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Summer

OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY


To study the attendance system in Britannia Industries Limited, Pantnagar.

➢ To know how much importance company gives to its attendance system.

➢ To know the satisfaction level among workers for the attendance system

followed by the company.

➢ To minimize the over time of workers.

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SCOPE OF STUDY

This my Project report in ‘Britannia Biscuits (P) Ltd,

SIDCUL, rudrapur’ which gives information about the

“External Environment Analysis and Strategies for

HR ” in Britannia Biscuits (P) Ltd .and its process, It will

give all information about topic related to subject and

implied in organization, This study will definitely show

its importance while another person will study about this

subject and any other topic which is related to the

subject. This study might be help him but this study is

based upon my personal experience and observation so

according to the environment report may show its

importance.

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RESEARCH

METHODOLOGY
SAMPLE SIZE

As it was seen that were four shops namely- Good day general. Good day

family,

Good day fifty-fifty and Good day Cream.

There were overall 1400 contractual workers working in these four shops in three

shifts.

Sample size chosen for this study was 200 in which 50 workers were chosen from

each shop.

SAMPLE SIZE

1- Sample size unit- Britannia industries ltd

2- Sample size no.- 200 employees

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To conduct any type of research a scientific method must be followed.The studies of

any kind contain an immense material in it which is very difficult to collect.So in

order to make my work easy and systematic I should follow research methods.

PRIMARY SOURCES

The primary data sources was collected from the staff members of HRD by using an

appropriate and standard questionnaire and observation of the working

environment of the organisation.

Primary data was collected through

• Questionnaires

• Personal observations

The instrument used for collection of data was questionnaire. The questionnaire
consisted close-ended question.

QUESTIONNAIRE

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STRUCTURED UNSTRUCTURED

OPEN CLOSE

ENDED ENDED

SECONDARY SOURCES

The secondary sources of data collection include ‘Company policy’,

documents,official records,articles from websites,newspapers and

magazines.secondary data was collected through

• Newspapers

• Magazines

• Journals

• Internet

METHODOLOGY ADOPTED
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➢ The first step was to identify the need of attendance system for all

employees.

➢ Attendance system followed by Britannia Industries Ltd, Pantagar was

analyzed closely and questions were asked from respective managers in

charge to clarify the doubts.

➢ To evaluate the effectiveness of attendance system questionnaires were

distributed to workers.

➢ The data obtained was analyzed to see the level of satisfaction arising from

the attendance & further suggestions were given to frame better attendance

system programmes.

As already mentioned that the attendance system is an on- going process, and

experimentation never stops. The need have to be reviewed periodically&

attendance system wheel never stops.

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INTRODUCTION

FMCG INDUSTRY

Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG), aalternatively called as CPG (Consumer packaged

goods) industry primarily deals with the production, distribution and marketing of consumer

packaged goods.FMCG are products that are sold quickly at relatively low cost. Though the

absolute profit made on FMCG products is relatively small, they generally sell in large

quantities, so the cumulative profit on such products can be large. Examples of FMCG generally

include a wide range of frequently purchased consumer products such as toiletries, soap,

cosmetics, teeth cleaning products, shaving products and detergents, as well as other non-

durables such as glassware, light bulbs, batteries, paper products and plastic goods. FMCG may

also include pharmaceuticals, consumer electronics, packaged food products and drinks,

although these are often categorized separately.

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Products belonging to the FMCG segment generally have the following

characteristics:

➢ They are used at least once in a month.

➢ They are used directly by the end consumer.

➢ They are non – durable.

➢ They are sold in packaged form.

The prime segments of the FMCG sector include personal care, household care,

packaged food and beverages, spirits and tobacco. The giants in FMCG sector

include Unilever, Proctor & Gamble, Cadbury’s, Wrigley and Perfetti.

FMCG are those consumables which are normally consumed by the consumers at a regular

interval. Some of the prime activities of FMCG industry are selling, marketing, financing,

purchasing, etc. The industry also engaged in operations, supply chain, production and general

management.

FMCG products contrast with durable goods or major appliances such as kitchen appliances,

which are generally replaced less than once a year. In

Britain, "white goods" in FMCG refers to large household electronic items such as refrigerators.

Smaller items such as TV sets and stereo systems are sometimes termed "brown goods"

Some of the best known examples of Fast Moving Consumer Goods companies include Clorox,

Colgate-Palmolive, General Mills, H. J. Heinz, Reckitt Benckiser, Sara Lee, Nestlé, Unilever,

Procter & Gamble, Coca-Cola, Carlsberg, Kimberly-Clark, Kraft, Pepsi, Warburtons, Wilkinson

and Mars.

Indian FMCG Sector

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The Indian FMCG sector is the fourth largest in the economy and has a market size of US$13.1

billion. Well-established distribution networks, as well as intense competition between the

organised and unorganised segments are the characteristics of this sector. FMCG in India has a

strong and competitive MNC presence across the entire value chain. It has been predicted that

the FMCG market will reach to US$ 33.4 billion in 2015 from US $ billion 11.6 in 2003. The

middle class and the rural segments of the Indian population are the most promising market for

FMCG, and give brand makers the opportunity to convert them to branded products. Most of the

product categories like jams, toothpaste, skin care, shampoos, etc, in India, have low per capita

consumption as well as low penetration level, but the potential for growth is huge.

The Indian Economy is surging ahead by leaps and bounds, keeping pace with rapid

urbanization, increased literacy levels, and rising per capita income.

The big firms are growing bigger and small-time companies are catching up as well. According

to the study conducted by AC Nielsen, 62 of the top 100 brands are owned by MNCs, and the

balance by Indian companies. Fifteen companies own these 62 brands, and 27 of these are owned

by Hindustan Lever. Pepsi is at number three followed by Thums Up. Britannia takes the fifth

place, followed by Colgate (6), Nirma (7), Coca-Cola (8) and Parle (9). These are figures the soft

drink and cigarette companies have always shied away from revealing. Personal care, cigarettes,

and soft drinks are the three biggest categories in FMCG. Between them, they account for 35 of

the top 100 brands.

