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CRANFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS

COURSE OF STUDY
FOR
Advanced Placement Environmental Science

COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year
CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry
GRADE(S): 11, 12

UNIT TITLE: Scientific Analysis
BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: This unit emphasizes inquiry based science. Students will learn methods to observe the natural world and apply the scientific
method to conduct original research of local ecosystems. Students will then analyze their data and report findings by writing a scientific paper. Emphasis is
placed on student interest and student centered problem solving.
*SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 2 weeks
*The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary.

LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS:

STANDARD 5.1 (Scientific Processes) All students will develop problem-solving, decision-making and inquiry skills, reflected by formulating usable questions
and hypotheses, planning experiments, conducting systematic observations, interpreting and analyzing data, drawing conclusions, and communicating results.

STANDARD 5.2 (Science and Society) All students will develop an understanding of how people of various cultures have contributed to the advancement of
science and technology, and how major discoveries and events have advanced science and technology.

STANDARD 5.3 (Mathematical Applications) All students will integrate mathematics as a tool for problem-solving in science, and as a means of expressing
and/or modeling scientific theories.

STANDARD 5.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a
conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology.

ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTION ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS, AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE
THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG):
LEARNING:
A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL:
 What is inquiry-based science?  key terms: scientific method, hypothesis,  complete homework 4-5 times per week
data, analysis, ecology, ecosystem, consisting of 3-5 textbook questions, web-
GUIDING QUESTIONS: sustainability, conservation, marginal coat based assignments or other sources of
 What are methods of observation in the of pollution, LD50, risk assessment. information.
field?
 materials and equipment used by field  record 10 questions about the environment
 What is the scientific method? ecologists. in the field and form hypothesizes from
each of these questions.
 How is scientific research preformed?  The sections of a scientific paper and how
to write one.  investigate household items to be used as
 How are scientific results analyzed? natural insecticides, and design and
 general information about their local conduct a controlled experiment with
 How are professional scientific papers ecosystem. house crickets.
written for publication?
 read, investigate and then write their own
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COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year
CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry
GRADE(S): 11, 12

 What is sustainability?  the names and achievements of early scientific paper based on their
scientists and conservationists in the field. experimental findings.
 What is ecology?
 how to formulate a hypothesis around  complete a cost-benefit analysis of a
 How is the cost of pollution measured? primary observations. cement plant and pollution: (Marginal
Costs of Polluting) complete with
 What is risk management and why is it B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND assessment questions. (optional)
so important in the field of THAT:
environmental science?  complete all AP Free Response Questions
 science is a method of learning more about
relevant to each unit. They can be
the world.
 What are does-response relationships assigned as homework, timed and done in
and how are they measured? class for an individual quiz grade, peer
 each section of a scientific paper has a
graded or collaboratively worked on in
specific purpose.
pairs.
 science constantly changes the way we
 answer the essential questions.
understand the world.
Tests: all tests throughout the year will contain
 the communication of new knowledge is multiple choice questions, reading excerpts and 4
vital to scientific progress. part essay(s) to model the Advanced Placement
Environmental Science (APES) test.
 cost benefit analysis of environmental
polluters involves many aspects of AP FRSPQ: 2002 #3 LD50
investigation.

SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:

 Preview the essential question and connect to learning throughout the unit.

 All textbook reading will be done outside of class.

 Take students outside to make observations of the local ecosystem. “CHS 10 Questions” Students write questions as they observe and explore local
habitats. Develop a hypothesis based on student observations and questions.

 Provide model scientific papers (both professional papers and past student work) as examples of the target performance.

 Individually or in small groups, students will investigate ecological topics of interest and perform an experiment/study.

 Students will investigate household items to be used as natural insecticides, and design and conduct a controlled experiment with house crickets.

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Page 3 of 31 .  Class lesson on scientific papers and critical interpretation of data  Students analyze data and write a scientific paper. 12  Students will investigate. read and then write their own scientific paper based on their findings.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11.  The teacher provides guidance and materials throughout the investigations. lab/field work and an AP free response question. classroom work.  Test: textbook chapters.

12 UNIT TITLE: Ecosystems.5 (Characteristics of Life) All students will gain an understanding of the structure. conducting systematic observations. and basic needs of organisms and will investigate the diversity of life.1 (Scientific Processes) All students will develop problem-solving.  watch a video on population ecology. STANDARD 5. Students will apply sampling techniques learned in class and apply their knowledge in the field to sample a population on the school grounds. parasitism. Students will also learn about ecological disrupters including invasive species. food webs and chains. *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 1-2 weeks *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary. reflected by formulating usable questions and hypotheses. STANDARD 5. web- intra and inter-specific competition. ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTIONS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE. niche. and learn how certain species live together in symbiotic relationships. forces.7 (Physics) All students will gain an understanding of natural laws as they apply to motion. based assignments or other sources of GUIDING QUESTIONS: ecotone. biosphere. edge effect. ecosystem services. effect do they have on native Page 4 of 31 . Students will track a population’s growth.  How is energy measured? succession. characteristics. and as a means of expressing and/or modeling scientific theories STANDARD 5. drawing conclusions. learn about limiting factors and explore how to manage wild populations. STANDARD 5.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. symbiosis. and energy transformations. LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5. STANDARD 5. take  What are invasive species and what notes and answer analysis questions.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology. species competition. SKILLS.  complete homework 4-5 times per week are its forms? mutualism. interpreting and analyzing data. commensalism. planning experiments. habitat. Energy and Living Organisms BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: Students will explore the nature and forms of energy. pioneer species. decision-making and inquiry skills.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena. information. biomass. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING: A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL:  What is the nature of energy? What  key terms: keystone species. trophic levels. and communicating results.3 (Mathematical Applications) All students will integrate mathematics as a tool for problem-solving in science. consisting of 3-5 textbook questions.

