Ideal for homeschooling and self-directed learning!

DRAWING
Author of Drawing for Dummies and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People Illustrated

BOOK 1: GETTING STARTED
Brenda Hoddinott

120 pages and more than 230 illustrations!
► Choose the right drawing supplies ► Set up a place to draw ► Make a portfolio and viewfinder frame ► 10 fun exercises and projects Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level: 6.84 Flesch reading ease score: 74.7

Brenda Hoddinott
Artist, illustrator, art educator, curriculum designer, forensic artist (retired), owner of Drawspace.com, and author of Drawing for Dummies, The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People Illustrated, and Drawing Book 1: Getting Started.

**********************************************************************
Born in St. John’s, Newfoundland, Brenda grew up in the small town of Corner Brook. With the help of learn-to-draw books, she developed good drawing skills by the age of 16. In 1982 Brenda left her well established career as a portraitist, graphic designer, and forensic artist, to move to Nova Scotia with her family. In addition to resuming the various facets of her art career, she began learning to paint in oils. From 1988 to 1994, Brenda began exhibiting her paintings and drawings in provincial and regional art exhibitions and competitions. She was honored with more than twenty prestigious visual art awards during these six years. Brenda and her partner John live in the suburbs of Halifax, Nova Scotia with their two SPCA rescue dogs, Timber (Huskador) and Katie (Rottbeagle). Their blended family includes five adult children and two grandchildren.

**********************************************************************

I

DRAWING
BOOK 1
GETTING STARTED
by Brenda Hoddinott
Author of Drawing for Dummies and The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People Illustrated

Published by Drawspace.com, Halifax, NS, Canada

and it is intended to provide helpful and informative material on all aspects of the subject matter. or risk. recording. book layout. Brenda Hoddinott and Drawspace. curriculum. NS. without the written permission of Brenda Hoddinott.drawspace. directly or indirectly. electronically sent or transferred to additional individuals or companies other than the original purchaser of this electronic book. Publisher: Drawspace.com. photocopying.com or through her website at http://www.com disclaim any responsibility for any liability. or otherwise. damages. resulting from the use or misuse of information and applications of any of the contents of this book. Copyright © 2009 Brenda Hoddinott All rights reserved. No part of this electronic book shall be reproduced by any method or means. John Percy. . loss. Brenda Hoddinott. This electronic publication contains the opinions and ideas of the author. Halifax. Canada Illustrations. specifically the basics of drawing. mechanical. which is incurred as a consequence. or transmitted by any method or means.com.II This book is dedicated to my loving partner. electronic. personal or otherwise. and cover design: Brenda Hoddinott Editor: Suzanne Beaton Brenda Hoddinott can be contacted at brenda@drawspace.

..............................................................................11 In the time of the caveman ........................................................4 Art Quote .................................................................................7 Chapter 1: Welcome to Drawing ......................................3 Sizing up the sidebars ...........................................................................................4 Tip! ..............................................................................................................15 .............................1 Look into this Book .6 Part 3: Go Draw! .............................................................12 Remembering the Renaissance ..........4 A few words on illustrations ...................................................................................15 YOU can draw! ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................14 Drawing is an action word ...........13 The Inside Scoop on Drawing ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................3 Warning! ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................4 Action sidebar numbers and letters ....................................................6 Part 1: Get Ready! ......................6 Part 2: Get Set! ................................5 Insights into the Parts ...................................................III CONTENTS ***************************************************************** Introduction .....4 Step-by-step projects .............................................................6 How to Use this Book ............................................................................................................6 Part 1: Get Ready! .............................................................................................................................9 A Brief History of Drawing .....................................11 The birth of classical art ...............................................................................................................................................................................................................................3 Info Tidbit ..............................................................3 ArtSpeak ............4 Shaping up with exercises ............................................4 Eyeing action icons .....................................