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Exhibit I

THE TOP 10 COMPANIES IN FMCG SECTOR

S. NO. Companies
1. Hindustan Unilever Ltd.
2. ITC (Indian Tobacco Company)
3. Nestlé India
4. GCMMF (AMUL)
5. Dabur India
6. Asian Paints (India)
7. Cadbury India
8. Britannia Industries
9. Procter & Gamble Hygiene
and Health Care
10. Marico Industries
The companies mentioned in Exhibit I, are the leaders in their respective sectors. The personal

care category has the largest number of brands, i.e., 21, inclusive of Lux, Lifebuoy, Fair and

Lovely, Vicks, and Ponds. There are 11 HLL brands in the 21, aggregating Rs. 3,799 crore or

54% of the personal care category. Cigarettes account for 17% of the top 100 FMCG sales, and

just below the personal care category. ITC alone accounts for 60% volume market share and

70% by value of all filter cigarettes in India.

The foods category in FMCG is gaining popularity with a swing of launches by HLL, ITC,

Godrej, and others. This category has 18 major brands, aggregating Rs. 4,637 crore. Nestle and

Amul slug it out in the powders segment. The food category has also seen innovations like

softies in ice creams, chapattis by HLL, ready to eat rice by HLL and pizzas by both GCMMF

and Godrej Pillsbury. This category seems to have faster development than the stagnating

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personal care category. Amul, India's largest foods company, has a good presence in the food

category with its ice-creams, curd, milk, butter, cheese, and so on. Britannia also ranks in the top

100 FMCG brands, dominates the biscuits category and has launched a series of products at

various prices.

In the household care category (like mosquito repellents), Godrej and Reckitt are two players.

Goodknight from Godrej, is worth above Rs 217 crore, followed by Reckitt's Mortein at Rs 149

crore. In the shampoo category, HLL's Clinic and Sunsilk make it to the top 100, although P&G's

Head and Shoulders and Pantene are also trying hard to be positioned on top. Clinic is nearly

double the size of Sunsilk.

Dabur is among the top five FMCG companies in India and is a herbal specialist. With a turnover

of Rs. 19 billion (approx. US$ 420 million) in 2005-2006, Dabur has brands like Dabur Amla,

Dabur Chyawanprash, Vatika, Hajmola and Real. Asian Paints is enjoying a formidable presence

in the Indian sub-continent, Southeast Asia, Far East, Middle East, South Pacific, Caribbean,

Africa and Europe. Asian Paints is India's largest paint company, with a turnover of Rs.22.6

billion (around USD 513 million). Forbes Global magazine, USA, ranked Asian Paints among

the 200 Best Small Companies in the World

Cadbury India is the market leader in the chocolate confectionery market with a 70% market

share and is ranked number two in the total food drinks market. Its popular brands include

Cadbury's Dairy Milk, 5 Star, Eclairs, and Gems. The Rs.15.6 billion (USD 380 Million) Marico

is a leading Indian group in consumer products and services in the Global Beauty and Wellness

space. The Indian FMCG sector is the fourth largest sector in the economy with a total market

size in excess of US$ 13.1 billion. It has a strong MNC presence and is characterized by a well-

established distribution network, intense competition between the organized and unorganized

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segments and low operational cost. Availability of key raw materials, cheaper labor costs and

presence across the entire value chain gives India a competitive advantage.

The FMCG market is set to treble from US$ 11.6 billion in 2003 to US$ 33.4 billion in 2015.

Penetration level as well as per capita consumption in most product categories like jams,

toothpaste, skin care, hair wash etc in India is low indicating the untapped market potential.

Burgeoning Indian population, particularly the middle class and the rural segments, presents an

opportunity to makers of branded products to convert consumers to branded products.

Growth is also likely to come from consumer 'upgrading' in the matured product categories. With

200 million people expected to shift to processed and packaged food by 2010, India needs

around US$ 28 billion of investment in the food-processing industry.

Automatic investment approval (including foreign technology agreements within specified

norms), up to 100 per cent foreign equity or 100 per cent for NRI and Overseas Corporate Bodies

(OCBs) investment, is allowed for most of the food processing sector.

Growth in production of FMCG


2002- % Est 2003- EST %
Production (market size) Unit
2003 growth 2004 growth
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FMCG (overall) Rs billion 600 2% 609 1.5%


Soap & Toiletries (overall) Rs billion 90 -5% 90.9 1%
Soap & Toiletries (overall) Mn ton 60 4% 60.09 1.50%
Fabric wash market MN ton 50 4% 50.25 0.50%
Laundry soaps/bars Rs billion 53.3 -6.5% 50.64 -5%
Detergent cakes MN ton 15 10% 15.3 2%
Washing powder MN tonn 25 10% 25.63 2.5%
Dish wash Rs billion 4.4 25% 4.27 -3%
Personal wash market Rs billion 45 5% 45.45 1%
Toilet soap Rs billion 42 -3.2% 40.11 -4.5%
Personal health care Rs billion 52 5% 50.44 -3%
Oral care Rs billion 26 4% 24.7 -5%
Tooth paste Rs billion 17.3 -13% 16.44 -5%
Tooth powder Rs billion 4.6 -6% 4.23 -8%
Tooth brush Rs billion 4.0 10% 4.2 5%
Skin care & cosmetics Rs billion 12 5% 12.6 5%
Skin/fairness cream Rs billion 5 12% 5.075 1.5%
Shaving cream Rs billion 1.1 15% 1.32 20%
Deodorant Rs billion 0.8 40% 1.12 40%
Hair Care
Coconut oil Rs billion 15 2% 15.23 1.5%
Coconut oil Tonn 3000 4% 3150 5%
Branded coconut oil Rs billion 8 6% 8.8 10%
Shampoos Rs billion 10.2 -5% 10.51 3%
Shampoos Tonn 29000 10% 33350 15%
Anti dandruff shampoos Rs billion 1 15% 1.15 15%
Hair dyes Rs billion 2 30% 2.5 25%
Feminine Hygiene Rs billion 2 0% 2.04 2%
Cleaners/Repellents Rs billion 8 20% 9.6 20%

