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2009 Fine Woodworking (June)

2009 Fine Woodworking (June)

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TAUNTON'S

ine
or inJ-\
VI Ma"Sline TBP NEW TOOLS 2009
Woo jW( rkmR'* BEST MEW TOOLS 2008
Fine fAVORITE RIVING KNIfE SYSTEM, roOtS AND SHOPS 2009
THE WORLD'S ONLY
UNISAW
RE-INVENTED.
The UNISAW
OII
that changed everything is about to do It again.
Completely redesigned, it 's packed with industry firsts. like the
effortless removal and adjustability of the blade guard. Or the
adjustable "IDol-free" two-position rivi ng knife system thai works
for both through and non-through cuts. There's even an
Bi -Level Dust Extraction" design that allows dust collection from
the blade and cabinet. Plus the UNISAW· is made in the USA of
foreign and domestic components. So checkout the next generation
UNISAW and watch the video at deltaportercable.com/unisaw
PreCISion control$ ,I
,our IrnCtltios.
', •• a
OU-PltU trunnlun.
RF.ADF.' Sf'RVIr.F. NO. n
Conuienee in I
" ell·dnl, ned d,awer.
fIne


up front
6 On the Web
8 Contributors
10 Letters
14
MEnlODS
OFWORI(
14 Methods of Work
Adjustable-height worktable on wheels
Easy dri ll-press fence
Rotating tower stores more hardware
20 Tools & Materials
Plunge-cut saw makes straight.
clean cuts
Compact dust coilector is powerful
and efficient
28 Fundamentals
Miter-gauge basics
MAY/ JUNE 2009 • ISSUE 205
features
32 Build a Bow-Arm Morris Chair
46
Uiroination puts heautiful grain and a graceful curve
within arm's reach
BY GREGORY PAOLINI
14 Bench Vises
A head-to-head look at tht! tool everyone needs
BY MATT KENNEY
Dust-Proof Any Tablesaw
EndoSt; tlte saw, direCI. dust, and you'll dear the air
BY RrCHARD BABBITT
52 Torture Test for Outdoor Finishes
We sent five types around the c()unlrV and found
one bvorite
BY TOM BEGNAL
57 The Ins and Outs of Drawer Stops
Four clever ways to keep :3 drawer in its place
BY PETER TURNER
62 Tape: Unsung Hero of the Shop
These 4 rolls help YOli cut deanl y, layout dearly,
and damp securely
BY ADRIAN FERRAZZUTTI
67 Low-Cost Lumber
With ]2 gre:H choices, you're bound to find a few near you
BY MATT KENNEY
72 End Grain Up
Uring butcher's block out of (he kitchen with and
tips
BY MARK KOONS
www.fmewoodworking.com
in the back
80 Readers Gallery
84 Q &A
Best brush for shellac
Round benchdogs are more versatile
than square ones
Working with warped panels
88 Master Class
The magic of hot·plpe bending
98 How They Did It
The back cover explained
Back Cover
$34 VS. $3.400
67
lOW.cOST
WOODS
THIS MONTH ON FineWoodworklng.com/extras
Visit oor Web site to access free Web lie-ins, 8'lallable April.1S. While you're there, don'l ml55 the collection
01 totally free content, Includi ng tool reviews, an project gallery, and must-read blogs.
Free Plans In Your Inbox
Get free plans. vld&os. and articles In the
FlrHI Woodworking eLetter. It's dell¥ered to
your Inool almO$t eYtny week of tile year
and " chock-fllil 01 _ntla1 tips. Go to
FlneWoodworklng.com to I l,n up.
online exclusives:
ARTICLE
Finish Recipe; Arts and Crafts Look
Without Harsh Chemical s
Gregory Paolln! ("Build 11 Bow-Arm Morris Chair")
mlmk:s the look of 11 tradltlonal Stickley fInish wittlout
fuming tha piece using industrial ammonia.
VIDEO
Hot.pipe Steam-Bending
Watch Michael Fortune (Master Class) demonstrate an
easy way to bend wOOd u!llnlil a shopma41e device.
GALLERY
Share Your Work to Win a Prize
Join one 01 our monthly gallery chall enges by posting
photos of your work lor a chance lit great prizes. David
Mathias 01 Dublin. Ohio, shared photos of his Gamble
House ""try table and .o'",o,ho,,,''''''''' o, , "" ..
exposed-Joinery challenge.
PHOTO: DAVID MATHIAS
Become II member to access more than 30 yean 01 Fine Woodworking content. VIew more than 500
lechnlque videos. browse l.,4O()..plus articles and project pions. and read the current issue Of1llroe,
iii D
Build a Morris Chair
Read the article In this Issue. and then watch the
vlcIe<t work!.l1op to see how Gregory Paolini builds
this re(;lIner. waring eXpeI't l ips lind tricks IIlong the
wey. It·s our l irst eYer woodworking project published
simultaneously 11'1 print and on video.
Foolproof Brushing Techniques
Don't reach IOf a rag Ihe next lime you need \0 apply
a IInl5h. Grab II bru5h !nslelld. and use Peler G&drys'
stralghtlorward methods 10 tl'rold drips and sags.
Quick Tip: Edge-Jointing
With a Router
senior edllor Thomas McMenna shows a jolnler-I ree
ww, 10 lei an abSOlulely straight. 5qllare edge on a
board. Ifs Ihe perlect technique lor panel glue-tJps.
6 rlNE WOODWOIIK1NG
Fine
WqqQ\Vorking-
Edilor M.a CIlrlsllana
....rt Directar Mlt hM I PflkQ\lkfl
Managing Edila' Mark Stholield
senior EdilOf Thorntos
Associate Editors Thomas G. Begnal
Ste'l'e Soon
Ankla KaPMIH
OiW!d Helm
Matttl"'" Kenrooy
A!lSOClat& EdltOf.
","'00 Gi na £ide
senior CfJJ,)f/
Production E(Ii1Of$ fJizabetll Healy
JUlie Rlllnit
Assoclmll Art Directors Kt'11y J, DunlQn
John Tetreault
S!'IOp Menager Robert Nash
.l.dministrative ASSistant Belfy Engel
Cootrll)uU"l[ Editors Ch'b Uen Bec ...
Gary Roc:owsld
0"" .. 1\ Hllck
ROland Jonn!oCl n
Lena
Consultirc Editor Jonalhlln Blnl<!fl
Methods of Work J;m Rio;hoy
uecut i'<e Edilor,
Books'" Video Helen ... , .... rt
FIM PSSN: 03E1·3453) II publio./led
b.mofllt\ly. WltII a special s.e.erAA ISSUe ,., till WIIII&r. D7
TrMlliIunton PrOHs.lnc .. _CI'Ml. CT 064706506.
Telepf')O(le 71 . PerioCIoc.!! ll postap paid at
Nev.10'1'00" . CT 06470.., 10\ ...xt,ijo .... .,. ""'ilin!! ofIio;u,
fXtit! regiotr&tKln .123210981.
s...t.o:r1pt1on R_, uS wJ(! C<i....oa. fur one
-.cur, $59.95 to. two $83,95for 1ti<M.-' (io
U.S. doIlarf.. plene). c.nadIIIn OI<tslOe
U.S ana C/tMaa, $41.95 (0( 0118 _. $73.95lortMI
$104.95 (0( nun )Il'IIfS (io plelllle).
Si"lOC «>Il\'. $7.99, copies outside till U,S, IVICJ
P<l<""I,"&iOtl$. $8.99.
Poot ...... Ser'ld aOCI,eas CllafliBS tQ Fw.. 1'\\)oa.ro,ld'li.
The n.",non p'I:".rnc" 63 S. Maio 51 .. PO BOo:
Ne-wwwn. C1'
c....t. Poet: Reu.n c.........., &<k\I,,$Ses
to C/o WOr1<Iw'idoe Maiters. Inc"
2835 Kew Or","" Wrnd!lO<. 00 N8T 387. '" .. 10
n,nIMl>t""nton.com.
Printed In 1he UIA
The L..i:!QUn<l CYClone CM>t CoIIec.tors
offer the benefits of a cyclone combined
wittlltte trlQhest- CJJaIitytilters In the inrustry. The Cyclone
dust separation unit is 99.7 "" efficient This means dust pcrtic:1es do not pass
ttYough 0Uf high elllclency fan unit. Rado frequency remote control
and automatic titer cleaning ilfe just some ot our telltlxes.
VIsit us at ww.y.IagLWlirtools.com or I)'ve us a cal
f or more details.
contributors
.. " " " 1
While working as a stockbroker in California, Richard Babbitt
( "Dust-Proof Any Tables8W") earned his pt1vate pilot's license with
multl-englne, Instrument and commercial ratings.. This In turn Nad
to an exciting 27.year career selling private and corporate planes
for Beech Aircraft. An avid woodworker, he used hIs knowledge of
aerodynamics to solve the problem on tablesaws.
Gregory Paolini (-Build a Bow-Arm Morris Chat"') spent the
last year designing and building a new woodworklng studio In the
mountains of western North Carolina, with 8 lot of help from his
wife, Ramona. He is 8 tull-tlme furniture and cabillSt maker, a
frequent contributor to FWW, and occasionally teaChes wood'Wori<lng
classes. His portfolio Is online at www.paollnlctafters.com.
Mark Koons ('End Grain Up·) was Introduced to the Japanese
woodworking tradltlon in 1966, when staffing an Army
hospital in Japan for casualties of the Vietnam War. Later, he spent
time as an Ironworker In Wyoming, where he would finally heed
his call to woodworking. Koons. who also teaches the craft (www.
markkoons.com), lives With his wife. Mary Ann, In Wheatland, Wyo.
When Adrian Femuzutti ("Tape: Unsung Hero of the SIIop0) moved
from a tiny basement shop in his house to a 4,()()O.sq.-ft. shared
workspace, he found that he was iOSing too much time walking lIClOSS
the shop to make a single cut or pick up a tool. So he brought in his
skateboard and now zips around. Ferrazzutti teaches woodworking at
the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship in Maine and Rosewood Studio
in Ottawa.
I
a reader written mallllz!ne To
For more nl0lm3t!On on our col1trtbutors
F W
.. learn hOW to propose an l"llc!e '0 to
,0 to Int! oodworklng com (l ulnOrS
F neWood"orkrng com ioubmissions
8 !'iN!' WOOOWOHK 1NG
P.milsher Anatole BUlldn
Sr. MarketonC Manaeer Mo!IIsI.D Robinson
4dmlnl!ltnlttve ,,"IS{lInt Cl'lristll'lll Glenoon
Ad'vertJstrc Director PIli ... BaOtoal
203-3Q4.3B72

Olrector ot
Advertisirc Markftm,
203-304.37&7

Sr. Natlooal
Account Mallllger .t..hlMllt
203.l{)4.l&l1l
!.bbe!; ........ ton.DOM
Assoel8te Al:COUlt
Mafllller Klmbert,o .......
,.".,...,,'"

Sr.4d S&ies


M.tert.$'''' Inqulrie&:
.....,..,..

--
6 :=" Bur.,.u of Cileulalion
Sr. Consumer
Marllel lOi Director Belli Reynold .. ProCItC
Cirwlatlon Mall¥f Noell. GardoI, f'foCIn;
Buslne:!oS MlIIl8£efS D;wId Pond.
Megan s.nr:ste.
The 'BlUnton Press
h,'pi..,,,,,, ........... ...
p..t)I;sI>er& 1975
& .Lan A ........
Su:r.anlle Roman
EW a. CFO llrnothV Rahl
SV?Ope.-atlOOJ Tho", "
Svp'CreatiYe & Edltooal SUWlll Edel man
SVP.led't1lOtoO Rrt Hoo.tIcy
SVP &. GrGo,lp PI.tIIishef l'IIuI Sprina:
S';1' & PuDlisher •
...........
SVP, Ad¥ortisong Sales Karl Ellie"
SVP" Group Publisher Ja"' ... Saolpille
VP. Human Resources CIoroi Mal rottl
vp"ControIIer
--
VP. Fulftllment PatrIe .. WiMlIMMOn
VP,FlMroce KIIlhy Worth
VI:' Taunton tntertlCtlve J..-. Rawon
VP, Sif'lile COpy sales .a.y Anll is
fAlIlIPl!nn. -...-__ ......
f'..e . ffte _i"LfII:
It.r_ . f' ..... ...... CoaI<lrw.
-...IOounI"".e_
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letters
• 1 1 1 A
Spotlight
ISSUE NO. 204
Mareh/ Aprtl2009
p. 57
TAKE THE GLOVES OFF
""10_""
---
---
--- ....... "" .. -
.... -"' ...
-_.

---
---
..... _-
.... _v.. .
.......... _ ...
,.... .... -
As a woodworker of many years' experience who stili has both hands and all of
his fingers, i winced at a recent picture showing a loosely gloved hand only Inches
from a spinning tablesaw blade.
I have heard many horror stories of mutilations of hands, fingers. and twe"
forearms resuttlng from g,loved hands being caught by spinning sawblades, drill
bits, shaper spindles, and jOinter blades. Our perception, and therefore our margin
for safety, ends at the ends of our fingers and not at the end of a glove.
-WI LLIAM SLOAN , cabinetmaker. Ann Arbor, Miell.
It is against the law In some states to wear gloves while operating rotating
equipment The glove Is easily grabbed and pulled Into the blade, Including the
fingers Inside, creating a severe safety hazard risk to the operator. We had an
experienced carpenter lose an index finger due to just such a n exposure.
Thin-kerf blades continued
In (he recent anide -r1\ II\-Kerf Blades Are
tOr (FW1V #2(4), the amhor left
out another Significant henefit: Since the
blade is 28% thinner, it should produce
28% less S<lwdust tl mn a standard hlade.
This is reason enough for mc to
-CRAIG REICHERT. Moose Jaw,
Sask., Canada
I have uS<.-'"tI thin-kl:rf blades tOr year.>
with great success ;(Ind no complaints
about accumly. BUI it is important to
remind people that they will need to
purchase a riving knife or !.pl.itter that is
the .;ame thkkOl..:ss as the blade. When I
switched over to thinner hlades, I had a
narrow escape when a board Sluck to the
sundard-kerf riving knife th<lt Clme wit h
my saw. manufacturers nov.' offer
riving knifes and sphttt:n; to match various
blade kerfs.
- TI M POOR, Woodbury, Mlnn.
10 FINE woonWONKING
- JEFF GILSTRAP, contractor. Collinsville, Okla.
Threat to black walnut trees
I am <l professor of entomology at
Colomdo State University, where we
have dL'lCOVered a new inse<.1-canied
fungus called Thousand Canken;, which
an extreme threat to hlack walnut
in Nonh America. Currently we think the
. ..e is restricted to the western United
States, when' it like it will kill all
black \\--alnurs within a dtx.-aJc or so; in
some arC".t. ... , most of the trees have
already died.
It would be devastating if SOIn<..""One
were to move a walnut log that contains
-walnut-twig beetles into areas where
bla<:k w.tlnul is native (much of tht:
eastern half of the United States).
No walnut lOW; with iY.drk intact should
he moved eastward. Kiln-dried lXlards are
thought to be: .-;afc, however. FOr more
information, go to: www.L-xt.colostate
.edu/puhs/in'>eCt/0812_alen.pdf.
- WHITNEY CRANSHAW, Colorado State University
Advice for woulO-be wood stackers
There is another bene fit of
and dl)'ing your own timber nm listeo>d
in your ankle ("DI)' Your OV>'fi Lllmix:r,-
FWW "2(4), and that is access (0 specialty
lumber such :l.'i very wide hoards, thiCk
'i1<1bs, crotchwcxx.l, ho:X>k-matched OOarcb,
turning blank." and more.
Over the past 10 years [ h<1vC air-dried
over 25,000 board feet, using the high-
quality lumber to make the Him, floor,
dams, and cabinetry for my house.
The article outlines exacdy how J stack
lumher except for one step. I sticker one
additional layer of framing lumher on top
of the pile, and then add rows of dmler
blocks, centenng them over The stICkers.
'Ihe extra weight keeps the board..; on the
top of the pile flat as they dl)'. On woods
that are especially prone to movement
while they dry, such as poplar, hk'kary,
and sycamore, I tend 10 add a solid layer
of cinder blocks.
I then cover the pile as described in the
article. I have had tremendous success
with this approach.
-TODD SMITH. Fai rfiel d, Va.
'1·)11;" i:J'
What got you started
in woodworking?
28%
24%
13%
10%
7%
5%
3%
11%
A relati ve
Secondary-school
shop classes
TV show
Economic
necessity
Magazi nes
A friend
Woodworking school
Other
In our eletter. we poll readers on new
questiOfis eac h month. Sign up for the
free newsletter at FineWoodworking. com.
Fine
Wo.QQWorking
To contact us:
r",. Woodworxing
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Copyright 2009 by The Taunton Press. Inc.
No reproauctlon without permission Of
n e Taunton Prau. Inc,
Fast
Bring your dust
colleetor's strength
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Connecr lO ;my
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MAY/)UNE 200<) 11
Off to a fast start
I recently rctin:u from II 26-ye-.u Clln:er in
go-kart racing, and Marted wOC>Cl.working
as a hobby. I accumulated some tooL .. ,
but I really needed a workbench. A
Google search led me to your free site

with the three-part video on building
a workbtnch. nil; were very
straightforward and easy to understand.
I printed out the plan and bought the
vise, dogs, hold-downs, dowei-centering
pins, and an as..o;ortment of damps from
OUf 10000.d woodworking 1>torc. I bought the
lumht!r, MDF, threaded rod, and screws
from a local home I huil t my
bench over the weekend and it
turned Ollt great.
- ERIC ERICKSON, Rogers, Minn.
About your safety
Correction ."
In "lIl us(l":ltro Guide to Drawers" (FWW#20-!, p. 41),
the drawing of a frame being f'J.bbeted along
inside &Ige implies that the router is moving
in a counter clockwise dirL"(.1:ion. which
would be a climb cut. 111e safer way to
make this cut would be in the other
di1\:clion, ;ts shown here.
BACK lEG
BOnOM
FRONT LEG
BOnOM
T
<l1li Clarlflcation
In "Huild a Bow-Front Hall Table-
1'1. in.

(F\V'W .K2.(4), we failed to label the
tapc:r on the It!"gs. See dmwing at k-ft
for the footprint<; of the legs.
Working wood is Inherently dangerous. Using hand or power tools I (or elsewhere) until you're certain they are safe for you. If something
Improperly or ignoring standard safety practices can lead to permanent about an operation doesn't feel right, find another w"Cfj. We want you
Injury or even death. Don't perform operations you learn about here to enjoy the craft, so please keep safet)' foremost In your mi nd.
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0 UCflol .... _....,foo'1I_.:
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' 31lf1$ • __

MAY/Jl.'NE 1009 13
methods of work ED I TED AND DRAWN BY JIM RI CHEY
II :l .. 01 1
Graduations
risers make It easy W
level the t op.
2x4 top
Base maoe
from >,<...10.·
thick MDF
bolt
connects top to
riser. \
.,.-
Top of base
removed for clarity
2x2 corner
blocks
Wheel axle
store wheel
Best Tip Adjustable-height
Bob BelleY1l1e
has been building
furniture for more
than 50 years, But
boards trum his
lumber stack al so
hOJlle been turned
Into wooden cars,
clocks, and Men
computers,
worktable on wheels
After several years and many projects, I'm still finding
new uses for this 'WOrktable. TIle latticework top,
made from 2x4s and assembled wlth biscuits, is a
versa tilt: aid for glue-ups and as.<;L"IIlbly work, and it
can he raised or lowered as needed. I l)'pically lower
it for a..o.....emhling cabineL" and raise it to save my back
for detail work, like cleaning up dovetails.
1be top can be adjustt:o frum 24 in. to 38 in. tall
via four risers that fit through openings in the top
of the base cabinet and. piyv.'ood
blocks lock and unlock the risers. Each knob has
a t.':I.ptive )18-in. nut that connect.<; to a holt
threaded through the block and riser slot. A glued-in
dowel prevents the block from pivoting in the ... Iot.
Each riser marked in I-in. incremenL<; to make it
easy to level the lOp.
Clamps can be placed anywhere on the top,
ooth vertiC"",dly and horizontally, to glue up small
and medium pieces or secure work for power
sanding. I also clamp scrJ.p lumlx:r to (he lop to
create imprompfu stops and holders for speeding
14 FrIO: WOODWORKING

Washers
Locking knob
Nut pressed
Into knot)
Riser
with
biscuits
-""In. dowel
prevents plywood
block from
splnfling .
up repetitive work such as routing, pocket-screw
joinery, or biscuit-slot cutting.
The top of the hase cabinet helps prevent tbe
cart from racking and provides a temporary resting
place for tools and hardware. A pair of hardware-
store wheels on a simple Y2-in. axle makes it easy to
move the table wheelbarrow style.
-BOB BELLEVILLE, Los Alt os, Calli.
A Reward for the Best Tip
Send)«lf original tips to Methocls of'Nor1l, Fine
Woodworking, PO 80)( 5506, Newtown, CT 06470. If
published, we pay $50 tor an unillustrated tip;
$100 for an illustrated one. if your tip is the best,
you win Jet's f raming clamp kit, which
includes f our paralief-jaw
clamps and handy
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OUR PERFORMANCE lS LSOO.US STAIN
methods of work ,,'Uoc"
Easy drill-press fence
This quick-to-make drill-press fenet
Tapered handle with
tI"Ireaded insert
is a big improvt.:ffil:nt oyer the clumsy
strip of wood and two clamps that
most of us use. The fixture nmsisrs
Loosen
"llO·in. slot In
table
of a 'A-in.-thick plywood auxiliary
table and a movablt.: fr.:nce. Attach the
aUXi liary table co the regular drill-press
table-arrangements will vary from
drill pres..;; to drill pn:ss. Make the
fence from a length of }1/2-in.
by lVz-in. aluminum angle faced
with plY'.vo(xL The fence adjusts
via f'.\!O slol!; in the plywc)(xJ table and
locks in place by tightening vertical
black handles that cng.lgc indusrnal
T-nul., below. YOl! can get both items
at www.gminger.<.xxn:item ... No. 2YJL1
(T-nuts) and No. 4X501 {hand It:>.
-DAVID M. GROSZ, Stamfold, Cann.
Bevel the

. ,
back. Grind the end fa fit
_ proflie to be scraped.
Can opener
Remove
ffle laos.
Cheap landing pad for sanders
$oml;! time ago I pun::ha-'<CI a fancy
landing pad for my 5-in. random-orbit
sander, but J Wasn't very happy with it.
I've smce replaced that accessory with
the plastic lid from a 39-<)z. coffee can.
I can set the sander down immediately
after using it. am.! the lid will spin until
the sander has come to a stOp. You
can '\ argue with \he cost.
-JON MUNSTOCK, Chama, N.M.
16 FINE WOODWORKING
Coffee-can li d
l ""· in . by l'h-in.
aluminum angle
handles to
slide fenco.
"'---T·nut, base
size 1V. in.
Custom scraper from a bottle opener
For many years [ have l:>etn making scrapers from ca n and
bottle openers (sometimes (.':.Illed church keys). I grind
thl;! ends of the opener.; fa custom shapes for restoring
antiques and s<.Tdping (xkl-shaped trim; they're also gn.vdt
for scmping glue out of tight comers. I have more than
50 different shapes Ih:!! I usc over and over again.
To make a scraper, I first snap off the little tabs. Then I
grind the JXlinted end to fit the project at hand, beveling the
back of the blade slightly. The curved ends of the openers
are jllst the right angle for effiden! scraping.
-JOHN H. MASON. Boise. Idaho
Random-orbil
sander
OUf' alNard-wnning
bandsaws just 9=)t better by
incorporating features from our Heavy-Duty
Series bandsaws. The lOng ist of standard featu-es rv:NJ
includes foot brake 'Nith micro-switch, rack and pinion fO( the upper
guidepost. geared tn.nions with gas spring. qJick tensiOn release, and
Ceramic Laguna Guides. 1llis new vefSIon that we are known for has
plenty of poIoYef for resawing. The cast -iron double tru .... on table 15 the
heaviest in its dass and features 2 parallel t slots. Heavy-cast iron ft.{
wheels provide the i'lertia and needed to accurately slice
wafer-thin veneers from a tal block of han:twood. Our
Guides insures unequalled blade guidance. 2 dustports earn
4-inch provide optimum dust control. 11le 3000 Series bandsavots
provide the perfect balance bebNeen price and perlormance.
THRIVING ON INNOVATION
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methods of work
Tower of storage
cabinets
cont i nued
Rotating tower stores more hardware In less space
While I'tthinkinp; the efficien<-), of my
workshop, I came up with the idea of
building a tower on top of a lazy susan
Top plate
to manage 12 containing 252
1;lllall drawers full of screws,
nut..-, bolts, and other
hardware. Before I built tilt!
• ..jn. MDF
between
layers
lOWer, dIe f.:ases ate up 15 sq. ft. of wall
spa1.-'e. With this arrangement, the 12
cases take up less than 2 sq. ft ;It the
cnd of the countertop.
I simply stack the layers of cases
on ·%-in.-thkk MOP. Gmvity kccp1>
them in place, but if you
have doubts, you could
hold them with a nonskid
material or double-faced tape. I chose
Il-in.-(Iia. lazy-susan hardw-are, the
largest r could find to support il t! th,,!
weight. The tower easily, making
every drawer instantl y ava il ahle.
- SERGE DUCLOS. Oelson. Que .. Canada
Finest Quality Reproduction Brass and
6
manutactt/l"ing 1t1e finest qual1!y
reprodiJCIion furniture harctv.rare. "-'\Ift'"
t:uilders hardware. fixtures. and
fireplace accessories available. Gall klr our
108·pago catalog, available klr $7.00
{catalog cost refunded on first order}.
4el W. Hich"l)' .
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18 FINE WOODWORKING
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• Dado up to 1h- widlh
• 1 shaper spil1dle II liable from 90"-45°
Fdder Cf 531
12' Jointer .. Ploner, 2-01 A-Ic.l"l ife cvllerblocl,
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from 39" up 10 98"
Felder Cf 741
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tools & materials
.to III ...
• POWER TOOLS
Plunge-cut saw makes
straight, clean cuts
D
EWALT HAS ENTERED THE PLUNGE-ClIT CIRCULAR-5AW ARENA
wLth [h..: inlfoduclion of its DWS"i20. Wurkin,lo: in Wn)U1Ktion
with a track, this .'iaw makes .straight, dean cut.., wIth a mini -
mum of fuss. Festool introduced this class of too1 a few years
ago and I soun wondered how I managed to get along without one.
Tracks for the DeWalt are wid separately and are available in three
lengths: 46 in., 59 in. , and 102 in. TI1e saw abo has a riving knife
that retracts when you need to plunge the saw.
'Ihcre are a few key differences betvieen the DeWalt and the Fes-
tool. The plunge-action is fussier on the DeWalt: Yuu haw to place
both on the back handle and apply pressure directly over the
blade. On the other hand, the DeWalt can cut on both sides of its
tnlck, meaning you won't have to spin the long around
when workinK. Both saws make very clean ClitS.
Forced to pick hetween the Fest(x)l and DeWalt, which are hath
excdlr:nl lools, I'd the Festool. It's light<.:r, <.:asicr to plunge,
and a better blade-changing mechanism.
The nWS520 sells for $500, the same price as rhe Fes[oo\ TS5EQ.
Plan to p<ly exl"l for the tmck: $AG for a 46-in. length, $100 for a
59-in. length, and $230 for a 102-in. lI.!ngth. Go to www.dewalt.com
for mot .. ' information.
-Mark Bdmundson f:ntildsfurniture jn Sandpoint, Idaho .
• WOOD TURNING
A better turning caliper
TYPI CALLY, WHEN TURNING A SPI NDLE with several diameters
along lt5 length, you need to
constantly reset a caliper to chock
those critical dimensions, a tedioUS and time-
consuming process. Or you need se\leral calipers, each
preset to a different diameter. Windsor chalrroaker Peter
Galborl has come up wllh a belter way: a caliper that has a
bullt·ln, easy-tl>read scale that measures any diameter from ¥.i In,
to 211.:1 In. while the work Is spinning. In tact, the caliper can be held in
one hand and pressed against the back of the spinning wood while a parting
back I"aur.nee. There
are zero-clearance plastic
Inserts on both edges, for
noar-splinter"free cuts, Itnd
t he riving knife (leN) redvt>
es the chance of kickback.
Me.alfNl .a)'01f tlfrn. Wit" tho
caliper behind the workpiece. you
can read tho diameter as yov fum.
tool Is held In the other hand, cutting the wood until the desired diameter Is reached. 1 found the caliper
to be pretty much foolproof. 85 did 8 number 0' other turners who tried It. The Galbert Caliper sells for
around $80. For more Information, go to www.petergalbertchairmaker.com.
- Andy B,nrlvm teaches wood turning at t he State Univelsity 01 New York at Purchase.
20 t·INF. WOODWORKING 1'11<,..,., .... ff
tools & materials ooc"""
• DUST COLLECTION
Compact dust collector
is powerful and efficient
D
ELlA HAS ADDED A NEW PLAYER to its dust-collection
roster. It gets yOll pknty of power in a lightwl'ight,
compact, package. It also has a
i-micron bag, better than the 5-mkron or 3O-micmn
bags found on many other collectors.
Mcxld SO-720 fe-.Jturcs a I -hr, 1O.8-amp induction motor
that, according to Delta, moves air at the rate of 650 (' ubic
feet per minute (cfm) at the collector port. places the
machine between a shup vacuum and the standard 1 Yz hp
collectors reviewed in FWW '"183· This model's capacity is
enough to move dust ,lOd chips into the collector as kmg
as you keep the hose length to under about 10 ft. (it comes
with a 5-ft. hose) and connect the dust collector to only one
machine at a time. I hooked it up to a 13-in.
planer, and it coll ected over 95% of the chips.
The Delta 50-720 sdls for around 1300. For more details, go
to wwv.'.deltaponeKahle.com.
-Tom lJe?,nal is an associate editor.
Roll-aYOllnd (:onven/.nc •• Delta's
new l · hp dust collector rolls from one
machine to another with Uttle fuss .
• BLADES
Sanding sawblade makes smooth cut
Cut and sand. A Final Cut sanding disk
on each side of this tHode produced
smoorh cuts IJoth ripping and crosscutting.
22 PI N E WOODWORK1 N G
A TABLESAW BLADE THAT CUTS AND SANDS AT THE SAME TIME? That's a
blade r had to try. The product, called Final Cut, Is a 10-In., 4O-too!h
., tablesaw blade with a 9-In.--<I/a., l()().grlt self·adheslve sanding disk
-
.-
-
-
....
mounted to each sIde. To test the effectiveness of Final Cut, I
crosscut and ripped some 5/4 cherry. The cuts were ex(:ellent.
For comparison, I made the same cuts In cherry using a recently
sharpened Forrest Woodworker II blade. The Final Cut blade
produced smoother rip- and crosscuts than the Forrest. As a
final test, t cut about 70 linear ft, of 0/4-1n. birch plywood to find
out how long the disk would last. The quality of the final cut was
almost as good as the first, and stili better than the Forrest.
By the way, when using Final Cut, make sure the blade height Is
such that the perimeter of the sanding disk extends above the thickness of
the stock. If It doesn't, the cut won't be fully sanded.
The lQ.ln. blade (with disks mounted) sells tor $65; replacement sanding disks are
available. For Information, go to www.flnalcutblade.com.
-BOb Nash is the shop manager at Fine Woodworlllng'.
www.£tnewQCdworklng.com
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Il1.ADI'I SDVICE NO. 71
MAY/JUNE 2009 23
tools & materials '001"",,
• ACCESSORIES
Ratchet action speeds up
bandsaw tension adjustment
M
OST EXPERTS AND MANUFACTURERS recommend re-
leasing the blade tension when a bandsaw is out of
usc fur more than a day. Blade changes also require
releasing and re-tensioning the blade. The new AI.."Cu-
right Ratchet-Rod speeds up tho:<e considerabl y
and makes them a lot easier on your hand and wrist. The kit
most tr.Hlitional-stylc 14-in. bandsaws with a cast-iron frame,
replacing the faerory tension screw, nut, and handle with an
ACME-threaded rod and nut for easier rotation. Topping the
assemhly is a removable rJlcheting knoh. To change r:.ltchct di-
rection, YOll just fl ip a lever on the bottom of the knoll.
Replacing the facTory equipment takes less than five minutes.
Major ,ldjustlU\!nts go very quickly, and the contoured knob fits
the hand comfortably. The Ratchc...-"t-Rod has tx..>come a welcome:
addi tion to my handsaw. It sells for ISO and is available frum
Carter Products (wYr'W.r.:arterproduds.com).
-Roland Johnson is a conln'buting editor.
Setter tension adjus ter. The knob on this aftermarket tenSion adjuster
has a ratchetlnt aCflon, so your f1aml doesn't have to work as f1ara.
The Wood Slicer'*
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• Woodwori:/T1f/ nps • New Tools
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woodnewsonline.com
Rt:t.r>F.It SllJMO. NO. 76
24 fINE WOODWORKING
PrKl,lon
Rout.r
Lift from
Woodp.ck .... •.
• Tool-leu micro·
adJuat ment.
• InataM Quk: k.-Urt
1!M1la, (PIot_l*Idng.)
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fundamentals
j, 1 1 Ol 01
Miter-gauge basics
HOW TO GET THE MOST FROM
THIS STANDARD TABLESAW
ACCESSORY
BY STEVE L.ATTA
Ch.ck fII • • 11d-
In,.c:tIon flr.t.
Jftheres roo much
slde-to-slde play,
peen the bar to
dimple a comer
and widen It
slightly.
Attach alt .ulelll.ry fence. This Is a must
because It supports longer pieces and reduces
teaTaur. Latta uses ¥ ... lfI. thick. 3-ifl.·wlde MDF.
28 FINE woonWORKtNG
at long after you set up yOur
fiffit u blesaw, you'll fi nd yourself
reaching for one of woodworking's
most common and useful
accessories---the miter gauge,
Stanchrd equipment with every
tablesaw, a miter gauge is the tool many
beginners use to make their first crosscut ...
With a miter gauge, you can accurately
cut workpieces to length wi th square
and make a variety of angled cuts, induding
those for mitered corners. A. .. you progress
in your woodworking, you'll probably add
a crosscut sled to your tool kit (see
Fundamentals: "Build a Simple crosscut sled
for the rable...aw," FW'W #188), but you wan',
outgrow the miTer gauge.
Setting up the gauge
111e miter gauge of a bar and an
adjustable head with a knob to kx:k the
adjustment. The har in the slots in the saw
wble that run parallel to tht' bbde. Look for a
sturdy aluminum headstock and an unobtrusivl:
locking knob With a secure and comfonable grip.
Atraching an auxiliary fence help brdce
the stock against the blade's tendency to push
Set the for It _qu.,.. cut. If the blaele
and slot are parallel. you can use 8 known 90°
reference to orient the gauge to the blade.
Check the ,..ults. After setting the gauge to
90· . make a test cut The cut SlJrface shoula be
square to the edge you held against the fence.
[gQR blocks
The itop block Is an a,&-OId way to cui multiple wo,kpieees
without again and again.
A hlnpd block I. nIce. It /etli you trim
both ends of a board without changing the
setting.
one end square (above). Then butt the squBre
end against the block and cut to length (right).
Cutting multiples w/ll 00 quick and accurate.
back tov.-ard the u.<;er and C'dUM,> it (0 pivot on
the corner of the gauge. The fence should be
tall enough to retain it:; strength when the blade
pa.s....es through it. Extending the [COle 11/2 in. or
SO past the blade will help you !'iafcly push shOll
cutoffs beyond tht: bladt:.
The preset angle on most miter gauges
are rarely accurate. To set for w
o
, put the gauge
in the slot upside down and. with the lock
knob \oosenoo. slide the head up flat againSt
the rip rail and tighten the knob. If the
saw is properly set up, that should do it. Check
it once with a drafting triangle to make !>lire it
is accurate.
Making a basic crosscut
To make a 90
0
crosscut, hold the stock
against the miter-gauge fence and push the gauge
through the mt. To avoid pinning the stock to
the table and to keep your hand.:: a safe distance
from blade, apply downward pressure only
over the gauge's steel har. After completing the
cut, Ix: sure to move the off the gauge
For tonter worl!:, It IORter .top block. A hookea block, held in place with a pair of
clamps, works for even the longest worl<pieces.
and away fmm the blade before sliding the
miter gauge back. the chance that
the blade will catch, and throw, the workpiece
during the return strokt,.
You can work to a pendl mark, but a
StOp block makes it eas)' to crosscut multiple
pieces to the same length. My hlock is hinged
and designed to work with my 3-in.-lall auxiliary
fence. A small piece of lA-in. plywood fastened
at the top of the block keeps it about % in. otl
www.f;new()odworking.com
FOI' short cutoffs, a .tandoff fence.
If you lise the rip fence as a stop, short
pIeces can get trapped between the
fence and Dlacte. 50 butt the work-
piece against a standoff stop, clamped
to the rip fence well in front of the
blade.
MAYI]U NE 20 0 9 29
fundamentals ""li"'"
Two gauges can be better than one
I"wo lfIIu". tun ala. by .'de. One sits In
each slot; totether they support a long fence.
cur 4tCeUf.t. dadoes. The twin-gauge setup works well for making cuts across the m/(1dle of a
long workpiece. Used mffer gauges are JnexpeflS/ve and eas), to find at flea markets Of online.
the saw table. This gap prewnts dust buil dup,
which can hinder ac<.-uracy. The plywood also
keeps the stop perpendicular to the table. If a
stop block is clamped at an angle, there will
be discrepancies in length between piet:es
of different thickness. When crosscutt ing, hold
the workpiece tight againSt the fence and
stop block.
A second gauge adds versatility
I always have one or two extra miter gauges
around the shop. They are handy for dedicati ojO:
to a specifIC task or for using in tandem to
suppon a long fence for crosscutting longer
workpieces. A cro.'>..";Cut sled is better, but this
ammgement is a good substi tutc. A rwin-gauge
also supports an L-shapeJ fence for
making specialized curs such a:; dentil molding,
finger joints, and knuckle jOint".
A tip for angled cuts
\XThen setting up for an angled cut, it's important
to set the gauge .'iO that the leading end of it.:;
fence toward the blade. If the troiling
end of the fence is dosest, the force of the cut
wnd .. to pull the stock into the lxxJy of the
blade. TItis leads to burn and Tearour when
the blade
And if a stop block were used, the angle
would tend to pull the stock away from the
hlock. Also. the auxil iary fence should stop at
the blade so the scrap from the cut does not gel
pushed onTO the back of the blade. 0
30 FINE woonWORKING
A Make wecise miters
Settlrtf up.n cut. Use a
pair of drafting triangles to set the
gauge for a 45· cut. Also be sure
the triangle is against the body o(
the blade and not a tooth, and set
the gauge so the leading end of its
fence points toward the blade.
Add an
fence for small
WOf'If. The fence
fIe/ps preverrt tearout
In small work like this
dentll mo/dlng. 11Ie
sawkerf In the fence
also helps locale cuts
In the workpiece.
To make the fence,
screw a 2-in.-wlde
strip of *-In. MDF to
the bottom edge of a
" ... In. piece.
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C 2009 FOIIII1 Cooe FW
MAY / JUNE 2()()9 31
Lamination
puts beautiful grain
and a graceful curve
within arm's reach
BY GREGORY PAOLINI
32 PINE WOODWORKING
C
raftsman furniture is known for lis 5trdighl lim ... "S.l(uartersawn oak.
and sense of ea rthen mass and solidity. No piece displays those
feamre:; better than a Morris chair, wilh its large, squ:U'e legs and
wide arms decked out in heaullful ray-fleck figure. The gmccfully bowed
arms of this version, based on a design hy Gustav Stickley, lighten The mass
Just enough to give it the f<..-cl of comfort. Throw in 3 reclining
hack and finn, but givins, cushions, and you have a Lha;r that you'll never
'Wan! to leave.
For the most part, the construction is straightforward. But (he most
dis(inctlve part of the chair-II .. arms--presents two big
maki ng bowed arms With atuactive grain. and a
jOint on the curved arms and side frame. I' ll show you how laminating
the arms gl.!ts you around t hose challenges. And I'll show you how to
I
ARTS & CRAFTS RECLINER
Bowed arms iIInd beautiful quartersawn oak
stand out on this Craftsman claulc. All the
jolnl$ are mortln and tenon, which makes
this ill chair that win lalt.
Top back slat, H'.ln.
thick by 3". In. wide by
22 in. long
Back slat. 1'1'. in. thick
by 2 .... In. w;de by
22 in. lona
Arm, .1 In. thick by 6 in. wide
by 41 In. lon8. laminated
f rom four V.-I n,-thlck plies
Backrest post, 1.". In.
thick by .1'4 in.
by 29'1. In. long
Side s lat. ¥. In.
thick by 3 in.
w.oe by 8¥lln.
long
Back stretcher,
1'" In. thick by
4 in .. w;'j. ,.,
27 In. long
Arm (Nerhan,s
Inside 01 leg by V. in.
Front leg.
2V .. In. square
by 24.,., In. lone.
Front stretcher,
lV.in. thick by
6'0'. In. wide by
27 In. long
Quartersawn veneer.
'" In. thick by 211. in.
w'de
l EG DETAIL
Cleat. l in. thick by
V. In. wide, located
1 ...... In. from the top
of the front ai'lCl
back stretchers
core,
In. thick by 21n.
w'de
square. elltends
Y. in. above 8rm
and Is beveled at
15°,
Rail and stretCher
tenons , 'Y. in. thick
1'1. in. long
1

Post edends If. in.
'.E--- 23V.in. ]II. above top slat.
t-
--------
Corbel,tV. In.
thick (see detai l ,
rl&hl)
l plans lor thl, chair are
2'Y. In.

ill flneWoodw<Jrking
.com/PlanStore.
,t--
, ;:v. in. }'-':t.l n.
1

p
-
,b <
3Zin. >J.o
I!.,
Df
l
4
'
Ao In.

