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Mariner v Handbook

Mariner v Handbook

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Published by Bob Andrepont
NASA handbook for the Mariner 5 mission to Venus.
NASA handbook for the Mariner 5 mission to Venus.

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Published by: Bob Andrepont on Jan 30, 2011
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NATIONAL AERONAUTICS A N D SPACE ADMINISI'RATION

HAMDBOOK

JET f ROPUtSlON LABORATORY California Institute of Technology May 1, 1968

PREFACE
This book prwides a convenient reference of significant technical data relative to Mariner V. It compiles a wide variety of factual information that is scattered throughout a large number of documents.

The information presented pertains primarily t o the Mariner V spacecraft itself and does not include the Launch Vehicle System, the ground support equipment, the Deep Space Network, or other areas which constitute the total Mariner Venus 67 Project. The primary Mariner V mission began on 14 June 1967 and is considered to have ended on 1 December 1967. This handbook thus becomes a log or history of the spacecraft performance from launch to end of mission; however, in the tables and figures, some orbital and performance parameters have beer; projected through 1971, inasmxh as Mariqer V spacecraft activity will continue.

iii

AB BREVIAT IONS
ADC/PNG AFETR AGC APAC A/PW CCGS DAS DC DFR DN DSCC analog-to.digital converter/pseudonoise generoior Air Force Eastern Test Range automatic gain control antenna pointing angle change analog-to-pulse width central computer and sequencer data automation subsystem direct command dual frequency receiver data number Deep Space Communication Complex Explos iveSaf e FaciIity engineering units f Iight acceptance identification h t a local oscillator pyrotechnic arming switch post-injection propulsion system power switch and logic planet senscr output quantitative command Spacecraft Assembly Facility Space Flight Operations Facility separation initiated timer spacecraft performance analysis and command static phase error type approval temperature control reference telemetry terminal peak saw tooth trapped radiation detector traveling wave tube voltage-controlled oscillator

ESF
EU FA ID LO PAS PIPS PS&L PSO QC SAF SFOF SIT SPAC SPE TA TCR TLM TPST TRD TWT

vco

iv

CONTENTS
Albedo (see Venus) Altitude . . .... .. . . .... Antenna (see Dual Frequency Receiver Antennas, High-Gain Antenna, Low-Gain Antenna) Attitude Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Battery (see Power Subsystem) Bays, Subsystem Locations in . . . . . . . . . Bit Rate ................ ...... ... Booster Regulators (see Power Subsystem) Cabling Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . Canopus Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . Canopus-Spacecraft-Sun Angle . . Cavity Arrplifier (see Radio) Celestial Latitude, Mariner V . . . . . . . . . Celestial Longitude, Earth . . . . Celestial Longitude, Mariner V . . . . . . . . . .. . . Celestial Longitude, Venus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Center of Gravity (see Spacecraft) Central Computer and Sequencer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Clock (see Central Computer and Sequencer, Data Automation Subsystem) Clock Angle . .... .. . . .... . . ....................... ..... Command Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commands (see Tables 24 and 25) Communication Times, One Way . . . . . . . . . .. . .. Comparison of Venus Missions (see Table 1) Computer (see Central Computer and Sequencer) Cone Angle ........................................... Data (see Telemetry) . . . .. .. . Data Automation Subsystem . . . . . . - . . , . . . . . . Data Encoder Subsystem . . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . Data Modes (see Telemetry) Dipole Moment of Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . Distance of Mariner Vfrom Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distance of Mariner V from Center of Venus . . . . . . . . Distance of Mariner V from Sun . . . . Distance Traveled Along Heliocentric Arc by Mariner V . . . . . . . . Dual Frequency Receiver . . . . . . . Dual Frequency Receiver Antennas . .. . . . ... . Earth Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Earth-Spacecraft-Sun Angle . . . . . . . . .. . . . Encounter . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . End of Mission . . Environmental Tests (see Tables 14-18)

. ..

. . .. . . . . . .. . . .. . .. .. ..... . .. . .. . .. . .. .

.

1
1

.

. . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .-.. . . . ..... .......... .....

2
3 3 4

..

.. . . . . . .. . .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . . . . . ... .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . ... . . . . .. . . .. .. ... .. . . . .. . .. . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .. .. . . .. . . . ...

4 5 5
5 6

6

. . . . .. .. . .. ... .. . . . . . . . .

7
7

8
8 8 8 9 9 10 10 12 12 13 14 15 15 15

. . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . .. .. .. . . .. .. .. . .. .. . .. . . . . . . . . ... . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... .. ... .. . .. . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . ... .. . . . . . ... .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. .

CONTENTS (Con t' d)
Exciters (see Radio) Experiments (see Table 6) Fields of View .......................................... Flight Event Times, 1967, GMT .............................. Flight Sequence (see Table 3) Frequency (see Radio) Fuel (see Propulsion Subsystem) Functional Block Diagrams of Subsystems (see Figs. 17-39) Gas (see Attitude Control) Gyro Control Subsystem .................................. Helium Magnetometer .................................... High-Gain Antenna ....................................... Instruments, Sciencr (see Dual Frequency Receiver, Helium hlagnetometer, Plasma Probe, Trdpped Radiation Detector, Ultraviolet Photometer) Key Milestone Summary ................................. Look Angles ........................................... Louvers k e e Temperature Control) Low-Gain Antenna ....................................... Magnetometer (see Helium Magnetometer) Mechanical Devices Subsystem ............................. Midcourse Maneuver ..................................... Midcourse Maneuver Constraints ............................ MT-1 Canopus Cone Angle Update Event ....................... MT-2 Canopus Cone Angle Update Event ....................... MT-3 Canopus Cone Angle Update Evmt ....................... MT-4 Canopus Cone Angle Update Event ....................... MT-5 Changeover to High-Gain Antenna ....................... MT-6 Changeover to 8-1/3 bps .............................. MT-7 Event (see flight Event Times, Table 25) MT-8 Begin DAS Encounter Sequence (see Flight Event Times) MT-9 Begin Piayback (see Flight Event Times) OccuItat ion Exper iment ................................... Orbit Data, Mariner V .................................... Planet Sensor .......................................... Plasma Probe .......................................... Post-Injection Propulsion Subsystem (see Propulsion Subsystem) Power Subsystem ....................................... Propulsion Subsystem .................................... Pyrotectll,rcs ........................................... Radio ................................................ Ranging .............................................. Receiver (see Radio) Redundancy (see Table 10)
vi

16 16

27 28 28

29 30
31 32 34 35 36 37 37 38
90

39

40 40 43 43

44 44 45 46 47

C 0 NTENTS (Cont’d)
Reference Designations (see Table 7) Reviews .............................................. Roll Rate ............................................. Science Subsystems ..................................... Scientific Data (see Figs. 55-54’) Sensors (see Canopus Sensor, Earth Sensor, Planet Sensor, I erminator Sensor) Separation Initiated Timer (see Mechanical Dedices Subsystem) Solar Panels ........................................... Spacecraft ............................................ Squibs (see Pyrotechnics) Star Map ............................................. Structure Subsystem ..................................... Subsystems (see Attitude Control, Cabling,- Central Computer and Sequencer, Command, Data Automation Subsystem, Data Encoder, Dual Frequency Receiver, Dual Frequency Receiver Antennas, High-Gain Antenna, Low-Gain Antenna, Mechanical Devices, Power, Propulsion, Pyrotechnics, Radio, Science, Structure, Tape Recorder, Temperature Control) Sun Gate ............................................. Sun Sensors ........................................... Tape Recorder ......................................... Telemetry ............................................. Temperature Control ..................................... Temperature Control Reference ............................. Terminator Sensor ...................................... Testing (Environmental Tests, see Tables 14-18; System Tests, see Table 19) Thermal Shields (see Temperature Control) Thrust (see Propulsion Subsystem) Time Conversion Guide (see Table 2) Timing (see Central Computer and Sequencer) Trajectory (see Figs. 40-54) Trapped Radiation Detector ................................ Traveling Wave Tube Amplifier (see Radio) Traveling Wave Tube Amplifier Changeover .................... Ultraviolet Photometer ................................... Velocity at Encounter (see Fig. 53) Velocity of Mariner V Relative to Earth ....................... Velocity of Mariner V Relative to Sun ......................... Velocity of Mariner V Relative to Venus ....................... Venus ................................................ Voltage-Controlled Oscillator (see Radio) Weight ...............................................
I

47 48 48

48 49

52 52

54 54 54 55 57 57 58

58

59 60
60 61 61 61

62
vi i

TABLES

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

6.

15.

16. 17.

18. 19. 20. 21. 22 . 23 . 24. 25 .

Comparison of Venus missions ......................... 65 Time conversion guide ............................... 66 Flight sequence .................................... 67 Mariner V ranges and velocities ........................ 73 Fartli and spacecraft positions. December 1967 throrrgh December 1971 ..................................... 75 Scierice experiments ................................. 83 Unit reference designations of components ................ 84 Electrical components ................................ 90 Mariner V launched weight. 15 .......................... 92 Redundant equipment backup sources 94 Average power loads ................................. 96 Temperature controi reference information ................ 99 Cabling subsystem engineering information ................ 100 Types of environmental tests ........................... 101 Assmbly level environmental test requirements ............. 102 System level environmental test requirements .............. 103 Subsystem environmental test summary (vibration and thermal-vacuum) .................................... 104 System level environmental test summary ................. 104 Spacecraft tests .................................... 104 Launch environmental telemetry channel assignment 105 Telemetry channel assignment .......................... 106 Time between telemetry samples ........................ 114 List of commands ................................... 115 Description of commands ............................. 116 CC&S commands .................................... 120

....................

..........

FIGURE?
l a. Mariner V spacecraft. earthward ........................ l b . Mariner V spacecraft. sunward .......................... 2a . Spacecraft mechanical configuration. earthward. solar panels extended ................................ 2b. Spacecraft mechanical configuration. side view. solar panels folded .................................. 2c . Spacecraft mechanical configuration. sunward .............. 3a. Packaging diagram. power subsystem. electronics assembly I 3b . Packaging diagram. science electronics. electronics assembly 111 ....................................... 3c . Packaging diagram. data encoder and command. electronics assembly IV ....................................... 3d. Packaging diagram. receiver and tape recorder. electronics assembly V ........................................
viii

125 126

127
128 129

... 130
131 132 133

FIGURES (Cont’d)
3e. Packaging diagram, RF communications, electronics assembly VI ....................................... 134 3f. Betailed view, electronics assembly VI .................... 135 3g. Packaging diagram, attitude control and CC&S, electronics 136 assembly VI1 ....................................... 3h. Packaging diagram, power regulator assembly, electrmics assembly V l l l .............................. 3 37 4. Attirude control gas jet configuration ..................... 138 5. Cone and clock angle convention ........................ 139 6. Spacecraft antenna coordinate system .................... 10 4 7. Canopus sensor cone angle update ...................... 141 8. Earth sensor field of view ............................. 142 9. Earth sensor calibration .............................. 143 10. Terminator sensor encounter geometry ................... 144 11. Solar panel maximim power vs time from launch ............ 145 12a. Output of exgerirnental solar cell Isc ..................... 146 12b. Output of experimental alar cell lsCR .................... 147 12c. Output of experimental solar cell Voc .................... 148 13. Bus temperatures vs time from launch .................... 149 14. Sunlit component temperatures vs time from launch .......... 149 15. Shaded component temperatures vs time from launch ......... 150 16a. Telecommunications performance analysis, uplink, 85-ft-diami!te r ant enn a ............................... 15 1 16b. Telecommunications performance analysis, downlink, 152 85-ft-diameter antenn a ............................... 153 17. Radio system .................................... 154 18. Command subsystem ................................. 19. Command format .................................... 155 20. Power subsystem ................................... 156 21. CC&S subsystem .................................... 158 160 22. Data encoder subsystem .............................. 23. Mariner V engineering telem2try commutation .............. 161 24. Attitude control subsystem ............................ 162 25. Pyrotechnics subsystem .............................. 164 26. Temperature control, cabling, and mechanical devices subsystems ........................................ 165 166 27. Propulsion subsystem ................................ 167 28. Tape recorder subsystem .............................. 168 29. Tape recorder format ................................ 30. Data automation subsystem ............................ 169 170 31. DAS real time k r m a t ................................ 170 32. DAS real time status bits ............................. 33. DAS encounter sequence.. ............................. 171 34. Trapped radiation detector subsystem .................... 172
ix

FIGURES (Cont’d)
35. 36 . 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42 . 43 . 44. 45. 46 . Plasrra probe subsystem .............................. 173 Helium magnetometer subsystem ....................... 174 176 ’“traviolet photometer subsystem ....................... Dual frequency receiver subsystem ...................... 178 Dual frequency receiver antennas subsystem ............... 18C Injection eriergy C, vs Isunzh date ...................... 181 Aiming zone and constraint regions for 14 June i967. launch ... 182 Heliocentric trajectory on ecliptic plane for 14 June 1967. launch ................................ 183 Clock angle of earth. launch through 1971 ................. 184 Cone angle of earth. launch through 1971 ................. 185 Cone angle of Canopus. launch through 1971 ............... 186 Distance traveled along heliocentric arc. launch through 1971 ...................................... 187 Spacecraft distance from earth. launch through 1971 ......... 1€8 Spacecraft distance from Venus. launch through 1971 ........ 189 spacecraft distance frdm sun. launch through 1971. 190 linear graph ....................................... Spacecraft distance from sun. lailnch through 1971. rotating coordinate system with fixed stin-earth line ............... 191 Spacecraft celzstial latitude. launch through 1971 ........... 192 Spacecraft celestial longitude. launch through 1971 .......... 193 Mariner V Venus track with respect to fixed radar features ..... 194 Encounter velocities and altitude ........................ 195 Time and position of key encounter events ................ 195 Refractivity as a function of height in the Venus atmosphere ... 197 Signal amplitudes at two frequencies during occultation ....... 198 199 Gas weight history ..................................

47 . 48 . 49a .
49b . 50. 51. 52 . 53. 54. 55 . 5s . 57 .

X

AL'BEDO (see Venus)

ALTITUDE above Venus at clovst approach
above Venus during encountei (see Fig. 53) above earth and Vems during mission (see Tabie 4 and Figs. 47-18) above Venus at closest approacb A o r to midcourse maneuver

4,094 km 2,544 mi

69,675 km 43,290 mi

ANTENNA (see Dual Frequency Receiver Antennas, High-Gain Antenna, low-Gain Anienna) ATTITUDE CONTROL (see also Canopus Sensor, Earth Sensor, 6yro Control Subsystem, Planet Sensor, Sun Sensors, Terminator Sensor) CCW roll valve operation inhibit time derived rate time constants charge pitch and yaw roll discharqe pitcll and yaw roll dynamic operation minimum valve on time minimum rate increment (2-valve operation) pitch and yaw

30-35 s

15.5 s 9s 119 s 18 s

20 ms
19 prad/s 14 prad/s 1.4 x 1.8 x 1261 Bay VI1
Ib Ib

roll
gas weight flow (per valve operation) pitch and yav roll electrical components, number ot (see also Table 8) electronics, location of flight nozzle thrust levels (at 15 psi) pitch and yaw

roll
gas pressure vessel, diameter pressure vessel designed nitrogen capacity (2 each) pressurization in vessels weight at launch weight history (see fig. 57)

2.25 x Ib 3.86 x lo-' Ib
9 in.