Projected Growth in Production of FMCG Sector


First two quarters First two quarters
SECTOR UNIT (Apr-Sept 2003-04) (Apr-Sept 2004-
Actual 05) Projected
FMCG (overall) Rs billion 1.50% 2%
Soap & Toiletries (overall) Rs billion -4% 1.50%
Soap & Toiletries (overall) MN tonn 2% 4%

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Fabric wash market


Laundry soaps/bars Rs billion -8% 0%
Laundry soaps/bars MN Tonn -5% 1%
Detergent cakes MN Tonn 7% 3%
Washing powder MN Tonn 7% 4%
Dish Wash Rs billion 10% 5.5%
Personal wash market Rs billion 7% 1.5%
Toilet Soap Rs billion -5% 1.5%
Personal health care Rs billion 5% 2%
Oral care Rs billion 4% 0.5%
Tooth paste Rs billion -4% 0.5%
Tooth powder Rs billion -6% 0.2%
Tooth brush Rs billion 12% 6%
Skin care & cosmetics Rs billion 5% 7%
Skin/fairness cream Rs billion 12% 12%
Shaving cream Rs billion 15% 20%
Deodorant Rs billion 32% 25%
Hair Care
Coconut oil Rs billion 1.5% 2%
Coconut oil Tonn 3.5% 6%
Branded coconut oil Rs billion 6% 12%
Shampoos Rs billion 2% 5%
Shampoos Tonn 12% 15%
Anti dandruff shampoos Rs billion 15% 17%
Hair dyes Rs billion 25% 26%
Cleaners/repellants Rs billion 20% 22%

FMCG Products and Categories

- Personal Care, Oral Care, Hair Care, Skin Care, Personal Wash (soaps);

- Cosmetics and toiletries, deodorants, perfumes, feminine hygiene, paper products;

- Household care fabric wash including laundry soaps and synthetic detergents; household

cleaners, such as dish/utensil cleaners, floor cleaners, toilet cleaners, air fresheners, insecticides

and mosquito repellents, metal polish and furniture polish;

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FMCG in 2006

The performance of the industry was inconsistent in terms of sales and growth for over 4 years.

The investors in the sector were not gainers at par with other booming sectors. After two years of

sinking performance of FMCG sector, the year 2005 has witnessed the FMCGs demand growing.

Strong growth was seen across various segments in FY06. With the rise in disposable income

and the economy in good health, the urban consumers continued with their shopping spree.

- Food and health beverages, branded flour, branded sugarcane, bakery products such as bread,

biscuits, etc., milk and dairy products, beverages such as tea, coffee, juices, bottled water etc,

snack food, chocolates, etc.

- Frequently replaced electronic products, such as audio equipments, digital cameras, Laptops,

CTVs; other electronic items such as Refrigerator, washing machines, etc. coming under the

category of White Goods in FMCG;

Sector Outlook

FMCG is the fourth largest sector in the Indian Economy with a total market size of Rs. 60,000

crores. FMCG sector generates 5% of total factory employment in the country and is creating

employment for three million people, especially in small towns and rural India.

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Analysis of FMCG sectors


Strengths:

1.Low operational costs

2. Presence of established distribution networks in both urban and rural areas

3. Presence of well-known brands in FMCG sector

Weaknesses:

1. Lower scope of investing in technology and achieving economies of scale, especially in small

sectors

2. Low exports levels

3. "Me-too" products, which illegally mimic the labels of the established brands. These products

narrow the scope of FMCG products in rural and semi-urban market.

Opportunities:

1. Untapped rural market

2. Rising income levels, i.e. increase in purchasing power of consumers

3. Large domestic market- a population of over one billion.

4. Export potential

5. High consumer goods spending

Threats:

1. Removal of import restrictions resulting in replacing of domestic brands

2. Slowdown in rural demand Tax and regulatory structure


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COMPANY

PROFILE
COMPANY PROFILE

The story of one of India's favorite brands reads almost like a fairy tale. Once upon

a time, in 1892 to be precise, a biscuit company was started in a nondescript house

in Calcutta (now Kolkata) with an initial investment of Rs. 295. The company we all

know as Britannia today.

The beginnings might have been humble-the dreams were anything but. By 1910,

with the advent of electricity, Britannia mechanized its operations, and in 1921, it

became the first company east of the Suez Canal to use imported gas ovens.

Britannia's business was flourishing. But, more importantly, Britannia was acquiring

a reputation for quality and value. As a result, during the tragic World War II, the

Government reposed its trust in Britannia by contracting it to supply large

quantities of "service biscuits" to the armed forces.

As time moved on, the biscuit market continued to grow… and Britannia grew along

with it. In 1975, the Britannia Biscuit Company took over the distribution of biscuits

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from Parry's who till now distributed Britannia biscuits in India. In the subsequent

public issue of 1978, Indian shareholding crossed 60%, firmly establishing the

Indianans of the firm. The following year, Britannia Biscuit Company was re-

christened Britannia Industries Limited (BIL). Four years later in 1983, it crossed the

Rs. 100 crores revenue mark.