relevant to each unit. 12 ecosystems?  R vs k-selected species. NPP tasks and activities built into the predator and prey? presentation. and that at each step more of it becomes  complete all AP free response questions unusable. in population size? THAT:  complete laboratory activities and report  energy conversions underlie all  What is biotic potential? on exponential growth of Lemna minor or ecological processes. invasive species Page 5 of 31 .  What are variations within a  the pyramid of biomass. reading excerpts and four-part essay(s) to model the APES test. other available species/kits.  all energy flows through systems. numbers and population? energy  navigate through a PowerPoint presentation taking notes and performing  What is the relationship between  GPP vs.  What is carrying capacity?  energy cannot be created. peer graded or collaboratively completed in pairs. it originates  demonstrate knowledge and understanding somewhere. classroom case studies. timed and completed in class for an individual quiz grade.  dissect an owl pellet record data and answer analysis questions. They can be assigned as homework. Students design and carry out their own  What are factors that produce change B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND experiments in collaborative groups.  potential energy and kinetic energy. lab and field work.  answer the essential question. through tests on textbook chapters. Tests: All tests throughout the year will contain multiple-choice questions.  What are exponential growth and  measure populations on school ground linear growth in populations?  first and second law of thermodynamics using sampling techniques learned in class.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. AP FRSPQ: 2001 #2: Gypsy moths and Lymes disease 2003 #1: Worm invasion.

12 SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES. INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential question and connect to learning throughout the unit. lab/field work and an AP free response question Page 6 of 31 .  All textbook reading will be done outside of class.  Lab: Exponential growth of Lemna minor or other available species/kits.  Population lab (assigned for homework)  Video: Population Ecology  Interactive PowerPoint: Energy Flow through Ecosystems  Test: Textbook chapters.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. classroom work.  Lab: Owl pellet dissection  Lab: Measuring a Population: Students design and carry out their own experiments in collaborative groups.

and answer analysis differ? questions. species benefit from them. A strong theme of sustainability.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11.  characteristics of endangered and  What role do humans play in the loss threatened species. threatened. with a case study about a large paper diversity and ecosystem diversity corporation. plants and animals?  watch a video about forest sustainability  ecosystem services and how humans  How do genetic diversity. Students will learn how the United States is managing open space and helping to preserve biodiversity. Students will learn about endangered and threatened species and the impacts that humans have on these plants and animals.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology. bell-weather  How do we as humans contribute to species. deforestation. STANDARD 5. selective cutting. extinct.  complete homework 4-5 times per week ecosystem services. SKILLS. STANDARD 5. of biodiversity?  watch a video about deer management in NJ and write a reflection paper including  major laws and treaties that help protect  What are some common uses for endangered and threatened species. their own experience with deer in the area. *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 2-3 weeks *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary.2 (Science and Society) All students will develop an understanding of how people of various cultures have contributed to the advancement of science and technology. endangered. 12 UNIT TITLE: Biodiversity and Land Use BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: This unit explores biodiversity. wise use and conservation underlies this unit. based assignments or other sources of GUIDING QUESTIONS: information. ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTIONS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE. and how major discoveries and events have advanced science and technology. ecosystem services and land use. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING:  What is biodiversity and how does it A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL: affect our everyday lives?  key terms: biotic pollution. sustainability. and how we as humans benefit from our environment and the goods and ecosystem services with which our environment provides us.  what sustainability in our ecosystems means when dealing with game and wild  What are the major laws and acts that  read and reflect on writings by Aldo Page 7 of 31 . LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5. web- the loss of habitat and biodiversity? cutting.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena. clear consisting of 3-5 textbook questions.

INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential questions and connect to learning throughout the unit. 2003 #4 Endangered species SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES.  wetlands are important features of our endangered and threatened species? landscape and have many important  demonstrate knowledge and understanding ecological functions.  Biodiversity PowerPoint presentation  Use computers and internet to track endangered species from various websites.  How are land resources being utilized through tests.edu/NJHEPS. textbook chapters.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. 12 help protect species biodiversity? species as well as forestry. peer graded or collaboratively completed in pairs. to better preserve their value for the classroom case studies. relevant to that unit. case study: Highland Park NJ  What are characteristics common to www.  All textbook reading will be done outside of class. Tests: All tests throughout the year will contain multiple choice questions.rst2.  answer the essential questions. AP FRSPQ: 2000 #3 Extinctions. Page 8 of 31 . lab and field work. THAT:  What are ecosystem services and how  stewardship is important in every aspect of do we benefit from them?  analyze a public planning and land use our lives. They can be assigned as homework. timed and completed in class for an individual quiz grade. reading excerpts and four part essay(s) to model the APES test.  How is a wild population managed? B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND  explain the technology used by scientists to track endangered species.  we are cutting down the rainforest future? ecosystem faster than it can naturally  complete all AP free response questions regenerate. Leopold.