2.60 Ib 2500 k300 psi at
7OoF 5.2 Ib

1

ATTITUDE C ONTRO 1 (Cont’d) gas jets number of location of (see Fig. 4) gas valve firing power per valve response time to open response time to close valve inlet pressure gyro operation time after Canopus sensor acquires an object pitch and yaw position deadband rate deadband ref erence de s igna t ion s of s ubasse mb1 ie s (see Table 7) rol I position deadband rate deadband roll rate magnetometer calibration Canopus search steady-state operation acceleration constants (2-valve operation) pitch and yaw roll torque constants (2-valve operation) pitch and yaw roll gas weight flow rate (per valve) pitch and yaw rolI thrust levels (see fl’-ht nozzle, above) weight, subsystem \see also Table 9) accelerometer gas systems gyro control and electronics jet vane actuatui assembly senso r s
BATTERY (see Power Subsystem) BAYS, SUBSYSTEM LOCATIONS IN
attitude colttrol and central computer and sequencer
2

12

2.14 W 8 ms 3.5 ms 15 k1.2 psi
205 s (typical)

k9.0 mrad k1.1 mrad/s

t4.5 mrad
e 0 . 3 mrad/s 3.5 mrad/s 2.0 mrad/s

0.48 mrad/s* 0.43 rnrad/s’ 36 x 56 x
ft-lb ft-lb

3.21 x
5.54 x
56.98 Ib 0.07 Ib 26.68 Ib 18.99 Ib 3.26 Ib 7.58 Ib

Ib/s Ib/s

Bay VI1

BAYS, SUBSYSTEM LOCATIONS IN (Cont’d)
data encoder and command subsystem power and pyrotechnic control power rzgulator and battery propulsion RF communicatiors (transmitter) RF comnlunicatic;rls (receiver) and tape recorder scientific equipment and data autoniation subsystem Bay IV Bay I Bay Vlll Bay II Bay VI Bay V Bay Ill

BIT RATE
at launch capability changeover t o 8-1/3 bps (see MT-6 and Table 25) 33-1/3 bps 33-1/3 and 8-1/3 bps

BOOSTER RECULATORS (see Power Subsystem) CABLING SUBSYSTEM
engineerirlg information (see Table 13) quantity assembled cables connector pins el ectr i cal connectors harnesses wires wire shields wire splices reference designation of subassemblies (see Table 7) type of conductor power leads signal leads type of insulation

30 7800 290
30

3100
227 26 7

#22 AWG silverplated copper $22 AWG silverplated copper alloy tape-wrapped TFE Teflon, nominal 10-mil thickness, treated for bondability

weight of subsystem, excluding support hardware (see also Table 9) weight of support hardware

43.63 Ib 3.57 Ib
3

CANOPUS SENSOR acquisition levels (star in view) acquisition gate on
acquisition gate off cone angle of Canopiis at lamck! cone angle change incier,.ent cone angle limits cone angle settings !see also Fig. 7) preset MT-1 MT-2 MT-3 MT-4 optional electron aperfuie di nensions field of view cone directiorl clock directior. excursion of conP tield of view focal length light level required for 1.0 x Canopus I inear range nuli accuracy operating range power requ Ire1 : reference designation of unit roll zearch rate of spacecraft for star acquisition scale factor sensitivity threshold speed effective geornetr ic sun shutter turn-on level tu rn-off level weight (see also Table 7 :

>0.3 x Canopus brightness c0.25 x Canopus brightness 76-77 deg 5.125 deg 74.5-1 11.2 deg

80 deg 85.1 deg 90.3 deg 95.4 deg 100.5 deg 105.7 deg 0.160 x 0.012 in.

11 deg 4 deg 25 deg 0.8 in. 0.5 x

ft-cd

k0.85 deg
0.125 deg 35-1 GOo F 1.45 W 7CS8

2.0 mrad/s 8 V/deg +20% 0.02 x Canopus brightness f/1.0

f/0.6
1000 k 2 0 0 ft-cd 600 ft-cd 6.28 Ib 14 Jun 19 Jun 76.9 deg 76.7 deg 76.6 deg

CANOPUS-SPACECRA?T-SUN ANGLE injection midcourse maneuver changeover to traveling wave tube amplifier
4

27 Jun

CANOPUS-SPACECRAFT-SUN

ANGLE (Cont'd)
24 Jul 24 Aug 10 Sep 26 Sep 1 Oct 10 Oct 10 Oct 19 Oct 1 Dec 78.0 deg 83.2 deg 87.8 deg 93.3 deg 95.0 deg S8.0 deg 98.0 deg 100.6 deg 102.4 deg

MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps MT-1 Canopus cone angle update MT-2 Canopus cone angle update MT-3 Canopus cone angle update MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna MT-4 Canopus cone angle update DC-V15 Canopus gate override closest approach end of mission from end of mission through 1971 (see Fig. 45)

CAVITY AMPLIFIER (see Radio) CELESTIAL LATITUDE, MARINER V (see also injection midcourse maneuver c!iageover to traveliiig wave tube amp1if ier MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps MT-1 Canopus cone angle update MT-2 Canopus cone angle update MT-3 Canopus cone angle update MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna MT-4 Canopus cone angle update closest approach end of mission from end of mission through 1971 (see Table 5) CELESTIAL LON6ITUDE, EARTH injection midcourse maneuver changeover to traveling wave tube amplifier MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps MT-1 Canopus cone angle update MT-2 Canopus cone angle update MT-3 Canopus cone angle update MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna MT-4 Canopus cone angle update closest approach end of mission

Fig. 50) 14 Jun 19 Jun
27 Jun 24 !ul 24 Aug 10 Sep 26 Sep 1Oct 10 Oct 19 Oct 1 Dec

0.00 deg -0.26 deg
-0.55 deg - 1.63 deg -2.52 deg -2.65 deg -2.37 deg -2.19 deg - 1.73 deg - 1.13 deg 0.35 deg

27 Jun 274.7 deg 24 Jul 300.9 deg 24 Aug 330.6 deg 10 Sep 346.6 deg 26 Sep 2.7 deg 1 Obt 7.6 deg 10 Oct 16.5 deg 19 Oct 25.7 deg 1 Dec 68.1 deg

CELESTIAL LONGITUDE, MARINER V (see also Fig. 51) injection 14 Jun 262.5 deg
5

CELESTIAL LONGITUDE, MARINER V (Cont'd) midcourse maneuver changeover to traveling wave tube amplifier MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps MT-1 Canopus cone angle update MT-2 Canopus cone angle update MT-3 Canopus cone angle update MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna MT-4 Canopus cone angle updzte closest approach end of mission from end of mission through 1971 (see Table 51 CELESTIAL LONGITUDE, VENUS launch midcourse maneuver changeover to traveling wave tube amplifier MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps MT-1 Canopus cone angle update MT-2 Canopus cone angle update MT-3 Canopus cone angle update MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna MT-4 Canopds cone angle update closest approach end of mission CENTER OF GRAVITY (see Spacecraft) CENTRAL COMPUTER AND SEQUENCER
basic timing frequency output central clock oscillator frequency frequency stabiiiiy command descriptions (see Table 24) commands launch phase m i d c w s e maneuver phase cruise phase encounter phase midcourse meneuver turn timing cyclic, wery 66-?/3 h commands, number of
6

19 Jun

267.5 deg

27 Jun 273.8 deg 24 Jul 299.5 deg 24 Aug 333.3 deg 10 Sep 354.5 deg 26 Sep 18.5 deg 26.4 deg 1 oc: 10 Oct 41.1 deg 19 Oct 56.9 deg 1 Dec 129.6 deg

14 Jun 19 Jun 27 Jun 24 Jui 24 Aug 10 Sep 26 Sep 1 Oct 10 Oct 19 Oct 1 Dec

214.2 deg 223.4 deg 234.6 deg 278.3 deg 327.3 deg 353.5 deg 19.7 deg 27.7 deg 42.1 deg 56.9 deg '125.2 deg

38.4

kHz

307.2 kHz +0.010! at -10 to +75"C

L-1-L-3
M-1-M-7 MT-1-MT-6 MT-7-MT-9 TM2-B CY-1 21

CENTRAL COMPUTER AND SEQUENCER (Cont’d)
electrical components, number of (see also Table 8) frequency outputs to power to radio location on spacecraft power required (2.4-kHz square wave) during boost during cruise reference designations of subassemblies (see Table 7) voltages required for operatior, input (2.4-kHz square wave) internal dc voltages

257G
38.4 kHz 1 pulse/66-2/3 h Bay VI1

10.5 W ~ 1 0 % 4.5 w -+lo%

weight (see also Table 9)

50 Vac k 2 0 % 65 YdC +20% 28 VdC AZO% 16 Vdc t 2 0 % 12.23 Ib

CLOCK (see Central Computer and Sequencer, Data Automation Subsystem) CLOCK ANGLE explanation of (see Fig. 5) COMMAND SUBSYSTEM command bit rate command format (see Fig. 19) electrical components, number of (see also Table 8) location on spacecraft number of bits per command word number of direct commands (DC! number of significant bits per DC command address parity bits command bits number of quantitative commands (QC) (see also Table 24) n m b e r C J ~significant bits per QC command power tequirpd, nominal reference designations of subassemblies (see Table 7) subsystems using commands attitude control central computer and sequencer {includes QC commands) data automation subsystem

1 bps 2615
Bay IV

26
29 11

2 9
1 (3) 26 3.6 W

8

2 2
7

COMMAND SUBSYSTEM (Cont'd) subsystems using commands (cont'd) data encoder power pyrotechrtic radio tape recorder weif,ht (see also Table 9) COMMa'NDS
comrnad descriptions (see Tables 24 and 25)

5 4 6 6 1 10.37 Ib

COMMUNICATION TIMES, ONE WAY
midcourse maneuver changeover to traveling wave tube amplifier MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps MT-1 Canopus cone angle update MT-2 Canopus cone angle update MT-3 Canopus cone angle update MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna MT-4 Canopus cone angle update closest approach end of mission 19 Jun 27 Jun 24 Jul 24 Aug 10 Sep 26 Sep 1 Oct 10 Oct 19 Oct 1 Dec 5.27 s 11.27 s 35.4 s 1 min, 18 s 1 min, 56 s 2 min, 49 s 3 min, 8 s 3 min, 45 s 4 min, 26 s 7 min, 20 s

COMPUTER (see Central Computer and Sequencer) CONE ANGLE
explanation of (see Fig. 5) update mechanics (see Canopus Sensor and Fig. 7)

DATA (see Telemetry) DATA AUTOMATION SUBSYSTEM electrical components, nvmber af (includes components in analog/pulse width converters; see also Table 8) location on spacecraft power required reference designations of subassemblies (see Table 7) telemetry fcrmat (see Figs. 29, 31, 32 and 33) weight (see aiso Table 9) DATA ENCODER SUOSYSTEM number of bits in binary engineering wcrds

1173 Bay 111 11.0 w

14.60 Ib

7

a

DATA ENCODER SUBSYSTEM (Cont’d)
number of commutator channels electrical components, number of (see also Table 8) location on spacecraft power required reference designations of subassemblies (see Table 7) telemetry commutation (see Fig. 23) telemetry format (see Telemetry) time between samples (see Table 22) weight (see also Table 9)

100
7585 Bay IV 8.75 W, av 9.04 W, peak

23.40 !b

DATA MODES (see Telemetry)

DIPOLE MOMENT OF EARTH

8.06 x

loz5G/cm3

DISTANCE OF MARINER V FROM EARTH (see also Fig. 47)
weekly intervals during flight (see Table 4) midcourse maneuver changeover to traveling wave tube amplifier MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps

19 Jun

1,581,615 km 982,770 mi 3,380,808 km 2,100,737 mi 10,622,390 km 6,600,447 mi 23,342,070 km 14,503,469 mi 34,915,052 km 21,695,207 mi 50,836,609 km 31,588,404 mi 56,494,636 km 35,104,139 mi 67,503,928 km 41,944,996 mi 79,764,757 km 49,563,522 mi 131,902,210 km 81,960,233 mi

27 Jun 24 ful 24 Aug 10 Sep 26 Sep

MT-1 Canopus cone angle update MT-2 Canopus cone angle update

MT-3 Canopus cone angle update
MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna MT4 Canopus cone angle update closest approach end of mission from end of mission through Dec 1971 (see Table 5) at closest approach, 27 Oct 1968

1 Oct
10 Oct 19 Oct

1 Dec

38,995,007 km 24,230,374 mi
9

UISTANCE OF MARINER V FROM CENTER OF VENUS (see also Fiw. 48)
launch midcourse maneuver changeover to traveling wave tube amplifier MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bgs MT.1 Canopus cone angle update MT-2 Canopus cone angle update MT-3 Canopus cone angle update MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna 14 JUI! 19 Jun 113,721,860 km 70,663,486 mi 105,427,870 krn 65,509,840 mi 95,255,438 krn 59,188,984 mi 57,234,319 km 35,563,756 mi 24,201,792 krn 15,038,296 mi 13,212,249 km 8,209,711 mi 6,522,823 km 4,053,094 mi 5,027,392 km 3,123,839 mi 2,564,426 km 1,593,460 mi 10,150 km 6,307 mi 15,669,615 km 9,736,648 mi

27 Jun 24 Jul 24 Aug 10 Sep 26 Sep

1 Oct
10 Oct 19 Oct
1 Dec

PT4 Canopus cone angle update
closest approach end of mision

DISTANCE OF MARINER V FROM SUN (see also Fig. 49) weekly intervals during flight (see Table 4) launch 14 Jun 151,945,190 km 94,414,363 mi midcourse maneuver 19 Jun 151,283,640 km 94,003,294 mi changeover to traveling wave tube 27 Jun 150,219,090 km amplifier 93,341,817 mi MT-6 changeover ta 8-1/3 bps 24 Jul 142,858,570 km 88,768,201 mi MT-1 Canopus cone angle update 24 Aug 129,662,lN km 80,568,343 mi MT-2 Canopus cone angle update 10 Sep 121,731,330 km 75,640,340 mi

The Mariner V structural test model setup f o r the lateral axis vibration test at JPL
10

OlSTkNCE OF MARINER V FROM SUN (Cont’dl MT-3 Canopus cone angle update 26 Sep 114,470,020 km 71,128,374 mi MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna 1 Oct 112,609,670 km t9,972,406 mi MT4 Canopus cone angle update 10 Oct 109,869,090 km 68,269,484 mi closest approach 19 Oct 108,038,200 km 67,113,186 mi end of mission 1 Dec 94,415,846 km 58,,67,282 mi from end of mission throu:lh 1971 (see Table 5) DISTANCE TRAVELEQ ALONG HELIOCENTRIC ARC BY MARINER V (see also Fig, 46) midcourse rmeuver 19 Jun 13,265,932 kri, 5,243.052 mi changeover to traveling wave 27 Jun 3 1,052,281 krr tube amplifier 19,294,993 mi MT-6 chavgeover to %1/3 bps 24 l u l 96,431,352 km 59,919,664 mi MT-1 Cancpus cone angle update 24 Aug 1!7,752,162 Icm 110,472,630 mi MT-2 Canopus cone angle update 10 Sep 226,342,582 km 140,642,760 mi MT-3 Campus cone angle update 26 Sep ~74,839,713km 1/0,777,480 mi MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenrra 1 Oct 30,516,461 km i8O,Si8,560 n? MT-4 Cancipus cone angle update i . . 319,265,219 kn! 198,382,210 mi c !osest approach j 9 Oct 349,248,682 km 21 7,013,070 mi end of mission 1 Dec 479,293,269 km 297,819,030 mi in one complete revolistion around sun, 685,431,149 kin 1 Jan 1968 425,907,’70 mi

.

U”

DUAL FREQUENCY RECEIVER dsta rate (cruise)
data rate (encounter) electrical components, number of (see also Table 8)
12

1.51 bps !high) 0.38 bps Clow) 70 bps 1274

DUAL FREQUENCY RECEIVER (Cont’dj frequency
intermediate input im2edance power input 2.4-kHz power consumption (nominal) location oti spacecraft noise terxperature, antenna terminals 423.3 MHz 49.8 MHZ temperature ranges desired operatirlg range operating limits, worst case nonoperating limits, stored, power off threshold sensitivity 423.3 MHz 49.8 MHt weight (see also Table 9) cables clamps and holders fil;ers receiver

423.3 MHz 49.8 MHz 24.2 MHz 50 ohms 2.4 kHz, 50 V rials, 1 CP square wave 2.0 w Bay 111

1500°K 83000K +10 to +3OoC -10 to + 7 5 o c -45 to +85OC
-136.2 dBm -129.2 dBrn 6.83 Ib 0.65 Ib 0.15 Ib 0.93 Ib 5.10 Ib

DUAL FREQUENCY RECEiVER ANTENNAS impedance (nominal) input frequencies VHF UHF maximum gain (relative to linear isotropic) VHF, at 49.8 MHz (referenced to base of coaxial tee) UHF, at 423.3 MHz (referenced to antenna mast connector) line loss (see Fig. 39) VHF (from base of tee to receiver) UHF (from antenna mast connector to receiver) mode poIar iza t ion VHF UHF

50 ohms 49.8 MHZ 423.3 MHz

0.0 t 2 . 5 dB
+6.0 k1.5 dB

1.0 dB
0.9 dB receive only linear linear
13

DUAL FREQUENCY RECEIVER ANTENNAS (Cont'd) radiation pattern, VHF beam shape (in plane, normal to RF boresight)
bearnwidth at -3 dB, majw axis of pattern bearnwidth at -3 dB, rniiior axis of pattern RF boresight relative to direction of earth at encounter radiation pattern, UHF beam shape beamwidth at -3 dB HF boresight cone angle at encountei type (see also Fig. 39) VHF

approximately elliptical 140 deg

55 deg
within 30 deg approximately circular 55 deg 15 deg integral with spacecraft solar panel structure employing a shunt feed of two panels stub radiator (approximately h/4 long) with 2 reflector elements over 4 ground plane radials mounted on end of solar panel less than 1.5 to 1 less than 1.5 to 1 0.94 Ib 0.21 Ib ea 0.52 Ib

UHF

voltage standing wave ratio VHF, at 49.8 MHz UHF, at 423.3 MHz weight, total (see also Table 9) VHF (feed units) UHF

EARTH SENSOR calibration (see Fig. 9) field of view (see also Fig. 8) cone direction clock direction look angle, cone direction look angle, clock direction reference designation of instrument sensitivity threshold
14