On the operations front, the company was making equally dynamic strides. In 1992,

it celebrated its Platinum Jubilee. In 1997, the company unveiled its new corporate

identity - "Eat Healthy, Think Better" - and made its first foray into the dairy

products market. In 1999, the "Britannia Khao, World Cup Jao" promotion further

fortified the affinity consumers had with 'Brand Britannia'.

Britannia strode into the 21st Century as one of India's biggest brands and the pre-

eminent food brand of the country. It was equally recognized for its innovative

approach to products and marketing: the Lagaan Match was voted India's most

successful promotional activity of the year 2001 while the delicious Britannia 50-50

Maska-Chaska became India's most successful product launch. In 2002, Britannia's

New Business Division formed a joint venture with Fonterra, the world's second

largest Dairy Company, and Britannia New Zealand Foods Pvt. Ltd. was born. In

recognition of its vision and accelerating graph, Forbes Global rated Britannia 'One

amongst the Top 200 Small Companies of the World', and The Economic Times

pegged Britannia India's .

Today, more than a century after those tentative first steps, Britannia's fairy tale is

not only going strong but blazing new standards, and that miniscule initial

investment has grown by leaps and bounds to crores of rupees in wealth for

Britannia's shareholders. The company's offerings are spread across the spectrum

with products ranging from the healthy and economical Tiger biscuits to the more

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lifestyle-oriented Milkman Cheese. Having succeeded in garnering the trust of

almost one-third of India's one billion populations and a strong management at the

helm means Britannia will continue to dream big on its path of innovation and

quality. And millions of consumers will savor the results, happily ever after.

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COMPANY OVERVIEW

HISTORY:- The story of on of India’s favorite brands reads almost like a fairy. Once

upon a time, in 1982 to be precise, a biscuit company was started in nondescript

house in Calcutta (now Kolkata) with an initial investment of Rs. 295 the company

we all know as Britannia today,

The beginnings might have been humble the dreams were anything but, by 1910,

with the advent of electricity, Britannia mechanized its operations, and in 1921it

became the first company east of the Suez Canal to use imported gas ovens,

Britannia’s business was flourishing. But, more importantly Britannia was acquiring

a reputation for quality and value, as a result, during the tragic world war ll, the

government reposed its trust n Britannia by contracting it to supply large quantities

of “service biscuits ” to the armed forces.

EXPANSION:- as time moved on, the biscuit market continued to grow… and

Britannia grew along with it. In 1975, the Britannia biscuit company took over

the distribution of biscuits fro, parry’s who till now distributed Britannia biscuits in

India, in the subsequent public issue of 1978, Indian shareholder crossed 60%firmly

establishing the Indian ness of the firm the following year, Britannia biscuit

company was re-christened Britannia industries limited (BIL).four years later in

1983, it crossed the Rs 100 core revenue mark.

On the operations front, the company was making equally dynamic strides. In 1992

it celebrated its platinum jubilee. The wadia group acquired a stake in the company

and became an equal partner with group danone in Britannia, the subsequent year

saw sales cross a landmark 1, 00,000 tones of biscuits or I billion packs of 100g.

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In 1997 , the company unveiled its new corporate identity –“eat healthy think

better”- and made its first foray into the dairy products market, in 1999 the

“Britannia khao,world cup jao”promotions further forfeited the affinity

consumers had with ‘brand Britannia’.

Britannia strode into the 21st century as one of India’s biggest brands and the pre-

eminent food brand of the country; it was equally cognized for its innovative

approach to products and marketing: the lagaan match was voted India’s mast

successful promotional activity of the year 2001 while the delicious Britannia 50-

50 maska Chaska became India’s mast successful product launch. In 2002, new

business division formed a joint venture with fonterra, the world’s second

largest dairy company, and Britannia New Zealand foods pvt. ltd was born in

reorganization of its vision and accelerating graph forbs global rated Britannia one

amongst the top 200 small companies of the world and The economic times

pegged Britannia India’s 2nd most trusted brand,

Today more than a century after those tentative first steps, Britannia fairy tale in

not only going strong but blazing new standards, and that miniscule initial

investment has grown by leaps and

Bounds to crore of rupees in wealth for Britannia’s shareholders. The company’s

offering are spread across the spectrum with products ranging from the healthy and

economical tiger biscuits mo the more lifestyle-oriented milkman cheese. Having

succeeded I garnering the trust

of almost one-third of India’s one billion populations and a strong management at

the helm means Britannia will continue to dream big on its path of innovation and

quality. And millions of consumers will savoir the results, happily ever after.

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PLANT LOCATION:- Delhi, Bangalore, Chennai, Kolkata new unit has been

establish in Pantnagar.

BIL, PANTNAGAR PLANT:- a substantial portion of biscuits is manufactured to its

new zone called “tax-free zone”. Established in April, 05, it has annual production

capacity of about 44,600mt, presently having an out put of 3720mt per month.

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MILESTONE OF BRITANNIA

1892

The genesis- BRITANNIA established with an investment of Rs295 in

Kolkata.

1910

Advent of electricity sees operations mechanized.

1921

Imported machinery introduced BRITANNIA becomes the first company east

of the Suez to use gas ovens.

1939-44

Sales rise exponentially to Rs 16, 27,202 in 1939 during 1944 sales ramp up

by more than 8times to reach Rs 1.36 crore.

1975

BRITANNIA BISCUITS CO. takes over biscuit distribution from parry.

1978

Public issue- Indian shareholding cross 60%.

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1979

Re-christened BRITANNIA INDUSTRIES LTD (BIL).

1983

Sales cross Rs 100 crore.

1989

The executive office relocated at Bangalore.

1992

Bil celebrates its platinum jubilee.

1993

Wadia group acquires stake in ABIL, UK &became an equal Partner with group

Danone in BIL.

1994

Volumes cross 1, 00, 000 tones of biscuits.

1997

Re-birth – new corporate identity Eat Healthy, Think Better

Leads to new mission. Make every third Indian Britannia

CONSUMERS

BIL enters the dairy products marker.