12  Video: NJN Presents Deer Crossing: NJ  Video: Forest through the Trees  Aldo Leopold: A Sand County Almanac. classroom work.rst2. lab/field work and an AP free response question. essay on passenger pigeons  Public planning and land use case Study: Highland Park NJ (NJHEPS references) www.edu/NJHEPS  Test: textbook chapters.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. Page 9 of 31 .

STANDARD 5. and geophysical systems of the earth. Point presentation of the nitrogen cycle. the earth’s geologic and atmospheric systems and the biomes of the world. students will explore the biogeochemical cycles. consisting of 3-5 textbook questions.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena.  What role does plate tectonics play in locations of each one around the world. mining and reclamation. and how the biogeochemical cycles. environment? and complete analysis questions. STANDARD 5.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11.2 (Science and Society) All students will develop an understanding of how people of various cultures have contributed to the advancement of science and technology. atmosphere and geosphere?  key terms: water. *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 3 weeks (This unit should be concluded by the Thanksgiving recess.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology. and how major discoveries and events have advanced science and technology. Students will learn how weather and climate affect the different parts of the world and how the earth’s systems interact with one another.) *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary.  In what way do weather and climate Page 10 of 31 .  What are the major carbon sinks?  the different biomes of the world and  take a self guided tour through a Power  Which trace elements are vital for the characteristics of each one. cycles. STANDARD 5.6 (Chemistry) All students will gain an understanding of the structure and behavior of matter.  complete homework 4-5 times per week plate tectonics. LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5. nitrogen. 12 UNIT TITLE: Interdependence in Earth’s Ecosystems BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: In this unit. the ever-changing earth?  conduct an experiment demonstrate  the layers of the atmosphere. carbon. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING:  How do elements cycle through our A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL: biosphere.  the different human activities that disrupt  How was the earth formed. convection currents. ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTION ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE. web- GUIDING QUESTIONS: climate. STANDARD 5. dynamics. based assignments or other resources.8 (Earth Science) All students will gain an understanding of the structure. solar radiation. SKILLS.  learn about the eutrophication of the has it changed over time? Chesapeake Bay through a case study with  the different plate boundaries and analysis questions.

lab and field work. biogeochemical cycles?  each person leaves a mark on the earth. 12 affect the biota of the earth? B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND  travel through the water cycle as a drop of  What constitutes the biosphere? water and then assess their journey THAT: through an evaluation of their choice. of each biogeochemical cycle? across biomes.  complete activities related to scientists’ and there are simple ways to reduce one’s  What processes aid in the recycling of forecasting and recording data about El impact on the earth.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11.  identifying plate boundaries and  What are the different biomes and movement of the earth enable us to marine environments of the earth?  measure their carbon footprint online and understand how the earth’s surface is engage in an online activity to balance the changing.  soil and climate determine the biomes of the world and the flora and fauna that can  review plate tectonics as previously survive in a given biome. peer graded or collaboratively completed in pairs. learned in other science classes.  What human activities disrupt the carbon budget. classroom case studies.  the cycling of matter in the earth is  What are the major reservoirs/ sinks  graph temperature and rainfall distribution essential to survival.  APES free response question: 2003 #3 Estuaries  answer the essential question.  demonstrate knowledge and understanding through tests: textbook chapters. timed and completed in class for an individual quiz grade. nutrients? Nino. and identify unidentified biomes based on data and soil. They can be assigned as homework. Page 11 of 31 .  complete all AP free response questions relevant to each unit.

AP FRSPQ: 2002 #4 El Nino 2003 #3 Estuaries SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES. reading excerpts and four part essay(s) to model the APES test.  Students will work in learning stations: Nitrogen Cycle Power Point Presentation.  Test: textbook chapters. 12 Tests : All tests throughout the year will contain multiple-choice questions. reading excerpts and four part essay(s) to model the APES test. Ch 7)  Climate and atmosphere PowerPoint presentation  Video: Chasing El Nino  Answer APES free response question in class: 2002 #4 El Nino with peer grading  Lab: Biome distribution lab  Review plate tectonics as previously learned in other science classes. classroom case studies.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. lab and field work  All tests throughout the year will contain multiple-choice questions. Water cycle: Journey and assessment. Carbon/oxygen cycle internet activity with carbon footprint and balancing the carbon budget. Case study: Chesapeake Bay  Lab: Cookie mining  Quiz: Biogeochemical cycles (textbook. INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential question and connect to learning throughout the unit.  All textbook reading will be done outside of class.  APES free response question: 2003 #3 Estuaries Page 12 of 31 .

LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5. ZPG. population profile. based assignments or other resources. and as a means of expressing and/or modeling scientific theories.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena. the statistical analysis of human population growth. STANDARD 5. SKILLS. Students will better understand the factors that influence population growth.2 (Science and Society) All students will develop an understanding of how people of various cultures have contributed to the advancement of science and technology. changes in human population size?  navigate their way through an interactive  major principles of population ecology website and game completing questions  How has the human population applied to human populations. and the environmental consequences of rapid human population growth.  What are the factors that produce overpopulation locally and globally. STANDARD 5. reflect on human ecology and the human  What is human ecology? race. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING:  How do we as humans impact our A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL: environment?  key terms: population density. Resources and the Environment BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: This unit consists of human demographics. 12 UNIT TITLE: Populations.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology. emigration. *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 2 weeks *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary.3 (Mathematical Applications) All students will integrate mathematics as a tool for problem-solving in science. ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTIONS ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. about the present and future world in terms changed throughout history? of population.  complete homework 4-5 times per week immigration. STANDARD 5. the differences between industrialized and developing countries and how overpopulation is the root cause of environmental problems.  the history of human population growth. replacement level fertility. and how major discoveries and events have advanced science and technology. CDR. density dependent  watch the video Island of the Flowers and GUIDING QUESTIONS: and independent factors. earth? demographic transition. doubling consisting of 3-5 textbook questions. Page 13 of 31 . CBR.  What is demography?  use internet resources to determine their  problems associated with human individual “ecological footprint”. ecological footprint. web-  What is the carrying capacity of the time.

 human population growth is the root  What factors help determine the cause of all environmental problems relationship between people and their  examine and answer analysis questions on environment? three countries policies on population growth.  What is the environmental impact of human overpopulation?  humans have had an impact on the  complete a case study of a given country earth for millions of years.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. using data from the World Census Bureau  What are problems associated with consisting of building and interpreting the rapid growth of urban areas? population profiles to determine  technology and population growth population growth trends. 12  What is the difference between highly B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND  complete questions from an interactive and lesser-developed countries? THAT: Power Point as well as interpret various  humans alter natural systems. relate to human overpopulation?  complete an activity demonstrating the amount of arable land on earth.  examine the causes and consequences on human population growth? the earth and natural resources of human population growth. have enabled humans to increase both  What methods have various the rate and the scale of the impact on governments used to try to slow the environment. AP FRSPQ: 2000 #4: Population Pyramides 2003 #2: Population Graph Page 14 of 31 .  answer the essential questions.  answer an AP free response question interpreting population pyramids. reading excerpts and four part essay(s) to model the APES test.  complete all AP free response questions relevant to the unit. Tests: All tests throughout the year will contain multiple choice questions. timed and done in class for an individual quiz grade. They can be assigned as homework. population profiles.  environmental problems have a  How do diseases such as HIV/AIDS cultural and social context. peer graded or collaboratively completed in pairs.

 All textbook reading will be done outside of class.  Internet assignment: “The State of the World Today”  Case Study/lab activity: Power of the Pyramids  Practice APES free response questions about human population dynamics. 12 2005 #1: Disease on the Rise 2007 #4: Populations in Urban Areas SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES. lab/field work and an AP free response question Page 15 of 31 . K selected species and survivorship curves packet and lecture  Demography quiz (textbook.  Test: textbook chapters. Environment).COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. Miller. INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential questions and connect to learning throughout the unit. Ch 8)  Case study of China’s “one child” policy  Online flashcards (text support from T. classroom work.  Video: Island of the Flowers with discussion and free response writing assignment  Interactive website Six Billion Human Beings and Measuring Your Ecological Footprint with analysis questions  Interactive “Demography” PowerPoint presentation with whiteboard  Arable land activity  Causes and consequences of high population growth packet with analysis questions  R vs.

a case study on the collapse of the Georges  How does the amount of genetic Bank Fishery.  How can we get off the pesticide  demonstrate over fishing in a “tragedy of a treadmill?  integrated pest management and commons” activity involving M&M’s with sustainable farming practices. resources.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. monoculture.  What environmental impacts result subsistence agriculture. web GUIDING QUESTIONS: persistent pesticides. characteristics. sustainability and problem solving are strong themes that run throughout the unit *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 2 weeks. and energy transformations. based assignments or using outside  What are local and global commons? pesticide treadmill. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING:  How can we improve sustainability in A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL: order to feed the world?  key terms: bioaccumulation.5 (Characteristics of Life) All students will gain an understanding of the structure. STANDARD 5. (This unit should be completed by Winter Break. SKILLS.) *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary.  watch a video and answer questions about from the “pesticide treadmill?” farming agriculture and pesticides. 12 UNIT TITLE: Feeding the World BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: This unit explores the challenge of feeding the world in the 21st century. LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5.  broad vs. Page 16 of 31 .2 (Science and Society) All students will develop an understanding of how people of various cultures have contributed to the advancement of science and technology. Students will model over fishing and explore the phenomena known as tragedy of the commons. Planning for the future. organophosphates.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology. Georges Bank Fishery. and how major discoveries and events have advanced science and technology. STANDARD 5. carabamates. FIFRA.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena. and basic needs of organisms and will investigate the diversity of life. the boom in modern agriculture known as the green revolution and learn about the advances and setbacks associated with modern pesticides. forces. FDCS. narrow spectrum pesticides.7 (Physics) All students will gain an understanding of natural laws as they apply to motion. Students will explore different farming practices. STANDARD 5. consisting of 3-5 textbook questions. DDT.  complete homework 4-5 times a week biomagnification. STANDARD 5. GM. ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTION ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE.