50 deg
3 deg 132 deg 270 deg 7ED6 0.001 ft-cd

EARTH-SPACECRAFT-SUN ANGLE midcourse maneuver changeover to trawling wave tube amplifier MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps MT-1 Canopus cone angle update MT-2 Canopus cone angle update MT-3 Canopus cone angle update MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna MT-4 Canapus cone angle update closest approach end of mission ENCOUNTER date day of flight time, GMT communication time (one way) earth-spacecraft-sun angle Canopus-s pace c raf t-su n angIe spacecraft celestial longitude spacecraft celestial latitude earth celestial longitude Venus celestid longitude spacecraft distance from earth
spacecraft distance from sun distance traveled along heliocentric arc spacecraft distance from center of Venus spacecraft altitude above Venus surface spacecraft velccity relative to earth spacecraft velocity relative to Venus spacecraft velocity relative to sun

19 lun 27 lun 24 Jul 24 Aug 10 Sep 26 Sep 1 Oct 10 Oct 13 Oct 1 Dec

117.1 deg
122.7 deg 147.9 deg 155.7 deg 141.6 deg 125.8 deg 121.0 deg 112.5 deg 104.0 deg 79.5 deg

19 Oct 1967 127 17:34:56 4 min, 26 s 104.0 deg 100.6 deg 56.9 deg -1.13 deg 25.7 deg 56.9 deg 79,764,368 km 49,563,280 mi 108,008,250 km 67,113,211 mi 349,247,530 krn 217,011,940 mi iOJ50.0 km 6,306.9 mi 4,094 km 2,544 rrii 56,706 nph 19,157 mph 85,003 mph

END OF MISSION date day of flight communication time (one way) earth-spacecraft-sun angle Canopus-spacec r aft-sun angle spacecraft celestial longitude

1 Dec 1967 170 7 min, 20 s 79.5 deg 102.4 deg 128.6 deg
15

END OF MISSION (Cont'd) spacecraft celestial latitude earth celestial longitude Venus celestial longitude spacecraft distance from earth
spacecraft distance from sun spacecraft distance from Venus distance traveled along heliocentric arc spacecraft velocity relative to earth spacecraft velocity relative to Venus spacecraft velocity relative to sun number of cormands sent

0.35 deg 68.1 deg 125.2 deg 131,502,210 km 81,960,233 mi 94,415,840 km 58,667,282 mi 15,669,615 km 9,736,648 mi 479,293,269 km 297,819,030 mi 86,224 mph 16,655 mph 85,513 mph
94

ENVIRONMENTAL TESTS (see Tables 14-1 $1 EXCITERS (see Radio) EXPERIMENTS (see Table 6) FIELDS OF VIEW Canopus sensor cone direction clock direction earth sensor cone direction clock direction planet sensor (aligned +41"4' clock) plasma probe
sun gate sun sensors primary sensors secondary sensors terminator sensor cone direction clock direction trapped radiation detectors

11 deg 4 deg
50 deg 3 deg 4.55 x 1.55 deg 30-deg half-angle

cone
2.2-deg ha1f-angIe cone

t 2 deg, each axis 4~ sr
2.5 deg 1.5 deg 180 deg

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT launch of Mariner V liftoff Atlas booster engine cutoff Atlas booster separation
16

14 J u ~ 06:Ol:OO

06:03:09 06:03: 12

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT (Cont’d) launch of Mariner V (cont’d) Atlas sustainer engine cutoff Atlas vernier engine cutoff shroud ejection Atlas/Agena separation Agena first burn ignition Agena first burn cutoff in parking orbit Agena second burn ignition Agena second burn cutoff Agena/spacecraft separation solar panels deployed Agena posigrade maneuve: sun acquisition start sun acquisition complete Canopus acquisition DC-V21 transmitted DC-V21 transmitted Canopus acquired cyclics, CC&S CY-1 (occur every 66-2/3 h) CC&S CY-1 NO. 1 midcourse maneuver QC-V1-1 transmitted QC-V1-2 transmitted QC-V1-3 transmitted DC-V29 transmitte d DC-V14 t ransmitted DC-V27 transmitted end of motor burn sun acquisition start sun acquisition complete Canopus acquired CCW 360-deg roll searches (UV data) DC-V2 1 transmitted Canopus acquired DC-V21 transmitt ed Canopus acquired DC-V21 transmitted Canopus acquired stabilization to cruise mode minimum QC-V1-1 transmitted minimum QC-V 1-2 tr ansm itte d mini rnum QC-V 1-3 transmitted

14 Jun

06:05:57 06:06:18 06:06:20 06:06:22 06:07:22 06 :09 :46 06:09:46 06 :23 :O1 06 :24 :36 0627:17 06:30:19 06 :32 :17 06:33:50 06 :43 :25

15 Jun

00:30:00
00:34: 00 0 1:09 :13 21:58:07

19 Jun

20:18:00 20:23:00 20:28:00 20:38:00 20:48:00 21:23:57 23:08:28 23: 1 4 : l l 23:21:24 23:32:19 23:33:15 00:23:58 00:25:00 01:16:54 0 1:17:50 02:06:15 02:19:00 02:24:00

20 Jun

02:29:00
17

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT (Cont’d) ranging (lunar) from midcourse to TWT changeover DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 3 (switch ranging receiver off) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 4 (switch ranging receiver off) DC49 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver off) transmitted

20 Jun

02:39:00

21 J u ~ 11:18:14 19:25:00 24 Juri 25 Jun 05:58:27 03:08:00

26 J u ~ 23:45:00

changeover to TWT power amplifier DC-V7 transmitted switch battery charger off DC-V28 transmitted ranging (lunar) to changeover to ranging (planetary) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 6 (switch ranging receiver off) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 7 (switch ranging receiver off) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 9 (switch ranging receiver off) ranging (pianetary) to MT-6 event DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 10 (switch ranging receiver off) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 15 (switch ranging receiver off)

27 lun

00:28:00

00:58:00

01:18:OO

28 Jun 30 lun

1S.18:35 19:45:00 13:58:45

2 JuI
6 JuI 8 lul

00:30:00
03:18:53

19:30:00 10 l ~ l 21:59:09

22 JuI
24 Jul

01:35:00 19:19:21

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT (Cont’d) MT-6, switch bit rate to 8-1/3 bps CC&S MT-6 ranging (planeiary) to MT-1 event DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 17 (switch ranging receiver off) MT-1, Cmopus cone angle update to 85.125 deg MT-2, Canopus cone angle update to 90.25 deg MT-3, Canopus cone angle update to 95.375 deg MT-5, changeover to high-gain antenna ranging (planetary) to MT-4 DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 42 (switch ranging receiver off) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver off) transmitted MT-4, Canopus cone angle update to 100.5 deg Canopus gate inhibit override DC-V15 transmitted ranging (planetary) to encounter DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 44 (switch ranging receiver off) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 45 (switch ranging receiver off) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted CC&S CY-1 No. 46 (switch ranging recei1:er offl encounter sequence DC-V25 transmitted

24 Jul

19:19:21

27 Jul 29 Jul

16:40:00 08:40 :20

24 Aug 08:41:33

10 Sep

OO:41:52

26 Sep 16:42:43 1Oct 16:43:33.8

5 Oct 7 Oct 9 Oct
10 Oct

23:55:00 19:23:39 22 :oo :oo 13:50:OO 14:04:14.4 14:25:00

14:30 :00 13 Oct 08:44:33.9

12 :42 :00
16 Oct 17 Gct 18 Oct 19 Oct 03:24:53.8 16:lO:OO 22:05:13.9 02:49:00
19

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT (Cont’d) encounter sequence (cont’d) OC-V25 observed on earth terminator sensor status verified nominal magnetometer calibration MT-7 (backup to DC-V25) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted DC-V9 observed on earth DC-V24 transmitted MT-8, DAS encounter sequence start

19 Oct

02:58:25 03:I 1:39.3 04: 11:00 04:45:05.8 08:50:00 08:59:38.8 10:50:OO 11:25:03.6 15:01:43 15:ll:OO 15:11:36 16:33:57* 16:37:59* 16:40:00 16:46:46 16:49: 17 16:56:00 17 :O1:00 17:12:OO 17:14:57* 17: 18:09* 17:34: 56 17:38:09 17:38:10 17:39:00

DC -V 16 Iransm iit e d DAS clock A enable DC-V16 observed on earth planet sensor output (PSO) science frame 98 PSO terminated DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver off) transmitted track 2 record start DC-V9 observed on earth plasma changzs indicating the magnetopause

PSO in science frames 148-152
PSO terminated, xience frame 153 closest approach (40S4 km) enter S-band occultation (closed-loop receiver) enter DFR occultation (49.8 MHz) enter DFR occultation (423.3 MHz) enter S-band occultation (open-loop receiver) terminator sensor output, science frame 185 exit S-band occultation exit DFR occultation (423.3 MHz) exit GFR occultation (49.8 MHz) dual frequency receiver lockup antenna pointing angle change (APAC) backup
*Times given are

17 :42 :05
17:46:49 17 :59 :59 18:C0:31 18:00:51 18:03: 13 18:19:10

Ifl 25 s.

20

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT (Cont’d) encounter sequence (cont’d) end of track 2 data tape recorder off (frame 251) DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver on) transmitted DC-V9 observed on earth roll transient observed roll transient observed

29 Oct

18:34:18 18:41:51 19:oo:oo 19:09:30 20:40: 12 00:40:28 07:25:23.4 07:26:12 07:44:33 08:00:36 0,Q:04:50 08: 15:38

20 Oct

playback MT-9, switch to data mode 4 switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4, begin track 1 test pattern switch to data mode 1 roll transient observed switch to data mode 4, beginnine of prelaunch data begin track 1 Venus encounter data end of tape No. 1, switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4, all ones switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4, begin track 2 test pattern switch to data mode 1 switch ts data mode 4, begin track 2 Venm encounter data switcn to data mode 1 DC-V9 (switch ranging recziver on) transmitted DC-V9 observed on earth end of tape No. 2, switch to data r o d e 4, begin second playback switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4, begin track 1 test pattern switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4, beginning of prelaunch data begin track 1, Venus encounter data end of tape No. 3, switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4, all ones switch to data mode 1

oa:i 732
21 Oct 01:13:01 01:14:28 91:14:35

01:32:59 01:49:03
03:5a:oa 18: 18:30
1a:45:00 18:54:44

ig:ia:i7 19:19:54

1w a : 0 8 19:54:14
20:09:32 20: 11:45 22 Oct 13:06:52 13:08:20 13:08:28
21

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT (Cont'd) playback (cont'd) switch to data mode 4, begin track 2 test pattern switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4, begin track 2 of Venus encounter data switch to data mode 1 end of tape No. 4, begin thVd playback switch to data mode 4, begin track 1 test pattern switch to data mode 1 DC-V2 transmitted (switch to data mode 2) switch to data mode 4, beginning of prelaunch data D C W observed, switch to data mode 2, stop playback 13 s before start of track 1 Venus encounter data DC-V28 transmitted DC-V28 observed on earth switch bit rates DC-V5 No. 1 transmitted, switch to 33-1/3 bps rate DC-V5 No. 1 observed on earth DC-V5 Na. 2 transmitted, switch to &1/3 t p s rate DC-V5 Nc. 2 observed on earth attitude control subsystem returned to normal optical control DC-VI9 transmitted DC-VI9 observed on earth turn off battery charger D W 2 8 transmitted D C - W observed on earth
switch ranging receiver on DC-V9 transmitted DC-V9 observed on earth switch ranging receiver off C Z S CY-1 NO. 53 three-roll exercise for ultraviolet photometer DC-V26 transmitted
22

?? Oct

13:26:03 13:42:06

23 Oct

15:51:29 t6:11:50
07:11:39 07:31:31 07:47:3 1 07:55:00 08:02:54

08:04. j 4 08:25:00 08:35:27

25 Oct

16:30:00 16:39:32 20:35:00 23:44:33

26 Oct

20:55:00
21:05:56

2 1:12:30 21:23:5l
4 NOV
16:35:00 16:45:46

7 NOV 08:46:26

09: 15:00

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT (Cont’d) three-roll exercise for ultraviolet photometer (cont’d) 7 Nov 09:20:00 DC-VZ5 transmitted 09:26:47 DC-V26 observed on earth 09:31:51 DC-V25 observed on earth 10:13:0C DC-VI6 transmitted 10:24:47 DC-V1G observed on eartk 10:30:00 DC-V2 transmitted IO :42:09 DC-V2 observed on earth 12:16:10 DC-V21 No. 1 transmitted 12:17:10 DC-V12 No. 1 transmitted [spacecraft did not receive this commandi DC-VZl No. I (start of roll) observed 12 :2 7 :54 on earth 13: 12:46 DC-V21 b.2 transmitted 13:13:OO Canopus acquired 13:ZO:OO DC-V12 No. 2 transmitted 13:24:30 DC-V21 No. 2 observed on earth 13:25:00 DC-V12 No. 3 transmitted 13:32:00 DC-V12 No. 2 observed on earlr! 13:37:00 DC-V12 No. 3 observed on earth 14:02:00 DC-V21 NG. 3 transmitted 14:OG:OO DC-V21 No. 4 transmitted 14:11:25 Canopus acquired 14:33:30 end of tape (record sequence) 15:15:00 DC-VI0 transmitted 15:26:07 DC-V10 observed on earth
playback of ultraviolet photometer data DC-V4 transmitted DC-V4 observed on earth switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4 switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4 end of tape, data mode 1 switch to data mode 4 switch to data mode 1 switch to data modL 4 DC-V2 transmitted DC-V2 observed on earth D W transmitted E DC44 observed on earth w i t c h to data mode 1 end of tape, data mode 4

8 NOV 21:OO:OO 21:ll :Erg 21:12:23 21:51:44 2 1:47:41 22:03:08 9 NOV 15:00:04 15: 19: 15 15:35:16 17:45:54 19:45:00 19: 57 :07 10 NOV 05:OO:OO 05:12:25 17:21:17 18:19:08
23

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967. 6MT (Cont’d) playback of ultraviolet photometer data (cont’d) 10 NOV switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4 switch to da’.a mode 1 DC-V2 transfnitted DC-V2 obscrved on earth DC-V28 trans mitt e d DC-V28 observed PI ewth DC-V2 8 Pansin it tecl DC-V28 observed on earth switch ranging receiver on DC-V9 transmitted switch ranging receiver olf 12 NOV CC&S CY-1 NO. 55 exercise to point the ultraviolet photolneter at the MT-6 pgint in space 19 NOV QC -V 1- 1 (minimum) transmitted QC-V1-2 (minimum) transmitted QC-VI-1 (17.18-deg pitch) observed on earth QC-VI-2 (1800-s roll) observed on earth DC -V 14 t r a nsmitted DC-V26 transmitted DC-V25 transmitted DC-V14 observed on earth DC-V26 observed on earth D W 2 5 observed ori earth DC-VI6 transmitted DC-V16 observed on earth DC-V2 transmitted DC-V2 observed on earth tape recorder on DC-VZ9 t ransm itte d DC-V29 observed on earth DC -V27 t ;a ns mitte d DC -V2 t r a t!5 mitted

1&:20:40 18:39:0 1 18:s 5 :03 18:58:10 19:10:24 19:15:00 19:27:M 15:30 :e0 19:42 :46 19:45:00 22:06:39

13:OO:OO 1” ‘j5:OO 13: 14:17 13:18:28 13:25:00 13:30:0@ 13.35:OO 13:38:39 13:43 :42 13: 4 m o 13:50: 12 14*C3:56 14:06:@0 14: :34 19 14:21:13 lX5:OO 14:39:08 14:53 :15 15:05:00

Project 0f f .ce p e r s o n d a t SFOF, awaiting 3ews of Mariner V launch
24

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT (Cont'd) exercise to point the ultraviolet photometer (cont'd) DC-V27 observed on earth, data mode 1 DC-V2 observed on earth, data mode 2 DC-V12 transmitted DC-V12 observed on earth start tape in science frame 145 track 1 record CCW pitch turn start begin track 2 record start roll turn (+313 deg) start burn (inhibited) stop burn stop roll/start sun reacquisition acquisit ion of Canopus end of track 2 record end of track 1 record DC-VI ! transmitted I DC-V10 observed on earth DC-V13 transmitted DC-V26 t rarrsmitted DC-V13 observed on earth DC-V2 t ransmitt ed DC-VZS observed on earth DC-V2 observed on earth QC-V 1-1 (minimum) trans mitt e d QC-V1-2 (minimum) transmitted GC-V1-3 (minimum) transmitted QC-VI-1 observed on earth QC-VI-2 Gbserved on earth QC-VI-3 observed on earth DC-V11 transmitted DC-V11 observed OR e x t h DC-V4 t ra nsmitted DC-V4 observed on earth switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4 switch to data mode 1 switch to data mode 4 end of tape, data mode 1 switch to data mode 4 switch to data mode 1 DC-V2 transmitted
26

19 NOV 15:06:49 15:18:30 15:51:'30 16:04:49 16:04:54 16:05:30 16:06: 17 not in data not in data not in data not in data not in data 17:41:30 18:05:36 18:12:30 18: 15:OO 18:28:49 18:40:00 18:50:00 18:53:39 18:55:00 19:03:46 19:08:47 19:20:00 19:25:00 19:30:00 19:33:58 19:39:09 19:44:03 19:45:00 19 :59: 11