1999

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Britannia Khao, World Cup Jao. - a major success Profit up37%

2000

Forbes Global Ranking – Britannia among Top 300 small Companies.

2001

BIL ranked one of India’s biggest brands No. 1 food brand of Britannia Lagaan

Match: India’s most successful

Promotional activity of the year’s .Maska-Chaska: India’s most successful FMCG

launch.

2002

BIL launches joint venture with Fonterra, the world’s second Larges dairy

company. Britannia New Zealand Foods Pvt. Ltd is born, rated as one

amongst the Top 200 small Companies of the world by forbs global economic

time Ranks bill India’s second most trusted brand. Pure magic- winner of the world

star, Asia star& India star award for packaging. ‘Treat duet’ – most successful

launch of the year ‘Britannia Khao,World cup Jao’ rocks the consumer lives yet

Again

2004

Britannia accorded the status of being a ‘super rand’ Cross 3, 00,000 tons of

biscuits.

Good day adds a new radiant- coconut-in its range.

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2005

Re-birth of tiger – ‘swasth khao, tiger ban Jao’ become the popular chant

Britannia launched ‘Greetings’ range of premium assorted gift Packs. The new

plant in Uttrakhand, commissioned ahead of Schedule. The launch of yet another

exciting snacking option Britannia

HISTORY OF BISCUITS

Sweet or salty. Soft or crunchy. Simple or exotic. Everybody loves the munching on

biscuits, but do they know how biscuits began?

The history of biscuits can be traced back to recipe created by the Raman Chef

Apicius, in which “a thick paste of fine wheat flour was boiled & apread out on a

plate. When it had dried & hardened it was cut up & then fried until crisp, then

served with honey & pepper.”

The word <Biscuit> is derived from the Latin words <Bis> means ‘twice’ and

‘Coctus’means ‘cooked of baked’.

The word ‘Biscotti’ is also the generic term for cooking in ltalian. Back then, biscuits

were unleavened, hard & thin wafers which, because of their low water content,

were ideal food to store. Hard track biscuits (earliest version of biscotti & present

day crackers) were part of the stayed fresh for long periods. The seafaring age,

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thus, witnessed the boom of biscuits when these were sealed in airtight containers

to last of month at a time. As technology improved during the industrial Revolution

in the 19th century, the price of sugar & flour dropped. Chemical leavening agents,

such as baking soda, became available & a profusion of cookies recipes occurred.

INTRODUCTION OF BRITANNIA PANTNAGAR UNIT

Britannia industries ltd was established at pantnagar on 1st May 2004 in the area of

approximately 20 acres mainly for the purpose of production of biscuits as this area

is free from almost all types of taxes.

In Britannia industries ltd there are many types of departments which are inter

connected to each other and work together for the welfare of the company as the

whole.There is a well built communication system inside the company which helps

in doing the work on time and full efficiency and effectivness.

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The department of company includes Quality assurance, stores, production,

purchase, maintenance, engineering, packaging and dispatch, personnel training,

finance, legal and administrative security.

In the Company when the raw material is entered in the company from that time

onwards the quality of material is taken into consideration. Firstly the material is

taken into the laboratary and is being tested and after that it is being taken in

progress.

At the production plant also care is being taken for the neatness and cleanness of

the biscuits and the biscuits are prepared in full hygienic conditions. For this

purpose all the persons who enter the production or plant area is not allowed to go

inside without wearing a cap.

New concept like 5S is also being implemented in Britannia Industries ltd. The

Company is persuing for ISO14001 certificate and it is ISO 22000 certified.

NUMBER OF PLANTS AND PRODUCTION AT THE

PANTNAGAR BRANCH

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Not all the branches of britannia are produced in this branch only some brands of

biscuits are produced at this branch.

Production of biscuits in Britannia Pantnagar is divided into four plants:

1) Plant I

a) Good day butter

b) Good day pista badam

1) Plant II

a) Good day cashew

1) Plant III

a) Fifty- fifty(50-50)

i) 50-50

ii) 50-50 Maska Chaska

iii) 50-50 Paper Chaker

1) Plant IV

a) Chocolate treat bourbon

b) Orange treat

MANAGEMENT OF BIL, RUDRAPUR

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FACTORY MANAGER: - MR. V. K. PROOTHI

PRODUCTION MANAGER:- MR. MEHAK SINGH

QUALITY ASSURANCE:- MR.DHANANJAY

MAINTENACE MANAGER:- MR.ABHIJEET DUTTA

PURCHASE MANAGER:- MR. ANIL SHARMA

FINANCE MANAGER:- MR. MUDIT AGARWAL

ENGINEERING MANAGER:- MR. SANJEEV KOSHY

HR-DEPARTMENT

HR MANAGER:- MR. MAYANK SRIVASTAV

PERSONNEL OFFICER:- MR. N.C.PANDEY

TRAINEE WELFARE OFFICER:- MR.S.N. DUBEY

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Worker’s Education

The education category of the workers has been categorized in to three parts:-

i. Less qualified
ii. Medium qualified
iii. Highly qualified

Less Qualified

This category in4cludes those workers who are X and XII pass. This category also
includes those workers who are not educated.

Medium Qualified

This category includes those staff and workers who have attained graduate level education. This
group generally forms clerical staff.

Highly Qualified

This category includes those staff and workers who are postgraduate or hold some
special degrees or knowledge. This category also includes technically qualified
people. In this category most of the person are experience holder like production
manager, accountant.