.............................................................................................................................36 Textures on a rough tooth .....................................................................28 Graphite pencils ..............................................39 Larger is not always better ..........................................................................................25 Picking out Proper Pencils ......27 Other fun pencil mediums .............................................................................................................................................43 Pencil sharpeners .41 Tools for Erasing ....................................................................21 Soft is dark ........................................................................................ or sheets? ..................................................................31 Chapter 4: Sketchbooks and Drawing Papers ............41 Kneaded erasers .......................................................................................39 Weighing in on paper ..........................19 Hard is light ..........29 Mechanical pencils ............29 Sticks and Stones (oops!) Powders .............................................................................................26 Wood-encased pencils .........................................................................................................................................18 The link between graphite and sheep ...............35 Big smile for a medium tooth ....................29 Woodless graphite pencils .................................................................................................................................................................................................33 Check up on Tooth (without a Dentist!) .......17 How the “lead” pencil got its name ......................40 Chapter 5: Adding to the Basics .................................................. hardcover..........................................................................................................................................................................................22 Combining soft and hard grades ...................................................19 Making the Grade .............................38 Softcover.................................34 The surface of a smooth tooth ................................................................................................................37 Sketchbooks and Papers ................IV Welcome to Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Chapter 2: Getting a Grasp on Graphite and Grades .................................................................................................................41 Vinyl erasers ..............................27 Charcoal pencils ...........................................................23 Finding out your grade ..24 Chapter 3: More Drawing Mediums ...........17 Traveling Back in Time with Graphite .................................................................................................................................42 Sharpening your Mediums .............................................43 .............................................................................................................................................

.......................57 Supplies for making a viewfinder frame ..................44 Stuff you can’t do without ..............52 Sitting correctly ...............46 Part 2: Get Set! .................................... but not necessary ................................................................................................58 Option 2: Using two pieces of board ............62 Action 7C: Making a Viewfinder Frame .........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................Contents V Sandpaper blocks and sheets ...................................................................................................51 How NOT to sit! ..........44 Pencil case ..............................................................................52 Putting Together a Portable Studio ......................53 Chapter 7: Making a List...........49 Choosing a drawing surface ....44 Viewfinder frame ...........................55 Nice to have .................................................................................................................63 .......................................................46 Spray fixative .....................44 Ruler ...............50 Good Posture First! .........................45 Nice to have......................................58 Option 1: Using one large sheet of board ............................................................55 Must have ............................................................................................................................ and Viewfinder Frame ...............................43 A Few Extras .........................................................................47 Chapter 6: Setting up For Drawing ............55 Action 7A: The Shopping List ...........................................................................................................................................57 Deciding on a size ..............45 Display boards ........................................57 Supplies for a portable studio .......49 A Comfy Place to Sit and Draw ..................................................................61 Adding ties and final touches .........................................................................50 Shedding light on your art ....................................56 Supplies for making a portfolio ........................................... Portfolio........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................57 Action 7B: Making a Portfolio ............................................................................................................................................................................................................46 Manikins ..............................................44 Portfolio .............................................................................................

........................................................................65 Becoming a Natural .....................................................................................................92 Create a sketch by framing your view .................................................80 Part 1: Circular shape .........................................81 Part 2: Straight-sided shape ....84 Part 3: Circle ................................................88 Just for fun! ........76 Action 9D: Playing with Erasers ................67 Leonardo the lefty ..................................................................................VI Welcome to Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Chapter 8: Give Yourself a Helping Hand .....................................................................................................................................................................68 Rotating your paper as you draw ......104 Squirkling shading for Mugly ..108 Glossary ...............................95 Action 10A: Drawing a Caveperson ........................................................................................................................................99 Action 10C: Mugly Wigglebottom ...................95 Action 10B: A Realistic Eye ..........90 Action 9F: Framing with a Viewfinder ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................91 Three steps for framing a view ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................69 Chapter 9: Putting your Supplies to Work .............................................71 Action 9B: Creating Values with Squirkles ...............103 Outlining Mugly with neat lines ...........................................................................93 Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings .....................72 Action 9C: Playing with Pencils .....................................................115 ...................................................................................................................................................71 Action 9A: Sketching a Self-Portrait ..............................65 Holding your Mediums ...........68 Part 3: Go Draw! ...77 Action 9E: Drawing Shapes by Rotating Your Paper .........67 Finding your natural hand movement .............................