22:oo:oo
22:13:33 22:14:58 22:32:00 22:48:00 23 :04 :4 1 20 NOV 16:01:45 16:21:08 16:37:08 16:58:10

FLIGHT EVENT TIMES, 1967, GMT (Cont’d) exercise to point the ultraviolet photometer (cont’d) DC-V2 observed on earth 20 NOV DC-V28 transmitted (turn on battery charger) DC-V28 transmitted (turn off battery charger) DC-V28 observed on earth DC-V 16 trans mitt e d DC-V28 ubserved on earth DC-VI6 observed on earth conaition spacecraft for long-term cruise DC-V9 (switch on ranging receiver) 21 NOV transmitted DC-V15 transmitted DC-V10 transmitted DC-V9 (switch ranging receiver off) transmitted DC-V15 obseived on earth DC-V10 observed on earth DC-V12 transmitted DC-V12 observed on earth 1 Dec mission termination FLIGHT SEQUENCE (see Table 3) FREQUENCY (see Radio) FUEL (see Propulsion Subsystem)

17:11:52

17:ZO:OO
17:30:00 17:33:42 17:35 :00 17 :43 :47 17:48:49

15:51:00 18:35:00 18:40 :00 18:45:00 18:49:09 18:54:11 19: 18:05 19:31:59

FUNCTIONAL BLOCK DIAGRAMS OF SUBSYSTEMS (see Figs. 17-39) 6AS (see Attitude Control)
6YRO CONTROL SUBSYSTEM gyros, number of input angle storage capability (rats plus position mode) operating temperature range operating rate range power required rate to position gain pitch and yaw rolI reference designation of subsystem weight (see also Table 7) 3

6 deg 30 to 1310F 2 1 deg/s 8.5 W
7s 12 s 7A2 10.99 Ib

HELIUM MAGNETOMETER
dynamic range electrical components, number of (see also Table 8) int e r v a I s between consecutive simultaneous-triaxial observations in one 50.4-sdata frame, at 8-1/3 bps 10ca:~r)non spacecraft noise trlxshold power requYed ref e r encc designat ions of subassernb Iie s (see Tacle 7) resolution o i telemetered magnetic data sensitivity threshold son. x s , number ?f
~ $ 9 rat:

204.8 y
1051

7.2, 14.4, 10.8, and 18.0 s on low-gain antenna 0.1 y rms/axis 7.21 W

weight (see also Table 9)

0.40 y per axis 50.25 y 1 (measures 3 orthogonal axes) 0.204 deg/s 6.56 Ib

HIGH-GAIN ANTENNA back radiation beam patterns (see Fig. 6) beamwidth at -3dB, major axis of patter11 2116 MHz 2298 MHz beamwidth at -3dB, minor axis of pattern 2116 MHz 2298 MHz beamwidth between first nulls, major %is of pattern 3116 MHz 2298 MHz beamwidth between first nulls, minor axis of pzttern 2116 MHr 2298 MHz fundamental resonant frequency line loss (between antenna assembly and electrmics case) 2116 MHz 2298 MHZ nominal peak gain (relative to right circular isotropic, referenced a t the antenna assembly) 2116 MHz 2298 MHz
28

-20 to -80 dB

15.2 deg l4.8 deg 7.6 deg 7.0 deg

38.5 deg 36.0 deg

19.5 deg 17.5 deg 120 Hz

0.25 dB 0.28 dB

21.6 dB 23.2 dB

HIGH-GAIN ANTENNA (Cont'd) orientation of antenna boresight pre-encowter clock angle cone angle post-encounter clock angle cone angle parabolic reflector depth of parabola distance of feed from parabolic vertex ellipse major axis length ellipse minor axis length maximum deviation from truc parabolic surface
reflector material performance analysis (see Fig. 16) polarization ellipticity oil axis 2116 MHz 2298 MHz reference design a t ion of subsystern type

107.4 deg 110.7 deg 96.5 deg 96.4 deg 8 in. 16 in. 46 in. 21.2 in. 0.040 in. ( = 0.007 wavelength) aluminum honeycomb right-hand circular 5.5 dB 0.4 dB 2E1 cupped turnstile feed and 2.06-to-1 elliptical parabolic reflector 1.17 1.28 4.91 3.99
to 1 to 1 Ib Ib

voltage standing wave ratio 2116 MHz 2298 MHz weight, antenna assembly (including reflector) weight of parabolic reflector

INSTRUMENTS, SCIENCE (see Dual' Frequency Receiver, HeIium Magnetometer, Plasma Probe, Trapped Radiation Detector, Ultraviolet Photometer)
KEY MILESTONE SUMMARY project authorized payload selection completed engineering chapge requests and prqblem/failure report systems operating equipment released from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility (SAF) for modification spacecraft design established

22 Dec 1965 15 Feb 1966

15 F::b 1966
14 Mar 1966 22 Apr 1966
29

KEY MILESTONE CUMMARY (Cont’d) thermal control model testing

22 Jun 1966 to 6 Jul 1966

st ruct :J r a! test mode I test ing test 1 start test 1 duration test 2 start test 2 duration flight support spacecraft (67-1) delivered t o SAF last item delivered telemetry and command processor compatibility demonstrated flight spacecraft (67-2) delivered to SAF initial power application last item delivered system test 1 si mu1ated precountdown spacecr af t/Ag e na interface test system test 2 radio frequency/telemetry compatibility demonstrated vibration test space simulator test, part 1 space simulator test, part 2 system test 3 shipment of Mariner V to AFETR AFETR testing and operations system test 4 Explosive-Safe Facility mechanical preparation spacecratt mate to Agena adapter spacecraft rnoved to Launch Complex 12 precoutitdown, spacecraft moved to ESF radio pr ob1em investigation spacecraft moved to Launch Complex 12 precountdown flight events (see PISO Flight Event Times) launch midcourse maneuver encounter mission ternination

18 Jul 1966 4 weeks 6 Nov 1966 10 days
1 Oct 1966 14 Deo 1966 5 Dec 1966 15 Dec 1966 6 Jan 1967 3 Feb 1967 6 Feb 1967 23 Feb 1967 27 Feb 1967 7 Mar 1967

13 Mar 1967 15 Mar 1967 23 Mar 1967 31 Mar 1967 17 Apr 1967 27 Apr 1967 3 May 1967 3 May 1967 25 May 1967 31 May 1967 2 Jun 1967 3 Jun 1967 8 Jun 1967 12 Jun 1967 14 1967 19 Jun 1967 19 Oct 1967 1 Dec 1967

LOOK ANGLES Canopus sensor cone direction
30

8(1-105.7 deg

LOOK ANGLES (Cont'd) Canopus sensor (cont'd) clock direction earth sensor cone direction clock direction high-gain antenna (cone direction) pre-encounter post-encounter planet sensor cone direction clock direction plasma probe cone direction sun gate, cone direction sun sensors, cone direction terminator sensor cone direction clock direction trapped radiaticn detector clock direction, all detectors cone direction, detector A cone direction, detectors B, C, and D u Itr avio let photometer cone direction clock direction LOUVERS (see Temperature Control) LOW-GAIN ANTENNA ground plane diaveter nominal peak gain (relative to right circular isotropic, referenced at the antenna connector) 2116 MHz 2298 MHz line loss (between antenna aiid electronics case1 2116 MHz 2298 MHz performance analysis (see Fig. 16) polarization ellipticity on axis 2116 MHr 2298 MHz reference designation of subsystem

0 deg
132 de& 270 deg 110.7 deg 96.4 deg 24" 54' 0 deg

0 deg 0 deg 0-180 deg
110 deg 110 deg

90 deg 95.5 dcg

7 in.

6.0 dB 5.0 dB

0.18 dB 0.23 dB right-hand circular 2.9 dB 2.9 dB 2E2

LOW-GAIN ANTENNA (Cont'd)
type circular wave-guide section te r minating in a crossed slot aperture over a ground plane 1.28 to 1 1.25 to 1 3.875 in. 88 in. 0.025 in. 3.41 Ib

voltage standing wave ratio 2116 MHz 2298 MHz waveguide inside diameter of length of thickness of tubing weight (antenna with mounting bracketry)

MAGNET0METER (see HeIium Magnetomete r) MECHANICAL DEVICES SUBSYSTEM cruise dampers and latches damping fluid
viscosity darnFing ratio frequericy of bus-panel system number on spacecraft weight (each) high-gain antenna pointing angle change (APAC) deployment mechanism antenna pointing angles clock cone deployment time release method rotation angle springs material number of thickness torque (each)
*Dow Corning.

DC* 210 silicone
oi I 1000 cs 0.154.70, matched to within 0.1 0.5-5.0 Hz, 311 panels matched io 10% 4 0.22 !b

107.4 deg initial 96.5 deg, final 110.7 deg, initial 96.4 deg, final 200-250 ms pyrotechnically initiated pinpuller 17" 36'

302 stainless steel 2 0.025 in. 8 idb

37

MECHANICAL DEVICES SUBSYSTEM (Cont‘d) high-gain APAC deployment mechanism (cont’d) springs (cont’d) type width weight low-gain antenna support dampers damping fluid viscosity material springs tubes

coil clock 0.468 in. 0.57 Ib

DC 210 silicone oil
500,000 cS
beryllium copper a h m i n u m and unidirectiondl fiber glass tubing

nominal damping rate long damper short damper nominal spring rate long damper short damper we;,ct iong damper short damper pyrotechnic arming switch (PAS) functions

11 Ib/in./s 5.5 Ib/in./s

320 Ib/in. 160 Ib/in.

0.39 lb 0.32 Ib
pyro arm ,pyre arm event Agena isolation amplifier off attitude control

turn on
pyro safe indication off 8AS 1 spacecraft separation 0.1 Ib
DC 210 silicone oil 6000 cs backup pyro safe indication off at separation +30 5 2 0 s backup pyro arm at separation +30 t.20 s

reference designation time of actuation weight separation initiated timer (SIT) damping fluid viscosity functions

33

MECHANICAL DEVICES SUBSYSTEM (Cont’d) separation initiated timer (SIT) (cont’d) functions (cont’d)

reference tics ignat ion weight solar panel boost dampers damping fluid Y iscosit y material s-rings tubes nominal damping rate nominal spring rate number on spacecrh;; u:.it weight solar panel deployment springs maximum allowable energy from sun shade deployment release m e t M springs active length rnaf er i3 I number per panel thickness torque ( e x h spring) type typical deployment time weight per panel

pyro armed indication at separation - 180 5 8 0 s i solar panel and sun shade deployment at separation +190 -Lao s 8M1 0.6 Ib
DC 210 silicone oil 30,000 cs

beryllium copper hard-anodized aluminurn 1.5 Ib,h /s 20 Ib/in. 4 0.11 lb

4.0 in./lb gyrotecinically initiated pinpullers
21.4 in. Elgiloy 2 0.025 in. 9 in.-lb stowed 7.5 in.-lb deployed coil clcA 6s 0.32 Ib

MIDCOURS‘: MANEUVER (see also Flight Event Times) date 19 Jun 1967 time 23.08:06 to

23:38:23.66
day OF flight flight angle correction communication time (one way) ear t h-s p acecraft-sun anel e
34

6 0.3 deg 5.27 s 117.3.5 deg

MI DCO URSE MANEUVER (Cont’d) Canopus-spacecraft-suri iizgie spacecraft celestial longitude spacecraft celestial latitude earth celestial longitude Venus celestia! longitude spacecraft distance from earth
spacecraft distance from sun spacecraft distance from Venus distance traveled along heliocentric arc spacecraft velocity relative to earth spacecraft velocity relalive to Venus spacecraft velocity relative to sun number af commands sent total time fcr event computed ideal parameters pitch turn roll turn motor burn time velocity increment command parameters pitch turn roll turn motor burn time velocity increment spacecraft actual performance p i L h turn roil turn r,iotor burn time velocity incrernent turn duration pitch roll turn rate pitch roll
MIDC 0UkSE MANEUVER C 0NSTRA INTS duration of first motor burn &;ation of turns1

76.72 deg 267.51 deg -0.260 deg 267.97 deg 223.37 deg 1,581,615 krn 982,770 mi 151,283,640 C r n 94,003,290 mi 105,427,900 krn 65,509,840 ini 13,300,000 km 5,243,000 mi 6,690 mph 58 430 mph 60,451 mph 6 3 h, 16 rnin, 7 s +55.35 deg +71.02 deg 17.6510 s 16.1272 m/s +55.27 deg +70.95 deg 17.66 s 16.135 rr,/s +55.18 deg +70.93 de& 17.66 s 15.392 m/s 304 s 380 s

+ 0.13 ‘18 deg,/s + 0.1867 deg/s
<1(?2.36 s < M Y s

35

MIDCOURSE MANEUW CONSTRAINTS (Cont'd) end of turn

pitch tur r, restriction

r o II tu r n restriction

restrictions on earth-spacecraft vcctnr

restrictions on sun-spacecreft vwtor

sun position in relation to ultraviolet photometer field of view

to occur outside interferslliekr region of law-gain antenna pattern at approximately 145 x lo" km magnitude of turn must be small enobgli to permit t r ansm issi on of DC-V13 if required if terminator sensor activated, 20-deg half-cone angle to rernair at 93-to 180-deg cone anglr if teminator sensor actilrated, 20-deg half-coce angle vector should not pass through field oi view of C2n9pus sensor sun-shutter sensor if possible
sun ,lot to pass within 5-1 'eg half-cone angle of field cf

MT-1 CANOPUS CONE ANGLE UPDATt :VENT date day of flight time cone angle setting communication time (one way) earth-spacecraft-sun angle Canopus-spacecraft-sun angle spacecraft celestial longitude spacecraft celestial latitude earth celestial longitude Venus celestial lcngitudc spacecraft distance from earth

24 ~ u 1967 g 72 08:41:08 85.1 deg 1 min, 18 s 155.7 dog 83.2 !eg 333.3 deg -2.22 deg
330.6 deg 327.3 deg

spacecraft distance from sun

23,341,07C km 14,503,469 mi 129,662,180 km 80,568,343 mi
I

' ~ /- '
36

MT-1 CANOPUS CONE ANGLE UPDATE EVENT (Cont’d) 24,201,792 km spacecraft distance from Venus 15,031,296 mi 177,752,162 km distance trave I e d a Iong heI iocent r ic arc 110,472,690 mi 15,348.8 rnph spacecraft velocity relative to ctartb 21,413.3 mph syaLecraft velocity relative +o Venus 71,630.0 mph spacecraft v l o c i t y relative to sun MT-2 CAUCI3ijS CONE ANGLE UPDATL ,WNT date day of flight rime cone angle setting commmif.ation time (one way) earth-spacecraft-sun angls Canopus-spacecraft-sun angle spacecraft celestial loitkitude spacecraft celestial letitude earth celestial lcngitude Venus celestial lmgituot, spacecraft distance from earth
spacecraft distance from sun spacecraft distant ?n? Veiics

distance traveled along heliocwtric arc spxecraft veiocity relative to earth spacecraft velocity relative to Venus ,pacecraft velocity relative to sun
MT-3 CANOPUS CONE ANGLE UPDATE EVENT date day OT flight time cone angle sztting comrnLnication time (one way) earth-spacecrai t-sun angle C Pr ~ o p m -spacer r 2 f t-su n angI e spacecraft ce Ir!st i3 i Iongit uci e spacecraf, ceic :a1 iatitude earth cele;tial longitude

10 Sep 1967 88 OO:41:26 90.3 deg 1 min, 56 s 141.6 deg 87.8 deg 324.5 deg -2.65 deg 346.6 deg 353.5 deg 54,515,052 krn 21,695,207 mi 121,731,330 km 75,640,340 mi 13,212,249 km 8,209,711 mi 226,342,582 km 140,642,760 mi 22,366.9 rnph 13,551.2 mph 76,144.5 rnph

26 Sep 1367 105 16:42:43 95.4 deg 2 min, 49 s 125.8 deg 93.3 deg 18.5 deg -3.37 deg 2.3 de6
3:

MT-3 CANOPUS CONE ANGLE UPDATE €VENT (Cont’d) Venus celestial longitude 19.7 deg spacecraft distance from earth 50,836,609 km 31,588,404 mi 114,470,020 km spacecraft distance from sun 71,128,374 mi 6,512,823 km spacecraft distance from Venus 4,953,094 mi 274,839,713 km distance traveled along heliocentric arc 170,777,480 mi 31,338.8 mph spacecraft velocity relative to earth 8,248.4 mph spacecraft velocity relative to Venus 8G,564.0 mph spacecraft velocity relative to sun MT-4 CANCPUS CONE ANGLE UPDATE EVENT date day of flight time cone angle setting communication time (one way) earth-spacecraft-sun angle Canopus-spacecraft-sun angle spacecraft celestial !ongitude spacecraft celestial latitude earth celestial longitude Venus celestial longitude spacecraft distance from earth
spacecraft distmce from sun spacxraft distance from Venus distance traveled along heliocentric arc spacecraft vdocity relative to earth spacecraft velocity relative to Venus spacecraft velocity relative to sun
MT-5 CHANGEOVER TO HIGH-GAIN ANTENNA date day of flight time communication time !one way! earth-spacecraft-sun angle Canopus-spacecraft-sun angle spacecraft celestial longitude spacecraft celestial latitude
38