AP FRSPQ: 1999 #4: Pesticide Controversy 2004 #1: Is the seafood we eat safe? 2005 #2 Global Meat Production 2006 #4 Fisheries SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES.  answer the essential question. unless something is done. They can be  one person can make a difference and that assigned as homework. reading excerpts and four part essay(s) to model the APES test.  Video: Race to Save the Planet  Activity/Lab: Tragedy of the Commons: M&M fishing with analysis questions and brainstorming of local commons and handouts on herring and anchovy over fishing  PowerPoint Presentation: Pesticides in the Environment: Bioaccumulation and Biomagnification Page 17 of 31 . INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential question and connect to learning throughout the unit.  complete all AP free response questions chain and then magnify? relevant to each unit.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. Tests: Al tests throughout the year will contain multiple-choice questions. over fishing is a  How do pesticides get into the food reality for this generation. peer the issue of pesticides and their graded or collaboratively completed in detrimental effects on humans and the pairs.  What are some issues associated with the use of pesticides? B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND  participate in a “pesticide treadmill” lab THAT: demonstrating the evolution of the super  What is a pesticide?  the world’s oceans are not limitless and bug and answer discussion questions. the world can change. on her accomplishments. 12 variability in a population affect the population’s ability to adapt to  the technology. timed and written  What was the “green revolution?” Rachel Carson’s activism was essential to in class for an individual quiz grade.  All textbook reading will be done outside of class. environment.  Top-level predators are going to be the most contaminated of the food chain.  with minor changes made by everyone. fishing methods and  read a chapter from Rachel Carson’s environmental changes? techniques associated with commercial accomplishments Silent Spring and reflect fishing.

12  Activity: Bioaccumulation in a food chain demonstrated with colored beads  Lab: The Pesticide Treadmill: The birth of the “superbug”  DVD: World in the Balance  Test: textbook chapters. Page 18 of 31 . classroom work. lab/field work and an AP free response question.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11.

SKILLS. soil pollution and soil conservation in the face of agriculture. soil texture. decision-making and inquiry skills. loam. and communicating results.1 (Scientific Processes) All students will develop problem-solving. Major topics include classification of soil particles. dynamics. LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5. reflected by formulating usable questions and hypotheses. planning experiments. conducting systematic observations. make recommendations for improving the soil quality. drawing conclusions. water holding capacity.3 (Mathematical Applications) All students will integrate mathematics as a tool for problem-solving in science. clay. soil types? types.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena. and geophysical systems of the earth. STANDARD 5. based assignments or other outside  How are soils classified? desertification. leaching. and answer analysis questions. Page 19 of 31 . ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTION ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE. physical characteristics and identification of soils. soil nutrients. interpreting and analyzing data. silt. with the students spending most of the class time conducting experiments or out in the field.  What are soil horizons?  the materials and equipment used by field  conduct a laboratory investigation to ecologists.6 (Chemistry) All students will gain an understanding of the structure and behavior of matter. STANDARD 5.  take notes from a PowerPoint presentation  How are soils identified in the field?  the importance of soils in determining about soils and their properties. consisting of 3-5 textbook questions.  complete homework 4-5 times per week percolation rate. and assess what  What are the characteristics of major  the physical characteristics that create soil could be grown in the soils current state. web- GUIDING QUESTIONS: erosion. and as a means of expressing and/or modeling scientific theories. This unit takes an inquiry based science approach. resources. STANDARD 5. 12 UNIT TITLE: Soils and their Preservation BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: This unit will introduce students to one of the most important factors of ecosystem and environmental quality: soil.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 1-2 weeks *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary. STANDARD 5. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING:  How are soils essential to our A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL: everyday lives?  key terms: sand.8 (Earth Science) All students will gain an understanding of the structure. measure soil nutrients of various soil  What causes soil horizons? samples.

supply. B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND WHC and percolation rate  What is percolation rate and how does THAT: this relate to environmental quality?  assess two different soil samples using  soil types can be identified by texture. conserve them?  complete all AP free response questions  soil is a major factor in determining relevant to each unit.  All textbook reading will be done outside of class. what methods are used to farms. percolation rate. peer graded or collaboratively completed in  studying soil composition and nutrients is pairs. AP FRSPQ: 2004 #4: Samples and Conservation 2005 #3: Mining SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES. erosion and soil pollution? Students will identify an unidentified silt and clay. INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential question and connect to learning throughout the unit. color. agriculture. 12  What is water holding capacity and ecosystems and biomes. sample. and color. and  Minerals and soils are in limited make recommendations for uses of all  soil is a factor when building landfills. texture by feel. vital to improving agricultural techniques and soil conservation.  Introduction to the unit: Look How Long It Took to Form One Inch of Soil (poster)  Lab investigation: Soil nutrient lab  “Black Gold” Soils PowerPoint presentation Page 20 of 31 . and relative percentages of sand.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. soil textural triangle. and in general development. timed and written input. They can be whether agriculture will be high or low assigned as homework. reading excerpts and four part essay(s) to model the APES test.  Answer the essential question. answer analysis questions. capacity. water holding  What is the relationship among WHC. in class for an individual quiz grade. percolation rate. how is it measured?  Quiz: field identification of soil horizons. and three soils. Tests: All tests throughout the year will contain multiple-choice questions.

classroom work.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. percolation rate. identification of an unknown soil type  Field investigation: Digging soil horizons  Use of digital photos on whiteboard to serve as virtual field trip of various biomes with different soil types  Test: textbook chapters. soil textural triangle. lab/field work and an AP free response question Page 21 of 31 . 12  Lab: Water holding capacity.

