y r y
r y r y
r r
I A y A e y

l
( )
·
l

·
− ·
− l π ( )
= + − − − + − l
l
l
l
l
2 1 0
3
2 2
2 2 2
4
0 0 2
0 0 2
1 1 1 1 1
8 2 4 4



( )
( )
c
i
c i c
i c i c i i
c c c c c
y
r sin
y r y
r y r y r r
I A

l
( )
·
l

·

l · − ·

π ( )
l
=− + − − − + −
l
l
l
l
l
4 1
3
2 2
2 2 2
4
2
2
1 1
8 2 4 4
y A e y

( )
bolt
bolts bolt j
A
I A e y
l
l
= + −
l
π
l

2
2
4


T
T
I
q
Q
=


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 58
Example 2.5
Re-analyze Example 2.2 using the Complete Method.

M
e i
P
= = =
42780
930
46
n
48"
q
e=M/P
y
73"
64"

Fig. 2-12
The actual process requires iterating on q until a calculated value of q agrees to the fourth decimal
place with the value from the previous cycle. The final iteration of q yields q=916.18446.


s
c
E
n .
E
= = =
29000
9 29
57 3000


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 59
Calculate the bolt values as follows

( )
bolt
y r sin j
θ = = °
= × ×θ
360
18
20

Bar # ybolt n Abolt nAbolt Qbolt Ibolt
1 0.000 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28079.03 26113565.79
2 9.889 9.29 3.25 30.1925 27780.47 25561196.78
3 18.809 8.29 3.25 26.9425 24549.76 22369575.05
4 25.889 8.29 3.25 26.9425 24359.02 22023329.44
5 30.434 8.29 3.25 26.9425 24236.56 21802449.64
6 32.000 8.29 3.25 26.9425 24194.37 21726597.54
7 30.434 8.29 3.25 26.9425 24236.56 21802449.64
8 25.889 8.29 3.25 26.9425 24359.02 22023329.44
9 18.809 8.29 3.25 26.9425 24549.76 22369575.05
10 9.889 9.29 3.25 30.1925 27780.47 25561196.78
11 0.000 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28079.03 26113565.79
12 -9.889 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28377.58 26671839.45
13 -18.809 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28646.92 27180531.35
14 -25.889 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28860.66 27587651.45
15 -30.434 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28997.90 27850633.93
16 -32.000 9.29 3.25 30.1925 29045.19 27941540.51
17 -30.434 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28997.90 27850633.93
18 -25.889 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28860.66 27587651.45
19 -18.809 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28646.92 27180531.35
20 -9.889 9.29 3.25 30.1925 28377.58 26671839.45
Totals 581.1 541015.35 503989684

The area of the outer circle is calculated as

r .
y l . . .
y . . .
. .
A . . . . sin
.

= =
= = − + =
= − =
( ) π
·
= − − − =

·
·
( )
0
0
2
2 2 2 1
1
73
36 5
2
36 5 930 916 18446 22 68
36 5 22 68 13 82
36 5 13 82
13 82 36 5 13 82 36 5 1108 79
2 3
.
6 5

The inner circle is next calculated
( )
c
c
l . .
y max . , .
.
A . . sin

= − + =
= − − =
( ) π
·
=− + − + =−

·
·
( )
2
2 2 2 1
24 930 916 18446 10 18
24 10 18 24 13 82
24 13 82
13 82 24 13 82 24 280 34
2 2
.
4


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 60

T
A . . . = + − = 1108 79 581 1 280 34 1409 55 .
Calculating the moment areas

( )
( )
.
. .
y .
.

= =
1 5
2 2
1
2 36 5 13 82
23 18
3 1108 79

( ) Q . . = − =
1
1108 79 930 23 18 1005464

( )
( )
.
c
.
y .
.
− −
= =

1 5
2 2
2 24 13 82
17 97
3 280 34

( )
c
Q . . =− − =− 280 34 930 17 97 255674

T
Q = + − = 1005464 541015 255674 1290806
Calculating the moments of inertia

( )
( ) ( )( )
.
. sin
. . .
. . . . .
.
I
. . . .
I

l
( )
·
l

·
− ·
π − (
= + − − l
l
l
l
l
− + −
=
4 1
3
2 2
4 2 2 2
1
2
2
1
13 82
36 5
13 82 36 5 13 82
36 5 36 5 13 82 36 5 13 82
36 5
8 2 4 4
1108 79 23 18 1108 79 930 23 18
911810020

)l


( )
( ) ( )( )
c
c
.
sin
. .
. .
I
. . . .
I

l
( )
·
l

·
− ·
π − (
=− + − − l
l
l
l
l
− − + − −
=−
4 1
3
2 2
4 2 2 2
2
2
13 82
24
13 82 24 13 82
24 24 13 82 24 13 82
24
8 2 4 4
280 34 17 97 280 34 930 17 97
233183299

)l


T
T
calc
T
I
I
q .
Q
= + − =
= = =
911810020 503898968 233183299 1182616405
1182616405
916 18446
1290806

Therefore, another iteration is not necessary and we can calculate final concrete and bolt stresses.

cmax
T T
Py .
f .
qA Q . .
×
= = =
− × −
46 22 68
1 73
916 18446 1409 55 1290806
ksi

bc
bc
t t
y . .
Py .
f .
qA Q . .
= − + =
×
= = =
− × −
64
930 916 18446 18 18
2
46 18 18
1 39
916 18446 1409 55 1290806


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 61

( )
( )
( ) ( )
( )
bolt
bolt b
T T
bolt
bolt
P e y q
P nA
qA Q
.
P .
. .
P . kips
− −
=

− − −
= ×
× −
=−
46 930 32 916 18446
9 3 25
916 18446 1409 55 1290806
105 6

The values from the Lutz Modification Example 2.2 compare as follows: 1.70 ksi vs. 1.73 ksi, 1.349
ksi vs. 1.39 ksi, and 110.4 kips vs. 105.6 kips.
Likewise, the other bolt forces may be calculated

Bar # ybolt n Pbolt
1 0.000 9.29 -31.85
2 9.889 9.29 -9.05
3 18.809 8.29 10.27
4 25.889 8.29 24.84
5 30.434 8.29 34.19
6 32.000 8.29 37.41
7 30.434 8.29 34.19
8 25.889 8.29 24.84
9 18.809 8.29 10.27
10 9.889 9.29 -9.05
11 0.000 9.29 -31.85
12 -9.889 9.29 -54.65
13 -18.809 9.29 -75.22
14 -25.889 9.29 -91.54
15 -30.434 9.29 -102.02
16 -32.000 9.29 -105.63
17 -30.434 9.29 -102.02
18 -25.889 9.29 -91.54
19 -18.809 9.29 -75.22
20 -9.889 9.29 -54.65

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 62
The maximum plate stress with a pole diameter of 58”, using 50 ksi grade plate, is then

( )
eff
pole
max
max
b .
y . .
.
f .
. .
. . . . .
M
. . in kips
.
f
. .
π×
= =
= − + =
×
= =
× −
( ) ( ) − −
· ·
× × −

· ·
· ·
( ) ( )
= +

× = −
×
= =
×
2 2
2
58
9 11
20
58
930 916 18446 15 18
2
46 15 18
1 16
916 18446 1409 55 1290806
73 58 73 58
9 11 1 16 9 11 1 73 1 16
2 2
2 3
64 58
37 41 506 8
2
6 506 8
9 11 2 25
… +
max
max
. ksi . . ksi n.g.
M . . in kips
.
f . ksi ksi o.k.
. .
≥ × × =

= × = −
×
= = ≤
×
2
65 93 75 50 1 33 50
64 58
105 6 316 8
2
6 316 8
41 2 50
9 11 2 25




Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 63
Ungrouted Base Plates
Determining Bolt Forces
Most monopoles built today do not have grouted base plates. Grouting of the plate can lead to
corrosion problems if means are not provided to allow for drainage of condensation that can
develop within the pole. Once grouted, the pole can no longer be adjusted for any out-of-plumb
condition since the leveling nuts will be encased within the grout. Some manufacturers have
specific warranty disclaimers if the pole is grouted.
The determination of bolt forces in ungrouted base plates is straightforward. The bolt group should
be symmetrical about both axes and the bolts should be the same size. Square base plates usually
have the bolt clustered in four groups located along the diagonals of the plate.
The maximum bolt force is determined by

max
max
My P
F
n I
= +
Where n is the number of bolts and y
max
and I are calculated as illustrated in the following
examples.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 64
Example 3.1
Analyze the bolt forces on a polygonal base plate with a bolt circle of 64” and (20) 2-1/4” bolts. The
vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).
32
30.43
25.89
18.8
9.88

Fig 3- 1


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 65

( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
max
max
n
y
I y r sin
I sin
sin sin
I
F . kips, . kips
=
=
= = θ
θ = = °
= × + × + × + × +
× + ×
=
×
= ± =+ −
∑ ∑
2
20
2
2
1
2 2
2 2
2
20
32
360
18
20
2 32 2 0 4 32 18 4 32 36
4 32 54 4 32 72
10240
46 42780 32
135 99 131 39
20 10240
sin


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 66
Example 3.2
Analyze the bolt forces on a square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle of 64” and
(12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5”. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-
kips).
32
31.68
4.485
4.5"
8.0575°

Fig. 3- 2

.
.
( )
·
θ = =

·
·
( )
π
4 5
360 8 0575
64
°

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 67

( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
max
max
n
y
I y r sin
I sin . sin .
I
F . kips, . kips
=
=
= = θ
= × + × + × + ×
=
×
= ± =+ −
∑ ∑
12
2
2
1
2 2
2 2
12
32
2 32 2 0 4 32 8 0575 4 32 81 9425
6144
46 42780 32
226 6 219 0
12 6144


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 68
Example 3.3
Analyze the bolt forces on a square base plate loaded parallel to the edge and a bolt circle of 64”
and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5”. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft
(42780 in-kips).
25.58"
22.63"
19.23"

Fig. 3- 3
.
.
( )
·
θ = =

·
·
( )
π
4 5
360 8 0575
64
°

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 69

( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
max
max
n
y .
I y r sin
I sin . sin sin .
I
.
F kips, . kips
=
=
= = θ
= × − + × + × +
=
×
= ± =+ −
∑ ∑
12
2
2
1
2 2
12
25 58
4 32 45 8 0575 4 32 45 4 32 45 8 0575
6144
46 42780 25 58
182 174 3
12 6144
2

As can be seen from these two examples, the maximum bolt force is always determined from the
loading along the diagonal for a square base plate.
Determining Bolt Shear
Shearing stresses in the pole are a maximum at the equator of the pole. A flexible base plate will
therefore have shearing forces distributed primarily to the two side regions at the equator. The
shear resisted by the bolts will then be

v
V
F
n
=
2

When the base plate is solid (without a central hole), the plate would be sufficiently rigid to equally
distribute the shear to all of the bolts.

v
V
F
n
=
Bending Stresses In Bolts
Bolts in ungrouted base plates may be subjected to bending stresses when the clear distance below
the leveling nut is excessive. The TIA Standard has no requirement for this condition. However,
AASHTO requires bending to be considered whenever the clear distance is greater than one bolt
diameter. The ASCE Manual 72 recommends that bending be considered whenever the distance is
greater than two bolt diameters. The bolt is considered to be bent in reverse curvature. The bending
stress would then be


v
b
b
cF
f
d
=
π
3
16


where c is the clear distance (see Fig. 3-4). When threads extend well into the clear space, the root
diameter of the threaded portion should be used for d
b
.


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 70
c db

Fig 3- 4

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 71
Determining Plate Stresses
Introduction
The methods of determining bolt forces and concrete stresses presented in the previous chapters are
commonly used by all designers. The methods for determining the base plate bending stresses,
however, are not so uniformly accepted.
Effective Width Based Upon Plate Theory
Traditionally, most methods have used the peak bolt force or maximum concrete stress in
determining a cantilever moment on an effective width of plate at the pole to determine the plate
stress by simple beam theory. The moment would be equal to the
M F d = ×
where F is the force and d is the distance from the force to the face of the pole. The stress in the
plate would then be

eff
M
f
B t
=
2
6

To determine if this is realistic, consider a circular ring, guided at the pole but free to displace
vertically, and simply supported continuously at the anchor bolt circle. Roarke
(25)
Table 24.1b states
that the maximum moment in the ring will be
( )
o o
o
L
M wa
C
b
C
a
r r a
L ln
a r a
=
l
( )
l ·
= +υ+ −υ

·
l ·
( )
l
l
' '
l
1 1
( ) +υ −υ
1 1
l ·
= + −
| ¦
·
l ·
1 1 ( )
l 1 1
l
+ +
9
8
2
8
2
9
1
1 1
2
1 1
1
2 4

where “a” is the radius of the outside of the ring and “b” is the radius of the inside of the ring
(outside radius of the pole). Poisson’s ratio can be taken as 0.30 for steel. The unit load, “w” is taken

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 72
as one and the position of the load, “r
o
”, is taken as “b” to simulate the load coming from the pole.
Note that this condition is for an axial load without moment, but it will give us some indication for
the correct value of effective width.

Monopole Examples
a 24 32 36
b 15 27.5 30
b/a .625 .86 .833
C
8
.787 .908 .893
L
9
.2576 .124 .143
M 7.85 11.94 5.77
d=a-b 9 4.367 6
B
eff
=d/M 1.15 1.03 1.04

Although this may be a crude comparison, it leads us to conclude that the classical method of using
a circumferential strip for determining plate stress should be reasonably accurate for plates that
have a uniform spacing of anchor bolts in a circular pattern.

Process Equipment Methods

A base plate without stiffeners is assumed to behave as a cantilever beam. The allowable bending
stress (AISC) would be limited to .75F
y
, while industrial engineers designing stacks usually limit
the stress to .6F
y
.
The maximum bending moment in grouted base plates on the compression side is calculated per
unit circumferential length (b=1 in) in the base plate as

c
press
OD D
d
f d
M

=
=
2
2
2

where we use f
c
as the average uniform pressure on the cantilevered plate, OC is the outside
diameter of the plate and D is the pole diameter across the flats.
The maximum bending stress is therefore

press
c
b
M
f d
f
t t
= =
2
2 2
6
3

where t is the thickness of the plate.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 73
When using any of the Complete Methods, the moment would be a combination of the concrete
pressure and the contribution of the bolts in compression. Both the compression and tension sides
of the base plate should be checked.
The unit maximum bending moment in all base plates on the tension side and ungrouted base
plates on the compression side is

bolt
BC D
d
Tdn
M
D

=
=
π
2

where we use T is the maximum bolt force on the cantilevered plate, BC is the bolt circle diameter,
D is the pole diameter across the flats, and n is the number of bolts. Sometimes a 45 degree angle
limitation is used
(13)
when there are a limited number of bolts (bolt spacing is greater than twice the
distance to the pole).

45



Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 74
Example 4.1
Analyze the bolt forces on an ungrouted square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle
of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5”. The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate
has a diameter of 58”. The thickness of the pole is .500” and the plate is 2.25” thick. The vertical load
is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).

M
e i
P
= = =
42780
930
46
n

68"
58"
29.5"

Fig 4- 1

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 75
Calculate the bolt values as follows
32
31.68
4.485
4.5"
8.0575°

Fig. 4-2

.
.
( )
·
θ = =

·
·
( )
π
4 5
360 8 0575
64
°

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 76

( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
max
max
n
y
I y r sin
I sin . sin .
I
P . kips,
=
=
= = θ
= × + × + × + ×
=
×
= ± =+ −
∑ ∑
12
2
2
1
2 2
2 2
12
32
2 32 2 0 4 32 8 0575 4 32 81 9425
6144
46 42780 32
226 6 219 0
12 6144
. kips


( ) ( )( )
y
P . kips
y .
.
P .
M . . . . . .
=
=
=
( ) ×
·
= + =

·
·
( )
= − + − =
1
1
2
2
32
226 6
31 68
46 42780 31 68
224 4
12 6144
226 6 32 29 5 2 224 4 31 68 29 5 1544 88
kips

If the effective width is limited to a 45 degree angle from the bolts (AISC approach),

( )
eff
b
b . . .
.
f . ksi
. .
= × + − =
×
= =
×
2
2 4 485 2 31 68 29 5 13 33
6 1544 88
137 4
13 33 2 25
.



Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 77
Base Plates With Gussets
When gussets are used to stiffen the base plate, the loading condition on the section of the plate
between the two gussets may be considered to act like a rectangular uniformly loaded plate with
two opposite edges simply supported by the gussets, the third edge joined to the pole, and the
fourth and outer edge free. The following table, taken from Timoshenko
(26)
, tabulates the bending
moments for this case.



b

x
b
x
M
y
( )
=
·

·

·

·
·
=
( )
2

y
b
x
M
y
( )
=
·

·

·

·
·
=
( )
2
0

0 0 -0.500f
cl
l
2
.333 0.0078f
c
b
2
-0.428f
c
l
2
.500 0.0293f
c
b
2
-0.319f
c
l
2
.666 0.0558f
c
b
2
-0.227f
c
l
2
1 0.0972f
c
b
2
-0.119f
c
l
2
1.5 0.123f
c
b
2
-0.124f
c
b
2
2 0.131f
c
b
2
-0.125f
c
b
2
3 0.133f
c
b
2
-0.125f
c
b
2
∞ 0.133f
c
b
2
-0.125f
c
b
2
In this table, b=gusset spacing (x direction) and l=base plate outside radius minus the pole radius
(y-direction).
Note that when l/b=0 (no gussets or gusset spacing is very large), that the equations reduces back
to the cantilever equation. Also, note that when l/b is equal to or less than 1.5, the maximum
bending moment occurs at the junction with the pole because of cantilever action. If l/b is greater
then 1.5, the maximum bending moment occurs at the middle of the free edge. The stress in the
plate is

max
b
bp
M
f
t
=
2
6

The gusset is usually designed to resist the entire shear force as a cantilever beam. Most process
design texts design the gusset by ignoring any contribution of the base plate itself; the gusset acts as
a vertical plate only. Some designers will assume a tee-beam with a portion of the base plate acting
along with the vertical plate gusset.
The gusset will impart a bending stress on the wall of the pole, which can be estimated from the
work of Bijilaard
(22)
.