It was during a difficult life transition that she provided me with the gift of encouragement to explore my creative self-awareness. However. including those who learn outside the boundaries of traditional and prescribed learning environments. with patience (and a sense of humor). her third book. Most notably. teacher. Blending expertise with encouragement. and advocate. For many. Drawing Book 1: Getting Started – the first in a series for homeschooling families and self-directed learners. but because I had been eagerly awaiting the completion of this learning resource. For the past fifteen years. When Brenda first approached me to write the forward for this. and skill levels. Brenda’s lesson plans and instructions accommodate a wide range of learning styles. but has exceeded the expectations of her audience with this invaluable arts-based curriculum. Not only because she asked me. As a learner. Brenda played a pivotal role in helping me reconnect with my artist within. I didn’t believe that I was creative or artistic. Until that point. as she leads students on a journey of self-discovery through self-directed learning. Foreword . abilities. I pursued undergraduate degrees in music and elementary and adult education. my own journey has taken me into the field of education. Many of the existing resources on the market are written and published without careful attention to the learning needs of the intended audience. The integration of my training has allowed me to participate in many roles: learner. I was filled with joy. As an educator with graduate training and expertise in curriculum and instructional design. her genuine and compassionate nature extends to her teaching of art and drawing. I believe that Brenda Hoddinott has not only responded to. mentor.Foreword by Robert A. access to quality learning and teaching materials is limited. Roughley VII ***************************************************************** I have known Brenda Hoddinott for many years. My perception of art and creativity was limited by my perfectionist ideals of what defined “artistic ability”.

and counseling psychology.Ed. but are far too often limited by the influence of those who fear the unlimited possibilities that come from creative thinking. abilities..VIII Welcome to Drawing Book 1: Getting Started My graduate work focused on educational and curriculum studies.. I encourage readers. reflective practice. B. MC. I have noticed the effect of inclusive and purposeful curriculum in the emergence of the creative self. Robert A. I became a consultant for change in curriculum development and inclusive education.. Roughley B. and worldviews. BAEd. self-identities. (or even rediscover!) your own artist within.. It is my hope that you find this experience just as enlightening as you explore. I have the pleasure of putting my academic “stamp of approval” in the front pages of this very unique and thorough approach to art education. Brenda joins her learners as they discover their creative talents. we possess the intentions of creativity. unlearned. As an educator and co-learner with students of all ages. “What we learn from others becomes our own through reflection”. Teaching and Learning Centre. University of Calgary . with a focus in special education. I have witnessed the long-term. As I transitioned from learner to teacher. As a counseling practitioner. University of Calgary Instructor. learners. and detailed visual illustrations. discover. My current positions have merged my credentials and focus into three main areas: teacher development (teaching professionals how to teach). M. after years of study.. In my various personal and professional roles. and relearned the importance of creativity and artistic expression in marking our developmental milestones and other life transitions. negative implications resulting from the demise or discontinuation of arts-based education in traditional and homeschooling settings. As human beings.Ed. and inclusive education. And now. Later in my career. and practitioners to build upon this quotation and consider that what one sees in their own self-reflection is the core of one’s creative identity.A. unique humor. Doctoral Student. I worked with children from kindergarten to grade six. Each chapter of this book represents a stage in the development and awareness of one’s artistic self. I have learned. Through her gentle and supportive directions. Someone once said.