STANDARD 5. algal bloom. decision-making and inquiry skills.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology. ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTION ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE. *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 3 weeks *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary. web- coliform. conducting systematic observations. eutrophication and chemical pollutants. This unit will also address the sources of the pollutants and how the pollutants affect the environment. salinization. septic system. and communicating results. based assignments or using other GUIDING QUESTIONS: eutrophication.1 (Scientific Processes) All students will develop problem-solving.5 (Characteristics of Life) All students will gain an understanding of the structure.  complete homework 4-5 times per week different aspects of our lives? biochemical oxygen demand. sludge. SKILLS. drawing conclusions. Students will distinguish between point and nonpoint sources of pollution and how we as individuals can help to reduce these sources.2 (Science and Society) All students will develop an understanding of how people of various cultures have contributed to the advancement of science and technology.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING: A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL:  How do water and water pollution affect  key terms: point and nonpoint pollution. characteristics. STANDARD 5.  What are the categories of water pollution? pollution. fecal consisting of 3-5 textbook questions. Major topics include the categories of water pollutants. dissolved oxygen. thermal resources.6 (Chemistry) All students will gain an understanding of the structure and behavior of matter. STANDARD 5. STANDARD 5. planning experiments. Students will also learn to measure water quality using various tools such as water testing kits. reflected by formulating usable questions and hypotheses.  materials and equipment used by Page 22 of 31 . interpreting and analyzing data. LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5. and how major discoveries and events have advanced science and technology. and basic needs of organisms and will investigate the diversity of life. water diversion.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. STANDARD 5. sewage treatment. sediment pollution. 12 UNIT TITLE: Water a Fragile Resource BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: In this unit students will explore the major types of water pollution. wastewater treatment in the Boston sources of water pollution? Harbor. chlorinization. indicator  assess and make recommendations for  What are examples of point and nonpoint species.

 assess and identify three to five unknown ecosystems? water samples using LaMotte Water  the eight categories of water pollution. peer  biological processes can cause graded or collaboratively completed in eutrophication.  All textbook reading will be done outside of class. eutrophication. biochemical oxygen quality? demand and dissolved oxygen.  What is a watershed? pairs. and prepare a lab  the mechanisms of a wastewater treatment report. diversion in the world? in maintaining human health and the health of ecosystems. reading excerpts and  treating wastewater is extremely important four part essay(s) to model the APES test.  How is drinking water purified in the plant. U. Page 23 of 31 . INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential question and connect to learning throughout the unit. pollution? B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND  conduct a week-long lab observing the  What are the impacts of poor water quality effects of nitrates and phosphates on a THAT: water sample and measuring the dissolved on human health?  water quality in local areas can reflect the oxygen. AP FRSPQ: 1999 #1 Pond Abiotic/Biotic 2001 #4 Water Quality Up/Down River 2002 #2 Water Diversion 2007 #1 Sewage SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES. 12  How does sewage effluent affect aquatic environmental scientists. overall health of the ecosystem.S. timed and written and commercially? in class for an individual quiz grade. Quality testing kits for chemical and  How is raw sewage treated? physical characteristics.  sewage discharge is related to   What are indicators of good and bad water answer the essential question.?  assess the water quality of Nomahegan  the goals of the Clean Water Act and the Pond through macro invertebrate and  What laws were enacted to reduce water Safe Drinking Water Act. micro invertebrate surveys.  What are major uses of water domestically assigned as homework. They can be vital in determining trends in land use. Tests: All tests throughout the year will contain  What are some examples of water multiple choice questions.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11.  How can we as individuals help to reduce water pollution?  complete all AP free response questions  monitoring water quality periodically is relevant to each unit.

)  Sewage study packet  Case study: Boston Harbor  Test: textbook chapters. Page 24 of 31 .COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. nonpoint water pollution  Lab: Water quality and identification of unknown water samples with lab report  Lab: Macroinvertebrate Indicator Species  Water diversion: case studies: Mono Lake. Aral Sea and Colombia River  Video: Rediscovering the NJ Highlands (provides most of NJ’s drinking water)  Video: Sewage Treatment (22 min. classroom work. lab/field work and an AP free response question. 12  Video: Assignment Discovery: Water to the Last Drop  Properties of water PowerPoint presentation  Enviroscape: Point vs.

1 (Scientific Processes) All students will develop problem-solving.  What is the difference between renewable and non-renewable  renewable vs. radioactive half life.  the alternative energy currently  How will oil extraction from the  Analyze the online case study about the implemented and being used in NJ Arctic Wildlife Refuge in Alaska great utility authority saving the world one Page 25 of 31 .2 (Science and Society) All students will develop an understanding of how people of various cultures have contributed to the advancement of science and technology. and communicating results. and how major discoveries and events have advanced science and technology. ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTION ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE. planning experiments. reflected by formulating usable questions and hypotheses. non-renewable resources  analyze a local solar panel system to resources? and examples of each.  complete homework 4-5 times per week resources? subsidy.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5. biomass. combustion. resources. conducting systematic observations. based assignments or using other GUIDING QUESTIONS: meltdown. STANDARD 5. STANDARD 5. Students will analyze the increase in fossil fuel use. STANDARD 5. interpreting and analyzing data. STANDARD 5. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING:  How can we break our dependence on A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL: fossil fuels and non-renewable  key terms: fossil fuels. and calculate how long it  What are fossil fuels and how are they  the parts of a nuclear power plant will take the consumer to pay off the formed? investment. 12 UNIT TITLE: The Search for Energy BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: Students will explore the sources of energy currently used and the alternative energy sources that have potential for practical development. web- isotopes. fusion. debate the pros and cons of nuclear energy and explore the alternatives currently used in our state. consisting of 3-5 textbook questions.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology. fission. assess its pros and cons and cost effectiveness. scrubbers.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena. drawing conclusions. spent fuel. decision-making and inquiry skills. cogeneration. SKILLS. NIMB. *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 3-4 weeks *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary.6 (Chemistry) All students will gain an understanding of the structure and behavior of matter.