24 In.
n,
'"
r-
L.. ,
n.

,
.
,

-4-
in. 71
l
5
1<1.c--- 2." ,0,----+1_1
www.finewouuwurkil1g.l.urn
»
Tenon, 'II In. thick by
In. wide by lin.
'ong
Tenon, In. thicK
by 2 In. wide by
lin. long
Rear lenon, 1 Y. In.
wide (before cutting
curve). inset .... In.
from rail bottom
Tenon,
'h in. thick by
1 .... in. wide
by ¥. In. long
Back leg,
2",. In. sq.
by 221h In.
loni
lower rail,
1 .".In. thick by
7 in. wide by
28 in. long
-' ..
MAY/JUNE 1009 33

••
••
TIPS FOR
ACCURATE
JOINTS
Every Joint In this chair Is
II mortise and tenon. the
traditional Craftsman joint. They
must fll well to get a square and
strong chair. Here's how to cut
the Joi nts accurately with two
common tools: a router and a
tablesaw.
get striking quartersawn grain everywhere
it including a simple and authentic
method for making a leg with four quarter-
sav.n faces.
Legs that look good from every angle
The legs of a traditional Morris chair
have four quartcf.'i8Wn faces. Lumher like
that doesn't grow on trees, but it can
be made in the shop. There are several
different methods to achieve the look. but
the one Stickley used, which is the easiest
by far, is to glue up a core of quartersawn
lumber and then laminate twO quarter-
sawn veneers over the flal:-;8wn edges of
the core,
After the glue is dry, trim the flush
to the core with a router and flush-trimming
bit. Then the bottom of each leg
to square it up, Don't worry aJxlllt the tops
now.
Mortises, then tenons
Surf wHh 01. rfCht bit. When roullng mortises, Paolini matches fhe straight bit's diameter to
the mortise's width so he aoesn't have to move the rourer side 10 side arnJ risk tilting n out of
square. lWo fences (one the routers edge guide; the other Clamped on) keep the rOLiter on trilck.
When m.lking it mortisc-and-tenon joint, I
usually start with the mortises_ Irs much
easier to fit a tenon to a mortise than the
other way around. You can cut all of the
mortises now, except the four in the arms.
Double the parts toT stable l'OutIn,_ Thin piet:es.llke the side posts,
don't provide a statile surlace for a router. Clamp two Of three of them
together to get a wider bearing surlace.
34 PINE WOODWORKING
They're Laid out and cut after you make the
tenons on the tops of the legs.
Remai n consistent wit h your reference edges. When cutting
the mortises on the legs, for example, reference the same fence
against the outside face of each one. Otherwise, the position of
the mortises will vary, resulting in sloppy joints and poSSibly a
chair that's out of square.
Now cut all of the tenons, except those on top of the legs, at
the tablesaw. Cut a full tenon on the back of the upper mil; you'll
just saw away part of it later.
Router-cut mortises have round so I round the tenons with
the rasp ponion of a Nlcholson 4-in-hand fite. Its smooth edges
Teftons at the tablesaw. First. cut the shoulders a hair deeper than
the cheeks using a combInation blade. Then, use a dado set to cut the
cheeks. Support the piece with the miter gauge.
;; HOW TO LAMINATE THE ARMS ___________ _
The bow of the arms
needs to match
2¥.
1 in.
Pivot pin holes,"'" in.
dia. ~ 2'1. in. deep
the curve cut onto
the upper rails and
legs. Use a full-scale
drawing at the <lrm's
profile to make the
bending form and
you'll get a great fit .
I-c------------------ 4CW. in.
R ••• w the p/Je •• Start the cuts on the fi:J blcsaw ana use the kerfs to
guide t he bane/saw blacle as you finish the cut freehand.
Build the fOIm I.y.' by I.y.r.
Make the first layer al the band-
saw. cleanIng It liP with hnd·
paper, Glue and screw on each
successive layer and rout It nush.
www.fi newoodworki ng.com
F/nl.h rhe form. Screw a
melamine fence to the rear of the
(orm and a stop to Its front edge.
Packing tape keeps the glue from
sticking 10 the form and stop.
won', mar the tenon shoulders. and i t . ~ aggre.ssive teeth make
quick work of [he rounding.
The tenons on the lower side rails will interfere with those of
the front and back stretchers where they meet inside the legs. The
best way around this is to insert the side rails into their mortises
and tmet: the front and back mortises onto them, You'U need to
trim rhe tenons' thickness about 1111 in. in those areas.
Drawing brings arms and legs together
The upper mil and the tops of the legs must be curved to match
the how of the arms. The easiest way 10 do this is to make a full-
size drawing of the arm's profile. You'll use thi" drawing to make
a pattern for marking the curve on the upper rails and legs and [0
make the bendi ng form uscu to laminate the arms. Here's an easy
Clam,. .. ciampa, clamps. Arter coating the pl/es with glue. press them
against the stop and fence. Add a fle:dble caul on lop and start clamping
next t o the slop. Work progressively down alont the form. Place a clamp
every 2 In. Youl1 need two doz.en.
MAY/JUNE 2009 35
Mark tr. cur". With the sic1es c1ry-fitterJ, align !he bottom of the rail
pJJttem with the bottom of the rail and mark the curve on the legs. This
locates the tenon'S Sfx)ulc1erS on tile legs. Then disassemble the sides,
realign the pattern on the rail , and mark Its curre.
W'"dy to make the full-sizl! urJ.wing of the profile. Spring a batten
between two Mils located at buth ends of the arc. Push the center
of the batten up to the high point of the arc and trace the line.
To make the pattern fur marking the Clilve on the legs and upper
rail, use grAphite paper to transfer the ann's profile (see drawing,
p. 35) to a piece of MDF. Cut thc curve on the bandsaw and
files and sandpaper to smooth it.
laminated arms are a cut above
!k.-cuU::>t: the bowed arms arc so prominent in this design, the
figure and grain that shows on the tOp of each arm must he
just right. Ann'> sawn from solid lumber would have a wild, dis-
tracting grain pattern. But laminating the arms allows you to
control their look, ch(X)sing your lx:st stock for rhe top ami uri-
enting it for the best effect. A laminated ann is also more stahle
than one cut from solid lumber, and concerns about short grain
weakness dis:lppear.
Laminating fonn keeps plies in line-Bent lamination,> C'.J.n be
tricky, but they don't need to be. A fence and a stop on the form
kcr.:p the plieS aligned, and a simple caul applies even pressure
over them. Usin/-,: the right kind of glue will prevent the plies frum
VIDEO WORKSHOP
watch Paolini build this project from
start to finish in a memberS-(lnly
at
36 FJ},E WOODWORKING
:: SAME PATTERN FOR THE SIDES
The hardest part of building this chair is f illing the arms to the sides.
The t ops of the upper ral ls are curved, and so are t he tenon Shoulders.
Make a pattern of t he upper ralls and use It to mark the curve. It's
easier to align and hold In place I han one of t he arms.
-,
o.
'--
\ Align paf/em with
bottom Mgs ()( rail.
-
t-
'--
T
3'/1 in.
:L
Cut the tenon .. Start by cutting the shoulders square. Cut the cheeks
with a dado set. 11ren chop and pare away the waste with a chi$f)1 as
shown to define the curtl6d ShOli/ders.
creeping after you remove them from the form. Start by making
a laminating form. First, transfer the arm's profile to a piece of
3/4-in.-thlck MDF. The pattern for marking the CUlVe won't work
here, oc"'Cause the arms arc longer than it.
Cut dose to the line of the curve on a bandsaw and sand or file
down to the line. You need eight 3,4-in. layers to get a form 6 in
wide. Use the first layer to make the remaining sc.--vcn.
Screw a fence to the side of the form and a stop to its front
end. They will keep tht plies aligned as you glue up the arms.
Cover all of the working surfaces Wilh packing tape to prevent
glue from sticking to them.
::MORTISE THE ARMS. __
The most accurate way to locate tne arm
mortIses is to mark dIrectly from the 10C
tenons. Tha i '118)" )'ou'r. not guaHI"';
where they should be.
FI,." cut .rm. to slZ8. After scraping
the glue from ona edge and Jointing It, rip
trnt arm to width with the concave side up.
Crosscut the 8rms to lenlth, usln, 8 sled
and small shim to get 8 square CIlt.
Low-stress re...awing-It takt::.-'i a finely tunt!d bandsaw to
wkie lumber. To make things E:<tSltt. I begin resay.m8 at tlk! table-
saw and finish up at the bandsaw. The tablesaw removes most
of the material and itt.; kerfs hdp me guide the oond<;aw blade
through the ::tml. After res.1wing all o f my laminates to 5/16 In.
thick, I plane them to 1,4 in,
The right gJue for laminations-The best glue for laminating
curved parts is urea formaldehyde. It has a long open time and
dot:sn'{ creep once dry. outweigh it" longer drying
time. If i'l, hov.rever, :1 known carcinogen, SO wear gloves and use
a respir.l.lor ot work in a well-ventilated area.
I use a piece of whitdxrJru fur a caul, because it hend,,; well and
is glue-resistant. Availahle at home centers, whiteboard is IAI-i n.·
thick covered on onc side with white thennofail.
Once both arms 3fe laminated, scrape the glue from one edge,
it, and rip the ann to width on the tablesaw, concave side
IIp. Then cut the am) to ienHth U1>lIlg a croos<.:ut sled and a shim
to gt:l a cut on fhe e>nd.
Cuned arms mean curved sides
To mark the curve of th..: ann nn the upper rails and legs, dry-
fit me side together. Align the bottom of the pattern
with the OOttoms of dle rails. The ends of the pattern will align
With the outside edges of the fmot and re"df legs. Mark the cutve
on the iru.iclc and outside faces of the legs. And mark the insi<k:
of the legs on the pattern so you can realign it to mark the rail.
Disassemble the side, and mark the rurve there, too.
Cut the ruN\: on the upper rail on the bandsaw. When you do
thiS, the back tenan will be CUI down to its final width. To cut
the tenons un the legs, first lise a combination blade tu cut all
four shoulder. :o;quare to the leg, in line with the highest shoulder
(the one of the front of each leg). Then use a dado sel to cut the
www. fJoewoodwotking.com
LOCATE AND CUT
THE MORTISES
1 . Lay the side assem-
bly on your bench and
stand an arm on the
tenons, flush against
their shoulders. The
front mortise Is 2 In.
from the front edge.
Use that measurement
to align the arm before
transferring the tenon
locations to the arm.
layout the underside.
'00.
2. Now cklmp the arm
In a vise so the mortise
area is level and use II
Forstner bit to remove
the W8ste. To avoid
tearout, go halfway
from one side. flip the
arm. and complete the
cut from the other sJde.
3. Use a eh/sello chop
away the remaining
waste and squant
the comers. As you
did When drilling, go
Mffwlly from one side
and ffnlsh up from the
".,.,..
MAY/JUNE 2009 37
:: ASSEMBlE THE BASE
Glue up the base before making the back, 50 you can take
measurements for the back directly from It .
Work In sr_tes, Assemble
the slcles first (right ). The
slats cia,, ', neecl glue If
they fit snugly. Glue the
rails to t he legs
the clamps on overnight.
NCAt, glue up and clamp
the stretchers. Attach ,he
arms (be/ow), brushl"g glue
01) them ancl on the leg
tenons. Leave the clamps
on for 24 hOfJrs.
Over and under. After stapling four courses of Webbing across the
'(Dme's op8l1/ng, weDve webbing through them fa create It strong but
comfortable base for It cushion.
38 fiNE W()OOWORKI"G
cheeks. To cut duwn to the CUlVed shoulder on the sides and
back of the [eR, use a chisel and mallet. I b:1Ck-bevel the shoulders
to ensure :1 tight fit with the bottom of the annrests.
Through-tenons require careful layout- Dry-fit and clamp
the side assemblies in preparation for cutting and fining the arm
mortL<;eS, Then clamp an assembly on the bench, inside face down
with the tenons overhanging the edge. Sct the arms on the tenons
and press them :mug against the .'ihoulders. Mark the fronts and
b-dcks of the morti!>es directly from the tenon..,. Remove the arms
and mark the morti se si des. Use a Forstner hit [0 remove most of
the waste from the mortises, then pare down to the lines with a
chisel. Next, chamfer the tenons that come through the arms. CUi
them 3/8 in. proud of the arms and bevel them at IS° .
After the are fit and the tenons chamfered, layout and drill
the holes for the back support pins. A drill press will ensure that
they're perpendicular. Be ....ure to lx)re the holes before cutting
the out'iide back comer of the arm.
While you"re at the drill press, drill the
holes for the pivot pin.;; in the legs.
Shape corbels to fit the arms
Wi t h the arms temporari ly in place, you
can fit and attach the corbels. I make a
pattern for the corbels. mark out four, and
cut them out at the bandsaw.
The front and hack corbels are the same
k ngth, but thl."y hang down lower on the
rear legs hecause of the arm's curve. 11l.e
corbels are centert.>J on the legs, and their
tops need some shaping for a snug fit against
the bottom of the arm. After they're shaped,
predrill them and the legs for screws, and
use a Forstner bit to ne-,lIe a countersink
for the screw head. Put a bit of glue on the
oorbeJs and screw them in place. Plug the
countersink:; with shopmade tapered plugS
[0 get a good grain match.
Next, cut the arc on the front stretcher,
and screw the seat-frame cleats to it and the
hack stretcher. Then glue up the base.
CUSHION ANATOMY
Ask your upholsterer t o make a layered cushion
like this one. Ifs firm and durable yet comfortable.
Musl i n
l·in. cotton
batting

fabric
3-in.
webbing
5-i n. high·denslty
urethane foam
HardWood frame
::THEN MAKE THE BACK
Cut the tenons shapi ng the slal.s. Using /I hBtf-plinern to mark the
curve 01 t he slats wilt ensure t hollhoy'ro symmetrical .
20 in.
'I
111. In. -"'! t
Tenon. % in. thick /
by 1 in. long
Slat,
.,., In. thick
518t blank. •
1:V.1n. Wide
.'\fler the glue dried, I made a hardwood f .... dme with webbing
for the seat cushion becau.st: I tiC"nt ,hi:; chair 10 an upholsterer,
and a hardwood frame is beuer than Ihe plywood frame some
uphol'llerers u.<;e. I u,'>Cd a:.h to make the fmmc, joining the parts
with mortLo;e-and-tenon joints. TI1e l ength and depth of me frame
should be If( in. unden.ize to all ow room for upholstery to be
wl"dPpcd :mxmd the t<ides and stapled to the bottom.
Back slats: Tenon the curve
J CUI 01\ the b;H.:k slats at the same time as the other ten-
ons because it b much easier tu cui tenons on a square piece than
on a thin, curved piece. Use a pattern to layout the curve and then
cut it at the hand.,aw. r ck:ancd up the sawm:lrks with a stationary
belt sander, bul a or sanding hlocks :Ilso works.
Authentic look without the fumes
Stickley's fumiwn.:: is well·known fur its ridl bro .... n finish, WhlCh
can be h'ld hy fuming WIth indu, .. trial ammonia But you (:an forgo
the ammooiJ and <;I m gel :l great finish. Mter sanding this chair,
I applied an ant ique cherry aniline dye. TIel it dry overnight and
then appIJ ed a dark walnut oil ·based pigment stain. I fi nishc.'<i il
off with Minwax Po lycryhc w.ller-based polyurethane.
'\It'hen Ihe finim L" dry and the upholstery done, bring your (:hair
into ttle house, put if in a welcoming and take a moment
10 enjoy its grace :lnd beauty. Then take a maybe a
Extra
For the complete finishing
recipe. 20 to
worklng.com/extras.
nap--to enjoy Its comfort.
o
Gregory Paolini makes Arts ana Crafts style
furniture in N.C.
www.finewuodworklng.r.:um
Cut ,he .,.ts. Bandsaw and smooth the curves after cutting the
tenons. Because the $la's are cur'o'ed. they tend to flex j) little under
clampin, pressure. Hardwood spacers limit the force of the clamps.
PIVOT AND
SUPPORT PINS
Even a novice can
turn these pins.
Check the diameter
of tnc shatt <l¥ lth
a Ve-in. open-end
wrerlCh. Use a gouge
until you're close,
and finish up with
sandpaper.
1+1"'- 10 .
Support pin
Spacer, white
oak. I'll in. dla.
by I;" in. thick
Pivot pin. white
oak. not glued In
SUPPORT PI N

PIVOT PIN
MAY/JUNE 2009 39
VISE OR VISE HAROWARE?
Ther. .... two basfc: choice •• Cast.Jron vises (feft) can be used tight out of the box amI give
you the option of adding wooden Jaws. With Vise hardware (rigllt), you 'II need to make and
install wooden Jaws.
40 F I NF. WOODWQJlKING
M
y woodworking improved dnt-
matically after I installed a vise on
my bench. With a vise: to hokl my
work, I could mark and cut accurate dove-
t;ti ls, plane square edges, and roUI profiles
withoUl the board :;Iiding all over.
That's why I'm convinced that a bench
\'ise is as importanl as any tuol in the ! ~ h o p
Whether you LL'>e power lools, hand tOOls, or
both. a good bench vise will hel p }'Ou work
more 3ccurately, l.ffitiently, and safely.
A bench viSe is meant to hold your work
scnlrcly. A good vise nO{ only does that
well, hUI also opens and dose.<; easily, has
jaws that clamp squarely to the stock and
hold it ti ght, and i.<; versa til l! enough to
handle a variety of wO<Xiworking tasks, A
bad vise doesn't hold boards tight, or has
a nut that pops off rhe t h r e a d ~ when you
tighten the jaws,
Narrowi ng the field
It woulcln'r be practic-J.I to test every vise
availahle, so I focused on front vbes, he-
caus!'; they a f t" the fif:>! serious vise wcxxl-
workers huy and can he the only type
they'll need. Front vises are not difficul t to
install and they can be used as end vises.
All have a screw between two guide bars,
hm there are two types. You can ouy a ful-
ly as..o;embled cast-iron vise, which includes
metal jaws, or simply the vise hardware,
which supplies the screw and guide oars.
You supply the wcxxien jaws.
Both types have their advantages. Vise
hardware is less obtrusive, because there
b kss visible metal and the jaws can be
made to match your benchlop. Cast-iron
vises are easier to install and most have a
built-in benchdog.
When I had the option. I chose quick-
release modds, becwse slowly winding
a vise open to plane a drawer or use the
built-in bench dogs isn't efficient or fun.
We abo tested ITo/a twin-screw vises. One
model was diSCOntinued, so we're publish-
ing only the results for Ihe Verilas model.
Like the other vises, it can be used as ei-
ther a front vise or an end vise. Though
it doesn't have the quick-release feature, it
can clamp stock vertk."'dlly in the center of
Features to consider
fritter fIn!fer or twist of th. wrist. On triCl!er·release vises (left), It lever near the handle
drops the nut so the outer jaw Sl ides quickly to whoro you neod it. This stylo Is based on tho
IconiC vises by Record. On some qulck-release vises, a quarter turn releases the nut (right).
Built-In or build H I n. Most cast·lron vises have a benchdog built into the front jaw (left). With
vise hardwarfi (rlgh!). you add a dog half) (or two) to the wooden front Jaw.
No rlX needod.
Kenney was sur·
prised to flnd that
some vises racked
very II!tle. He could
tighten the jaws
enough to hold It
board for dovetail-
Ing ;lna not have
the board shift at
all (above left). On
the veri/as vise, you
can place It wide
board between the
two screws (belOW
left), and the vise
applies clamping
pressure equally,
Easy fl1( . Some vise jaws pivot and lose their grip when a piece must be clamped
In only ono side of tile vise. The solution Is fO clamp it scrap of t he SDme thickness
£It the othur end.
www. nnewoodworking .co m M AY/ ]L'N E 2 009 41
Cast-iron vises
ANANT 521f.z ED
it'> jaws, making it easier to dovetail wide
boards. That's a compelling benefil.
To put these vises to the test, each one
had to be used daily for a variety of tasks,
and they had to be compared side by side:. I
needed help and found it in the School of Alt
+ Oesi.';O at Purchase OJllege in New York
Dennis Fitzgerald. who oversees the wood-
shop there, installed the vises in the shop,
and the students uS\.."tI and abused them for a
semester on tasks such as dovetailing, ph-ln-
ing, (''J.rving, and working on ;,haped parts.
FiD:gerald and I abo did our ov,.n testing,
and weighed in on the results.
Nnte that the vises were used heavily
42 FINf WOODWORKING
for hand-tool work, which the most
on a vise. Any vise that stands up to
;;awing and planing should be fine for ma-
chine work like routing and drilling. The
:,tudents benefited, too. These vises were a
bif.; improvt:ment over the old ones in their
shop. And every vise W"dS donated to the
school by the manufac[mer or ;;upplier.
The makings of a good vise
We don't ask vises to do much, but there
are features [0 look for other than the abil-
ity to clamp wood securely. There';; an easy
fix for vises that f'Jck (see p. 41), but the
less you have to deal with l"acking the bet-
SUPPUER STREET
(PRODUCT NUMBER) PRICE
wVlw.highlandwoodworking.com
$140
(199302)

$110
(199152)
W\ffW. woodcraft .com
$100
(148437)
www.southern-tool.com
$194
(WMH7 0B569 )
www.woodcrafl.com
$155
(16T52)
www. leevalley.com
$145
(10G04.12)
www.rockler.com
$140
(33487)
wWVI.japanwoodworkcr.com
$72
(66.252.5)
www.southern·tool.com
$250
(WMH63218)
JORGENSEN RAPID-ACTING
BENCH VISE
tef. We checked for racking hy clamping a
board vertically on one side of the and
measuring how fM out of parallel the jaws
were on the other side.
Also, check the vertical alignment. The
jaws should damp squarely [0 the stock
from top to bottom. Because the screw
is at the oottom of the vise, the bottom
tend-; to pull in as pressure is applied. To
compensate, the moving jaw on
vises should he camed in slightly at the
top. (With vise hardware, taper the front
jaw so it's slightly thicker at the top.)
There arc two types of quick release: trig"
ger and twist. I recommend a twist-release
QUICK JAW WIDTH OPENING EASE OF USE I RACKING 'VERTICAL COMMENTS
RELEASE CAPACITY I ALIGNMENT
Yes, lever 9 in, 12"{. in. p"",
0.05 Good
Ves, lever 9 In, 9 in, Good 0.05 Excellent
Yes, tWist 9 1n, 13 In, Excellent 0,09 Excellent
YeS,lever 9'1. in. 9Y, In. Good 0.06 Excellent
Yes, twist 10 i n. 12 in. Excellent 0.04 Excellent
Yes, twist 9 in. 13 In, Good 0.13 Good
Ves, twist 9 In. 131n, Good 0.08 Excellent
Yes, lever 9 i n, 10V. in. Good 0.08 Excenent
Yes, twist 10 in. 13 In. Good 0.06 Very good
MEDIUM QUICK· RELEASE STEEL
ROCKLER WORKBENCH VISE
BENCH VISE (LEE VALLEY)
INSTALLING A CAST-IRON VISE
Just bolt . nd to. "necessary, Install a
SPlJCer under l he benchtop t o keep the top
of the }4WSJust below the top of the bench.
w ... · w , n newoodwor ki n g. com
Get _rw.,Hh alon, jlf." Mortlsln, a long
wooden Jaw over the rear jaw makes It easier
to clamp wide and Iont boards.
Qulck·release nut doesn't re-engage well.
Low-quality plast ic benchdog In Iront jaw,
Must add wooden front jaw
to get a benchdog.
Release lever is not easy to operate.
Steel benchdog moves easily and
s t a ~ s in place once set,
Doesn't open and close smoothly,
Doesn't open and close smoothly.
Paint chipped easily.
Qulck-release nut doesn't fe-engage
immediately.
SHOP FOX QUICK RELEASE WOOD VISE

WILTON 79A
MAY/ } l N ~ 200 9 43
Vise hardware
ECONOMY QUICK-RELEASE
FRONT 'VISE (WOODCRAFT)
LARGE QUICK-RELEASE
FRONT VISE (LEE VALLEY)
QUICK-RELEASE
fRONT VISE
(WOODCRAFT)
INSTALLING VISE HARDWARE
St.rt with trreIMHpl.t • • The first step is
to screw the baseplate to the bottom of the
b&nchtop. Then clamp the rear Jaw In place lind
mark the holes for the screw and guide btlrs.
44 F I NE WOODWORKING
Attach the re.I' Jaw. After youVe drilled holes
(or the screw and guide bars, bolt the rear jaw
to the btlnchtop. Barrel nuts mortisea In from
the bottom of the benchtop capture the bolts.
www.woodcraft.com
(145444)
www.leevalley.com
(Large, 7OG08 .10)
www.woodcraft.com
(17All)
www.rockler.com
(37180)
www.leevalley.com
(05G12)
ROCKLER
QUICK-RELEASE
END VISE
'87
$1 40
$215
$180
$230
Bolt the front Jaw In place. Clamp the wood-
en front jaw to the rear Jaw, and t hen Install the
screw plate ana guide bars.
QUICK OPENING EASE OF
RELEASE' CAPACITY USE RACKING
Yes, twist in. Fair 0.15
Yes, twist 13 in. Good 0.09
Yes, twist 14V. in. Good 0.05
Yes, twist 13 in. Good 0.06
No 12 in. Excellent NfA
COMMENTS
Too much play in screw and guide
bars cause<! jaw to open
and close poorly.
Nut occasionally fall s to disengage
when you twist screw 10 pull jaw out.
Required more force to open and
close jaw than other
Can clamp up to S·ln.·wide bOards
between guide post and screw.
Can clamp up to 16-in.--wlde boards
between screws: two handles
are a nulsallce at times .
VERITAS
TWIN-SCREW VISE
INSTALLING THE VERITAS TWIN-SCREW VISE
Att.1tc:h til. nut • . The round nuts fit Into holes
drilled info the resr Jaw, and the squafO bases
are screwed In place. Then attach the Jaw to t he
benchtop.
www.fi newoodworking.com
A. the $Cre .... turn. Clamp the front jaw in
place and start cranking the screws. W'hen
tight, attaCh t he screw plates.
vise, because the nut disengages when the
screw is turned. This makes it easy to hold
a workpiece in one hand and use the other
to turn the screw and adjust the front jaw.
On a trigger-release you must pul!
and hold a trigger to disengage the nut. It
can be tricky to do thi.-; while the
jaw with the same hand.
With a quick-release vise, an important
feamre is how weI! the nut engages. If the
nut or when you tighten the
screw, the vise doesn't lighten and your
workpiece can fall Ollt. Finally, l'heck the
fit and Rough can scratch or
cut your fingers or \ ... ·orkpicce, and screws
th:"l t don't tum smoothly are frustrating.
And the winners are ...
Among the "ist's, thl.:Jorgenscn is
the best. Its mechanism
very well , and it has a hig metal henchdog
that moves smoothly and stays in place.
The vertical alignment wa,> always dead-on
under pressure, and it racked the second
least. The beM value the Groz rapid-
action vise. It performed very wdl, and I
li ke the action of the rel ease.
Among vLo;e hardware, Veritas twin-
screw is easily the best. It has the biggest
clamping capacity and doesn't rack. The
front jaw can be skewed for tapered parts
or to overcome racking force if you damp
something outside the screws. The Veritas
doesn't have quick release, but everything
else aoout it is so nice we didn't miss it.
We pickl-d. the large quick-release front vise
sold by Lee Valley as the !"lest value. It's a
solid performer at a good price. 0
Mall Kenney is an associate editor.
CUp the chain In. A small splint clip holdS the
ends of fhe chain together. The chain turns a
sprocket OIl each screw, and lets you open alld
close bot h screws with one hand.
MAY!JUNE 1009 45
Dust-Proof
Any Tablesaw
Enclose the saw, direct the
dust, and you'll clear the air
BY RICHARD BABBITT
L
A
s a retired pilot living in Washington State's San
Juan Islands, I often fly cancer patients to the
mainland for treatment. Having witnessed the
plight of these patiL"1l1S, I bttame earnestly motivated to
minimize dust in my shop after the government catego-
rized wood dust as a carcinogen.
The major dust maker was my contractor's 5.1.W, one of an
estimated million such saws in this countly. Manufacturers seem
to have given little or no thought to dust collection beyond stick-
ing a dust port below the blade. The inefficiency of this system
is obvious every time a piece of wood is cut and the operator
becomes surrounded by a cloud of dust. To come up with a hel-
ter solution, I put on my pilot's cap and began to think about
airflow. By <lpplying aerodynamics to my I was ahle to
46 FINE WOODWORKING

FOLLOW THE FLOW
No matter which t ype of saw you hilve, the principl e
Is the same: Close off mO!it of the saw, allow rapid
ai rflow in a few key ilreas, and you'll send the dust
tOWflld the hose and not int o the shop,
ENCLOSE A CONTRACTOR' S SAW
You need an outfeid t able f rom Which you can suspend IS
00)( to enclose the motor. The base of a typical cont ractor's
saw already has e dust chute, so three small panels will
close off t he bottom; the rear one gets the dust port .
HOT· ROD THE
INSERT PLATE
Widen Ihe back of the slot in (j
zero-clearance insert plate 10
create suct ion where the dUst
usually shoots out. Increase
the effect by aadi ng a pair
of holes at the point where
Make holes where
teeth rise.


-
,. _ .. -..
'I .... in.·wide opening
Increases airflow ;rlte saw.
the come up (with t he blade
height set to 1 In).
Outfeed
Rear
panel
screwed
to side
panels
Motor box screwed
to frame of
outfeed table Filler
Bottom screwed
to sides
Left side
panel
4·jn. (lust
,mt
Rear panel
vastly improve dust collection, and keep Ihe motor cooler in
the pnx."Cs:;.
While I'll focus on the contractor's saw, the principl(;!; and tech-
niques WOrk on any saw. Two of Fine editors will
describe how they a hybrid s.'lW and a cabinet hltw.
Dust goes with the flow-if you di rect It
The average cont ractor':,; saw, wi th it . .:; open design, is equivalent
to sticking the du:.t hose in the middle of the t(X)m, Some dust-
laden air will be drawn in, but the majority will be too far from
the hose and will float off iOlo the shop. You need (0 iOl.'rease
the velocity by reStricting and directing the amount of air emcr-
in)/: the base of the saw. My plan uses three pieces of plyn'ood to
enclose tht;;: lower part of the saw, and five more to build a small
box around the rear-hanging motor. This enables me to direct the
airflow to the dust port,
This system a du<;t collector rated al a minimum of
1.100 cubic feet per minute (dm), Most I1f2-hp mobile <iu';t col-
lectors fir the bill, but if yours doesn't have a 1- or 2-micron filter,
www.fincwoodworking.com
you invest in one. The smallest particles are the most
dangerous.
Begin by enclOSing the motor-The moc:or enclosure is sus-
pended from an outk'cd table. TIle bracing under my Rockier
table is placed almost perfectly for this instaUation, but if you have
another outfeed table, you can either adapt the bracing or attach a
shopmade frame to the undC!'!lide of the table.
The first .'itep is to calculate the size of the box required to
enclose the motor at both the 0" and 45
0
blade settings. On most
contra<:tor's saws, the motor is mounted on a hinged plate and
bangs down behind the saw, supported by the drive belt. To make
the enclosure box as compact as posSible, you'll need to pull the
motor up slightly by shortening the belt. The easiest way to do
this is to buy 4 f1. of link belt (www.in-lineindustries.com).Be
sure to unplug your saw before working on it.
Because the motor will he completely sealed in, YOll can
move any helt guard. Now till the blade to the 4,)° position and
adjust the belt length to give III in. of clearance from the motor's
capacitor to the underside of the outfeed tahle. This io rum will
MAY/JUNE 2 0 0 9 47
BOX IN THE MOTOR
AS SMALL AS POSSIBLE
M.asure the
openint. After
Installing a /in"
belt to adjust the
height of the
motor, use a farre
measure and level
to find the height
of the motor·
enclosure b<»
you need.
To mi nimize the sil e of the bOll, the motor should be ':12 in. from
the outfeed table when the blade Is ti lted to 45', The motor box
dimensions refar t o Babbitt's Delta contractor's saw. Your saw may
r.eed a different-size box.
BACK VIEW
Side
screwed to bracing
underneath the
outfeed t<lolc
l ink belt
installed
1-in_ to 2·i l"l.
clearance
l·in. clearance
SIDE VIEW
Outfeed table
Sida panels notched
to receive oulfee<J..
table braci ng ---t'
Notch where leg
meets apron of
tablesaw
13
1
/0 in.
48 fINE WOODWORKING
'I2- i l"l.
I
1-in.
clearance
Ai r-intake slots in
rear panel
Motor
Attach the motor-boK sid ••. The sides can be screwed to the bracing
that supports your outfeed table. Cut the rigflt-hand side of the box to fit
the back of the tables<lw <lnd notch the top to go around the bracing.
Add the return.
On thIs right-tilt
saw, the left-hand
side of the mo-
tor box extends
past thO base of
Ihe saw 10 give
the motor room
to swing out
when tM "'ade Is
angled. To seal the
box, a Short return
panel is attaChed.
determine how far the motor hangs down at the 0" setting. To
get the vertical dimem; ions of the box, reset the blade tilt to
set a tape measure on the floor, run the tape up past the motor
to the underside of the outfeed table, and lock it. Hold a level
against the lowest part of the motor mount and across the tape,
note the ;md add 1 in. for clearance. This will be the
vertical dimension of the left, right, and rear panels (all references
to right and left are from the orx:mtor's position). Hold the level
vertically an inch away from the back of the motor and mark rhe
underside of the Olilfecd table.
Reg:in with the right side panel-I have a right-tilt saw. For
a left-tilt one, reverse the descriptions for the left and right side
pands. 111C right rand mllst seal against the rear apron of the
saw's base, plus a portion of the 7
0
splayed leg. I held a piece of
cardtxlard tightly again:;t the side and scribed it. \Y.,'e know the
height of the panel; for the Width, measure from the top of the
base to the line yOll made on the underside of the outfeed table.
Depending on the design, your saw may have an indent where
the vertical p"drt of the saw meets the leg. This is the wid-
est part of the right panel. Cut the pand to height and width, then
use the template to cut the profile to fir the tablesaw. Cut Hlots in
Loo/l( rot fap ..
Use weather-
stripping or duct
tape to close off
MY tJlps between
the motor boJI and
the tatllesaw,
Clos. Ute bo.ll. Screw on the tlack, Slots In the back panel allow air to
enter al hllh speed, coollnt the motor and picking up the dust
the top edge to accommodate bracing under the outfeed tabh:,
drywall to attach the panel 10 the bracing_
Making the left side panels-When the blade is angled at 45°,
the rYlO{Of extends beyond the left side of the saw. To allow for this,
the main left-side panel doesn't contact the back of the saw, It is the
same height as the right panel but III in wider and doesn't have to
allow for the indent or the leg. locate the left p-<lnel an inch
away from the tilted m()(or aocl attach it in the same way.
The gap hetween [he front of the left p:meJ and the left side
of the saw is enclosed by a short return panel. This panel's lOp
edge will bult up against the underside of the left table extension.
Scribe a piece of cardboard to measure the side splay of the !i3w's
left leaf k.-g and u:.e this to bands2w the retum panel to the correct
.. hare. "ow <;Crew the retum panel 10 the left side panel.
The bottom of the motor encLosure will be attached bter, but CUt
it to size now. Add )A In. to the for a shelf to receive the
rear panel. CUi a hole in the fronl for the power cord.
Create the dust-collection area In the saw's base
The base endo:.ure on my saw consist. .. of two side paneL .. and a
rear panel ,h<ll hOllses the dust port. Place a piece of cardboard
www.fincwoodworklng.com
SEAL THE REST OF THE SAW

..
AlI_ fM.o-
ceo. The base
side panels have
handles attached,
This makas It/sm
easier 10 Install
iJnd to remove for
saw' access.
seal the
under.lde ot
the table, Large
gaps between the
saw's tlase and
!able afe best
filled wfth a foam
sealant.
Add • aim",.
_I""'. A
made magnetic
panel cown HIe
curved slot for the
helgflt-adjustment
crank. Adjust
the openlnt to
achieve optimum
airflow,
MAYlJlJNI! 2009 49
How to dust-proof a hybrid saw
After reading Richard BabbH1:'s article, I was
curious whether I could achieve the &arne
results on my DeWalt hybrid saw. I knew the
base was open to the floor, but a closer in-
spection showed huge gaps between the base
and the tabletop, and even the legs and side panels did not nave a
good seal. Not surprisingly, dust colle<:tion was never Yery efficient.
Working wtth 8abbttt, I came up with a design that adopted the
principle of dirading the air.
The first task was to remove the plastic comtJ'natlon blade..
shroud and dust chute. Not havIng an easy way to create an angled
dust chute, I Installed a plywood flOOf In the base with a 2-1n. by
&.In. opening at the front. From this floor I hung the airway dust
chamber with the dust port at the rear. Not wanting to drill hOle!!
In tIKI legs, I secured the back panel to the with latches that
allow for easy access to tIN! Inside of the saw. Tne large gaps be-
tween the base and the table were filled wfth expanding foam seal-
ant; weathel'5trlpplng fliled the gaps between the sheet-metal legs
and the side panels, and small pieces of magnetic &heet (refrigera.-
tor magnets} covered holes around crank handles, etc.
The Improvement In dust coltectlon has been dramatic. During
several weeks of use that Included cutting medlurn-denstty flber-
board and plywood, almost no dust escaped the 5aW. Inside, the
motor and the mechanics remained remarkably clean.
-Mark Wof/ald /s the manat'nt editor.
AI, go •• In, du.t cornell out. Despife the semi-open .MSG, this hybrid
saw was successfully dust·proofed using the same principles emp/uyGd
on a contractors saw. Hlgh·speed air enters slots in t he rear panel, wash·
es over the motor, picks up dust f rom the blade, find exits at the bottom
\lla a 4·;n.-4l a. hose.
50 F1Nl-: WOODWOH!-..lNt;
CONSTRUCT AN AIRWAY OUST CHAMBER
like Babbitt 's con tractor"s saw, t his design draws i n cl ean ai r t hrough
the hack Slots and the tllt-control slot. But, instead of an angled dust
chute, a fl oor opens int o a lower dust chamber li nked to t he dust port.
Upper back panel permanently
attached to t he saw
Removable
lower back
panel
Latch
knob
Openi ng, 2 In. wiele
by 6 in. long
over the rear opening in the saw's base and mark the opening on
it. Add 1 V2 in. to the side;; <l nd tran;;fer this to the plywood.
The first Cut should he on the hottom edge with the blade till ed
to match the angle of the dust chute. After the sides of the
pand on the bancbaw, on center, draw a 4V2-in.·dia. circle with its
bottom 1104 in. from the lower edge of the panel. Cut this out with
a jigsaw. Now dri ll two deamnce hoks evenly sIXIced into each
leg, staying -% in. from the inside edge. Screw the panel to the legs
and seal the oottom of the interior with self-stick weatherstripping.
Now thm you are finished working on the back of the saw, you
can install the bottom pand of motor hox.
Make the lower side pands in the same way, using a cardooard
templ<l tc. Stick weatherstripping on the top edge of the panel".
Use fridge
magnets
Plastic magnetic sheet ,
often used for free adVer·
tisements, can be easily
cut to close small gaps,
like the one around the
blade-angle crank.

Even cabinet saws can
be improved dramatically
I WH skeptical that dust collection on my old
General 350 cabinet saw could be improved,
for two reasons. Arst, It was already mostly en-
closed. Second, I had already bultt a box to close off the one gap-
Ing hole In the cabinet- the square cutout that allows the motor
to pivot when the blade I, Ilflgled. But after seeing photos of my
saw, Babbitt suggested a number of modlfteations.
The best up,(,ade was to cut three siots In the plywood box,
located to send a .tream of ai, across the motor, cooling It and
helping to keep the gear. and trunnions dust..free.
Then, starting at the bottom of the saw, I replaced a perm&-
nent pile of dust with a three.part plywood floor to tunnel chips
toward the port. The next task was to direct some air across this
channel to push the dust to the port. A piece of plywood and a
metallouve, did the trick (below right). I then sealed other gaps
with expanding loam and weatherstripplne, used magnetic sheet
to cover screw holes and gaps around handles, and fitted an atJ.
Justable cover to the tUt-control slot.
After several months of use, there Is no buildup or dust around
the base of the saw, I get almost no dust coming off the back of
the blade, and when I remove tM Insert to k)ok Inside. the motor
and trunnions are VefY clean.
- Au Christiana Is the editor.
Front and back panels cont rol the airflow
We've now dosed otT .111 the confl icting :l ir inlets except for the
back panel and tbe lilt-<.'rank This is where we stan to
direct the airflow. CUI the back panel to fit the opening in the
rear Note where the motor is with rhe blade
vertical , and align the higb velocity air-intake slots so that the air
flOW5 over and around the illataI'.
There are a couple of ways to seal the tilt-crank slot; If you
live near a sign company, .'iee if you can acquire a piece of mag-
netic sign board large enough to cover the slot. Alternatively, cut
a scrap of iJ:Hn. -lhkk plywood 1 in . wider than the opening.
Drill tWO holes diagona ll y opposite each other and epoxy in two
magnet ...
Open and cJo.-;e fhb panel to fi nd the most effident airfl ow. Too
sm.tll an opening may starVe thot dust colle..."'tor of air and n:ducc
the !low; too large an openi ng lTlay reduce air velocity entenng
the rear of rhe saw. I generdlly kc::ep mine DpL"Il 1 V:z in. 10 2 in.,
and a liuJc wiill.., when mnmng a dado bbde. Afte r several hours
of usc, check for huil dup inside [he saw by removi ng
the hack pand or the inscrt plate. Some dust slo ped on the sides
away from the main airflow is normal. You aren't attempting to
get all the dw,t uut of the saw. ju.. .. t to get the vast majori ty into
the dust collector, not your nasal passages. 0
Woodwolker Ricflard Babbitt attempts 10 keep ttJe air clear in hiS shOp Or)
San Juan ISland, Wash.
www.finewoodwor kin g.com
Add Im.Q. Christiane had a plywood boX coveri ng the mot or openIng.
So he Just routed /hree slots. posJtioned to wash cool air aver the motai'.
'nt.'.". floor.
fa Channel dust
toward the aust
port, Install
II noor In the
base, willi two
p/ywooa side
panels angled
downward.
Let .1, sweep tile froor. A thin plywood panel blocks al/ of tile louver
slots In the acee55 door. exctlpt t he lowest. Because that slot Is stili sev-
era/Inches above the new floor, install a slleet-metallower fO a/reef In-
coming air aown to the floor. Attach t ho panel wi tll COIlstrtlcfion tlahes/ve.
MAY/JUNF 2009 51
How we tested
NORTHWEST
Salem, Ore.
Lots 01 cool temperatures and
high humidity. On average, only
one day In five Is sunny.
We treated live wood species with five outdoor
finishes. To find out how the samples would hold up
over the course of the year to the weather In dIfferent
reglons of the country, we sent a rack of sample
boards to Oregon. New Mexico, and louisiana. while
one stayed In Connecticut. Each regIon subjected the
s!lmples to .. unique set of climate conditions. The
data represent average numbers.
NORTHEAST
Brld&eport, Conn.
Seasonal temperatures ( - F)
(high/low)
Winter: 48/34
Summer: 79/50
Relative humidity
(AM/PM)
Winter: 74%,187"
Summer: 43%/ 85%
Sunny days: 77
RaInfall: 39 In.
Snowfall: 7 In.
SOUTHWEST
Albuquerque, N.M.
Plenty of sunshIne.
not much rain. and
low humidity make
for a wood-friendly
environment.
NM
Seasonal temperatures ( " F)
(high/low)
Winter : 49/24
Summer: 91,162
Relative humidity (AM/PM)
Wlnte,: 38%/ 61%
Summer: 25%/ 51%
Sunny days: 167
Rainfall : 91n.
Snowfall: 10 In.
T
he great outdoors isn't great for wood. No matter if iI's a
fallen maple nee in the back wocrls or an Adimndack chair
in the backyard, nature wants to convert all dead wood
into compost.
Sunlighl and moisture do a lot to start the process. Sunlight, par-
ticularly the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength, causes a chemical deg-
radation in wood. Muisture absorbed by [he wood fibers c a l l s e ~
them [0 expand and comract, and that produces surface chl.'Lks.
Then, too. the free7.ing and thawing cycles common in northern
www.fint:wuudworking.com
In winter. freezing and thawing
cycles aren't kind to wood.
Seasonal temperatu,es/"F)
(high/low)
Winter; 38/24
Summer: 80/63
Relative humidity (AM/ PM):
Winter: 58,*,/ 11%
Summer: 61%/78%
Sunny days: 99
Rainfall: 42 In.
Snowfall: 261n.
Seasonal temperetures (OF)
(high/ low) SOUTHEAST
Winter: 63/44
Summer: 90/72
Relative humidIty (AM/PM)
Winter: 66%/ 85%
Summer: 65%/ 91%
Sunny days: 101
Rainfall: 62 In.
Snowfall: 1.41n.