Finally. Medium refers to any drawing tool (anything from a pencil to the burnt end of a stick) used to make marks on a surface. you find out what to pack in a portable studio so you can comfortably draw outdoors. This book tells you about drawing supplies.Introduction 1 ***************************************************************** YOU can learn to draw! All you need is some vision and a way to hold a drawing medium. sit back and relax as I tell you about this book and how to use it. In this introduction. Figure 02: A cartoon drawing is created with a pencil. Sidebar is a box of text (some have illustrations) that provides additional information about a topic. Pencil refers to a broad category of drawing tools that have the medium inside a holder (Figure 03). Figure 03: A regular pencil with a medium inside a wooden holder is a very popular drawing tool. I also discuss how to set up a practical place to draw indoors. Vision is the ability to see. Drawing (verb) refers to the process of applying a medium to a surface to create an image (Figure 01). I explain the very best way to work through this book. Several simple exercises and projects help you warm up your drawing hand. you find out about each part of this book and all the different types of sidebars. and it provides you with definitions of art words and terms. This sidebar is called ArtSpeak. . You are also introduced to several art related words and terms. Figure 01: A hand is drawing a cartoon. Drawing (noun) is an image created on a drawing surface with a drawing medium (Figure 02). So. Introduction ArtSpeak ArtSpeak is a fun word used to describe the vocabulary of art. In addition. and shows you how to use them.

I created the drawings in Figures 07 and 08 when I was around 14. A sketch is usually done quickly with simple lines (Figure 04) and (or) shading (Figure 05). TIP! Save all your sketches and drawings! Someday. you may want to look back on your early works to see how much you’ve improved. Text refers to the words used in writing. Icon is an image (such as a drawing) used to identify a specific task or information. Luckily. Figure 07: A family living in a log house in the forest. ArtSpeak sidebars are identified by a cartoon icon of Albert Einstein.2 Welcome to Drawing Book 1: Getting Started ArtSpeak Illustration is an image (such as a drawing) that is used to help explain text. Figure 05: Shading is added to the same sketch. Figure 06: Five values from light to dark. Values are the different shades of gray you make when adding shading to a drawing. Sketch (verb) refers to the process of doing a sketch. Shading (noun) refers to the various values within a drawing that make images appear three-dimensional. Figure 08: Little girl with a doll. . Shading (verb) is the process of adding values to a drawing. Sketch (noun) is a simple drawing of the important parts of a subject. my parents had saved them for me. Figure 04: Simple sketch of a seated man.

Figure 09: Shading transforms the shape of a simple circle into the planet Earth. Look into this Book In this section. Sizing up the sidebars Scattered throughout this book. Classical drawing refers to the drawing methods invented by ancient Greeks and Romans for creating realistic drawings (called realism). Figure 10: I used classical drawing methods to copy a work created by Leonardo da Vinci during the Renaissance. Classical drawing was later enhanced by the great artists of the Renaissance. and show you how to identify the various sidebars. . so you can better understand what you read. The artist tries to draw what he or she sees as realistically as possible. you find five different sidebars (identified with circle-shaped icons) that are filled with useful information. Realism is a way of drawing in which living beings and objects are drawn as they appear in real life. icons. and illustrations in this book. such as the history of art. I tell you about.Introduction 3 ArtSpeak Shape refers to the outward outline of a threedimensional object. projects. ArtSpeak ArtSpeak sidebars (Figure 12) define the drawing words and terms in this book. Renaissance (from the French word for “rebirth”) refers to the changes within European culture from the early twelfth century to the late sixteenth century. Tidbit icon is a simple flower rendered with classical drawing techniques. Figure 12: ArtSpeak icon is a cartoon of Albert Einstein’s face. exercises. Info Tidbit Info Tidbit sidebars (Figure 13) provide tidbits of information about art-related subjects. Figure 13: Info Figure 11: A lifelike drawing of an eye is an example of realism.