( )
gusset
bpolewall
M
. Z .
f
t Rt . ah
ah
Rt
l
l
l
l
= +
l
( )
· l
+
·

l ·
( )
l
1
3
2 2
2
1 32 031
1 43
4


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 78
where

( )
gusset
.
Z
. am m
.
t Rt
t thicknessof pole wall
a t t
R radius of pole wall
h height of gusset
m thickness of base plate
=
( )( )
· ·
+
· ·
· ·
( ) ( )
=
= +
=
=
=
2
1 0
177
1 0
2


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 79
Alternate Method 1
This method is identical to the Process Equipment Method with the following modifications.
1. D is taken to be the average diameter of the polygonal pole
flat tip
D D
D
+
=
2
.
2. d is taken from the edge of the bolt rather than from the bolt circle
b
BC D d
d
− −
=
2
.
Alternate Method 2
This method is identical to the Process Equipment Method with following modifications.
1. D is taken to be the average diameter of the polygonal pole
flat tip
D D
D
+
=
2
.
2. d is taken from the edge of the nut to the fillet weld
nut
w
BC D d − −
= −
2
d t .
Alternate Method 3
This method is identical to the Process Equipment Method with following modifications.
1. D is taken to be the average diameter of the polygonal pole
flat tip
D D
D
+
=
2
.
2. d is taken from the edge of the nut to the fillet weld
nut
w
BC D d − −
= −
2
d t .
3. The plate is considered to be bent in double curvature such that the moment is one-half that
of a cantilevered plate. This assumes that the bolt is considered capable of resisting such a
moment. An equivalent procedure would be to adjust the bolt circle, BC, to a point midway
between the bolt and the average diameter of the pole.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 80
Method of Slices
The method evolved from the AISC method (see Introduction), which takes a slicing plane across
the entire width of the base plate. The method ignores the tension side distribution shown in Fig 1-3
and assumes that the effective width resisting bending moment, b
eff
, goes across the entire plate as
shown in Fig. 4-3. Should a slice occur near a bolt hole, the width of the hole(s) is deducted from the
effective plate width.

n.a.
1
2
3
4
beff
y
d
B

Fig 4- 3
The method requires that a number of slicing planes be taken between the bolt circle and the
neutral axis. The net moment at any slice is then the sum of the moments due to the forces outside
of the cutting plane minus the moment due to stresses in the pole when the slice occurs within the

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 81
diameter of the pole. Most designers who use this method usually only take a slice at the face of the
monopole, a point that may or may not be the most critical slice.
At any location from the center of a square plate for loading on the diameter, y

( ) ( )
y . B
eff
y d/
y d/
eff
y n.a.
bolt bolt i i i
b
eff
b . B y
d d
b . B y y d y
M P y y f y y , y y
M
f
b t
=
=
=
=
= −
( ) ( )
· ·
= − − − − −

· ·
· ·
( ) ( )
= × − + × − <
=


707
2
2
2
2
1 414 2
1 414 2 2
2 2
6

Parallel loading usually does not control in this method since the bolts are usually below the y
location of the face of the pole.
At any location from the center of a square plate for loading parallel, y

( ) ( )
y B/
eff
y d/
y d/
eff
y n.a.
bolt bolt i i i
b
eff
b B
d d
b B y d y
M P y y f y y , y y
M
f
b t
=
=
=
=
=
( ) ( )
· ·
= − − − −

· ·
· ·
( ) ( )
= × − + × − <
=


2
2
2
2
2
2
2 2
6

At any location from the center of a polygonal or circular plate, y


( ) ( )
y B/
eff
y d/
y d/
eff
y n.a.
bolt bolt i i i
b
eff
B B
b y B y
B B d d
b y B y y d y
M P y y f y y , y y
M
f
b t
=
=
=
=
( ) ( )
· ·
= − − −

· ·
· ·
( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
· · · ·
= − − − − − − −

· · · ·
· · · ·
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
= × − + × − <
=


2
2
2
2 2
2
2
2
2 2
2 2
2 2 2 2
6

The moment due to the pole shell stresses be calculated as follows

d
r
y
cos
r

=
( )
·
α =

·
·
( )
1
2


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 82

( )
( )
( )
( )
pole
cos cos Ptr Mtr
M cos cos d
A S
cos sin cos Ptr Mtr
sin cos
A S sin co
α α
θ− α
= θ− α θ + θ
− α
d
cos
s
l
α α− α α + α
l
= α−α α +
l
α−α α
l
∫ ∫
2
2 2
0 0
2 2 2 3 1
2 2
2 2
1
2 2



Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 83
Example 4.2
Analyze the bolt forces on an ungrouted square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle
of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5”. The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate
has a diameter of 58”. The thickness of the pole is .500” and the plate is 2.25” thick. The vertical load
is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).

M
e i
P
= = =
42780
930
46
n

68"
58"
1
2
29.5"
23.2"

Fig 4- 4

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 84
Slice 1 occurs at the outside face of the pole. Slice 2 is at .8 times the diameter of the pole (AISC
critical location).

Calculate the bolt values as follows
32
31.68
4.485
4.5"
8.0575°

Fig.4-5

.
.
( )
·
θ = =

·
·
( )
π
4 5
360 8 0575
64
°

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 85

( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
max
max
n.a.
n
y
I y r sin
I sin . sin .
I
P . kips,
y . "
=
=
= = θ
= × + × + × + ×
=
×
= ± =+ −
×
= =
×
∑ ∑
12
2
2
1
2 2
2 2
12
32
2 32 2 0 4 32 8 0575 4 32 81 9425
6144
46 42780 32
226 6 219 0
12 6144
46 6144
55
12 42780
. kips


( ) ( )( )
a
a
b
b
eff
y
P . kips
y .
.
P .
b . . .
M . . . . . .
.
f . ksi
. .
=
=
=
( ) ×
·
= + =

·
·
( )
= × − × =
= − + − =
×
= =
×
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
32
226 6
31 68
46 42780 31 68
224 4
12 6144
1 414 68 2 29 5 37 152
226 6 32 29 5 2 224 4 31 68 29 5 1544 88
6 1544 88
49 28
37 152 2 25
kips
This compares to 130.8 ksi using the Process Equipment Method.
Next, calculating the stress on slice 2

( )
( )
( ) ( )
eff
y . d .
.
cos .
.
A . in
I in
S
.
b . . . . . .

= =
( )
·
α = =

·
·
( )
π −
= =
π −
= =
= =
= × − × − − − − =
2
1
2 2
2
4 4
4
2
80 23 2
23 2
665
29 5
59 58
91 88
4
59 58
39311
64
39311
1333
29 5
1 414 68 2 23 2 2 29 5 23 2 59 29 5 23 2 13 3 .


Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 86

( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
( ) ( )
pole
pole
. .
M sin . . cos .
.
. cos . sin . cos . .
. .
sin . . cos .
M
× × ×
= − +
l
− +
× × ×
l
l

l
l
= + =
2
2
3 1 2
2 2
2 46 5 29 5
665 665 665
91 88
665 665 665 665 665
2 42780 5 29 5
1333 665 665 665
41 4495 4535


( ) ( )( ) M . . . . . = − + − − =
2
226 6 32 23 2 2 224 4 31 68 23 2 4535 1265
f .
. .
×
= =
×
2
2
6 1265
112 73
13 3 2 25
ksi


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 87
Alternate Method 1 – Square Base Plates
This alternate uses one slice at the face of the pole and limits the value of b
eff
to no greater than the
diameter of the pole.

Alternate Method 2 – Circular Base Plates
This alternate uses one slice at the face of the pole and uses 90% of b
eff
.

Boulos Method (New York Dept. of Transportation)
As can be seen from Examples 4.1 and 4.2, there is a wide discrepancy between stresses calculated
by the Process Equipment Method (used by industrial engineers for stacks) and those calculated by
the Method of Slices (used by a number of pole manufacturers), especially if the slice location is
limited to the face of the pole.
A research project was undertaken in 1993 at the New York State Department of Transportation
Engineering Research and Development Bureau and sponsored by the Federal Highway
Administration
(5)
. The project performed full-scale testing and finite element analysis of traffic
signal poles (square poles with four anchor bolts) to evaluate their structural adequacy. Results of
testing and analysis of four poles indicated that they were structurally inadequate. The support
base plate and anchor bolts were found to be deficient components, but the pole’s post was
adequately designed. FEA models of the signal poles that verified the test results were then used to
evaluate a representative sample of poles from three major suppliers. Results showed that plates
designed by the manufacturers’ current (1993) methods of design were not adequate to carry the
design loads. The report proposed a new design method for the base plate. This method is only
applicable to square base plates. Since the testing was done on smaller ungrouted base plates
commonly used for traffic poles having only four bolts, the method may not be totally applicable to
larger diameter pole used for telecommunication purposes; however, it will provide educational
background into the problem of determining stresses in base plates.
Boulos et al determined that both the parallel load and diagonal load cases resulted in three critical
zones of stress. The diagonal case had a single zone at the narrowest part of the plate (45 degrees to
the diagonal). The parallel case had two zones, each one at the narrowest part of the plate (0
degrees and 90 degrees).

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 88

Fig. 4- 6

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 89

Fig. 4- 7

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 90
Diagonal Loading Case
The method proposed by Boulos et al calculates the maximum bending stress as

( )
b
BC DB
d
M d
f
. L DB BC T

=
×
=
α − × ×
2
2
6
1 414

Where M/BC is the bolt force, BC is the bolt circle diameter, L is the width of the plate and DB is
the diameter of the pole. Upon careful examination of this equation, it can be seen that this is
identical to the method of slices with a correction term for the effective width, α.

BC DB DB
. . . .
T L L
/C
L . BC BC
. .
L DB L
C .
α
α
( )
( )
·
·
− − + − ·

·
· ·
( )
·

α =·

·
· −
·

·
·
( )

=
2
4 304 0 02021 4 304 4 503
707
0 9750 1 686
1 097


Typically, the value of α is . . . ≤α ≤ 45 75

Fig. 4- 8

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 91
Parallel Loading Case
Bending Stress
The maximum bending stress was found to occur midway between the bolts as the point of
maximum pole stress pushes down analogous to a triangular load at midspan spanning between
the two bolts. In fact, Boulos constructed a mathematical model which assumed that the plate
spanned between the two bolts with fixed ends. The loading was then assumed to be a triangular
load acting between the bolts.

( )
( )
b
DB
DB
M
L
L
f
DB
t L DB
L
L max . BC, D
L BC DB LT DB
. . . . . .
DB T L L DB L DB
/C
T DB
. .
BC BC
l
( )
l ·


·
· l
( ) ′

l
= − +
l
( )
l ·
β −

·
·
l
( ) ′
l

=
( )
( )
·
·
− − − − + + ·

·
· ·
( )
− ·

β =·

·
·
·

·
·
( )
4
2
2
2
1
1
3 1
4 3 12
707
157 6 21 85 33 259 3 48 13 194 6
127 4 21 65

C .
β
β
=1 080

Typically, the value of β is . . . ≤β ≤ 0 5 1 5

Fig. 4- 9
Torsional Shear Stress at Midpoint of Side
The side of the plate has one bolt in compression and the other in tension. This results in a torsional
stress that is calculated as

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 92

( )
( )
v
M
f
C bT
b min . BC, DB
=

γ
=
2
2
707


b/t C’
1.0 0.208
1.2 0.219
1.5 0.231
2.0 0.246
2.5 0.258
3.0 0.267
4.0 0.282
5.0 0.291
10.0 0.312
∞ 0.333


BC BC DB DB DB
. . . .
DB T L L
/C
L . BC BC DB BC
. .
L DB . B DB L
C .
γ
γ
( )
( ) −
·
·
− − − + − ·

·
· ·
( )
·

γ =·

·
· − −
·
− +
·
·
( )
− −
=
2
210 66 9 1719 714 8 358 3
707
48 16 288 2 381
1 414
1 094


Typically, the value for γ is 1 3 . . . ≤γ ≤2 3

Fig. 4- 10

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 93
The method is valid for square base plates within the following ranges

BC
. .
T
DB
. .
L
BC
. .
L
≤ ≤
≤ ≤
≤ ≤
8 0 16 5
0 5 0 75
0 95 1 05

These ranges are usually exceeded for telecommunication poles and the corresponding values will
be < 0, thus suggesting that the lower bounds should be used. Therefore, it may be prudent to
impose an upper limit on the effective width equal to .40 of the full slice width at the face of the
pole for poles with four bolts. However it is reasonable to assume that, as the number of bolts
increases, the effective width would increase above this value.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 94
Owens Method (New York Dept. of Transportation)
Owens
(6,7)
et. al., extended the Boulos method to accommodate grouted base plates. He
incorporated yet another check using yield line theory.


Fig. 4- 11

The research confirmed the Boulos findings that base plates previously designed by manufacturers
were deficient.
The stress at the yield line is calculated as follows

by by
x
by
by
x
M T r
t . t a
S b b
M
f
S
= ×
( )
· ′′ ′
= × = −

·
·
( )
=
2 2
707
6 6 4
d

Comparing to the Method of Slices, the effective width is

eff
b b . B .
′′
= = − 823 707
Which is about 40-45% of the full diagonal width at the face of the pole for common
telecommunication poles.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 95
ASCE Manual 72 (Proposed 2003 Revision)
ASCE Manual 72
(27)
contains a base plate design section which uses the Method of Slices with the
45 degree limitation discussed in the Process Equipment section. The ASCE method checks two
bend lines on each facet of the polygon, a line parallel to the pole face and another line tangential to
the corner of the polygon. The bend line for a circular pole is tangent to the pole. See Fig. 4-11.

Beff
Parallel to bend line
45
c1
c2
T
a
n
g
e
n
t
i
a
l

t
o

c
o
r
n
e
r

Fig. 4- 11

The bending moment on the bend line is then the sum of the bolt forces outside of the bend line
times the distance of the bolt from the bend line (c1 and c2 in Fig. 4-11). The tangential to corner
situation is only applicable to power line transmission poles where the forces are primarily parallel
and perpendicular to the transmission lines. Telecommunication poles can be oriented at any

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 96
possible angle to the wind and therefore the pole would be assumed to be oriented such that the
bolts and the polygonal faces are in the worst possible condition with the resultant moment in only
one direction. The the parallel case would be the worst case scenario for this situation.
Example 4.3
Analyze the bolt forces on an ungrouted square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle
of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5”. The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate
has a diameter of 58”. The thickness of the pole is .500” and the plate is 2.25” thick. The vertical load
is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).

M
e i
P
= = =
42780
930
46
n

68"
58"
29.5"
13.33"

Fig 4- 12

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 97
Calculate the bolt values as follows
32
31.68
4.485
4.5"
8.0575°

Fig.4-5

.
.
( )
·
θ = =

·
·
( )
π
4 5
360 8 0575
64
°

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 98

( ) ( )
( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
max
max
n
y
I y r sin
I sin . sin .
I
P . kips,
=
=
= = θ
= × + × + × + ×
=
×
= ± =+ −
∑ ∑
12
2
2
1
2 2
2 2
12
32
2 32 2 0 4 32 8 0575 4 32 81 9425
6144
46 42780 32
226 6 219 0
12 6144
. kips


( )
( ) ( )( )
a
a
b
b
eff
y
P . kips
y .
.
P .
b . . . . in
M . . . . . .
.
f . ksi
. .
=
=
=
( ) ×
·
= + =

·
·
( )
= × + × − =
= − + − =
×
= =
×
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
2
32
226 6
31 68
46 42780 31 68
224 4
12 6144
2 4 485 2 31 68 29 5 13 33
226 6 32 29 5 2 224 4 31 68 29 5 1544 88
6 1544 88
137 4
13 33 2 25
kips
This compares to 49.28 ksi using the Method of Slices (Example 4.2).





Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 99
Anchor Bolts
Material Grades
Over the years, a wide variety of bolt grades have been used for pole base plates. The most
commonly used grades are listed below.

ASTM Designation Tensile Strength, ksi
A307 60
A325 (SAE Gr 5 similar) 105
A354 Gr BD 150, 140 (over 2 ½”)
A354 Gr BC 125, 115 (over 2 ½”)
A449 90
A490 (SAE Gr 8 similar) 150
A618 Gr 75 (Anchor bolt grade, #18J bars) 100
A687 150
A36 58
A572 Gr 50 65
A572 Gr 42 60
A588 70
F1554 Gr 36 58
F1554 Gr 55 75
F1554 Gr 105 125

The current standard has anchor bolts unified under ASTM F1554 . Only grades 36 and 55 permit
welding.
Hooked anchor bolts have fallen into disfavor as tests have shown that local crushing occurs at the
bend point leading to a reduction in pullout capacity. The standard method detail is to provide a
threaded portion at the bottom of the anchor bolt and attach a nut or nut with washer. When the
grade permits welding, the nut is usually tack-welded to the bolt to insure that the nut does not

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 100
loosen or fall off. High strength grades usually do not permit welding and a second “jam” nut is
often provided.
The number of anchor bolts required is a function of the maximum net uplift on the column and the
allowable tensile load for the grade chosen. Prying forces in anchor bolts are typically neglected.
Fatigue is often ignored in the selection and sizing of anchor bolts. However, in cases of high
seismic/wind situations fatigue may be a consideration. The following table shows some
recommended values for bolt fatigue stresses.