New Orlean_, lao
Hot and humid summers.
Plenty 01 rain. FreezIng and
thawing cycles are as rare In
LouiSiana as snowy owls.
climates can exacerbate the weathering process. leEr unfinished,
a new pie<:e of furniture can stan to look old in a few weeks. in
a year, it can look ancient.
So to help outdoor furniture withstand [he elements. a protec-
tive finL<;h is a must. And if yuu w;mt (0 t;ee and enjoy the wood,
you're going to want a dear finish rather than paint.
There are several types of (·It-oIr finish made for outdoor use. Blll,
as we discoven.-d in a yearlong tl.·st, they don't all deliver. Some
offered almost no long-term protection. Others did conSiderably
MAY /JUNE 1009 53
WATeo EXTERIOR WOOD FINISH
START CT OR LA NM
---
. -
-_.-
Source:
www.fuslOleum.com
Price: $14jqt.
AppilcaUon: Two coats.
each applied liberally
ROlults: The outdoor penetrating
011 finish was t he eaSiest t o apply,
but at the end of the yearlong test,
all the samples, except fOf those in
New Mexico, had weattJelea to
Shades of gray. All UlO samples had
rough surfaces Shallow cracks and
cllecks were common. SOme pine
sa mples had full-thickness checks on
the end.
Rating: Unacceptable
belter. Hut our did more than hdp us find a couple of good
outdoor finishes It ,Iiso showed us how .<;eVer.J.1 different wood
species hold up to the And, it gave us new insiglu into
the t:ffc<..1 {)( d imate on borh finish and wood.
Testing tells the tafe
TIlt' teSI evaluated the four types of fi nhh u.o;ed most often OUt-
doors: pent:trdtmg oil. water-based polyurethane, marine spar
,'amish, and marine extra-UV-filtet varnish, plus a comho that
one fini$her louted in;to e:J, rlier issue ("A Durable Exterior Finish:
fWW"-l79), epoxy and marine cxtra-UV-tiIler varnish. Also. to see
if lht: wood 5pecies made a difference. we applied each finish to
five different w()(xk ct:dar, ipC. mahogany, pine, and white oak.
All. excep( for pine, afe known to hold up to the outdcxJrs bettet
than Finally, IU see how geography factor; in, we ran thc
tcst in four regions of the tnbed State..:; .. vitll distim:.tly different
cl imau'''S: the Northeast (Connecticut), Nonhwest SOl.1lh·
west (1'I.ew MeXico). a nd Southeast (louL,>i.'t na).
F.ach wood ,<;.ample wa<; >A in. thit: k by 6 in '" ide by 8 m. long.
For aU the sample<; of each wocx:l came lrom the,;.arne
board. And every coat of firush was applied equally to both side:.
and all edges. Each fioi:-. h was applied according to the rnanufac-
tmer's recomrnendation<; .. hown on the lanel.
We buW four test racks, e'dch designed to hold 25 One
rack wcnt up on the fl at roof of our Connecticut office buildinJl (a
perfect out-of-the-way location. we thought, until summer arrived
. .

ZAR EXTERIOR WATER· BASED POLYURETHANE
. '-
{;.;,
, rwth_t'-I
"lLro ,
t-l.
""- .. ----
........, ....
Source:
www.ugl.com
Price: $22/qt.
Application: Three
coats
Results: On everage. about 20% of
the finish had det enorateCl . resulting
in areas ot weathereCl gray. Where the
flnlSh remained. much of It showed
areas of flaking and chi pping.
The mix of grayed wood and remaining
finish produced on unsightly monied
look.
Rating: Unacceptable
54 FINE WOODWORKING
START CT OR LA NM
======
McCLOSKEY MAN O'WAR MARINE SPAR VARNISH
Source:
www.mCCloskey
finishes.com
Price: $20/qt.
Application: Four
coats
Result s: The Ilnish generally held
up well on the mahogany. lpe, and
pine. Same with the cedar samples.
except for the one that visited New
Mexi co---tl1at one showed some fi nish
deterioration. The wh ite oak samples
had the tOllghest time, with about 40%
of the f inish deteriorating.
Ratint: Fair to good
START
and a colony of hornets built a ne!>! at the trapdoor leading to the
rooO; the other three went to om regional testers. All the racks
wt!fe JXlsilioned to face .south, ensuring maximum exposure to th€
sun, with the samples tilted at 45° to prevent standing water.
What we learned
After 12 months outckxJrs, all the samples came home to the FWW
shop. The results are shown on these pages. For space reasons,
we only included photos of the white oak (a light-colored, open-
grained wood) and ipe (a dark-..:olored, dose-grained wood).
One thing was immediately obviOus: The sampks finisheu with
oil suffen:d the most. All five wood species in all four
had roughened surfaces. With the exception of those from New
CT OR LA , NM
Mexico, all the bright surface colors had been replaced by various
of gray. Abo, all the samples showed end-gf'"Ain check..,,; and
surface cracks, most of them minor. The pine samples, however,
showed several end-gr::tin checks that extended the full thkkness
of the wood.
In fact, the oiled wood didn't look any better than unfinished
wood exposed to tilt, same conditions. So unless you want to
reapply the 011 every couple of months, don't hother with it.
Although fari ng better than penetrating oil, both the exterior
water-based polyurethane and the spar varnish were disappoint-
ments. All the water-based poly samples showed deterioration,
some minor hut most closer to major. Spar varnish held up shghtly
heuer, with a 50/50 splil between major and minor levels of
EPIFANES HIGH GLOSS MARINE VARNISH
Source:
WNW.epifanes.com
Price: $45/Qt .
Application: Seven
coat s, t hinned per
instructions
Results: No sign of finish
deterioration, no SIgn of flaki ng or
chi pping. Sampl es showed only the
sl ightest change in color. Mind you.
it takes a while to apply the seven
required coats.
Ratine: Very good
www.fi new oodworki n g.com
START CT I OR LA NM
-
..
,
,
MAY!]UNE 2009 55
SMITH & CO. PENETRATING EPOXY SEALER
UNDER EPIFANES MARINE VARNISH
START CT : OR ' LA I NM
Source:
www.smithandcompany.org
Price: $42jqt. plus $45/qt.
Appli cati on: Three coats
plus five coats Epifanes (unthinnedj
Results: No sign 01 finish
deteriOration, no sign of flaking or
chippi ng. Only the slightest ctlange
in colOr.
Rating: Ver y good
deterioration. The sp-.tr-varnish pine sample from New Mexico
was an exceptIon, as it held up pn.>tty well.
Without questiOn, the marine exu3-lN-filter and the
epoxy plus marine varnish lookl."CI the best. 1be colors maintained
much of their Surface cracks, checks, or defecL'; were
almost nonexistent. Thl· only reason I rated them "very good"
rarher than "excellent" be<.:'au,-;e the colors changed slightly
during the yearlong test: The ipC lightened. The: white ook light-
ened, but only a biro The cedar and pine darkened. The mahogany
darkened, except in New Mexico, where it lighccO(.·d slightly.
Interestingly, the samples frum New Mexico sutJen..'"<i the least.
On::gon samples did better than those from ("..onnooicut and loui-
siana. The Connecticut samples looked the worst for wear. So,
accordiojO: to our test, moisture causes more weathering than UV
light. When moistme combines with freeZing and thawing <.yeles,
as is common in northern statt!:., the wood weathers even more.
As far as wOcXl species go, the cedar and ire samples held up a
bit better than the others. Mahogany and white oak showed slight-
ly mort.! weilthering. The pine boards had the- toughest time.
Choosing a fayorlte
"1111: Epifancs finbh and held up equally and the
work to apply them was about the same. Forced to pick a favorite.
I'd take the Epif.mes. because it is one product, not two. 0
Tom Begnill is an associate editor.
Which finish is right for you?
il1t new. After
about a year out-
doors. this project
finiShed wnh
Eplfanes 1001<.$
almo$t a$ good
as It did after Its
first day.
56 FTNF
If you like the rus-
ric look of weath-
ere(! wood. don'r
(Watco) didn1
have a visible ef-
fect after a year,
But IpC, cedar.
and mahogany
weathered the
t ' f
____ _
Four clever ways
to keep a drawer
in its place
BY PETER TURNER
A
,,·dl-fiLlCd, smooth-gliding inset
drawer is a testament to fine furni-
Ufe making. This type of drawer,
ofren made with half-blind dovetails at the
front and through-dovetails at the back,
into a pocket built into a case or a table.
In a cast.' pi<.:ce, the drawer usually is sup-
ported on a frame; in a taole, it slides on
a rail ami runners, steered in and out of
the pocket hy guides.
But the unseen grunts of the drawer
pocket are the stops, which
serve as the brakes 10 kl'l!p a dr ... wer from
heiog pushed in too far Gn-stops) or un-
expcct(;.'(]!y pulled out too far
Stop$ also help keep the draw!;:r reveal
consistent, whether you want a flush draw-
er front or one that's recessed a bit.
I've screwed in-slOps hchinJ the front
rail, and I've mortised them into the rail
(see pp. 58-')9). For uut-stops, r favor
a couple of clever mechanisms (see
pp. 60-{)1).
There arc :,impler method:; to :,top
a drawer. Hut I stick to these few be-
cauSl.: thcy arc positivc and
durahle, making
them worthy of
__ furniture.
PeterTumer is a furniture maker
in Portland, Maine. To see more of his
worlc, visit www.peterstumer.com.
MAY/J U NE 2009 57
In-stops
Thin rail? Put the stop behind it
Top rail
Slop. 'I. in. thick V. in. wide,
with grain oriented
Stop hits near bottom
of drawer front.
I
n my furnit ure, grain typically plays an Important role-
whether I'm looking to play up contrast or work toward
seamless transitions between parts. When building tables
with drawers, [ often cut the drawer lace and Its ralls, aballe
and below, from the SBme plank and then Install them In the
same order they were oriented In the plank.
This method has two advantages. First, It unifies the front
of the piece, with a continuous grain match from the top rail to
Stop Is screwed to
bac k of lower rail.
m.
In.
Drawer front and rail 5 8re
cut from the same board to
ensure thickness is Ihe same.
the bottom. Second, because I rip the parts after they've been
Jointed and planed, they are identical in thickness. This allows
me to Install two stops on the back of the bottom rail, making
it easy to create flush drawers. The back of the drawer face,
below the drawer bottom, rests against the face of the applied
stop. If I want Inset drawer fronts, I Just dial In the setback by
creating a small step in the stop. You'll need a full In. below
the drawer bottom to accommodate the stop.
Two at. time. Mill one piece of hardwood to thickness and width, then coun·
tersink a hole on each end. Round over the ends and cut off the two stops.
Home on the r.II. Screw the stops behind the rail, one on
each end, about 2 In. from the sides of the drawer pocket.
58 FI NE WO O D W O R KING Phot,,,,, lborn .... McKcn",, : drawings; John
On a wide rail, mortise it in
HmdwoOO stoP. % In. thick
by 'I. in. wide by ¥. in. long
Stop hits near bottom
of drawer front.
~ "
I
f the lower front rail Is wide enough, I otten mortise two
l-shaped stops Into It to keep a drawer flush with the front
of the case or dial In the reveal of a recessed drawer. With this
system, you need to cut tile mortises for the stops before glu-
ing up the piece. But a mortised stop Is bulletproof and will
keep a drawer In piac;:e forever.
Use a ',4-in. straight bit to rout the mortlaes for the two
stops. The distanc::e from the front of the rail will depend on
the reveal of the drawer, but be sure the mortises ar. tar
enough away from the drawer pocket sides that you can use 8
shoulder plane to fine-tune the stops after installation. Square
up the ends of the slots with a chiseL
Make the stops out of a stralght-iralned harcfWood stick
that'll about »Ii In. thick by % In. wide. I've used hickory and
ash. but any deMe hardwood will do. Cut a lip on ea"h end
of the stick before "uHfng the stops to length. The length of
the stops depends on the clearance below the drawer bottom,
usually"" In. I typically leave ~ . In. of clearance above the
s.top, so It won't ever rub the drawer bottom.
After Installation, the front of the stop's lip can be planed
to flt a drawer flusn or to Inset the drawer front. Take light
passes. and check the drawer alignment often.
www. l inewoodwork i ng. C0111
~
IIfoo In . IS
typical.
/
"'"
I
~ ,
'II in.
'Aa in.
'I
~
Drop In the stop __ After gluing up fhe case. Install the stops In their
morllst's. Just remember to orient the lip outlovard.
Ohtl fn the reveal. Insert Ill e drawer to check lis alignment. Ttlen trim
tile slop as needed. using a shoulder plane set for an ultralight cuI.
MAY/JUNE 2009 59
Out-stops _____ ~
Rotating stop spins on the kicker
Drawer back Slop hits tlack
of drawer.
A
SP,nner stop Is a clever way to keep a drawer from being pulled out of Its
pocket; the only dowI'ISlde 18 that you must cut a notch In the drawer back.
Make the spinner Y.z In. square by :1. In. long out of a durable hardwood-I
often use aah. Then cut a notch, Cilntered in the top edte of tho drawer back,
that provides Vi In. of cleararte;:e around the stop. The stop Is drilled to receive
a round-head screw wltn washer.
Position the stop below the tabletop or kicker so that one-quarter of the
drawer'. Isneth will remain In the pocket. For example, If too drawer Is 1.3 in.
long from front to back, the spinner would be positioned so that Its screw is
2"1a In. Into the drawe, pocket. With a 1f.t.in.-thlck drawer back, this drawer will
come to rest alalnst the stop with about 10 In. of drawer exposed. Any fI'IOre
and there could be too much downward lever·
age on tIM drawer when tulty extende1:l .
The stop also aligns with the notch In
the drawer back. You want the screw loose
enough that the stop can be spun, but . n u ~
enough that there's no wobble In the connec-
tion. If the sound of wood hitting wood bues
you, glue a piece of leather to one face of the
spinner to act as a cushion.
To Install the drawer, spin the stop so that
It clears the notch In the drawer back, and
then spin It parallel to the drawer back to
lock the drawer In the pocket.
60 F I NE WO ODWO R KI NG
ROlbl e stop to remore
Of insert drawer.
#6 by '1. ·in.
pan· head screw
"i*"i n. hole f or
screw and washer
%:r-i n. cleara nce hole
Hardwood spinner.
¥.:! in. square by
1 ir1 .lon/l
Make .. spinner. With the spinner slock milled
to w/<1th and thickness. drill t/le holes for the
screw and washer (Jeft). After cuftlng t/le spin·
ner tQ length. screw It In place.
Spring-loaded stop is mortised into top rail
Tongue nits
back of drawer.
Drawer locked
In pocket
T
his sptl nCY ash st op angl es down to hit the Inside of the drawer back, but can
be pressed up 110 that the drawer can be remoyed. Housed In a mortise In the
upper rail , the stop has two parts: a flat tongue and a wedge-shaped base.
The anile of the base and the length of the ton,CUe will depend on the depth
of your drawer. Again, a good rule of thumb Is to leave at least a quarter of the
drawer"s length In tna pocket In the open. stopped position.
Cut the soiled base on the band saw, then glue it onto the tongue so that the
grain Is aligned. let the assembly dry, drill a nole and countersink for a screw,
then mount the 8$Sembly Into Ita mortis •.
Press up on IMsue
to release drawer.
Tongue, 3(., in.
t hick by 1 In. wide
by 3'Y4 i n. long
'I, In.
www. fi no:wo o d worki n g .com
I 'll i
Front rai l
FInd the rltht antJe. Lower the blado of a bevel
gauge until ft hits the back of the drawer (top).
Transfer that angle to a small block and cut the
eng/ed base on the bandsaw.
Mak. til. t l l p ~ r . Glue the flat tongue to Its
anglad base.
Install It. Screw the stop Inside Its mortIse.
Countersink the hole so the screw doesn't protrude.
\l.AY!J CNE 2009 61
These 4 rolls will help you cut cleanly,
layout clearly, and clamp securely
BY ADRIAN FERRAZZUTTI
S
OIIlt! of you will sneer at the th()ught that something
as humble as Sticky tape can help your
woodworking. But don't be snick up about tape. I'll
bet you will find in this article at least one use for tape
that will makt:! you a better woodworker.
But before YOll start peeling and slicking, it hel[>:'l to be-
come familiar with the different types oftapc. useful
for woodworking: green and blue painter'S tape, packing
tape, and double-faced tape.
62
Green painter's tape is a great all-purpose shop tape. Un-
like fC.bTlilar white masking tape, it has a low tack, which
means it will release from wood with less chance of pull-
ing out the fibers. However, it's noc: that strong. It snaps if
too much pressure Lo; applied, so don't use it as a damp
when gluing.
TIle blue painter'g (ape I use is the 14-day-release type
(3M, "2090) rJ.ther than the 6O-iliLy type, which has a lower
fINE WOODWOIIKtNG
tack. I prefer the crepe style over the because it
stretches better, pulling and joints together. Com-
pared with green tape, bl ue tape a fair bit of force
hefore it snaps, so it can handle light clamping tasks. It has
greater tack but releao.;es well. It also cost'; more.
Packing tape is a great choice for damping where tradi-
tional are cumbersome. It has great stretch hefoTe it
which tmoslates into of damping force. PaLidng
tape is also very handy as a glue-release surface. Tape the
contact surfaces of bending and cauls to prevent
them from being glued to your work.
Double-faced tape is a great hdpin,ll; hand for hardware
installation. The many types vary in thickness and adhe-
sion. [ use a thin, type as well as turner'S
tape. which is thicker with a very aggressiw adhesion.
Adrian Ferrazzutri is a furniture maker in Guelph, Ont, Canada.
Eliminate
tearout
E\len when combined
with a In-
sert, the best sawblades
can cause cross""aln
chipping. particularly on
plywood. To prevent this,
apply a strip of green tape
straddling the cut line on
the downward-faclne: side.
Green tape 15 a better
choice than blue, because
It Is le.s prone to pulling
out wood flbers when
removed.
Pros. dawn the tolllpe firmly. really tubblnt It on the wood surface. To minimi.l.e edge blowout as the blade
611its 1119 CuI. F9frazzutt/ continues 'he tape around the edge To pre'o'enf this end section of tape from acting
like a shIm and making t he cut slightly off square, he wraps a small strip of tape on the other end of the piece
that is In contact with the crosscut fanea (2). Once the cut has been made, he gently peels away the tape to
revea's edge (3),
Stretch it for extra clamping force
It's hard to attach
edging to curves with
conventional clamps,
but packing tape works
wonderfully. To get the
thickness of the edg.
banding that he wants
without makln& It too
stiff to benCl, Ferrazzuttl
creates the banding
from two thlnrHIr strips.
He e88811 the outside
comer. of outer
strip with a block plane
to prevent the tape
from breaking as It Is
stretched.
Stan clampint from the center outw. rd. Stretch the tape out w.ard as If YOII)"e trying to break It. then wrap It down
the (aces o( the panel (left). Check that the edging overhangs both sides of the panel. rerrazzuttlilkes to leave the
edging long.so he can locate the last tape strip way out off the panel (or to«! pressure at the comer (rltht).
www.finewoodworking.com MAY/JUNE 2009 63
Clamp edge.bandlnt
with fape. Stretch the
tape outward, then wrap
It down the faces of the
panel (top). Check that
the edging overhangs both
sides of the poJnel. You can
a/so use rape to clamp
solid-wCJO(J corner banding
to plywood boxes (aboVe).
Remove the tape In the
direction of the grain to
duee the risk of pulling out
wood (right).
64 FINE WOODWORKING

Apply straight edge-banding
When clamping edge-bandlng to plywood, tape Is much easier to
use than masses of regular clamps. Mill the edging about II. In.
wider than the thickness of the panel, and ease the outside
comers of the edging so that the tape doesn't break when it Is
stretched. To make tile glu&-up go faster, tear off a number of
pieces of tape and line them up on your bench.
Apply glue to the strip, but not the core. This helps prevent the
plywood from .welllng while you are clampln,. Slide the banding
back and forth until there Is squeeze-out along the entire joint on
both sid ••. Starting from the center, stick each tape strip to the
banding, and tllen with equal pressure pull each end of the strip
out and then down firmly onto both sides of the panel. After the
glue is dry. remove the tape by pulling It as close as possible In
line with the grain; this is less likely to pull out wood flbers than
pulling the tape across the grain.
Bring the edging almost flush with the plywood veneer using
a block plane or cabinet scraper. Then switch to a carll
,craper (below) until you start getting shavings hom the veneer.
SAFE EDGES PROTECT SURFACES
Control ",he,.. )'OV cut, Create a card scraper with a "safe' edge
by wrapping some tape around the end that Is ewer the veneered
panel (top). To make a "safe ' rile to flush the ends o( edge-bandlng,
wrap tape around the ffont of the file (bottom).
No-clamp f lu. up.
Lay tile four sides of
the box on it bench,
using a straightedge
for alignment. Stretch
short strips of tape
across tile center of
the Joints, then long
pieces along the
entire length (top).
Flip the assembly,
apply glue. Insert the
bottom of the boJe,
and rolf the assembly
togetllfN (center). For
tho last comor. simply
stretch short strIps of
tape across the Joint
(bottom).
www.fincwoodworking. com
Assemble a mitered box
Miters are difficult to g1ue up with tradition-
al clamps because the s l ~ t e s t Imbalance
In pressure can cause a side to squirm out
of posltktn. By apptying uniform pt'Usure to
all roor corners, tape overcomes thl!l prob-
tem. Stretch strips of blue tape aeron the
centers ot the three adjoining iDlnts, then
stretch ktng pieces of tape along the entire
length 01 the three Joints. The number of
strips will depend on the width of the mIter
Joint. For thi, 5-ln.·tall boll:, two .trlps are
enough. By slightly stretching the tape, the
Joints are pulled tIght and may even overlap
very sUthtiy.
Alp over the assembly and apply glue to
the bevels of the miters. Insert the bottom
01 the box and begin rolling the assembly
together. The tape provides clamping pres-
sure and acts as a hinge, keeping tM .Ide.
aliened. For the last corner, simply stretch
short strips 01 tape across the jOint. Check
lor square; you may need to lightly tap down
a corner to maintain a flush edge.
tt's a good Idea to reinforce thi s type of
Jolm using splines. leave the tape on when
cutting the sktts on the tablesaw to avoid
tearout, but remove It belore gluing In the
apllnes to avoid the risk of tape getting
glued In with the spline.
Perfect 5"llrt • • 'ots. To avoid tearout, leave the tape In place
when cutting the 5/ot5 on the table5aw.
MAY/JUNE 1009 65
Combine them to simplify hinge installation
Locat. the hlnte mortl_. Apply gl'e'en tape to tho hlnte area and attach
a piece of double-faced tape to one leaf of the hinge (left). Then temporar-
ily secure the hinge In Its flnal/oear/on with double-faced tape and use a
sharp X-Acto knife to scribe around the hinge (center}. Peel away the cut-
out section of tape, leaving II ell/se/Jne templafo. Chop ilWily the bulk of
the OroD while staying about >,.i, In. Inside the tape perimeter, then make a
paring cut along the I/ne (right).
An III-fitting door wild Is an eyesore. so you should install your
hlnte. precisely. I oriJ:!nally d .... eloped this technique to achieve
dean Inlays In dark wood •• uch 88 wenge, walnut, and ebony,
where scribed pencil or knife lines are difficuH to.eo twen In the
best of 11,1lt. I now use It when inlaying on all woods, and when
installl", hinces and locks on doors and boxes,
Apply some Creen tape to the Meas of the case where the
hln.es will be located, Then apply some thin doubl&-faced tape to
an outside leaf of each hlnee.
After placing the hinge in the exact location desired, use a
sharp X·Acto knife to serl.,. around tl1e hinge, cutting throueh the
tape. Peel away the tape from the field that needs to be chopped
out, leaylng the rest of the tape lIS a template surrounding the
hinge area. Once the bulk of the wood II removed, place the back
edge of a chisel against the edge of the tape
and elye the chisel a light tap with a mallet.
The thin lip of the tape will act like a stop. Pro-
ceed around the outline until the flnal size of
the recess has been defined.
Place the hinge In the teee .. and apply
a plece of doubl.faced tape to tlH!t outSide
surface. Now place a piece ot &:reen tape on
the door or lid where the hinge will be located,
maklnt SUfe tl1e tape extends down the edge.
Allen the door to the cabinet or the lid to the
box, pr8$$ It down on the hln&:e&, and then
remoye It with the hinge stuck to the Ireen
tape. Scribe around the hinge with a knife, and
use a marking pu,. set to the thickness of a
hinge's leaf to mark the depth ofthe recess.
Peel off the tape, remoye the waste, Install the
hinge, and close a perfectly aligned door.
66 t'JNt: WUUUWI.)1{JUN(j
Derermlne tho hinto
'ocatlon. Set the hinge
in the mortise and
apply double-faced
tape 10 the back of the
other leaf (aboVe). Appty
green tape to the hinge
area of the lid Of door
and carofully lower it
into position. Uft off
the lid or door and the
hinge will stick to it
Cleft). Scribe around the
hinge and excavate the
mortise in me same
way as Defore.
Lo"W-Cost
Lumber
With 12 great choices, you're
bound to find a few near you
BY MATT KENNEY
L
ike most woodworkers, I love
lx.wduLifuI wood. And I W.lnt to u;;c
the best r can fInd in the furniture
I make. Woods like cherry, walnut, and
white oak, however, can cost $6 or P
per hoard foot, and much more in 5OIl1t!
regions, Even in the best of limes, that
adds up quickly. In these hard times,
with everyune's purse strings cinched
tighter, it's not easy to drop several hun-
dred dollius on wood.
It's ro.·.sihle to find cherry and wal-
nut for less than retail if you buy
green lumber from a :>mall sawmill
and dry it yourself, or if you're ahle
to cut your own lumber. But those op-
tions are not open to everyone.
That's why I began to look around for
.mme furniture woods that were high in
quality but lower in cost. I asked editors
and longtime authors, I queried lumber
dealers around the country. and I scoured
the Intem(.-1:. I W'dS givt:n plenty of sUAAe:'4
tions for low-cost w(x)ds, but not all of
them panned out.
In the c'nd, I whittled down the list to
12. True, most aren't suitable for high-style
period furniture, but they work beautifully
for almost everything else. Better yet, all
cost kss than $5 per board foot , SOlOl'
much less_ Mind you, these prices arc for
rough lumber. You'll pay more if you need
it surfaced.
Here's something else I learned. It makes
sense to ruy local. Being from the South,
I've used white ash for furniture and never
paid more than $2 per Ixlard foot. Bllt I'd
never heard of aspen or red alder, which are
available out West, and at bargain prices,
So take a look at these low
4
cost but
overlooked furniture woods, find one that
grows in your area, and head Ollt to the
lumberyard. Don't let the economy keep
you from making beautiful furniture.
Mart Kenney is an associate editor.
___ _______ Behind the numbers ___ _
The best way to Identity a wood's hardness, worlQlbility, and pro<:U¥lly to warping and checking, without using subjedl¥e terms sUl:h
as fair, good, hard, or soft, Is With numbers. That's why we give the 5pel:ifll: gravity and pen::cnt shrinkage for each specIes listed.
MoNt Information about wood shrInkage can be found by visitIng the Forest Products Laboratory Web site at www.fpl.fs.fed.us.
A wood's speclfll: ,ravlty speaks to how hard, dense, and
hea¥)" it is. The higher a wood's specific the tougher and
stronger it is. basically. These numbers also mean that cherry
and walnut are easier
to work-by hand or
white
oak.
WOOD TYPE
Cherry
Walnut
White oak
SPECIFIC
r
GRAVITY
0.50
0.55
0. 68
7.1
7.8
The percent shrinkage indicates 8 wood's stability. There are
three numbers to consider: tangential and radial shri nkage.
taken on their own. and the ratio of the two, As the ralio of
3. 7 1. 9
5.5 1.4
tangential to radial
shrinkage gets
nigher, wood Is more
pr one to warping.
10.5 5.6 1.8
MAY/JUNE ZOO'} 67
" ... erage pri ce: $2-$3 bd. h.
Speclflc gr .... ft ': 0.064
Pe rcent shrinkage;
Tangontial11 .9, Radial 5.5
T/ R ratio 2.2
Ayer";e pri ce: $3--$4 bd. ft.
Specific gravlt )': 0.72
Percent s hrlnk_.e:
Tangential 10.5. Radial 7.0
T/R rat io 1.4
Ayerilge price: $1-$2 1lI:l. ft.
Specific , raylt)': 0.42
Percent shrinkage:
TangentialS.2, Radial 4.6
T/R ratio 1.8
68 F I NE WOODWOIlKI:-IG
Available throughout the United States
Beech
Once favored for handplanes and othe,
tools, beech Is toulh. even-grained, at-
tractive, Bnd fairly easy to work. It has
the soft, flesh)' tones of pear, with very fine,
light flecks. Beech isn't known for Its stability,
so design accordingly.
ollk Is mllKullnft. bftech Is feminine, and
se.q too."
-Ga"ett Hack., contrlbutlnt ed/tor
Hickory
With a warmth and tone similar to raw
ChtHf),. hickory is a beaulltul furniture
wood, even If doesn't darken with age. It'.
extremely difficult to work with hand tool.,
but power tools can get the Job done. Be wary
of cracka: Once one starts, It tends to dive
deeper. There are seyeral types of hickory.
shagbark being common, but there's Ilttl.
difference among them.
"Hickory otten has wonderful. flamfH/ke
"'.'n patterns like walnut or butternut. The
more I us. hickory, the more I like It ...
--Petet Turner. ftequent contributor
Poplar __
Poplar Is often used as 8 secondary wood
In furniture, and most woodworke,. are
hesitant to let It take center stage. One
reason Is Its Creen streaklnc. which some
tr)' to hide under a coat of stain. But .tainln,
doesn·t work well, because poplar I. prone to
blotchlnt. Instead, finish with 011 and let the
poplar 8&e e:racafully.
"The creamy color 0' poplat ate. to a mel-
low told, while the treen streaks turn da,k
brown. A"anted with care, thHe colo,. can be
U$&d to nice .ffect. ..
-MIke Pekovlch, FWW art director
SnNIII 5e./e, bit .".ct. Scott King (BarlJados)
used tho soft lonos and understated ,rain of
beech to great effecrln this tabletop treasure
box, where garish grain would have upset the
del/cacy of the small parts.
5tren.,h
aodlNauty.
Renowned
woodworker
James Krenoy
(Calif.) put
the strength
of hickory to
good use. The
hickory legs

.. and frame are
delicate bill
strong enough
to support tills
pear cabinet.
Hltkontr • • t wood. In this bench by Pekovlch
(Conn. ), the light and dark streaks of the poplar
top add visual Interest and blend well with Ihe
walnut base.
Sma,t qu"ts loud t raIn. Tills writ·
Ing riosk by Stephen Lamont (Alton, England}
proves that red oak. despite Its dark grain lines.
can have a subdued beauty.

tlt_,""
_ ble price.
Pekovfr:h found
the curly maple
for ttlis Stlaker
side tabla by
dlt£ting through
the SOrt-m8p/f1
bin at a local
hardWood
dealer.
Red oak
Plaln.awn red oak, wfth big cathedrals of
grain swathed In stain and encaHd In poSy-
urethane,ls often aSl&OClated wtth factory.
made furniture that hlh little personaltt,.. But
rlft- or quartersawn red oak Is a dtfferent story.
The &tralttrt crain adds a clean, linear ehtment
to furniture, and Its subtle ray fleck shimmeNl.
It's often stacked, and priced, wtth the plain-
sawn stuff. You'll sometimes find curly boards
In the same stack.
"Quartersawn red oak Is .'eek, handsome,
hard wearIng, and It works
-Maflo Rodriguez, frequent contributor
___ Soft maple
It'. hard to believe that soft mapte Isn't
more popular as a primary wood. It hal a
uniform color and a nice grain pattern that
Is often Indlstlngullhabte from hard maple,
and It's much easier to work, SOft maple Is
great for ebonW",. There's mor. than one
spe<:les sold al soft maple, but they're all
maple, and are essentially the same.
"Often, flgured soft map'e Isn't .eparated
out from the re'u'.r boards. So to find It, you
only nefll to dig through the stack."
-Roland Johnson, contributing editor
-------White ash
.... lIflful CllfYe •• The wishbone cunes of
this chair and desk by Doug Chamblin (Ore.)
display the beauty. strength, lind bendabillty
of whlt6 asn.
uss dense than oak, white alh Is a joy to
work with hand tools. It's easy to work with
machines and power tools, too. Given Its
weiCht, ash II tremendoulUY strong, and It
Iteam-bends very well, even when klln-dtled.
So It's a Creal woOd tor chairs or any furniture
parts, like legs and aprons, that might be
curved. And the rich, creamy color of white
ash makes It a great wood fo. fine furniture.
"Quarters.awn boards, stili aYlfllable In wide
wIdths, ore especially .tunnlng, and cost less
than cherty and walnut."
-Matt f(enney, 4doclate editor
A ... price : $2- $3 bo_ ft .
Speciftc ,ravlt,. : 0.63
Percent I nr lnk.,e:
Tangential 8.6, Radial 4.0
T/R ratio 2.2
AlIl!ra&. price: $3- $4 bd. ft .
Speclftc ,rnlt)': 0.54
. tlrlnkace:
Tangential 8.2, Radial 4.0
T/R ratio 2.0
Averap price: $2- $3
Spec:Ulc travity: 0.60
Percent . hrlnka,e:
Tangential 7.8, Radial 4.9
T/ R ratio 1.6
MAV/] U"E 1009 69
Midwest/West
__ . ____________ Aspen ________________________ _
Ayer.C' price: S2-S30d. ft.
Sp*cUle ,ravlty: 0.38
Percent J hrlnka,.:
TilngentiaI6.7. Radia l 3.5
TjR ratio 1.9
Aspen Is creamy whtte wlth a faint crain, and
r. slightly softer than cherry. Once dry, It'.
remarkably stable. The occasional tree can
have as much flash and pop 88 the best curly
maple. Aspen usually works well with hand
tools or power tools, glues ea8l1y, and takes
paint very well.
"'Aspen Is my favorite afternatlve to woods
like cherry and walnut. It's an Ideal second.r,
wood, but .'50 Is beautiful enough 10, an entIre
piece of furntture. "
-Garrett Hack

elm _
The distinctive Crain of red elm I. a cro •• be-
tween ash lind red oak, and when quartersawn
It Iac::ks the medullary rays (ray fleck) promi-
Aver.ee $2-$3 bd. ft,
Speelfle , rl \llt)': 0.53
Pereent I hrlnkl&e:
Tangential 8.9. Radial 4.9
T/ R ratio 1.8
nent In oaks. In color, fed elm can yary from
IICht tan to reddish brown, with hints of yellow
and green. When roughsawn, It might appear
a bit sickly. but once milled and !liven a hand·
planed surface, It'. very attractive.
to work and dimensionally stab/ft, red
elm mai<es a treat furniture wood, It'. one of
my personal favorites,"
-Roland Johnson
PIIIYS ".11
with oUler . ,
The light color
and subtle
grain of aspen
blend we!!
wifh other
woods. such
as the alder
drawer f ronts
of this cabinet
.by Matt Ken-
ney (Conn.).
Wood ami _rl< foptf'ter. The straight
grain of riftsawn red elm complements the lines
of this side tallie by Kevin Kauffunger (Penn. ),
and it s reddish color adds warmt h.
Red alder ______________________ _
Av. rage prlee: $4-$5 bd. ft .
Speclfle er.wlt)' : 0 .41
Pere&nt shrinkage:
Tangential 7.3. Radial 4.4
T/ R ratio 1. 1
70 F I N E WOOVWOII Kl l\·V
Often referred to as poor-man's cherry, red
alder has a grain pattern Similar to cherry.
It's dimensionally stable, relatively light. and
workS beautlfulty. Wide, clear, and long pieces
are readily available. It takes a stain or dye
well. and with the right color Is a good cherry
Imposter.
"Red aide, has a nicer grain pattern than
cherry. and Its sapwood 18 less of a headache
when It's trme to apply a flnrsh,"
-Mark Edmundson, frequent contrIbutor

SubtJ6 train,
rk h color.
Red alder has
the warmth
of cherry.
with slightly
more fWbtle
grajn, maki ng
il great for
furniture with
clean lines.
like thIs t ablo
by kenney.
poc.ro. rhlo fl'ill" « .. mer rlgiK); Kc>"in
East
______ _____ Eastern white pine __ -<---
Plentiful, beautiful, and atlll available as wide
planks, eastern WhHe pine Is a great furniture
wood. It's easy to work, and a sharp handplane
will leave a beautiful luster on the surface.
Knots and pitch pockets can gum up your
tools, but you can cut ruthlessly around them
to tet beautiful boards. You can do the same
with a le55-eltpenslve grade, and save
A ... price:
Se lect: $2- $3 bd. ft . ;
"My favorite softwood, because It smells 1 common: $21X1. ft .
• ,eat, Is a ple8SUNJ to work, and when qua,- Specille &ravlty: 0.35
tonawn, It'. mora sfable than any other natl.". Percent 5hrtnliaCe:
North American wood." Tangential 6.1. Radial 2. 1
T/ R ratio 2.9
_
_______ -C __ h_,'_Stfsn Backsvoort, cont' .. _ _ _
Sassafras _
C.. "" , but refined. The relaxed feel of fast·
em white pine Is perfect for understated but
elegant pieces like this Shaker lap desk by
Christian BecksvOOft (M<llne).
An Imposter
with Its own
Identity. The
color and grain
of sassafras
make It a great
substitute for
chestnut. but
this step stool
by Kelly Mehler
(Ky.) shows
that It can
stand on Its
own as a furni·
ture wood.
Furniture In n.m ... Figured yellow birch Is
fa/rly common and CJJn be used to add drama.
Hank Gilpin (R.I., chose a s/ngle splendid
board for the drawer (ronts of this sideboard
In yellow birch.
A soft, open-pored wood with distinct grain
patterns, sassafras gives off a unIque but
pleasant aroma when worked. Because of Its
lI&ht brown color, It can be 8ubstltuted for
chestnut. As a lleCondary wood, It has a stron·
eer Impact than poplar or maple, and It looks
great as a primary WOOd, too.
"SaSSBfras Is a pleasure to work. It's soft,
cuts cleanly. and has a tangy aroma,
-)on Arno, Ane Woodworking's late, .'eaf
expert on wood
Yellow birch
Because it'. used heavily In kitcMn cabinets,
yellow birch's available at mOlit lumberyards.
Take your time going through the stack and
you'll Hnd some beautiful boards. tt can be
brittle and dlfftcutt to work, but patience gets
around those problems. Curly yellow birch is
also 8Yallabie, and 'siess expenslye than curly
maple or flame birch.
"Yellow bIrch Isn't used enough all 8 prima,y
wood, whIch Is. shame, because It's beautiful."
--ChristIan 8ecksyoort
NIlJtcl&, t/"" flOI!'"' r-nis GI\QI (lOp left); Ibnk Gilptn (Iwlnom Iefi)
.... ver •• e price: bd. ft.
Specific Cravlty. 0.45
Pflrcent Ihrlnkl,a:
Tangential 6.2. Radial 4 .0
TI R rat io 1.6
Aver.,e price: $4-$5 bd. ft.
Specl"c ,r.vlty: 0 .62
Percant Ihllnka,a:
Tarlgential 9.2, Radial 7.2
T/R ratio 1.3
MAY!JUNH 1009 71
NEW ANGLE ON GRAIN
End grain can bring a new perspective 10 workin, in
wood. With a finish applied, the colot5 of domestic
end grains are 85 vivid 85 the long grain of ex-oUn,
with striking textures and contrasts. Bnlance Is
important, though, when It comes to both
looks and wood movement.