. In addition. Tip! A tip can be more than the pointy end of a stick! The tips inside these sidebars (Figure 15) can save you time. and frustration by telling you easier ways to do some tasks or how to take better care of your supplies. energy. 9. Figure 16: Art Quote icon is an adorable cartoon called a Wooly Woo. an action icon identifies either an exercise or project. Figure 14: Warning icon is a scaredlooking cartoon face with a nose shaped like an exclamation mark. Eying action icons In Chapters 7. Art Quote Quotes about art (Figure 16) provide insights into the creative minds of well-known artists. you find several action icons. Projects usually take more time than exercises. Some ask you to make something and others ask you to gather your drawing supplies and draw. Action sidebar numbers and letters As you know. Shaping up with exercises Wherever you see the icon in Figure 17. Figure 15: Tip icon is a cartoon face on a light bulb. and 10. Figure 17: Exercises are identified by an icon of a boy doing exercises. A letter identifies its order within the chapter. an exercise icon may ask you to do a simple sketch or drawing. you find an exercise designed to help you make or use drawing supplies. Step-by-step projects When you see the icon in Figure 18.4 Welcome to Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Warning! Better safe than sorry! Protect your drawings (or yourself) from potential dangers by following the advice in these sidebars (Figure 14). it’s time to complete a step-by-step project. Each exercise and project can be identified by the number of the chapter in which it appears. Figure 18: Step-by-step projects are identified with a hand holding a pencil. Each has two or more illustrated instructions to help guide you.

The number and letter 10C (C being the third letter of the alphabet) identifies the third action in Chapter 10. the first action sidebar in Chapter 7 is marked 7A (A is the first letter of the alphabet).Introduction 5 ► AC T I ON 7 A ◄ Figure 19: The first exercise in Chapter 7 helps you make out a shopping list for buying drawing supplies. Do you happen to know the name of a good orthodontist? . you may become inspired by examining the skills you are working to achieve. Likewise. this one is an exercise. As an added bonus. As you can tell by the icon (Figure 19). ► AC T I ON 1 0 C ◄ Figure 20: Action 10C takes you step-by-step through the process of drawing a cartoon puppy named Mugly Wigglebottom. For example. maybe one of your artistic goals is to draw realistic animals (check out Figure 21). For example. For example. The icon identifies a project. the fourth illustration in Chapter 6 (a cartoon artist practicing his drawing skills on page 50) is marked Figure 604. A few words on illustrations You are not expected to draw all the illustrations in this book! Most drawings are intended to illustrate and help you understand the topics being discussed. the first illustration in Chapter 1 (a drawing of mountains on page 9) is marked Figure 101. Each illustration in this book is marked with a number based on its placement within a chapter. Figure 21: A challenging drawing of a Shih Tzu who goes by the name of Panda.

you’ll be ready for Drawing Book 2: Lines and Spaces. Part 3: Go Draw! The first two parts of this book prepare you for the activities in this part. You will encounter a few challenges with terminology (this is why you have a glossary in the back of the book). you find out what’s inside each of the three parts of this book. Part 2: Get Set! In this part. I help you set up a comfortable place to draw. When you begin to feel totally overwhelmed and frustrated. Nine fun exercises and projects challenge you to put your drawing supplies to work as you learn several basic drawing skills and techniques. I offer the two following options: Plan A Slowly work through the entire book in sequence. How to Use this Book This book is designed to be read in order . If an exercise or project is too difficult. You find out about proper lighting. Part 1: Get Ready! Sit back and relax as I tell you about the drawing supplies you need to complete the exercises and projects in this book. Enjoy the illustrations and try your hand at the various exercises and projects that appeal to you. go back to plan A and work through the book from beginning to end! .from beginning to end. Each new piece of information. good posture for drawing. By the time you reach the end of the book. However. until you are happy with the results. skill. and some projects beyond your current skill level. or technique prepares you for the next. ideal drawing surfaces. doing each exercise along the way. and various ways to hold your pencil. Plan B Read through this book in no particular order. human nature being what it is.6 Welcome to Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Insights into the parts In this section. go back and try it again (and again if you need to). You also have the option of making an artist’s portfolio and viewfinder frame.