Number of Cycles
a
Allowable Tensile Stress, ksi
20,000 to 100,000 40
100,000 to 500,000 25
500,000 to 2,000,000 15
Over 2,000,000 10
a
Categories correspond to AISC Appendix K


Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 101
Anchorage
Prior to publication of ACI 318-02, anchorage of bolts was based upon approximate methods using
pull-out “cones” as developed in AISC
(12)
and PCI
(24)
. ACI 318 presented a new method for
determining anchor bolt capacities. Appendix D of ACI 318-02 (ACI 2002) and Appendix B of ACI
349-01 both address the anchoring to concrete of cast-in-place anchors. Adhesive anchors and
grouted anchors are not covered by these appendices. The provisions in both of these appendices
are based upon the Concrete Capacity Design (CCD) Method.
In the CCD method the concrete cone is considered to be formed at a slope of 1 in 1.5 rather than
the older 45 degree assumption. The cone is considered to have a square shape in plan rather than
the classical round shape to simplify calculations.
Section 15.8.3.3 of ACI 318-02 requires that anchor bolts reach their design strength before
anchorage failure or failure of the surrounding concrete (ductile failure) yet no code section is
provided to state how this is to be accomplished.
Lutz-Fisher
(23)
, outline a procedure to insure this ductility requirement. When an anchor bolt is
designed to lap with reinforcement, the anchor capacity can be taken as
se y
A F φ since the lap splice
will insure that ductile behavior will occur. A is the tensile stress area of the anchor bolt and
as given in ACI 318-02 Chapter 9. To insure ducitlity for breakout, there must be sufficient
lap length (with a standard hook on the reinforcing bars if required) to adequately develop the
capacity. The distance “g” as shown in Fig. 5-1 is the distance from the centerline of the anchor bolt
to the centerline of the nearest reinforcing bar. Using a Class B splice, the required embedment (top
of concrete to top of nut) would be
se
. φ= 9

ef d
g
h . l top cov
.
= + + 1 3
1 5
er
When the anchor is solely resisted by concrete, as it would be for pullout and side-face blowout,
one needs to have the concrete designed with additional capacity in order to insure ductility of the
connection. To achieve this, Lutz proposed that the concrete must reach a capacity of
( )
se y
. A F φ 5 1 2
thereby insuring that the steel would yield prior to concrete rupture.

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 102
hef
Hooked bars if required
g
1
1.5
Potential failure plane
1.3ld

Fig. 5- 2 Development of bar for concrete breakout

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 103
Example 4.1
An anchor bolt has a factored (USD) bolt tension of 50 kips. There are 8 anchor bolts and the
anchor bolts are 10 inches from the edge of a 60 inch diameter concrete pier and the bolts are 1-1/4”
F1554 Gr 55. There are 24-#9 Gr 60 reinforcing bars bundled in groups of 2, 3 inches clear from the
edge of the pier and the concrete strength is 3500 psi. The basic development length of a #9 bar with
3 inches clear is 37 inches (straight bar).

3"
10"
9"
60"

Fig 5-2
Check tension capacity of 2-#9 bars

cap b y
P . nA F . . o. φ = × × = × × × = 90 90 2 1 0 60 108 k.
The anchor bolt capacity is

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 104

s se ut
N . A F . . . kip φ = × × = × × = 75 75 969 75 54 5 s

Breakout
Ductility for breakout will be insured by lapping the bolt with the reinforcing bars.

d
d
ef d
l in
. l in
g
h . l cover in, say '
. .
=
=
≥ + + = + + =
37
1 3 48
9
1 3 48 3 57 5
1 5 1 5

Pullout
To insure ductility for pull-out and side-face blowout, the concrete strength must be greater than


( )
se y
kips
. A F . . .
bolt
φ = × × × = 1 25 1 25 0 9 969 55 60
Using a nut diameter of 2.1”, the pullout strength is

( ) ( )
pn p brg c
brg
pn
N N . . A f
. .
A .
N . . . . kips o.

φ =φψ =
( )

·
=π =
·

· ·
( )
φ = × × × × = ≥
4
2 2
70 1 4 8
2 1 1 25
2 236
4
70 1 4 2 236 8 3 5 61 60 k.

Often the anchor bolts are held together with a ½” setting plate ring. This would increase the
bearing area but might not be fully effective since the plate would bend during pullout. An
assumption could be made that the bearing would be equivalent to a washer which would have an
outside diameter of two times the bolt diameter.
Side-Face Blowout
The side clearance, c , is 10”. Since , side-face blowout must be checked. The side-face
blowout strength is
ef
c . h ≤ 4

o
sbg brg c
s
N . c A f
c
.
. . . ki
( )
· ′
φ = +

·
·
( )
( )
·
= + × × = ≥

·
·
( )
×
75 1 160
6
18 85
75 1 160 10 2 236 3500 139 5 60
6 10
ps o.k.

Normally, side-face blowout would not need to be checked if ties are provided in the region at the
anchor bolt nut location such that the ties would cross the failure plane.



Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Recommendations • 105
Recommendations
Determining Base Plate Forces
Grouted Base Plates
All of the methods presented yield approximately the same results. However, the Complete
Methods are more accurate when there are a limited number of bolts. The Complete Methods also
have specific methods for square base plates, which can only be approximated as circular using the
Process Equipment or Lutz Methods.
Therefore, the Complete Method should be modified to obtain a more reasonable distribution of
plate stresses considering that the plate is not infinitely rigid. The following two modifications
should be made:
1. The distance from the bolt circle to the outside edge of the plate should be limited to the
distance from the pole face to the bolt circle.
2. The plate hole opening diameter should be taken as no less than the inner diameter of
the pole minus the distance from the pole face to the adjusted outside edge of the plate.
Ungrouted Base Plates
The method of calculating bolt forces using the section modulus of the bolt group is the only
method currently being used.
Determining Base Plate Stresses
The Method of Slices without any adjustment to the effective width was proven inaccurate by the
work of Boulos and Owens. The method should only be used for square base plates whenever the
effective width of plate at the face of the pole is multiplied by an adjustment factor . The factor
would be approximately 0.40 for four bolt base plates and would increase for poles with more than
four bolts.
The Process Equipment Method of considering the plate as a simple cantilever from the center of
the bolt circle to the face of the pole is still the simplest method for circular or polygonal plates and
yields results for square base plates, when using the 45 degree rule, that are comparable to those

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Recommendations • 106
obtained by using the Boulos method when using a lower bound of .40 on effective width. There
was no evidence in the research that would support the assumptions in any of the Alternate
Methods although they may have some validity.
The ASCE Manual 72 (Proposed) Method is identical to the aforementioned Process Equipment
Method using the 45 degree rule.
The Process Equipment Method (45 degree rule)/ASCE Manual 72 Method is therefore
recommended using the parallel bend line and the worst case positioning of pole facets and
bolts.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Recommendations • 107
Construction Details
The majority of poles manufactured today are small diameter poles used for traffic control
purposes. The poles are circular and extend through the plate as shown below.

gap
Typical Fillet Weld
Top Weld Resists - 75-100% of Load
Bottom Weld Resists 25% of Load
Must build out weld to
achieve proper root thickness

This detail subjects the weld to a constant state of stress. Larger diameter polygonal poles may have
manufacturing tolerances such that a “gap” may occur during fit-up. This requires that the fillet
welds be built-up in order to maintain the proper root thickness.
A better detail for larger diameter poles is to extend the plate inside the pole and to use a full
penetration weld as shown below. A covering fillet(s) may be added to prevent water collection at
the base plate.



Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Bibliography • 108
Bibliography
References
1. Design of Steel Transmission Pole Structures, Manual 72, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE).
2. Standard Specifications for Structural Supports for Highway Signs, Luminaires and Traffic Signals, American
Association of State Highway Transportation Offices (AASHTO).
3. Guide Specifications for Design of Metal Flagpoles, The National Association of Architectural Metal
Manufacturers (NAAMM).
4. Metal Flagpole Manual, The National Association of Architectural Metal Manufacturers (NAAMM).
5. Research Report 159, Load Testing, Finite Element Analysis, And Design of Steel Traffic-Signal Pole, Boulos, Fu,
and Alampalli, New York State Department of Transportation.
6. Research Report 131, A Simplified Design Procedure For End-Plates and Base-Plates Of Cantilevered Traffic
Structures, Frank Owens, Osman Hag-Elsafi, Sreenivas Alampalli, New York State Department of
Transportation.
7. New Procedure For Design of End Plates and Base Plates of Cantilevered Traffic Support Structures, Osman Hag-
Elsafi, Sreenivas, and Frank Owens, ASCE Journal of Structural Engineering, October 2001.
8. Design of Welded Structures, Blodgett, Lincoln Arc Welding.
9. Design of Steel Structures, Gaylord and Gaylord.
10. Steel Structures, McGuire.
11. Steel Structures, Design and Behavior, Salmon and Johnson.
12. Steel Design Guide Series 1, Column Base Plates, American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC).
13. Column Base Plates with Axial Loads and Moments, DeWolf, ASCE Journal of Structural Engineering,
November 1980.
14. Base Plates Under Axial Loads and Moments, Thambiratnam, ASCE Journal of Structural Engineering, May
1986.
15. Concrete Plain and Reinforced, Taylor, Thompson, and Smulski, 1925.
16. Process Equipment Design, Brownell and Young , 1957.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Bibliography • 109
17. Tubular Steel Structures, Theory and Design, Troitsky , Lincoln Arc Welding 1990.
18. Pressure Vessel Handbook, Megyesy.
19. Pressure Vessel Handbook, Bednard , 1991.
20. Internal Memorandum, Computerized Structural Design, Dr. Leroy Lutz, 2004.
21. Internal Memorandum, Computerized Structural Design, Daniel Horn, 2004.
22. Design of Plate Structures – Volume 2, Bijilaard, American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI).
23. Steel Design Guide Series #7, Industrial Buildings, Roofs to Column Anchorage, Lutz-Fisher, American
Institute of Steel Construction (AISC), 2004.
24. Prestressed Concrete Design Handbook, Presressed Concrete Institute (PCI).
25. Formulas for Stress and Strain, Roarke.
26. Theory of Plates and Shells, Timoshenko.
27. ASCE Manual 72, Guide for Design of Steel Transmission Pole Structures, American Society of Civil Engineers
(ASCE)

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Glossary of Terms • 111
Glossary of Terms
AASHTO
American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials.
AISC
American Institute of Steel Construction.
AISI
American Iron and Steel Institute.
ASCE
American Society of Civil Engineers.
Base Plate
A steel plate that transmit forces from a column to the foundation.
Monopole
A stepped or tapered steel pole. Poles can be round or polygonal (8,12,16, or 18 sides).
NAAMM
National Association of Architectural Metal Manufacturers.
PCI
Prestressed Concrete Institute.

Determining Bolt Forces 66
Determining Bolt Shear 71
Diagonal Loading Case 91
Index
E
Effective Width Based Upon Plate Theory 74
Example 1.1 9
Example 1.2 14
Example 1.3 17
Example 2.1 26
Example 2.2 31
Example 2.3 38
Example 2.4 47, 58
A
Example 2.5 63
Example 3.1 68
AASHTO 111
Example 3.2 69
AISC 111
Example 3.3 69
AISC Method For Building Columns 7
Example 4.1 79, 104
AISI 111
Example 4.2 87
Alternate Method 1 80
Example 4.3 101
Alternate Method 1 - Square Base Plates 90
Alternate Method 2 83
F
Alternate Method 2 - Circular Base Plates 91
Alternate Method 3 87
Flexible Base Plate 8
Anchorage 104
ASCE 111
G
ASCE Manual 72 (Proposed 2003 Revision) 99
Grouted Base Plates 107
B
H
Base Plate 111
Historical Perspective 2
Base Plates With Gussets 79
Bending Stress 95
I
Bending Stresses In Bolts 71
Boulos Method (New York Dept. of
Transportation) 91
Introduction 72
Breakout 105
L
Lutz Modification 29
C
Complete Circular Base Plate Method 63
M
Complete Square Base Plate - Load On Diagonal
33
Material Grades 104
Method of Slices 87
Complete Square Base Plate - Load Parallel 50
Modification for Clipped Corners 36
Monopole 111
D
Determining Base Plate Forces 105
Determining Base Plate Stresses 108
Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Index • 113

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Index • 114
N
NAAMM 111
O
Organization 1
Owens Method (New York Dept. of
Transportation) 99
P
Parallel Loading Case 94
PCI 111
Process Equipment Design Method 19
Process Equipment Methods 77
Pullout 105
S
Side-Face Blowout 105
Stiff Plate Approach 12
T
Technical Manual 1-1 43
Technical Manual 1-2 54
Technical Manual 1-3 79
Torsional Shear Stress at Midpoint of Side 96
U
Ungrouted Base Plates 108

Copyright 2004 C-Concepts, Inc.

Contents
Introduction 1
Organization .............................................................................................................. 1 Historical Perspective ............................................................................................... 2 AISC Method For Building Columns ..................................................................... 7 Flexible Base Plate ........................................................................................ 8 Example 1.1 ................................................................................................... 9 Stiff Plate Approach ................................................................................... 12 Example 1.2 ................................................................................................. 14 Example 1.3 ................................................................................................. 17

Grouted Base Plates

19

Process Equipment Design Method...................................................................... 19 Example 2.1 ................................................................................................. 26 Lutz Modification .................................................................................................... 29 Example 2.2 ................................................................................................. 31 Complete Square Base Plate – Load On Diagonal .............................................. 33 Modification for Clipped Corners............................................................ 36 Example 2.3 ................................................................................................. 38 Example 2.4 ................................................................................................. 43 Complete Square Base Plate – Load Parallel ....................................................... 47 Example 2.4 ................................................................................................. 50 Complete Circular Base Plate Method ................................................................. 54 Example 2.5 ................................................................................................. 58

Ungrouted Base Plates

63

Determining Bolt Forces ......................................................................................... 63 Example 3.1 ................................................................................................. 64 Example 3.2 ................................................................................................. 66 Example 3.3 ................................................................................................. 68

Determining Plate Stresses

71

Introduction.............................................................................................................. 71 Effective Width Based Upon Plate Theory .......................................................... 71 Process Equipment Methods ................................................................................. 72 Example 4.1 ................................................................................................. 74 Base Plates With Gussets........................................................................... 77 Alternate Method 1 ................................................................................................. 79

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases

Contents • iii

Alternate Method 2 ................................................................................................. 79 Alternate Method 3 ................................................................................................. 79 Method of Slices....................................................................................................... 80 Example 4.2 ................................................................................................. 83 Alternate Method 1 – Square Base Plates............................................................. 87 Alternate Method 2 – Circular Base Plates .......................................................... 87 Boulos Method (New York Dept. of Transportation) ........................................ 87 Diagonal Loading Case.............................................................................. 90 Parallel Loading Case ................................................................................ 91 Owens Method (New York Dept. of Transportation) ........................................ 94 ASCE Manual 72 (Proposed 2003 Revision) ........................................................ 95 Example 4.3 ................................................................................................. 96

Anchor Bolts

99

Material Grades ....................................................................................................... 99 Anchorage .............................................................................................................. 101 Example 4.1 ............................................................................................... 103

Recommendations

105

Determining Base Plate Forces ............................................................................ 105 Grouted Base Plates ................................................................................. 105 Ungrouted Base Plates............................................................................. 105 Determining Base Plate Stresses.......................................................................... 105 Construction Details.............................................................................................. 107

Bibliography

108

References............................................................................................................... 108

Glossary of Terms Index

111 113

iv • Contents

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases

Introduction

Organization
The following chapters will cover the following topics: 1. An historical perspective including the AISC approach to base plate design for building columns. 2. Classical methods for determining bolt forces and concrete stresses for grouted base plates. 3. Classical methods for determining bolt forces for ungrouted base plates. 4. Evaluation of various methods currently being used to determine base plate bending stresses for plain and stiffened plates

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases

Introduction • 1

Historical Perspective
Monopoles have become increasingly popular for use in the telecommunication industry. The advantages include architectural attractiveness and a minimal use of land. Poles are of two general types, tapered polygonal poles and stepped pipe poles. The tapered polygonal pole shown in Fig. 1-1, is custom manufactured to exact diameters required for the design. Each section is joined using telescoping lap joints.

Fig. 1- 1

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases

Introduction • 2

Pipe poles are made from large diameter pipe sections and joined by external or internal flange connections as shown in Fig. Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 3 . 1-2. 1. Fig. the most common method of attaching the pole to the foundation is with a base plate.2 While some poles may be directly buried into the earth.

however.Base plates can be square with clustered anchor bolts as shown in Fig. AASHTO also recommends that the minimum base plate thickness be equal to the bolt diameter. the ASCE Manual(1) suggests limiting the distance to two bolt diameters. AASHTO(2) limits this distance to one bolt diameter.3 The clear space below the leveling nut is not limited by the TIA-222 Standard. Fig. 1-3 when overturning moments are relatively light. 1. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 4 .