GLOBAL PARTNERS

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The Nadia Group of India along with Groupe Danone of France, are equal

shareholders in ABIL, UK which is a major shareholder in Britannia Industries

Limited. GROUPE DANONE is an International FMCG Major specializing in Fresh Dairy

Products, Bottled Water and Biscuits/Cereals. One of the World leaders in the food

industry, these are some of the laurels it possesses:

 No. 1 worldwide in Fresh Dairy Products

 No. 1 worldwide equally placed in Bottled Water (by volume)

 No. 2 worldwide in Biscuits and Cereal Products

Through its three core businesses (Fresh Dairy Products, Beverages and Biscuits

and Cereal Products), GROUPE DANONE is committed to improving the lives of

people around the world by providing them with better food products, a wider

variety of flavors and healthier pleasures. Its dominant position worldwide is based

on major international brands and on its solid presence in local markets (about 70%

of global sales come from brands that are local market leaders).

GROUPE DANONE is recognized for the dynamism and strength of its brands:

 Danone: the leading brand worldwide for Fresh Dairy Products; DANONE

represents almost 20% of the international market. DANONE is present in 40

countries worldwide.

 Evian: the best selling mineral water brand, with 1.5 billion bottles sold every

year. Present in the 5 continents, in 125 countries.

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 LU: the second brand worldwide, the first biscuits brand of GROUPE DANONE,

which represents almost the half of the sales for the Biscuits and Cereal Products

division. LU is mainly present in Western Europe.

 WAHAHA: the leading brand for refreshing still water (water, ready made

tea, fruit juices). The brand is one of the most popular in China, with more than 1.5

billion liters of water sold each year. Its name means "the child who laughs".

Financial results:

 Net sales in 2004: 13,024 million Euros (+6.1% at comparable scope)

 Operational Income: 1,706 million Euros

 Operating Margin: 13.1% (+40 base points in relation to 2004

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Most consumers believe that to in order to stay healthy one

needs to make certain compromises on some good things in life.

Whether it is missing that extra hour of sleep over early morning

exercise, or eating unappetizing foods over that extra oil-

dripping samosa. At the same time most of us agree that good

nutrition cannot come from one kind of food alone, but from a

healthy combination / assortment of several healthy ingredients

put together. Britannia NutriChoice 5 Grain Biscuits are a perfect

answer to those looking for healthy eating options without as

much making a compromise on taste, or convenience, or health.

Because Britannia NutriChoice 5 Grain biscuits are made from 5

carefully chosen healthy cereals (Oats that help reduce bad

cholesterol, Corn which promotes heart health, Ragi a good

source of both Calcium as well as Fibre, Rice low in fat, and

Wheat that provides wholesome energy). These biscuits are

delicately sweetened with natural honey, and come in a unique

large oval shape. It is this large size and the healthy

combination of the ingredients, that make it an ideal hunger

buster for those in-between meals time hunger.

Britannia NutriChoice 5 Grain biscuit pack contains several small

single serve pocket meals packs, so that one is never far away

from pacifying hunger on the move. So whenever you miss your

breakfast, or succumb to those unhealthy evening snacks, you

can relish the goodness of health with Britannia NutriChoice 5

Grain biscuits. 34
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The story of one of India's favorite brands reads almost like a fairy

tale. Once upon a time, in 1892 to be precise, a biscuit company was

started in a nondescript house in Calcutta (now Kolkata) with an

initial investment of Rs. 295. The company we all know as Britannia

today.

The beginnings might have been humble-the dreams were anything

but. By 1910, with the advent of electricity, Britannia mechanized its

operations, and in 1921, it became the first company east of the Suez

Canal to use imported gas ovens. Britannia's business was

flourishing. But, more importantly, Britannia was acquiring a

reputation for quality and value. As a result, during the tragic World

War II, the Government reposed its trust in Britannia by contracting it

to supply large quantities of "service biscuits" to the armed forces.

As time moved on, the biscuit market continued to grow… and

Britannia grew along with it. In 1975, the Britannia Biscuit Company

took over the distribution of biscuits from Parry's who till now

distributed Britannia biscuits in India. In the subsequent public issue

of 1978, Indian shareholding crossed 60%, firmly establishing the

Indian ness of the firm. The following year, Britannia Biscuit Company

was re-christened Britannia Industries Limited (BIL). Four years later

in 1983, it crossed the Rs. 100 crores revenue mark.

On the operations front, the company was making equally dynamic

strides. In 1992, it celebrated its Platinum Jubilee. In 1997, the

company unveiled its new corporate identity - "Eat Healthy, Think


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Better" - and made its first foray into the dairy products market. In

1999, the "Britannia Khao, World Cup Jao" promotion further fortified

the affinity consumers had with 'Brand Britannia'.

Britannia strode into the 21st Century as one of India's biggest

brands and the pre-eminent food brand of the country. It was equally

recognized for its innovative approach to products and marketing:

the Lagaan Match was voted India's most successful promotional

activity of the year 2001 while the delicious Britannia 50-50 Maska-

Chaska became India's most successful product launch. In 2002,

Britannia's New Business Division formed a joint venture with

Fonterra, the world's second largest Dairy Company, and Britannia

New Zealand Foods Pvt. Ltd. was born. In recognition of its vision and

accelerating graph, Forbes Global rated Britannia 'One amongst the

Top 200 Small Companies of the World', and The Economic Times

pegged Britannia India's 2nd Most Trusted Brand.

Today, more than a century after those tentative first steps,

Britannia's fairy tale is not only going strong but blazing new

standards, and that miniscule initial investment has grown by leaps

and bounds to crores of rupees in wealth for Britannia's shareholders.

The company's offerings are spread across the spectrum with

products ranging from the healthy and economical Tiger biscuits to

the more lifestyle-oriented Milkman Cheese. Having succeeded in

garnering the trust of almost one-third of India's one billion

populations and a strong management at the helm means Britannia

will continue to dream big on its path of innovation and quality. And

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millions of consumers will savor the result.