Bring butcher's block
out of the kitchen
with these design
and construction tips
BY MARK KOONS
I
started v.'Orking with cnd gr.lin becllL'>e it packs an
illlense visual punch andpve me :t use fot scrap
pieces (hal would otherwise have been discard(:'t.l.
End grain also allows me lO use domestic woods with
renewed interest because it hrings OUt different grain
features and colors than can be seen in the long grain.
I also discovered that L-nd'gr"in slabs allow unique fur-
niture forms (see MAdd an apron and legst p. 78) that
-wouldn't be possible with long-grain construction.
End grain a very durahle tabletop Buecher-
block countenops wear out knives before they need
resurfacing, and finishes <.lIn wick deep heneath the
surface 01 end grain, adding to its imperviousness. Of
course, this qll<llity Lm't as important in a coffee table
as it is in a cOUntc::rtop. hut is it ever a problem to have
a tabletop that's too l.Iur .. ble?
Working with end gnun up takes a good deal of
plannmg, consider:l1ion or wood m(lvement, and re-
petitive steps_ But the results are worth the effort. I use
eod-grain constntction in kitchenware. but this type
of conslruCltOfl can be IUS! as beautiful in high-end
furniture as It is utilitarian In the kitchen. If you are
mtngued by the possibilities of t:O(J gr'din. what
you need 10 know
Amlngement of wood Is key to success
TIle gre'.ltest 10 this work is wood movemem.
Wood always expand'! or contr'dCLS with changes in
humidity. The solution is balancinR the construction-
arranging the p3J1S ba!K.'d on grain direction.
You could put the pieces IQRether without
ering their orientation, but thaI randomness would
lead to an unstable slab Por example, instead of
www.fl newoodworklnJt.com
TH E BAS I C STEPS
1 . MAKE A LONG·GRAIN
SLAB
Arrange sticks In a
balanced panern.
2 . CROSSCUT TO FORM
END·GRAIN STRIPS
Cut blOCk Into
end-grain strips.
Flip so end grain Is
facln, up.
3. FLIP STRIPS AND
GLUE AGAIN
one lamlnat/on.
The width of file
crosscuts becom!S the
MAY/JUt\E 2009 73
LAYING OUT AN END-GRAIN PATTERN
DETERMiNE THE SIZE OF THE GLUE-UP
There is a bit of math t o be done to be sure you build a large
enough long-grain glue-up fO( Ihe slab you need. The long·
grain stri p5 will be flipped, so the thickness of the
slab determines the distance between crosscuts.
Then dl ... lde the length of t he slab you want
by the thickness of the long-grain glue-
up. That 's the number of crosscuts.
Not all t he st icks need to be
full length. You can glue shorter
Slicks of similar color and grain
into 8 long assembly by butting
their ends and using the sticks
abo\le and below lor
support. Just layout
your crOSscllt s ami
adjust the st ickS to be
sure the glue joints
don't silO .... up in
the flnal slab.
You know the ir width, solus!
multipl y to got the length of ;;"
the long-graln glue-up,
Don'l forgel to allow
for the sawkerfs,
Strips
Joints hidden
in middle of
crosscut
Buttjain!
Sticks
--- Sttcks are
lIaried In width,
moylng In the same
dIrectIon could be
strong enough to pull
apart the glue JOints.
Grained Is
aligned,
Pieces with grain that Ilows to
the left are balanced by those
that tend toward the right.
Expansion and contraction are far greater
in the direction of annlliar rings than
across them. therefore flatsawn stock is
balanced by quartersawn stOCk.
Cheek the ..... m •. After ii!temate end-lr"ln str ips wi ll be nipped end
f or end t o creata OJ ropeat lng pattern. If any seams line up. they will be aligned all the
way down the length of the end.g,aln pattern. To prevent this. Koons double-checks
his array of longvaln strips wi th a fuler that starts at zero in the center and counts
outward In both directions.
74 FINE WOODWORKING
deliheratcly arranging annular rings so that they alter-
n:lt<: in dir<:ction and restrain each other's movement,
you could end up with a row of end grain that all
moves in the same direnton. If you compound the
prohlem in the adjoining row, the laminations will pull
apart in alx>ut one year's time.
Kt:ep in mind that smaller overall slabs accumulate
internal stres." than large ones. AI'iO. thinner as-
semblies generate less Mress than thicker ones. So the
thicker or larger an t!nci-grail) construction, [he greater
its tendency to move and surface check if the grain
isn't arranged carefully.
Beginners aL<;() should consider that a single-species
lamination, espedally of some relatively stablt: wood
Hk(.: walnut, will be easier to lay our than one pattern-
ing a mnge of species with different expansion propel'-
(il..·s. Abo, you can get plenty of contr.tSl from the gmin
patterns and colors of a single speCieS, while ifs easier
[0 create an eyesore when mixing woods.
Be generoul wHh tl"e. Use It squeeze bottle
,Md roller 10 spreaa glue 011 both faces. For a
large surface that requires longer wOf"lng time,
glue half Ihe lamination first and add the other
half lifter It dries, Do a dry run to war" out the
arrangement and PrNajusl the clamps. then
apply glue. Set the hor/zOIItal clamps In place,
but don't lighten them. Loosely clamp the top
callis to the bottoms. end then loosely lighten
the horizolltal clamps. Nr1w. snug the top ana
bottom clamps rJo1wn tightly and go back to
fighten the horlzonlals.
8e&Jn crOSSCII«I", at the center. To make the Slab more manageable and reduce cumuJatlvo
error across the top, crosscut the slab at the center (left). Then reference off the rip fence to cut the
of the strips to the same wIdth (r/gllt).
Different wood have different rate-; of tan-
gential (parallel 10 the growth rings and perpendtCU-
lar 10 the gr.lin) Jnd radial (perpendicular to wuwth
rinW;) shnnkage So if you do mix woods, specie.s lb.&(
2J'e Mable should be used (0 restrdin those thaI are less
stable. You C3n the stability of lIifferent spc·
<.it'S in R. Bruce Hoadley's lindf't"Standing whod (The
Taunton PreSS. 2ooS) or at the Web site of Fo[('S!:
Pnxlw:.ts L.lboratory (wwwJpLfdcd.us)
Butcher-block assembly made easy
Crc:lling of end !(f"Jin d(x's not require
tOJ!;ether hundreds or little cul)d3. Nor does it involve
.'iawing off laminations like of salami.
www.fin ..
some manufaccurers do exactly thac. My proce.'ls in-
volves two big a long gram glue-up and then
an coo-grain glue-up. Basic-.dly, I glue .'itick.s logelhcr,
surf:lce and crosscut them, .. nd then reglue . hem as
end grain.
Arrange the sticks-First, I rip the sut:ks to willth.
Before any glut' is spread, I aCl".mge the component'!,
haiandng them the way 1 de!K:riix-d c:ulier, to make
visual and structural scn.'< in the final as .. ;emhly.
I pay attemion 10 grain, wldlhs of the sti<.:k:s, spe-
cies, and color. Once I settle un an arr-Jngement,
I mark the sticks with a :-;ofL pencil to keep tr;u:'k
of the order. lhe process, I continu-
ally mark the pieces to keep them arranged in the
MAY / J UNE 2009 75
2. GLUE UP END-GRAIN STRIPS
Mark, flip, mark,
Put the end-
grain sticks back in
thel, original order
and mark them
(rIght) so you can
easily rcorcler the
stiCks after eJqler;'
men/lng with differ·
ent flips. You can flip
and rotate. or just
flip_ Here, Koons flips
every ot her stick
ups/de down and end
(or end (be/ow).
ROTATE END
FOR END
correct order. In determining the length of your sticks
and crosscuts, it's important to make note of the
latiomhip betv,reen the thickness of the first lamina-
tion (til.: long-grain th.: width of the subsequent
and the overall thickness and length of
the tabletop. The thickness of the long-grain slab
v.{ill determine the width of the repeating end-grain
{yJ.ttern on your tahletop. The width of th>.: crosscuts
of the long-grain slab will determine the thickness
of the top.
As an example, if I wanted to build a tabletop
1 in. thkk by 24 in. wide by 36 in. long. I could
hegin by making a long-grain that was 21/11 in.
thick by about 243/16 in. wide (leaving a little extra to
trim the assembly square later) For the I-in.-thick
lOp, I would make my crosscuts 1 %2 in. But how
long should I make the long-grain slab? If the cross-
cuts arc a heavy 1 in. and they get turned end grain
up so th>.: ZY!:l-in. pattern is facing the top and bot-
tom, then I'll need at least H:I in. plus the amount of
15 sawkerfs for the length of the long-grain lamination.
But why cut it close? Make the lamination longer than
you need, even if that means a few extra crosscuts
kicking around.
Gl ue and clamp t he sticks-Once the assem-
hly arranged, it's time to glue the sticks into one
wide, long board. Some of the sticks are made from
multiple layers, and some of those are made of short
sticks butt-jointed and held in place when glued to
the adjoining layer. Those multilayered sticks nlllS! get
jointed and planed hefore becoming part
of the larger gille-up.
The cauls should be very straight and
sturdy to prevent fiexing, as they will deter-
mine how level the glue-up is. TIle lower
cauls rest between pipe clamps and hold
the work up off the bench and slightly
above the damps. The upper cauls have a
layer of cork on the lXJttom side that helps
the work flat against the lower cauls.
Make sure all the cauls are stick-free by
taping or waxing.
You'll need a flexible adhesive, Yellow
glue is notorious for cold-creep, the ten-
den<-}, for a glue to allow slow but inevi-
table movement over years. Here, that b an
asset beca\.lse it stretches when the wocxl.
and th", w(xxl does.
Glue them baell; together. Use the same proccclurc as you did with the loog·grain lam/nation to
glue up the end-grain sticks. Taking the time to tape all the seams before the glue-up will keep the
Surface then cros scut vs. crosscut
then surface-Once the sticks are glued
into a slab, you can make the crosscuts
that estahlish the surface. This is
a crucial place fur qllality machining. The
more variation here, the more effort it \vill
take to smooth the You'll need a
clean, sharp blade to the table, a
zero-clearance throat plate, and a sacrifi-
cial backup fence on your crosscut sled or glue from seeping into the end grain and save you cleanup time later.
76 FINE W O ODWO RK I N G
chalk tQ mllrk the high
spofs ana/1M spots. Using
a belt sander. begin to re-
move the high spots only
(above). Stop to reassess
the surface with a straight-
edge and re-mark the
high spots to sand again.
Repeat until the surface IS
flat. The final surfacing is
done with a rllndom-orblt
sander (right).
www.fint'"woodworking.cum
Or u.&e handplanes. The low angle and very sharp blade of this jack
plano leave if smooth. refined surface. Put an arc. or camber, in the plane
jron to keep the edges from digging in. and work from the outside In to
.wold breakage on the edges.
miter gauge-elevated. a little to keep dust from affecting the
width of the ("TO ..'iSCUt. Ideally, you'll want no burn mark.s or saw
flutter on your cuts. Every 0.001 in. error is 0.001 in. you'll have
to work off across the entire slab later.
Remove the damps and scrape off the excess glue while it is
still rubbery. If you have a planer wider than the slab, use it to
surface the board befort' making crosscuts.
If your planer isn't wide enough to accommodate the ta-
bletop, you'll have to clean up the surface with a scraper,
crosscut first, and then use my tablesaw trick (see bottom
right photo. p. 75) to lightly skim the surfaces of the cross-
cuts before regluing them into the final end-grain lamiillltion.
Once you've cleaned up all the sides of the end-grain strips,
MAY /J U Nr: l 009 77
Because of the end·grllin
orientation. legs. a border.
ana an apron can be glued
directly to the top. The regs
could be notched directly
Into the top, but lor a
mi nimal Investment of time,
the border and apron dress
up the core and add the
appearance of depth to the
entire top.
GLUE LEGS
AND APRON
TO THE CORE
A.pron
Core
Corner
notch
for leg
L.,
Cre.fe;lt bGrd.,. and apron. After edge.gluing bo/lrds for one border
and one apron per side of the table, laminate the border TO tho apron
(left), and then use a scrol/saw or bandsaw to cut the shape of the apron
(right). Sanding and filing will refine the shape.
7S FINE ';I: o onWORKING
Border
arrange them b-d..:k in order and witness-mark them.
Now nip every other Mrip end for end and
down, use a str-.l.ighledge on the edges and a square
on the end to square up the whole arrangement, and
witness-mark them again. Align this mark in the final
glue-up to keep the end-grain sticks square. Now you're
ready to glue the crosscut imo the fi nal !>lab. Use
the same procedure for the firud gluing that you used
when you glued the long-grdin together; bLII thL"
time, the cauls and damps run lengthwise.
SUrfacing end grain
Because end grain is more durable than 10nR grain
and can be to run through jointer.. or plan-
ers, it takes a bit more work TO surface. If you have
your own wide-belt then you are in luck. Rem·
ing time on a wide-hdt sander is al<KI an option, blll
short of that I've had SUC\.' l"S.S with a belt sander and
mndom-orbit sander, as well as with handplanes.
If you don't u:;r: a belt s:Jnder often. pf""dctice glid-
ing the running sander squarely onto a test piece and
backing off while slipping it sideways. On the actual
workpiece, mark the high and low spots, grind av.-ay
the high spots, and continually stop and check your
progress with a straightedge, re-marking if necessary,
Begin with 60- to 8O-grit paper and move up tu 220 grit
on the belt sander. Clean and the surface for
uniform scratching before changing to a finer grit.
When Ihe defect.s are ground away and the surface is
flat. move to the r:.mdum-orbit sander, beginning with
80 or 100 grit and proceeding through 220 grit.
A well-planed surface is always the most beautiful.
If you have a low-angle jack plane-----even a low-angle
Apply the apron. Working on one side at a time, clilmp tha apron in place
and proclrll/ and tap In a brad to locate the apron during the glu,,"up (left).
Koons left the Inside border slightly wider to accommodate the nail. Any ex·
cess material gets trimmed off when notching for the leg, which will cover
the nail hole, Make sure the apron Is square to the tabletop (right).
No. -4 block plane will v.rork-sharpen it well (expect
to go back to your stones frequently), ease the cor-
nl."1"S of the work from the OUL'ijde edges
of The workpiece toward the center. In some ways
it'5 easier to plane end grain because you don'l have
to WOrTY aboul rever.;ing gt"J.in. I've aL..o had succes.<;
with a standard-angle No.7 plane equipped with a
very sharp Hock iron.
A different approach to aprons and leg Joinery
Lung-grain lablclOps are typically attached to
a leg-and-apron system, and rh:lt type of assembly
can be done with an end-grain tabletop 35 well . But
end-grain work offers an alternative. Legs and aprons
can be glued onto the edge ... of an end-grain slab. My
methoci happens after the core tabletop is completely
glued together.
At the samt! time as the apron. I aud a border of the
same width :md length to my consrruction. It si ts out-
side the table core but inside the apron and creates a
tran .. ition bctwl.-<.'n the llibletop pattern
and the outside apron
To create :1 bordt!r/apron comhina-
lion, stan by edge-glumg Sl icks inlO
sections that rll the sidl:S of lhe core.
Keep Ifl mind that you :;till have to bal-
ance the :.l.IT3.ngemeo[ of the SlICks in
the border/apron construction Once
those 5ecuoru are dry, laminate them
10 one anolill.:r. UM! a M;roll<;.aw to <:ul
the shape, and files and sanding drums
to refine it . Then glue and damp the
apron as.sembly to the core.
Once the aprun is st:<.·urtd un the
core, I me my sliding tablesaw to cut
corner notches for the legs. Don· ( wor-
ry if you don't have a on your
tablesaw. Before I had one J used a
shupmade cros.'>Cut sled to carry the
tabletop assembly acro ....... the blade
while notching out for the legs As-
suming a p.ur of ffi lter-gauge slols and
an extemion to the fight and behind
the sawblade, make the sled out of
two hardwood stflpS 20 in. long and
two fences 2'"A in. by 5
1
1l in., the fmnt
one about 16 in. long and the back one about 60 in.
Long.
You can assemble the sled right on the.saw by glUing
the fences square to the guide and rhe blade,
then flipping t he assembly and screwing the joints
before the glue is fuJly cured. 0
Mark Koons is a self-employed woodworiH!f in Wheatland, \.'.yo.
www.fi newoodwvrking.com
Cut th. rrotch. Koons udds a higher, longer fence to the crosscut fence on his sliding
lablesaw. It adds stability and extends the slider to t he other side ofllle table, which Is
necessary because various cuts are made with the table extending to each sJde.
MAY/JlINE 2009 79
gallery
I
DAVID BENETELLD
Harttord, Vt .
Benetello based this cylinder-top desk (21 In. deep by 341n.
wide by47 in. tall ) 011 one in Thomas Sheraton's The Cabinet
Maker and Upholsterer's Drawing Book. The mahogany case
is joined with hidden mitered dovetai ls. The veneered li d
and writi ng su rface are connected with a ball bearing/strap
mechanism so the lid opens as the writing surface is pulled
out. Other woods are Brazilian rosewood. Macassar ebony,
holly, black-dyed costello, and pine. The finish is shellac
andwax. PHOTOS: lll NCE PATTER SON
I
SAM NDRRIS
Burli ngton, Vt.
Norris blended the
influence of James Krencw
with his own sense of
scale to create this
sideboard. The SWiss
pear, big-leaf maple, and
Deodar cedar sideboard
Is 14 In. deep by 44 In.
wide by 42 In. tall. The
finish is shellac. PHOTO:
SETH JA NOFSKY
80 FINE WOODWORKI N G
\-\J.Ilh. .. d
Do you make your own
woodWorking tools? We want
to showcase them in OUT
annual Tools & Shops Issue.
We'd al so like to include
photos of restored vintage
hand tool s and machinery.
Send entry forms (ilvil ilable at
www.f inewoodworki ng.com)
and photos (unaltered digital
images, prints with negati ves,
or slides) to Readers Gall ery,
FWw. 63 5. Main St ., Newtown,
CT 06470. or email fwgall ery@
taunton.com, The deadline is
June 18 .
JOHN OLENIK
Ballston Spa, N.Y
Heavily Influenced by the furniture of Greene and
Greene, Olenik designed and bunt this sideboard
(24 in. deep by 60 in. wide by 39 in. tall) as a gift
for his dauglrtef. The project took 600 hours over Ure
course of a year. To ensure a precise COlor match, aU of
the mahogany came from two 28-in. by 16·ft boards.
secondary woods are ebony, maple, and quartersawn
oak. The finiSh is an oil/varnish mixture and WaK..
RUSSElL F. GALE JR.
Fort Bragg, Calif.
When building this wall clock, Gale incorporated the techniques
of veneering, bent-Lamination, and steam·bendlng learned during
his second semestllf at the College of the Redwoods. To keep tile
design as si mple as possible, he veneere<l the face with 12 separate
sections, el iminating the need for numbers or reference points. The
biggest challenge of the project was the beadwolk around the dial
opening. The gtanadillO, hemlock, and snakewood clock Is 5Y.t in.
deep by 8 in. wide by 30 in. tall. The finish Is shellac and wax,. and
the fTlO't'BmeRt is a Hermie 14-day coli gong. I'H010S: 011.... 10 WELTER
www.finewood wor k ing.com
FRANK DEJONG
Toronto, Ont. . Canada
DeJong spent nearty 150 hours making this ash bar
stool (2 13f. ln. deep by 17 In. wide by 38 in. tall) .
It was a lesson in refining a deslgn. and
ang\edjoinery, The finish Is linseed 011 and oll·based
polyu rethane.
MAY/JUNE 1009 81
readers gallerY"o!;o",d
GREG PENNINGTON
Hendersonville, Tenn.
When building this white oak, maple, and
basswood settee, Pennington sllaped all
45 spindles by hand with a drawknife
and spokeshave. The undercarriage
was turned on the tathe, and the seat
was carved with a $COrp and travlsller.
Pennington says It was "an adventure
In problem solving and geometry which
resulted in mallY hours of fun," The chair,
finished wi th milk paint, all. and varnlsll,
is 21 In. deep by 78 In. wide by 47 in. taU.
PHOTO: JOHN LUCAS
TODD PLUMMER
Morgan HIli, Calif.
This coffee table features a carrvas-backed tambour that slides
around the circumference of the piece. Sl iding the tambour reveals
compartments at the ends of the table and a central thrnugh-drawer.
Plummer was inspired by tambours wtllIe studying Scandinavian
design at in Sweden. The top is big-l eaf maple veneer
over quarteBawn poplar sta...es. The rest of the table (21 In. deep by
40 In. wide by 17 in, tall ) is solid curty maple. The finish is shellac
and WlU:. PHQ1QS: ANDREW PATIERSDN
82 PINE woonWORKII\'G
I
RICK CANNON
Memphis, Tenn.
Cannon made thi s bowl In less than four hours from some
rough boards rcsctJed from a landfill. The darker wood Is
walnut, but the lighter wood is a mystery. His inspiration for
the design and fonn came from the wOOd-turning books of
Ray Key and Bert Marsh. The bowl , 6 tn. dfa. by 4Y.! tn. tan,
was finished with blond shellac.
CHUCK ZELLER
Bartley, Neb.
Inspired by old tamel-back
steamer trunks, Zeller decided
to learn steam-bending afld
re-create the luggage as
furniture. This white-oak chest
Is 20 in deep by 36 In. wide by
28 In. tall. The case Is joined
with a modified box joint, and
the compound curve of tile lid
required a separate form for
TED SAXERUD
Arlington. Va.
Saxemd made a deal with his wife: If he could buy a tablesaw
he'd build her a dining table. Once he built the table and she
knew what beautiful tllings he was capable of making, she
for a place to store her famity china. This cherry comer
cabinet (one of two) incorporates bubinga, sycamore, and
ebony inlay. Saxerud used splined miter joints on the angled
parts and mortise-and-tenon joints everywhere else. The
cabinet, finished with shellac and lacquer, stands 22 in. deep
by 42 in. wide by 87 in. tall.
each piece. In keeping with the original trunks,
the interior is lined in a heavy brocade fabric. Subtle distressing and a blend
of waxes give the chest Its atltlque look. PH OTO: OLSEN'S PHOTOGRAPIiY
ROY SUPERIOR
Wil liamsburg, Mass,
possible, Superior likes to incorporate humor into his work. The OINe
Museum, a wall -hung cabinet (91h: in. deep by 23 in. wide by 33 In. tall), Is a parody
of museum culture and Includes SlJch things as the world's largest olive, smallest
olive. most bizarre olives, beard!l{f olive. two· headed olive, mini olive press. and Olive
pits from around the world. In addition to a variety of exotic woods, Superior used
bone. brass, copper, antique glass, Plexiglas, gold leaf, and egg tempera paints. The
unpainted wood Is finished with walco Danish 011 and wax. PHOTOS: JOHN POLAK
MAY !J lI NE 2 00 9 83
Best brush for shellac
Q: I'd like to start using shellac to finish the furniture
I build. What typo of brush Is best and how should I
care for It?
- GRAHAM PARKER, Portl alld, Ore.
A: IF I HAD TO CHOOSE JUST ONE BRUSH, it woul d be a mop
bmsh. The brbllcs m;.lke it great for small areas
like legs and drawer fronts; and becau$€ mop brushes hold
lots of finish, they also work great for larger surfaces. Less-
expt:nsive ones are fine for gtmcrnl work, but for laying down
fme topcoats on small pans or molding, I'd use a mop bmsh
with bristles made from squirrel or goat hair.
As versatile a:; mop brushes tire, it is also very helpful to
have a fbi bru:-:h for laying down smQO(h, thin topcoats on
large .sulfaces such as tabletops. I recommend a bru.'ih With
synthetic bfi!,de'i made from Taklan. However, lhey don'(
hold much fmish
SOURCES OF
SUPf>t..Y
Both types of
brush can be
found lit
art-supply
stores, or
onlineat_.
diCkb!ick.com
Buy these two. Mop brushes (top) hold a lot
of finish. So they're great for putting down a
first coat avor a Jarg'e surface. Flat brushes
don't hold much flnlsh,lxIt they put down very
fine, smooth coats.
As for cleaning brushes, there's not much to it. JUS! dip
the brush in denat\u'Cd alcohol, reshape the bristles, and .set
the brush aside to dry. Before you use it the next soak
il in denatured alcohol for about 10 minllles to soften and
d issolve any shelJac o n the bristles.
- FmiJ'biuR expert Peter Gedrys IS a jrequt>tJ1 co"trl!;mlor
Round dogs are more versatile than square ones
Q: I've Just started
planning my first
real woodwol1dng
bench, I want to
use benchdogs.
but don't know If I
should use round
ones or square
ones. Is one better
than the other?
- ART GIBSON,
Sa na Fe, N.M,
84 FINE 'X'oonWC)I!.KINt;
A: IN MY EXPERIENCE. round
and btnchdogs hold
stock equally welL That being
there are some impor-
tant difference,.;.
Ruund dogs are easier to
Simply drill a hole in
your benchtop and send the
dog home. They also can ro-
tate to accept oddly shaped
workpiece.. .. , and their round
boles work with
and hold-down:.. The biggest
drawback to round dogs is
getting round stock that's the
right di;lmcter lo press inlo
place WIthout falling through.
Accurately sized hardwood
dowel,.; (.-an be hard to find,
You can rum them yourselt
if you have a lathe. YOll Gill
buy round mt'tal dogs, but
he careful. They easily nick
plane blades and router bit,<;.
An alternative is to make a
Drop-In .top. With round benchdogs, you can quickly make a planing
stop, lind eIJsily malch Ihe stop's thickness to the wompiece.
dog with a square head on
it (left), where the dowel
nl.-ed to fit perfectly.
Square dog>; arc 10
make, bUI cutting holes
is diflkult on a henchtop that',.;
already glued up, They don't
handle oddly shaped \\'Ofk-
pieces very v,"ell either And
you can't use {heir holes for
holdfasts and hold-downs.
expert Cbns
Gochnour is a jrequem
contn'bulor.
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MAY /JU/,\ \i 2 0 0 9 85
Q&A '""""""
Working with warped panels
Q: I'm making
a cabinet from
cherry, After gluing
up the panels
and cutting the
Joinery, I stacked
and stlckered
the panels.
Unfortunately,
they've warped. Why
did this happen and
Is there anything I
can do to correct It?
-JEFF HUNTINGTON,
loudon, N.H.
A: THE MOISTURE CONTENT and
internal tension of properly
dried lumber should be in
equilibrium and the \vocx!. sta-
ble when you bring it home.
However, there often is les.."1
moisture near the surfaces,
and when you mill the board.
YOll upsd the balance and the
wood can rnrist or warp.
To reduce this risk, wood
should be milled equally on
hoth sides, a little at a time,
stickcrcd, and then fe-milled.
This will slowly relieve the
stresses and allow the mois-
ture to equalize with the
moisture in your shop.
Even with these precautions,
wood still warps sometimes,
but it's not the end of world.
I work with warped wood
frequenrly. If the are
secured, like on a dovetailed
Don't use oil on waterstones
Q: The temperature
In my shOp regularly
dips below freezing
In the winter. If
there's any water In
my waterstones, It
freezes, expands,
and breaks them.
Can I use oll
to lubricate
them Instead?
- BENTON
LANDERS,
Minnoapolis,
Minn.
A: ACCORDING TO WATERSTONE
MANUFACTURER NORTON, you
shouldn't use oil on water-
stones because the oil will
clog the stone's pores. That
would keep slurry from de-
vdoping. Slurry is J soupy
mixture of water and loose
particle:;, and it's
what does the honing.
Your hest het Juring the
winter is to keep your water-
stones in a heated area. Or
you could just switch to an-
other sharpening method.
-.Hate Kenney Is
an associate editor:
Match lubricant to .ton •. A water-
stone needs wafer to sharpen effec·
tlVeIY. and an oilstone needs 01/.
86 FINE WOODWORKING
Moisture from the ground helps the concave
side of the panel relax, while the sun's
dries out the convex side. As a
result, the warp will work itself out and
the panel will fl atten itself.
Moistura
carcase, the warping can be
taken out by the joinery.
YOll :llso can remove the
warp by placing the panel
with the convex side toward
a heat source and drying it
back into shape. An old-timer
I once worked with would
toss a warped JYJ.nei (concave
side down) Oflto the lawn,
and let the moisture from the
earth and the heat of the sun
take out the warp.
But your panels could warp
again. After you get the ""'arp
om, assemble your cabinet
quickly, before they get the
chance.
-ChriStian Becks/Joorf is a
contrthuting editor.
Slurry does tile sharpening. With sharpening stones, It's the muddy
slurry that hones a tool 's 6dga. You can't form a good slurry on a water·
stone thats clogged with oil.
Find it
Search
~
'cia
fast.
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I =I::H.
MAY /JUNF. 1()()9 87
master class
.. 1 1 " ...
Distinctive
cur ves. Th6
The magic of
hot-pipe bending
nve back slats
on For tune's
signat ure chairs
are bent on a
hot pipe.
BY M I CHAEL FOR T UNE
his is a very easy technique
for bending thin strips
of wood to virtually any
shape. Better yet, the simple
is made from a
few hardware-store pan",
You hold a strip of wood against
a section of metal pipe heated by a
propane torch. On the .side in contact
'ivith the pipe, the lignin bond benveen
the wood fibers is softened by the
heat until it is pliable enough to bend
partially around the pipe. Unlike steam-
bending, there is no need to constmct a
All the metal parts can be bought at your
local hardware store. and can make the
bending Jig In less than an hour.
A layer o( thick fi-
berglass under the
pipe flange keeps
the Doara from IJurft-
irlg. Cut away tho
fiberglass outside
the flange
Sand aff any protec-
t/ve coating (right) or
heating the pipe will
cause a lor of smoke.
88 FINE WOODWORKING
large steambox or substantial
bending forms.
TIle curved sides of musical
in.struments such as guitars and
violins have traditionally been made
this way. but I usc til(; technique to
bend door pulls, curved moldings, sa lad
tongs (shown at right), back slats for
chairs, and many other items.
Most woods bend if the piece is thin
Unlike steam-lx'llding, when: only
domestic hardwoods bend to any
appreciable degree, you can use the hot-
Flange
Fiberglass
Upright,
¥. in. th ick by
6 in. wide. and
long enough to
bring the pipe
to chest level
Ii'f- __ Slot for template
Cleat screwed to upright
keeps the assembly
from rocking in use.
Prop,mc torch with
fan pattern head
Hand screw
prevent s torch
from rOili ng.
BlocK of wood raises the
torch to the correct height.
pipe method to Ix.'"tld a broad range of
species. As with steam-bending, straight-
gmined wood that has been air dried
will bend fa,<;ter, to tighter mdii, and with
fewo.:r than kiln-dried wood.
You can use kiln-tlricd wood, juSC
to break a few pieces and to take longer.
Woods thai bend well on a hot
pipe include red aod white oak, ash,
walnut, elm, hickory, and beech.
Woods that bend with less
particularly to tight radii, include cherry,
maple, Awmalian iaccwocxl, Macassar
ebony. imhuia. East Indian rosewood.
mahog-.tny. domestic softwoods, and
wfter domestiC hardwoods as
lxlSSWO(X] and poplar. Avoid
hending curly or figured
wood and burls; they
break easily.
The thickest piece that
can be bent is 'Ai in" and
then only to a gentle curve.
This due to the limited depth
that the he'.1t from the pipe penetrates
the wood_ Heating hoth sides won't help;
it will just encourage the outside ftI)ers to
streto;;h ami
It is importam to have grain
across the width of the piece. You might
get lucky and find a wide board with
consistently flawless grain, but I've found
that j in. is about the practical limit in
width. You need to make the blank only
about liS in. wider and Y32 in. thicker
W.t the wood. To encourage a;r-dried wood to
bend. soak it In water lor about three hours.
Fortune uses a section of roof gutter as a
trovgh.
www.finewoodworking.com
Hot and pliable. Onco at tho critical tempera-
ture. the wood is easy to bend around the pipe.
For bends close to the end, grip It with Vlse-Grip
pliers designed for sheet metal.
complete, light the
torch and slide the
head into the pipe.
cheap and accurate
way to tell when t he
pipe has reached
200"F, the right
temperature to
bend wood.
ChftCIf. your pnltlr .... Fortune attaches the
bending t emplates to the top o ( the hot-pipe
bending jJg. making it easy to see when the
workpiece has reached the desired radius.
MAY/JUNE 2009 89
master class co,",,"
Create a double-bent door handle in
Cite ell the fir. c bend. Verify your
accuracy by placing the first bend
Bgtllnst tho tomplare.
than [hc tlesirc:d fimshctl plct:e,
but if the piece is to be bent at
the ends, it be about an
inch al c;l(:h end to give
pliers a place 10 grip.
Buikl the bending jig
I find II 001 to have Ihe :rurface of
the at about che:;t level. This
wa)' if is t:asy to sec Ihe wood bend
without stl"dining your hal:k. St>, til(:
length of the upright, which clamps
Into a bench vise, is determined by
the height of the workbench and
your own height A deal
the back of the upright rests
on top of the vise and eli minates
the tcndcnq fur til(: jig tu rock as
pressure is applied to the pipe.
r advise starting with a 2-in.-dia
pip<: and wurking down to tighter
radii as you 1;ain experience. Do not
t.L'\e galvanized pipe LI will
give off a toxic whe n heated. lise
regular black pipe. scraping or
off an}' protective lacquer or shellac.
Cut a hole In upnglu IJl in. larger
In diamcu ... 7 Ihan Iht: pipe. The heated
flange be from lhe
wo:xI with a gasket. ( plaf..-e ;I 2-i o.- to
3-in -Ihi .... k wad of fiberglass insulation
over the hole and Ihen compre'>.S il as
I .s<:n.::w the flange to the wood. After
cutti ng around the out<;lde of the flangl:
to remove the I turn
the upright over lind C'tU an X in rhe
90 PINE WOODWORKING
Create the ned bend. Be/ng careful not to
reheat the first bend, work on bending the
second sect jon.
fi berglass in the middle of the flange. r
fold the tlhc:-rgla'is h:t .... k dnd <; Iaplc.: it tu
the edges of the hole. protect" the
V'orood from heal.
The heat !>Curce is a propane lOrch.
fiued wit h a head thai shapes the flame
inlo a fa n fXlltern. Very lillie propane
i.o; used. lbe valve e)O me
head is never opened fuJJy,
Rlllht all around. Check the second bend
against the template. By the way. this hllndle
works on doors and drawers.
Unlike laminating or !>team-bending
that rel it!s on a form to proVide the
shape, this technique requires that yuu
h.and·fonn (coax. really) the pan being
bent to match tht! p.:tnem. This can take
from as lillie as a fe\\ minutes for Va-tn. ·
thIck strip:; to as long a:; 10 minutes
even when the pipe b
bemg heated, and a .•
long flame is s\lfficient to
maintain the 20C1'F operating
temperature of the pipe.
Holdtng a piece of nylon webbing
on t he outside ot a ple<:e redUC:e$
the risk of the outside fibers
lifti ng and causIng a split.
Have the tank si t at atxlUl
60" to the bench wit h the head aOOm
onc-third of the way into the pipe.
Secure the tank with a w()(xien hand
damp, if necessary u'>ing a block of
wood to bring It to the right height.
t.-wke sure the tank cannot roll or .. Up
out of place. An uncontrolled flame has
no place in a \\.'orkshop.
Coax the 9;tr1ps around the bend
Before lighting the to n.:h, I make a
profile of the shape I need from
IA-in.-thick hardboard or plywood.
II is then easy 10 overbend the wood
strips and let them spring back lU 111
the pattern. With practice, it becomes
ea.,>)' to judge just how much and
where to bend. If you are nOi usi ng
green wood, it help.s to soak the strips
thoroughly for about three hours before
bending them.
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master class ",,",,"ed
Lock down the pieces
A .. Hi nt/It. Often. the t emplate f or checki ng
the CUf lfe a/so serves this rol e.
jf you are bending material
Success means geltlng a feel for Just
how much surface atea has to be healed
and for how long, and how much
overlx-nding i<; required to :l.chieve the
correct result.
You C.HI im.reasc your success rate by
holding a on the of the
stri p as it is being bent. This hold
down wood fiber.; that want 10 lift and
create a deeper spi n. The strap should
be just: wider than Ihe piece being bent,
Online Extra
To watch Michael Fortune demonstrate
his hoI-pipe oendlng technique, go to
FineWoodworklng.com/ el(tras.
and should not COOll' In contact with the
hOI pipt'o Nylon strap used for banding
boxes IS Ideal and easy to fi nd, while
wKk-r .s trips can lx from old
lawn chaiN or a lawn,'hair rt:pair kil.
let the wood dry In Its new curve
Once the strip illS u.:t'n bent to the
desired shape, It needs to maintain that
shape while Ihe wood l-'OO1s and dnes.
This <;eni ng time can he a.s short a ...
hours for thin or 24 hours for the
thkkc ... ,
Ideally you the piect!' to have a
moi:\ture cOn\t!'nt of 7% (o B% before
starting to sand il or apply a ftnish. You
can speed the process by pladng the
92 )lIN!:: WOODWORK I NG
Clamp II#1tly. " thl! workpiece has nor been bent sufficiently while being healed, nrm clamping
will not flnlsh the )01). A few clamps Of ellen maskIng tape shoul d be all you need.
pieces OC'.lf. but not on. a radiatOr, or by
having a ran blow ai r across them Wood
With ml--dullary ray ... like
red and white oak can dl.:vclop
on the plam"a""rn surface If it dries too
quickly. I recommend putting a dot h or
blanket over oak parts for the 24
hours to retard ,";urfacc <.Irying.
You al so need to maintain Ihe curve
while the piece dries. Thi::. c:ln be as
simple as a stop of tape acro:-s the bt:nJ,
or you can build a wood!>!n setting JI g the
same shape :1.<; the pattern The hent pan
rests in the setting jig secured with
damps or tape. On!>! cautionary note:
Btcause the bent wood is initiai1y damp.
metal clamps will leave a stain. This is
JXlrticularly evident with woods high In
tannin like oak and walnut
Air needs to reach boTh surfaces of the
drying workpiece tu w:ltping or
cupping. Therefore, the setting jig should
be:: a frdffic rdthe r than a solid
For simple -Uft "hll PC"i, I lust Mkk the
piece in the open j .. ws of my wocxien
bench vise [0 hold the desired curve.
Once the part:. have SI..'t to thei r net\-
::.hape. they will have little memory of
ever hdng strJ.ighl. Huwever. ends that
are nO( restrained will have a tendency
to move with changes in humidity.
Parts bent this way should not be
immersed in water for kngth of
time, as they will straighten 0
Multlpl. parts. " YOII are making several Iden-
tical parts Slich as chair back slats. It can IJe
Quicker fo build a s;ngle large settlng}lg.
Held In 8 vise. You may be able fo dry small
parts IJy cliJmping them lightly In a bench vise.
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l"lrelnel Toots, p. 9
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,
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Ball &0 Bali RtprodllCtloo
'"
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Kuffel Cn'tk Prrss. P. 26
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Rockier Woodworking
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,.
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p.9.1
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Woodpeckers. p. 14
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Air p.91 90 ';'oodworken Sourct, p. 9J
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www.finewoodw<lrkin8_com MAynlJNE 2009 97
High design, low price
BY ANISSA KAPSALES
lehael Fortune's chairs (seen on the back cover) run the
price gamut, but as the sticker price comes down the time
anJ dlort invested have to do the same. In this $34 made-
fDr-production chair (light), he also had to accommodate
the limitations of manufacnlring in a developing counu-y.
Traveling from his studio in Canada to a community
in Belize, Fortune provided on-site training, researched the materials
available locally (keeping prices down and further boosting the local
economy), and worked with the available machinclY, which was often
low-tech. The of the chair a.-; well as the productiOn methods
got pared down to the basics, and organization was the key to weecs;;.
Fortune said he appreciated the challenges as a designer and craftsman,
and most of the lessons he ieal11ed can be carried back into the one-
man custom
.-
Side stretchers
are dowel ed
and glued t o
rear legs.
PACKS FLAT-ASSEMBLES
EASILY
The chair had to be designed so it
could be delivered as an RTA (ready-to-
assemble) product . Dowel s and bolts
with cylinder nuts allow the product
to knock down lor lIat packing and
shipping, so the chair can be easily
assembl ed at Its linal destination.
___ Seat ('Ifld backrest are
screwed to chai r base.
1
j
Front stretcher is
doweled and glued
to front legs.
98 WOO[)WORKIKG
Jigs make JOlrHIfY foolproof.
The rcady-to-assemble joinery
was done with hand drl/ls. A
shopmade JIg was clamped to
a bench, and the workplaces
set In place and drilled. To
keep things fail-safe, all the
Jigs for this chair were color
coded and precisely lalJeled.
Then, multlpla drills were set
up with the IJ/ts at set depthS.
New life fOf 1M old
AI the sile, For-
tune found a defunct over-
h6ad router being used <IS
a storage talJlt:. Luckily,
he was able to procure
miSSing parfS and rehab
me machine so it could be
used, wlm shopmade JIgs,
to cut the curvea /Jack rest
and seat after they were
laminated on a form .

VI

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RF.ADF.' Sf'RVIr.F. NO. n

\\bod~Vorking ~ fIne MAY/ JUNE 2009 • ISSUE 205 14 MEnlODS features 32 Build a Bow-Arm Morris Chair Uiroination puts heautiful grain and a graceful curve within arm's reach BY GREGORY PAOLINI OFWORI( 14 Bench Vises A head-to-head look at tht! tool everyone needs up front 6 On the Web 8 Contributors 10 Letters 14 Methods of Work Adjustable-height worktable on wheels Easy drill-press fence Rotating tower stores more hardware BY MATT KENNEY 46 Dust-Proof Any Tablesaw EndoSt. direCI.fmewoodworking. clean cuts Compact dust coilector is powerful and efficient 57 The Ins and Outs of Drawer Stops Four clever w ays to keep BY PETER TURNER :3 drawer in its place 62 Tape: Unsung Hero of the Shop These 4 rolls ~'ill help YOli cut deanly.com . tlte saw. th~ dust. layout dearly. you're bound to find a few near you BY MATT KENNEY 72 End Grain Up Uring butcher's block out of (he kitchen with con~1:ruClion the~ d~s jgn and tips BY MARK KOONS www. and you'll dear the air BY RrCHARD BABBITT 52 Torture Test for Outdoor Finishes We sent five types around the c()unlrV and found one bvorite BY TOM BEGNAL 20 Tools & Materials Plunge-cut saw makes straight. and damp securely BY ADRIAN FERRAZZUTTI 28 Fundamentals Miter-gauge basics 67 Low-Cost Lumber With ]2 gre:H choices.

cOST WOODS .in the back 80 Readers Gallery 84 Q &A Best brush for shellac Round benchdogs are more versatile than square ones Working with warped panels 88 Master Class The magic of hot·plpe bending 98 How They Did It The back cover explained Back Cover $34 VS.400 67 lOW. $3.

and then watch the s. Ne-wwwn.. " " . Si"lOC «>Il\'.o. uS C<i..S ana C/tMaa. $8.. Ankla Ka PMIH OiW!d Helm GALLERY Matttl"'" Kenrooy A!lSOClat& EdltOf. two vlcIe<t work!.. doIlarf. waring eXpeI't l ips lind tricks IIlong the wey.e project gallery. Lena Consultirc Editor Methods of Work Jonalhlln Blnl<!fl J. ". " _CI'Ml. PerioCIoc. OI<tslOe U. rt Directar M. and read the current issue Of1llroe.~ 'T fXtit! regiotr&tKln ... C1' 06470-~506.plus articles and project pions.. $34. D7 TrMlliIunton PrOHs.com.".oa. c.com to I l. PO BOo: ~506.a CIlrlsllana Mlt hM I PflkQ\lkfl Mark Stholield Thorntos M ~Ke nflll fum ing tha piece usin g industrial ammonia... and use Peler G&drys' stra lghtlorward methods 10 tl'rold drips and sags... 10 lei an abSOlulely straight. Quick Tip: Edge-Jointing With a Router sen ior edllor Thomas McMenna shows a jolnler-I ree Printed In 1he UIA ww.pipe Steam-Bending Watch Michael Fortune (Master Class ) demonstrate an senior EdilOf Associate Editors Thomas G. '" .ld'li....99.99.e. CT 06470.~r: Ser'ld aOCI..m Rio. 8'lallable April... Fine ARTICLE Finish Recipe. Begnal Ste'l'e Soon easy way to bend wOOd u!llnlil a shopma41e device..t. Poet: Reu.... exposed-Joinery challenge. till WIIII&r.o:r1pt1on R_ .-' Poot . 00 N8T 387...1S.. Includi ng tool reviews. iii D FIM _~: PSSN: 03E1·3453) II publio...non p'I:". shared photos of his Gamble Hou s e ""try table and .."&iOtl$. .S. ~.... wJ(! Build a Morris Chair Read the article In this Issue.. don'l ml55 the collection 01 totally free content.S. DunlQn John Tetreault Robert Nash .ijo . It·s our l irst eYer woodworking project published simultaneously 11'1 print and on video. The n."" Wrnd!lO<..123210981.hoy uecut i'<e Ed ilor.nIMl>t""nton. Assoclmll Art Directors fJizabetll Healy JUlie Rlllnit PHOTO: DAVID MATH IAS S!'IOp Menager Kt'11y J.. C/o WOr1<Iw'idoe Maiters.. M anaging Edila' VIDEO Hot. an e~lensp.cur. c. $59.~ fur one -. ~ars.t..."'00 senior CfJJ. VIew more than 500 lechnlque videos.. 10\ .nadIIIn GS'~.$Ses to Finc~.rt online exclusives: Become II member to access more than 30 yean 01 Fine Woodworking content. Telepf')O(le 2Q3-4~81 71 ..xt.rnc" 63 S. &<k\I.erAA ISSUe . Si~ copies outside till U. Wh ile you 're there.95 (0( nun )Il'IIfS (io U. IVICJ P<l<""I.n o~flOble n.. and must-read blogs.~oort Free Plans In Your Inbox Get free plans. 6 rlNE WOODWOIIK1NG .''''''''' o.95lortMI ~arl.)f/ Production E(Ii1Of$ Gi na £ide Share Your Work to Win a Prize Join one 01 our monthly gallery chall enges by posting photos of your work lor a chance lit great prizes. na~ 10 c.. browse l. $73 .1\ Hllck ROland Jonn!oCl n ~ eff FlrHI Woodworking eLetter. . Inc" 2835 Kew Or". Ohio. CT 064706506.THIS MONTH ON FineWoodworklng.!! ll postap paid at Nev. It's dell¥ered to your Inool alm O$t eYtny week of tile year and " chock-fllil 01 _ntla1 tips. David Mathias 01 Dublin. (. 1'\\)oa..eas CllafliBS tQ Fw..o'"...u.. Maio 51 .S.dministrative ASSistant Cootrll)uU"l[ Editors Belfy Engel Ch'b Uen Bec ... ""'ilin!! ofIio.. Foolproof Brushing Techniques Don't reach IOf a rag Ihe next lime you need \0 apply a IInl5h. vld&os.n up.l1op to see how Gregory Paolini builds this re(.. Ifs Ihe perlect technique lor panel glue-tJps. Books'" Video Helen .lIner. 5qllare edge on a board./led b....ro. $83. and articles In the Gary Roc:owsld 0"".10'1'00" .l. $104 .mofllt\ly.com/extras Visit oor Web site to access free Web lie-ins. Grab II bru5h !nslelld .95 (0( 0118 _ .95 to.95for (io U.. 1ti<M. Go to Fln eWoodworklng.. $41. WltII a special s. Arts and Crafts Look Without Harsh Chemicals Gregory Paolln! (" Build 11 Bow-Arm Morris Chair") mlmk:s the look of 11 tradltlonal Stick ley fIn ish wittlout WqqQ\VorkingEdilor ..lnc . $7.4O().ho.. plene).. plelllle)..

com or I)'ve us a cal for more details.CJJaIitytilters In the inrustry.IagLWlirtools. .The L. VIsit us at ww..y.7 "" efficient This means dust pcrtic:1es do not pass ttYough 0Uf high elllclency fan unit. Rado frequency remote control and automatic titer cleaning ilfe just some ot our telltlxes.i:!QUn<l CYClone CM>t CoIIec. The Cyclone dust separation unit is 99.tors offer the benefits of a cyclone combined wittlltte trlQhest.