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 5 .Base plates can also be polygonal or circular to accommodate a larger number of bolts. 1. Fig. While some testing has been done on smaller pole base plates used in highway construction (usually poles between 10 and 20 inches in diameter). poles were used almost exclusively for flags(3. Some state highway departments (New York) have developed their own methods. poles have become popular for both electric transmission towers and for telecommunication structures. the designer is left to arrive at appropriate methods based upon classical structural mechanics. There is currently no industry standard for the design of pole base plates. A typical example is shown in Fig. such design techniques may or may not be appropriate. but no national standard exists.4) and for highway structures(2). In recent years. As such. Recent finite element studies(5.7) have indicated that current design practices used by pole manufacturers may be under-designed by 20 to 30%. Therefore. no testing has been done on larger diameter pole base plates such as used in the telecommunication industry (poles 36 to 72 inches in diameter).6. 1-4. Prior to that.4 Poles have been used in the power transmision field since the 1960’s. The plate may need to have gusset plates (stiffeners) in order to transfer forces due to axial and bending moment to the pole.

let us examine the traditional methods that have been developed for designing building columns subject to axial loads and moment. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 6 .5 The purpose of this report is to make available the various design techniques currently being used in the industry in the hope that more reliable methods of design may be developed in the future. To begin. 1.Although monopole failures are a relatively rare occurrence. 1-5) have increased interest in manufacturer’s design and manufacturing techniques. Fig. a number of recent pole failures (see Fig.

80 times the diameter of the pipe. The AISC method for designing axially loaded base plates defines the critical section as being at .10.95 times the depth of the structural members for shapes of rectangular cross-section such as wide flanges and tubes.11. Working stress methods for analyzing moment resistant base plate can be found in engineering texts(8. a flexible plate approach and a stiff plate approach.12). Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 7 .9.AISC Method For Building Columns Moment resisting base plates for building columns are covered in neither the AISC Specification nor the Manual of Steel Construction. Engineers must therefore refer to textbooks or technical papers for design methods although not all texts cover this topic. DeWolf(13) and Thambiratnam(14) compared methods of designing building columns to test data. The critical section for pipe is defined at a location equal to . Two different approaches have been taken to determine the distribution of forces on the base plate.

1.6 Flexible base plate force distribution The following basic equations (B=plate width) define the static forces as shown in Fig 1-6. P M f D T C A N' N fc A/3 Fig. T +P = C = M− fcAB 2 PD 2 T= D f+ 2 2 (T + P ) fc = AB Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 8 .Flexible Base Plate Relatively flexible base plates are incapable of maintaining a linear strain distribution and the assumption is made that the compression force is centered beneath the compression flange of the column.

Fy for the plate and anchor bolts is 36 ksi and f’c is 3 ksi. The bolts are 1.5" 8" T C A N'=12.5" N=14" fc A/3 Fig.1 Design a base plate for an axial load of 60 kips and a moment of 480 in-kips.Example 1.7 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 9 . 1.5” from the edge. The structural member is an 8-inch wide flange and the base plate is 14x14. 60 k 480 in-k 5.

70fc′ = 2.75× 36 Fb = .26 + 60 = 85.95× 8 = 3. 9×14 The thickness of the plate is determined by checking both the compression and tension sides.1 ksi Ap 60× 8 2 = 25.26) = 1.2 fcpl = 1.87 ksi 9 2 0.5 + 2 14 − 8 =9 A = 3× 2 C = T + P = 25.22 (1.87 ) 3.35 ksi ≤ 2.k. The critical section is at 14 − 0.Fp = .87 × 3.35 = 0.09 in 2 3 2 M W × t pl S reqd = .16 in .26 fc = 2 (85.1 ksi o.26 kips = 12.63 kips T= bolt 8 5.75Fy t pl = Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 10 .2 in−kip M pl = + = 6. W = 1" = Fb 6 b= t pl = 6M Fb 6×6.09 = 1.35fc′ 480 − A2 = .35 − 0.2 in 2 9 − 3.

47 in − kips 3.5" 1.7 > 1.5 + (3.5 use 1.16 3.2 − 1.2 − 1.63×(3. 14" b=3.2 in t pl = Therefore the tension side controls.5 beff = 1.The critical width on the tension side is defined by AISC as shown in Fig 1-8.2×.2 − 1.5) = 21. 6×21.5) = 3.47 = 1.22 in ≥ 1.75× 36 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 11 .5 = 1.5" 8" Fig 1-8 M pl = 12.2" beff 14" 45° 1.

base plates are capable of approaching a linear strain distribution and the base plate is assumed to behave in a manner similar to reinforced concrete columns(8).Stiff Plate Approach Thicker. P+T = C = where B=width of the base plate.9 Stiff base plate force distribution The following basic equations define the static forces as shown in Fig 1-9. P M f D T A N' N fc Fig 1. stiffer. fcAB 2 e= M P N A   − −e  T = −P  2 3  N A  − +f  2 3  Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 12 .

fc = TA N  Asn  − A + f  2    P+T = TA2 B N  2A s n  − A + f   2    Defining  N K 1 = 3 e −       2 6nA s K2 = (f + e) B N    K 3 = −K 2  + f   2   A 3 + K1A 2 + K 2A + K 3 = 0 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 13 .

3 + 5.3 in   7.969 = 1.5) Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 14 .1 ksi Ap 480 = 8 in 60 29000 n= = 9. A = 7.1 using the stiff approach and assuming 1 ¼” diameter bolts. 3 57 3000 A s = 2×.5 kips = 10.94  14  K 1 = 3 8 −  = 3      2 6×9.1 ksi fc = 9.5 = −1300    2   Solving for A by trial.Example 1.6 ksi ≤ 2.35fc′ e= A2 = .3 −8   7− kips  3 T = −60   = 20.94 K2 = (5.3 = 1.70fc′ = 2.2 Design the same plate of Example 1.3×1.5×7.25 bolt  7 − 7.3 + 5. Fp = .5    3 20.5 + 8) = 104 14 14  K 3 = −104  + 5.94 (7 − 7.3×1.

The thickness of the plate is determined by checking both the compression and tension sides.90 ksi fcpl = 7.5" 1.6 − 0.2 in 2 7.3 − 3. 14" b=3.2 1.25 in .95× 8 = 3.2 − M pl = + = 7 in inkip 2 3 6×7 t pl = = 1.22 (1.2" beff 14" 45° 1.90) 3.5" 8" Fig 1-10 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 15 .3 2 0. The critical section is at 14 − 0.90× 3.75× 36 b= The critical width on the tension side is defined by AISC as shown in Fig 1-10.6 = 0.

5 + (3.2 − 1.5 = 1.5) = 3.2 − 1.43 = 1.25 in 3.43 in − kips 3.25×(3.5 in beff = 1.5) = 17. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 16 .2 − 1.75× 36 Therefore the compression side controls.10 in ≤ 1.7 > 1.M pl = 10.5 in side clearanace use 1.2 in t pl = 6×17.2×.

77 × 3.8xDiameter 1.3 Re-design Example 1.55 in inkip 2 3 6×9.Example 1.55 t pl = = 1.3 2 0. however the distance to the critical section is now 14 − 0.77 ) 3. A pipe would have the critical section defined as 14" b=3.82 (1.3 − 3.8 − M pl = + = 9.6 − 0.46 in .8 1.77 ksi fcpl = 7.75× 36 b= Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 17 .2 for an 8” pipe column.6 = 0.8 in 2 7.5" Fig 1-11 The analysis for bolt forces and concrete stress are identical to the wide flange base plate.80× 8 = 3.5" 1.2" 45° beff 14" .

8 ×.5 in side clearance use 1.17 in ≤ 1.8 in t pl = 6×23.46 in 3.Checking the tension side M pl = 10.3 = 3.8 − 1.5 in beff = 1.58 = 1.8 − 1.75× 36 Therefore the compression side controls.5 + 2.5) = 23. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Introduction • 18 .58 in − kips 3.5 = 2.3 > 1.25×(3.

and Bednard(19). Megyesy(18). The following description of the method is taken from Brownell and Young(16). M P f s nf (d-kd) kd c d Fig. The method was developed for circular base plates.1 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 19 . 2. The method is based upon reinforced concrete column theory using the Working Stress Design Method (WSD). and Smulski(15). Thompson. Troitsky(17). however the method can be conservatively used for polygonal plates and square base plates by using the diameter across the flats of the plate. Note that all of the grouted base plate techniques that follow assume that the eccentricity is sufficiently large enough to produce tension on a portion of the base plate.Grouted Base Plates Process Equipment Design Method Procedures for designing circular base plates with large openings (approaching the inner diameter of the shell) have been used for over 75 years.. The method most often used was based upon the work of Taylor. The most common use has been for chimneys and stacks used in the process equipment field.

Defining the modular ratio as n= Es Ec Fig. 2-1. By similar triangles fs nf = c (d − kd) kd therefore k= nfc 1 = nfc + fs 1 + fs nfc ( ) The area of bolts can be expressed in terms of an equivalent ring of steel of thickness t having the same total cross-sectional area of steel as shown in Fig. Polygonal plates can be assumed to be a circular ring equal to the flat diameter of the polygon. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 20 . Denoting fc as the compressive stress in the concrete. the induced compressive stress in the steel bolts is given by fs = nfc Considering the stress to be directly proportional to the distance from the neutral axis. which is typically the case when the shell of the pole runs through the base plate. 2-2. The neutral axis is located at a distance kd from the downwind side of the bearing plate and at a distance (d – kd) from the upwind side. This assumption would only be valid if there are a sufficient number of bolts uniformly spaced around the bolt circle. a straight line may be drawn from fs to nfc as shown in Fig. The wind load and the dead weight load of the pole result in a tensile load on the upwind anchor bolts and a compressive load on the downwind anchor bolts. The method assumes that the bolt circle is in the center of the bearing plate. This assumption is valid only if the base plate can be considered rigid. 2-1 is a sketch representing the loading condition for the anchor bolts of the monopole base plate.

2. The area of this element is dA s = t s rdθ Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 21 .ts δθ tc θ α Ft d/2 r= Fc Neutral axis Ft kd l1 jd l2 zd Fig.2 Fc The location of the neutral axis from Fig. cos α = And d 2 − kd = 1 − 2k d2 α = cos−1 (1 − 2k ) A differential element of the steel ring is measured by dθ. 2-2 can be defined in terms of the angle α.

g.where r=d 2 The distance from the neutral axis to this differential element is r(cos α + cos θ ) Denoting the maximum steel stress as fs. l1. can be located by first determining the moment on the tension side and then dividing by Ft. The moment of the differential element is dM t = dFt r ( cos α + cos θ)  (cos α + cos θ )  = fs t s r  r (cos α + cos θ) dθ  1 + cos α   (cos α + cos θ )2   dθ = fs t s r  (1 + cos α )   Integrating M t = 2fs t s r 2 ∫ π α (cos α + cos θ) dθ (1 + cos α ) 2 3 1  (π−α ) cos2 α + 2 (sin α cos α ) + 2 (π−α )  = 2fs t s r2    1 + cos α   Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 22 . of the tensile force. the stress in the element is fs′ = fs The force in the element is therefore r (cos α + cos θ) r (1 + cos α ) dFt = dA s fs′ = fs t s r The total tensile force is therefore (cos α + cos θ) (1 + cos α ) π Ft = 2∫ dFt = 2fs t s r ∫ α π α (cos α + cos θ) dθ (1 + cos α )   2 = fs t s r  ((π−α ) cos α + sin α )  (1 + cos α )  = fs t s rC t where   2 C t =  ((π−α ) cos α + sin α )  (1 + cos α )  The c.

Ct and l1 are constants for a given value of k. The differential element for a compression ring of thickness tc is dA c = t c rdθ The distance from the neutral axis to this element is r (cos θ − cos α ) The maximum distance from the neutral axis is r (1 − cos α ) The element stress is directly proportional to the distance from the neutral axis fc′ = fc The compressive stress in the steel is r (cos θ − cos α ) r (1 − cos α ) ′ fsc = nfc (cos θ − cos α ) (1 − cos α ) The force is determined by multiplying by the element areas  cos θ − cos α  dFc = fc′dA c = fc t c r   dθ  1 − cos α   cos θ − cos α  ′ dFsc = nfscdA s = nfc t s r   dθ  1 − cos α  The total is therefore  cos θ − cos α  dFctot = (t c + nt s ) rfc   dθ  1 − cos α  Integrating cos θ − cos α dθ 0 1 − cos α  2 (sin α −α cos α )   Fc = (t c + nt s ) rfc    1 − cos α Fc = (t c + nt s ) rfc 2 ∫ α Fc = (t c + nt s ) rfc C c Conversely Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 23 . Values for the compression area follow a similar formulation. The width of the compression ring is defined as t c = bpl − t s .Dividing l1 = 3 1  (π−α ) cos2 α + 2 (sin α cos α ) + 2 (π−α )  Mt  = r   Ft π−α ) cos α + sin α (   The values of α.

can be located by first determining the moment on the compression side and then dividing by Fc. Defining the dimensionless ratio j as l1 + l 2 d 2 1 3 3  (π−α ) cos2 α + 2 (π−α ) + 2 sin α cos α  1  1  1  + 2  2 α − 2 sin α cos α +α cos α  =2    sin α −α cos α (π−α ) cos α + sin α   j= The distance from the neutral axis to the centerline of the pole is d cosα 2 and the distance zd is equal to zd = l 2 + The quantity.g. l2. The moment of the differential element is dM c = dFc r (cos θ − cos α ) (cos θ − cos α ) = (t c + nt s ) r fc dθ (1 − cos α ) 2 2 Integrating dθ 1 − cos α 2 3 1   2  cos α − 2 (sin α cos α ) + 2 α  = (t c + nt s ) fc r 2   1 − cos α   0 M c = (t c + nt s ) fc r 2 ∫ 2 α (cos θ − cos α ) 2 Dividing 3 1  α cos2 α − 2 (sin α cos α ) + 2 α  Mc  l2 = =r   Fc sin α −α cos α   The total distance between the forces Ft and Fc is equal to l1+l2. of the compressive force.fc = Fc (t c + nt s ) rC c Where  sin α −α cos α  Cc = 2    1 − cos α  The c. z is therefore d cos α 2 3   1 α − 2 sinα cos α +α cos2 α     z = 1  cos α +  2 2     sin α −α cos α    Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 24 .

at the outer edge of the base plate is  2kd + bpl    fcmax = fc     2kd    Where bpl is the width of the bearing plate.The values of Cc. Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 25 . j and z are constants for a given value of k. l2. The two equilibrium conditions that must be met are M wind − Pzd − Ft jd = 0 M wind − Pzd jd Ft + P − Fc = 0 Fc = Ft + P Ft = Substituting M − Pzd  fs = 2π  wind  C jdA  t s   F = t t s rC t fc = kdfs n (d − kd) The peak bearing stress.

1593) + 2 sin (1.1593))  = 1.Example 2.1593)  1 2  = .25) = 65 in 2 r= ts = 64 = 32 in 2 65 = .1593) cos (1.442  1 + cos (1.1593)   2 3  1 1.1593 rad  (sin (1.1593) cos (1.1593) cos (1.1593) + sin (1.4376×64 = 830 kips .1593 cos (1.677 2 α = cos−1 (1 − 2k ) = cos−1 (.1593) cos (1.323 in 64π tc = Assuming a trial value of k of 0.1593) cos2 (1.1593 cos (1.1593)2    2  = .1593 cos (1.781×64 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 26 .1 Analyze a grouted base plate for a 55” diameter pole that runs through the base plate.5093 C c = 2   1 − cos (1.1593) +  2  2     sin (1.1593 − 2 sin (1.4376 z = 1  cos (1.1593) − 1.1593)   Ct = 2 (π− 1. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).1593) + 2 (π− 1.1593) + 1.1593)    1 3  (π− 1.1593 cos (1.1593) − 1. n= Es 29000 = = 9.29 E c 57 3000 A s = 20 (3.1593)   1 2 Ft = 42780 − 46×.1593)    1 1.30… 73 − 55 − .1593) + sin (1. The thickness of the base plate is 2-1/4”.1593) + 1. The concrete has a strength of 3000 psi.1593) cos (1.323 = 8. The outer diameter of the base plate is 73”.1593) = 2.1593 − 3 sin (1. The bolt circle is 64” with (20) 2-1/4” bolts.4) = 1.1593) − 1.781 2   sin (1.1593 cos (1.1593)  + j =   (π− 1.

165 C c = 1. however most process equipment designers use the average stress at the bolt circle for ease of computation.8 ksi o.88 ksi .55 .442 876 = 1. 2×. 1 = .33 = 2.323) 32×1. The stress on the compression side is Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 27 .437 j = .3025×64 The maximum bending moment in the plate is actually due to a trapezoidal stress distribution.323× 32×2.78 ksi ≤ .546 k calc = .305 = .546×2×.3 + .25 = 107 kips  73 − 55   1.677 + 9.4366 z = .7 × 3×1.8 fs = 32.516 C t = 2.781 Ft = 829.55 ksi (8.305 32.92 fc = 1.88 1+ 9.92× 3.3025 2 α = 1.29×.5093 k calc = Calculate a new value for k.k.8 Fc = 875.303 k= The next loop Which is sufficiently accurate to proceed to final calculations Pbolt = fsA bolt = 32.3025×64 +    2    fcmax = = 1.Fc = 830 + 46 = 876 kips fs = fc = 830 = 32.29×1.

bt 1×2.252 The stress on the tension side is M max = Pa = 107 × fmax = 64 − 55 = 481.g.33 = 36 ksi n.546×92 M max = = = 62. 55π 2 2.g.5 in − kip 2 6× 481.25 20 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 28 .6 fmax = 2 = = 74.75× 36×1.6 2 2 in 6M 6×62.75× 36×1.in − kip fc l2 1.5 = 66 ksi ≥ .2 ksi ≥ .33 = 36 ksi n.