Part 1: Get Ready! 7 PART 1 GET READY! ► Simple history of drawing ► Process of learning to draw ► Fun history of graphite ► Grades of graphite ► Differences between B and H grades ► How grades affect the look of drawings ► Graphite and charcoal drawing mediums ► Wood-encased. and woodless pencils ► Drawing powders and sticks ► Textures. and ruler ► Manikins. sizes. portfolio. display boards. viewfinder frame. and weights of drawing papers ► How to select and protect the tooth of paper ► Vinyl and kneaded erasers ► Pencil sharpeners and sandpaper ► Pencil case. mechanical. and spray fixative .

8 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started .

Figure 101: You won’t find this scene anywhere on planet Earth. the tallest trees on earth grow toward the sky. How about a snow dragon dancing with polar bears and penguins? Or stone faces standing guard over a river valley in another galaxy far away? How many stone faces can you find in the drawing in Figure 101? Figures 102 and 103 show you a couple just to get you started. In another drawing. magical forest.Chapter 1: Welcome to Drawing 9 Chapter 1 Welcome to Drawing ***************************************************************** On a simple sheet of drawing paper. ogres and trolls are chasing one another through a dark. I wonder if any other life forms besides stone faces live here? .

Can you find his nose. and an eye? ArtSpeak Portfolio is a case in which artists store (or carry) drawings and papers to protect them from damage. Prehistoric describes the period in time before language was used to write and record history. (As an aside. unaware of the creature with the huge open mouth waiting for lunch to walk by. many archeologists have excellent drawing skills. mouth. . (Obviously. a very shortened version of history!) You also find out the real truth behind the silly gossip that you need a magical talent to become an artist. you learn 32. Figure 104: In Action 7B in Chapter 7. Figure 102: Imagine yourself strolling peacefully along this path. mostly about the lives and activities of human beings and their environments.000 years of art history by reading a thousand words.10 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started In this chapter. Figure 103: See the face of a regal male warrior gazing toward the right. Figure 105: Prehistoric humans drew pictures like these on the walls of caves. For example.) Figure 106: A drawing of an old arrowhead that looks similar to some that were discovered by archeologists. Archaeologist is a person who studies ancient peoples by finding and documenting the things they left behind. historians (people who study and write about history) have documented that Leonardo da Vinci was born in Italy in the year 1452. chin. History is a written record of the past. I show you how to make a simple portfolio.

Technique is a well-known method (such as a specific way to do shading) that is used to accomplish a particular activity or task. more than one shading technique may be suitable for a specific drawing. These drawings tell us a lot about how prehistoric humans lived. This section offers a brief background on drawing . drawings of simple human figures (Figure 108) were added to burial stones. a form of communication that is free of such rules as correct spelling or proper grammar.from the cave drawings of prehistoric humans. In other words. For example.Chapter 1: Welcome to Drawing 11 A Brief History of Drawing Drawing is a universally understood language.000 years. The drawings in Figure 107 are similar to prehistoric drawings found on the walls of caves in France. In the time of the caveman Artists have been drawing for at least 32. an artist’s choice of a shading technique (or techniques) is generally based on his or her skill level and what works best to capture the subject. ArtSpeak Style refers to an artist’s approach to his or her own art. to the masterpieces of the Renaissance. Hence. realism is a well-known style. During prehistoric times in Africa. You can try your hand at drawing a human figure the way some prehistoric people did. Figure 108: Drawing based on an actual prehistoric drawing discovered on a stone in Africa. in Action 10A in Chapter 10. the drawings recorded their stories without spoken language or written words. Figure 107: Copies of prehistoric cave drawings created by cavemen (or cavewomen). An artist’s style may be based on his or her personal preferences and art education. For example. . Archaeologists have discovered many of their drawings on the walls of caves.