(fake scenario). They can be  What alternative energy sources are assigned as homework. nuclear power plants?  debate in a formal classroom setting the  it is vital for the survival of our society to  What are some advantages and proposed “Springfield Nuclear Reactor” develop alternative sources of energy. Oh My!! use of fossil fuels? THAT:  understanding the role of cultural. pollution development of energy solutions. factors the impact of the environment. reading excerpts and four part essay(s) to model the APES test.  Why must we plan our use of resources for the continuation of life  answer the essential question.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. and the environment as we know it? Tests: All tests throughout the year will contain multiple choice questions.S. social  compile a PowerPoint presentation and economic factors is vital to the  What are the advantages and addressing fossil fuels.  How can you personally limit your Cogeneration and Methane. 12 impact the tundra ecosystem? flush at a time! Atlantic County Utility B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND Authority: (ACUA): Wind Turbines. Students research the pros disadvantages of nuclear power plants? and cons of a nuclear reactor in a nearby  many of our resources exist in finite town. timed and written being developed and how efficient are in class for an individual quiz grade. and domestic cars. peer these sources? graded or collaboratively completed in pairs. quantities and conservation and  What factors need to be considered sustainable practices must be developed to for a long term storage site for spent maintain the quality of life in the U. politics.  complete all AP free response questions nuclear fuel and why? relevant to each unit. AP FRSPQ: 1999 #2 Resource Management 2001 #1 Heating a Home 2002 #1 Electric Vehicles 2006 #1 Solar Power 2007 #2 Energy Conservation Page 26 of 31 . Students must choose a disadvantages of using fossil fuels to produce energy? vehicle and justify their purchase based on  making decisions regarding nuclear power sound economic and environmental is very difficult because of the numerous  What causes the nuclear reaction in research.

analysis and calculations  Case study: ACUA cogeneration and wind power  Renewable energy and cnservation pcket  Test: textbook chapters. 12 SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES. Page 27 of 31 . classroom work.  Video: Race to Save the Planet: More is Less  PowerPoint presentation Project: Wheels and War  Locked Horns: The Fate of Old Crowe  History Channel: Mega Disasters: Chernobyl and Three Mile Island video clips  Formal class nuclear power debate  Case study: Oyster Creek Nuclear Power Plant. lab/field work and an AP free response question. NJ  History Channel: Modern Marvels: Sugar (ethanol clip)  Solar Power Louie Style PowerPoint presentation.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11.  All textbook reading will be done outside of class. Toms River. INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential question and connect to learning throughout the unit.

recycling on school grounds  What are environmental problems associated with landfills?  substances that are considered hazardous  read Brownfields in a Box: The Nahant waste. fly ash. STANDARD 5.  What is the difference between solid leachate.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology. sustainability. electrostatic precipitator.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena. and geophysical systems of the earth. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING:  How can we reduce the amount of A: STUDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL: solid and hazardous waste produced  key terms: municipal waste. Hazardous Waste and Recycling BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: Students will learn about solid and hazardous waste. 12 UNIT TITLE: Solid. PCB. hazardous waste. assigned as homework. based assignments or other resources. lime consisting of 3-5 textbook questions.8 (Earth Science) All students will gain an understanding of the structure. They can be  the goals of the superfund program. *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 1-2 weeks (usually over Spring recess) *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary. GUIDING QUESTIONS: dioxins.  the features of a landfill. ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTION ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE. dynamics.  How do incinerators work?  proper disposal methods for hazardous  What are environmental problems waste. timed and written  What defines hazardous waste? in class for an individual quiz grade. mass burn incinerator. STANDARD 5. web- scrubber. Marsh Case Study.  How do landfills work?  participate in a service learning activity:  the features of an incinerator. Students will learn about various disposal methods including sanitary landfills and incineration. Wise use. LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5.  complete all AP free response questions associated with incinerators? relevant to each unit. source reduction recycling and reusing are underlying themes and students will learn how they can personally limit the amount of waste they generate. SKILLS. the hazards they impose and the proper disposal methods of each.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. sanitary  complete homework 4-5 times per week worldwide? landfill.  read and discuss Love Canal: There is No and hazardous waste? Away. peer graded or collaboratively completed in Page 28 of 31 .