2. ts α1 δθ tc α θ Ft d/2 r= rc= Dc /2 ro Fc Neutral axis (d-Dc)/2 Ft jd kd zd Fig. Should the compression ring extend inside the pole and the bolt circle is not centered on the outstanding leg of the base plate or.3 Fc Lutz observed that a simple correction using two values of k would yield the correct result. Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 29 . Lutz(20) extended the theory to account for the fact that the compression ring may have a different diameter than the steel tension ring. based upon the relative stiffness of the base plate. it is deemed that the center of compression will be at or near the pole diameter. then the results will be in error.Lutz Modification One of the major assumptions in the Process Equipment Method is that the center of pressure is coincident with the steel bolt ring.

Note that when rc = r then k t = k and the results are identical to the Process Equipment Method. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 30 . with radius ro . at the outer edge of the base plate.kt = 1 − rc r r +k c 2 r 1 " jd" = ( j − 2 ) d + rc Ft = M wind − Pzd ( j − 1 ) d + rc 2 fc =   t + nt r  r C c c  c s    rc   1 2 Fc k=   1 + r       r  c s c 1+ ( f nf ) The peak bearing stress. z and j are then calculated using the value of k t . is  2kd + ro − rc   fcmax = fc        2kd The value C c is calculated using k while the values for C t .

n= Es 29000 = = 9.25 + .2773… 73 − 48 − .1362) cos (1.1362)    1 2 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 31 .1362)  2   3 1  cos (1.109)   kt = 1 − 30.1362 cos (1.323 = 12. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).2773) = 1.109 cos (1.2773 = .109))   = 1.1362)  = .447 C c = 2   1 − cos (1.25 32 30.1362) +  2 1.25) = 65 in 2 r= rc = 64 = 32 in 2 = 30.109 rad  (sin (1.4399   z=       sin (1.25 in (73 + 48) 2 2 ts = 65 = .1362 rad Ct = 2 (π− 1.1362) = 2.1362) − 1.109) − 1. The concrete has a strength of 3000 psi.2895 2 32 α1 = cos−1 (1 − 2×.177 2 α = cos−1 (1 − 2×.1362) + sin (1. The thickness of the base plate is 2-1/4”.1362) cos (1.29 E c 57 3000 A s = 20 (3.1362 − 2 sin (1.1362) + 1.2 Analyze a grouted base plate with an inner diameter of 48” and an outer diameter of 73”. The bolt circle is 64” with (20) 2-1/4” bolts.2895) = 1.1362 cos (1.4482  1 + cos (1.Example 2.323 in 64π tc = Assuming a trial value of k of 0.

277 k calc = 33.25    1 + 32      30.29×.42 + 46 = 906.97 ksi .1362) cos2 (1.4399×64 = 860.1362) + 2 (π− 1.349 1 2 Which is sufficiently accurate to proceed to final calculations Pbolt = fsA bolt = 33.1362 − 2 sin (1.2773× 32 + 36.29×1.25  = .70 ksi 2×.1362)  1 + j = 2   (π− 1.1362) + 2 sin (1.77 1+ 9.7807 − .447    30.1362) cos (1.4 kips fcmax = 1.1362) cos (1.349×2×.4482 906.5) 64 + 30.25×1.25 = 110.5 − 30.177 + 9.2773× 32 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 32 .349 ksi    12.1362) + 1.1362)   Ft = 42780 − 46×.323 32  30.42 kips (.1362) cos (1.1362) + sin (1.42 = 33.97 × 3.1362)   3  1 1.1 3  (π− 1.7807 2   sin (1.1362) − 1.42 kips fs = fc = 860.25 = 1.323× 32×2.25 Fc = 860.1362)  1 2  = .1362 cos (1.1362 cos2 (1.42 = 1.

Complete Square Base Plate – Load On Diagonal The Process Equipment Method assumes that the bolts can be idealized as a ring of steel and that the compression area can be idealized as a ring with the center of pressure at the center of the ring. 2.a. developed a method for square base plates with a circular opening which takes into account individual bolt locations. Often base plates are encountered that have as few as four bolts. q B y e=M/P n. These cases can result in significant errors when calculating pressures and bolt forces. Base plates that extend inside the pole will also have a triangular stress distribution that may differ from the assumed ring theory. Horn(21). Circular or polygonal plates can be analyzed using the Complete Circular Base Plate Method discussed in the next section. di Fig.4 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 33 .

Defining ri = di 2 y = . a condition that occurs when B4 πd4 − i 12 64 e>  πd2  . The moment of inertia divided by the moment area will then be the location of the neutral axis.707 B − e + q 29000 57 fc′ Py max qA T − Q T n= fc = A T = A1 + A2 + A c + ∑ comp (n − 1) A b + ∑ tens nA b The area of the triangular wedge is defined as A1 = y ×2 y = y2 2 Should the neutral axis (n. Bolts that are in the tension zone will have their areas transformed by A bolt = nA b Bolts within the compression zone will have their areas transformed by A bolt = (n −1) A b The method will calculate moment of inertia of the areas and the moment areas about the “e” line . two wedge areas will have to be subtracted y2 = y − .707 B B2 − i      4   The method will make use of transformed areas of the bolts. The process iterates on the value of q until it is determined to a sufficient degree of accuracy.707 B A2 = 0 if y2 ≤ 0 = −2y2 if y2 > 0 2 Should the neutral axis fall below the top of the circular opening.The method is valid when there is net tension on the section.a. the area of the semi-circle must be deducted Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 34 .) fall below the diagonal of the plate.

l > 0   0  r  2  i  The moment area is defined as Q T = Q1 + Q2 + Q c + Q bolts  y Q1 = A 1  q −       3  y  Q 2 = A 2 q − 2       3 y1c = 0 . if l < 0 = −2 (ri2 − y2 ) 0 3A c 1.5 Q c = A c (e − y1c ) j= ntens Q bolts = ∑ j=1 nA b (e − y j ) + j= ncomp ∑ j=1 (n − 1)A b (e − y j ) The moment of inertia of the areas is defined as I T = I1 + I2 + I c + I bolts 2  y2   +  q − y    I1 = A1      18  3    2  y2  y     I2 = A 2  2 +  q − 2       18  3       πr 4 y 0 I c = −  i +  8   (r 2 i −y 2 3 0 ) 2 − ri2 y 0  y    ri4 sin−1  0    r  ri2 − y2 2  i  0 2 − − A c y1c + A c (e − y1c )  4 4     A2 2 I bolts = ∑  bolt + A bolt (e − y j )   4π  q= IT QT Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 35 . − ri ) y  ri2π Ac = − + y 0 ri2 − y2 + ri2 sin −1  0  .l = ri − e + q y 0 = max (ri − l.

2. 2-5. there are “negative” areas that must be removed from the analysis. c q B y e=M/P n.a. di Fig.5 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 36 .Modification for Clipped Corners When the corners of a square base plate are clipped as shown in Fig.

707 B + c. 2c) A 4 = −y2 4 2y l4 = e − c + 4 3 Q4 = A4l4  y2  I 4 = A 4  4 + l2   4   18    y5 = 0 if y ≤ .707 B. c) A 5 = y2 5 l5 = e + y5 3 Q5 = A5l 5  y2  I5 = A 5  5 + l2   5   18    A T = A1 + A2 + A 3 + A 4 + A 5 + A c + ∑ comp (n − 1) A b + ∑ tens nA b Q T = Q1 + Q2 + Q 3 + Q 4 + Q 5 + Q c + Q bolts I T = I1 + I2 + I 3 + I 4 + I5 + I c + I bolts fc = P ( y − c) qA t − Q t Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 37 .The previous equations may be used with the addition of the following terms A 3 = −c2 l3 = q − y + 2c 3 Q3 = A 3l 3  c2  I3 = A 3  + l2   3  18    y 4 = 0 if y ≤ .707 B − c = min ( y − .707 B = min ( y − .

5”. The concrete strength is f’c=3000 psi. A36 plate.6 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 38 . The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate has a diameter of 58”. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips). The plate is 2. 58" Fig 2.3 Analyze the bolt forces on a grouted square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.a.25” thick. e= M 42780 = = 930 in P 46 q 68" y e=930" n.Example 2.

The final iteration of q yields q=911.33267.5   = 8. Calculate the bolt values as follows 8.485 Fig.68 4.0575° 4.5" 32 31. 2-7  4.The actual process requires iterating on q until a calculated value of q agrees to the fifth decimal place with the previous cycle.0575° θ = 360       64π  n= 29000 =9 57 3000 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 39 .

684 n 9 9 8 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 9 9 Abolt 3.707 ×68) = 0 A2 = 0 Calculating the deduction for the area of the hole 2 58 = 29 2 l = 29 − 930 + 911.25 3.25 3.49 Calculating the moment areas  29.33267 −      3  Q2 = 0 y1c = −2 (292 − 18.33 ri = y 0 = max (ri − l.25 Totals nAbolt 29.25 3.69 23356.61 = 887.5 27071.5 23348 28138.25 29.684 -31.22 23356.86 + 0 + 341.25 3.25 3.25 3.25 26 29.25 3.41 A1 = (29.61  2 A T = 864.85 911.25 3.26 28129.25 3.87 Q c = −318.672 ) 3 (−318.31 27071.25 29.41  = 779690 Q1 = 864.5 = 22.25 29.67 Ac = − 18.672 + 292 sin −1      29  = −318.41) = 864.25 3.25 29.61(930 − 22.25 341.69 27333.26 317672 Ibolt 25298393 25298393 20966558 27069305 25054975 25054975 25542988 25542988 20981316 20981316 27051524 27051524 295894256 Calculating the plate areas y = .684 31.31 27333.Bar # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ybolt 0 0 32 -32 4.25 26 26 29.41 − .33267 = 10.5 27202.707 ×68 − 930 + 911.25 3.87 ) = −289020 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 40 .25 29.61) 1.25 Qbolt 27202.485 4.485 31.485 -4.25 29. 29.25 − 318.67  292 π  + 18.67 292 − 18.684 -31.485 -4. − ri ) = 18.85 y2 = max (0 .33267 = 29.22 28129.

25) 46 (930 − (−32) − 911.67    294 sin −1    29   29 18.33 fbc = = 1.33267 − 3   = 702954883       I2 = 0    π294 18.33267 × 887.7 kips (tension) Pcompr = 46 (930 − 32 − 911.33267 ) 911.41 = = 2.33267 × 887.33 = 1.67 29 − 18.33267 × 887.61)(930 − 22.04 ksi 911.8 kips ( compression ) Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 41 .33267 × 887. another iteration is not necessary and we can calculate final concrete and bolt stresses.49 − 808342 Pbolt = Pbolt = P (e − y bolt − q) qA T − Q T (nA b ) (9× 3.33267 − 930 + 32 = 13.67  − − … 2 4 4    2 −(−318.33267 ) (8× 3.412  29.87 ) (292 −18. Py 46×29.33267 × 887.33 46×13.Q T = 779690 + 0 − 289020 + 317672 = 808342 Calculating the moments of inertia 2  29.33267 − 930 + 29 = 10.672 ) 3 2 2 2 I c = −262180695 I T = 702954883 + 0 − 262180695 + 295894256 = 736668444 I 736668444 q calc = T = = 911.25) 911.85   18 + 911.49 − 808342 y bc = 911.41      I1 = 864.33267 QT 808342 Therefore.67 + Ic = −   8   18.49 − 808342 Pbolt = 148.49 − 808342 y pole = 911.95 ksi qA T − Q T 911.872 + (−318.33 fcmax = fcpole = 46×10.34 ksi 911.61)22.49 − 808342 Pcompr = −34.

832 The maximum plate stress using the maximum pressure over a 4.252 2 2 As can be seen.707 ×68 − 29) + + 34.33 = 36 ksi n.707 ×68 − 29) 4.5 ksi ≥ 36 ksi n.684 n 9 9 8 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 9 9 Pbolt 54.684 -31.485 4.9763 -33.96912 147. for all of the bolts.g.96912 -33.485 31.485 -4.95 − 1.684 -31.8084 -34.6406 67.5×2.5×(2.252 M max( t ) = 148.5×2.832 147.76 41.8× 3 = 446 in − kips fbmax = 6× 446 = 117.6406 41.75× 36×1. 4. Bar # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ybolt 0 0 32 -32 4.8084 54.5” strip is then M max( c) = 4.5×1. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 42 . using the maximum stress over the plate results in an extremely high stress.684 31.485 -4.8× 3 = 1998 in − kips 2 3 6×1998 fbmax = = 526 ksi ≥ . 4. A more reasonable approach would be to modify the method to discount a portion of the plate similar to if the plate had a “clipped” corner.04)(.79381 148.04 (.Likewise.g.9763 67. This can only be achieved if the plate is extremely stiff.

Assuming that the bolt circle is at the midpoint between the pole and the clipped edge. the new value for q is 915. After iterating. Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 43 .a.Example 2. 2. 13" q 68" 35" y e=930" n. 58" 64" Fig.7 The previous equations may be modified using the clipped corner adjustments.3 to discount a portion of the plate.4 Modify Example 2. the amount to be clipped would then be 13 inches from the top of the plate.860.

14 292 − 14.94 A1 = (33.684 31.25 29.64 y2 = max (0 .25 3.25 3.684 -31.69 27333.13 ≥ 13 ∴ y4 = 0 Calculating the deduction for the area of the hole 2 58 = 29 2 l = 29 − 930 + 915.25 3.5 23348 28138.94 = 14.94 − .684 -31.68  2 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 44 .31 27071.485 -4.94) = 1151.25 Totals nAbolt 29.25 3.485 31.25 29.5 27071.94 + = 890.25 3.485 -4. 33.25 341.25 3.31 27333.5 27202.82 132   I 3 = −160  + 890.Calculate the bolt values as follows Bar # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ybolt 0 0 32 -32 4.26 317672 Ibolt 25298393 25298393 20966558 27069305 25054975 25054975 25542988 25542988 20981316 20981316 27051524 27051524 295894256 Calculating the plate areas y = . − ri ) = 14.22 28129.25 29.86 = 33.59 3 Q 3 = −169× 890.707 ×68) = 0 A2 = 0 A 3 = −132 = −169 2×13 l 3 = 915.69 23356.14 Ac = − 14.485 4.59 = −150509.707 ×68 − 33.25 3.592  = −134044230    18    .25 Qbolt 27202.25 3.25 3.86 ri = y 0 = max (ri − l.25 26 29.14  292 π  + 14.25 3.86 − 33.142 + 292 sin −1      29  = −535.25 3.86 = 14.25 26 26 29.707 ×68 − 930 + 915.25 29.25 29.25 29.26 28129.707 × B − y = .684 n 9 9 8 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 9 9 Abolt 3.22 23356.

14 29 − 14.86×789.59 = −150509.242 + (−534.14  π29  29  Ic = −  + − − … 2 4 4  8      −(−534.A T = 1151. 2 y max = y − c = 33.68) 1.86×789.14 (292 − 14.68 = 789.86 QT 722447 Therefore.86 46×14.86 − 33.24 Q c = −534.21 − 722447 y pole = 915.14   3    294 sin−1   4 2 2 2 14.142 )  29 14.21 Calculating the moment areas  33.5 = 20.82 y1c = −2 (292 − 14.94   = 1041713 Q1 = 1151.21 − 722447 fcpole = Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 45 .64 + 0 − 169 + 341.94 fcmax = Py 46×21.64      18  3    I2 = 0  132  I 3 = −169  + 890.592  = −134044230     18     14.94 − 13 = 21.94   = 702954883  I1 = 1151.68)20.25 − 534.24) I c = −442542378 I T = 942352607 + 0 − 134044230 − 442542378 + 295894257 = 661660255 I 661660255 q calc = T = = 915.94 = = 2. another iteration is not necessary and we can calculate final concrete and bolt stresses.90 ksi 915.86 − 930 + 29 = 14.86 = 1.94 + 915.142 ) 3 (−534.67 ksi qA T − Q T 915.86 −      3  Q2 = 0 Q 3 = −169× 890.64 915.25) = −486428 Q T = 1041713 + 0 − 150510 − 486428 + 317672 = 722447 Calculating the moments of inertia 2 2   33.68 (930 − 20.68)(930 − 20.

25) 915.86) (9×3.Pbolt = Pbolt = P (e − y bolt − q) qA T − Q T (nA b ) 46 (930 − (−32) − 915.90)(35 − 29) M max( c) = + + 35.11848 -171.8 kips (tension) Pcompr = 46 (930 − 32 − 915.5×2.5” strip is then 4.21 − 722447 Pcompr = −35.6568 59.3585 -69.86×789.5×1.86×789.21 − 722447 Pbolt = 171.645 -170.75× 36×1.485 4.25) 915.07247 58.684 31.g.4 in − kips 2 3 6× 303.33 = 36 ksi n.5×(2.67 − 1. for all of the bolts.6568 -52.96 kips ( compression ) Likewise. Bar # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ybolt 0 0 32 -32 4.86) (8× 3.8× 3 = 515 in − kips fbmax = 6×515 = 135.485 -4.90 (35 − 29) 4.07247 -170.96× 3 = 303.9 ksi ≥ .684 -31.9551 -69.645 The maximum plate stress using the maximum pressure over a 4. 4.6 ksi ≥ 36 ksi n.5×2.485 31.g.252 2 2 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 46 .485 -4.9551 -35.684 -31. 4.4 fbmax = = 79.822 -35.684 n 9 9 8 9 9 9 9 9 8 8 9 9 Pbolt -52.3585 58.252 M max(t ) = 171.