... Mark Koons ('End Grain Up·) was Introduced to the Japanese woodworking tradltlon in 1966. Later..o ... This In turn Nad to an exciting 27.t... GardoI.'pi... Richard Babbitt ( "Dust-Proof Any Tables8W") earned his pt1vate pilot's license with ~Msoclal4 M. WiMlIMMOn J.sI>er& ~tr... Rawon VP..e ~ .$'''' Inqulrie&: multl-englne.DOM Assoel8te Al:COUlt Mafllller Klm bert. lives With his wife. KrIst".led't1lOtoO Rrt Hoo.year career selling private and corporate planes for Beech Aircraft.. .t)I... Fulftllment VI:' Taunton tntertlCtlve -Mal rottl KIIlhy Worth PatrIe..-atlOOJ Svp'CreatiYe & Edltooal SU Wlll Edelman SVP..com. where he would finally heed his call to woodworking. Koons.o~ nt""_ Sr. . markkoons...tIcy SVP &.. PY es~t Su:r. ProCItC Noell. Megan s.eta~ nton.-ft. Mary Ann.bbe!..()()O.Lan A..-." . ~<t ... a frequent contributor to FWW. he used hIs knowledge of aerodynamics to solve the dust~lIection problem on tablesaws.nr:ste. His portfolio Is online at www. ~ .. " L~IK" SV?Ope..tert.l&l1l !.. Consumer h.. .. -__ ..3B72 1JbI<IH..anlle Roman EW a.COnt Sr.... Ferrazzutti teaches woodworking at the Center for Furniture Craftsmanship in Maine and Rosewood Studio in Ottawa.hlMllt 203.:..wId Gregory Paolini (-Build a Bow-Arm Morris Chat"') spent the last year designing and building a new woodworklng studio In the mountains of western North Carolina.0 to FInt! Woodworklng com (l u lnOrS w~ a~ a reader written mallllz!ne To SVP.contributors ......... Pond. .y Anll is fAlIlIPl!nn..milsher Anatole BUlldn Mo!IIsI. VP. ~ I learn hOW to propose an l"llc!e '0 to F neWood"orkrng com ioubmissions f'. ~.. Saolpille VP. Ad¥ortisong Sales Karl Ellie" SVP" Group Publisher Ja"' .... Sif'lile COpy sales ....1' & PuDlisher• ~_ UM l'IIuI Sprina: .'" kpanllaOllot. Instrument and commercial ratings. f'foCIn. ...tIIishef S'.37&7 k~IInt"".. InOe~1 p....4d S&ies While working as a stockbroker in California.... he found that he was iOSing too much time walking lIClOSS the shop to make a single cut or pick up a tool... ~ ~. ffte It.com Olrector ot Advertisirc Markftm... Ramona.. . f'.FlMroce When Adrian Femuzutti ("Tape: Unsung Hero of the SIIop 0) moved from a tiny basement shop in his house to a 4.. Wyo... ton.. CoaI<lrw... He is 8 tull-tlme furniture and cabillSt maker.a.r_ .. 1975 & ..l{)4. An avid woodworker. D.com)..u of Cileulalion MarllellOi Director Cirwlatlon Mall¥ f -Sr.. For more nl0lm3t!On on our col1trtbutors . he spent time as an Ironworker In Wyoming. In Wheatland.paollnlctafters.. CFO llrnothV Rahl Tho".. and occasionally teaChes wood'Wori<lng classes.... " " " 1 P. _i"LfII: -... Bur. with 8 lot of help from his wife.. who also teaches the craft (www.".""'" -~ 6 :=" Belli Reynold .e_ 8 !'iN!' WOOOWOHK 1NG .IOounI"".. MarketonC Manaeer 4dmlnl!ltnlttve .lp PI. Human Resources CIoroi vp"ControIIer VP....... when staffing an Army e~acuatlon hospital in Japan for casualties of the Vietnam War. GrGo."IS{lInt Cl'lristll'lll Glenoon Ad'vertJstrc Director PIli. So he brought in his skateboard and now zips around..D Robinson Sr..sq. shared workspace. ~ 203-304.. . Natlooal Accoun t Mallllger UI'Id~ ...... Buslne:!oS MlIIl8£efS The 'BlUnton Press .... BaOtoal 203-3Q4.

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Our perception. . FOr more information.:ss as the blade. This is reason enough for mc to ~wi tch . --~ . __ ..itter that is the .. i winced at a recent picture showing a loosely gloved hand only Inches from a spinning tablesaw blade..'i very wide hoards. to match various blade kerfs. ho:X>k-matched OOarcb. The article outlines exacdy how J stack lumher except for one step. .:... Kiln-dried lXlards are thought to be: . Mlnn... and cabinetry for my house.... Canada Threat to black walnut trees I am <l professor of entomology at I have uS<. in some arC".e States. creating a severe safety hazard risk to the operator.afc. which posc~ an extreme threat to hlack walnut in Nonh America.loved hands being caught by spinning sawblades. cabinetma ker. on the top of the pile flat as they dl)'. Woodbury. -_. and that is access (0 specialty lumber such :l.... go to: www.pl. .. Colorado State University 28% 24% 13% 10% 7% 5% 3% 11% A relati ve Secondary-school shop classes TV show Economic necessity Magazi nes A friend Woodworking school Other In our eletter..""One were to move a walnut log that contains -walnut-twig beetles into areas where bla<:k w.. 204 Mareh/ Aprtl2009 Spotlight p.-'"tI thin-kl:rf blades tOr year. and twe" forearms resuttlng from g. the amhor left out another Significant henefit: Since the blade is 28% thinner. 'Ihe extra weight keeps the board. I tend 10 add a solid layer of cinder blocks. BUI it is important to remind people that they w ill need to purchase a riving knife or !.-. 10 FINE woonWONKING . ends at the ends of our fingers and not at the end of a glove. when' it kxlk~ like it will kill all black \\--alnurs within a dtx..... . Sign up for the free newsletter at FineWoodworking..L-xt. is restricted to the western United .TI M POOR. com.. experienced carpenter lose an index finger due to just such a n exposure.• letters 1 1 1 A ISSUE NO. Curren tly we think the di~ .. and therefore our margin for safety..tlnul is native (much of tht: eastern half of the United States).1-canied fungus called Thousand Canken. We had an Advice for woulO-be wood stackers There is another bene fit of harv(.. however." and more. Va. Fai rfiel d. with iY. and jOinter blades. -CRA IG REICHERT.. and sycamore..(Ind no complaints about accumly. dams. "" .""10_"" . Okla. most of the trees have already died. I sticker one additional layer of framing lumher on top of the pile.. On woods that are especially prone to movement while they dry.edu/puhs/in'>eCt/0812_alen. -T ODD SMITH...l. Including the fingers Inside. 57 -----. drill bits.ame thkkOl. it should produce 28% less S<lwdust tl mn a standard hlade. I then cover the pile as described in the article. '1·)11.. ..drk intact should he moved eastward. where we have dL'lCOVered a new inse<.' offer riving knifes and sphttt:n.pdf. such as poplar. I have heard many horror stories of mutilations of hands. -WI LLIAM SLOAN ..-aJc or so. fingers... floor.. we poll rea ders on new questiOfis eac h month . contractor. It would be devastating if SOIn<. I have had treme ndous success with this approach. . . hk'kary...000 board feet. ---.. using the highquality lumber to make the Him.. Colomdo State University. tu rning blank." i:J' What got you started in woodworking? Thin-kerf blades continued In (he recent anide -r1\II\-Kerf Blades Are tOr Everyone~ (FW1V #2(4). Ann Arbor.~t manufacturers nov.. shaper spindles.. TAKE THE GLOVES OFF As a woodworker of many years' experience who stili has both hands and all of his fingers.. thiCk 'i1<1bs... centenng them over The stICkers. crotchwcxx. Sask. _v. No walnut lOW.-"' .t.JEFF GILSTRAP. When I switched over to thinner hlades..~ting and dl)'ing yo ur own timber nm listeo>d in your ankle ("DI)' Your OV>'fi Lllmix:r. Over the past 10 years [ h<1vC air-dried over 25. Moose Jaw. Miell... and then add rows of dmler blocks. I had a narrow escape when a board Sluck to the sundard-kerf riving knife th<lt Clme wit h my saw..WHITNEY CRANSHAW..> with great success .FWW "2(4). . Collinsville. Mo. It is against the law In some states to wear gloves while operating rotating equipment The glove Is easily grabbed and pulled Into the blade.colostate .

~~ng_oomJcu stomersetVioe To find "".~om sam·9pm ET Mon-Fri.NOOdwDr~. plus our floor and workbench cleaning aTtachments! Or send eo email to fwads~nlon .fii.. )IOu can cano::el your 5ubsc"pU on ana receive a full and ImrTltlOiate refund of the entire !iubscriprlon price. <Ank9J6 MAY/)UNE 200<) 11 . 10 11 customer service To older produeti tor S&nrt ~our Ca ll 8O().-.477-8727 9am-Spm ET MQn.finewoodworilmg.vleet.et hel9 .: Visit _..~newoodwork.C'Jmjproduct::l To .. II yOu woule! J)refer that we not IntlUI'le your ru'lfne.COITI To advertise In Fine Woodworking: Call 8O().00 I 307-739-9·P8 whirecMpd·llcl. CT 0&470-5506 Tel: 203-426-8171 Send an 1MI'i811 : fw@taunlon.1.: 1oW(W.~ Write to Fine Woodwor~ing at the address CIIII: 8QO.eom Mdin.flnewoodWorkir1jO!_com/priY8CY or call: S00-477-B1219am-Spm fT Mon-Fn For employman\ Informa tion : VI..my tool in your shop.ked qu".30'#8955 Fax: 203-210-6753 Email: fwOuiunton. fli'le'l\lOOdwol1ing.uog Rodder.le.Fine Wo. please vlslI: wv. Nev.Fri store: en email to I'T\aWIzirlEsalesCiltaunton .com Visit: www.tO'Nn.\GECOI.QQWorking To contact us: r". 110. Inc.COIT1/FAQ$ p~nal.w.n&. 9afTC Spm IT 581 To flnd out about Visit Fln ~ Woodworking product. No reproauctlon without permission Of n e Taunton Prau. jth onllne member sa..(X: $5.lt ~careers.309-8954 Connecr lO ...oR CATAJ. Inc.C.wetS 10 huquently .. To 'Peak direct. Box 5506.l free. No Questions asked Dust Right'" Integrated dust control aooesso ri ~ ~isil For a stort ntar you or.com/jworder orcall:~286 Bring your dust colleetor's strength to every corner of the ~hop ! Fast 315P. Woodworxing The Taunton Press 63 Sooth Main Street.dion!o: \115ft www.luntor.1.uarantH: If at al1)' time you're oot completely satlsfled with Fine WooOworking . _com TtM! Taunton r.com WHITECHAPEL LTD PfO~I: To submit an artlele . lifo! : We make a portion of our mailing list avaI lable to roputablo firms.com To &ubscrlbe Of place an order: VI$lt _w.com I l -S77-ROCKLER Copyright 2009 by The Taunton Press.tl.

Off to a fast start I recently rctin:u from II 26-ye-.u Clln:er in go-kart racing, and Marted wOC>Cl.working as a hobby. I accumulated some tooL.. , but I really needed a workbench. A Google search led me to your free site
(~"V.w.gettingstartedinwoodworking.(.'OIl1 )

Correction ."
In "lIlus(l":ltro Guide to Drawers" (FWW#20-!, p. 41), the drawing of a frame being f'J.bbeted along il~ inside &Ige implies that the router is moving in a counter clockwise dirL"(.1:ion. which would be a climb cut. 111e safer way to make this cut would be in the other

with the three-part video on building a workbtnch. nil; ~'idL-a. were very straightforward and easy to understand. I printed out the plan and bought the vise, dogs, hold-downs, dowei-centering pins, and an as..o;ortment of damps from OUf 10000.d woodworking 1>torc. I bought the lumht!r, MDF, threaded rod, and screws from a local home CL·nl~r. I huilt my

di1\:clion , ;ts shown here.
BACK lEG BOnOM FRONT LEG BOnOM

T
~l

bench over the weekend and it
turned
Ollt

great.
- ERIC ERICK SON , Rogers, Minn.

<l1li Clarlflcation In "Huild a Bow-Front Hall Table1'1. in. (F\V'W .K2.(4), we failed to label the tapc:r on the It!"gs. See dmwing at k-ft for the footprint<; of the legs.

About your safety
Working wood is Inherently dangerous. Using hand or power tools Improperly or ignoring standard safety practices can lead to permanent Injury or even death. Don't perform operations you learn about here

I

(or elsewhere) until you're certain they are safe for you. If something about an operation doesn't feel right, find another w"Cfj. We want you to enjoy the craft, so pleas e keep safet)' foremost In your mind.

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To bea rucccs:sful fum.on.' maker fn!Ui~ m1IIY >kills. Yoo need [0 undersund doIgn ~nd the essc:nWl ~Uf\'r."lI ,klIs of mmctlflg ruur ....t. /::)ta~ 0\'('1" 2~ ~ ~ !mid Sa.'3gC nu:;(~ 1r0lbh0ps !t3Ch cjj ~ -aIues 'i>lIh IIC'A' \\'IXId insiglu lam MAl dw bulklin8 sUls. scy\e and design, and thr: 0>I:IUiaI ~lJI'VJ.~"lI ~ that help pJ.r the bills. yOW' choia: 'lidllx: fnmI ~ olle week 'Uncr'
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\\"o\"A"JindlllTlilUremakt,.O)ffl "-../ The ua,-;j $ol':lge WfJIb~ :aMllT,lSlen:b»u Iw't lroinrd ;llId In!klrnccd one 0\11 01ten IIW:crs in I gcacr.uioo ("/ F~ cr.ttsm.:n

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MAY/Jl.'NE 1009

13

II

methods of work
:l ..

01

1

ED I TED AND D RA WN BY JIM RI C H EY

~·in.-dia.

bolt

connects top to

2x4 top

riser. \

.,.Base maoe
from >,<...10.·
thick MDF

Top of base removed for clarity

2x2 corner
blocks
Wheel axle

with

biscuits

Graduations risers make It easy W
level the t op. -""In. dowel


Washers Riser

prevents plywo od block from splnfling .

store wheel
Locking knob Nut press ed Into kno t)

Best Tip Adjustable-height

worktable on wheels
After several years and many projects, I'm still finding new uses for this 'WOrktable. TIle latticework top, made from 2x4s and assembled wlth biscuits, is a versa tilt: aid for glue-ups and as.<;L"IIlbly work, and it can he raised or lowered as needed. I l)'pically lower it for a..o.....emhling cabineL" and raise it to save my back for detail work, like cleaning up dovetails. 1be top can be adjustt:o frum 24 in. to 38 in. tall via four risers that fit through openings in the top of the base cabinet Over.~i7-e knoh~ and. piyv.'ood blocks lock and unlock the risers. Each knob has a t.':I.ptive )18-in. nut that connect.<; to a )~in. holt threaded through the block and riser slot. A glued-in dowel prevents the block from pivoting in the ... Iot. Each riser l~ marked in I-in. incremenL<; to make it easy to level the lOp. Clamps can be placed anywhere on the top, ooth vertiC"",dly and horizontally, to glue up small and medium pieces or secure work for power sanding. I also clamp scrJ.p lumlx:r to (he lop to create imprompfu stops and holders for speeding up repetitive work such as routing, pocket-screw joinery, or biscuit-slot cutting. The top of the hase cabinet helps prevent tbe cart from racking and provides a temporary resting place for tools and hardware. A pair of hardwarestore wheels on a simple Y2-in . axle makes it easy to move the table wheelbarrow style.
-BOB BELLEVILLE, Los Alt os, Calli.

Bob BelleY1l1e
has been building furniture for more

than 50 years, But
boards trum his

A Reward for the Best Tip
Send)«lf original tips to Methocls of'Nor1l, Fine Woodworking, PO 80)( 5506, Newtown, CT 06470. If

lumber stack also
hOJlle been turned
Into wooden cars,

clocks, and Men
computers,

published, we pay $50 tor an unillustrated tip; $100 for an illustrated one. if your tip is the best, you win Jet's f raming clam p kit, wh ich includes four paralief-jaw clamps and handy

14

FrIO: WOODWORKING

visit cabotstain. • Innovative products and technology to meet the demands of today 's pro. Or call ' -800-US-STAIN.HOW WE F RMULATE OUR STAINS IS STRONGLY INFLUENCED BY THE POWERS ABOVE. • Long·la sting. NAMELY RAIN. (abotst. SNOW AND SUN.in .com. • Consistent quality and color in every can. • To learn more. ~ OUR PERFORMANCE lS LEGENDARY:~ LSOO. • Ea sy to ap ply.US STAIN . fade resistant color.

I've smce replaced that accessory with the plastic lid from a 39-<)z.lgc indusrnal T-nul.. I can set the sander down immediately after using it. -JOHN H. l ""·in . coffee can. No. slot In au~ili8ry table slide fenco. YOl! can get both items at www.methods of work .xxn:item. Make the fence from a length of }1/2-in. to drill pn:ss.gminger. Attach the aUXiliary table co the regular drill-press table-arrangements will vary from drill pres.Tdping (xkl-shaped trim. aluminum angle Bevel the back. ~ Grind the end fa fit ~ ~ _ proflie to be scraped.':.\!O slol!. but J Wasn't very happy with it. aluminum angle faced with plY'.v dt for scmping glue out of tight comers..-thick plywood auxiliary table and a movablt. I first snap off the little tabs. 4X501 {hand It:>.! time ago I pun::ha-'<CI a fancy landing pad for my 5-in. Chama. The fixture nmsisrs of a 'A-in. in.. •..~ Loosen handles to "llO·in.'Uoc" Tapered handle with tI"Ireaded insert Easy drill-press fence This quick-to-make drill-press fenet is a big improvt. "'--. You can '\ argue w ith \he cost.:nce. -DAVID M.! the lid will spin until the sander has come to a stOp. Stamfold. Coffee-can lid Random-orbil sander 16 FINE WOODWORKING . by lVz-in. 2YJL1 (T-nuts) and No.! ends of the opener. by l'h-in. -JON MUNSTOCK. beveling the back of the blade slightly. N. The curved ends of the openers are jllst the right angle for effiden! scraping.T·nut.. To make a scraper. in the plywc)(xJ table and locks in place by tightening vertical black handles that cng. Then I grind the JXlinted end to fit the project at hand.<.vo(xL The fence adjusts via f'.. fa custom shapes for restoring antiques and s<.M. Idaho Can opener Remove ffle laos. random-orbit sander. Cann. below. am.:ffil:nt oyer the clumsy strip of wood and two clamps that most of us use. GROSZ. base size 1V. . Boise.. Cheap landing pad for sanders $oml. 0~=::::r------e:::5. I grind thl.. I have more than 50 different shapes Ih:!! I usc over and over again.: fr.Illed church keys). Custom scraper from a bottle opener For many years [ have l:>etn making scrapers from ca n and bottle openers (sometimes (. MASON. they're also gn.

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~ EWALT HAS ENTERED THE PLUNGE-ClIT CIRCULAR-5AW ARENA wLth [h. and a better blade-changing mechanism. D ha. In tact. -Mark Bdmundson f:ntildsfurniture jn Sandpoint. 85 did 8 number 0' other turners who tried It. each preset to a different diameter. 'Ihcre are a few key differences betvieen the DeWalt and the Festool.:1 In. Or you need se\leral calipers. which are hath excdlr:nl lools.com.. Festool introduced this class of too1 a few years back I"aur.i In. The Galbert Caliper sells for around $80. It's light<.. and $230 for a 102-in.:asicr to plunge.nee.. length.straight. TI1e saw abo has a riving knife that retracts when you need to plunge the saw. this .: inlfoduclion of its DWS"i20. There are zero-clearance plastic Inserts on both edges. 1 found the caliper to be pretty much foolproof. Tracks for the DeWalt are wid separately and are available in three lengths: 46 in. clean cuts ago and I soun wondered how I managed to get along without one. length. meaning you won't have to spin the long a. The nWS520 sells for $500. 59 in.. Wit" tho caliper behind the workpiece... you can read tho diameter as yov fum. Go to www.. Wurkin.alfNl . easy-tl>read scale that measures any diameter from ¥. Both saws make very clean ClitS.petergalbertchairmaker. WOODWORKING 1'11<. the caliper can be held in one hand and pressed against the back of the spinning wood while a parting tool Is held In the other hand. Idaho . Forced to pick hetween the Fest(x)l and DeWalt. the same price as rhe Fes[oo\ TS5EQ. dean cut..lo: in Wn)U1Ktion w ith a track. lI. $100 for a 59-in. cutting the wood until the desired diameter Is reached.:r. the DeWalt can cut on both sides of its tnlck.tools & materials . The plunge-action is fussier on the DeWalt: Yuu haw to place both hand~ on the back handle and apply p ressure directly over the blade. • WOOD TURNING A better turning caliper TYPI CALLY. On the other hand. 20 t·INF.'iaw makes .com for mot. while the work Is spinning. constantly reset a caliper to chock those critical dimensions. you need to Me. Plan to p<ly exl"l for the tmck: $AG for a 46-in....dewalt. • POWER TOOLS Plunge-cut saw makes straight.Andy B. go to www.. For more Information. Windsor chalrroaker Peter Galborl has come up wllh a belter way: a caliper that has a bullt·ln.to I I I . WHEN TURNING A SPINDLE with several diameters along lt5 length.!ngth.. . ff . .. w Ith a minimum of fuss. I'd c~ the Festool.~semhly around when workinK. for noar-splinter"free cuts.a)'01f tlfrn.nrlvm teaches wood turning at t he State Univelsity 01 New York at Purchase. <. a tedioUS and timeconsuming process. and 102 in.. to 211. Itnd the riving knife (leN) redvt> es the chance of kickback.' information. .

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the cut won't be fully sanded. moves air at the rate of 650 ('ubic feet per m inute (cfm) at the collector port.nal is an associate editor. -BOb Nash is the shop manager at Fine Woodworlllng'.tools & materials ooc""" • DUST COLLECTION Compact dust collector is powerful and efficient roster.com.. I hooked it up to a 13-in. tablesaw blade with a 9-In. I crosscut and ripped some 5/4 cherry.lOd chips into the collector as kmg D ELlA HAS ADDED A NEW PLAYER to its dust-collection as you keep the hose length to under about 10 ft.nc •• Delta's new l ·hp dust collector rolls from one machine to another with Uttle fuss .Jturcs a I -hr. hose) and connect the dust collector to only one du.deltaponeKahle. l()(). Is a 10-In. For Information. -. make sure the blade height Is such that the perimeter of the sanding disk extends above the thickness of the stock. It gets yOll pknty of power in a lightwl'ight. compact.and crosscuts than the Forrest.--<I/a. blade (with disks mounted) sells tor $65. I made the same cuts In cherry using a recently sharpened Forrest Woodworker II blade.ln. • BLADES Sanding sawblade makes smooth cut A TABLESAW BLADE THAT CUTS AND SANDS AT THE SAME TIME? That's a blade r had to try. Mcxld SO-720 fe-. For more details. birch plywood to find out how long the disk would last. The product.. By the way.8-amp induction motor that. (it comes with a 5-ft.. 1O. If It doesn't. go to www. The cuts were ex(:ellent. The lQ.~ places the machine between a shup vacuum and the standard 1Yz hp collectors reviewed in FWW '"183· This model's capacity is enough to move dust . It also has a i-micron bag. planer. -Tom lJe?. Roll-aYOllnd (:onven/.. A Final Cut sanding disk on each side of this tHode produced smoorh cuts IJoth ripping and crosscutting..grlt self·adheslve sanding disk mounted to each sIde. - Cut and sand. when using Final Cut.~t-prod ucing machine at a time. go to wwv. 22 PI N E WOODWORK1 N G .- .com. The quality of the final cut was almost as good as the first. Thi. called Final Cut. ea~'Y-to-roll-arollnd package.'. replacement sanding disks are available. As a final test.. and it collected over 95% of the chips. better than the 5-mkron or 3O-micmn bags found on many other collectors. The Delta 50-720 sdls for around 1300. and stili better than the Forrest. of 0/4-1n.flnalcutblade. The Final Cut blade produced smoother rip. according to Delta. To test the effectiveness of Final Cut. For comparison. t cut about 70 linear ft. 4O-too!h .

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Blade changes also require releasing and re-tensioning the blade.woodpeck.ldjustlU\!nts go very quickly.. CleYl. ~. The kit fiT~ most tr. The new AI.IfP'/6 WWlidurMJrit..>come a welcome: addi tion to my handsaw.• ..It SllJMO.com/fw Made In the USA woodnewsonline.Hlitional-stylc 14-in.ditM PytlleACCscr The Wood Slicer'* lEGENOAAY RESAWlHG BLADE • CUTS SMOOTHER • STAYS SHARP LONGER • WORKS FASTER • SOUNDS OUIETER • MAKES VENEERS Woodp.com Rt:t. lit" SIIJIts I 3S. and the contoured knob fits the hand comfortably. • ACCESSORIES Ratchet action speeds up bandsaw tension adjustment leasing the blade tension when a bandsaw is out of usc fur more than a day.com).1 '183:>9 ~~~ • Oo. ·· Whiteside Router Bits 24 fINE WOODWORKING .R SD\lCE NO.. NO.ck. 76 Rt:AIJH.I..:arterproduds...r>F. replacing the faerory tension screw.com Kl!AJ)~.lon Rout. so your f1aml doesn 't have to work as f1ara. 70 • FESTOOL • STEEL CITY TOOLS • FEIN • ONEWAY LATHES • LlE·NIELSEN • LEIGH DOVETAIL JIGS • TORMEK • CARVEWRIGHT • KREG • GRANSFORS BRUKS AXES • Hotrmlln & tUmmM GjOnniln Wori:o. Replacing the facTory equipment takes less than five minutes.ltchct direction. uat • InataM Quk: k. YOll just flip a lever on the bottom of the knoll.ilOO rp'I1 Tate them fa . nut. UMg . and handle with an ACME-threaded rod and nut for easier rotation.. The Ratchc.-Urt 1!M1la.. NORTHWEST SCHOOL of W OODEN BOATBU LDING PrKl. The knob on this aftermarket tenSion adjuster has a ratchetlnt aCflon. L.r. Major . Topping the assemhly is a removable rJlcheting knoh.. M OST EXPERTS AND MANUFACTURERS recommend re- -Roland Johnson is a conln'buting editor.r Lift from Learn the Tl'iltit Offering COLlI'SeS inlraartlonaf! and Contempcralj' t30atbullding Accre.tools & materials '001""."Curight Ratchet-Rod speeds up tho:<e adjustment~ considerably and makes them a lot easier on your hand and wrist. Setter tension adjus ter. (PIot_l*Idng.-"t-Rod has tx. • Tool-leu micro· adJ ment.mflte you to subSCribe to WOOD NEWS Highland Woodworking 's FREE Online Magazine • Woodwori:/T1f/ nps • Class Schedules • New Tools • Spec/oil SavIngs HIGH PERFORMANCE CARBIDE WHEELS FOR YOUR DREMEL· 1YPE DRlW f311.nctt" OUTERBITS. bandsaws w ith a cast-iron frame. It sells for ISO and is available frum Carter Products (wYr'W.COM WOODWORKING BOOKS 25% OFF We . www. To change r:.arn more .pIeca camage.) All ona ~eautiful w aul'fNnt campLls on the Olympic PeninsLli.

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j,

fundamentals
1 1
Ol 01

Miter-gauge basics
HOW TO GET THE MOST FROM THIS STANDARD TABLESAW ACCESSORY
BY STEVE L.ATTA

Ch.ck fII • • 11d-

In,.c:tIon flr.t. Jftheres roo much
slde-to-slde play, peen the bar to dimple a comer

at long after you set up yOur fiffit u blesaw, you'll find yourself reaching for one of woodworking's most common and useful accessories---the miter gauge, Stanchrd equipment with every tablesaw, a miter gauge is the tool many beginners use to make their first crosscut... With a miter gauge, you can accurately cut workpieces to length with square end~ and m ake a variety of angled cuts, induding those for mitered corners. A... you progress in your woodworking, you'll probably add a crosscut sled to your tool kit (see

and widen It
slightly.

Fundamentals: "Build a Simple crosscut sled for the rable...aw," FW'W #188), but you wan', outgrow the miTer gauge.
Setting up the gauge 111e miter gauge con.~L<;ts of a bar and an adjustable head with a knob to kx:k the adjustment. The har fil~ in the slots in the saw wble that run parallel to tht' bbde. Look for a sturdy aluminum headstock and an unobtrusivl: locking knob With a secure and comfonable grip. Atraching an auxiliary fence ~ill help brdce the stock against the blade's tendency to push

Attach alt .ulelll.ry fence. This Is a must because It supports longer pieces and reduces
teaTaur. Latta uses ¥...lfI. thick . 3-ifl.·wlde MDF.

Set the tau~ for It _qu.,.. cut. If the blaele
and slot are parallel. you can use 8 known 90° reference to orient the gauge to the blade.

Check the ,..ults. After setting the gauge to 90·. make a test cut The cut SlJrface shoula be square to the edge you held against the fence.

28

FINE woonWORKtNG

[gQR blocks

The itop block Is an a,&-OId way to cui multiple wo,kpieees
without again and again.

A hlnpd block I. nIce. It /etli you trim both ends of a board without changing the

setting.

one end square (above). Then butt the squBre end against the block and cut to length (right). Cutting multiples w/ll 00 quick and accurate.

back tov.-ard the u.<;er and C'dUM,> it (0 pivot on the corner of the gauge. The fence should be tall enough to retain it:; strength when the blade pa.s....es through it. Extending the [COle 11/2 in. or SO past the blade will help you !'iafcly push shOll cutoffs beyond tht: bladt:. The preset angle .~tops on most miter gauges are rarely accurate. To set for wo , put the gauge in the slot upside down and. with the lock knob \oosenoo. slide the head up flat againSt the rip fe~ rail and tighten the knob. If the saw is properly set up, that should do it. Check it once with a drafting triangle to make !>lire it is accurate.

Making a basic crosscut To make a 90 0 crosscut, ~imply hold the stock against the miter-gauge fence and push the gauge through the mt. To avoid pinning the stock to the table and to keep your hand.:: a safe distance from t~ blade, apply downward pressure only over the gauge's steel har. After completing the cut, Ix: sure to move the ~tock off the gauge and away fmm the blade before sliding the miter gauge back. Thi.~ avoid~ the chance that the blade will catch, and th row, the workpiece during the return strokt,. You can work to a .~imple pendl mark, but a StOp block makes it eas)' to crosscut multiple pieces to the same length. My hlock is hinged and designed to work with my 3-in.-lall auxiliary fence. A small piece of lA-in. plywood fastened at the top of the block keeps it about % in. otl
www.f;new()odworking.com

For tonter worl!:, It IORter .top block. A hookea block, held in place with a pair of clamps, works for even the longest worl<pieces.

FOI' short cutoffs, a .tandoff fence. If you lise the rip fence as a stop, short pIeces can get trapped between the fence and Dlacte. 50 butt the workpiece against a standoff stop, clamped to the rip fence well in front of the
blade.
MAYI]U NE 20 0 9

29

fundamentals ""li"'"
Two gauges can be better than one

I"wo lfIIu". tun ala. by .'de. One sits In each slot; totether they support a long fence.

cur 4tCeUf.t. dadoes. The twin-gauge setup works well for making cuts across the m/(1dle of a long workpiece. Used mffer gauges are JnexpeflS/ve and eas), to find at flea markets Of online.

the saw table. This gap prewnts dust buildup, which can hinder ac<.-uracy. The plywood also keeps the stop perpendicular to the table. If a stop block is clamped at an angle, there will be discrepancies in length between piet:es of diffe rent thickness. When crosscutting, hold the workpiece tight againSt the fence and stop block.
A second gauge adds versatility I always have one or two extra miter gauges around the shop. They are handy for dedicatiojO: to a specifIC task or for using in tandem to suppon a long fence for crosscutting longer workpieces. A cro.'>..";Cut sled is better, but this ammgement is a good substitutc. A rwin-gauge
~rup also supports an L-shapeJ fence for making specialized curs such a:; dentil molding, finger joints, and knuckle jOint".

Add an 1.-.hlJ~

fence for small
WOf'If. The fence fIe/ps preverrt tearout

In small work like this
dentll mo/dlng. 11Ie

sawkerf In the fence also helps locale cuts
In the workpiece. To make the fence , screw a 2-in.-wlde strip of *-In. MDF to the bottom edge of a " ...In. piece.

A Make wecise miters

A tip for angled cuts \XT hen setting up for an angled cut, it's important to set the gauge .'iO that the leading end of it.:; fence poinl~ toward the blade. If the troiling end of the fence is dosest, the force of the cut wnd.. to pull the stock into the lxxJy of the blade. TItis leads to burn and T earour when the blade exit~. And if a stop block were used, the angle would tend to pull the stock away from the h lock. Also. the auxiliary fence should stop at the blade so the scrap from the cut does not gel pushed onTO the back of the blade. 0

Settlrtf up.n an~ed cut. Use a pair of drafting triangles to set the gauge for a 45· cut. Also be sure th e triangle is against the body o( the blade and not a tooth, and set the gauge so the leading end of its fence points toward the blade.

30

FINE woonWORKING

po$Illon oUow.1 PreSSeS (~lIM'IirI2Hn.. so contact us loday.ForrestBlades. Inc. 1C 8 bag from $555 FOIa .r 1M blod..0(01" MS.'. cd 811 surll to ask 10( our frfIEI 40 mOLlie pmduct line cd-rom 800 54!1-~1U MA 01742 Quality VAKuum Products.. We've been the leader for over 60 years. pitch buildup. lime chef timel Abrasion. Tho_~"_ ~~1M1 www. Electric Vacuum Systems 51 . Vinyl Bags (25 _ Custom Bags & Frame Flip top Frame Presses (10 Skx:k S!u4) Professional System s with .Iaoot~ Cooe FW VAKuum Pressing equipment Air-Powered (~tUl1) 8.finewoodworking. 10 Iow.) Polyurethane 8. We handle all types and makes of blades. Typical tumarOUfld is just 4 to 5 days. .. 9'>".. rw sharpening jeopardize the lite and performance of even the finest carbide-tipped blades and dado sets. ..FOfl'ffitSharpening Helps Prevent Bad Cuts Like These oditJ..aiglll cut.IO competllall! 10' blade drifl and also iroclvdl" a Prethion L~I Cvnor for iocredibly 0((1. 43 Bradford www.com 1-800-733-7111 (In NJ . call 97H73-S236) C 2009 FOIIII1 t.t$ In two dimer>$ion. brnJcI'Hft " price ..com MAY / JUNE 2()()9 31 .. ccnrttudion lor <>mOI'ngly ". Our expert factory sharpening will help protect your investment.'101. Rigid alum . micro chipping aM poor Low prom.ll91r......d 10 CVlIhkI "".

. lighten The mass Just enough to give it the f<. and cunin~ a mort~-3nd-tenon C jOint o n the curved arms and side frame. wilh its large. and sense of ea rthen mass and solidity.!ts you around those challenges. . No piece displays those feamre:. Throw in 3 reclining hack and finn. squ:U'e legs and wide arms decked out in heaullful ray-fleck figure. arms--presents two big chaJlen~es making bowed arms With atuactive grain. But (he most dis(inctlve part of the chair-II . better than a Morris chair. and you have a Lha. For the most part. I'll show you how laminating the arms gl. the construction is straightforward.l(uartersawn oak. but givins. The gmccfully bowed arms of this version.r that you'll never 'Wan! to leave.Lamination puts beautiful gra in and a graceful curve within arm's reach BY GREGORY PAOLINI raftsman fu rniture is known for lis 5trdighl lim.-cl of i rresi~tihle comfort. cushions."S. And I'll show you how to 32 PINE WOODWORKING . based on a design hy Gustav Stickley..

by 221h In. --. -' . '" In.. . long ---. in. in.2.. ~"~". inset . wide by 22 in. In. In. long 15°. in.1 In. . 1'" In. wide by 41 In. t- l -------~ ful~slze plans lor thl... l in. Bowed arms iIInd beautiful quartersawn oak stand out on this Craftsman claulc. w.in. wide (before cutting curve). lone.t-. In. thick by 6'0'. 1 . T· -422~jn.. n . L. thick by 2 . 'Y. Back stretcher. In. E Post edends If. thick by 6 in.o Df • 4 ' Ao In. ¥.b p < l ~If.. located 1 . wide by 28 in. In. in. loni lower rail. long Back leg.~~"~w~ core..1'4 in. 1 '. » .-thlck plies Side s lat. MAY/JUNE 1009 www.. thick by 3".oe by 8¥lln. 'h in . thick by 211. In. long Quartersawn veneer. I!.. .. w'de In. }'-':t. wide by lin . thick by 4 in .. • 2'Y. 1'1'. from the top of the front ai'lCl back stretchers square. In. In. .de by 22 in. ~ 1 . All the jolnl$ are mortln and tenon. in. wide by 27 In. rl&hl) above top slat. H'. laminated from four V. long Back slat." . which makes 'ong Tenon. th ick by In. in. thick b~ 1'1.urn 33 . l EG DETAIL Corbel.tV. 'II In . thick by . ~ ~all'ble ill flneWoodw<Jrking . In. 24~ln . chair are . thick by V. long Arm..". In.'j. thick by 21n.. '" l 5 1<1. 71 n . above 8rm and Is beveled at Tenon.I ARTS & CRAFTS RECLINER Top back slat. 3Zin. 27 In. from ra il bottom Front leg. sq.:v.in.In. In.l. Front stretcher. thick by 1 . w. Arm (Nerhan.~I ]II.----+1_1 'n~ L . In. by 2 In. square by 24. wide.. 24 In. in. 1 Y.. thick by 3 in.ln. wide by lin. In. lV.-I n.. long Ten on. . ~ In. long long Rear lenon. in. r- >J. . thick by 7 in.0.. thick (see detail.ln.23V. w.com/PlanStore.. wl~ by 29'1.. elltends Y. wide by ¥.". Rail and stretCher tenons . thicK this ill chair tha t win lalt..c--. 2V. lona Backrest post.finewouuwurkil1g. w'de Cleat.. 1 . in. In.s Inside 01 leg by V. In. in. 2". lon8. In.

at the tablesaw. Cut a full tenon on the back of the upper mil. you'll just saw away part of it later. Now cut all of the tenons. Clamp two Of three of them together to get a wider bearing surlace. Support the piece with the miter gauge. They're Laid out and cut after you make the tenons on the tops of the legs. mortises now.n faces.8wn edges of the core. then tenons When m. lWo fences (one the routers edge guide._ Thin piet:es. II mortise and tenon. use a dado set to cut the cheeks. Then cros~1. Then. Teftons at the tablesaw. resulting in sloppy joints and poSSibly a chair that's out of square. which is the easiest by far. Ro uter-cut mortises have rou nd end~.llke the side posts. so I round the tenons with the rasp ponion of a Nlcholson 4-in-hand fite. trim the veneer. When cutting the mortises on the legs. They must fll well to get a square and strong chair. reference the same fence against the outside face of each one.. including a simple and authentic method for making a leg with four quartersav. Lumher like th at doesn't grow on trees. tablesaw. You can cut all of the square. I usually start with the mortises_ Irs much easier to fit a tenon to a mortise than the Surf wHh 01. Its smooth edges Double the parts toT stable l'OutIn. Don't worry aJxlllt the tops ri~l\t now. First.~ flush to the core with a router and flush-trimming bit.It the bottom of each leg to square it up. When roullng mortises.lking it mortisc-and-tenon joint. 34 PINE WOODWORKING . the traditional Craftsman joint. Remai n consistent w ith your reference edges. Paolini matches fhe straight bit's diameter to the mortise's width so he aoesn't have to move the rourer side 10 side arnJ risk tilting n out of other way around. but it can be made in the shop. Mortises. cut the shoulders a hair deeper than the cheeks using a combInation blade. the position of the mortises will vary. but the o ne Stickley used. don't provide a statile surlace for a router. is to g lue up a core of quartersawn lumber and then laminate twO quartersawn veneers over the flal:-. After the glue is dry. Otherwise. for example.• •• •• TIPS FOR ACCURATE JOINTS Every Joint In this cha ir Is get striking quartersawn grain everywhere it count~. except the four in the arms.'i8Wn faces. Here's how to cut the Joints accurately with two common tools: a router and a Legs that look good from every angle The legs of a traditional Morris chair have four quartcf. the other Clamped on) keep the rOLiter on trilck. except those on top of the legs. There are several different methods to achieve the look. rfCht bit.

Make the first layer al the band- saw.. Arter coating the pl/es with glue. Youl1 need two doz. Work progressively down alont the form. The best way arou nd this is to insert the side rails into their mortises and tmet: the front and back mortises onto them.com MAY/JUNE 2009 35 . Pivot pin holes. in. 2¥.. dia. mar the tenon shoulders. Build the fOIm I..~ aggre.ssive teeth make qu ick work of [he rounding.-. ~ 2'1. clamps.h rhe form. 1 in. Packing tape keeps the glu e from sticking 10 the form and stop. won'... Screw a melamine fence to the rear of the (orm and a stop to Its front edge. Drawing brings arms and legs together The upper mil and the tops of the legs must be curved to match the how of the arms."'" in. . You'll use thi" drawing to make a pattern for mark ing the cu rve on the upper rails and legs and [0 make the bending form uscu to laminate the arms.. Here's an easy R••• w the p/Je •• Start the cuts on the fi:J blcsaw ana use the kerfs to guide the bane/saw blacle as you finish the cu t freehand. in..' by I. Clam.. cleanIng It liP with hnd· paper. www. press them against the stop and fence.y.4CW. and it.en. The tenons on the lower side rails will interfere with those of the front and back stretchers where they meet inside the legs. Glue and screw on each successive layer and rout It nush.r.. Use a full-scale drawing at the <lrm's profile to make the bending fo rm and you'll get a great fit . The easiest way 10 do this is to make a fullsize drawing of the arm's p rofile. deep I-c----. F/nl. HOW TO LAMINATE THE ARMS _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ The bow of the arms needs to match the curve cut onto the upper rails and legs.. in those areas.fi newoodwork i ng...y. ciampa. Place a clamp every 2 In.. Add a fle:dble caul on lop and start clamping next to the slop.. You'U need to trim rhe tenons' thickness about 1111 in..