10 Oct 1967 119 14:04: 14.4 100.5 deg 3 min, 45 s 112.5 deg 98.0 deg 41.1 deg - 1.73 deg 16.5 deg 42.1 deg 67,503,928 km 41,944,996 mi 109,869,093 km F8,269,484 mi 2,564,426 km 1,593,460 mi 319,265,219 krn 198,382,210 mi 40,061.9 mph 6,930.4 rliph 83,561.1 rnph
1 Oct 1967 109 16:43:33.8 3 min, 8 s 121.0 deg 95.0 deg 26.4 deg -2.19 deg

MT-5 CHANGEOVER TO HGH-GAIN ANTENNA (Cont'd)
earth celestial longitude Venus celestial longitude spacecraft distance from earth spacecraft disimce from sun spacecraft distance i:om Venus distance traveled along iltliocentric arc spacecraft v2locity relative to earth spacecraft velocity relative to Vwus spacecraft velocity relative to sun
MT-6 CHANGEOVER TO 8-1/3 bps

7.6 deg 27.7 aeg 56,494,636 km 35,104,139 mi 112,609,670 km 69,972,406 mi 5,027,332 km 3,123,839 mi 290,516,461 km 180,518,560 mi 34,408.8 mph 7,447.4 mph 81,719.9 mph

date day of flight time communication time (one way) earth-spacecraft-sun angle Canopus-spacecraft-sun angle spac' craft ctiestiai longitude spacecraft celestial latitude earth celestial longitude Venus celestial longitude spacecraft distance from earth spacecraft distance from sun spacecraft distance from Venus distance traveled alGng heliocentric x c spacecrzft velocity relative to earth spacecraft velocity relative to Venus spacecraft velocity relative t o sun

24 Jul 1967 41 19:19:21 35.4 s 147.9 deg 78.0 deg 299.5 deg - 1.63 deg 300.9 deg 278.3 deg 10,622,390 km 6,600,447 mi 142,858,570 km 88,768,210 mi 57,234,319 kni 35,563,756 mi 96,431,352 km 59,919,664 mi 7,754.8 mph 38,604.7 mph 64,630.4 mph

MT-7 EVENT (see Flight Event limes, Table 25)
My-8 BE61N

QAS ENCOUNTER SEQUENCE (see Flight Event Times)

MT-9 BEGIN PLAYBACK (sce Flight Event Times)
39

OCCULTATION EXPER IM E N 1 enter occultation time at spacecraft (19 Oct 1967) time observed on earth Venus time at p0ir.t of entrance
altitude above Venus
loss of signal time at spacecraft time observed on earth altitude above Venus

17:3 1:36 17:38:09 between midnight and sunrise 4,175 km 2,594 mi 17:34:42 17:38:09 4,094 km 2,544 mi 17:55:33 17:59:59 6,785 krn 4,216 mi 17:58:04 18:02:30 near noon 7,339 krn 4,560 mi 0.005 ft/s 80m 262 ft

acquisition of signal time at spacecraft time observed on earth altitude above Venus
exit occultation time at spacecraft (13 Oct 1967) time observed on earth Venus time at point of emergerlce altitude above Venus

range rate accuracy rangkg accuracy (average) ORBIT DATA, MARINER V aphelion dates of distance from sun 10 Apr 22 Oct celestial parameters astronomical ilnit

10 Apr 1968 22 Oct 1968 109,888,340 km 58,281,446 mi 109,889,930 km 68,282,434 mi 149,597,900 km 92,960,134 mi

M a - ' n e r V is Iawxhed f r o m Cape Kentiedy O N 14 June 1967, a t O6:Ol:OO G M T . The lmri,ch vehicle is a?i Atlas i ) / h g e n a D combination
40

ORBIT DATA, MARINER V (Cont'd) celestial parameters (cont'd) radius of Venus iistd for orbit tiptermination
solar radiation constant used in orbit determinations universal constant of gravitation used in orbit determinations celestial position (see also Table 5) sun-spacecraft inferior conjunction sun-spacecraft superior conjunction closest approach to Venus (see also major heading, Encounter) altitude above Venus altitude above Venus, prior to midcourse maneuver date of distance from center of Venus

6,056 km 3,763 mi 103,100,000kg-km/s2 0.6671 x lo-"
km3/kg-s2

28 Oct 1968 30 Mar 1968 10 Jun 1969

4,094km 3,544 mi
69,675 km 43,290mi 19 Oct 1967 10,150.0 km 6,306.9 mi

encounter velocities and altitudes (s?e Fig. 53) 17:34:56 timet of earth-spacecraft range (see also Tables 4 and 5) 259,528,540km maximum range 161,263,560mi 1 Apr 1968 0 maximum range, date of 38,995,007krn minimum range, after encoiinter 24,230,374mi 27 Oct 1968 minimum range, date of 27 Dec 1969 heliocentric orbit 29 Jan 1968 date of first completed trip around sun 0.1177 eccentricity of 2.697 deg inclination to ecliptic before encounter 1.385 deg inclination to ecliptic after mcounter 114.11 deg longitude of ascending node 194.61 deg orbital period 98,320,366km semimajor axis 61,093,326mi 97,637,399! m semiminor axis 60,668,951mi misoellaneous data aiming point diagram (see Fig. 41)
42

ORBIT DATA, MARINER V SCont'd) miscellarreous data (cont'd) angle of celestial longitude of earth between lauiich and closest approach angle of celestial longitude of spacecraft between launch and closest approach B vector distance between initial aiming point (in B plane) and actual point hit
inclination to Venus orbit closest approach to earth afte: encounter date of perihelion dates of distance from sun 4 Jan 1968 spacecraft velocity relative t o sun

123.12 deg 154.40 deg

3,248 km 2,018 mi 31.70 deg 27 Oct 1968 4 Jan 1968 17 Jul 1968 86,757,486 km 53,908,756 mi 92,491 mph

SENSOR field of view (aligned at +4l04'slocki function

4.55 x 1.55 deg to initiate the sciwce encounter sequence upon sensing the limb of Venus
240 54' 0 deg above Bay V l l l 40 mW 0.01 ft-cd 0.57 Ib

look sngle cone direction clock direction location power consumption sensitivity threshold weight

PLASMA PROBE diameter of viewing aperture electrical componeiits, nrimbcr of (see also Table 8) field of vL-~
grids, number of lccation on spacecraft

2.5 in.
1494 15-(leg half-angle

cone
4 sun side, inboard of Bay 111

look angle cone angle
43

PLASMA PROBE (Cont’d) measurement ranges (positive ions) flux density

5x

to

energy spectrum power required average peak reference designat ions of subassemblies (see Table 7) sensors, number of weight (see also Table 9)

5 x IO-* particles c m 2 sec-’ 30 eV t o 10 keV 2.7 W (typ) 2.90 w
1 6.88 Ib

POST-INJECTION PROWLS ION SUBSYSTEM ‘see Propulsion Subsystem) POWER SUBSYSTEM (see also Solar Panels) battery life
tYP2

number of cells voltage (at full charge) electrical components, number of, excluding solar cells (see also Table 8) inverters, number of location of power regulator and battery iocation of power subsystem on spacecraft output voltages 2.4-kHz square wave 4 H step square wave (to gyros) Wz power consumption (see Table 111 reference designation of subassemblies (see Table 7) regulators, ntimber of regulator output voltage regulator power capability solar pafiel power output (see Fig. 11) telemetry points, number of ?!eight, including solar. panels

1200 Wh si Iver-zinc 18 33 v

1064

3
Bay Vlll Bay I

50V rrns (+3, -2%) 27 V rms +lo% (3-phase) (flight phase related)
2

52 Vdc +1%
150 W

23 149.59 Ib

PROPULSION SUBSYSTEM burn time capability at launch characteristic velocity location on spacecraft
44

102 s 4340 ft/s Bay I I

PR(IPULSI0N SUBSYSTEM KO.; !'d) maximuin thrust vecfor ddiedion capability, 2 jet vanes deflected 25 deg motor thrlls? axis aligirnent to CG at 'wnch horizortal offset vertical offset total offset motor tiit angle nozzle expansion ratio number of ignitions possible operating temperature range propeIIant f Iow rate reference designation of subsystem specific heat ratio stagnation chamber pressure throat area, ambient total AV capability type af fuel uncertainty in motor pointing accuracy vacuum s?ecific imgulse (without jet vanes) vacuum specific impulse, 4 jet vanes deflected 10 deg vacuum thrust, without jet vanes vacilum thrust, 4 jet vanes deflected 10 deg vacuum thrust coefficient, without jet vanes weight, subsystem (see also Table 9) weight, wet nitrogen gas oxidizer propellant PYROTECHNICS electrical components, number of (se!? also Table 8) pinpullers, number of location on spacecraft

2 5 . 0 deg 0012 in. 0.001 in. 0.012 in. 1.5 deg 44: 1 2 +35 to +125*F 0.21487 Ibrn/s lOAl 1.38 189.4 psia 0.15 in? 91.9 m/s hydrazine 2.5 mad, max 236.0 Ibf-s/lbm 232.7 50.55 49.19 1.75 45.87 Ibf-s/lbm Ibf Ibf Ib

0.90 Ib 0.11 Ib 21.50 Ib

240 5
4 at solar panel tips 1 at high-gain ant e nna deployment qechanisrn 0.25 Ib ea

weight pyrotechnic control units power required type weight squibs all fire current 10 single bridgewire

1.1 w capacitor discharge 8.03 Ib

2.0 A
45

PYROTECHNICS (Cont'd) squibs-all fire current (cont'd)
10 dual bridgewire number of (includes 10 used by propulsion subsystem) weight of weight, sdbsystern (see also Table 9)

3.3 A
20

0.50 Ib 8.53 ib

RADIO (sce also High-Gain Antenna, Low-fiain Antenna) cavity amplifier output (nominal) pr e separat ion postseparation traveling wave tube amplifier output, r.ominal dc power input to cavity power amplifier

0.5 W (+27.0 dBm)
7.1 W (+38.5 dBm) 11.2 W (+40.5 dBm) 32 W, high-power

mode
10 W, low-power Iwnch mode
dc power input to traveling wave tube amplifier dynamic range to threshold (nominal) electrical components, number of (see also Table 8) exciter output (nominal) location of subsystem on spacecraft noise temperature, including preselector (nominal) nominal downlink h q u e n c y for VCO mode (two-way lock at best lock frequency) nomins! one-way transmission frequency at 250C exciter A exciter B nominal uplink frequency for VCO mode (best lock frequency) radiated power increase, cavity to TWT reference designations of subassemblies (seeTable 7) telecommunications performancs analysis (see Fig. 16) threshold level, csrrier (nominal) threshold level, command (nominal) weight, subsystem (see also Table 9) 2.4-kHz pow3r input to receiver 2.t-kHz power input to exciters and control unit
46

61 W 100 dB
1774 0;6 ? (+28 dBm) Bays V and VI

2700°K
2297.593837 MHz a'_ 25°C 2297.603093 MHz 2257.609993 MHz

2115.700992 MHz
at 25°C 41 W (nominal) .

-150 dBm
-141 dBrn 39.18 Ib 8W

12 w

RANbDNG (see also Flight Event Times) Mark I system (lunar) first turned on 20 Jun 1967 dropped below threshold 6 Jul 1967 distance from earth at threshold
inherent accuracy (average) Mark I system (planetary) 1 first turned on dropped below threshold distance from earth at threshold inherent accuracy (average)

19 :4 1:C2 15:00:02

6,000,000 km 3,728,000 mi 45 rrl 147 f t
20:40:02 17 :51-02 100,000,000 km 62,137,000 mi 80 m 262 ft

21 Jun 1967 5 Nov 1967

RECEIVER (see Radio) REDUNDANCY (sed Table 101 REFERENCE DESIGNATIONS (see Table 7) REVIEWS system status (preliminary design) subsystem design pyrotechnics high-gain ant enna data automa!ion subsystem sensors dual-frequency receiver power subsystem ultraviolet photometer tape recorder thermal control solar panel61 hardware reviews G'-1 status JPL pr' inping acceptance Nkc .dquarters review (quarterly) ;trsi (JPL) second (JPL) thi a <IPU fourth UPL) fifth mission readiness (AFETR) W h , midmission (Washington, L C.)
1.7 Feb 1966

12 Apr 1966 28 Apr 1966 26 May 1966 7 lun 1366 10 lun 1966 12 Jul 1966 28 Jul 1966 29 Jul 1966 8 Aug 1966 1 Apr znd 27 Sep 1966 following S>.F delivery 9 Feb 1967 21 Apr 1967 13 Apr 1966 15 Aug 1966 14 Dec 1966 10 April 1967 25 May 1967 3 Aug 1967
47

REVIEWS (Cont'dl NASA headquarters review (quarterly) lPwt'd) seventh, encounter readiness (JPL) eighth, post-encounter (Washington, D. C.) ROLL RATE magnetometer calibration Canopus search SCIENCE SUBSYSTEMS ancillaries
instruments, number of insti uments, (see also headings by instrument name and Table 6)

4 C.,t 1967 13 Dec 1.967

3.5 mrad/s 2.0 mrad/s
da?d alltamation subsystem 5
dual frequency receiver helium magnetometer pl .,d probe trapped radiation detecto; ultraviolet photometer Pay Ill

location cf electronics on spacecraft power equired by science instiuments plds data automation subsystem reference dasignations of science instruments (see Table 7) weight (see alsci Table 9)

27.74

w

45.37 Ib

SENSORS (see Canopus Sensor, Earth Sensor, Planet Sensor, Terminator Sensor) SEPARATION INITIATE0 TIMER (see Mechanical Devices Subsystem) SGLAR PANELS (see also Powet Subsystem)

cells
type material nurrber per panel number per sectiun number of series cells per w w number of stanaard cells for telemetry monitoring size of eacv solar :ell
48

p on n boron-diffused siliccn 4410 1470 105
c

. *

I x2cm

SOLAR PANELS (Cont'd) dimensions linear

area of each panel total solar panel area experimental solar cell outputs (see Fig. 12) panel sections area of each section number per panel number of parallel rows per section maximum voltage output per section power output available near earth, at 550C at closest approach reference designations of subassemblies (see Table 7) solar distance at earth at Venus solar energy near earth near Venus weight of each panel

44.40 x 35.5 in. (cell area; panel length = 74.98 in.) 10.9 ft2 43.6 ft2

3.6 ft'

3 14
51 V

405 w
620 W

1.49 x 10" km 1.08 x 10" km

135 mW/cm' 255 mW/cm' 15.3 Ib (solar panel only)
Canopus sensor view direction, Bay VIII, 45 deg from - Y axis, 45 deg from + X axis

SPACECRAFT clock angle Oaeg reference

configuration (see Figs. 1and 2) dimensions overall height span with solar panels extended width of octagon (at points) electrical components, total number of (see also Table 8) functions with alternate operations, number of options available for 18 functions, number of redundant items (see Table 10)

9.5 ft 16.3 ft 54.5 in. 47,342 18 53

49

SPACECRAFT (Cont'd) spacecraft center of gravity positions boost configuration X axis Y axis Z axis cruise (pre-midcourse) configuration X axis Y axis 2 axis cruise (post-midcourse) configuration X axis Y axis 2 axis spacecraft magnetic fieid (at magnetometer, without solar panels) magnetometer X axis magnetometer Y axis magnetometer Z axis spacecraft moments and products of inertia boost configuration

+0.79 in. + O X in. -18.83 in.

+0.77 in.
+0.29 in. -12.14 in.

+O.72 in. +0.23 n.
-12.16 in.