 What is the superfund program? new technologies will reduce waste production and provide cleaner.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential question and connect to learning throughout the unit. reading excerpts and four part essay(s) to model the APES test.  All textbook reading will be done outside of class.  small efforts can reduce the amount of waste we actually produce. classroom work. multiple-choice questions. Black Day in Bhopal o APES free response question  Test: textbook chapters. AP FRSPQ: 2000 #2 Is Recycling Smart Economics? 2006 #3 Brownfield SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES. lab/field work and an AP free response question Page 29 of 31 . more Tests: All tests throughout the year will contain efficient ways of waste disposal.  Video: Talking Trash  Case Study CD: Brownfield in a Box  Composting  Spring recess packet consisting of: o Solid waste notes with questions o Hazardous waste notes with questions o Case Studies: Love Canal. hazardous waste? THAT:  combining conservative resource use with  answer the essential question. 12  What disposal methods are used for B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND pairs.

STANDARD 5. consisting of 3-5 textbook questions. STANDARD 5. conducting systematic observations.4 (Nature and Process of Technology) All students will understand the interrelationships between science and technology and develop a conceptual understanding of the nature and process of technology. web- affecting humans and the global temperature inversion. *SUGGESTED TIMELINE: 2-3 weeks *The suggested timeline is subject to change as teachers and program supervisors find necessary. aerosols. CFC’s.  How does air pollution differ in developed  complete a case study on the effects of and developing countries?  chemical composition of major air global warming using news articles: Sea pollutants.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11. STANDARD 5.1 (Scientific Processes) All students will develop problem-solving. atmosphere? global distillation effect. global warming. LINK TO CONTENT STANDARDS: STANDARD 5. penguins. based assignments or other resources. ESSENTIAL OVERARCHING QUESTION ESSENTIAL KNOWLEDGE.2 (Science and Society) All students will develop an understanding of how people of various cultures have contributed to the advancement of science and technology. acid deposition and ozone depletion. answering  What are the major classes of air pollution  the difference between primary and essential questions and linking to internet and their effect on the environment? secondary air pollution and how each resources.  navigate their way through a PowerPoint GUIDING QUESTIONS: presentation on air pollution. level rise. decision-making and inquiry skills. interpreting and analyzing data. reflected by formulating usable questions and hypotheses. develops. students will explore the major types of air pollution and global atmospheric changes. dust dome. Major topics in this unit include the greenhouse effect and global warming. 12 UNIT TITLE: The Global Atmosphere BRIEF SUMMARY OF UNIT: In this unit. and how major discoveries and events have advanced science and technology. SKILLS. AND ASSESSMENT (EVIDENCE OF KNOWLEDGE THAT WILL FOCUS TEACHING AND UNDERSTANDINGS: AND UNDERSTANDNG): LEARNING: A: STDENTS WILL KNOW: STUDENTS WILL:  What are the human sources of air  key terms: smog. polar ice caps.6 (Chemistry) All students will gain an understanding of the structure and behavior of matter. STANDARD 5.  complete homework 4-5 times per week pollution and how are these pollutants greenhouse effect. and communicating results. effects on coral reefs. planning experiments. The unit will also address sources of the pollutants and how the pollutants affect the environment. acid deposition. drawing conclusions. ozone. etc. Page 30 of 31 . urban heat island.10 (Environmental Studies) All students will develop an understanding of the environment as a system of interdependent components affected by human activity and natural phenomena. polar  What is the greenhouse effect? bears.

lab/field work and an AP free response question Page 31 of 31 . ozone depletion and acid 2007 #3 Ozone  What are the impacts of poor air quality on deposition. its effect on the natural and human made  studying the causes and effects of global environments? warming is vital to finding ways to reverse the trend.COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11.  answer the essential questions.  What are greenhouse gasses and where do  evaluate the effects of acid rain on they come from?  environmental effects of air pollution. human health? SUGGESTED SEQUENCE OF LEARNING ACTIVITIES.  What are potential effects of ozone depletion?  human and natural processes create the Tests: all tests throughout the year will contain greenhouse effect. timed and done in B: STUDENTS WILL UNDERSTAND  How does stratospheric ozone differ from class for an individual quiz grade. peer tropospheric ozone? THAT: graded or collaboratively worked on in  air pollutants are categorized into seven pairs. AP FRSPQ:  What has the international community 1999 #3 Air Quality done about global climate change issues?  North American lakes are negatively 2001 #3 Indoor Air Pollution affected by interactions among global 2006 #2 Atmospheric Temps warming. 12  sources of air pollution. multiple choice questions. INCLUDING THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY AND OTHER RESOURCES:  Preview the essential question and connect to learning throughout the unit. multiple substances in the Laboratory.  complete all AP Free Response Questions ozone? relevant to each unit.  What causes ozone depletion? major classes due to their composition and effect. They can be assigned as homework.  All textbook reading will be done outside of class. classroom work.  What is the importance of stratospheric  layers of the atmosphere.  Video: An Inconvenient Truth with class discussion  Air pollution PowerPoint presentation  Ozone: The Hole Story  Case study: Effects of Global Warming  Acid rain lab  Test: textbook chapters. reading excerpts and 4  How is acid deposition formed and what it part essay(s) to model the APES Test.

12 Page 32 of 31 .COURSE TITLE: Advanced Placement Environmental Science LENGTH OF COURSE: Full year CREDITS: 5 PREREQUISITES/COREQUISITES: Environmental Science or AP Biology or Honors Biology/Honors Chemistry GRADE(S): 11.