They w ill keep tht p lies aligned as you glue up the arms. You need eight 3. and so are t he tenon Shoulders. Laminating fonn keeps plies in line-Bent lamination.E WOODWORKING . o. laminated arms are a cut above !k. But laminating the arms allows you to control their look. align !he bottom of the rail pJJttem with th e bottom of the rail and mark the curve on the legs. Usin/-.4-in. Cut the cheeks with a dado set. distracting grain pattern. 36 FJ}. but they don't need to be. With the sic1es c1ry-fitterJ. It's easier to align and hold In place I han one of t he arms. 35) to a piece of MDF. Spring a batten between two Mils located at buth ends of the arc. cur". Push the center of the batten up to the high point of the arc and trace the line.J. layers to get a form 6 in wide. transfer the arm's profile to a piece of 3/4-in.> C'. use grAphite paper to transfer the ann's profile (see drawing.: the right kind of glue will prevent the plies frum Cut th e tenon. A laminated ann is also more stahle than one cut from solid lumber. Start by making a laminating form. Ann'> sawn from solid lumber would have a wild. Cut thc curve on the bandsaw and u~e files and sandpaper to smooth it.n be tricky.:p the plieS aligned.: : SAME PATTERN FOR THE SIDES Th e hardest part of building this cha ir is f illing th e arms to the sides. and concerns about short grain weakness d is:lppear. Cut dose to the line of the curve on a bandsaw and sand or file down to the line.com/e~tra5. ch(X)sing your lx:st stock for rhe top ami urienting it for the best effect. Make a pattern of t he upper ralls and use It to mark the curve. t- T 3'/1 in. Mark '-- tr. 11ren chop and pare away the waste with a chi$f)1 as shown to define the curtl6d ShOli/ders. A fence and a stop on the form kcr. oc"'Cause the arms arc longer than it. The t ops of the upper ral ls are curved. Start by cutting the shoulders square. creeping after you remove them from the form. This locates th e tenon 'S Sfx)ulc1erS on tile legs. and mark Its curre. VIDEO WORKSHOP watch Paolini build this project from start to fin ish in a memberS-(lnly ~ideo at FineWoodworking. The pattern for marking the CUlVe won't work here. Screw a fence to the side of the form and a stop to its front end. Cover all of the working surfaces Wilh packing tape to prevent glue from sticking to them. p. the figure a nd grain that shows on the tOp of each arm must he just right.wing of the profile. and a simple caul applies even pressure over them. :L '-- \ Align paf/em with bottom Mgs ()( ra il.-thlck MDF.-cuU::>t: the bowed arms arc so prominent in this design..--vcn. -. First. To make the pattern fur marking the Clilve on the legs and upper rail. realign the pattern on the rail. Then disassemble th e sides. Use the first layer to make the remaining sc. W'"dy to make the fu ll-sizl! urJ.

lor ot work in a well-ventilated area. The front mortise Is 2 In.: ann nn the upper rails and legs. and rip the ann to width o n the tablesaw.. After scraping the glue from ona edge and Jointing It. not guaHI"'. I begin resay..1wing all o f my laminates to 5/16 In. hov. too. :1 known carcinogen. Align the bottom of the pattern with the OOttoms of dle rails. and mark the rurve there. thick.aw blade through the ::tml. usln. MAY/JUNE 2009 37 .rever. 8 sled and small shim to get 8 square CIlt. 2. The right gJue for laminations-The best glue for laminating curved parts is urea formaldehyde.. When you do thiS. ~)int it. . Then use a dado sel to cut the www.:ut sled and a shim to gt:l a ~uart' cut on fhe e>nd. Disassemble the side. concave side IIp. first lise a combination blade tu cut all four shoulder. Now cklmp the arm In a vise so the mortise area is level and use II Forstner bit to remove the W8ste. in line with the highest shoulder (the one of the front of each leg). And mark the insi<k: of the legs on the pattern so you can realign it to mark the rail. layout the underside. Cut the ruN\: on the upper rail on the bandsaw. I p lane them to 1 in. Lay the side assembly on your bench and stand an arm on the tenons.: : MORTISE THE ARMS. Th~ benefit~ outweigh it" longer drying time.. After res. the back tenan will be CUI down to its final width.rm.4 LOCATE AND CUT THE MORTISES 1 . dryfit me side a~mblue5 together. Low-stress re. To make things E:<tSltt.· thick Ma~onitc covered on onc side with white thennofail.m8 at tlk! tablesaw and finish up at the bandsaw.. SO wear gloves and use a respir. go halfway from one side. If i'l.com 3. To avoid tearout._ _ Th e most accura te way to locate tne arm mortIses is to mark dIrectly from the 10C tenons. The ends of the pattern will align With the outside edges of the fmot and re"df legs. flip the arm. It has a long open time and dot:sn'{ creep once dry.. rip trnt arm to width with the concave side up. I use a piece of whitdxrJru fur a caul.. to slZ8.. whiteboard is IAI-in. FI. Then cut the am) to ienHth U1>lIlg a croos<. Tha i '118)" )'ou'r.iclc and o utside faces of the legs. Cuned arms mean curved sides To mark the curve of th. because it hend. kerfs hdp me guide the oond<.fJoewoo dwotking . Use a eh/sello chop away the remaining waste and squant the comers. As you did When drilling. Use that measurement to align the arm before transferring the tenon locations to the arm.-'i a finely tunt!d bandsaw to r~w wkie lumber. and complete the cut from the other sJde. from the front edge..." cut . The tablesaw removes most of the material and itt. where they should be.quare to the leg..l. Crosscut the 8rms to lenlth. Once both arms 3fe laminated.. To cut the tenons un the legs. Availahle at home centers. '00. go Mffwlly from one side and ffnlsh up from the ". Mark the cutve o n the iru. :o. scrape the glue from one edge.awing-It takt::. flush against their shoulders. well and is glue-resistant.

and use a Forstner bit to ne-. Ifs firm and durable yet comfortable. neecl glue If they fit snugly. in the legs. brushl"g glue 01) them ancl on the leg tenons.. Work In s r_tes.e corbels are centert. layout and drill the holes for the back support pins. weDve webbing through them fa create It strong but comfortable base for It cushion.. Attach . After they're shaped. Shape corbels to fit the arms With the arms temporarily in place.Dry-fit and clamp the side assemblies in preparation for cutting and fining the arm mortL<. Remove the arms and mark the mortise sides. After the arm. After stapling four courses of Webbing across the '(Dme's op8l1/ng. Mark the fronts and b-dcks of the morti!>es directly from the tenon. chamfer the tenons that come through the arms.'ihoulders. and cut them out at the bandsaw. NCAt. and their tops need some shaping for a snug fit against the bottom of the arm.'. Next. 11l.. Glue the rails to the legs ancl lea~e the clamps on overnigh t. and screw the seat-frame cleats to it and the h ack stretcher.. mark out four. UphOlstc r~ fabric Muslin l·in. C US HION ANATOMY Ask your upholsterer to make a layered cushion like this one. Assemble the slcles first (right). Then glue u p the base.~ on the sides and back of the [eR. then pare down to the lines with a chisel. cotton Over a nd under.~ are fit and the tenons chamfered .. I make a pattern for the corbels. webbing Ha rdWood frame 38 fiNE W()OOWORKI"G . A drill press will ensure that they're perpendicular.. The front and hack corbels are the same k ngth. Plug the countersink:. use a chisel and mallet. inside face down with the tenons overhanging the edge.>J on the legs. Put a bit of glue on the oorbeJs and screw them in place..ure to lx)re the holes before cutting the out'iide back comer of the arm. cut the arc on the front stretcher. high·denslty urethane foam 3-in . proud of the arms and bevel them at IS° ..lIe a countersink for the screw head. glue up and clamp the stretchers. Be . w ith shopmade tapered plugS [0 get a good grain match. The slats cia. 50 you ca n take measurements for the back directly from It . To cut duwn to the CUlVed shoulder !ine. but thl. Through-tenons re q uire careful layout. CUi them 3/8 in.. cheeks. Next.: : ASSEMBlE THE BASE Glue up the base before making the back. predrill them and the legs for screws. Leave the clamps on for 24 hOfJrs. Wh ile you" re at the d rill press.eS. Use a Forstner h it [0 remove most of the waste from the mortises."y hang down lower on the rear legs hecause of the arm's curve.he arms (be/ow). batting 5-in. you can fit and attach the corbels. Sct the arms on the tenons and press them :mug against the . I b:1Ck-bevel the shoulders to ensure :1 tight fit with the bottom of the annrests. Then clamp an assembly on the bench. drill the holes for the pivot pin.

Use a pattern to layout the curve and then cut it at the hand. dme with webbing for the seat cushion becau. 0 and a hardwood frame is beuer than Ihe plywood frame some uphol'llerers u. TIel it dry overnight and then appIJed a dark walnut o il·based pigment stain.. I u. In.r. n finish. and finish up with sandpaper. Wide Tenon. 20 in.s. Back slats: Tenon the curve J CUI Ih~ l(... dla. pressure..ller-based polyurethane.1n. Check the diameter of tnc shatt <l¥lth a Ve-in. I applied an a nt ique cherry aniline dye. WhlCh can be h'ld hy fuming WIth indu.. Because the $la's are cur'o'ed.. 1+1"'.:um MAY/JUNE 2009 39 . • 1:V.. 3¥. white oak. I made a hardwood f. bring you r (:hair into ttle house.e. chair 1 an upholsterer.'\fler the glue dried. Cut .. white oak. Pivot pin. r ck:ancd up the sawm:lrks with a stationary belt sander.: : THEN MAKE THE BACK Cut the tenons ~fore shaping the slal.'<i il off w ith Minwax Po lycryhc w.~ 0 1\ the b. curved piece.. and take a moment 10 enjoy its grace :lnd beauty.C. Mter sanding this chair. In. put if in a welcoming ~pol.:k slats at the same time as the other ten- ons because it b much easier tu cui tenons on a square piece than on a thin. 20 to FlneW~ worklng. -"'! t Slat.'non.aw.e-and-tenon jo ints.ize to allow room for upholstery to be wl"dPpcd :mxmd the t<ides and stapled to the bottom. .in.<. --~ For the complete finishing recipe.he . they tend to flex j) little under clampin.. Spacer.ts. joining the parts with mortLo.hi:. thick 518t blank. not glued In PIVOT AND SUPPORT PINS Even a novice can turn these pins.10 . Gregory Paolini makes Arts ana Crafts style furniture in Waynes~ille. Hardwood spacers limit the force of the clamps.finewuodworklng.st: I tiC"nt .'>Cd a:..h to make the fm mc. I'll in. thick Authentic look without the fumes Stickley's fum iwn. Use a gouge until you're c lose. bul a ~poke~have or sanding hlocks :Ilso works." in. Then take a seat~ nd maybe a nap--to e njoy Its comfort. TI1e length and depth of me frame should be If( in. N. trial ammonia But you (:an forgo the ammooiJ and <. Support pin . I finishc. unde n. long Bandsaw and smooth the curves after cutting the tenons. '\It'hen Ihe finim L" dry and the upholstery done.:: is well·known fur its ridl bro.com/extras.I m gel :l great finish . open-en d SUPPORT PI N ~Online Extra o wrerlCh. thick / by 1 in.H.. by I. % in... 'I 111. PIVOT PIN www. Using /I hBtf-plinern to mark the curve 01 t he slats wilt ensure t hollhoy'ro symmetrical.

l.ffitiently. I could mark and cut accurate dove- M t. and safely.Iiding all over.tils. With Vise hardware (rigllt).. easily.Jron vises (feft) can be used tight out of the box amI give you the option of adding wooden Jaws. and roUI profiles w ithoUl the board :.VISE OR VISE HAROWARE? y woodworking improved dntmatically after I installed a vise on m y bench. you 'II need to make and install wooden Jaws. a good bench vise w ill hel p }'Ou work more 3ccurately. versa til l! enough to 40 F I NF. or both. A good vise nO{ only does that well. plane square edges. A bench viSe is meant to hold your work scnlrcly. hUI also opens and dose. WOODWQJlKING . . That's why I'm convinced that a bench \'ise is as importanl as any tuol in the !~hop Whether you LL'>e power lools. jaws that clamp squarely to the stock and hold it tight. and i. two basfc: choice •• Cast. With a vise: to hokl my w ork. has Ther... hand tOOls.<.<.

I chose qu ickrelease modds. He could tighten the jaws enough to hold It board for dovetailIng . he- caus!'. nnewoodworkin g . becwse slowly winding a vise op en to p lane a drawer or use the built-in bench dogs isn't efficient or fun. Like the o ther vises. All have a screw between two gu ide bars. so I focused o n front vbes. It lever near the handle drops the nut so the outer jaw Slides quickly to whoro you neod it. Vise hardware is less obtrusive.I to test every vise availahle.. wrist. which includes metal jaws. it can clamp stock vertk. On the veri/as vise. you can place It wide board between the two screws (belOW left). Kenney was sur· prised to flnd that some vises racked very II!tle.embled cast-iron vise.handle a variety of wO<Xiworking tasks. or has a nut that pops off rhe th read~ w hen you tighten the jaws. Most cast·lron vises have a benchdog built into the front jaw (left). No rlX needod. www. and the vise applies clamping pressure equally. A bad vise doesn't hold boards tight. With vise hardwarfi (rlgh!). Cast-iron vises are easier to install and most have a built-in benchd og. You can ouy a fu lly as. We abo tested ITo/a twin-screw vises.lna not have the board shift at all (above left). One model was diSCOntinued. You supply the wcxxien jaws. The solution Is fO clamp it scrap of t he SDme thickness £It the othur end. This stylo Is based on tho IconiC vises by Record. Features to consider Narrowing the field It wo ulcln'r be p ractic-J.co m M AY / ]L'N E 2 009 41 . Though it doesn't have the quick-release feature. When I had the o ption. hm there are two types. so we're p ublishing only the results for Ihe Verilas model. On triCl!er·release vises (left). they a f t" the fif:>! serious vise wcxxlworkers huy and can he the on ly type they'll need. On some qulck-release vises. or simply the vise hardware. Front vises are not difficult to install and they can be used as end vises. a quarter turn releases the nut (right). Built-In or build H I n. because there b kss visible metal and the jaws can b e made to match your benchlop. Some vise jaws pivot and lose their grip when a piece must be clamped In only ono side of tile vise."'d lly in the center of fritter fIn!fer or twist of th. Both types have their advantages. you add a dog half) (or two) to the wooden front Jaw.o. Easy fl1( . it can be used as either a fro nt vise or an end vise. which supplies the screw and guide oars.

awing and planing should be fine for machine work like routing and drilling. There'.com STREET PRICE (199302) ~ww.. but there are features [0 look for other than the ability to clamp wood securely. I recommend a twist-release 42 FINf WOODWORKING .rving.) There arc two types of quick release: trig" ger and twist.12) www. FiD:gerald and I abo did our ov. And every vise W"dS donated to the school by the manufac[mer or . To compensate. taper the front jaw so it's slightly thicker at the top.southern·tool. but the less you have to deal with l"acking the bet- tef. woodc raft ...."tI and abused them for a semester on tasks such as dovetailing.O at Purchase OJllege in New York Dennis Fitzgerald. These vises were a bif.com (66. and the students uS\.Gom $140 (199152) W\ffW. the moving jaw on ca.highlandwoodworking. We checked for racking hy clamping a board vertically on one side of the vi~ and measuring how fM out of parallel the jaws were on the other side.tudents benefited. and working on . making it easier to dovetail wide boards. 41).woodcrafl.com $145 (33487) $140 wWVI.z ED SUPPU ER (PRODUCT NUMBER) wVlw.com (WMH7 0B569 ) $100 $194 www. to pull in as pressure is applied.n testing. (''J. check the vertical alignment.252 ..com $155 (10G04. too.'. and weighed in on the results.com (WMH63218) $72 $250 JORGENSEN RAPID-ACTING BENCH VISE it'> jaws.com $110 (148437 ) www. ph-lning. an easy fix for vises that f'Jck (see p.Cast-iron vises ANANT 521f.~t-iron vises should he camed in slightly at the top. the bottom tend-.~tress on a vise.haped parts. which put~ the most . Also. (With vise hardware.south ern-tool. installed the vises in the shop. each one had to be used daily for a variety of tasks.5) www. and they had to be compared side by side:. The :. I needed help and found it in the School of Alt + Oesi. To put these vises to the test.rockler. The jaws should damp squarely [0 the stock from top to bottom.highlandwoodworking. Any vise that stands up to . Because the screw is at the oottom of the vise. leevalley. The makings of a good vise We don't ask vises to do much. That's a compelling benefil.. who oversees the woodshop there..upplier.japanwoodworkcr. Nnte that the vises were used heavily for hand-tool work. improvt:ment over the old ones in their shop.com (16T52) www.

05 Good Qulck·release nut doesn't re-engage well.06 Very good Qulck-release nut doesn't fe-engage immediately. n newoodwor ki n g . p"". 131n. Yes.09 Excellent Must add wooden front jaw to get a benchdog. 13 In. YeS. 13 In . Ins tall a SPlJCer under lhe benchtop t o keep the top of the }4WSJust below the top of the bench. Good 0. 12 in. 9Y. Good 0.lever 9'1. lever 9 in. Excellent 0. Ves. w . Ves. Good 0.· w . Excellent 0. Yes. com Get _rw.08 Excellent Doesn't open and close smoothly. 10V. nd to.Hh alon.04 Excellent Steel benchdog moves easily and sta~s in place once set. 12"{. twist 9 In.13 Good Doesn't open and close smoothly. jlf. in..QUICK RELEA SE JAW WIDTH OPENING CAPACITY EASE OF USE I I RACKING 'VERTICAL ALIGNMENT COMMENTS Yes. tWist 91 n. 0.05 Excellent Low-quality plast ic benchdog In Iront jaw. Yes. twist 10 in. Good 0. Good 0. twist 9 in. MEDIUM QUICK·RELEASE STEEL BENCH VISE (LEE VALLEY) ROCKLER WORKBENCH VISE SHOP FOX QUICK RELEASE WOOD VISE • INSTALLING A CAST-IRON VISE WILTON 79A Just bolt . Good 0. MAY / } l N ~ 200 9 43 ... Yes. 9 in. a long wooden Jaw over the rear jaw m akes It easier to clamp wide and Iont boards. Yes. In. in. 13 In. in.08 Excenent Paint chipped easily. lever 9 in. twist 10 in." Mortlsln.06 Excellent Release lever is not easy to operate. "necessary. lever 9 In.

Then clamp the rear Jaw In place lind mark the holes for the screw and guide btlrs.leevalley. After youVe drilled holes (or the screw and guide bars.rockler.I' Jaw.leevalley.com (Large .rt with trreIMHpl.woodcraft. Attach the re.t • • The first step is to screw the baseplate to the bottom of the b&nchtop.com (145444) '87 www. bolt the rear jaw to the btlnchtop. Barrel nuts mortisea In from the bottom of the benchtop capture the bolts. 7OG08 . Clamp the wooden front jaw to the rear Jaw.woodc raft. Bolt the front Jaw In place. 44 F I NE WOODWORKING .10) $1 4 0 www. and then Install the screw plate ana guide bars.Vise hardware ECONOMY QUICK-RELEASE FRONT 'VISE (WOODCRAFT) www.com (05G12) $230 QUICK-RELEASE ROCKLER QUICK-RELEASE END VISE fRONT VISE (WOODCRAFT) INSTALLING VISE HARDWARE St.com (17All) $215 LARGE QUICK-RELEASE FRONT VISE (LEE VALLEY) www.com (371 8 0) $180 www.

QUICK RELEASE' OPENING CAPACITY EASE OF USE RACKING COMMENTS Yes. www . Then attach the Jaw to t he benchtop. twist 13 in.15 Too much play in screw and guide bars cause<! jaw to open and close poorly. Good 0. The Veritas doesn't have quick release. We pickl-d. CUp the chain In. vise. Good 0. Among the l~lsl-iron "ist's. Good 0.e hardware. 0 Mall Kenney is an associate editor. twist 14V. A small splint clip holdS the ends of fhe chain together. It has the biggest clamping capacity and doesn't rack. and it has a hig metal henchdog that m oves smoothly and stays in place. nut• . It's a solid performer at a good price.09 Nut occasionally fall s to disengage when you twist screw 10 pull jaw out. Yes..1tc:h til.--wlde boards between screws: two handles are a nulsallce at times . thl. The chain turns a sprocket OIl each screw. This makes it easy to hold a workpiece in one hand and use the other to turn the screw and adjust the front jaw.. while m ovin~ the jaw with the same hand.06 Can clamp up to S·ln .com MAY!JUNE 1009 45 . attaCh t he screw plates.:Jorgenscn is the best. the vise doesn't lighten and your workpiece can fall Ollt. INSTALLING THE VERITAS TWIN-SCREW VISE Att. twist 13 in.·wide bOards between guide post and screw.-. Finally. th~ Veritas twinscrew is easily the best. because the nut disengages when the screw is turned. On a trigger-release \'i. and it racked the second least. The vertical alignment wa.05 Required more force to open and close jaw than other ~ises. l'heck the fit and fini. Among vLo. Fair 0. No 12 in. Yes. but everything else aoout it is so nice we didn't miss it. turn.fi newood working... and screws th:"lt don't tum smoothly are frustrating . It can be tricky to do thi. you must pul! and hold a trigger to disengage the nut.. Its twi~t-relea5C mechanism work~ very well . VERITAS TWIN-SCREW VISE And the winners are .. and I like the action of the twi~t release. Yes. W'hen tight.~h.·orkpicce.. an important feamre is how weI! the nut engages. A. It performed very wdl.~e. and the squafO bases are screwed In place. and lets you open alld close both screws with one hand. Clamp the front jaw in place and start cranking the screws. Rough ca~ting~ can scratch or cut your fingers or \. The beM value i~ the Groz rapidaction vise. the $Cre.> always dead-on under pressure. in. With a quick-release vise. The front jaw can be skewed for tapered parts or to overcome racking force if you damp something outside the screws. twist 11~ in. If the nut pop~ or iump~ when you tighten the screw. Excellent NfA Can clamp up to 16-in. The round nuts fit Into holes drilled info the resr Jaw. the large quick-release front vise sold by Lee Valley as the !"lest value.

and you'll send the dust tOWflld the hose and not int o the shop . I put on my pilot's cap and began to think about airflow.W. By <lpplying aerodynamics to my table~aw. and you'll clear the air BY RICHARD BABBITT L A s a retired pilot living in Washington State's San Juan Islands. becomes surrounded by a cloud of dust. the principl e Is the same: Close off mO!it of the saw. The inefficiency of this system is obvious every time a piece of wood is cut and the operator FOLLOW THE FLOW No matter which type of saw you hilve. I was ahle to 46 FINE WOODWORKING . Having witnessed the plight of these patiL"1l1S. one of an estimated million such saws in this countly. direct the dust.Dust-Proof Any Tablesaw Enclose the saw. To come up with a helter solution. I often fly cancer patients to the mainland for treatment. I bttame earnestly motivated to minimize dust in my shop after the government catego- • rized wood dust as a carcinogen. The major dust maker was my contractor's 5. allow rapid airflow in a few key ilreas.1. Manufacturers seem to have given little or no thought to dust collection beyond sticking a dust port below the blade.

fincwoodworking. YOll can re~ move any helt guard. open design. www. This io rum will MAY/JUNE 2 0 0 9 47 .or 2-micron filter. Increase the effect by aading a pair of holes at the point where th e t~ th come up (with t he blade height set to 1 In). TIle bracing under my Rockier table is placed almost perfectly for this instaUation.t collector rated al a minimum of 1.t collectors fir the bill.t hose in the middle of the t(X)m. Outfeed ta~bI~.mt Rear panel vastly improve it. of link belt (www. The base of a typical co nt ractor's saw already has e dust chute. the principl(.'rease the velocity by reStricting and directing the amount of air emcrin)/: the base of the saw. but the majority w ill be too far from the hose and will float off iOlo the shop. you can either adapt the bracing or attach a shopmade frame to the undC!'!lide of the table. but if you have another outfeed table. is equivalent . of clearance from the motor's capacitor to the underside of the outfeed tahle. the motor is mounted on a hinged plate and bangs down behind the saw. To make the enclosure box as compact as posSible.~ editors will describe how they du~t-proofed a hybrid s. the rear one gets the dust port . The first . and keep Ihe motor cooler in the pnx.ENCLOSE A CONTRACTOR ' S SAW You need an outfeid t able f rom Which yo u can suspend IS 00)( to enclose the motor.Be sure to unplug your saw before working on it. HOT· ROD THE INSERT PLATE M ake holes whe re teeth rise. supported by the drive belt.in-lineindustries. This enables me to direct the airflow to the dust port. Most I1f2-hp mobile <iu'. Two of Fine Woodworki1l8'. This system requirc~ a du<. • • ..com you ~holi id invest in one.:. and five more to build a small box around the rear-hanging motor. to sticking the du:.. While I'll focus on the contractor's saw. but if yours doesn't have a 1.com). The easiest way to do this is to buy 4 f1..: lower part of the saw.. My plan uses three pieces of plyn'ood to enclose tht. (lust .'lW and a cabinet hltw. Because the motor will he completely sealed in. so three small panels will close off t he bottom. Filler Rear panel screwed to side panels Bottom screwed to sides Left side panel 4·jn.. Now till the blade to the 4. The smallest particles are the most dangerous."Cs:.~ dust collection.!..·wide opening _-. saw. On most contra<:tor's saws. you'll need to pull the motor up slightly by shortening the belt.100 cubic feet per minute (dm). 'I. Increases airflow .)° position and adjust the belt length to give III in. Dust goes with the flow-if you direct It The average cont ractor':. and techniques WOrk on any saw.~~":_::::~~~~~~§~f------~T---------Motor box screwed to fram e of outfeed table Widen Ihe back of the slot in (j zero-clearance insert plate 10 create suct ion where the dUst usually shoots out..'itep is to calculate the size of the box required to enclose the motor at both the 0" and 45 0 b lade settings..rlte saw. Some dustladen air will be drawn in. Begin by enclOSing the motor-The moc:or enclosure is suspended from an outk'cd table. -. with it.. You need (0 iOl.in.

Hold a level against the lowest part of the motor mount and across the tape. reverse the descriptions for the left and right side pands. the motor should be ':12 in. 1-in. Your saw may r. and lock it.eed a different-size box. I held a piece of cardtxlard tightly again:. Attach the motor-boK sid••. Cut Hlots in 48 fINE WOODWORKING . . Cut the rigflt-hand side of the box to fit the back of the tables<lw <lnd notch the top to go around the bracing. a Short return panel is attaChed. To get the vertical dimem. The motor box dimensions refar t o Babbitt's Delta contractor's saw. and rear panels (all references to right and left are from the orx:mtor's position). clearance l·in . The sides can be screwed to the bracing that supports your outfeed table.md add 1 in. Depending on the design. table bracing ---t' Notch where leg meets apron of tablesaw 13 1 in. I clearance Side screwe d to bracing underneath the outfeed t<lolc l ink be lt insta lled 1-in _ to 2·i l"l. reset the blade tilt to O~. Hold the level vertically an inch away from the back of the motor and mark rhe underside of the Olilfecd table. Reg:in with the right side panel-I have a right-tilt saw.'e know the height of the panel. Cut the pand to height and width. your saw may have an indent where the vertical p"drt of the saw meets the ~played leg. for clearance. the left-hand side of the motor box extends past thO base of Ihe saw 10 give the motor room to swing out when tM "'ade Is angled.il"l. \Y. Add the return. This is the widest part of the right panel. 111C right rand mllst seal against the rear apron of the saw's base. On thIs right-tilt saw.ions of the box. set a tape measure on the floor. from the outfeed table when the blade Is ti lted to 45'. measure from the top of the saw'~ base to the line yOll made on the underside of the outfeed table. BACK VIEW 'I2. AS SMALL AS POSSIBLE To minimize the sile of the bOll. For a left-tilt one. use a farre measure and level to find the height of the motor· enclosure b<» you need. run the tape up past the motor to the underside of the outfeed table. This will be the vertical d imension of the left.t the saw'~ side and scribed it. right. note the dimen~jon. --~ /0 determine how far the motor ha ngs down at the 0" setting. plus a portion of the 7 0 splayed leg.. then use the template to cut the profile to fir the tablesaw.BOX IN THE MOTOR M..asure the openint. for the Width. After Installing a /in" belt to adjust the height of the motor. clearance SIDE VIEW Ai r-intake slots in rear panel Outfeed table Motor Sida panels notched to receive oulfee<J. To seal the box.

. the main left-side panel doesn't contact the back of the saw..ure on my saw consist. locate the left p-<lnel an inch away from the tilted m()(or aocl attach it in the same way. the rYlO{Of extends beyond the left side of the saw. To allow for this. This makas It/sm easier 10 Install iJnd to remove for saw' access. and a rear panel .fincwoodwo rkln g. The bottom of the motor encLosure will be attached bter. Adjust the openlnt to achieve optimum airflow.. Screw on the tlack.oceo. Slots In the back panel allow air to enter al hllh speed. Create the dust-collection area In the saw's base The base endo:. Add )A In .SEAL THE REST OF THE SAW Loo/l( rot fap. Scribe a piece of cardboard to measure the side splay of the !i3w's left leaf k. Ute bo. coollnt the motor and picking up the dust the top edge to accommodate bracing under the outfeed tabh:. of two side paneL. seal the under.hare. CUi a hole in the fronl edg~ for the power cord. It is the same height as the right panel but III in wider and doesn't have to allow for the indent or the ~played leg. Large gaps between the saw's tlase and !able afe best filled wfth a foam sealant.com made magnetic panel cown HIe curved slot for the helgflt-adjustment crank..lde ot the table.-g and u:.h<ll hOllses the dust port. . u. "ow <. but CUt it to size now. AlI_ fM. Use weatherstripping or duct tape to close off • MY tJlps between the motor boJI and the tatllesaw. MAYlJlJNI! 2009 49 . Clos.~ drywall "'CTew~ to attach the panel 10 the bracing_ Making the left side panels-When the blade is angled at 45°..e this to bands2w the retum panel to the correct . to the len~h for a shelf to receive the rear panel. The base side panels have handles attached. Add • _I""'.A sho~ aim". Place a piece of cardboard www.. This panel's lOp edge w ill bult up against the underside of the left ta ble extension.ll. The gap hetween [he front o f the left p:meJ a nd the left side of the saw is enclosed by a short return panel..Crew the retum panel 10 the left side panel.

hose. and even the legs and side panels did not nave a good seal. picks up dust from the blade.fer this u u tlin~ to the plywood. staying -% in . I came up with a design that adopted the principle of dirading the air. 50 F1Nl-: WOODWOH!-. Not surprisingly. Bu t. <lnd tran. using a cardooard tem pl<ltc. Screw the panel to the legs and seal the oottom of the interior w ith self-stick weatherstripping. Despife the sem i-open . After cuttin~ the sides of the pand o n the bancbaw. -Mark Wof/ald /s the manat'nt editor.-4la.. shroud and dust chute. Removable lower back panel Latch knob over the rear opening in the saw's base and ma rk the opening on it. and small pieces of magnetic &heet (refrigera. Cut this out w ith a jigsaw.lNt. .tor magnets} covered holes around crank handles. opening at the front. The first Cut should he on the hottom edge w ith the blade tilled to match the angle of the dust chute. I was curious whether I could achieve the &arne results on my DeWalt hybrid saw. find exits at the bo ttom \lla a 4·. instead of an angled dust chute. a fl oor open s in to a lowe r dust chambe r li nked to t he dust port. dust colle<:tion was never Yery efficient. Tne large gaps between the base and the table were filled wfth expanding foam sealant. du. Not wanting to drill hOle!! In tIKI legs.n. this hybrid saw was successfully dust·proofed using the same principles emp/uyGd on a contractors saw. Now drill two deamnce hoks even ly sIXIced into each leg. I secured the back panel to the ~gs with latches that allow for easy access to tIN! Inside of the saw... Make the lower side pan ds in the same way. Upper back pa nel permanently attached to t he saw Opening. Hlgh·speed air enters slots in t he rear panel.·dia. go•• In. Now thm yo u are finished working on the back of the saw. I knew the CONSTRUCT AN AIRWAY OUST CHAMBER like Babbitt 's con tractor"s saw. to the side. circle with its bottom 1104 in. from the lower edge of the panel. on center. from the inside edge. you can install the bottom pand of th~ motor hox. can be easily cut to close small gaps.. Plastic magne tic sheet . but a closer inspection showed huge gaps between the base and the tabletop. draw a 4V2-in. wiele by 6 in. The first task was to remove the plastic comtJ'natlon blade. Add 1V2 in. During several weeks of use that Included cutting medlurn-denstty flberboard and plywood. I Installed a plywood flOOf In the base with a 2-1n. like the one around the blade-angle cran k. The Improvement In dust coltectlon has been dramatic.MSG. weathel'5trlpplng fliled the gaps between the sheet-metal legs and the side panels. Working wtth 8abbttt.In. Not havIng an easy way to create an angled dust chute. Use fridge magnets AI. etc. almost no dust escaped the 5aW. often used for free adVer· tis ements. Inside. t his design draws in cl ean air through the hack Slots and the tllt-contro l slot. Stick weatherstripping on the top edge of the panel". 2 In. long base was open to the floor. wash· es over the motor. by &. From this floor I hung the airway dust chamber with the dust port at the rear. the motor and the mechanics remained remarkably clean.t cornell o ut.How to dust-proof a hybrid saw After reading Richard BabbH1:'s article.

Open and cJo.. Arst.'ran k ~ l{)t. and trunnions dust. not your nasal passages. and align the higb velocity air-intake slots so that the air flOW5 over and around the illa taI'. 0 and a liuJc w iill. willi two p/ywooa side panels angled downward. and when I remove tM Insert to k)ok Inside.part plywood floor to tunnel chips toward the port.. there Is no buildup or dust around the base of the saw. CUI the back panel to fit the o pening in the rea r endo~ure. Christiane had a plywood boX covering the motor openIng. fa Channel dust toward the aust port. and fitted an atJ.. Let . exctlp t t he lowest. Too sm. I had already bultt a box to close off the one gapIng hole In the cabinet. This is where we stan to direct the airflow.'iee if you can acquire a piece of magnetic sign board large enough to cover the slot.t to get the vast majori ty into the dust collector.t uut of the saw... Front and back panels cont rol the airflow We've now dosed o t . ."'tor of a ir and n:ducc the !low.co m 51 . But after seeing photos of my saw. If you live near a sign com pany. Then. check for ~wd ust hu ildu p inside [he saw by removing the hack pand or the inscrt plate. 0 Woodwolker Ricflard Babbitt attempts 10 keep ttJe air clear in hiS shOp Or) San Juan ISland. Add Im. Attach t ho panel witll COIlstrtlc fion tlahes/ve. I replaced a perm&nent pile of dust with a three.1. Install II noor In the base.tll an opening may starVe thot dust colle.e fhb panel to fi nd the most effident airflow.. 'nt.(. ju. A thin plywood panel blocks al/ of tile louver slots In the acee55 door. posJtioned to wash cool air aver the motai'.-..Q.. cooling It and helping to keep the gear. The best up. Wash. The next task was to direct some air across this channel to push the dust to the port. A piece of plywood and a metallouve. Babbitt suggested a number of modlfteations.tream of ai. .'..111 the confl icting :l ir inlets except for the T back panel and tbe l:lrg~ lilt-<. did the trick (below right).the square cutout that allows the motor to pivot when the blade I. cut a scrap of iJ:Hn. Note where the m otor is po. located to send a . I generdlly kc::e p m ine DpL"Il 1 V:z in. Because that slot Is stili severa/Inches above the new floor. floor. There are a couple of ways to seal the tilt-crank slot. across the motor.free. I get almost no dust coming off the back of the blade. So he Just routed /hree s lots. I then sealed other gaps with expanding loam and weatherstripplne. You aren't attempting to get all the dw. Ilflgled. Justable cover to the tUt-control slot.. MAY/JUNF 2009 w ww . sweep tile froor. Afte r several hours of usc. It was already mostly en- closed.-lhkk plywood 1 in .fin ewoodwor kin g. Alternatively. Second. Some dust slo ped o n the sides away from the main airflow is normal. too large an opening lTlay reduce a ir velocity entenng the rear of rhe saw.. for two reasons. used magnetic sheet to cover screw holes and gaps around handles. when mnm ng a dado bbde.Au Christiana Is the editor. wider than the opening. 1 2 in. starting at the bottom of the saw. the motor and trunnions are VefY clean.ade was to cut three siots In the plywood box.".• Even cabinet saws can be improved dramatically I WH skeptical that dust collection on my old General 350 cabinet saw could be improved.~ iti o ned with rhe blade vertical. After several months of use. Drill tWO holes diagona lly opposite each other and epoxy in two magnet. install a slleet-metallower fO a/reef Incoming air aown to th e floor.

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Seasonal temperatures ( .fint:wuudworking. No matter if iI's a fallen maple nee in the back wocrls or an Adimndack chair in the backyard. it can look ancient.ing and thawing cycles common in northern www. Plenty of sunshIne.ee and enjoy the wood. Relative humidity (AM/PM) Wlnte. Ore. Blll.es/"F) (high/low) Winter.41n.-d in a yearlong tl. The data represent average numbers. a protective finL<.. particularly the ultraviolet (UV) wavelength. you're going to want a dear finish rather than paint./ 11% Summer: 61%/78 % Sunny days: 99 Rainfall: 42 In. unique set of climate conditions. not much rain. To find out how the samples would hold up over the course of the year to the weather In dIfferent reglons of the country. too.How we tested NORTHWEST We treated live wood species with five outdoor finishes. and louisiana. in a year. the free7. Plenty 01 rain. Sunlight. And if yuu w. There are several types of (·It-oIr finish made for outdoor use. while one stayed In Connecticut. we sent a rack of sample boards to Oregon. freezing and thawing cycles aren't kind to wood. NM SOUTHWEST Seasonal temperatures ( " F) (high/low) Winter : 49/2 4 Summer: 91. only one day In five Is sunny. 38/24 Summer: 80/63 Relative humidity (AM/ PM): Winter: 58. FreezIng and thawing cycles are as rare In LouiSiana as snowy owls. Seasonal temperetures (OF) (high/low) Winter: 63/44 Summer: 90/72 Relative humidIty (AM/PM) Winter: 66%/ 85% Summer: 65%/ 91% Sunny days: 101 Rainfall: 62 In.: 38%/ 61% Summer: 25%/ 51% Sunny days: 167 Rainfall: 91n.'Lks. Others did conSiderably MAY /JUNE 1009 53 . and low humidity make for a wood-friendly environment. Snowfall: 1. Snowfall: 10 In. N. So to help outdoor furniture withstand [he elements. Brld&eport. On average.162 Albuquerque. Conn. Each regIon subjected the s!lmples to . Lots 01 cool temperatures and high humidity. and that produces surface chl. Sunlighl and moisture do a lot to start the process. New Mexico. nature wants to convert all dead wood into compost.com climates can exacerbate the weathering process. Then. Muisture absorbed by [he wood fibers callse~ them [0 expand and comract. causes a chemical degradation in wood. a new pie<:e of furniture can stan to look old in a few weeks. In winter. they don't all deliver.mt (0 t. NORTHEAST Salem.h is a must. Some offered almost no long-term protection.*.F) (high/low) Winter: 48/34 Summer: 79/50 Relative humidity (AM/PM) Winter: 74%. Seasonal temperatu. Snowfall: 7 In. SOUTHEAST • New Orlean_. leEr unfinished.M.187" Summer: 43%/ 85% Sunny days: 77 RaInfall: 39 In. Snowfall: 261n.·st. T he great outdoors isn't great for wood. lao Hot and humid summers. as we discoven.

olJs Shades of gray. Each fioi:-. ~ "".vitll distim:.. rwth_t'-I "lLro .com Price: $1 4jqt. and white oak. had weattJelea to ~nr.ew MeXico).. resulting in areas ot weathereCl gray.'tna). ...<. . water-based po lyurethane...WATeo EXTERIOR WOOD FINISH START CT OR LA NM . e'dch designed to hold 25 ~mple~ One rack wcnt u p on the fl at roof of our Connecticut office buildinJl (a perfect out-of-the-way location. We buW four test racks. F. aU the sample<. but at the end of the yearlong test.ugl.<.~ '- LA NM . marine spar . ipC... of each wocx:l came lrom the. we ran thc tcst in four regions o f the tnbed State. in. ----_. long. Application: Three coats Results: On everage. ~ . All UlO samples had rough surfaces Shallow cracks and cllecks were common. afe known to hold u p to the outdcxJrs bettet than mo~t.~ ~ . p lus a comho that one fini$her louted in. thit:k by 6 in '" ide by 8 m. {. And. all the samples. Finally..o. we applied each finish to five different w()(xk ct:dar.rlier issue ("A Durable Exterior Finish: fWW"-l79).J.h was applied according to the rnanufactmer's recom rnendation<. All.>i. each applied liberally ROlults : The outdoor penetrating 011 finish was t he eaSiest t o apply. For consi~te ncy.. Testing tells the tafe TIlt' teSI evaluated the four types o f fin hh u.:. Where the fln lSh remained. and all edges. about 20% of the finish had detenorateCl.. hown on the lanel. IU see how geography factor.- Source: www.Iiso showed us how .ed most often OUtdoors: pent:trdtmg oil. much of It showed areas of flaking and chi pping. it gave us new insiglu into the t:ffc<. excep( for pine.ach wood .. Rating: Unacceptable 54 FINE WOODWORKING .ample wa<.1 {)( d imate on borh finish and wood. mahogany. .. SOme pine sa mples had full-thickness checks on the end. except fOf those in New Mexico. until summer arrived . Nonhwest (~gon) SOl. Rating: Unacceptable belter. - ZAR EXTERIOR WATER · BASED POLYURETHANE START CT OR ... ---- Price: $22/qt. we thought.1lh· west (1'I.'amish.fuslOleum. Source: www. to see if lht: wood 5pecies made a difference.eVer.1 different wood species hold up to the w~athcr. Also... And every coat of firush was applied equa lly to both side:.tly different climau'''S: the Northeast (Connecticut).. pine. .. a nd Southeast (louL. The mix of grayed wood and remaining finish produced on unsightly monied look. AppilcaUon: Two coats.. and marine extra-UV-filtet varnish. >A in.. epoxy and marine cxtra-UV-tiIler varnish.arne board. Hut our te~1 did more than hdp us find a couple of good outdoor finishes It ..com t-l.to e:J.

lpe. ensuring maximum exposu re to th€ sun. NM finishes.. All the water-based poly samples showed deterioration. and pine.====== Source: www. t hinned per instructions Results : No sign of finish deterioration.. . All the racks wt!fe JXlsilioned to face . some minor hut most closer to major. both the exterior water-based polyurethane and the spar varnish were disappointments.f i new oodworki n g.. all the samples came home to the FWW shop. Ratint: Fair to good and a colony of hornets built a ne!>! at the trapdoor leading to the rooO. All five wood species in all four re~ions had roughened surfaces. and surface cracks. Mind yo u. open- grained wood) and ipe (a dark-. One thing was immediately obviOus: The sampks finisheu with oil suffen:d the most. it takes a while to apply the seven required coats.com Price: $20/qt. Ratine: Ve ry good www. all the samples showed end-gf'"Ain check. Although fari ng better than penetrating oil. In fact. same conditions. dose-grained wood). Application: Seven coats .:olored. showed several end-gr::tin checks that extended the full thkkness of the wood.com MAY!]UNE 2009 55 . with a 50/50 splil between major and minor levels of EPIFANES HIGH GLOSS MARINE VARNISH START Source: WNW.com CT I OR LA NM Price: $45/Qt . Sam pl es showed only the sl ightest change in co lor.epifanes. What we learned After 12 months outckxJrs. we only included photos of the white oak (a light-colored. don't hother with it. So unless you want to reapply the 011 every couple of months.. most of them minor. Spar varnish held up shghtly heuer. the other three went to om regional testers.south. The pine samples. The results are shown on these pages. all the bright surface colors had been replaced by various ~hades of gray. the oiled wood didn't look any better than unfinished wood exposed to tilt. however. with about 40% of the finish deteriorating. The wh ite oak samples had the tOllghest time.. Same with the cedar samples. except fo r the one that visited New Mexico---tl1 at one showed some finish dete rioration. For space reasons. . - . With the exception of those from New Mexico. Abo. with the samples tilted at 45° to prevent standing water. no SIgn of flaki ng or chi pping. Application: Four coats Result s: The Ilnish generally held up well on the mahogany.mCCloskey McCLOSKEY MAN O'WAR MARINE SPAR VARNISH START CT OR LA .

When moistme combines with freeZing and thawing <. The sp-.:'au.a. As far as wOcXl species go. not two.~ be<. as is common in northern statt!:. where it lighccO(. and mahogany weathered the 56 FTNF woon~' OKKJNG .toughest time.SMITH & CO. Interestingly. the marine exu3-lN-filter varni_~h and the epoxy plus marine varnish lookl.onnooicut and louisiana . The pine boards had the. But IpC.s-Epifa~ held up equally and the work to apply them was about the same. except in New Mexico.. were almost nonexistent.e the colors changed slightly during the yearlong test: The ipC lightened. moisture causes more weathering than UV light. Rating: Ver y good deterioration. as it held up pn. So. 1be colors maintained much of their bri~htncss_ Surface cracks."CI the best. or defecL'.. Which finish is right for you? il1t new. (Watco) didn1 have a visible effect after a year. the wood weathers even more.$ almo$t a$ good If y ou like the rusric look of weathere(! wood. cedar.. 0 Tom Begnill is an associate editor. but only a biroThe cedar and pine darkened.'"<i the least. I'd take the Epif. The: white ook lightened. Appli cati on : Three coats epo)(~ plus five coats Epifanes (unthinnedj Re sults: No sign 01 finish deteriOration. Only the slightest ctlange in colO r.org Price: $42jqt.·d slightly. don 'r as It did after Its first day. this project finiShed wnh Eplfanes 1001<. The mahogany darkened. PENETRATING EPOXY SEALER UNDER EPIFANES MARINE VARNISH START CT : OR ' LA I NM Source: www. checks.tr-varnish pine sample from New Mexico was an exceptIon. because it is one product. Mahogany and white oak showed slightly mort.-. Without questiOn . After about a year out- doors.! weilthering. Thl· only reason I rated them "very good" rarher than "excellent" W'.smithandcompany. no sign of flaking or chipping. ire Choosing a fayorlte "1111: Epifancs finbh and cpoxy-plu. plus $45/qt.yeles. the cedar and samples held up a bit better than the others.mes. Forced to pick a favorite. The Connecticut samples looked the worst for wear.>tty well. On::gon samples did better than those from (". the samples frum New Mexico sutJen. accordiojO: to our test.

r favor a couple of clever mechanisms (see pp.. to :. it slides on serve as the brakes 10 kl'l!p a dr.top a drawer. For uut-stops. steered in and out of the pocket hy guides.::~~ furniture.t ' f DravverSto ~_____ ~~p~s Four clever ways to keep a drawer in its place BY PETER TURNER A .' pi<.: thcy arc positivc and durahle . This type of drawer. To see more of his worlc. There arc :..:r reveal consistent. But the unseen grunts of the drawer pocket are the stops. MAY/J U NE 2009 57 . I've screwed in-slOps hchinJ the front rail..impler method:. smooth-gliding inset drawer is a testament to fine furni- Ufe making. the drawer usually is supported on a frame. 60-{)1).com. ofren made with half-blind dovetails at the front and through-dovetails at the back. making them worthy of a rail ami runners.. Stop$ also help keep the draw!.'(]!y pulled out too far (out-stop. in a taole.·dl-fiLlCd. which __ -.~). 58-')9). and I've mortised them into the rail (see pp. fit~ into a pocket built into a case or a table.wer from heiog pushed in too far Gn-stops) or unexpcct(. whether you want a flush drawer front or one that's recessed a bit. Hut I stick to these few becauSl. visit www.:ce. fi~n:e PeterTumer is a furniture maker in Portland. Maine.peterstumer. In a cast.

from the sides of th e drawer pocket. First. Mill one piece of hardwood to thickness and width. McKcn". in. lborn . I Just dial In the setback by creating a small step in the stop. John T~'\fclUl1 . with grain oriented verl i ca ll ~ Stop hits near bottom of drawer front. Drawer front and ra il 5 8re cut from the same board to ensure thickness is Ihe same ... If I want Inset drawer fronts. When building tables with drawers. on e on each end. Screw the stops behind the rail. 'il~ In. Second.In-stops Thin rail? Put the stop behind it Top rail Slop. It unifies the front of the piece. grain typically plays an Important role- whether I'm looking to play up contrast or work toward the bottom. wide. in. The back of the drawer face.II. Round over th e ends and cut off the two stops. making it easy to create flush drawers. I n my fu rnit ure. 'I.. thick b~ V.. Home on the r... below the drawer bottom. below the drawer bottom to accommodate the stop. : drawings. because I rip the parts after they've been Jointed and planed. from the SBme plank and then Install them In the same order they were oriented In the plank. time. 58 FI NE WO O D W O R KING Phot. You'll need a full ~ In. aballe and below. Stop Is screwed to bac k of lower rail.. then coun· tersink a hole on each end. about 2 In. [ often cut the drawer lace and Its ralls. Two at. m. This allows me to Install two stops on the back of the bottom rail.. with a continuous grain match from the top rail to stop. rests against the face of the applied seamless transitions between parts. This method has two advantages. they are identical in thickness.