+2.6~ +7.ly
Ix = 84.94 slug ff Ir = 80.94 slug ff Iz = 49.32 Slug fT
Ixy
Ixz

- 1.oy

lrz

= -3.60 Slug ff = +1.60 slug ff = +1.05 Slug ff

cruise (pre-midcourse) configuration

cruise (post-midcoursel configuration

73.60 Slug ff lp = 71.08 Slug ft? lz = 124.48 SJL: ft? lxy = -3.24 sIu;~ ff Ixz = + 1.03 S J U ~ ff lm = +0.96 Slug f f Is = 73.54 slug f f Ir = 71.02 Slug ff Iz = 124.38 Slug ff I , = -3.28 Slug ff s I, = +1.01 slug fV x lpz = +0.94 Slug ft'
Ix =

SPAC team at work at JPL, evaluating Mariner V performance

SPACECRAFT (Cont'd) temperatures vs time (see Figs. 13-15) total number of parts assembled cables electrical components (see also Table 8) excluding integrated circuits 594 integrated circuits x 33.5 (1 integrated circuit = 33.5 conventional components) mechanicai, electromechanical and other weight (see also Table 9) SQUIBS (see Pyrotechnics) STAR MAP number of stars stored in computer

97,130

30
44,486 24,674
I

19,812 52,614 539.17 Ib

423 'Ailky Way and zodiacal light

+

STRUCTURE SUBSYSTEM electronic assembly chassis (see also Fig. 3) location
material volume for electronics

weight high-gain ant enna structure dimensions, parabolic reflector ellipse major axis length ellipse minor axis length material feed support truss

Bays I and 111 through VI1 ZK-60 magnesium two vertical spaces per bay: 6 in. wide by 16.5 in. high 4.19 to 4.59 lb

46 in. 21.2 in.
Lexan end fittings, unidirectional fiber glass tubing aluminum honeycomb 0.0007-in. core 0.003541. face skins

parabolic reflector

low-gain antenna structure dimensions, waveguide inside diameter length thickness material ground plane waveguide
52

3.875 in. a8 in. 0.025 in. aluminum honeycomb 5061 aluminum tube

STRUCTURE SUBSYSTEM (Cont’d) oct agm structure adapter attach feet quantity width (each) construct ion

8 1.00 in. machined upper and lower rings tied together by machined longerons
50.35 in. 55.08 in. 18.0 in. ZK-60 magnesium 34.5 Ib Bay II 606LT6 aluminum 0-4 deg 186- to 90-deg cone angle) &1/2 in. laterally, 3/8 in. upward, 1/4 in. down 2.25 Ib Epon 913 Epon 956 and 2-mil glass cloth 44.40 in. 74.98 in. 0.OO5-in. a1uminum face skin and corrugations 9.7 Ib

diameter across flats maximum height material weight propulsion support structure location material motor thrust axis adjustment capability

weight solar panel structure adhesive dielectric material length celled surface overall material

weight of structure width celled surface superstructure construction

35.5 in.
swaged thin-wall tubes riveted to machined end fittings mounts high-gain antenna to octagon
53

function

STRUCTURE SUBSYSTEM (Cont’d) superstructure (cont’d) material weight SUBSYSTEMS (see Attitude Control, Cabling, Central Computer and Sequencer, Command, Data Automation Subsystem, Data Encoder, Dual Frequency Receiver, Dual Frequency Receiver Antennas, High-Gain Antenna, Low-Gain Antenna, Mechanical Devices, Power, Propukion, Pyrotechnics, Radio, Science, Structure, Tape Recorder, Temperature Controll

606LT6 aluminum 3.25 Ib

SUN GATE field of view
number of sun gates number of celis sun acquisition time

2.2-deg half-angle cone 1 2 20 min (maximum)

SUM SENSORS field of view primary sun sensor secondary sun sensor number of sensor assemblies number of sensor cells number of primary cells number of secondary cells reference designations of subassemblies (see Table 7)

t 2 deg each axis 4~ sr 4

16
4 12

TAPE RECORDER bit capacity bit error rate electrical components, number of (see also Table 8) location on spacecraft number of tracks recordic:! simultaneously operating temperature range playback frequency playback times track 1 track 2
54

1x

lo6

< I in

io5 bits

1479 Bay V 2 -10 to 70°C 8-1/3 bps 17h, 48min, 35s 18h, 4min, 47s

TAPE RECORDER (Cont’d) power required, nominal (24.00 Hz)

record f:equency record-to-playback speed ratio recording sequence (see Fig. 29) record times track 1 127min, 22s track 2 107min, 32s reference designations of subassemblies (see Table 7) tape length 5 3 4 loop 0.01 in./s tape speed, playback 0.08 in./s tape speed, record tape width 0.25 in. total recording time during encounter 2h, 7min weight, subsystem (see also Table 9) 19.35 Ib

3.4 W, launch 6.0 Vi, playback 7.1 W, record 4.6 W, standby 66-2/3 bps 8: 1

TELEMETRY channel allocations, 7-bit words Lee also Table 21) scient ific data mode 2 40 words 60 words data mode 3
engineering communications measurements current measurements deck syncs event counters position measurements pressure measurements spare temperature measurements voltage measurements data frames bits per high-rate data frame mode 1 mode 2 cycle tim2 (8-1/3 bps) mode 1 mod2 Z cycle time (33-1/3 bps) mode 1 mode 2

90 words 11 13 3 4 (2 words) 13 7 3 33

5

140 420 16.8 s 50.4 s

4.2 s 12.6 s
55

TELLMETRY (Cont’d) data frames (cont’d) number of compiete science measurements per data frame dual frequency receiver helium magnetmeter plasma probe trapped radiation detector uItr avi o Ie t photometer
data modes, number of data mode formats data mode 1 science bits per data frame engineering bits per data frame data mode 2 science bits per data frame engineering bits per data frame data mode 3 science bits p s i data frame engineering bits per data frame data mode 4 science bits per data frame number of data tracks encoding type

Mode 2

Mode 3

2 9 6 3
3

2
15 6

3
9

4

0 140

280
140 406 14

160 2 (non-realtime data)
sampled data, digital phaseshift-keying with pseudonoise synchronization

engineering format (see Fig. 23) error probabilities bit error probability at threshold required ST/N/B* for bit error probability of 5 x word error probability at threshold time between samples (see Table 22) transmission rates word length
*Signal power per bit to noise power in unit bandwidth.

5 x 10-3
+7.6 t- 1.2 dB 1 W6;d in 28

33-1/3, 8-1/3 bps

7 bits

56

TEMPEMTURE CONTROL assemblies, number of louvers angular change of louvers relative to temperature louver area for each bay total louver area louver positioning error number of bays with louvers number per assembly total number of louvers weight of all louvers parts, ,lumber of in system shielding amount of octagon covered by shielding material of blanket layers

40

90 deg/30 OF 1.4 ft' 8.4 ft' t.5 deg 6 22 (11 pairs) 128 8.16 Ib 1200

85%
0.0005-in. slurni~ized FVlylar 19 13 7.5 Ib 12 ft2 0.00 1-in. aluminized Teflon lanyard release from so!ar panels

numbers of layers in lower blanket number of layers in upper blanket weight of thermal pass; Je-type shielding sun shade area material method of deployment springs number of torque weight weight, srrbsystem (see also Table 9)

8 1 in.-lb 0.98 Ib 17.25 Ib

TEMPERATURE CONTROL REFERENCE detector
function location and sample types on spacecraft + X panel - V psnel - X panel nominal prsperties (see Table 12) number on spacecraft weight (each unit)

platinum resistance thermometer measures paintsample tempera ture S-13 white Cat-a-Lac black S-13M white

3 0.1 Ib
57

TERMINATOR SENSOR encounter geometry (see Fig. 10) field of view
look angle weight sensi?ivity threshold function

1.5 deg clock 2.5 deg cone 110 deg cone 110 deg clock 0.16 Ib 0.1 ft-cd to trigger high-gain antenna pointing ar,gle change upon sensing the terminator of Venus

TESTING environmental tests (see Tables 14-18) system tests (see Table 19) THERMAL SHIELDS (see Temperature Control) THRUST (see Propulsion Subsystem) TIMING (see Central Computer and Sequencer) TRAJECTORY (see Figs. 40-54)

TRAPPED RADIATION DETECTOR counting rates detectors A, B, C detector D detection levels (number of detectors! electrical com>onents, number of (see also Table 81 field of view (all detectors)
geometric factor, omnidirectional detector A detector B detector C geometric factor, unidirectional detector A detectoi B detector C detector D location on spacecraft look angle detector A axis relative to spacecrafi-sun line full look angie
58

0.6 to 10' counts,% 0.071 to 10' counts/s 4 417 30-deg half-angle cone
approx 0.15 CP' approx 0.15 cm2 approx 0.15 cm2

0.044 0.055 0.050 0.065

k0.005 cm2 sr -1-0.005 sr cmz ~k0.005 sr cm2 kO.003 cm2 sr above Bay IV

0 deg

10 deg

TRAPPED RADIATION DETECTOU (Cont’d) look angle (cont’d) detectors 8, C, D axis relative to spacecraft-sun line full look angle (det 8 and C) full look angle (Get D) measurement ranges detector A electrons protons X-rays detector 8 electrons protons detector C electrons protons detector D electrnns
protvs

70 deg 60 deg 80 deg

>95 keV >2.7 keV h<10 1 E, > 45 keV
E,

E,

E , insensitive to any energy D, 0.30 < E,, <12 MeV D, 0.50 < Ep < 5.3 MeV D, 0.98 < Ep < 2.2 MeV

> 0.65 MeV > 150 keV > 3.1 MeV

alpha particles power required s e w n , numbzr of weight (see also Table 9)

D, 21 .

< 18 MeV

< E,

05 W . 4 2.63 Ib

TRAVELING WAVE TUBE AMPLIFIER (see Radio)

TRAVELIS W A R TUBE AMQLIFIER CHANGEOVER
date day of flight time commwication time (one way) earth-spacecraft-sun angle Canopus-spacecraft-sun angle spacecraft celestial tongitude spacecraft celestial latitude earth celestial longitude Venus celestial longitude spacecraft distance from earth spacecraft distance from sun

27 Jun 1968
13

00:27:00 11.27 s 122.7 deg
76.6

273.8 deg -0.551 deg 274.7 deg 234.6 deg 3,380,8@9 km 2,100,737mi 150,219,438kni 93,341,&17mi
59

TRAVELING WAVE TUBE AMPLIFIER CHANGEOVER (Cont'dl spacecraft distance from Venus 92,255,438 km 59,188,984 mi distance traveled along heliocentric arc 31,052,281 km 19,294,993 mi spacecraf:: velocity relative to earth 6,587 mph spacecraft velocity relative to Venus 54,381 mph spacecraft velocity relative to sun 61,035 mph ULTRAVIOLET PHOTOMETER comparison of tubes B and C comparison of tubes A and 6 data rate
dynamic range electrical components, number o i (see also Table 8) field of view Tubes A and B lube C location on spacecraft power required sensitivity sensors, number of spectral range Tube A, calcium fluoride filter Tube B, barium fluoride filter lube C, lithium fluoride filter weight (see also Table 9)

hydrogen, 1216 oxygen, 1304 8 33-1/3 bps and 8-113 bps 0.7 to 100.0 kilorayleighs 1223

1

1 deg solid cone
2-1/2 deg solid cone above Bay 'I 4.6 W 700 rayleighs at 1216 1 3 phototubes 1250-1900 1350-1900 1050-1900 9.21 Ib

1 1

8

VELOCITY AT ENCOUNTER (see Fig. 53)
VELOCITY OF MARINER V RELATIVE TO EARTH
periodically during flight (see Table 4) injection midcourse maneuver changeover to traveling wave tube amplifier MT-6 changeover to 8-113 bps MT-1 Canopus cone angle update Ml-2 Canopus cone angle update MT-3 Canopus cone angle update
60

14 Jun 19 Jun 27 Jun 24 Jul 24 Aug 13 Sep 26 Stp

25,501 mph 6,690 mph 6,587 mph 7,755 mph 15,349 mph 22,367 mph 31,399 mph

VELOCITY OF MARINER V RELATIVE TO EARTH (Cont'd) MT-E changeover to high-gain antenna 1 Oct 34,409 mph MT-t Canopus cone angle ilpdate 10 Oct 40,062 mph 19 Oct 56,696 mph closest approach 1 Dec 86,224 mph end of mission VELOCITY OF MARINER V RELATIVE TO SUN po-iodically during flight (see Table 4) midcwrse maneuver 19 h n changeover to traveling wave tube 27 Jun amplifier MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps 24 l u l MT-1 Canopus cone angle update 24 Aug 10 Sep MT-2 Canopus cone angle update 26 Sep MT-3 Canopus cone angle update I Oct MT-5 Changeover to high-gain antenna MT-4 Canopus cone angle update 10 Oct closest approach 19 Oct 1 Gec end of mission at perihelion of heliocentric orbit 4 Jan 1968 10 Apr at aphelion of heliocentric orbit 1968

60,451 mph 61,035 mph 64,690 mph 71,630 mph 76,144 mph 80.564 mph 81,750 mph 83,561 mph 85,003 mph 85,513 mph 92,491 mph 73,022 mph

VELOCITY OF MARINER V RELATIVE TO VENUS periodically during fiight (see Table 4) 19 Jun midcourse maneuver changeover to traveling wave tube 27 Jun amplifier 24 Jul MT-6 changeover to 8-1/3 bps 24 Aug MT-1 Canopus cone angle update 10 Sep MT-2 Canopus cone angle update 26 Sep MT-3 Canopus cone angle update 1 Oct MT-5 changeover to high-gain antenna 10 Oct MT-4 Canopus cone angle update 19 Oct closest approach 1 Dec end of mission
VENUS albedo ( ~ 5 5 0 0 ) 1
cloud top temperature density mass

58,430 rnph 54,381 mph 38,605 mph 21,413 mph 13,551 mph 8,248 mph 7,447 mph 6,930 mph 19,157 mph 16,655 mph

0.6 min 0.76 max 200 o K 5.35 g/crn3 4.870 x lo2' g
61

VENUS (Cont'd) radius (solid surface) rotation period surface gravity surface pressure surtace temperature VOLTACE-CONTROLLED OSCILLATOR (see Radio) WEIGHT subsystem weights (see Table 9) total spacecraft weight

6080 t l O k m * 250 +40 days retrograde 900 cm/s* 20 2 2 bars* 550 2 2OoK*

539.17 Ib

*Based upon the Soviet Union's Venus 4 data. See also Table 1.

62

TABLES

Table 1. Comparison of Venus missions
Mission

I

Encounter date

Flight time,

I

Commu 11icat ion distance, 6m

Mariner II flyby

12/14/62 2/27/65
3/ 1/66

109.5 107 105 128.5 127.5

57.8 59.2 61.4
?7.9

-

Venus 2 flyby

Venus 3 impacter Venus 4 lander
Mariner V flyby

10/18/67
10/19/67

79.76

NOTE: Venus 3 impa:ted within a few minutes of the time that it reached the Moscow zenith, but the Venus 2 flyby occurred 4 h before zenith passage. Venus 2 is reported to have passed 24,000 km above the alanet surface; the corresponding number for Mariner I t was 34,854 km, an or Mariner V was 4,094 km.

65

Table 2. lime conversion guide
6MT
EDT

EST

POT

PST

Tidbinbillr

Woomen

Mddd Wrd so. Afdm

0100 0200 0300 0400 0500
0600

0700 0800 0900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 1900
2000

2100 2200 2300 2400

2100 2200 2300 2400 0100 0200 0300 0400 0500 0600 0700 0800 0900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 19W 2000

2000 1800 1700

2100 2200 2300 2400 0100 0200 0300 0400 0500 0600 0700 0800

1900 1800 2000 1900 2130 2000 2290 2100 2300 2200 2400 2300 0100 240d 0200 0100 0300 0200 MO 0300 O
0,500 O400

0600 0500 0900 0700 0600 1000 0800 0700 1100 00 o 9 m 1200 1000 0900 1300 1100 loo0 1400 1200 1100 1500 1300 1200 1600 1400 1300 1700 1500 1400 1800 1600 1500 19OQ 1700 1600

1100 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 1900 2000 2100 2200 2300 2400 0100 0200 0300 0400 0500 0600 0700 G800
09m

lo00

1030 1130 I230 1330 1430 1530 1630 1730 1830 1930 2030 2130 2230 2330 0030 0130 0230 0330 0430 0530 0630 0730 0830 0930

0300

0430 0500 0600 0700 0800
0900

1000 1 loo 1200 1300 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 1900
2000

2100 2200 2300 2400 0100 0200

66

.- *E .E E r c
E

8
0
v)

Ln

+ +
t-

(v

*

cr)

II c

c

+

t-

II

I I cn

00

Q)

d

4

67

'0
Q)

d CL
0
.l )r

B

E z
L

0

2

n E

0

o?

( D

h

T !

c??

CD

0

2 69 s ..
T?

00

m

c?! p: N N c?!
? !

W

c?! 00 0 0 9 .

. ( -

69

h

L Q)

n

b-

z Q)

P

M tu

c
0

a
0

E
v)

a o . 0 c
0
Q) CI

tu

U

m

3

n

I i 7

..

I
w

I
w

I
w

I
W

C D h C3m

00

m

70

W
4d Y-

0.

m
O

0

r
W

Y

U

d)

3= 0
L

0

E
111
0

E
L-

W

Po c ,

U

8 W

c ,

s
V
v)

a 3

+

L1 111

' .L

-? c?! v) c?!
m
h

e m
N
Q,

c
4

c

I
W

W

+

3

4

v)

71

72

3

x

9 cv
00

8
00

h

0

00rr)

-! !

2

2

3

73

j
c

Y

c

00
Qr

v:

h

m

3
m

h

a -

9

00

3

x
CD

e -

3 2
Q,

Ln

I

1

LU

74

t

0

4

75

76

00

d

2
Q,

CB * I

cv

z

cr)

-r?;
00

0

x
W

e l

h h

s

1

1

1

I I

i i

1 1 1

77

0 0 0 C d h d O d N

00

Y

78

m a oa- 0 a m - - - mw-! M m e

-* .