ceiling. and one of his most famous sculptures is the Statue of David. woman. or child that was discovered attached to the face of a burial mummy. animals. . and sculptures) that can be appreciated by the sense of sight. The drawing in Figure 110 is copied from a mummy portrait that was discovered in Egypt. copied from a fresco that had been buried under volcanic ash in Greece for more than 3500 years. The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel (in Rome) is also a fresco that was painted by Michelangelo between 1508 and 1512. Murals have been discovered on the walls of prehistoric caves and inside ancient Egyptian tombs. as well as how people lived during these times. Many show major deterioration. Frescos that date back more than 3500 years have been discovered in Greece. or marble. rock. Many date back to the Roman occupation of Egypt. and people. paintings. or other large surface. A very well-known sculptor of the Renaissance was Michelangelo. Mummy portrait is a painting of a man. The birth of classical art Long before the Renaissance. Fresco is an artwork painted on a thin layer of plaster that covers a wall or ceiling. all the drawings in this book are considered visual art. The discovery of several of these artworks helps us understand the styles and techniques of the artists.12 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started ArtSpeak Mural is a drawing or painting on a wall. Visual art refers to artworks (such as drawings. Figure 109 is a drawing of an antelope. Sculpture is a three-dimensional artwork that is made of a material such as bronze. Figure 109: The smoothly flowing lines of this drawing capture an antelope as it appeared on an ancient fresco. Sculptor is an artist who creates sculptures. Archeologists have found the remnants of murals and frescos painted on walls of buildings in ancient Greece and Rome. ancient Greek and Roman artists created realistic artworks of nature. but others are remarkably well preserved. For example.

The unknown artist used classical techniques to make the face appear three-dimensional. Figure 110: My goal was to create a drawing that looked like the ancient painting. art students were encouraged to study and practice the techniques of the most highly skilled artists (called “masters”). Remembering the Renaissance The beginning of the Renaissance is identified by the very popular rebirth of classical drawing throughout Europe. frescos. created the most magnificent masterpieces our world has ever known. during the time known as the High Renaissance.000 years ago. many students of the masters eventually became masters themselves. realistic sculptures and paintings of people have survived the ravages of time. and digital art. Some of the more dedicated art students experimented with new ways of drawing and ended up creating new techniques. During this time. . and Albrecht Dürer. several breathtaking. Great masters.Chapter 1: Welcome to Drawing 13 In addition to murals. sculpture. Figures 111 and 112 demonstrate classical drawing techniques from the High Renaissance. Hans Holbein. such as Leonardo da Vinci. Between 1480 and 1527. classical drawing techniques were greatly improved and many new techniques were born. I couldn’t resist the challenge of drawing someone who lived more than 2. many very famous artists (called “great masters”) further developed drawing as the most important of all visual arts. I decided to include the flaws of the old wooden panels on which it was painted. Michelangelo. Throughout the Renaissance. coins. students of art all over the world are still learning from the masters of the Renaissance. One of my favorite ancient paintings is a mummy portrait of a young man. Hence. Classical drawing techniques are considered the foundation of all visual arts including painting. possibly a Roman soldier (Figure 110). and pottery. Even today.

The Inside Scoop on Drawing Throughout the process of learning to draw. As your drawing abilities become stronger. Figure 113: An artist uses his creativity to make a few changes to the body of the model in his drawing. Figure 112: Classical drawing techniques are used in a drawing of a young girl (based on a drawing by Leonardo da Vinci). Check out the artist’s model and compare him to the drawing (Figure 113). creativity is also enhanced. appreciate.14 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Figure 111: This classical drawing of a youth is copied from a work by Michelangelo. and better understand the world around you. you automatically learn to observe. .