Complete Square Base Plate – Load Parallel
The Process Equipment Method assumes that the bolts can be idealized as a ring of steel and that the compression area can be idealized as a ring with the center of pressure at the center of the ring. Often base plates are encountered that have as few as four bolts. These cases can result in significant error when calculating pressures and bolt forces. Base plates that extend inside the pole will also have a triangular stress distribution that may differ from the assumed ring theory. Horn(21), developed a method for square base plates with a circular opening which takes into account individual bolt locations. Square plates with clipped corners or polygonal plates can be analyzed using the Complete Circular Base Plate Method discussed in the next section.

B q y e=M/P

di

Fig. 2-8

The method is valid when there is net tension on the section, a condition that occurs when

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases

Grouted Base Plates • 47

B4 πdi4 − e > 12 64 2  B  2 πdi    B −    2 4 
The method will make use of transformed areas of the bolts. Bolts that are in the tension zone will have their areas transformed by

A bolt = nA b
Bolts within the compression zone will have their areas transformed by

A bolt = (n −1) A b
The method will calculate moment of inertia of the areas and the moment areas about the “e” line. The moment of inertia divided by the moment area will then be the location of the neutral axis. The process iterates on the value of q until it is determined to a sufficient degree of accuracy. Defining

ri =

di 2 y = . 5B − e + q 29000 57 fc′ Py max qA T − Q T

n= fc =

A T = A1 + A c + ∑ comp (n − 1) A b + ∑ tens nA b
The area of the rectangle is defined as

A1 = yB
Should the neutral axis fall below the top of the circular opening, the area of the semi-circle must be deducted

l = ri − e + q y 0 = max (ri − l, − ri ) Ac = −
The moment area is defined as

y  ri2π    + y 0 ri2 − y2 + ri2 sin −1  0  , l > 0 0 r  2  i  Q T = Q1 + Q c + Q bolts

Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases

Grouted Base Plates • 48

 y   Q1 = A 1  q −     2
y1c = 0 , if l < 0 = −2 (ri2 − y2 ) 0 3A c
1.5

Q c = A c (e − y1c )
j= ntens

Q bolts =


j=1

nA b (e − y j ) +

j= ncomp


j=1

(n − 1)A b (e − y j )

The moment of inertia of the areas is defined as

I T = I1 + I c + I bolts

 By 3 y I1 = + A 1 q −       12 3
   πr 4 y 0 I c = −  i +  8  

2

(r

2 i

−y

2 3 0

)

2

ri2 y 0

 y  ri4 sin−1  0      r  ri2 − y2 2  i  0 2 −  − A c y1c + A c (e − y1c ) 4 4   

 A2 2 I bolts = ∑  bolt + A bolt (e − y j )   4π  q= IT QT

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases

Grouted Base Plates • 49

The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate has a diameter of 58”. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).5”. e= M 42780 = = 930 in P 46 68" q y 930" 58" Fig.4 Analyze the bolt forces on a grouted square base plate loaded parallel to the edge and a bolt circle of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4. The concrete strength is f’c=3000 psi.Example 2.2-9 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 50 .

0575° θ = 360       64π  n= 29000 =9 57 3000 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 51 .23" Fig.The actual process requires iterating on q until a calculated value of q agrees to the fifth decimal place with the value from the previous cycle.63" 19. Calculate the bolt values as follows 25. 2-10  4.5   = 8.58" 22. The final iteration of q yields q=911.6964.

02 21567106 27764.25 331.25 3.25 29.43 26544558 23680.3  + 18.6964 −      2  y1c = −2 (292 − 18.25 26 26 29.25 3.70   = 964727 Q1 = 1067.58 -25.58 -25.02 21567106 23680.32 ) 3 (−334.62 21406382 23591.66 Q c = −334.25 29.88 (930 − 22.23 19.6964 = 10.3 Ac = −   29 π   18.72 26709212 23591.63 22.36 911.98 Calculating the moment areas  15.25 Totals nAbolt 26 26 29.5 = 22.88) 1.70 A1 = 68×15.34 + 331.36 Calculating the deduction for the area of the hole 58 = 29 2 l = 29 − 930 + 911.98 26355418 27764.62 21406382 27864.92 21267418 23514.25 3.58 25.5 − 334.25 3.5 Qbolt Ibolt 23514.63 -22.32 + 292 sin−1    29  = −334.88 = 1063.Bar # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ybolt 25.3 292 − 18.25 26 26 29.25 3.25 3. − ri ) = 18.98 26355418 308733 287.6964 = 15.23 -19.25 3.43 26544558 27864.25 3.66) = −303848 Q T = 962727 − 303848 + 308733 = 969612 Calculating the moments of inertia Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 52 .25 3.88  2 2 A T = 1067.700.25 3.70 = 1067.72 26709212 27950.92 21267418 27950.23 n 8 8 9 9 8 8 9 9 8 8 9 9 Abolt 3.63 19.23 -19.63 -22.5×68 − 930 + 911.7 ri = y 0 = max (ri − l.25 29.58 22.186 Calculating the plate areas y = .25 3.

63 -22. 2 2 fcmax = Py 46×15.32 )  29 18.23 -19.23 19.6964×1063.66) I c = −275697158 I T = 871988756 − 275697158 + 287700186 = 883991774 I 883991774 q calc = T = = 911.472 133.75 ksi qA T − Q T 911.7 = = 1.6964 QT 969612 Therefore.88)(930 − 22.472 -2.36 911.6964) 911.7   = 871988746 + 1067.7 3 15.091 -12.98 − 969612 Pbolt = 143.58 22.58 25.98 − 969612 Pbolt = P (e − y bolt − q) qA T − Q T (nA b ) (9× 3.1 kips Likewise.88)22.685071 122.63 19.685071 -2.3  π29  29  Ic = −  + − − … 2 4 4  8      −(−334.58) − 911.25) Pbolt = 46 (930 − (−25.386 122.23 -19.53961 133.386 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 53 . another iteration is not necessary and we can calculate final concrete and bolt stresses.6964 − I1 =      12 2   18.3 (292 − 18.08987 -21.63 -22.53961 -12. 68 ×15.23 n 8 8 9 9 8 8 9 9 8 8 9 9 Pbolt -21.6964 ×1063.091 143.662 + (−334.63 22.58 -25.3 29 − 18.58 -25.08987 143.3   3   294 sin−1   4 2 2 2  18. the other bolt forces are Bar # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 ybolt 25.

This assumption was valid for larger diameter pole with a relatively large number of bolts. developed a method for circular or polygonal base plates with a circular opening which takes into account individual bolt locations. Often base plates are encountered that have as few as four bolts. Horn(21). These cases can result in significant error when calculating pressures and bolt forces. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 54 . Square plates using the Complete Base Plate Method were discussed in the last two sections. Base plates that extend inside the pole will also have a triangular stress distribution that may differ from the assumed ring theory.Complete Circular Base Plate Method The Process Equipment Method assumes that the bolts can be idealized as a ring of steel and that the compression area can be idealized as a ring with the center of pressure at the center of the ring.

y q e=M/P di B Fig.2-11 The method is valid when there is net tension on the section. a condition that occurs when (B4 − di4 ) e> 8 B ( B 2 − d2 ) i The method will make use of transformed areas of the bolts. Bolts that are in the tension zone will have their areas transformed by A bolt = nA b Bolts within the compression zone will have their areas transformed by A bolt = (n −1) A b Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 55 .

− ri ) Ac = − The moment area is defined as y  ri2π + y c ri2 − y2 + ri2 sin−1  c  . Defining ri = di 2 y = .The method will calculate moment of inertia of the areas and the moment areas about the “e” line. l > 0   c  r  2  i  Q T = Q1 + Q c + Q bolts y1 = 2 (r 2 − y 2 ) 0 3A c 1. The moment of inertia divided by the moment area will then be the location of the neutral axis.5 Q1 = A1 (e − y1 ) Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 56 . the area of the semi-circle must be deducted l = ri − e + q y c = max (ri − l. 5B − e + q 29000 57 fc′ Py max qA T − Q T n= fc = A T = A1 + A c + ∑ comp (n − 1) A b + ∑ tens nA b The area of the outer circle is defined as B 2 l0 = r − e + q r= y0 = r − l 0 A1 = y  r2π − y 0 r2 − y2 − r2 sin−1  0    0 r   2 Should the neutral axis fall below the top of the circular opening. The process iterates on the value of q until it is determined to a sufficient degree of accuracy.

y1c = 0 . if l < 0 = −2 (ri2 − y2 ) c 3A c 1.5 Q c = A c (e − y1c ) j= ntens Q bolts = ∑ j=1 nA b (e − y j ) + j= ncomp ∑ j=1 (n − 1)A b (e − y j ) The moment of inertia of the areas is defined as I T = I1 + I c + I bolts   4 y  πr 0 + I1 =   8      4 y  πri + c Ic = −   8    y    r2 sin −1  0    r  r −y 2   2 −  − A1 y1 + A1 (e − y1 )  4 4   2 2 0 (r2 − y20 ) 2 3 − r y0 2 (ri2 − y ) 2 2 3 c − ri2 y c  y    ri4 sin−1  c      ri2 − y2 2  ri   c 2 −  − A c y1c + A c (e − y1c ) 4 4     A2 2 I bolts = ∑  bolt + A bolt (e − y j )   4π  q= IT QT Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 57 .

5 Re-analyze Example 2.Example 2.18446. 2-12 The actual process requires iterating on q until a calculated value of q agrees to the fourth decimal place with the value from the previous cycle.29 E c 57 3000 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 58 . n= Es 29000 = = 9. The final iteration of q yields q=916.2 using the Complete Method. e= M 42780 = = 930 in P 46 y q e=M/P 48" 64" 73" Fig.

25 3.51 27850633.37 24236.45 503989684 Bar # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ybolt 0.434 -32.29 9.25 3.809 -25.809 9.1925 30.5 − 22.1925 30.9425 26.25 3.5 2 y = l 0 = 36.29 9.47 28079.82 36.82 13.02 24549.889 18.889 0.25 3.58 28646.000 9.29 8.000 -9.889 -30.78 26113565.76 24359.29 9.78 22369575.5  = 1108.1925 30.18446 = 10.82  242 π  Ac = − + 13.29 8.29 8.889 18.25 3.1925 26.58 541015.822 + 242 sin −1      24  = −280.25 3.03 28377.9425 26.809 -9.29 9.29 9.5 − 930 + 916.25 3.66 28646.76 27780.25 3.29 9.822 − 36.90 29045.29 9.29 8.9425 30.434 -25.25 3.64 22023329.1925 30.9425 26.68 = 13.1925 581.889 30.68 y 0 = 36.45 27180531.19 28997.52 − 13.25 3.64 21726597.35 26671839.79 26671839.1925 30.9425 26.35 27587651.79 25561196.1925 30.18446 = 22.82  36.29 9.29 9.34  2 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 59 .25 3.93 27587651.56 24194.25 3.92 28860.29 9.25 Totals The area of the outer circle is calculated as 73 = 36.Calculate the bolt values as follows θ= 360 = 18° 20 y bolt = r × sin ( j×θ) Abolt nAbolt 30.45 27850633.29 8.52 π  − 13.25 3.25 3.92 28377.1925 30.29 9.82 242 − 13.90 28860.1 Qbolt 28079.56 24359.1925 30.889 n 9.29 3.1925 30.9425 26.44 22369575.889 -18.05 22023329.03 27780.889 -18.93 27941540.1925 30.54 21802449.29 8.809 25.82 r= A1 =  13.52 sin−1      36.35 Ibolt 26113565.05 25561196.45 27180531.434 25.29 8.25 3.29 9.1925 30.66 28997.434 32.25 3.79  2 The inner circle is next calculated l = 24 − 930 + 916.18 .9425 26.000 30.18 y c = max (24 − 10.44 21802449.000 -30.25 3.02 24236. − 24) = 13.25 3.47 24549.25 3.

82 36.34)17.18) 3 2 2 2 I1 = 911810020  13.82    2 2 3  244 sin−1   4 2 2 2  24  13.A T = 1108.97 Q c = −280.79)(930 − 23.1 − 280.82    36.55 − 1290806 y bc = 64 − 930 + 916.5 = 17.82 (24 − 13.34)(930 − 17.55 − 1290806 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 60 .18 Q1 = 1108.54 sin−1    36. another iteration is not necessary and we can calculate final concrete and bolt stresses.34 = 1409.82 )  24 13.79 + 581.5 = 23.18446 QT 1290806 Therefore.822 ) 3 (−280.182 + (1108.97 ) = −255674 Q T = 1005464 + 541015 − 255674 = 1290806 Calculating the moments of inertia    π36.52 −13.54 13.5   36.5 13.82 24 − 13.79) 1.18446 = 18.68 = = 1.82  − − … 2 4 4    2 −(1108.18446×1409.79)23. 2 fcmax = Py 46×22.18 = = 1.822 ) 3 (1108.82  π24  Ic = −  + − − … 2 4 4  8      −(−280.52 − 13.972 + (−280.34 (930 − 17.18 2 Py 46×18.34) 1.822 ) 13.79 (930 − 23.73 ksi qA T − Q T 916.97 ) I c = −233183299 I T = 911810020 + 503898968 − 233183299 = 1182616405 I 1182616405 q calc = T = = 916.39 fbc = qA t − Q t 916.82 I1 =  +  8   (36.18) = 1005464 yc = −2 (242 − 13.18446×1409.55 Calculating the moment areas y1 = 2 (36.5 − 13.

29 9.Pbolt = Pbolt = P (e − y bolt − q) qA T − Q T (nA b ) (9×3.65 -75.39 ksi.18446×1409.22 -54.19 37.809 -25.27 -9.29 9.29 8.41 34.29 9.18446) 916.434 -32.27 24.63 -102.434 32.889 0.29 9. 1.000 -9.19 24.29 Pbolt -31.29 9.29 9.434 -25.889 -18.2 compare as follows: 1.02 -105.889 -18. 1.55 − 1290806 Pbolt = −105.29 9.889 30.54 -102.65 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 61 .29 9.4 kips vs.85 -54.809 9.85 -9. Likewise. 105.000 30.6 kips The values from the Lutz Modification Example 2.29 9.889 18.889 n 9.54 -75.29 8.70 ksi vs.29 8.000 9.29 8.434 25. 1.809 -9.84 10.22 -91.809 25. and 110.73 ksi.25) 46 (930 − (−32) − 916.29 8.349 ksi vs.6 kips.29 9.29 9. the other bolt forces may be calculated Bar # 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 ybolt 0.29 9.000 -30.889 -30.29 8.02 -91.889 18.05 -31.84 34.29 8.05 10.

73 − 1.16 916.16  9.11×(1.11 20 58 − 930 + 916.2 ksi ≤ 50 ksi o.8 in − kips 2 6×506.11×2. 9.93 ksi ≥ .18446×1409.k.g.33 = 50 ksi n.75×50×1.8 in − kips 2 6× 316.The maximum plate stress with a pole diameter of 58”. is then beff = y= π×58 = 9.252 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Grouted Base Plates • 62 .11×2.8 fmax = = 65.55 − 1290806 2 2  73 − 58   73 − 58    9.16)    2       2  M max = + +… 2 3 64 − 58 37.11×1. 9.252 64 − 58 M max = 105.18 2 46×15.6× = 316.41× = 506.18446 = 15. using 50 ksi grade plate.18 fpole = = 1.8 fmax = = 41.

Grouting of the plate can lead to corrosion problems if means are not provided to allow for drainage of condensation that can develop within the pole. The determination of bolt forces in ungrouted base plates is straightforward. Some manufacturers have specific warranty disclaimers if the pole is grouted.Ungrouted Base Plates Determining Bolt Forces Most monopoles built today do not have grouted base plates. Once grouted. The maximum bolt force is determined by Fmax = P My max + n I Where n is the number of bolts and ymax and I are calculated as illustrated in the following examples. the pole can no longer be adjusted for any out-of-plumb condition since the leveling nuts will be encased within the grout. The bolt group should be symmetrical about both axes and the bolts should be the same size. Square base plates usually have the bolt clustered in four groups located along the diagonals of the plate. Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 63 .

43 25.88 Fig 3.1 Analyze the bolt forces on a polygonal base plate with a bolt circle of 64” and (20) 2-1/4” bolts. 32 30.89 18.8 9.Example 3. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).1 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 64 .

39 kips 20 10240 2 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 65 .99 kips. − 131.n = 20 y max = 32 I = ∑ y2 = ∑ (r sin (θ )) 1 20 2 θ= 360 = 18° 20 2 2 2 I = 2× 322 + 2× 02 + 4 ×(32 sin (18)) + 4 ×(32 sin (36)) + 4 ×(32 sin (54)) + 4 ×(32 sin (72)) I = 10240 Fmax = 46 42780× 32 ± = +135.

5" 32 31.0575° 4. 3.Example 3.5   θ = 360      64π  = 8.2  4. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 inkips).2 Analyze the bolt forces on a square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.68 4.485 Fig.5”.0575°  Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 66 . 8.

− 219.9425)) I = 6144 46 42780× 32 Fmax = ± = +226.0 kips 12 6144 2 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 67 .0575)) + 4×(32 sin (81.6 kips.n = 12 y max = 32 I = ∑ y2 = ∑ (r sin (θ)) 1 2 12 2 I = 2× 322 + 2× 02 + 4×(32 sin (8.

3. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).Example 3. 25.58" 22.3 Analyze the bolt forces on a square base plate loaded parallel to the edge and a bolt circle of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5”.23" Fig.0575°  Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 68 .63" 19.3  4.5   θ = 360      64π  = 8.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 69 . The shear resisted by the bolts will then be Fv = 2V n When the base plate is solid (without a central hole).n = 12 y max = 25. the plate would be sufficiently rigid to equally distribute the shear to all of the bolts. The TIA Standard has no requirement for this condition. AASHTO requires bending to be considered whenever the clear distance is greater than one bolt diameter. A flexible base plate will therefore have shearing forces distributed primarily to the two side regions at the equator. 3-4). However.0575)) I = 6144 46 42780×25. The ASCE Manual 72 recommends that bending be considered whenever the distance is greater than two bolt diameters. The bolt is considered to be bent in reverse curvature.58 I = ∑ y2 = ∑ (r sin (θ )) 1 2 2 12 2 I = 4×(32 sin (45 − 8. The bending stress would then be fb = 16cFv πd3 b where c is the clear distance (see Fig. Determining Bolt Shear Shearing stresses in the pole are a maximum at the equator of the pole. When threads extend well into the clear space. the root diameter of the threaded portion should be used for db.3 kips 12 6144 2 As can be seen from these two examples.58 Fmax = ± = +182 kips. Fv = Bending Stresses In Bolts V n Bolts in ungrouted base plates may be subjected to bending stresses when the clear distance below the leveling nut is excessive.0575)) + 4×(32 sin (45)) + 4×(32 sin (45 + 8. − 174. the maximum bolt force is always determined from the loading along the diagonal for a square base plate.

4 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Ungrouted Base Plates • 70 .c db Fig 3.

and simply supported continuously at the anchor bolt circle. The moment would be equal to the M = F ×d where F is the force and d is the distance from the force to the face of the pole. guided at the pole but free to displace vertically. The unit load. The stress in the plate would then be f= 6M Beff t2 To determine if this is realistic.1b states that the maximum moment in the ring will be M = wa L9 C8 2  b 1 C 8 = 1 + υ + (1 − υ)     a  2  L9 =     2    ro 1 + υ a 1 − υ   ro    ln + 1 −          a 2 ro 4   a      where “a” is the radius of the outside of the ring and “b” is the radius of the inside of the ring (outside radius of the pole). The methods for determining the base plate bending stresses. are not so uniformly accepted. however. Roarke(25) Table 24. “w” is taken Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 71 . Effective Width Based Upon Plate Theory Traditionally. most methods have used the peak bolt force or maximum concrete stress in determining a cantilever moment on an effective width of plate at the pole to determine the plate stress by simple beam theory. Poisson’s ratio can be taken as 0.30 for steel.Determining Plate Stresses Introduction The methods of determining bolt forces and concrete stresses presented in the previous chapters are commonly used by all designers. consider a circular ring.

86 .03 36 30 .893 .367 1. OC is the outside diameter of the plate and D is the pole diameter across the flats.15 32 27. The maximum bending stress is therefore fb = where t is the thickness of the plate. Process Equipment Methods A base plate without stiffeners is assumed to behave as a cantilever beam.75Fy.787 .85 9 1.833 . while industrial engineers designing stacks usually limit the stress to . The allowable bending stress (AISC) would be limited to .908 .as one and the position of the load.143 5. 6M press t2 = 3fcd2 t2 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 72 . The maximum bending moment in grouted base plates on the compression side is calculated per unit circumferential length (b=1 in) in the base plate as d= OD − D 2 f d2 M press = c 2 where we use fc as the average uniform pressure on the cantilevered plate.2576 7.6Fy. it leads us to conclude that the classical method of using a circumferential strip for determining plate stress should be reasonably accurate for plates that have a uniform spacing of anchor bolts in a circular pattern. is taken as “b” to simulate the load coming from the pole.124 11. “ro”.77 6 1. Note that this condition is for an axial load without moment.04 Although this may be a crude comparison.625 .94 4.5 . but it will give us some indication for the correct value of effective width. Monopole Examples a b b/a C8 L9 M d=a-b Beff=d/M 24 15 .

45 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 73 . Both the compression and tension sides of the base plate should be checked. BC is the bolt circle diameter. The unit maximum bending moment in all base plates on the tension side and ungrouted base plates on the compression side is d= BC − D 2 Tdn M bolt = πD where we use T is the maximum bolt force on the cantilevered plate. and n is the number of bolts. the moment would be a combination of the concrete pressure and the contribution of the bolts in compression. D is the pole diameter across the flats. Sometimes a 45 degree angle limitation is used(13) when there are a limited number of bolts (bolt spacing is greater than twice the distance to the pole).When using any of the Complete Methods.

e= M 42780 = = 930 in P 46 68" 29. The thickness of the pole is .1 Analyze the bolt forces on an ungrouted square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5" 58" Fig 4.Example 4. The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate has a diameter of 58”.25” thick.5”.1 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 74 . The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips).500” and the plate is 2.

485 Fig.5   = 8. 4-2  4.0575° θ = 360       64π  Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 75 .0575° 4.5" 32 31.Calculate the bolt values as follows 8.68 4.

68 − 29.5) + 2 (224.33 fb = 6×1544.88 2 If the effective width is limited to a 45 degree angle from the bolts (AISC approach).33×2.4)(31.68     46 42780× 31.0 kips 12 6144 y1 = 32 P1 = 226.485 + 2 (31.n = 12 y max = 32 I = ∑ y2 = ∑ (r sin (θ)) 1 2 12 2 I = 2× 322 + 2× 02 + 4×(32 sin (8.9425)) I = 6144 46 42780× 32 Pmax = ± = +226. − 219.68 − 29.88 = 137.6 kips y2 = 31.5) = 1544.6 kips.5) = 13.0575)) + 4×(32 sin (81.252 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 76 . beff = 2× 4.68  = 224.4 kips P2 =  +   12   6144 M = 226.4 ksi 13.6 (32 − 29.

123fcb2 0. tabulates the bending moments for this case.124fcb2 -0. taken from Timoshenko(26).319fcl2 -0. note that when l/b is equal to or less than 1. The gusset will impart a bending stress on the wall of the pole.125fcb2 -0.43ah 2  1 Rt   + (4ah 2 ) 3       Rt       Determining Plate Stresses • 77 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases . Also.0558fcb2 0. The following table. Some designers will assume a tee-beam with a portion of the base plate acting along with the vertical plate gusset. the loading condition on the section of the plate between the two gussets may be considered to act like a rectangular uniformly loaded plate with two opposite edges simply supported by the gussets. b 0 . that the equations reduces back to the cantilever equation.0293fcb2 0. the maximum bending moment occurs at the middle of the free edge.0972fcb2 0.125fcb2 ∞ In this table.125fcb2 -0. b=gusset spacing (x direction) and l=base plate outside radius minus the pole radius (y-direction).333 . the gusset acts as a vertical plate only.666 1 1.5 2 3 x = b   2  Mx      y=    0 0.031   +   1. and the fourth and outer edge free. fbpole wall = M gusset t2      1. If l/b is greater then 1. The stress in the plate is fb = 6M max t2 bp The gusset is usually designed to resist the entire shear force as a cantilever beam.500fcll2 -0.0078fcb2 0. the third edge joined to the pole. which can be estimated from the work of Bijilaard(22). the maximum bending moment occurs at the junction with the pole because of cantilever action.5. Note that when l/b=0 (no gussets or gusset spacing is very large).133fcb2 0.Base Plates With Gussets When gussets are used to stiffen the base plate.119fcl2 -0.131fcb2 0.227fcl2 -0.5. Most process design texts design the gusset by ignoring any contribution of the base plate itself.428fcl2 -0.500 .32Z .133fcb2 x = b   2  My      y=0    -0.

177 am  m  + 1.where Z= 1.0      Rt  t    t = thickness of pole wall a = 2 (t gusset + t ) R = radius of pole wall h = height of gusset m = thickness of base plate Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 78 .0   2  .

This assumes that the bolt is considered capable of resisting such a moment. 2 Alternate Method 2 This method is identical to the Process Equipment Method with following modifications. BC. d is taken from the edge of the nut to the fillet weld d = D flat + D tip 2 . 2 3. D is taken to be the average diameter of the polygonal pole D = 2. BC − D − d nut − tw . D is taken to be the average diameter of the polygonal pole D = 2. 2 Alternate Method 3 This method is identical to the Process Equipment Method with following modifications. 1. Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 79 . BC − D − d nut − tw . 1. An equivalent procedure would be to adjust the bolt circle.Alternate Method 1 This method is identical to the Process Equipment Method with the following modifications. d is taken from the edge of the bolt rather than from the bolt circle d = BC − D − d b . D is taken to be the average diameter of the polygonal pole D = D flat + D tip 2 . 1. 2. The plate is considered to be bent in double curvature such that the moment is one-half that of a cantilevered plate. d is taken from the edge of the nut to the fillet weld d = D flat + D tip 2 . to a point midway between the bolt and the average diameter of the pole.

a. goes across the entire plate as shown in Fig. 4-3. y d Fig 4. which takes a slicing plane across the entire width of the base plate. The net moment at any slice is then the sum of the moments due to the forces outside of the cutting plane minus the moment due to stresses in the pole when the slice occurs within the Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 80 . beff. beff B 1 2 3 4 n. Should a slice occur near a bolt hole.Method of Slices The method evolved from the AISC method (see Introduction).3 The method requires that a number of slicing planes be taken between the bolt circle and the neutral axis. the width of the hole(s) is deducted from the effective plate width. The method ignores the tension side distribution shown in Fig 1-3 and assumes that the effective width resisting bending moment.

y < y i fb = 6M beff t2 The moment due to the pole shell stresses be calculated as follows r= d 2  y α = cos−1     r   Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 81 . y y=B/2 y=d /2 beff beff y=d/2 y=n.414B − 2y − 2  − y d −  − y   2 2     M = ∑ Pbolt ×( y bolt − y) + ∫ fi ×( y − y i ) . y y=. = 1. a point that may or may not be the most critical slice.a.414B − 2 y 2 d  d      = 1. y < y i fb = 6M beff t2 At any location from the center of a polygonal or circular plate. y beff beff y=d/2 y=n.a.a. y < y i fb = 6M beff t2 Parallel loading usually does not control in this method since the bolts are usually below the y location of the face of the pole. At any location from the center of a square plate for loading on the diameter.707 B y=d/2 beff beff y=d/2 y=n. At any location from the center of a square plate for loading parallel.diameter of the pole. B  B  = 2  − y B −  − y     y=d /2   2    2  y=B/2 2 2 B  B  = 2  − y B −  − y − 2       2    2  d     − y  d −  d − y       2    2  2 M = ∑ Pbolt ×( y bolt − y) + ∫ fi ×( y − y i ) . =B 2 d  d  = B − 2  − y  d −  − y       2    2  M = ∑ Pbolt ×( y bolt − y) + ∫ fi ×( y − y i ) . Most designers who use this method usually only take a slice at the face of the monopole.

2Mtr2 α (cos θ − cos α ) dθ (cos θ − cos α ) dθ + ∫0 S ∫0 1 − cos α 2 3 2Ptr2 2Mtr2  α cos α − 2 (sin α cos α ) + 1 α  2 = (sin α −α cos α ) +  A S  sin α −α cos α  2Ptr2 M pole = A α 2 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 82 .

2 Analyze the bolt forces on an ungrouted square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4.5”.4 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 83 . e= M 42780 = = 930 in P 46 68" 1 2 23.25” thick.Example 4. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips). The thickness of the pole is .5" 58" Fig 4.2" 29.500” and the plate is 2. The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate has a diameter of 58”.

Slice 2 is at . Calculate the bolt values as follows 8.485 Fig.0575°  Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 84 .5   θ = 360      64π  = 8.68 4.4-5  4.Slice 1 occurs at the outside face of the pole.8 times the diameter of the pole (AISC critical location).5" 32 31.0575° 4.

414 ×68 − 2×29. − 219.68  46 42780× 31.414 ×68 − 2×23.4 kips P1b =  +      12  6144 beff 1 = 1.28 ksi 37. calculating the stress on slice 2 y2 = .68 − 29.5) = 1544.5 − 23.88 = 49.5 − 23.0575)) + 4×(32 sin (81.3 2 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 85 .88 in 2 64 39311 = 1333 S= 29.252 2 This compares to 130.a.2  23.8 ksi using the Process Equipment Method.55 " y n.5) + 2 (224.80d = 23.152 M1 = 226.6 (32 − 29.n = 12 y max = 32 I = ∑ y2 = ∑ (r sin (θ)) 1 2 12 2 I = 2× 322 + 2× 02 + 4×(32 sin (8.0 kips Pmax = ± 12 6144 46×6144 = .2) 59 − (29.2) = 13.2 − 2 (29.68   = 224.5  = . Next.6 kips.5 = 37.9425)) I = 6144 46 42780× 32 = +226.665  A= I= π (592 − 582 ) 4 4 π (59 − 58 4 ) = 91. = 12× 42780 y1a = 32 P1a = 226.88 f1 = 6×1544.2   α = cos−1      29.4)(31.152×2.5 = 39311 in 4 beff = 1.6 kips y1b = 31.

2) + 2 (224.52 M pole = (sin (.665    1333 sin (.665 cos (.665) − 2 (sin (.73 ksi 13.665)) + … 91.52  .665) cos (.4)(31.6 (32 − 23.2× 46×.665) − .665 cos (.665)   M pole = 41 + 4495 = 4535 M 2 = 226.5×29.5×29.252 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 86 .665)) + 2 .665) − .88 2 3 1 2× 42780×.2) − 4535 = 1265 f2 = 6×1265 = 112.3×2.68 − 23.665 cos (.

Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 87 . Boulos Method (New York Dept. Results showed that plates designed by the manufacturers’ current (1993) methods of design were not adequate to carry the design loads. it will provide educational background into the problem of determining stresses in base plates. This method is only applicable to square base plates. Boulos et al determined that both the parallel load and diagonal load cases resulted in three critical zones of stress. of Transportation) As can be seen from Examples 4. there is a wide discrepancy between stresses calculated by the Process Equipment Method (used by industrial engineers for stacks) and those calculated by the Method of Slices (used by a number of pole manufacturers). each one at the narrowest part of the plate (0 degrees and 90 degrees). The report proposed a new design method for the base plate. The support base plate and anchor bolts were found to be deficient components. The diagonal case had a single zone at the narrowest part of the plate (45 degrees to the diagonal).1 and 4. Alternate Method 2 – Circular Base Plates This alternate uses one slice at the face of the pole and uses 90% of beff. the method may not be totally applicable to larger diameter pole used for telecommunication purposes.Alternate Method 1 – Square Base Plates This alternate uses one slice at the face of the pole and limits the value of beff to no greater than the diameter of the pole. especially if the slice location is limited to the face of the pole.2. Since the testing was done on smaller ungrouted base plates commonly used for traffic poles having only four bolts. but the pole’s post was adequately designed. A research project was undertaken in 1993 at the New York State Department of Transportation Engineering Research and Development Bureau and sponsored by the Federal Highway Administration(5). however. The project performed full-scale testing and finite element analysis of traffic signal poles (square poles with four anchor bolts) to evaluate their structural adequacy. FEA models of the signal poles that verified the test results were then used to evaluate a representative sample of poles from three major suppliers. Results of testing and analysis of four poles indicated that they were structurally inadequate. The parallel case had two zones.

6 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 88 .Fig. 4.

7 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 89 .Fig. 4.

Fig.Diagonal Loading Case The method proposed by Boulos et al calculates the maximum bending stress as BC − DB 2 6M × d fb = α (1.097 Typically.45 ≤ α ≤ . Upon careful examination of this equation.8 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 90 .503  4. the value of α is . L is the width of the plate and DB is the diameter of the pole. 2    DB  BC DB    −…   − 4. it can be seen that this is identical to the method of slices with a correction term for the effective width. BC is the bolt circle diameter.304 + 4.02021       L  T L   /C α =  α     L − .304 − 0.9750 − 1. α.707 BC BC  0.686       L − DB L Cα = 1.75 . 4.414L − DB)× BC × T 2 d= Where M/BC is the bolt force.

65       BC BC C β = 1. Boulos constructed a mathematical model which assumed that the plate spanned between the two bolts with fixed ends. fb = 3M  DB    βt (L − DB)    L′  2 2 4  DB 1 − DB         1 1− L′   L ′    − + 4  3 12     L ′ = max (.9 Torsional Shear Stress at Midpoint of Side The side of the plate has one bolt in compression and the other in tension.707 BC. 4.080 Typically.3 DB − 48. In fact. This results in a torsional stress that is calculated as Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 91 . The loading was then assumed to be a triangular load acting between the bolts.4 − 21.33 BC − 259.6        L    DB T L DB L − DB   /C β =  β     T DB  127.Parallel Loading Case Bending Stress The maximum bending stress was found to occur midway between the bolts as the point of maximum pole stress pushes down analogous to a triangular load at midspan spanning between the two bolts. the value of β is 0.5 ≤ β ≤ 1. Fig.5 .6 − 21. D) 2    DB  LT 157.85 L − .13  + …   + 194.

246 0.5 2.0 2. Fig.0 4.333 ∞ 2   210 − 66.2 BC − DB + 381 BC       L − DB L 1.291 0.3  DB  −…           L    DB T L   /C γ =  γ      48.fv = M 2 ( γC ′bT 2 ) b = min (.208 0.0 5. DB) b/t 1.9 BC − .1719 BC − DB − 714.5 3.707BC.219 0.3 .10 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 92 .094 Typically.312 0.2 1.414B − DB C γ = 1.282 0.0 1.0 10.8 DB + 358.231 0.0 C’ 0. the value for γ is 1. 4.3 ≤ γ ≤ 2.258 0.267 0.16 L − .707 BC − 288.