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THE ORIGIN OF EAT HEALTHY AND THINK BETTER

Britannia – the biscuit leader with a history- has withstood the tests of time. Part of

the reason for its success has bee its ability to resonate with the changes in

consumer needs – that have varied significantly across its 100+year epoch. With

consumer democracy reaching new levels, the one common thread to emerge in

recent times has been the shift in lifestyles & a corresponding awareness to health.

People are increasingly becoming conscious of dietary care & its correlation to

wellness & matching the new pace to their lives with improved nutritional & dietary

habits. This new awareness has seen consumers seeking foods that complement

their lifestyles while offering convenience, variety & economy, over &above health

& nutrition.

Britannia saw the writing on the wall. It’s “Swasth Khao, Tan man jagao” (Eat

Healthy, Think Better) re-position directly addressed this new trend by promising

the new generation a healthy & nutritious alternative- that was also delightful &

tasty.

Thus, the new logo was born, encapsulating the core essence of Britannia-

healthy, nutritious, and optimistic- & combining it with a delightful product

range to offer variety & choice to consumers.

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In 1997 BIL, whose business seemed to be doing well? Instead of concentrating on

it, virtually charted a new course by seeking to reinvent itself it built a new

corporate identity and adopted a colorful and identifiable logo with a new base line

– Eat Healthy, Think Better, from being a manufacturer of baked products BIL

kicked off a diversification exercise to become a comprehensive foods and

beverages company making cheese and other dairy products, in addition to its

bakery products.

Its diversification into dairy business has been fairly successful the company ha s

relented all its dairy products under the milkman brand mane brand flavors like

Milkman cold coffee & milkman lassie have been launched in flavored drinks

besides Milkman chocolate milk & milkman strawberry milk . Cheese, dairy

whitener, Butter & Ghee are the other products sold under the milkman brand.

By the end of 2000 the exploits of BIL seemed to have fructified, at last in the short-

run in a survey conducted b A&M, BIL emerged as the number one food company

well ahead of competitive brands like Nestle and Cadbury. Bill’s dairy business

seemed to be doing reasonably well. In the cheese segment it stood second with

about 35% market share in the bakery segment also it was doing well , with its

biscuits business making significant inroads its positioning plank Eat Healthy

think better also seemed to have struck the right chord with its customers.

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COMPANY’S OBJECTIVES

MINIMIZATION OF EXTRA DUTY

MAXIMUM PRODUCTIVITY.

1. Investing in appropriate technology.

2. Working collaborates with the business partners.

3. Quality products to the customers

4. That value quality & food safety as a core pillar of the business.

5. To control the wastage & save time & efforts, company applies KAIZEN costing.

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RAW MATERIAL USED

1. NORMAL STORAGE RAW MATERIAL

> Wheat flour

O Sugar

O Ammonia

O Skimmed Milk powder

O Burnt sugar

O Lecithin

O Sodium bicarbonate

O Citric acid

O Palm oil

O GMS paste

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2. COLD STORAGE RAW MATERIAL

O Butter

O Cashew

O Essences

O Skimmed milk powder

O Condensed milk

These all are not become fresh in the normal temperature. That’s why these

materials have to store in the cold storo-5 temperature at which material becomes

solid & fresh.

HOW THE PRODUCTION PLAN COMES?

The production plan comes directly form the company’s head office Bangalore

every month.

The plan consists of: -

O Variety name.

O How much production will do for the particular variety?

O Total production in tones.

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O Area where varieties will be dispatched along with the Quantity.

O Dispatch order.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS

Name

Designation

Mr.Nusli N Wadia Chairman

Ms.Vinita Bali Managing

Director

Mr. George Casala Director

Mr. Keki Dadiseth Director

Mr.Avijit Dev Director

Mr. Stephan Gerlich Director

Mr. A K Hirjee Director

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ROLE OF ATTENDANCE

The role of attendance in organization is:-

1. Decrease in Absenteeism of contractual workers

2. To decrease the turn over rate by increasing the satisfaction level of workers.

3. Better human relations in management.

4. To increase the productivity of the company which in large helps the

company to grow.

5. To minimize the overtime of workers.

CONCEPT OF ATTENDANCE

1. Maximum Productivity.

2. Good relation between workers and management.

3. Decrease in absenteeism.

4. Systematic attendance system.

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FINDING

Following questionnaire were distributed to the workers.

QUESTIONNAIRE

1. Do you know about the Attendance System of Britannia Industries Limited?

• Yes

• No

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8%

92%

Yes No

INTERPRETATION:-

92% workers know about the Attendance System of Britannia Industries Limited

while only 8% workers do not know about the Attendance System of Britannia

Industries Limited.

2. Are you satisfied by the Attendance System of Britannia Industries Limited?

• Yes

• No

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17%

83%

Yes No

INTERPRETATION:-

83% workers are satisfied with the Attendance System of Britannia Industries

Limited while17% workers are not satisfied with the Attendance System of Britannia

Industries Limited.

3. Are you satisfied by the Wages Process of Britannia Industries Limited?


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• Yes

• No

17%

83%

Yes No

INTERPRETATION:-

83% workers are satisfied with wages process of Britannia Industries Limited while

17% workers are not satisfied with wages process of Britannia Industries Limited.

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4. Do you know about the Attendance Policy of Britannia Industries Limited?

• Yes

• No

33%

67%

Yes No

INTERPRETATION:-

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67% workers know about the Attendance Policy of Britannia Industries Limited while

33% workers are do not know about the Attendance Policy of Britannia Industries

Limited.

5. Do you know about the leave System of Britannia Industries Limited?

• Yes

• No

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42%

58%

Yes No

INTERPRETATION:-

58% workers know about the leave System of Britannia Industries Limited while
42% workers do not know about the leave System of Britannia Industries Limited.