0 0 0

1 1 1

2

L

f
79

80

81

4

W

0

B z

82

83

Table 7. Unit reference designations of components
~~~ ~

-

~

~

Subsystem

Unit

Ref.

No.

Weight, Ib

Antcnnas

High-gain antenna Low-gain antenna Dual frequency rectiver 423-MHt antenna 50-MHz antenna (+ x) 50-MHz antenna (+Y) Control system electronics Control gyros and electronics Attitude control +X/-Y gas subsystem Gds vessel (dry) Pressure regulator 4-jct gas manifold (+XI 2-jet gas manifold (-Y) Attitude control -X/ +Y gas subsystem

25 2E2

4.91 3.41

i 5E3 15E2F1 15E2F3
7A1 ?A2 7GA1/2 7GV1 7GR1 7GM41 7GM21 7GA1/2

0.52
0.21 0.21

Attitude control

8.00
10.99

4.22 1.25 1.40 0.83

Gas vessel (dry)

7GV11

4.22

Pressure regulator
&jet gas manifold (-XI
2-jet gas manifold (+Y) Primary sun sensor (Bay II) Primary sun sensor (Bay VI) Secondary sun sensor (Bay Ili Secondary sun sensor (Bay VI) Sr_rn gate sensor Earth sensor Canopus sensor Canopus sun shutter Planet sensor Terminator sensor Cabling Electronic assembly 1 power harness pyro harness support hardware Bay 11 PIPS pyro harness PIPS instrumentation harness Electronic assembly 3 science harness data automation subsystem interconnect

7GR11 7GM411
7GM211
7PS2

1 .a
0.83
0.17 0.13

1.25

7PS6 7ss2
7SS6
7SG7 7ED6

7csa
7CS8/A

0.13 0.13 0.13 Q.34 5.58
0.67 0.57

ma
7Ts2

0.16

9w4 9W18

2 .Q3
1.39

0.43
9w10 9Wll 0.85

0.56
2.57

9W20
9W21

4.53

84

Table 7. (Cont‘d)
Subsystem

Unit

Ref.

No.

Weight,

ie

Cabling kont’d)

9W27 plasma probe interconnect 9w30 magnetometer interconnect support hardware Electronic assembly 4 9w3 command harness 9W6 data encoder harness support hardware Electronic assembly 5 radio harness 9W13 9W17 tape recorder harness support hardware Electronic assembly 6 radio harness 9w2 support hardware Electronic assembly 7 CC&S harness 9w5 attitude control harness 9W7 support hardware Upper ring harness 9w1 Upper ring power harness 9W9 Cable trwgh Solar panel pyro harness 9W8 Solar panel squib harnesses (4) 9 ’ m Attitude control gas system harness 9Wl5/16 Lower ring signal harness 9wl9 Upper ring science signal h a m s 9w22 Magnetometer signal harness 9W26 Magnetometer coaxial cable (cell) 9W29 Magnetometer coaxial cable Oamp) 9W34 WAC squib harness 9W28

0.27 0.86

04 .3
1.47 3.54 0.43
0.56 1.37 0.43

130 0.42 233 0.93

a3 4
6.00 130 1.00 1.12 0.89

1.82 7.44 0.48 G.11 023 024

030
1.32 1.65 1.78 134 1.46

Central computer

and
sequencer

Central clock launch counter End counter Maneuver clock Maneuver duration Address register an6 maneuver duration output Input decoder Central computer and sequencer transformer -rectifier Relay hold transformer-rectifier

5A1 5A2

5A3
SA4 5A5

5A6 SA7

1.72 1.14
1.33 0.49
85

5As

5A9

Table 7. (Cont'd)
Subsystem Unit Ref. No. Weight, Ib

Command

Command cietector 1 Command detector 2 Command detector 3 Conimand program control Command decoder 1 Command decoder 2 Command decoder and power supply

3A1 382
3A3

3A4
3A5

3A6 3A7 2OAl 20A22OA9

1.51 1.43 1.58 1.53 1.46 1.42
1.44 3.56

*

Data automatim subsystern
-

DAS power supply Logic
~~~

i 1.04
1.83

Data encoder

Pseudonoise generators Modulator, mixer, transfer register, data selector Analog-todigital converter Analog-to-digita I converter Event counters Functional switching Decks 100, 110 Decks 210, 220 Decks 200, 300 Decks 400, 410 Decks 420, 430 low-level amplifier Power supply
~ ~~

61 A

6A2 6A3 6A4
6A5 6A6 6A7 6A8 6A9 6A10 6A11 6A12 6A13

1.87 1 1.66 1.92 1.75 1.94 1.77 1.67 1.70 1.74 1.66 2.26
022/panel

.a

Mechanical devices

Cruise dampers and latches High-gain antenna pointing angle change deployment mechanism Long low-gain antenna support damper Short low-gain antenna support damper Pyro arming switch Separation initiated timer Solar panel boost dampers (8 required) Solar panel deployment springs and open switches

0.57
0.39
8AS1

8M1

0.32 0.1 0.6

0.11 ea
0.32/panel

86

Table 7. (Cont'd)
Subsystem

Unit

Ref.

NO.

Weight, Ib

Post-injec tion propulsion subsystem PDwer

Post-injec tion propuIsion subsyster,i

10A
~ ~

43.54 21.22 1.86 1.64 2.94
33.13

___

~

Power regulator Power distribution subassembly Power synchronizer Battery charger assembly Battery assembly 2400-Hz main inverter 2400-Hz maneuver inverter 400-Hz 3-phase inverter Pyrotechnics control assembly Pyrotechnics control assembly Receiver assembly Receiver assembly Receiver transformer-rectifier Exciter assembly Attenuator Directional coupler, high-gain antenna Directional coupler, omni directional antenna Auxiliary oscillator, temperature transducer Dual 3-port circulator switch M r circulator switch ot Cavity filter 2 Cavity power amplifier Control circuits Cavity power supply Traveling wave tube amplifier power supply Traveling wave tube amplifier Exciters, transformer-rectifier

4A8
a1 1 4A12

4A13
4A14 4A15 4A16 4A18
81 A

2.60 2.65
3.36

Pyrotechnics

8A2
2RA1 2RA2
2TR1

4.02 4.01

Radio

4.40
3.90 0.88 5.04 0.20 026 0.49 0.03 2.55 224 0.38 1.78 1.44 2.07 3.45 1.s 10 .6
a7

2RE1 2AT1

2Dc1
2DC2
ZTTl

2cs3 2cs2
2CF2 2PA1 2cc1 2Ps2

2Ps3 2PA2 2TR2

Table 7. (Cont'd)
Subsystem

unit

Ref. No.

weight, Ib

Science instruments

Dual frequency receiver Trapped radiation detector Plasma probe sensor Plasma probe electronics Plasma probe electronics Plasma probe electronics Magnetometer electronics transformer-rectif ier Magnetometer electronics Magnetometer Sensor UV photometer UV photometer electronics Solar panel Solar panel Solar panel Solar panel
~~

35A1/2 25A1 32A1 32A2 32A3 32A4 33A2 33A3 33A1 34A1 34A2 4A1

2.55 ea 2.63 1.22 1.76 1.29 2.61 2.69 2.38 1.31 7.61 16 .0 15.11 15.44 15.25 15.23

Solar panels

+X -X +Y -Y

4A5 4A3
4A7

~

Structure

Bay II shear web Electronic assembly chassis Bay I Bay 111 Bay IV Bay V Bay VI Bay VI1 Octagon structure Propulsion support structure Superstructure Tape Tape Tape Tape Tape Tape transport electronics 1 electronics 2 electronics 3 electronics 4 electronics 5 CTR)

4.22 42 6 4.30 4.55 4.30 4.34

34.50
2.25 3.25
1A 61 16A2 16A3 16A4 16A5 16A6

Tape recorder

9.07 2.06 1.89 2.36 1.96 f .74

Temperature control reference

+X $13 white -Y Cat-a-Lac black - X S-13M white

11Tr61 11m7 11Tr65

all
0.1 1 0.11

88

Table 7. (Cont'd)
Subsystem

1

Unit

Ref.

No.

I

Wdght, ,b

Temperature control

Cable trough blanket Louvers (6 sets) Lower thermal blanket and attach hardware Side shields Upper thermal blanket and attach hardware Deployable sun shade arid attach hardware Trapped radiation detector shields Magnetometer thermal shield Attitude control gas jet shields (4 required)

0.45 1.35 ea
2.19 1.68
1.83

0.78

0.07 0.04 0.08 ea

89

6s
0 E

s .c
Y

E

0 a3

E s .I
a3

90

N

ln

m m v-4

91

i
92

Independently mounted.

A/C = attitude control.
TC = thermal control.

W Actuators and mechanisms.

t Ion chamber bracket.

Table 9. Mariner V launched weight, Ib.

Bay V: RF coinmunications and tape recorder. Bay 11: propulsion. Bay 111: science and DAS. Bay IV: data encoder and command. Bay VI: RF conirnunications.

Bay VI!. attitude control and CC&S.
Bay VIi1: power regulator.

93

Table 10. Redundant equipment backup sources
Type of redundancy employed

Redundant equipment

Discussion

Two identical exciters switchable either by internal logic or by
ground command. Only one operates at any time.

RF exciters

Block

Pyrotechnic control assemblies Midcourse propulsion valves Power bwnter regulators

Block
Block

Two identical half systems, both on line continuously after separation.
Duplicate pyrotechnic-actuatedvalves provide the capability for two midcourse rnaneiivers. Failure sensing circuit detects over/ under voltage condition at main booster output. Switches maneuver booster on and main booster off. Three relays can supply power t o the science loads. One operated at separation or DC-V2; one operated at DC-V2 or M-7; operated at one DGV25, overriding science inhibit logic. Two identical units switchable by ground ccmmand. Only one operates at any time. Two half system and pressure vessels. Both operate continuously after attitude control turnsn.

Block

Science power relays

Block

Analog-todigi tal converter and pseudono& code generator Attitude control gas system

Block

Block

DAS encounter clocks

Block

Two clocks count in parallel to achieve recording sequence control. Clocks A and B initiated by DC-V16 and planet sensor, respectively.
Two crystal oscillators are on continuously. Failure of prime oscillator causes backup to be gated into countdown circuit t o obtain required internal frequencies.

DAS oscillators

Block

94

Tzhla 10. (Cont'd)
Redundant equipment Type of redundancy ernpI oye d

Discussion

-

Cavity and TWT power amplifiers plus associated power supplies switchable either by internal logic or by ground command. On!y one operates at any time. Two separat ion-activated switches: pyiotechnic arming switch and separation initiated timer. Either one can power both pyrotechqic half systems. ?imary control is a 38.4kHz synchronizationisignal from the CC&S. In the absence of this signal, synchronization is derive ' f:om an oscillator internal to power, OF the inverters pill free-run at appxximately 2.4 kHz. A Canopus sensor and an earth sensor are used The latter is useful only during the first 3 weeks of the mission. Accuracy of roll attitude determination is somewhat reduced. Normally initiated a t L-3 or DC-V13. Canopus sensor on with brighlnes? gate in effect. This mode may Le restored Tfter use of an alternate by DC-ll9. DC-VI5. Canopus sensor m; brightnes- gate removed from circi!it. Canopus sensor will track any detectable light source. Gyros disabled. DC-V18. Inertial roll cctltral. Canopus sensor off, gyros on. Pitch arid yaw gyros in rate mode; sun sensors unaffscted. WV20. No roll control. Canopus sensor off; gyros off.

RF power amplifiers Functional

Pyrgtechnic arming cievices

Functional

Power frequency sources

Functional

Roll attitude
sensors

Functional/ alternate mode

Roll orientation controls

Alternate mode

95

P

.

96

:
,

: ? ?
1 0 0

5

97

w

h

98

e
. I

0

c1

m E L
0

.-

c .
E W 0

c

E W

c

E E
c 0 u

c .

c .
E

L a E al

al I -

E

4
a a

F

c"

m

99

Table 13. Cabling subsystem engineering information
Unit Connectors

9w1 9w2 9w3 9w4 9w5 9W6 9w7 9W8 9w9 9w10 9w11 9W13 9W 15/16 9W17 9W18 9w19 9W20 9\42 1 9W22 9W26 9W27 9W28 9W29 9W30 9w34 9W38
Total

23
4

1
9

1 1

25 14 10

43 8

10 18

3
5

7
11

1
25

4
20

1
1

17
19 25 9 5

5

14 18 6

4
37

5
23 5

6
L

3

1

d 0

5

4
15 10

10
11 5

1

11
11 5

a
0 0 6
8

0
8

3
8

3
8 2 12 27 3

1

7

3
12 5 12 29 19 27

0
14 32

4
5 15 6

5
0 39 0
82
1

27
9

1

0
1
4

1 1
3

4
5
3 3 2 2 2 2 2

4
3

0 0
0

6
4 2

0
0 0

1
0 0
8 226

2 12 137

131

23

12 0 - 29 1 267

100

Table 14. Types

df

environmental tests

-

a. Major tests
~ ~~ ~

System level

I

Subsystem level

Vi bration Shock Acoustic Thermal-vacuum Electromagnetic interference

Bewh handling Transportation vibration Humidity Explosive atmosphere Shock Static acceleration Low-frequency vibration Complex wave vibration Thermal-vacuum Thermal shock RF interference Magnetics
~

~~~

~~

b. Miscellaneous tests

Type

I

Description

Structural test model

Temperature control model Developmental test model Other tests

Basic structure static test Vi bration Modal survey Acoustic Special electromagnetic interference test (squib safety) Solar panel deployment Space simulator thermal-vacuum Stray tight reflectance Antenna pattern Preliminary stray light test

RF noise measurements of AFETR operations Electronic packaging development Preliminary match-mate Thermal blanket ballooning Low-gain antenna extreme temperature Electronic assembly shipping container Solar panel structural development Antenna deployment testing Sun shade deployment testing

101

Table 15. Assembly level environmental test requirements
lest
TA

test level

FA

test level

Bench handling Drop test Transportation vibration

Free-fall corner drop Height variable to weigh!

Not applicable

1.3 g peak, 2-35 Hs 3.0 g peak, 35-48 Hz 5.0 g peak, 4 8 - 5 0 Hz
h e 1 and .iir during assembly operation 75% humidity a n i varied temperature Five 20r)-g, 0.7 kO.2 ms TPST pulses, 3 axes

ExpIosive atmosphere
Humidity Shock Static acceleration Vi bration Sinusoidal (all assemblies) Sinusoidal (assernblies 210 Ib

+14 g, 3 axes
Hz 3g peak, 4.4-15 Hz

5 min
I

-c 1.5 in., 1-: -''

3 min

Not applicable

2.0 g rms sine, 15-40 Hr" 9.0 g rms sine, 40-250 Hzb 600 s 4.5 g rms sine, 250-2000 H t Random noise 16.4g rms noise, shaped spectrum 180 s

9.7 g rms noise,
shaped spectrum, 60 s

I

Vacuuin/ te rnperature

- 10°C (+ 14°F)
+750C
(+

4h

167°F)

12 days

0°C (320F1, 2 h 55°C (131°F), 40 h
torr Not applicable

lo-' torr
Thermal shock (for external assemblies)

+750 to -46°C (167" to -50°F)

Game for assemblies < l o Ib.

b9.0 g rms sine, 40-2000 Hz for assemblies < l o !b.

102

c .-

E

m

\

&

E

L

M
h

.v)
c
Q)

E .-

.-

. I c

E

S

8 .0
0

E

E
0 t

2
c

..

0 .u

5

n

2

103

Table 17. Subsystem environmental test summary ivibration and thermal-vacuum)
Environment

I

Total items in test

I

Total failures

I

Failure rate, yo

TA tests
Vi bration Vacuum/temperature 21

4
7

19

22

32

FA tests
Vacuum/ t e mperat u re Vibration

51 117

5

6.2 6.5

7

Table 18. System level environmental test summary

Problem Spacecraft 67-1 (backup) Spacecraft 67-2 (flight)

Failure that should have been detected at subsystem level Failure that could be detected only at systems level

2

4

Tabk 19. Spacecraft tests
A t JPL

I

A t RFETR

Subsystem tests Subsystem interface tests System tests Attitude colltrol quantitative leak test Electrical modal survey Space simulator test Vibration test Weight and center-of-gravity measurement

Systern tests SpacecraftIAgena adapter matchmate Electrical test RF loop calibration Dummy run countdowri Umbilical release test Weight and center-af-gravity measurement Cooling test

104

Table 19. (Cont’d)
~

A t JPL

1

A t AFElR

Free mode test Magnetic mapping Agend/spacecraft interface test Launch countdown dummy run Space Flight Operations/ spacecraft/Deep Space Network compatibility test Current loop test System tests

Joint fl ight-acceptance composite tests Science instrument calibrations Magnetic mapping Spacecraft /Agena matchmaie Final system test Final electrical tests Spacecraft post-matchmate checkout Simulated launch

Table 20. launch environmental telemetry channel assignment
Channel Measurement Calibration range (nominal)

Launch spacecraft - Agena telemetry

12 13

Spacecraft V-bad strain gage 1 Spacecraft V-band strain gage 2 Shroud separation monitor Shroud pressure Spacecraft-Agen? temperature Spacecraft axial vibration Adapter axial vibration

0-2700 Ib
0-2700 Ib 0-28 V &15 psia 0-165 *F

15 (44)
16 (17) 16 (18) 17

t 2 0g

18

+30 g
~~~~ ~

F

JPL base band
~~

Launch complex environmental acoustic instrumentation

1 2
3

Umbilical boom microphone 1 Umbilical btjom micruyhone 2 Umbilical bcom microphone 3 Umbilical bGom misrophone 4

150 dS
150 dB

150 dB
150 dB

4

1’35

106

cu
I

I n
H

h
h

rr!

n
4

0

r

I

I

U

0

I

I

t
c

'c m
Y

W

rn
Q,
v)

E

cv
U c m

e
U

m

c

0

0

D E rn
0 ..CI

0

c
v)

* E
c ,

m

0

0

cr

w

c
W

L c ,

h
v)

c

E

W

3

w

5.

e,

5
w
m
L

-Y 0
Q)

s

0
Q)

c3

a

107

cr)

. c3

CD 0

e
m
t?
h
4
4

00
0-2

h
Y

d

Ln

m
cr)

0

CD

-?
03

4

00

=? a

00

-?
d

a -=t
I n
M

c3

*

I
rD y !
h
4

cr,

N

;

I

E m

' b

) .