After Installation. in. in. the front of the stop's lip can be planed to flt a drawer flusn or to Inset the drawer front. so It won't ever rub the drawer bottom. tar enough away from the drawer pocket sides that you can use 8 shoulder plane to fine-tune the stops after installation. l inewoodwork i ng .top. Just remember to orient the lip outlovard. I f the lower front rail Is wide enough. "'" I 'I ~ IIfoo In . ash. % In. Square up the ends of the slots with a chiseL Make the stops out of a stralght-iralned harcfWood stick that'll about »Ii In. you need to cut tile mortises for the stops before gluing up the piece. 'Aa in. th ick by 'I. The distanc::e from the front of the rail will depend on the reveal of the drawer. With this system.On a wide rail. www. ~" / 'II in.:e forever. mortise it in HmdwoOO stoP. and check the drawer alignment often. I've used hickory and Drop In the stop__ After gluing up fhe case. thick by % In. Install the stops In their morllst's. of clearance above the s. The length of the stops depends on the clearance below the drawer bottom. wide by ¥. Take light passes. using a shoulder plane set for an ultralight cuI. In. Use a '.4-in. I otten mortise two l-shaped stops Into It to keep a drawer flush with the front of the case or dial In the reveal of a recessed drawer. typical. But a mortised stop Is bulletproof and will keep a drawer In piac. IS ~ ~. but be sure the mortises ar. Cut a lip on ea"h end of the stick before "uHfng the stops to length. wide. Insert Ille drawer to check lis align ment. Ttlen trim tile slop as needed. long Stop hits nea r bottom of drawe r fro nt. usually"" In. straight bit to rout the mortlaes for the two stops. Ohtl fn the reveal. I typically leave ~. C0 111 MAY/JUNE 2009 59 . but any deMe hardwood will do.

z In. #6 by '1. and then spin It parallel to the drawer back to lock the drawer In the pocket. Cilntered in the top edte of tho drawer back .in. long from front to back. Into the drawe.3 in. this drawer will come to rest alalnst the stop with about 10 In. 8 Make the spinner Y. RO lble stop to remore Of insert drawer.Out-stops _ _ _ _ _~ Rotating stop spins on the kicker Drawer ba ck Slop hits tlack of drawer. Then cut a notch .. Any fI'IOre and there could be too much downward lever· age on tIM drawer when tulty extende1:l.:! in. that provides Vi In. Position the stop below the tabletop or kicker so that one-quarter of the drawer'. With the spinner slock milled to w/<1th and thickness. square by :1. Make . The stop Is drilled to receive a round-head screw wltn washer. For example. spinner. screw It In pla ce.nu~ enough that there's no wobble In the connection. but . After cuftlng t/le spin· ner tQ length. To Install the drawer. The stop also aligns with the notch In the drawer back. ·in.t. long out of a durable hardwood-I often use aah. drill t/le holes for the screw and washer (Jeft). Isneth will remain In the pocket.lon/l 2"1a In. pan·head screw %:r-in. In. the spinner would be positioned so that Its screw is "i*"in. spin the stop so that It clears the notch In the drawer back. You want the screw loose enough that the stop can be spun.:e around the stop. of drawer exposed. 60 F I NE W O ODWO R K I NG .-thlck drawer back. glue a piece of leather to one face of the spinner to act as a cushion. If the sound of wood hitting wood bues you. square by 1 ir1 . ¥. If too drawer Is 1. the only dowI'ISlde 1 that you must cut a notch In the drawer back. With a 1f.nner stop Is a clever way to keep a drawer from being pulled out of Its pocket. cleara nce hole A SP. hole for screw and washer Ha rdwood spinner. of cleararte. pocket.

in . but can be pressed up 110 that the drawer can be remoyed. the stop has two parts: a flat tongue and a wedge-shaped base. t h ick by 1 In . FInd the rltht antJe. Lower the blado of a bevel gauge until ft hits th e back of the drawer (top). Again. let the assembly dry. Screw the stop Inside Its mortIse. a good rule of thumb Is to leave at least a quarter of the drawer"s length In tna pocket In the open. drill a nole and countersink for a screw. Cut the soiled base on the band saw. tllp~r. Glue the fla t tongue to Its anglad bas e. Countersink the hole s o th e screw doesn't protrude. til. then glue it onto the tongue so that the grain Is aligned. The anile of the base and the length of the ton. Install It. Tongue . In. long I 'll i Front rai l 'I. Transfer that angle to a sma ll block and cut th e eng/ed base on the ba ndsaw.AY !J CNE 2009 61 . Press up on IMsue to release drawer.Spring-loaded stop is mortised into top rail Tongue nits back of drawer. www.CUe w ill depend on the depth of your drawer. stopped position. fi no:w o o d wor ki n g . Mak. then mount the 8$Sembly Into Ita mortis•. wide by 3'Y4 i n. Drawer locke d In pocket T his sptlnCY ash st op angles down to hit the Inside of the drawer back..co m \l. 3(. Housed In a mortise In the upper rail.

Canada. and clamp securely BY ADRIAN FERRAZZUTTI of you will sneer at the th()ught that something as humble as Sticky tape can po. Tape the contact surfaces of bending form~ and cauls to prevent them from being glued to your work. which tmoslates into lot~ of damping force. blue tape takc.bTlilar white masking tape. But before YOll start peeling and slicking.I!ns and joints together. It snaps if too much pressure Lo.~ a fair bit of forc e hefore it snaps.es well.~ive type as well as turner'S tape. Mo. which means it will release from wood with less chance of pulling out the fibers. so it can handle light clamping tasks. and double-faced tape. applied.. l ess-aggres. But don't be snick up about tape. it hel[>:'l to become familiar with the different types oftapc. It also cost'. Ont.. it has a low tack. It has great stretch hefoTe it ~nap~.ll. tack. Unlike fC. [ use a thin. hand for hardware installation. PaLidng tape is also very handy as a glue-release surface. Double-faced tape is a great hdpin. packing tape. Packing tape is a great choice for damping where traditional clamp. "2090) rJ. pulling . Compared with green tape.~. The many types vary in thickness and adhesion. However.These 4 rolls will help you cut cleanly. I prefer the crepe style over the . which has a lower 62 fINE WOODWOIIKtNG . I'll bet you will find in this article at least one use for tape that will makt:! you a better woodworker. more.~sibly help your woodworking..~moorh because it stretches better.ther than the 6O-iliLy type. It has greater tack but releao.~ are cumbersome. TIle blue painter'g (ape I use is the 14-day-release type (3M. Adrian Ferrazzutri is a furniture maker in Guelph. it's noc: that strong. so don't use it as a damp S OIIlt! when gluing. Green painter's tape is a great all-purpose shop tape. which is thicker with a very aggressiw adhesion. layout clearly.~t useful for woodworking: green and blue painter'S tape.

T minimi. banding that he wants without makln& It too stiff to benCl. he gently peels away the tape to revea's chl~free edge (3). particularly on plywood. To prevent this.e edge blowout as the blade o 611its 1119 CuI. rd. F9frazzutt/ continues 'he tape around the edge (~).co m MAY/JUNE 2009 63 . www. dawn the tolllpe firmly. then wrap It down the (aces o( the panel (left). the best sawblades can cause cross""aln chipping. because It Is le. apply a strip of green tape straddling the cut line on the downward-faclne: side. he wraps a small strip of tape on the other end of the piece that is In contact with the crosscut fanea (2). Check that the edging overhangs both sides of the panel. Pros. of t~ outer strip with a block plane to prevent the tape from breaking as It Is Stan clampint from the center outw. Once the cut has been made. He e88811 the outside comer.s prone to pulling out wood flbers when removed. really tubblnt It on th e wood surface. Green tape 15 a better choice than blue.fin ewoodworking . To get the thickness of the edg. Ferrazzuttl creates the banding from two thlnrHIr strips.ard as If YOII)"e trying to break It. rerrazzuttlilkes to leave the edging long.Eliminate tearout E\len when combined with a ze'~learance Insert. Stretch the tape outw.l. but packing tape works wonderfully. T pre'o'enf this end section of tape from acting o like a shIm and making t he cut slightly off square. Stretch it for extra clamping force It's hard to attach edging to curves with conventional clamps.so he can locate the last tape strip way out off the panel (or to«! pressure at the comer (rltht). stretched.

This helps prevent the plywood from . wider than the thickness of the panel. Create a card scraper with a "safe' edge by wrapping some tape around the end that Is ewer the veneered panel (top). stick each tape strip to the banding. )'OV cut. Stretch the tape outward. Slide the banding back and forth until there Is squeeze-out along the entire joint on both sid••. Apply glue to the strip.welllng while you are clampln.craper (below) until you start getting shavings hom the veneer. In. Mill the edging about II. Then switch to a ~safe" carll . • Control ". After the glue is dry. Bring the edging almost flush with the plywood veneer using a block plane or cabinet scraper. Check that the edging overhangs both sides of the poJnel..bandlnt with fape. Starting from the center. this is less likely to pull out wood flbers than pulling the tape across the grain. Remove the tape In the direction of the grain to ~ duee the risk of pulling out wood flbe~ (right). remove the tape by pulling It as close as possible In line with the grain.. tape Is much easier to use than masses of regular clamps. 64 FINE WOODWORKING . but not the core. To make tile glu&-up go faster. You can a/so use rape to clamp solid-wCJO(J corner banding to plywood boxes (aboVe). SAFE EDGES PROTECT SURFACES Clamp edge.. tear off a number of pieces of tape and line them up on your bench. and tllen with equal pressure pull each end of the strip out and then down firmly onto both sides of the panel.he. To make a "safe ' rile to flush the ends o( edge-bandlng. and ease the outside comers of the edging so that the tape doesn't break when it Is stretched. wrap tape around the ffont of the file (bottom).Apply straight edge-banding When clamping edge-bandlng to plywood. then wrap It down the faces of the panel (top).

com MAY/JUNE 1009 65 . By slightly stretching the tape. Lay tile four sides of the box on it bench. using a straightedge for alignment. keeping tM . Flip the assembly. tt's a good Idea to reinforce this type of Jolm using splines. The number of strips will depend on the width of the mIter Joint. leave the tape on when cutting the sktts on the tablesaw to avoid tearout. www. leave the tape In place when cutting the 5/ot5 on the table5aw. then long pieces along the entire length (top). then stretch ktng pieces of tape along the entire length 01 the three Joints. For thi. By apptying uniform pt'Usure to all roor corners.trlps are enough. To avoid tearout. aliened.fincwoodworking. apply glue. For the last corner. Stretch strips of blue tape aeron the centers ot the three adjoining iDlnts. tape overcomes thl!l prob- tem. Check lor square. the Joints are pulled tIght and may even overlap No-clamp f lu. very sUthtiy. Insert the bottom of the boJe. you may need to lightly tap down a corner to maintain a flush edge. For tho last comor. and rolf the assembly togetllfN (center). 5-ln.Ide. Stretch short strips of tape across tile center of the Joints. but remove It belore gluing In the apllnes to avoid the risk of tape getting glued In with the spline.·tall boll:. simply stretch short strips 01 tape across the jOint. two .Assemble a mitered box al clamps because the Miters are difficult to g1ue up with traditionsl~test Imbalance In pressure can cause a side to squirm out of posltktn. The tape provides clamping pressure and acts as a hinge . simply stretch short strIps of tape across the Joint (bottom). Perfect 5"llrt • • 'ots. up. Alp over the assembly and apply glue to the bevels of the miters. Insert the bottom 01 the box and begin rolling the assembly together.

and use a marking set to the thickness of a hinge's leaf to mark the depth ofthe recess. then make a paring cut along the I/ne (right).es will be located. 66 t'JNt: WUUUWI.)1{JUN(j . and close a perfectly aligned door. where scribed pencil or knife lines are difficuH to.faced tape to tlH!t outSide surface. pr8$$ It down on the hln&:e&. Place the hinge In the teee. Chop ilWily the bulk of the OroD while staying about >. and when installl". walnut. so you should install your hlnte. maklnt SUfe tl1e tape extends down the edge. remoye the waste. Peel away the tape from the field that needs to be chopped out. place the back edge of a chisel against the edge of the tape and elye the chisel a light tap with a mallet. Then apply some thin doubl&-faced tape to an outside leaf of each hlnee. I oriJ:!nally d. pu. Then temporarily secure the hinge In Its flnal/oear/on with double-faced tape and use a sharp X-Acto knife to scribe around the hinge (center}. and ebony.. In.eloped this technique to achieve dean Inlays In dark wood•• uch 88 wenge. and apply a plece of doubl. Allen the door to the cabinet or the lid to the box. Inside the tape perimeter.. the hlnte mortl_.i. Appty green tape to the hinge area of the lid Of door and carofully lower it into position. use a sharp X·Acto knife to serl. and then remoye It with the hinge stuck to the Ireen tape. I now use It when inlaying on all woods. The thin lip of the tape will act like a stop.1lt. Scribe around the hinge with a knife. Peel off the tape.. Install the hinge. cutting throueh the tape. precisely.Combine them to simplify hinge installation Locat... Scribe around the hinge and excavate the mortise in me same way as Defore. Uft off the lid or door and the hinge will stick to it Cleft). Now place a piece ot &:reen tape on the door or lid where the hinge will be located. leaving II ell/se/Jne templafo. Apply gl'e'en tape to tho hlnte area and attach a piece of double-faced tape to one leaf of the hinge (left). Set the hinge in the mortise and apply double-faced tape 10 the back of the other leaf (aboVe). hinces and locks on doors and boxes. Once the bulk of the wood II removed. leaylng the rest of the tape lIS a template surrounding the hinge area.. An III-fitting door wild Is an eyesore..eo twen In the best of 11. Derermlne tho hinto 'ocatlon. Proceed around the outline until the flnal size of the recess has been defined. Apply some Creen tape to the Meas of the case where the hln. Peel away the cutout section of tape. around tl1e hinge. After placing the hinge in the exact location desired..

-1:. walnut. Better yet. you 're bound to find a few near you BY MATT KENNEY ike most woodworkers. 9 1. taken on the ir own . without using subjedl¥e terms sUl:h as fair. A wood's speclfll: .·. So take a look at these low cost but overlooked furniture woods. and I scoured the Intem(. I've used white ash for furniture and never paid more than $2 per Ixlard foot. Here's something else I learned.55 0. and the ratio of the two. and at bargain prices.mme furniture woods that were h igh in quality but lower in cost.us.8 3. and head Ollt to the lumberyard. dense . or soft. hard.fed.6 10. most aren't suitable for high-style period furniture. Even in the best of limes.lnt to u.fpl.wduLifuI wood. good. find one that grows in your area. Is With numbers. o r if you're ahle to cut your own lumber. True. Bllt I'd never heard of aspen or red alder. In the c'nd. and much more in 5OIl1t! regions. But those options are not open to everyone . I whittled down the list to 12. And I W. That's why we give th e 5pel:ifll: gravity and pen::cnt shrinkage for each specIes listed. with everyune's purse strings cinched tighter.4 1.sihle to find cherry and walnut for less than retail if you buy green lumber from a :>mall sawmill and dry it yourself. it's not easy to drop several hundred dollius on wood. basically. can cost $6 or P per hoard foot. and hea¥)" it is. 7 1.5 MAY/JUNE ZOO'} 67 .1 7.fs.ravlty speaks to how hard. There are three numbers to consider: tangential and radial shrinkage. Being from the South. and pro<:U¥lly to warping and checking. all cost kss than $5 per board foot . MoNt Information about wood shrInkage can be found by visitIng the Forest Products Laboratory Web site at www. Woods like cherry.5 5. SOlOl' much less_ Mind you. The higher a wood's specific gra~ ity. That's why I began to look arou nd for . In these hard times.. which are available out West.8 5.Lo"W-Cost Lumber With 12 great choices . however. wood Is more pr one to warping. but not all of them panned out. These numbers also mean that cherry and walnut are easier to work-by hand or machin~tMn white SPECIFIC WOOD TYPE oak. but they work beautifully for almost everything else. the tougher and stronger it is. I asked editors and longtime authors. GRAVITY r The percent shrinkage indicates 8 wood's stability. Cherry Walnut White oak 0. _ __ _______ Behind the numbers _ _ __ The best way to Identity a wood's hardness. As the ralio of tangential to radial shrinkage gets nigher. It makes sense to ruy local. worlQlbility. these prices arc for rough lumber. and white oak. It's ro. I W'dS givt:n plenty of sUAAe:'4 L tions for low-cost w(x)ds. 68 7. You'll pay more if you need it surfaced. I queried lumber dealers around the country. Don't let the economy keep you from making beautiful furniture. I love lx. that adds up quickly.c the best r can fInd in the furniture I make. 4 Mart Kenney is an associate editor.50 0.

tainln.e: Tangential 10. can be U$&d to nice .. thHe colo.e price: $3--$4 bd. It tends to dive deeper..h aodlNauty. Radia l 5.. tools. ft. Be wary of cracka: Once one starts. Beech isn't known for Its stability..~~::. so design accordingly.. doesn·t work well...0 T/R rat io 1.". The hickory legs Ayer". and SnNIII 5e. ft. But . to a mel- low told.ct. hickory.9.4 "Hickory otten has wonderful.k brown. In this bench by Pekovlch (Conn. the more I like It. attractive. ).42 Percent shrinkage: TangentialS. -MIke Pekovlch. difference among them. Poplar _ _ Poplar Is often used as 8 secondary wood In furniture. but there's Ilttl. are hesitant to let It take center stage. where garish grain would have upset the del/cacy of the small parts. ~If ollk Is mllKullnft.:~31-:.. even If doesn't darken with age. even-grained. beech Is toulh. Radial 4.) put the strength of hickory to good use. 5tren. flesh)' tones of pear. because poplar I.5 T/ R ratio 2. The more I us.'n patterns like walnut or butternut. ..Available throughout the United States Beech Once favored for handplanes and othe. ftequent contributor f.5...q too. FWW art director Hltkontr• • t wood." -Ga"ett Hack... light flecks. which some tr)' to hide under a coat of stain. finish with 011 and let the poplar 8&e e:racafully.rain of beech to great effecrln this tabletop treasure box. It'. Bnd fairly easy to work. hickory is a beaulltul furniture wood. --Petet Turner. It has the soft.. the light and dark streaks of the poplar top add visual Interest and blend well with Ihe walnut base. Renowned woodworker Jam es Krenoy (Calif. There are seyeral types of hickory.ffect. extremely difficult to work with hand tool.72 Percent s hrlnk_. One reason Is Its Creen streaklnc. Specific gravlt )': 0. ft ': 0. prone to blotchlnt. Tangontial11 .. erage price: $2-$3 bd . raylt)': 0.=::. A"anted with care. but power tools can get the Job done.2.. bftech Is feminine. flamfH/ke "'. and most woodworke.064 Pe rc e nt s hrinkage. " . and frame are delicate bill strong enough to support tills pear cabinet. 68 F I NE WOODWOIlKI:-IG . bit ..8 "The creamy color 0' poplat ate. Radial 7.o.. Scott King (BarlJados) used tho soft lonos and unders tated . Specific .6 T/R ratio 1. h. Speclflc gr. while the treen streaks turn da. shagbark being common./e. with very fine. Instead. contrlbutlnt ed/tor Hickory With a warmth and tone similar to raw ChtHf). Ayerilge price: $1-$2 1lI:l.2 se.

despite Its dark grain lines. handsome...$3 bo_ ft . white alh Is a joy to work with hand tools. Given Its weiCht. There's mor. than one spe<:les sold al soft maple. SOft maple Is great for ebonW". ft .tunnlng.White ash uss dense than oak. and It works n/~ty.$4 bd .or quartersawn red oak Is a dtfferent story. The &tralttrt crain adds a clean.e: Tangential 7.. maple. Radia l 4. Speciftc ." -Matt f(enney.54 ~rcent bin at a local hardWood dealer. but they're all AlIl!ra&.. "ra~1I price : $2..2 -Maflo Rodriguez." -Roland Johnson.9 T/ R ratio 1.awn red oak. and cost less than cherty and walnut. Tills writ· Ing riosk by Stephen Lamont (Alton. ash II tremendoulUY strong. It's easy to work with machines and power tools. linear ehtment to furniture. "Often. So to find It. made furniture that hlh little personaltt. too.. and It's much easier to work.. Pekovfr:h found the curly maple for ttlis Stlaker side tabla by dlt£ting through the SOrt-m8p/f1 It'. But rlft. wtth the plainsawn stuff.. It's often stacked. frequent contributor _ __ Soft maple ~v"r tlt_.'eek. Radial 4. ore especially . England} proves that red oak. flgured soft map'e Isn't .r boards. hard to believe that soft mapte Isn't more popular as a primary wood. stili aYlfllable In wide wIdths.8. A. Averap price: $2. It hal a uniform color and a nice grain pattern that Is often Indlstlngullhabte from hard maple."" _ ble price. wfth big cathedrals of grain swathed In stain and encaHd In poSyurethane.$3 .0 .6. this chair and "Quarters. and priced. So It's a Creal woOd tor chairs or any furniture parts.t "'~n qu"ts loud t raIn. You'll sometimes find curly boards In the same stack. fine furniture.. strength..) display the beauty.. that might be curved.lIflful CllfYe •• The wishbon e cunes of desk by Doug Chamblin (Ore. like legs and aprons. tlrlnkace: Tangentia l 8. lind bendabillty of whlt6 asn. price: $3.ls often aSl&OClated wtth factory.0 T/R ratio 2. and are essentially the same. And the rich.. Radia l 4. 4doclate editor Spec:Ulc travity: 0.0 T/R ratio 2 .2. can have a subdued beauty. Sma.60 Percent ..awn boards. and It Iteam-bends very well. contributing editor .rnlt)': 0.e: "Quartersawn red oak Is .eparated out from the re'u'. even when klln-dtled.Red oak Plaln. and Its subtle ray fleck shimmeNl.6 MAV /] U"E 100 9 69 .. hard wearIng.ravlt.: 0. Speclftc ." Tangential 8. creamy color of white ash makes It a great wood fo.63 Percent I nrlnk.. hrlnka. you only nefll to dig through the stack..

rl \llt)': 0. and with the right color Is a good cherry Imposter.9. and it s reddish color adds warmt h. cherry.ravlty: 0. The straigh t grain of riftsawn red elm complements the lines of this side tallie by Kevin Kauffunger (Penn.ee pr ~e : $2-$3 bd. The light color and subtle grain of aspen blend we!! wifh other woods. The occasional tree can have as much flash and pop 88 the best curly maple. fed elm can yary from IICht tan to reddish brown.~tn _rl< foptf'ter." -Mark Edmundson. and Its sapwood 18 less of a headache when It's trme to apply a flnrsh. but . red elm mai<es a treat furniture wood. slightly softer than cherry.'50 Is beautiful enough 10.4 1 Pere&nt shrinkage: Tangential 7.38 Percent J hrlnka. Radial 4. It's dimensionally stable.. rhlo fl'ill" «. like th Is t ablo by kenn ey.5 wood. "Red aide. Aver. Radia l 3. Red a lder has • well.____________ Aspen _________________________ Aspen Is creamy whtte wlth a faint crain.7.). one of my personal favorites. It might appear a bit sickly.8 ~£B5y The distinctive Crain of red elm I. with slightly more fWbtle grajn." -Roland Johnson Wood ami a. but once milled and !liven a hand· to work and dimensionally stab/ft. ft. Wide. Aspen usually works well with hand tools or power tools. Speelfle .3. ). such as the alder drawer f ronts of th is cabine t . Kc>"in l<.: TilngentiaI6. clear. rage prlee: $4-$5 bd.mer rlgiK). "'Aspen Is my favorite afternatlve to woods like cherry and walnut. Red alder _______________________ Often referred to as poor-man's cherry. 1 the warmth of cherry. remarkably stable. making il great for furniture with clean lines. red alder has a grain pattern Similar to cherry.Midwest/West __ . and takes paint very well.ro. relatively light.~~=~~~~~~Red elm _ planed surface. Sp*cUle ..C' price: S2-S30d. ft .wlt)': 0 . It takes a stain or dye SubtJ6 train.11 with oUler . It's an Ideal second. and workS beautlfulty. ft. PIIIYS ". It'. Ayer. and when quartersawn It Iac::ks the medullary rays (ray fleck) prominent In oaks.53 Pereent I hrlnkl&e: Tangential 8. a cro •• between ash lind red oak.4 T/ R ratio 1. . glues ea8l1y. Radial 4. It'. an entIre piece of furntture. Once dry.9 ~:~~~~~. It'. rk h color.by Matt Kenney (Conn. with hints of yellow and green. Speclfle er.r. has a nicer grain pattern than Av.9 T/ R ratio 1. When roughsawn. In color. very attractive. " -Garrett Hack TjR ratio 1. and r. frequent contrIbutor 70 F I N E WOOVWOII Kl l\·V poc.jufflln~ . and long pieces are readily available.

Radial 4 . ~ -)on Arno. ft . cuts cleanly. and 'siess expenslye than curly maple or flame birch." --ChristIan 8ecksyoort Aver. mora sfable than any other natl. "My favorite softwood. 1 common: $21X1. but refined. chose a s/ngle splendid board for the drawer (ronts of this sideboard In yellow birch.2 T/R ratio 1. North American wood.9 _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ -Ch .::~. ft . . _ An Impos ter Sassafras _ 'b~"~t~'n~'~ed~'~to~.. Specl"c . "Yellow bIrch Isn't used enough all 8 prima.eat. but this step stool by Kelly Mehler (Ky.3 NIlJtcl&. 0. It has a stron· eer Impact than poplar or maple. It's soft. sassafras gives off a unIque but pleasant aroma when worked. Hank Gilpin (R. and atlll available as wide planks.0 TI R rat io 1. and It looks great as a primary WOOd. Take your time going through the stack and you'll Hnd some beautiful boards.e price: $4-$5 bd.. It'.ver••e price: $ ~$4 bd.) shows that It can stand on Its own as a furni· tu re wood. too. Radial 7.y wood. because It's beautiful. and save mone~. Ane Woodworking's late. "SaSSBfras Is a pleasure to work. tt can be brittle and dlfftcutt to work. and a sharp handplane will leave a beautiful luster on the surface.'eaf expert on wood . shame. Ibnk Gilptn (Iwlnom Iefi) MAY!JUNH 1009 71 . Is a ple8SUNJ to work. Figured yellow birch Is fa/rly common and CJJn be used to add drama. and has a tangy aroma. because It smells A. The color and grain of sassafras make It a great substitute for chestnut. Knots and pitch pockets can gum up your tools. Furniture In n._ _ _ ~~:::=====~~. Specific Cravlty. yellow birch's available at mOlit lumberyards. beautiful. It can be 8ubstltuted for chestnut.1. The relaxed feel of fast· em white pine Is perfect for understated but elegant pieces like this Shaker lap desk by Christian BecksvOOft (M<llne). ft.vlty: 0 . It's easy to work..$3 bd.2. . cont' .2.."" . Because of Its lI&ht brown color.. used heavily In kitcMn cabinets. eastern WhHe pine Is a great furniture -<--- wood.. 1 T/ R ratio 2. but patience gets around those problems. with Its own Identity.~ A soft.r. Radial 2.a: Tarlgential 9 . You can do the same with a le55-eltpenslve grade." Specille &ravlty: 0.East _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ __ Eastern white pine _ _ Plentiful. whIch Is. As a lleCondary wood.45 Pflrcent Ihrlnkl..I..".35 Percent 5hrtnliaCe: Tangential 6..m.tonawn. t/"" flOI!'"' r-nis GI\QI (lOp left). C.'_Stfsn Backsvoort. • . er~e price: Se lect: $2. Curly yellow birch is also 8Yallabie..62 Percant Ihllnka. and when qua..6 Ye llow birch Because it'. ft. but you can cut ruthlessly around them to tet beautiful boards. open-pored wood with distinct grain patterns.a: Tangential 6.

Bnlance Is important. .NEW ANGLE ON GRAIN End grain can bring a new perspective 10 workin. With a finish applied. the colot5 of domestic end grains are 85 vivid 85 the long grain of ex-oUn. when It comes to both looks and wood movement. with striking textures and contrasts. though. in wood.

Flip so end grain Is facln. up. consider:l1ion or wood m(lvement. Of course. one lamlnat/on. CROSSCUT TO FORM END·GRAIN STRIPS Cut blOCk Into end-grain strips. The solution is balancinR the constructionarranging the p3J1S ba!K. hut is it ever a problem to have a tabletop that's too l. but this type of conslruCltOfl can be IUS! as beautiful in high-end furniture as It is utilitarian In the kitchen.ltest chaJlen~ 10 this work is wood movemem. I also discovered that L-nd'gr"in slabs allow unique furniture forms (see MAdd an apron and legst p. Wood always expand'! or contr'dCLS with changes in humidity. I use eod-grain constntction in kitchenware.l. this qll<llity Lm't as important in a coffee table as it is in a cOUntc::rtop. End grain also allows me lO use domestic woods with renewed interest because it hrings OUt different grain features and colors than can be seen in the long grain. FLIP STRIPS AND GLUE AGAIN Amlngement of wood Is key to success TIle gre'. adding to its imperviousness. If you are mtngued by the possibilities of t:O(J gr'din. MAKE A LONG·GRAIN SLAB I started v.com MAY/JUt\E 2009 73 . but thaI randomness would lead to an unstable slab Por example. instead of www.fl newood worklnJt. The width of file crosscuts becom!S the 3. You could put the pieces IQRether without con~id­ ering their orientation.Iur. and repetitive steps_ But the results are worth the effort.'d on grain direction. End grain creale~ a very durahle tabletop Buecherblock countenops wear out knives before they need resurfacing.'Orking with cnd gr. ble? Working with end gnun up takes a good deal of plannmg.. 2 .lIn wick deep heneath the surface 01 end grain. h~re's what you need 10 know Arrange sticks In a balanced panern.lin becllL'>e it packs an illlense visual punch andpve me :t use fot scrap pieces (hal would otherwise have been discard(:'t. and finishes <. 78) that -wouldn't be possible with long-grain construction.• Bring butcher's block out of the kitchen with these design and construction tips TH E BAS I C STEPS BY MARK KOONS 1 .

. Pieces with grain that Ilows to the left are balanced by those that tend toward the right. [he greater its tendency to move and surface check if the grain isn't arranged carefully.. ii!temate end-lr"ln str ips will be nipped end for end t o creata OJ ropeat lng pattern. Kt:ep in mind that smaller overall slabs accumulate les. Abo. Y can glue shorter ou Slicks of similar colo r and grain into 8 long assembly by butting their ends and using the sticks abo\le and below lor support.&?::~ the flnal slab. thinner assemblies generate less Mress than thicker ones. Beginners aL<. espedally of some relatively stablt: wood Hk(. If you compound the prohlem in the adjoining row..lde the length of t he slab you wan t by the thickness of the long-gra in glueup. up in ~~§~~~g~~~~ ' "C.. Koons double-checks his array of longvaln strips with a fuler that s ta rts at zero in the center and counts outward In bo th directio ns. will be easier to lay our than one patterning a mnge of species with different expansion propel'(il.·s.Sttcks are lIaried In width. After cr~cutting. they will be align ed a ll the way down the length of the end.() should consider that a single-species lamination.'''~ . Not all the st icks need to be fu ll length . Don 'l forgel to allow fo r the sawkerfs. Th e long· grain strip5 w ill be flipped ." than large ones. you could end up with a row of end grain that all moves in the same direnton. You k now the ir width ....aln patte rn. That 's the number of crosscuts. so the thickness of the slab determines the distan ce between crosscuts..~ internal stres.: walnut. If any seams line up.. Th en dl.LAYING OUT AN END-GRAIN PATTERN DETERMiNE THE SIZE OF THE GLUE-UP There is a bit of math t o be done to be sure you build a large enough long-gra in glue-u p fO( Ihe slab you need.. Just layout your crOSscllt s ami adjust the st ickS to be su re the glue joints don't silO .. therefore flatsawn stock is balanced by quartersawn stOCk. Expansion and contraction are far greater in the direction of annlliar rings than across them.tSl from the gmin patterns and colors of a single speCieS. solus! multipl y to got the length of the lon g-graln glue-up.~<. Joints hidden in middle of crosscut Buttjain! Strips Sticks .g.. 74 FINE WOODWORKING . Grained Is aligned. moylng In th e sa m e dIrectIon could be strong enou gh to pull apa rt the g lue JOints. Cheek the . you can get plenty of contr. the laminations will pull apart in alx>ut one year's time. To prevent this. So the thicker or larger an t!nci-grail) construction." -.m •. AI'iO.. deliheratcly arranging annular rings so that they altern:lt<: in dir<:ction and restrain each other's movement. while ifs easier [0 create an eyesore when mixing woods.

Arrange the sticks-First..u:'k of the order. nd then reglue .es have different rate-.:k:s. . surf:lce and crosscut them. and color.lboratory (wwwJpLfdcd. Then reference off the rip fence to cut the Different wood ~pcc. Set the hor/zOIItal clamps In place. Once I settle un an arr-Jngement. specie.us) Butcher-block assembly made easy Crc:lling fickl~ of e nd !(f"Jin d(x's not require fitt.&( 2J'e Mable should be used (0 restrdin those thaI are less stable. 8e&Jn crOSSCII«I". center (left).mge the component'!.Md roller 10 spreaa glue 011 both faces. to make ~ood visual and structural scn. haiandng them the way 1 de!K:riix-d c:ulier. Nr1w. species.Be generoul wHh tl"e. but don't lighten them. crosscut the slab at the ~Sl of the strips to the same wIdth (r/gllt). Bruce Hoadley's lindf't"Standing whod (The Taunton PreSS.s lb..'iawing off laminations like ~Hce~ of salami. then apply glue.ts L. Basic-.. I mark the sticks with a :-.'itick. a long gram glue-up and then an coo-grain glue-up. 2ooS) or at the Web s ite of th~ Fo[('S!: Pnxlw:. Nor does it involve .n~ tOJ!. I glue . end then loosely ligh ten the horizolltal clamps. 1'hrou~hout lhe process. snug the top ana bottom clamps rJo1wn tightly and go back to fighten the horlzonlals.'ls involves two big g1~ups. Before any glut' is spread. glue half Ihe lamination first and add the other half lifter It dries. You C3n r~~-arch the stability of lIifferent spc· <.hem as end grain. woodworkin~ .. Loosely clamp the top callis to the bottoms. I pay attemion 10 grain. althou~h www.fin .emhly.ether hundreds or little cul)d3.it'S in R. at the center.) shnnkage So if you do mix woods.'< in the final as.ofL pencil to keep tr. For a large surface that requires longer wOf"lng time.lin) Jnd radial (perpendicular to wuwth rinW. Use It squeeze bottle . I aCl". I continually mark the pieces to keep them arranged in the MAY / J UNE 2009 75 .s logelhcr. Do a dry run to war" out the arrangement and PrNajusl the clamps. To ma ke the Slab more manageable and reduce cumuJatlvo error across the top. of tangential (parallel 10 the growth rings and perpendtCUlar 10 the gr. My proce.co m some manufaccurers do exactly thac.dly. I rip the sut:ks to willth. wldlhs of the sti<.

and a sacrifiglue up the end-grain sticks. Koons flips hegin by making a long-grain . long. a Glue them baell. the tenden<-}. every ot her stick thick by about 243/16 in. I could flip_ Here. and the overall thickness and length of thel. cro sscu t then surface-Once the sticks are glued into a slab. Make sure all the cauls are stick-free by taping or waxing.correct order. But why cut it close? Make the lamination longer than you need. wide by 36 in. th.: width of the subsequent ~'ue.~lab that was 21/11 in. tion (til. mark. plus the amount of 15 sawkerfs for the length of the long-grain lamination. and they get turned end grain ROTATE EN D FOR END up so th>.ttern on your tahletop. long board. The thickness of the long-grain slab and mark them v. You can flip and ro tate. Surface then cro s scut v s. the more effort it \vill take to smooth the surfaC!. men/lng with differ· As an example. I would make my crosscuts 1 %2 in. flip.~.~ and Contracl. Those multilayered sticks nlllS! get jointed and planed hefore becoming part of the larger gille-up. wide (leaving a little extra to ups/de down and end trim the assembly square later) For the I-in. You'll need a flexible adhesive. In determining the length of your sticks and crosscuts. This is a crucial place fur qllality machining. if I wanted to build a tabletop ent flips. Yellow glue is notorious for cold-creep. Put the endgrain sticks back in cros. The cauls should be very straight and sturdy to prevent fiexing. You 'll need a clean.~Iab). then I'll need at least H:I in . The more variation here. lOp. for a glue to allow slow but inevitable movement over years.~ arranged. thkk by 24 in. original order the tabletop.: ZY!:l-in. Glue and cla mp t he sticks-Once the assemhly i.{ill determine the width of the repeating end-grain (rIght) so you can {yJ.' of the top. Taking the time to tape all the seams before the glue-up will keep the cial backup fence on your crosscut sled or glue from seeping into the end grain and save you cleanup time later. that b an asset beca\. The upper cauls have a layer of cork on the lXJttom side that helps pre~s the work flat against the lower cauls. w(xxl does. Use the same proccclurc as you did with the loog·grain lam/na tion to zero-clearance throat plate.~ th".lse it stretches when the wocxl. expand. But how long should I make the long-grain slab? If the crosscuts arc a heavy 1 in. togethe r.~.: long-grain . you can make the crosscuts that estahlish the end-~rain surface. it's time to glue the sticks into one wide. pattern is facing the top and bottom. and some of those are made of short sticks butt-jointed and held in place when glued to the adjoining layer. as they will determine how level the glue-up is.reen the thickness of the first laminaMark. sharp blade .: crosscuts easily rco rcler the of the long-grain slab will determine the thickness stiCks after eJqler. or just 1 in. The width of th>. 2 . it's important to make note of the re~ latiomhip betv. TIle lower cauls rest between pipe clamps and hold the work up off the bench and slightly above the damps.~ a.-thick (or end (be/ow). GLUE UP END-GRAIN STRIPS 76 FINE W O ODWO RK I N G . even if that means a few extra crosscuts kicking around.~quared to the table. Here. Some of the sticks are made from multiple layers.~cut.

and work from the outside In to . you'll want no burn mark. in the plane jron to keep the edges from digging in. Stop to reassess the surface with a straightedge and re-mark the high spots to sand again.001 in. Put an arc. The final surfacing is done with a rllndom-orblt sander (right). Using a belt sander. Once you've cleaned up all the sides of the end-grain strips.. Repeat until the surface IS flat. you'll have to clean up the surface with a scraper. If your planer isn't wide enough to accommodate the tabletop. or camber.s or saw flutter on your cuts. Remove the damps and scrape off the excess glue while it is still rubbery. use it to surface the board befort' making end-gl~lin crosscuts. p. 75) to lightly skim the surfaces of the crosscuts before regluing them into the final end-grain lamiillltion. a little to keep dust from affecting the width of the ("TO.fint'"woodworking. Ideally. error is 0.001 in.& e handplanes. and then use my tablesaw trick (see bottom right photo. begin to remove the high spots only (above). www. crosscut first. If you have a planer wider than the slab.wold breakage on the edges.Or u. The low angle and very sharp blade of this jack plano leave if smooth.cum MAY /J U Nr: l 009 77 . you'll have to work off across the entire slab later. refined surface. Every 0. miter gauge-elevated.'iSCUt. chalk tQ mllrk the high spofs ana/1M spots.

Any ex· cess material gets trimmed off when notching for the leg. Cre. re-marking if necessary. but lor a minimal Investment of time.S with a belt sander and mndom-orbit sander. A well-planed surface is always the most beautiful. mark the high and low spots.pron Corner notch for leg L. Align this mark in the final glue-up to keep the end-grain sticks square. legs.to 8O-grit paper and move up tu 220 grit on the belt sander.r: a belt s:Jnder often. Make sure the apron Is square to the tabletop (right). When Ihe defect. the border and apron dress up the core and add the appearance of depth to the entire top.mdum-orbit sander. grind av. On the actual workpiece. and apron.I: o onWORKING ... then you are in luck. laminate the border TO tho apron (left).fe. Now you're ready to glue the crosscut strip. Rem· ing time on a wide-hdt sander is al<KI an option. the cauls and damps run lengthwise. clilmp tha apron in place and proclrll/ and tap In a brad to locate the apron during the glu.s are ground away and the surface is flat."up (left). Use the same procedure for the firud gluing that you used when you glued the long-grdin ~ticks together. Sanding and filing will refine the shape. a border. The regs could be notched directly Into the top. If you have your own wide-belt ~ander. GLUE LEGS A ND APRON TO THE CO RE Core Border SUrfacing end grain Because end grain is more durable than 10nR grain and can be dangerou~ to run through jointer.~ imo the final !>lab.'l"S. or planers. Begin with 60. as well as with handplanes. 7S FINE '. Working on one side at a time..ighledge on the edges and a square on the end to square up the whole arrangement. move to the r:.gluing bo/lrds for one border and one apron per side of the table. and witness-mark them again. Koons left the Inside border slightly wider to accommodate the nail. blll short o f that I've had SUC\. pf""dctice gliding the running sander squarely onto a test piece and backing off while slipping it sideways.l. ana an apron can be glued directly to the top. bLII thL" time. Clean and in~pect the surface for uniform scratching before changing to a finer grit. If you don't u:. which will cover the nail hole. Now nip every other Mrip end for end and up~ide down. arrange them b-d. After edge. beginning with 80 or 100 grit and proceeding through 220 grit.:k in order and witness-mark them. If you have a low-angle jack plane-----even a low-angle A. use a str-. and then use a scrol/saw or bandsaw to cut the shape of the apron (right).. Apply the apron.. it takes a bit more work TO surface. and continually stop and check your progress with a straightedge..Because of the end·grllin orientation.-ay the high spots.lt bG rd.