6. Are you satisfied with the Leave System of Britannia Industries Limited?

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• Yes

• No

17%

83%

Yes No

INTERPRETATION:-

83% workers are satisfied with the Leave System of Britannia Industries Limited

while 17% workers are not satisfied with the Leave System of Britannia Industries

Limited.

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7. Do you think Attendance system of Britannia Industries Ltd. can be improved?

• Yes

• No

8%

92%

Yes No

INTERPRETATION:-

92% workers think attendance system of Britannia Industries Limited can be

improved while 8% workers think vice-versa.

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8. Do you know about the Absenteeism System of Britannia Industries Limited?

• Yes

• No

33%

67%

Yes No

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INTERPRETATION:-

67% workers are know about the Absenteeism System of Britannia Industries

Limited while 33% workers do not know about the Absenteeism System of

Britannia Industries Limited.

9. Are you satisfied from all type of Rules regulation & Discipline of Britannia

Industries Limited?

• Yes

• No

42%
Yes
No
58%

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INTERPRETATION:-

58% workers are satisfied from all type of rules regulation & Discipline of Britannia

Industries Limited while 42% workers are not satisfied from all type of rules

regulation & Discipline of Britannia Industries Limited.

10. Are you satisfied by the HR Department of Britannia Industries Limited?

• No

• Yes

17%

Yes
No

83%
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INTERPRETATION:-

83% workers are satisfied from HR Department of Britannia Industries Limited while

17% workers are not satisfied from HR Department of Britannia Industries Limited.

11. Are you satisfied by the conveyance facility of Britannia Industries Limited?

• No

• Yes

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Yes
50% 50%
No

INTERPRETATION:

50% workers are satisfied the conveyance facility of Britannia Industries Limited

while 50% workers are not satisfied the conveyance facility of Britannia Industries

Limited.

12. Do you know about the incentive system of Britannia Industries Limited?
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• No

• Yes

25%

Yes
No

75%

INTERPRETATION:-

75% workers are know about the incentive system of Britannia Industries Limited

while 25% workers are do not know about the incentive system of Britannia

Industries Limited.

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FINDINGS AND ANALYSIS

After observation and personal interview the attendance procedure followed in

Britannia Industries Ltd. Pant agar could be found. We came to know that every

worker of BIL. Is issued a monthly attendance card and each day worker has to

show this card to the respective in charge who marks his attendance in that card

and notes the time of reaching to the company and similarly the Time Out i.e.

when the worker leaves the company is noted in that monthly attendance card.

Every month the worker is issued a new monthly card.


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Similar attendance which is recorded in the attendance card of the worker is

recorded in the attendance sheet which is kept with the management. Attendance

is also marked by the supervisor of respective dept. of particular contractual worker

.Further cross checking is done per day of the attendance marked by the

management and that of attendance marked by the supervisors of of respective

department . Then this attendance is fed on the computer.

So, we see the attendance procedure followed by the BIL is somewhat manual.

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CONCLUSION

In today’s cut throat competition & rapidly changing society, attendance system is

not only desirable but the organization must commit resources to it.

Workers know about the attendance system followed by the company and workers

are satisfied with the attendance system. Though workers are satisfied with the

attendance system of the company but still they feel further improvements can be

made in the attendance system.

RECOMMENDATIONS

➢ Employee should be made to understand that they become more productive,

efficient and effective in their work if they take their attendance with total

positive approach.

➢ The programme should be designed in such a way that it helps to fulfill the

need of all departments plus it should also satisfy the expectations of the

workers.

➢ The programme should turn out in such a way that it is beneficial for staff

members.

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➢ Further on, company could use automatic 'swipe' cards which read

automatically when a person moves out or in could be an answer to recording

... of course it would require the employee to wear the ID full time this could

be enforced easily

A feasibility study could be done no wades readymade - automated

attendance tracking software are available with different means of recording.

Normally FIRST IN PUNCH will be considered as Time in, and last PUNCH OUT

will be Time out for attendance in biometric systems.

➢ It’s true that a swipe card can be faked, so essentially we are looking at a

more personalized identity, a unique one. Obvious solutions are Retina and

Thumb. But within them, the retina system is too costly and workers might

not be comfortable posing every time in front of the sensor to enter, they

might complain damage to the eyes.

So a thumb based biometric is a good solution .As far as the problem of still

entering the factory even after getting scanned , we can have another similar

system with the concerned dept supervisor which should be the control point

for movement . Plus good backend software will solve the problem of multiple

entry/exits.

BIBLOGRAPHY

BOOKS AND JOURNALS

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➢ Britannia Industries Ltd. Manuals.

➢ Personnel Management. By C.V.Mamoria

➢ Personnel Management. By S.V. Gankar

➢ Human resource & Personnel Management by Ashwathappa

WEBSITES

➢ www.britindia.com

➢ www.google.com

➢ www.cithr.com

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ANNEXURES

QUESTIONAIRE

1. Do you know about the Attendance System of Britannia Industries Limited?

Yes No

2. Are you satisfied to Attendance System of Britannia Industries Limited?

Yes No

3. Are you satisfied Wages Process of Britannia Industries Limited?

Yes No

4. Do you know about the Attendance Policy of Britannia Industries Limited?

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Yes No

5. Do you know about the leave System of Britannia Industries Limited?

Yes No

6. Are you satisfied to the Leave System of Britannia Industries Limited?

Yes No

7. Do you think Attendance system of Britannia Industries Ltd. can be

improved?

Yes No

8. Do you know about the Absenteeism System of Britannia Industries Limited?

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Yes No

9. Are you satisfied from all type of Rules regulation & Discipline of Britannia

Industries Limited?

Yes No

10. Are you satisfied by the HR Department of Britannia Industries Limited?

Yes No

11. Are you satisfied by the conveyance facility of Britannia Industries L

Yes No

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12. Do you know about the incentive system of Britannia Industries Limited?

Yes No

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