However it is reasonable to assume that.40 of the full slice width at the face of the pole for poles with four bolts. Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 93 .5 ≤ ≤ 0.0 ≤ These ranges are usually exceeded for telecommunication poles and the corresponding values will be < 0. Therefore. the effective width would increase above this value.95 ≤ ≤ 1. it may be prudent to impose an upper limit on the effective width equal to . as the number of bolts increases.75 L BC 0. thus suggesting that the lower bounds should be used.05 L 8.The method is valid for square base plates within the following ranges BC ≤ 16.5 T DB 0.

. the effective width is beff = b′′ = . Fig.707 t2  b′ − a  =     6 6  4 Comparing to the Method of Slices. extended the Boulos method to accommodate grouted base plates. 4. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 94 .Owens Method (New York Dept. The stress at the yield line is calculated as follows M by = T × rby S x = b′′ × fby = M by Sx  t2 . He incorporated yet another check using yield line theory. of Transportation) Owens(6.7) et.823B − . al.707d Which is about 40-45% of the full diagonal width at the face of the pole for common telecommunication poles.11 The research confirmed the Boulos findings that base plates previously designed by manufacturers were deficient.

a line parallel to the pole face and another line tangential to the corner of the polygon. Telecommunication poles can be oriented at any Tan ge ntia l Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 95 to cor ne r . See Fig. 4-11). The tangential to corner situation is only applicable to power line transmission poles where the forces are primarily parallel and perpendicular to the transmission lines. The ASCE method checks two bend lines on each facet of the polygon.11 The bending moment on the bend line is then the sum of the bolt forces outside of the bend line times the distance of the bolt from the bend line (c1 and c2 in Fig. The bend line for a circular pole is tangent to the pole.ASCE Manual 72 (Proposed 2003 Revision) ASCE Manual 72(27) contains a base plate design section which uses the Method of Slices with the 45 degree limitation discussed in the Process Equipment section. 4-11. Beff c2 c1 Parallel to bend line 45 Fig. 4.

5" 58" Fig 4.500” and the plate is 2. The the parallel case would be the worst case scenario for this situation. Example 4.3 Analyze the bolt forces on an ungrouted square base plate loaded on the diagonal and a bolt circle of 64” and (12) 2-1/4” bolts spaced at 4. The vertical load is 46 kips and the moment is 3565 kip-ft (42780 in-kips). The thickness of the pole is . The plate is 68” square and the inside of the base plate has a diameter of 58”.possible angle to the wind and therefore the pole would be assumed to be oriented such that the bolts and the polygonal faces are in the worst possible condition with the resultant moment in only one direction. e= M 42780 = = 930 in P 46 13.12 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 96 .5”.33" 68" 29.25” thick.

Calculate the bolt values as follows 8.4-5  4.5" 32 31.485 Fig.0575° θ = 360       64π  Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 97 .68 4.0575° 4.5   = 8.

6 (32 − 29.4 kips P1b =  +     12   6144 beff1 = 2× 4.5) = 1544.9425)) I = 6144 46 42780× 32 Pmax = ± = +226.n = 12 y max = 32 I = ∑ y2 = ∑ (r sin (θ)) 1 2 12 2 I = 2× 322 + 2× 02 + 4×(32 sin (8.68   = 224. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Determining Plate Stresses • 98 .33 in M1 = 226.33×2. − 219.5) = 13.68  46 42780× 31.2).485 + 2×(31.68 − 29.6 kips.252 2 This compares to 49.0 kips 12 6144 y1a = 32 P1a = 226.5) + 2 (224.6 kips y1b = 31.4 ksi 13.0575)) + 4×(32 sin (81.88 f1 = 6×1544.28 ksi using the Method of Slices (Example 4.68 − 29.88 = 137.4)(31.

The most commonly used grades are listed below. 140 (over 2 ½”) 125. #18J bars) A687 A36 A572 Gr 50 A572 Gr 42 A588 F1554 Gr 36 F1554 Gr 55 F1554 Gr 105 Tensile Strength. When the grade permits welding. the nut is usually tack-welded to the bolt to insure that the nut does not Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 99 .Anchor Bolts Material Grades Over the years. a wide variety of bolt grades have been used for pole base plates. ksi 60 105 150. 115 (over 2 ½”) 90 150 100 150 58 65 60 70 58 75 125 The current standard has anchor bolts unified under ASTM F1554 . The standard method detail is to provide a threaded portion at the bottom of the anchor bolt and attach a nut or nut with washer. Hooked anchor bolts have fallen into disfavor as tests have shown that local crushing occurs at the bend point leading to a reduction in pullout capacity. Only grades 36 and 55 permit welding. ASTM Designation A307 A325 (SAE Gr 5 similar) A354 Gr BD A354 Gr BC A449 A490 (SAE Gr 8 similar) A618 Gr 75 (Anchor bolt grade.

000 aCategories Allowable Tensile Stress.000 100. in cases of high seismic/wind situations fatigue may be a consideration. High strength grades usually do not permit welding and a second “jam” nut is often provided.000 to 2. Prying forces in anchor bolts are typically neglected.000 to 100. However.000. Fatigue is often ignored in the selection and sizing of anchor bolts.000 500. The number of anchor bolts required is a function of the maximum net uplift on the column and the allowable tensile load for the grade chosen.000 to 500. Number of Cyclesa 20. The following table shows some recommended values for bolt fatigue stresses.000 Over 2.000. ksi 40 25 15 10 correspond to AISC Appendix K Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 100 .loosen or fall off.

When an anchor bolt is designed to lap with reinforcement. To achieve this. The provisions in both of these appendices are based upon the Concrete Capacity Design (CCD) Method. the required embedment (top of concrete to top of nut) would be h ef = 1.8. To insure ducitlity for breakout.25 φA se Fy thereby insuring that the steel would yield prior to concrete rupture.5 When the anchor is solely resisted by concrete. Adhesive anchors and grouted anchors are not covered by these appendices.9 as given in ACI 318-02 Chapter 9. one needs to have the concrete designed with additional capacity in order to insure ductility of the connection. In the CCD method the concrete cone is considered to be formed at a slope of 1 in 1.5 rather than the older 45 degree assumption. ( ) Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 101 . A se is the tensile stress area of the anchor bolt and φ = . Appendix D of ACI 318-02 (ACI 2002) and Appendix B of ACI 349-01 both address the anchoring to concrete of cast-in-place anchors.3. ACI 318 presented a new method for determining anchor bolt capacities. The distance “g” as shown in Fig. Section 15. 5-1 is the distance from the centerline of the anchor bolt to the centerline of the nearest reinforcing bar. the anchor capacity can be taken as φA se Fy since the lap splice will insure that ductile behavior will occur. outline a procedure to insure this ductility requirement.3l d + g + top cover 1. Lutz proposed that the concrete must reach a capacity of 1. Lutz-Fisher(23).3 of ACI 318-02 requires that anchor bolts reach their design strength before anchorage failure or failure of the surrounding concrete (ductile failure) yet no code section is provided to state how this is to be accomplished. The cone is considered to have a square shape in plan rather than the classical round shape to simplify calculations. Using a Class B splice. there must be sufficient lap length (with a standard hook on the reinforcing bars if required) to adequately develop the capacity. anchorage of bolts was based upon approximate methods using pull-out “cones” as developed in AISC(12) and PCI(24).Anchorage Prior to publication of ACI 318-02. as it would be for pullout and side-face blowout.

5.5 hef Potential failure plane g Fig.2 Development of bar for concrete breakout Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 102 .3ld 1 1.Hooked bars if required 1.

Example 4.90×2×1. The anchor bolt capacity is Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 103 .0×60 = 108 o.k.1 An anchor bolt has a factored (USD) bolt tension of 50 kips. The basic development length of a #9 bar with 3 inches clear is 37 inches (straight bar). 3 inches clear from the edge of the pier and the concrete strength is 3500 psi.90× nA b × Fy = . There are 24-#9 Gr 60 reinforcing bars bundled in groups of 2. There are 8 anchor bolts and the anchor bolts are 10 inches from the edge of a 60 inch diameter concrete pier and the bolts are 1-1/4” F1554 Gr 55. 9" 10" 60" 3" Fig 5-2 Check tension capacity of 2-#9 bars φPcap = .

252     A brg = π   = 2. side-face blowout would not need to be checked if ties are provided in the region at the anchor bolt nut location such that the ties would cross the failure plane.9×.236   4   φN pn = .5 1.969×55 = 60 Using a nut diameter of 2.969×75 = 54.4 h ef . The side-face blowout strength is  s  φN sbg = .5 1.1”. the pullout strength is kips bolt φN pn = φψ 4 N p = .12 − 1.4) A brg (8fc′)  2.k.75 1 + o 160c A brg fc′     6c    18. An assumption could be made that the bearing would be equivalent to a washer which would have an outside diameter of two times the bolt diameter.85  160×10 2. say 5 ' 1. = .25 (φA se Fy ) = 1.236× 8× 3.3l d = 48 in h ef ≥ 1.5 kips ≥ 60 o.k. Since c ≤ . Side-Face Blowout The side clearance.3l d + Pullout To insure ductility for pull-out and side-face blowout.5 = 61 kips ≥ 60 o.φN s = .75×A se × Fut = . Often the anchor bolts are held together with a ½” setting plate ring.4×2. This would increase the bearing area but might not be fully effective since the plate would bend during pullout. l d = 37 in 1. the concrete strength must be greater than g 9 + cov er = 48 + + 3 = 57 in.25× 0.70 (1.75×. is 10”. c . Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Anchor Bolts • 104 .5 kips Breakout Ductility for breakout will be insured by lapping the bolt with the reinforcing bars. side-face blowout must be checked.70×1.75 1 +      6×10  Normally.236× 3500 = 139.

The distance from the bolt circle to the outside edge of the plate should be limited to the distance from the pole face to the bolt circle.Recommendations Determining Base Plate Forces Grouted Base Plates All of the methods presented yield approximately the same results. 2. The method should only be used for square base plates whenever the effective width of plate at the face of the pole is multiplied by an adjustment factor . which can only be approximated as circular using the Process Equipment or Lutz Methods. the Complete Method should be modified to obtain a more reasonable distribution of plate stresses considering that the plate is not infinitely rigid. that are comparable to those Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Recommendations • 105 . The Process Equipment Method of considering the plate as a simple cantilever from the center of the bolt circle to the face of the pole is still the simplest method for circular or polygonal plates and yields results for square base plates. The plate hole opening diameter should be taken as no less than the inner diameter of the pole minus the distance from the pole face to the adjusted outside edge of the plate. The following two modifications should be made: 1. the Complete Methods are more accurate when there are a limited number of bolts. Therefore. The Complete Methods also have specific methods for square base plates. Ungrouted Base Plates The method of calculating bolt forces using the section modulus of the bolt group is the only method currently being used. Determining Base Plate Stresses The Method of Slices without any adjustment to the effective width was proven inaccurate by the work of Boulos and Owens. However.40 for four bolt base plates and would increase for poles with more than four bolts. when using the 45 degree rule. The factor would be approximately 0.

The ASCE Manual 72 (Proposed) Method is identical to the aforementioned Process Equipment Method using the 45 degree rule. There was no evidence in the research that would support the assumptions in any of the Alternate Methods although they may have some validity. Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Recommendations • 106 . The Process Equipment Method (45 degree rule)/ASCE Manual 72 Method is therefore recommended using the parallel bend line and the worst case positioning of pole facets and bolts.obtained by using the Boulos method when using a lower bound of .40 on effective width.

A better detail for larger diameter poles is to extend the plate inside the pole and to use a full penetration weld as shown below.75-100% of Load Bottom Weld Resists 25% of Load gap Must build out weld to achieve proper root thickness This detail subjects the weld to a constant state of stress. A covering fillet(s) may be added to prevent water collection at the base plate. Typical Fillet Weld Top Weld Resists . This requires that the fillet welds be built-up in order to maintain the proper root thickness. The poles are circular and extend through the plate as shown below.Construction Details The majority of poles manufactured today are small diameter poles used for traffic control purposes. Larger diameter polygonal poles may have manufacturing tolerances such that a “gap” may occur during fit-up. Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Recommendations • 107 .

Steel Structures. Column Base Plates with Axial Loads and Moments. Frank Owens. 9. New York State Department of Transportation. McGuire. 15.Bibliography References 1. Research Report 159. Boulos. Guide Specifications for Design of Metal Flagpoles. New Procedure For Design of End Plates and Base Plates of Cantilevered Traffic Support Structures. Process Equipment Design. Luminaires and Traffic Signals. Steel Structures. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC). Osman Hag-Elsafi. Metal Flagpole Manual. Concrete Plain and Reinforced. Blodgett. and Frank Owens. and Alampalli. Column Base Plates. May 1986. Design of Welded Structures. Research Report 131. American Association of State Highway Transportation Offices (AASHTO). 2. 6. DeWolf. Osman HagElsafi. October 2001. Lincoln Arc Welding. Thambiratnam. Taylor. Sreenivas Alampalli. November 1980. 12. 1957. ASCE Journal of Structural Engineering. ASCE Journal of Structural Engineering. And Design of Steel Traffic-Signal Pole. and Smulski. Design of Steel Transmission Pole Structures. 14. 7. 13. 10. Sreenivas. New York State Department of Transportation. Brownell and Young . Manual 72. Design of Steel Structures. Salmon and Johnson. The National Association of Architectural Metal Manufacturers (NAAMM). Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Bibliography • 108 . 3. ASCE Journal of Structural Engineering. Fu. 11. Base Plates Under Axial Loads and Moments. 16. Gaylord and Gaylord. 1925. A Simplified Design Procedure For End-Plates and Base-Plates Of Cantilevered Traffic Structures. 5. Thompson. 4. Steel Design Guide Series 1. Load Testing. The National Association of Architectural Metal Manufacturers (NAAMM). Design and Behavior. Finite Element Analysis. 8. Standard Specifications for Structural Supports for Highway Signs.

Bijilaard. Prestressed Concrete Design Handbook. Tubular Steel Structures. 24. 25. Design of Plate Structures – Volume 2. Megyesy. 23. Lincoln Arc Welding 1990. Computerized Structural Design. Presressed Concrete Institute (PCI). 19. Guide for Design of Steel Transmission Pole Structures. Bednard . 2004. 2004. 22. Internal Memorandum. American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). Leroy Lutz. Formulas for Stress and Strain. American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC). Theory and Design. ASCE Manual 72. 27. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Bibliography • 109 . Pressure Vessel Handbook. 2004. 26. Lutz-Fisher. Internal Memorandum.17. 20. Dr. Roofs to Column Anchorage. Daniel Horn. 1991. Timoshenko. Pressure Vessel Handbook. Theory of Plates and Shells. Troitsky . Roarke. 21. Computerized Structural Design. Steel Design Guide Series #7. 18. Industrial Buildings.

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12. Monopole A stepped or tapered steel pole. Base Plate A steel plate that transmit forces from a column to the foundation. NAAMM National Association of Architectural Metal Manufacturers.16. Poles can be round or polygonal (8. PCI Prestressed Concrete Institute. ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers.Glossary of Terms AASHTO American Association of State Highway Transportation Officials. AISI American Iron and Steel Institute. or 18 sides). Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Glossary of Terms • 111 . AISC American Institute of Steel Construction.

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3 17 Example 2.2 31 Example 2.2 87 Example 4.3 69 Example 4.Circular Base Plates 91 Alternate Method 3 87 Anchorage 104 ASCE 111 ASCE Manual 72 (Proposed 2003 Revision) 99 B Base Plate 111 Base Plates With Gussets 79 Bending Stress 95 Bending Stresses In Bolts 71 Boulos Method (New York Dept.Load On Diagonal 33 Complete Square Base Plate .4 47.1 9 Example 1.3 38 Example 2.1 68 Example 3.5 63 Example 3.Determining Bolt Forces 66 Determining Bolt Shear 71 Diagonal Loading Case 91 Index E Effective Width Based Upon Plate Theory 74 Example 1. of Transportation) 91 Breakout 105 C Complete Circular Base Plate Method 63 Complete Square Base Plate .2 69 Example 3.Square Base Plates 90 Alternate Method 2 83 Alternate Method 2 .3 101 F Flexible Base Plate 8 G Grouted Base Plates 107 H Historical Perspective 2 I Introduction 72 L Lutz Modification 29 M Material Grades 104 Method of Slices 87 Modification for Clipped Corners 36 Monopole 111 A AASHTO 111 AISC 111 AISC Method For Building Columns 7 AISI 111 Alternate Method 1 80 Alternate Method 1 .Load Parallel 50 D Determining Base Plate Forces 105 Determining Base Plate Stresses 108 Technical Manual 1 Design of Monopole Bases Index • 113 . 104 Example 4.1 79.1 26 Example 2.2 14 Example 1. 58 Example 2.

N NAAMM 111 O Organization 1 Owens Method (New York Dept. of Transportation) 99 P Parallel Loading Case 94 PCI 111 Process Equipment Design Method 19 Process Equipment Methods 77 Pullout 105 S Side-Face Blowout 105 Stiff Plate Approach 12 T Technical Manual 1-1 43 Technical Manual 1-2 54 Technical Manual 1-3 79 Torsional Shear Stress at Midpoint of Side 96 U Ungrouted Base Plates 108 Technical Manual 1 – Design of Monopole Bases Index • 114 .

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