A different approach to aprons and leg Joinery Lung-grain lablclOps are typically attached to a leg-and-apron system. long and the back one about 60 in. 0 Mark Koons is a self-employed woodworiH!f in Wheatland. then flipping the assembly and screwing the joints before the glue is fuJly cured.aw to <:ul the shape.till have to balance the :. UM! a M . and rh:lt type of assembly can be done with an end-grain tabletop 35 well . My methoci happens after the core tabletop is completely glued together. ~nc.No.in..'. Don·( worry if you don't have a ~lider on your tablesaw. by 511l in.·urtd un the core."1"S of the bl~dc . But end-grain work offers an alternative.:r. rrotch.. Legs and aprons can be glued onto the edge.ition bctwl. Then glue and damp the apron as. -4 block plane will v.. I aud a border of the same width :md length to my consrruction. and files and sanding drums to refine it .-<. It sits outside the table core but inside the apron and creates a tran . which Is necessary because various cuts are made with the table extending to each sJde.<.. Cut th.fi n ewoodwvrking.l. O nce the aprun is st:<.l work from the OUL'ijde edges of T workpiece toward the center.com MAY/JlINE 2009 79 .... Before I had one J used a shupmade cros. make the sled out of two hardwood stflpS 20 in. with a standard-angle No..'n the llibletop pattern and the outside apron To create :1 bordt!r/apron comhinalion. www.saw by glUing the fences square to the guide .rork-sharpen it well (expect to go back to your stones frequently).'>Cut sled to carry the tabletop assembly acro. \.sembly to the core.7 plane equipped with a very sharp Hock iron. Keep Ifl mind that you :.. You can assemble the sled right on the. It adds stability and extends the slider to t he other side ofllle table. I me my sliding tablesaw to cut corner notches for the legs. laminate them 10 one anolill.. stan by edge-glumg Sl icks inlO sections that rll the sidl:S of lhe core.ngemeo[ of the SlICks in the border/a pro n construction Once those 5ecuoru are dry...roll<. I've aL.yo..ur of ffi lter-gauge slols and an extemion to the figh t and behind the sawblade. long and two fences 2'"A in. of an end-grain slab. the blade w hile notching out for the legs Assuming a p. Koons udds a higher. In some ways he it'5 easier to plane end grain because you don'l have to WOrTY aboul rever. At the samt! time as the apron.o had succes.. longer fence to the crosscut fence on his sliding lablesaw.ing gt"J.~trips and rhe blade.IT3. Long. ease the cornl. the fmnt one about 16 in .

or slides) to Readers Gall ery.J~~9~rs gallery I DAVID BENETELLD Harttord. FWw. The deadline is June 1 8 . 6 3 5.com) and photos (unaltered digital images. The finish is shellac. 80 FINE WOODWORKI N G .Ilh.com. or em ail fwgallery@ taunton. holly. deep by 44 In. Send entry forms (ilvil ilable at www. PHOTO: SETH JA NOFSK Y Do you make your own woodWork ing tools? We want to showcase th em in OUT annual Tools & Shops Issue. tall. wide by47 in. Vt .. Newtown.. Vt. The veneered lid and writing su rface are connected with a ba ll bearing/strap mechanism so the lid opens as the writing surface is pulled out. tall ) 011 one in Thomas Sheraton's The Cabinet Maker and Upholsterer's Drawing Book. We'd also like to include photos of restored vintage hand tools and machinery. and Deodar cedar sideboard Is 14 In.finewoodworki ng. Main St . The fin ish is shellac andwax. The mahogany case is joined with hidden mitered dovetails. Other woods are Brazilian rosewood. Norris blended the 'l'oohllak"-'r~ \-\J. CT 06470. deep by 341n. PHOTOS : lll NCE PATTER SO N I SAM NDRRIS Burli ngton. prints with negatives. and pine. Benetello based this cylinder-top desk (21 In.. Maca ssar ebony. wide by 42 In. black-dyed costello. big-leaf maple.d influence of James Krencw with his own sense of scale to create this sideboard. The SWiss pear.

It was a lesson in ~tching. I'H010S: 011. GALE JR. To ensure a precise COlor match. 10 WELTER w ww. refining a deslgn. The biggest challenge of the project was the beadwolk around the dial opening. Canada DeJong spent nearty 150 hours making this ash bar stool (2 13f ln. Gale incorporated the techniques of veneering. and snakewood clock Is 5Y. The finiSh is an oil/varnish mixture and WaK. and steam·bendlng learned during his second semestllf at the College of the Redwoods. . aU of the mahogany came from two 28-in. Ont. bent-Lamination.finewoo d wor k in g.. tall) ... wide by 38 in.Y Heavily Influenced by the furniture of Greene and Green e. tall) as a gift for his dauglrtef.t in. When building this wall clock. and ang\edjoinery. tall. secondary woods are ebony. and quartersawn oak. deep by 17 In. RUSSElL F. The gtanadillO.co m FRANK DEJONG Toronto. N. Calif.. deep by 60 in.. The finish Is shellac and wax. The finish Is linseed 011 and oll·based polyu rethane. he veneere<l the face with 12 separate sections. MAY/JUNE 1009 81 . Olenik designed and bunt this sideboard (24 in.JOHN OLENIK Ballston Spa. wide by 39 in. eliminating the need for numbers or reference points. maple. and the fTlO't'BmeRt is a Hermie 14-day coli gong. by 16·ft boards. hemlock. deep by 8 in. T keep tile o design as simple as possible. Fort Bragg. . The project took 600 hours over Ure course of a year. wide by 30 in.

The finish is shellac and WlU:.es.! tn. The undercarriage was turned on the tathe. The top is big-leaf maple veneer over quarteBawn poplar sta. taU. deep by 40 In. 6 tn.o". The bowl. His inspiration for the design and fonn came from the wOOd-turning books of Ray Key and Bert Marsh. wide by 47 in. The rest of the table (2 1 In. When building this white oak. by 4Y. and varnlsll. This coffee table features a carrvas-backed tambour that slides around the circumference of the piece. Sliding the tambour reveals compartments at the ends of the table and a central thrnugh-drawer. was finished with blond shellac. PHOTO: JOH N LUCAS TODD PLUMMER Morgan HIli.. T enn. Cannon made this bowl In less than four hours from some rough boards rcsctJed from a landfill. Calif. Plummer was inspired by tambours wtllIe studying Scandinavian design at Capellag~ rden in Sweden. PHQ1QS : ANDREW PATIERSDN I RICK CANNON Memphis. and the seat was carved with a $COrp and travlsller.readers gallerY"o!. is 21 In. The darker wood Is walnut. but the lighter wood is a mystery. tall) is solid curty maple. finished wi th milk paint. Pennington says It was "an adventure In problem solving and geometry which resulted in mallY hours of fun. tan. Tenn. deep by 78 In.. all. 82 PINE woonWORKII\'G ." The chair. wide by 17 in. and basswood settee.d GREG PENNINGTON Hendersonville. maple. dfa. Pennington sllaped all 45 spindles by hand with a drawknife and spokeshave.

TED SAXERUD Arlington. The unpainted wood Is finished with walco Danish 011 and wax. deep by 42 in. a wall -hung cabinet (91h: in. tall. The case Is joined with a modified box joint. The OINe Museum. Once he built the table and she knew what beautiful tllings he was capable of making. wide by 33 In. deep by 23 in. stands 22 in. Superior used bone. This cherry comer cabinet (one of two) incorporates bubinga. brass. copper. CHUCK ZELLER Bartley. and ebony inlay. Mass. This white-oak chest Is 20 in deep by 36 In. tall. Subtle distressing and a blend of waxes give the chest Its atltlque look. PHOTOS: JOHN POLAK MAY !J lI NE 2 00 9 Whene~er 83 . antique glass. sycamore. In keeping with the original trunks. wide by 87 in. Zeller decided to learn steam-bending afld re-create the luggage as furniture. the interior is lined in a heavy brocade fabric. Inspired by old tamel-back steamer trunks. Is a parody of museum culture and Includes SlJch things as the world's largest olive. Plexiglas. mini olive press. Saxerud used splined miter joints on the angled parts and mortise-and-tenon joints everywhere else. tall). finished with shellac and lacquer. beard!l{f olive. gold leaf. smallest olive. The cabinet. possible. Neb. In addition to a variety of exotic woods. most bizarre olives. and Olive pits from around the world. Va. Saxemd made a deal with his wife: If he could buy a tablesaw he'd build her a dining table. wide by 28 In. she as~ed for a place to store her famity china. and the compound curve of tile lid required a separate form for each piece. PH OTO: OLSEN'S PHOT OGRAPIiY ROY SUPERIOR Wil liamsburg. and egg tempera paints. Superior likes to incorporate humor into his work. two· headed olive.

arc (:a.. Lessexpt:nsive ones are fine for gtmcrnl work. They don't handle oddly shaped \\'Ofkpieces very v. it would be a mop bmsh. . As versatile a:.lke it great for small areas like legs and drawer fronts.lxIt they put down very fine.com A: IF I HAD TO CHOOSE JUST ONE BRUSH. So they're great for putting down a first coat avor a Jarg'e surface.FmiJ'biuR expert Peter Gedrys IS a jrequt>tJ1 co"trl!. smooth coats.ART GIBSON .Y Both types of Best brush for shellac Q: I'd like to start using shellac to finish the furniture I build.... They easily nick plane blades and router bit... dog with a square head on it (left). where the dowel d(X:~n't nl. righ t di. and becau$€ mop brushes hold lots of finish. (.lmcter lo press inlo Drop-In . I'd use a mop bmsh with bristles made from squirrel or goat hair.. I recommend a bru. you can quickly make a pla ning place WIthout falling through. Accurately sized hardwood dowel.~)(:r 10 make. soak il in denatured alcohol for about 10 minllles to soften and d issolve any shelJac o n the bristles. but he careful. it is also very helpful to have a fb i bru:-:h for laying down smQO(h. . Ore . mop brushes tire. but don't know If I should use round A: IN MY EXPERIENCE. Before you use it the next ti~ .KINt.de'i made from Taklan. there are some important difference.. What typo of brush Is best and how should I care for It? . brush can be found lit art-supply stores. However. lhey don'( hold much fmish Buy these two. and their round boles work with holdfaSL~ and hold-down:. With round benchdogs. Sa na Fe. Ruund dogs are easier to in~tal1: Simply drill a hole in your benchtop and send the dog home.top. ~Hand-/ool expert Cbns Gochnour is a jrequem contn'bulor. You can rum them yourselt if you have a lathe. YOll Gill buy round mt'tal dogs. Square dog>. Po rtl alld . An alternative is to make a stop.-an be hard to find. .-ed to fit perfectly. JUS! dip the brush in denat\u'Cd alcohol. Is one better than the other? . Flat brushes don't hold much flnlsh.M. or onlineat_. already glued up. they also work great for larger surfaces.GRAH AM PARKER. The d()mc-sha~d brbllcs m.mlor Round dogs are more versatile than square ones Q: I've Just started planning my first real woodwol1dng bench. They also can rotate to accept oddly shaped workpiece... As for cleaning brushes. N.. Mop brushes (top) hold a lot of finish.sulfaces such as tabletops.<. 84 FINE 'X'oonWC)I!. but for laying down fme topcoats on small pans or molding.. lind eIJsily malch Ihe stop's thickness to the wompiece.. I want to use benchdogs. The biggest drawback to round dogs is getting round stock that's the ones or square ones."ell either And you can't use {heir holes for holdfasts and hold-downs. and . reshape the bristles. round and ~qllar(: btnchdogs hold stock equally welL That being ~aid. thin topcoats on large . diCkb!ick..'ih With synthetic bfi!.SOURCES OF SUPf>t. there's not much to it.set the brush aside to dry. bUI cutting ~uare holes is diflkult on a henchtop that'.

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That would keep slurry from devdoping. I work with warped wood frequenrly. 86 FINE WOODWORKING . assemble your cabinet quickly. and when you mill the board. you shouldn't use oil on waterstones because the oil will clog the stone's pores. If the end~ are secured. there often is les. like on a dovetailed carcase. wood still warps sometimes. You can't form a good slurry on a water· stone thats clogged with oil. If there's any water In my waterstones. -. This will slowly relieve the stresses and allow the moisture to equalize with the loudon.. After gluing up the panels and cutting the A: THE MOISTURE CONTENT and Joinery. It's the muddy slurry that hones a tool 's 6dga. they've warped. internal te nsion of properly dried lumber should be in equilibrium and the \vocx!. Your hest het Juring the winter is to keep your waterstones in a heated area. I stacked and stlckered the panels.."1 moisture near the surfaces. and breaks them. -ChriStian Becks/Joorf is a contrthuting editor. wood should be milled equally on hoth sides. N. After you get the ""'arp om. However. the warping can be taken out by the joinery. expands. YOll upsd the balance and the wood can rnrist or warp. It freezes. and it's what does the honing. O r you could just switch to another sharpening method. Can I use oll to lubricate them Instead? . stable when you bring it home. while the sun's he~t dries out the convex side . before they get the chance.nei (concave side down) Oflto the lawn. As a result. Why did this happen and Is there anything I can do to correct It? -JE FF HU NTINGTON.ton•.BENTON LANDERS. a little at a time. With sharpening stones. Don't use oil on waterstones Q: The temperature In my shOp regularly dips below freezing In the winter. and then fe-milled. Minn. Slurry does tile sharpening. A waterstone needs wafer to sharpen effec· tlVeIY.Q&A '"""""" Working with warped panels Q: I'm making a cabinet from cherry. Slurry is J soupy mixture of water and loose abra~ive particle:. MANUFACTURER NORTON.Hate Kenney Is an associate editor: Match lubricant to . the wa rp will work itself out and the panel will fl atten itself. but it's not the end of world. Even with these precautions. and an oils tone needs 01/. A: ACCORDING TO WATERSTONE Minnoapolis. An old-timer I once worked with would toss a warped JYJ. YOll :llso can remove the warp by placing the panel with the convex side toward a heat source and drying it back into shape. moisture in your shop.H. Moisture from the ground helps the concave side of the panel relax. and let the moisture from the earth and the heat of the sun take out the warp . But your panels could warp again. Unfortunately. To reduce this risk. Mo istura stickcrcd.

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88 FINE WOODWORKING . On the . Sand aff any protect/ve coating (right) or Upright.side in contact 'ivith the pipe. the simple appamtu~ is made from a few hardware-store pan". 1 master class 1 " .struments such as guitars and violins have traditionally been made this way. technique to bend door pulls. Most woods bend if the piece is thin Unlike steam-lx'llding. and many other items. in . back slats for chairs. You hold a strip of wood against a section of metal pipe heated by a propane torch. Ii'f.. you can use the hot- All the metal parts can be bought at your local hardware store. sa lad tongs (shown at right). wide. the lignin bond benveen the wood fibers is softened by the heat until it is pliable enough to bend partially arou nd the pipe.mc torch with fan pattern head Flange Fiberglass A layer o( thick fiberglass under the pipe flange keeps the Doara from IJurftirlg.. Unlike steambending.. Cut away tho fiberglass outside the flange (abo~e). his is a very easy technique for bending thin strips of wood to virtually any shape. BlocK of wood raises the torch to the correct height. and ~ou can make the bending Jig In less than an hour. heating the pipe will cause a lor of smoke. TIle curved sides of musical in.. Better yet. Cleat screwed to upright keeps the assembly from rocking in use. ¥. th ick by 6 in. and long enough to bring the pipe to chest level Hand screw preven ts torch from rOili ng. Th6 nve back slats on For tune's signa t ure chairs are bent on a The magic of hot-pipe bending BY M I CHAEL FOR T UNE hot pipe. Distinctive cur ves._ _ Slot for template Prop. but I usc til(. curved moldings. there is no need to constmct a large steambox or substantial bending forms. when: on ly domestic hardwoods bend to any appreciable degree.

Onco at tho critical temperature.t the wood. ChftCIf. wider and Y32 in.. making it easy to see when the workpiece has reached the desired radius. Fortune attaches the bending t emplates to the top o ( the hot-pipe bending jJg. The thickest piece that can be bent is 'Ai in" and then only to a gentle curve. hickory. cheap and accurate way to tell when t he pipe has reached 200"F. your pnltlr. Hot and pliable.com 89 . W. You might get lucky and find a wide board with consistently flawless grain. maple. and beech. You need to make the blank only about liS in. . include cherry. This i. ash.~ than kiln-dried wood. Macassar ebony.r-dried wood to bend. For bends close to the end. imhuia. domestic softwoods. to tighter mdii. MAY/JUNE 2009 www. thicker complete. straightgmined wood that has been air dried will bend fa.<. juSC ~xpect to break a few pieces and to take longer. it will just encourage the outside ftI)ers to streto.1t from the pipe penetrates the wood_ Heating hoth sides won't help. the wood is easy to bend around the pipe. elm. walnut.pipe method to Ix. Woods thai bend well on a hot pipe include red aod white oak. mahog-..tny. Woods that bend with less succe~s. light the torch and slide the head into th e pipe. soak it In water lor about three hours..h ami f~liL It is importam to have cOllsL~tent grain across the width of the piece. You can use kiln-tlricd wood.finewoodworking. and wfter domestiC hardwoods ~uch as lxlSSWO(X] and poplar. is about the practical limit in width. To encourage a. Avoid hending curly or figured wood and burls. Fortune uses a section of roof gutter as a trovgh. th e right temperatu re to bend wood. Awmalian iaccwocxl.'"tld a broad range of species.~ due to the limited depth that the he'. East Indian rosewood. grip It with Vlse-Grip pliers designed for sheet metal. but I've found that j in. and with fewo. they break easily.ter.:r brcakage. As with steam-bending. particularly to tight radii.

s to soak the strips thoroughly for about three hours before bending them. ( p laf.o.. Very lillie propane i. By the way...'au~ L will I give off a toxic ga.. really) the pan being The heat !>Curce is a p ropane lOrch. Ihan Iht: pipe.'orkshop.ain experience... t. 10 minutes inlo a fa n fXlltern..-thick hardboard or plywood. but if the piece is to be bent at the e nds. Up out of place.~Llrplus fiherglas~ . sta~: s Cite ell the fir.-w ke sure the tank cannot roll or . Do not t. The heated 7 flange mu~ be ~parated from lhe wo:xI w ith a gasket. lise regular black pipe.master class co. I make a profile of the sha pe I need from IA-in. If you are nOi using green wood. Create the ned bend.t level.. With p ractice. til(: length of the upright.::w the flange to the wood. Cut a hole In Ih~ upnglu IJl in.. scraping o r ~ nding off an}' protective lacquer or shellac.lde of the flangl: to remove the .:tnem. it becomes ea...to 3-in -Ihi.• on t he outside ot a ple<:e redUC:e$ long flame is s\lfficient to the risk of the outside fibers maintain the 20C1'F operating lifting and causIng a split.... Verify your accuracy by placing the first bend Bgtllnst tho tomplare.. it help... lbe valve e)O me head is never opened fuJJy. r Unlike laminating or !>team-bending fold the tlhc:-rgla'is h:t . Coax the 9. which clamps Into a bench vise.s<:n.". if necessary u'>ing a block of wood to bring It to the right height.. c bend. is determined by the height of the workbench and your own height A deal ~rewed acr~s the back of the upright rests on top of the vise and eli minates the tcndcnq fur til(: jig tu rock as pressure is applied to the pipe.. II is then easy 10 overbend the wood strips and let them spring back lU 111 the pattern. Secure the tank with a w()(xien hand damp. This wa)' if is t:asy to sec Ihe wood bend without stl"dining your hal:k. Be/ng careful not to reheat the first bend. larger In diamcu.. k dnd <. After cutting around the out<. This can take fiued w ith a head thai shapes the flame from as lillie as a fe\\ minutes for Va-tn. work on bending the second sectjon.~ w he n heated." C reate a double-bent door handle in two. Have the tank sit at atxlUl 60" to the bench w ith the head aOOm onc-third of the way into the pipe.. it ~hou l d be about an inch lung~r al c. even w hen the p ipe b Holdtng a piece of nylon webbing bemg heated. and a ~-1Il . r advise starting with a 2-in.I 2-i o. Tl"1I~ protect" the shape.-e ..Iaplc. used. Check the second bend against the template.k wad of fiberglass insulation over the hole and Ihen compre'>."(... St>..L'\e galvanized pipe tx. Buikl the bending jig I find II 001 to have Ihe :rurface of the p i ~ at about che:. to as long a:. th is technique requires that yuu V'orood from heal.· thIck strip:. h. temperature of the pipe.>)' to judge just how much and where to bend.S il as I .::: [e:~..l(:h end to give l ockil\~ pliers a place 10 grip. 90 PINE WOODWORKING .: it tu that relit!s on a form to proVide the the edges of the hole. bent to match tht! p... than [hc tlesirc:d fimshctl plct:e.-dia pip<: and wurking down to tighter radii as you 1. An uncontrolled flam e has no place in a \\.. I turn the upright over lind C'tU an X in rhe fiberglass in the middle of the flange .tr1ps around the bend Before lighting the to n.:h . Rlllht all around. this hllndle works on doors and drawers.and·fonn (coax..

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bu t not on . ~Iock . ws of my wocxien bench vise [0 hold the desired curve. You also need to maintain Ihe curve while the piece dries.. I lust Mkk the piece in the open j.lf. This is JXlrticularly evident w ith woods high In ta nnin like oak and walnut Air needs to reac h boTh surfaces of the drying workpiece tu prev~nt w:ltp ing or cupping. This <. " YOII are making several Identical parts Slich as chair back slats. ~ Online Extra To watch Michael Fortune demonstrate his hoI-pipe oendlng technique. Held In 8 vise...". Once the part:.master class ". while wKk-r .s short a. the template for checking the C lfe a /so serves this role.HI im...~o should not be immersed in water for ~my kngth of time.reasc your success rate by hold ing a . Ih~ hou rs for thin pi~ or 24 hours for the thkkc. Uf Clamp II#1tly. the pattern The hent pan rests in the setting jig secured li~htly with damps or tape.Irying. nrm clamping will not flnlsh the )01). or you can build a wood!>!n setting JIg the same shape :1. Huwever..chieve the correct result. required to :l. You can speed the process by pladng the pieces OC'. For simple -Uft "hllPC"i. ends that are nO( restrained will have a tendency to move with changes in humidity. 92 )lIN!:: WOODWORK I NG . metal clamps will leave a stain. This hdp~ hold down wood fiber. " thl! workpiece has nor been bent sufficiently while being healed. A few clamps Of ellen maskIng tape should be all you need. Thi::. Parts bent this way al. let the wood dry In Its new curve Once the strip illS u. they will have little memory of ever hdng strJ.strips can lx salva~d from old lawn cha iN o r a lawn.hape.~lrar o n the out.. and how much overlx-nding i<. that want 1 lift and 0 create a deeper spin. the setting jig should be:: a frdffic rdthe r than a solid ~urface...ening time can he a.:t'n bent to the desired shape. like red and w hite oak can dl. and should not COOll' In contact with the hOI pipt'o Nylon strap used for banding boxes IS Ideal and easy to find.urfacc <.com/ el(tras. h~ks on the plam"a""rn surface If it dries too quickly.ngle large settlng }lg."ed Lock down the pieces A . It can IJe Quicker fo build a s. as the y will straighten 0 Multlpl. jf you are bending ~jn ·th ick material Success means geltlng a feel for Just how much surface atea has to be healed and for how long. It needs to maintain that shape while Ihe wood l-'OO1s and dnes.".ighl. c:ln be as simple as a stop of tape acro:-s the bt:nJ. go to Fin eWo odworklng.<. The strap should be just: wider than Ihe piece being bent..'hair rt:pair kil. Often. You C. There fore.Hint/It.. or by having a ran blow air across them Wood With pronou nc~ ml--dullary ray .~kie of the strip as it is being bent.. have SI. I recommend putting a dot h or blanket over oak parts for the fj~ 24 hours to retard . You may be able fo dry small parts IJy cliJmping them lightly In a bench vise. On!>! cautionary note: Btcause the bent wood is initiai1y damp. parts..'t to their net\::. Ideally you ~'3nt the piect!' to have a moi:\ture cOn\t!'nt of 7% (o B% before starting to sand il or apply a ftnish.:vclop I. a radiatOr..

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Shop...-'tI ced~r lumhe.. LI.. '~. HIGH QUAUTY HEAVY·DUTY Swcl eX\e!\<..lalool ~kpl ~ You un Ion.. ooohup·'.... T."I1en1 . m\ 11iGIIUNl)WOODU'ORKINGOOM.. ~_r.ng.COri. pool n .>rub-on cw.·nfu. ..n"" (416) ~29·232j. "... m:vbJed. •. ~112n1 cl<u6n Fk"iblc «htd ... monlh Con.nln...N. brick.. ~_d... <.n.. """IERICA.ll perlod .!lxl !)'OI!TIO!'e. Ihrou3h ~n~"" Workshops. (n!) 499-1 901 lelU)i>iU200 IIPra-Iloo.COM .. ~h. Vlll~ge. flitches... lumbM 8O(J-27oj... Inr"".. \/4 \0 12/4 lumhe. dlt:rry.II N HODDS r "Tn.... PO 80" SSOIi. SlO( f=/StopslT"bl~ hlen:l>on.... Flexeel ~i. So: nd t o: Fin..... "The Oper~!ln8 DOMESTIC ANI) IMPORTED EX01'ICS h>r musiiMlrumt"ms.urf..:tion GJ::O RGf."" '.....~nll'w~-u'<ed lool5. v. (~~9) ZT7-8456..STUOENT RAllO ~I fine WOOChYOfking K"booI NE~' irut!'l>Clk>na1 .p"'hen~iYe Cen l'" fm futnllure Lufumanship (207) '...cdawoodworkinp:bool"'" WINDSOR CHAIR CLASS(S: 1 w....... . c:>11 (30. :..tl"g eJaull"i..t'ljl In lil/Xkl nl* ~ expert on wff..T 100 ..'\ 01~1 ~ _ . Chff.Uk...d Ad D O:1'I .... hand""w hl3de h"... 11'1" Think· ing M~n'. ~:"otic WOD(t."1 ""II l" .. TROI'lCAt. VJtl\1 our r>CW w. ..... NIKIJ! pin ~~ilen tt l>ins.>oth. in .· mIll O\II.. quute . ablC'. 8/8. .11.. OuntJI>:..· .. l1l3p1e . o./ 'IU~liL)' h~ndtoob.-~hin<'l.tumFurnil"re..pnlbnd....thle" mOre. ud pUU..("m l·rENCE .' of hurl and crOlCiles. I'XiYl1( HARDWOODS Of LAll... mltu. ~. ww"" h.omf dtu$/fI1NI.ded. R. hurled maple.mperry..OI'l I2hk . Keep back issues looking new In slipcases..<ed and Anllqu~ 1001£ gnd paru...OOO..o.sc HOOL O F ~"oonWORK I NG in ~mifuJ nonh ldill.ker "4anhc.mf... n thl. "' Onl!lW 'qI'\teD tiow. mmlmum .. 1<. ~1'1<1 I.amt'"... In <.. 400!.". ""'>T" Hand Tool 110M KAlINliAN'I'IQUE & USED TOO~S.Sil utJ..b . lug .p"-.Ano: &. .. 200 .(\m Hud~ Bu.-) (217) 390-3828 Info@1 .. ruming.I1 a year's worth of Fillo Woodworking..l..kinA 1)\11) ''''''' aHilable.' Wlllllm~ . &: p"n~lmg....~hajrw.k W()QduW*if\lil 1-llll.'' '. JoC~llIhU'..r:.. HIgh""..<....-Inll ~nd OIIhcr me&:! (828) 765 2~59: WW1l(."THS..."". t.l. l.·. VA. ~nd CU .olu.d ""'ak'M WM PUNV STUDIO. Tt":US (~ B) 661-9'i'S'l S 600 ph" bhlppinll..' fo)ne lftlodoro"'.j()1 3R9 0144. in Elkwood. NOIIh Carolln.O)· su.u"ing blade rated be'l·p. .. a: Kits WOOD AND TOOL EXCHA '\ICE LAYOUTS [In''.c~"l1 "It"". ~'..... Ir><lL fogured myn~'I)Od...21..trn.. lnut.c<>m (903) 769·1017.... Jogo!...IA... or 001 "1 (t(J(J) lj. each case holds more thltl.u~~ 1·200 COmll)ele. _h.. l'fol'eWonal work· • I"oop . VA POj) ""7l-jO()7.. CtuOe" Qut"tn Anne lnd Chippcn<b. SU!llmer work.ltun!on ~"'~ilable !:we) "'5S-9902.~.SO COEIIR U'AlI.. offe ..06 . o. Sianier plane. Fresno. ')met 1962.·1.e~' 0e<J....v (.. C. Ie~"" tne... on w..c hl~oric ... Phd... M>... On.. bOll"...wm QUALTll'" ~ORTHeRN AI'I'AJ. ()<'II.9<1<. EI SE.......and \. ilibs. the .In h. Product +011 050 To ordaf call: 1-800-888 . .'.....fU9. f<)r ~mllU' .pptnj: M"hi8~n (9!19) 7j4-7.. FtGU!U:L> CLAWO ~'Al. Johnson Lumber..Un3. Plans FULL SIU 1't}R...ND The Ch. ~<t(. e. plus mQUloiolndl> II'lO<¢ r... 'II~""lun Wood.Street &-verly.OUnl~ .H"'JT~""I~"k..'Orlr.com THe ACANTHUS WORKSHOP.ti(06) '541-1039. AICS 1 !Iw 20-. cJJI (~16J W3.. P-' Iw-~I.~XO!k.....·ord by p. .CH IAN' hudwood. N"""luw ."t Itt! .-. h.. u~h (41'S) 924-8403 Of pnicderhc~com AJw~ bu)'lngl WOODSUCE8.£ is (or prink ... 8286 lONGLUF H£AlI1' PI NP. 9..*<1" CWD FIIH! \I''/ltldIl. .... C""..~ "J'..)e~ ". CA TIGER MAPLE .chool of fumiltlre "rh.1~.o/MC..Ic cluil'$.~ 1 Ooughu (" "''''''.':mnllllutd-A·. .""'..' "'"1I:h 81Jdcn. <Ii)fe aI "''WW nwllmbc.. FAX 20""2106~ IO . 2009 LUlle iJ AprIL U . . Foo.. Bovrld in dart blue and embossed in gold...>.J"'.l\.. MAHOGANY..'R"S. ..es.O(l.. b).-rhI""h.. _w"".Iakin...r.. m~king and ~.....lId. <lU~"I" V{)'um~ dL. Vb.... ado an IIOIKommiss . I Jlmoulh... crotch lumber.00 .. Iighl-liIlt'd.. t-Ifch • plp""xod~ & (~f "4MJO I ~ ~~.."'" <In).164 """"'..t..com 96 FIN!!. ww ".61 1 . SLACK 1STH CENltJRY furni!u . .com li60) ~~z.) F1r>OrinX.k imen.o phot0lll2phed md prict:d.nllu... alkr 1'S7~) ANDERSON RANCH ARTS CENTER on fl.~11 (bIO) 9iO-\36l o. VA S:H~. c--m:ul.660. .''''[:Ink for "nJiJ 10 larK" 1".. knjJ~ 1'" ~ tJ .. hOCol.·Ofklng ..·ht. Abo lumifl)( da. n<lcnon"mch·orWwo<k.. HllO-l"o8-!':oIf". "ioe-nbr-~n.. Hul!<' In''<'r\lOI)' fA lumb"r.. VA (540) Power Tools ('.. n.'lll3ge (DE) f"'~ i""..flo). Mid_st..)fX'.A."'lt fRt:t:..re'l In Snoov/l1.".o:om 11-MOr.5.J.. turn· ing >110<1<.-ood.I4I036. f>n'l\r-~m in 1)e"i.. .."" "l. .... OIhefJ.". ~.:. )1~'S42-}:8')..com MESQUITE LUMBER (91~1 17")-3'lA11 "'I" WOOl) PORN -WOOD AS GOOD u ir lieu old Mf<lWth. I89S..burg... Matched SCI<.......com l!iJRO 32 k:"........l"•....U. len...I1 CA PFHARI )"·OOl>S. P rlvlte In.. . " .NORA'IID EXOTIC I I~rd"'oods OW'J 100 ..".•600 oao.eKO"'ch.....o moonui0..-n bj. TORONTO..t.tfllocr..uo.ol" M . ("el .. I\VO-..'non .)lunlhcr ..\I\ Making 2nd Re~oral. cherty. Kundbl.." w".1:nu.tHlbl '. Ph ... .ed slam.. L. :14.1292 System ru. I" .. plUII S/H.«xn PENLAN D SCHOOL OF CRAfTS.mm!.'Ofbhopo In "'O(>O"'O". cherry/qu.. 80(). . " "rtford.pc..r""".lh lead lnsuuClor.'01'1'1 Fine ~WxkJng URGE C.I. ". matched :«:I" 4/~ In H/~ lSO·fl.i"".<1 from SOl". u.Jn~ cia...furnl" . (form"rty Jolner's Edg.. ""QOD '" TOOL £XCHANC...." millwork.d•• rtl lind hig .:lruW<J<Xi:>.o ~'~II~\)It.dII. IntelT\3Uoru l :.... Flrw Il'oodworlifng lS'Ille' 9.'OOd.uk \VWW.. .".d. ~ . :>IC tlS2) 416 ~~I~..' sapcle... _Iy fl:1\O\~ted 10 20-1'1. ....NI! .. 116 '«31..siness Opportunities lIo'OODWORJCING SHUI' and home Shop .. =:l c/""roy.... ..jthtto:~k'ul'>lbet<. I'alI $ 8 . for more Informatlnn o n adve rTising go to Uiwwfl.. CORlY.. WOODWORKING .'d.. Of><'-. also other oldo:r \x>t.1'ff<Ion:aJ instruction a).. '~19) 8'0.. ink'" re>odendt'$.. d. Kbdr ¥.OO plu.. ~/4. """ "'\I""" COMe TO LEARN IN SCmu....llion1u mbt:r.It .... HgbOOjI("lIiII"'>:'n:ron.lL'K JJ /'J7IC) '¥..·ttk lnlensh".23... I/und..."<hot·~... che ra t" Is U S/Ii" ... f"n~". Visit w"'.•tom r. S/I1.. k.. . "ish ww . ~il" .ACHF. (70j) 631 .j. IIAN'DS-ON OOUllSllS in ~"df"l Mllne Ikglnrw.. "'.. fmc ~ Kmin.. curly /:11 crotch "laro .' l'Ht..m ..rom SAWMILL UlRE(..~ 16.." ()JI_.. ai.AMO WALNUT hook·m. (~'iO) 937·31159 CLEAR ALASKAl\ YELLOW CeDAR ""'1t"". ~ & W·S632 nning... Low ...... 1. lfU"llled. ~ ww".ll1g.. minimum j lin" • . ktl'!!'·la. l".~ by i"dMdua~ o nly. chlppcndlll ... ofT US 1~/29. (R66) SOS-46117...1e<:ILIJn fA lund ptm". NORTlf/CENTRAL VIRGINlA Ti!l~r mapk..'Orld.()2IJ3 .AuKU.sionforn'QO(hom BI!.. 1·800-443.." Unj~crfal T . . (~70) '2~ . Renll~Il<.... COIll. Im.Jidn.""ow cum3lpfodllClS..NUT fbb6 ~Dd pbnb..""hOle. ""l!~"ry...~.. nilpr..' 6"'2·~27~. CO Sam ... di~"lI £Urope'.CLASSIFIED Thoe CIU51f1ed r. Hem"" Hardwood.. (~W ) 825-1006.. hlslork trC". .ctool <om For Sale FI"t IfwJwOrki"8 i".". '\fWw..I!u}-C~l<lum her com \ .."""'...I. C P.. ~"ln"t.1..nl.."0671 BIRI)'S-IlYE ANI) CURLY MAPLE . inq ... I. butternut.on Por turtht-r Inrurn""iClo 1'1'1"..1. I) h.T .. Jrr~mon. WiOc board'.s al 1VWW.w • pnnl. (11l1"'~...1 g""n Ck'3r ."8.COM 'Iblk. 0 .. ~ccrunl"'nl" .1~~'\Jb...lnlOTWO<Xl...J'-"Io"" hok·!<on"ll ~"m fOf f.ClI Wood AMERICAN CHESTNUT.. .. cond itlon..·h:Kkocd H·".. h.. Yeh".(l3'r """'''''. 800-2il-67'l!1 QUILTED. dri~d... 1·1 TF.. 'luart""'3wn ""k .... dun .u .~eorgo:dl(kcom ~m...""'I><'><J.."O"..".. Ten 60'" Bnlrock plan.~ ot exrnicoI..tC<'d SatiM2ction lIua/"ilnk-e.. Ju.. ""'.·ph. CoL. IS .....IEI'\I! m:ag:w""'" ezcellenl C'omlidon..iHl)( M' I'ALACHIAN HAR D~'OODS dl.... ~lnlt and me-~" mdu....

.tng.. ....I. 95 " " " [)ella Machinery. p. p. p. p. W Wood R:oII. p. p.r Senko ..31 2 Cormtcticul \':lIley School (. p.. 2. 93 ll red AsIlocIatfs. p. 1 58 Dieftnbacher Tools. .wm. 9.. p. 15 Cabl'aru. p. p. 93 Crnfuman. '" " " Kay Indusl1ies.pilog !. p. p. 9J ulling Tools. 93 " '" Corman: lntcrnal!UfIal. AlYt'FJlllSfJt. p. P'>U . p. B7 91 " " " " Lie-Nielkn foolwork!.1n:!woods. Inc. p. 14 Air Sj-~fms... p. p. 11 Cr.ertainly \\'00II. 99 N 'I' SdlOoi 01 Vi'oxx!r:n BoalmlildilLB. p. 19 Fi~ 1f~'OI"kin8 Arrhil'e\ on .d.95 M.. 26 ~·ooollO!)S._r 5<1'11'0. A.. 26 r"tn"''t lOr t'umilure . p. 25 CaI"l"tVi'rigtn. p. p..95 Williamll &: Hussey."'ood>A'Ori. ". . Inc. P. P.31 . 95 . U fIoIfl1l:lrl1l Machine Co. 85 Lcighlnd~. 93 Mission t·umishin~.!H Wood·Mizer. 13 \lthita"hapel. 26 WOOIIworldnB. 18 • .91 90 '. Ud. 'U Woode/lBoal Magazine.ookmpo l1ving. p. p. p. '" so. R .lhlrt Products. p. ". p. p.ohy -':a11l1l1 ProdUCli.r. p. 93 ftider Group liSA. p.a Woodpeckers.9J F. p. p. Cabinetparts. 95 \\'ood Glue.a'I('J...finewoodw<lrkin8_com " " . II Adria TooIIl'OOO.. .h 'ndL8ries. p. " " Gorilla • " " Gilmtr Vi'ood Coolpany.. fJ.... p. f. 2J Northwen nmllo>r. p.t1'R11S£R. /9 Suffolk Machif'ltry. p. " " " ell)' of Trees Woodworking I~it llle. IJ Good /t:. W Design Fllrnitllre. 91 Onlida AIr SyslEms. p.1 Colonial Chair Co.al. 18 ililJl11<!r Hill srnool or t:agle . p.lTe. 94 t\re.. 95 .. p. p.f~ /I. p. p. p. 95 hum Dfsign. " " " " Aa:Ilralt T=k.\IF. p. No . 31 Quality \'akuum products. I. . p. II Groff /I Gnlir lumber. . ~ . 93 lIi!jhland \\'OOIt. p. IIcmi HaniMlod. !H .!H p. P. p. .."lITISI'JI.9. 26 Ligoomat.l i"umitllrt p. J3 l'Ililadelphi:.95 " Cabir1et &. " FIf'ltWoodwortlng. p_ 12 Kuffel Cn'tk Prrss. 2J Woodwofker's Supply. " " " " NorthWt'Sl U'OO(\Wllrking StudiO.J( W~ng. 13 l'Ilvid "fiarrtn DirtCt... ll. p. 16 luthien MertanUIe Inti.p. p. 95 GuillemM Kayab. p. Afl'. J7 l. p. p. Inc.d"tsman Stlldio.. 19 [)-~vld Sa\"age Woodvo'Oniny" p. p. " " " .l". 27 f. 19 f. p. ".31 Ball &0 Bali RtprodllCtloo Hardw.. p. p. Inc. 24 " " " " " " 58 JI)S Company. 13 Hearne H.Affinity&Tool Works.93 Kd1l'r & Compan): p. J4 " Tht lleall Tool Co.. 31 Osbum~ ~'ood I'«k Tool Company. p. " T& T Design. p. 93 I .. !lertshirt \tOftr eo.87 DVD. 95" ~wn)" I'kml$. II lMe\roood Studio.R_. 30 ]..25 ~id. p. " 31 Rockier Woodworking ~nd HAT\lware.com.9. 9..!if How kJ . Tool Compan)'.. &hcrr'~ ". 26 p.5 r. loe. 85 '" Tht Furnirurt Institute 0( Mas.o. " IJ Infi nily C Inside I':Issage School of Fine DR Power Equipmt'flt. p.a8una Tools. 9.. " ". 11 Inlfmational Yacht Re$tOn\tion Sd\ooI. p.9. p. ROlliI'!" Bits-rom. [rIC . p. p.93 " MortNl Pal. 7 i. p. Inc.pe Hardwoods.1 p. ?rodllCls. p. p. 94 Plwt-A·. 93 l'oorthwert \1i'~rking Studio.85 fine Woodworking Index on DYD. II nlebond Wood Glue. p. p. Ctbol Stain. p. p.'orliln g. 13 " 5<:1'('\1' Proollcts..5 Hartvilk Tool W~IIg... . fltW" 'uw Senko .. 95 www. AD\"~~" """". p.aguna Tools. Amt'rican Furniture LltMJIl. Condon Company. 94 .sachuse1ts. iroc.'oodworken Sourct.. " " " \'ac-L--C!amp. p.ngravin..com. " " " CraflSmaruhlp. No. Nne Creek Wood Co. p.. 93 F. 19 O:!borm \\100II 1'roduc!S. . p.l . J3 MAynlJNE 2009 97 . Bett. p. 87 \\'oodfin<itr.. 9. p. p. p. A. p. p.. !H . 9. p.. p. p_ 93 Cool. . 1R 5o:hool 0( Woodwortlng. J3 Forrest M allluaauTing. p.. p. !H !)imilTios Klit<.f British Mastttc\asses. 9 Durn·Gril. 2) 23 Woodcraft.G Prodllcts." ~ . <H l"lrelnel Toots.19p. 23 WirKMr (hair \l'orbhops.U " " . p. p.. p. Inc. !H North IIfnnf! Street School. 26 Culex Tools.. p. p.24 Nora Hall.. " " ())borne: "rod f>rOOucts. p. p.abineun:lktr·s Supply. rts. p.: -roods.\bli£. p.. p. p. Doors. 111e Japan Woodworker..

. . In this $34 madefDr-production chair (light).High design. but as the sticker price comes down the time anJ dlort invested have to do the same. Then. and worked with the available machinclY. j Jigs make JOlrHIfY foolproof. low price BY ANISSA KAPSALES lehael Fortune's chairs (seen on the back cover) run the price gamut. so the chair can be easily assembl ed at Its linal destination.-. to cut the curvea /Jack rest and seat after they were laminated on a form .. To keep things fail-safe. multlpla drills were set up with the IJ/ts at set depthS. A Front stretche r is doweled and glued to front legs. shopmade JIg was clamped to a bench. Fortune provided on-site training. The de. PACKS FLAT-ASSEMBLES EASILY The chair had to be designed so it could be delivered as an RTA (ready-toassemble) product. Fortune said he appreciated the challenges as a designer and craftsman.~ign o f the chair a. and organization was the key to weecs. Dowel s and bolts with cylinder nuts allow the product to knock down lor lIat packing and shipping. researched the materials available locally (keeping prices down and further boosting the local economy). and most of the lessons he ieal11ed can be carried back into the oneman custom ~h()p.- 1 Side stretchers are dowel ed and glued to rear legs . The rcady-to-assemble joinery was done with hand drl/ls. which was often low-tech . Traveling from his studio in Canada to a community in Belize. 98 fl~£ WOO[)WORKIKG . and the workplaces set In place and drilled. he was able to procure miSSing parfS and rehab me machine so it could be used. Fortune found a defunct overh6ad router being used <IS a storage talJlt:. New life fOf 1M old ma~hlrHI_ AI the sile. wlm shopmade JIgs. Luckily. _ _ _ Seat ('Ifld backrest are screwed to chai r base. all the Jigs for this chair were color coded and precisely lalJeled. he also had to accommodate the limitations of manufacnlring in a developing counu-y. well as the productiOn methods got pared down to the basics.

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