I
x
\

>
x
\

+
I

+

Q)

d

m

ZV- N 0d f 0 N l (

108

m
4

2
d.

" .

d .
00

-t

4

I
LL
0

109

cv

c9 a m

II

0

u !

h

hl

I

110

m o
N

" .

09

L L L L
0 0

LL
0

LL
0

LL
0

L
0

L

L
0

5
h

m

m

+
0

.*r =
111

0
00
w

Ln

+

m m .
v )

3 ,

m

c9 eN

I
LL
0

L L L L
0 0

L
0

L L 0 0

iLL
0 0

LL
0

N N

W

h

0005
d b

d

b

N N

112

I &
0

L L L L
0 0

LL
0

LL
0

L

QJ

5: E
m
L=

a

m

E .-

z
-

h

O

m c 3

e *

113

114

-

Command number

t
Command name

Table 23. List of commands

Command address

Binary

Octal

DC-Vi

Command TLM mode 1 Command TLM mode 2, turn on science Track change command Command TLM mode 4 Command switch data rate Command switch ADC/PNG Switch power amplifier Switch exciters Switch ranging Transmit high-receive low Transmit high-receive high Transmit low-receive low Maneuver command inhibit inhibit prop command (turn on Canopus s5nsor and attitt-de control Remove maneuver inhibit Remove prop inhibit (resets DC-Vl3) Canopus gate inhibit override Start encounter backup clock Cycle Canopus cone angle Gyros on-inertial control (2nd-roll positive tncrement) Gyros off-normal control (resets DG-V15, DC-V18, & DC-V20) Remove roil control

110 000 011 00

6 030

DC-V2 DC-V3

110011 011 10
110 101 011 00 110 011 101 00

6 332 6 530

DGV4
DC-V5 DC-V6

110@00 VI 10.
110 000 1111

6 350 6 050
6 060

w

DC-V7
DC-VS DGV9

110 ~ 1 0 0 1 0 0

6 110
6 652

'IO 110 101 10
110 110011 10 110 110 00000

6 632
6 600

DC-VI0
DC-V11 DC-V12

110 101 110 00
110 101 101 00

6 560

6 550

DC-V13

!10 010 11100

E 270
6 240
& 140

DC-V14

110 010 100 00 110 001 100 OG

DC-Y15
DC-VI6 DC-V17 DC-Vl8 DGVl9

110 101000 23
110 010 001 00

6 500
6 210

110 100 loll 00

6 440

I10 100 010 00

6 420
6 740 6 720

DGV20
DC-V21 DC-V22

110 11110000

Roll override-negative increment 110 111 010 00
Aiitenna pointing angle change

I10 111001 00

6 710

115

number

Arm second prop maneuver Begin DAS encounter mode (switch to data mode 3) (pltanet sensor power on) (switch plasma probe to mode 3) Science on/overload inhibit override Begin encounter sequence (tape recorder power on) (energize terminator sensor) (batterv charger to boost
-11ode)

Binary

Octal

DC-V23
DC-V24

110 001 11100

6 170

110 100 001 00

6 410

UC-V25

I10 010 010 00
1 1 011 110 00 1) 110 100 11100

6 220 6 360 6 470 6 662 6 120

DCW6

Tlirli

i)c-v27 DGV28
DGV29 QC-VI QC-V1-1 QC-V13 QC-V13

if science (battery charger to boost mode) hitizte midcourse maneuver h i t c h battery charger (tape recorder electronics off) Arm first prop maneuver Maneuver command bits to CC&S (Pitch turn duration) (Roil turr! duration) (Motor burn duration)

110 110 110 10 110 001 010 00

110 011 000 11-10 6 303-2 110 011 000 00-01 6 300-1 110 011 000 10-11 6 302-3

Command
~~

Table 24. Description of cammands
Effect

DC-V!

Tiansfers the data encoder to mode 1 operation (all engineering words) as soon as the transfer is acceptable to the data encoder transfer logic. Transfers the data encoder to mode 2 operation (20 engineering words, 40 science words) as soon as the transfer is acceptable t o the data encoder transfer logic; applies 2.4-kHz power to the science instruments.

DC-V2

Table 24. (Cont'd)
Command
Effect

DC-V3

Switches tape recorder data tracks (playback only). Transfers the data encoder to mode 4/1 opGration (recorded data or rsal-time engineering data) as soon as the transfer is acceptable to the data encoder transfer logic. (If recorded data are available from the ta::f : t-order, recorded data are telemetered; if no recorded data ave ; W S C R ~ (at end of tapes), then engineering data in mode 1 (ire teizmetered.) Stops tape recorder record mode if in operation. Transfers the data encoder from one bit rate to the other. The data encoder can operate at either 8-1/3 51 33-1/3 bps. Transfers the data encoder from one (ADC/PNG) to the other. The data encoder has two ADC/PNi;s, A and B. Transfers the radio from one power amplifier tr, the other. The radio subsystem has two power amplifiers, A (traieling wave tube) and B (cavity). Changes the radio from one exciter to the other. The adio subsystem has two exciters, A and B. Turns the spacecraft radio ranging receiver either on 0: 3ff. Causes the radio subsystem circu!ator switches to he conditioned so that the spacecraft transmits via the high-gain antenna and receives via the low-gain antenna. Causes the radio stlbsystem circulator switches to be conditioned so that ++e sbscecraft transmits and receives via the high-gain antenna. Causes the radio subsystem circulator itches to be combtioned so that the spacecraft transm;'ts and receives via the low-gain antema. Removes the attitude control excitation power from CCSS control lines so that the attitude control functions that are controlled by the CC&S are disabled. DC-V13 also prevents the pyrotechnics control circuitry from firing the motor start and stop squibs. Reverses the state of all the relays acted cpon by DC-V13. DC-Vl4, therefore, is a reset for DC-Y13 and reverts the atti+:,de control and pyrotechcics subsvttems back to CC&S I t rol on

DGV4

DC-V5

DC-V6
DC-V7

DC-V8

DC-V9

DC-VI0

DC-VI1

DC-VI2

DEV13

DC-V14

.

117

Table 24. (Cont’d)
Cornmanti

I

Sffect

DC-Y15

Causes the Canopus sensor roll error signal to be apolieci to the roll gas jet electronics at all times, regardless of whether or not the roll acquisition logic is satisfied, and also prevents the roll search signal from being applied to the roll channel, and roli acquisition logic violations from turning on the gyros. Toggles DAS Timer A. Used to issue backup commands for the encounter sequence. Causes a step change in the Cznopus sensor cone angle by changing the voltage on the deflection plcltes o6 the Canopus sensor’s imbge dis:ector. Turns on the gyros (ir; the inertial mode) and the Canopus sznsor sun shutter and turns off the Canop!: sinsor. DC-V18 also turns on the turn cmmand generator and conditions the attitude control circuitry for commznded ral! turns. Each succesive DC-V18 causes positive roll rota!ion of 2.25 deg. Serves as the reset fr>i DC-Vl5, DC-V18, and CS-?20. Turns off the Canopus sensor and turns on the Canopus sensor sun shctter; alsc irlhibiis the roll acquisition logic from turning on t!v gyros. Simulates a Canopus acquisition logic violation, turns on thc gyros, and applies a negative roll search signal to the .oil gas jet electronics, thereby causing the spacecraft to counterclockwise roll search to acquire a new target. Each scv-ssive DC-V21 will zlso cause the spcecraft to roll h r , i 2.25 deg if preceded by a DC-V18 Commands py:o to activate a pinpuller that allows the antenna to change position for opiimizing fh2 S-band occultawn experiment. Sets relays in the pyrotechnics subsysterr so that CC&S commands M-6 and M-7 are routed to the squibs allotted to the second motor burn. Begins DAS encounter mode. Enable DAS timer E? (toggle). Switch tn :,A mode 3; planet sensor power on; .:witch plasma p x 4 2., to encounter forrnak.

DC-V16

DC-VI 7

DC-VI8

DGV19 DC-V20

DC-V21

cc-v22

DC-V23

DC-V24

Command

Effect

GC-V25

Begins encounter sequence. Applies power to the termir ?t?r sensor and io the tape recorder. Enables the battery charger booFt mode arid rer loves Dooster regulator @vel load inhibit. Removes 2.4-kHz power from all the science lo-4s !tape recorder 2.4-kHz power rewsins 0-l; also enables the battery charger boost mode. starts the maiieuver sequence hy issuing the CC&S command M-1 (turn on gyros), by appiying power LO the maneuver clock, and by removing the mailewer clamp and a flip-flop reszt signal from the CC&S maneuver circuitry.

DC-V26

DC-V27

.

D C - V ~ ~ Transfers the battery chsrger from the charge m o ' io the b:iost enable mode or vice versa. Turns off 2.4-kHz power to the tape recorder.

DC-v29

Sets relays in thz pyroiech, :s subsystem so that the CC&S ccirnrnands M-6 and M-7 3re rocted to ti? - 3 2 1 s allotted to the first notor burn. Sets pitch turn polarity and preloads the 'G3 pitch shift rggister so that at a counting rate of 1 pps the register will fill in the required time interval for the attitude control subsystem to pitch tu, n the spacecraft the amount I required for 2 given rn:d course maneuver. Sets roll turn polarity and preloads the CC&S roll shift register so that at a counting rate of 1 pps the reqister wil! fill in the required time interval for the attitude control subsystem to rLIl turn the spacecro?t the m t u n t required for a given midcourse maneuver.

QC-Vl-1

QC-VI-2

QC-V 1 3

Preloads tho CC&S velocity shift register so that at a count'ng rate of ?O pps the register v d l fiil ill ttic timc interval necessary for the midcourse motor fo burn so that the spacecraft obtains thr required velocity change for a gi+en midcourse maneuver.

119

Table 25. CC&S commands

command No. CCtS

I

Function and purpose

L-l
L-2
L-3

Deploy solar panels. Gackup for separatioii initiated timer. Turn on attitude control. Backup for pyro araing switch. Turn on Canopus sensor. Turn on gyros for warmup. Maneuver start command. If CC&S commaod L-3 has failed to operate, the automatic resetting of M-1 after the maneuver will turn the Canopus sensor off. This condition can be corrected by sending DC-V13 after completion of the maneuver.

M-1

M-2

All axes to inertial control. Places all three gyros in position mode and places gas jet system under command of gyro position errors. Turns off Canopus sensor. Turns on atitopilot,
Set turn polarity.

w3

M4
M-5

Command X axis (pitch) turn. Command Z axis (roll) tuin. Start motor burn. Stop motor burn. Set Campus sensor cone angle 1.
Set Canopus sensor cone angle 2.

M-6
M-7
MT-1 M-f-2
Mi3
MTQ

Set Canopus sensor cone angle 3. Set Canopus sensor cone angle 4.
Transmit high-receive low. Switch to 8-113 bps. Turn on tape recorder power. Start terminator sensor excitation. Begin DAS encounter sequence. Switch to mode 4.

MT-5
MT-6
MT-7

MT-8
MT-9

120

Table 25. (Csnt'd)
CClS command No.

I

Function and purpose

CY-1

Fc4owing DC-V9, switches ranging receiver off; failure switching to backup transmitter and switching of antennas .

NOTE: In the case of interfaces with the attitude control subsystem, the CC&S closes or interrtpts a circuit supplied by attitude control. Duration of the circuit closure or interruption depends on the fdnction to be performed. CC&S commands L-2, L-3, and MT-1 through MT-4 are permanent changes in the circuit state. CC&S commands M-1 through M-5 require resetting after controlled periods.

121

FIGURES

0

o
0

_=

0

_-.
0

0

U

lo
u PL .

-

5

I

I
,

127

130

U J

z n
2 K

*o-+

0

w

'u
a
l i

0 P W

a0
I t

BE
a G
I' ;

K

0
I

4

' 0

\

0

\,
I

d

131

(D (D

0
0

W

c m
L
0)

U
0
0

e :

0)

132

*
W
VI VI

* P

*
E
m

133

4

0

W K N

u .-

M

C 0

Y L

0

0

0

0

II

134

U

135

m
v) v)

5

E

a

\

w Fa

:
0
L'

0
0
0

0
0

01 I
0

0
O

0

-

J

E

136

d
D
O

0

0

0

0

0

137

u
i bb
G

138

MT-l *E-56.4

dqr
davr
days

MT-2-E-39.7 MT-3-€43.0

I

I

I I I
-125

I

-lw

I
-75
-50 -25

d
100

0

25

50

75

I

iIME FROM ENCOUNTER, dmys

Fig. 7. Canopus sensor cone angle update

141

CANOPUS CONE ANGLE

/

REQUIRED FIELD OF Vltw IN CONE FOR ALL POSSIBLE LAUNCH DATES

SN U

Fig. 8. Earth sensor field of view

142

c

-0 -

L

I

I

I

I

I

I

-

A

'2lMlnO

MOSNX H l t l V 3

143

TIME FROM LAUNCH,days

Fig. 13. Bus temperatures vs time from launch

Fig. 14. Sunlit component temperatures vs time from launch
149

Fig. 15. Shaded component temperatures vs time from launch

150

7

I

I

151

- 0

I

I

w n

t
i m

>
0

- 2

Lo
IV

- 0

I

LD

D

Q
I

0 0

1 0
I

0

0

2

2

0

0

f 2

152

-1 I

153

I I
r.

-I-I I I I

1

1
L ,

Fig. 18. Command subsystem

Fig. 19. Command format

154

I

'1

I

!I

156

TO

(33&1)

Fig, 36. Helium magnetometer subsystem

175

138

192

\
> >
t

nl
rr)

0

193

194

I -

a
a
42

60

.
19OCT 1967

,
TIME, GMT

Fig. 53. Encounter velocities and altitude

195

IONI#
* D

ATMI

........
QUAD

........... ............. ........... .......... ......... ........ .....
;; i

-.-j

t"

SUN

ATMF = final ohzervation o atmospheric effect on S-band signal f ATMI = initial observation of atmospheric effect on S-band signa!
BL = bright limb of planet observed by ultroviolet photometer

CO = center of geometrical occultation DL = dark limb of planet observed by ultraviolet photometer .. E = periapsis

GO = Geometrical occultation; earth-speecraft line of sight intersects dark limb of planet IONF = final detection of ionosphere by dual frequency receiver ION1 = initial detection of ionosphere by dual frequency receiver

L S = loss of O

spacecraft radio signal resulting from occultation

QUAD = quadrature; sun-Venus-Mariner V angle 90 deg R S = reacquisition of signal by Goldstone DSCC O TER = terminator crossing observed by ultraviolet photometer XGO = exit from geometrical occultation at bright limb

fig. 54. Time and position of key encounter events
196

4

2

102

6 4

2

r
\
6090
6 00 1

IO'
61I O
6120
6130 614C

DISTANCE FROM PLANET CENTER, R, km

Fig. 55. Refractivity as a function of height in the Venus atmosphere

197

c ,

E

+ I
c

c .

m
VY

U

W

N

II 5
Q)

oi

d-

GP ' 3 0 n l l l d W V 1VNE)IS

198

5.5

5 .o

4.5

P

+-

-.
4.0

--

w
(3

I

5

v)

a
(3

3.5

- - --

+X/-Y HALF GAS S Y S T E M GAS CONSUMPTION RATE= 0.001I 2 Ib/day -X/+Y HALF GAS S Y S T E M GAS CONSUMPTION RATE = O.Nl34Ib/doy TOTAL GAS WEIGHT -

3.0

2.5

-

-

* I _ .

.-.-.-

-*--

2-2-

__ - I
I

2 .o
225 255

I

I

I

I

205

315

345

Fig. 57. Gas weight history

199

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