People who expect to know how to ski after reading a book on skiing are not going to have any success until they actually go skiing. you can also learn to draw objects. people. In other words. With a little creative thought. You need to actually draw to achieve strong skills. Simply put. The closest relatives of drawing are printing and writing. You can also learn to draw from your imagination. Drawing provides a way for you to document how you see the world. Being able to draw also allows you to take up other visual arts (such as digital art and painting) more easily than people who cannot draw. Both of these activities require some sort of action in order to be learned. The process of reading this and every other art book from cover to cover cannot improve your drawing skills. Just as you learned to draw the letters of the alphabet.Chapter 1: Welcome to Drawing 15 Drawing is an action word Music students can’t learn to play piano by reading a music book without actually applying their knowledge to the action of playing a piano. All you need is some vision and a way to hold a drawing tool. you must put your knowledge into practice! YOU can draw! Drawing is an easily acquired skill that everyone can learn. Figure 115: The horse has magically turned into a unicorn! . Talent is nothing more than a word that describes the process in which you accept your ability to become a good artist. learning to draw does not require a magical force to have been born within you. artists can even change what they see in the real world into something completely different! Compare my reference photo in Figure 114 to the drawing in Figure 115. and other subjects. Drawing is also an action word. Figure 114: A photo of a horse in a field as viewed through the legs of another horse.

Figure 117: The style I use to draw a horse’s head is similar to the styles of the drawings of the masters demonstrated in Figures 111 and 112. The techniques that you like best help determine your unique style. Figure 116 shows an underdrawing of a horse. For instance. ArtSpeak Underdrawing is a loosely rendered sketch that is created as a guide for a final drawing (or painting).16 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Info Tidbit Developing your own style To develop a personal style of your own. Figure 116: A very faint underdrawing identifies the basic shapes of a horse’s head. you can become as good as you can imagine. You CAN draw! With lots of patience and hard work. My drawing techniques reveal that I have been a student of the masters for most of my life. Always take joy in your good drawings. . and learn from those that you don’t like. My sketch of a horse’s head (Figure 116) demonstrates the classical technique of lightly rendering an underdrawing before beginning a final drawing (Figure 117). you first need to learn as many techniques as possible. Leonardo da Vinci often used the technique of doing an underdrawing with metalpoint (refer to definition on page 18) before beginning a drawing or painting. Strong drawing skills eventually come to everyone who works hard.

you examine drawings rendered with different grades of graphite to give you an idea of how B and H pencils affect the look of drawings. ArtSpeak Graphite is a soft black form of opaque (nontransparent) carbon found in nature. Clay is a naturally occurring material that becomes hardened when dried. Some graphite drawings created hundreds of years ago are still around today. Traveling Back in Time with Graphite In this section. (When it comes to graphite. graphite has survived the test of time.Chapter 2: Getting a Grasp on Graphite and Grades 17 Chapter 2 Getting a Grasp on Graphite and Grades ***************************************************************** Something called “graphite” is the best friend of many artists who love to draw. a B grade is not better than an H!) In addition. Hence. It is often mixed with clay to make various types of drawing tools for artists. Grade refers to the softness or hardness of the mixture used in the manufacture of drawing mediums. I share a little bit of fun information about graphite and its history. You also learn about the grades of graphite. you discover a few fascinating tidbits about the history of graphite. In this chapter. . Figure 201: The base value of five different grades of graphite.

they are usually more expensive than pencils made for writing. The term “lead pencil” is often incorrectly used to describe graphite pencils that are made of graphite and clay (and contain no lead whatsoever). Figure 202: The earliest stylus was a thin metal stick made of lead. an ordinary graphite pencil comes to mind (like the ones used by schoolchildren). During the Renaissance. but can scratch your drawing paper instead of going on smoothly. a word of caution: these pencils are not designed for drawing! Inexpensive graphite may work well for writing. graphite pencils do produce a warm-toned gray line that looks very similar to the marks made by leadpoint. A stylus worked by leaving a thin deposit of metal on the surface of paper. or copper.18 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Another great thing about graphite is its ability to be erased. Professional drawing pencils are made with a higher quality mixture of graphite and clay and make marks that flow more smoothly. gold. producing a fine gray line. the masters created many beautiful intricate drawings with only a stylus. Styluses made of lead have been traced back to ancient Rome. you can often find a few of the faint lines from the underdrawings. Leadpoint is considered the ancestor of the modern graphite pencil. How the “lead” pencil got its name Before the discovery of graphite. many mistakes can be fixed. ancient artists made drawings with long. and so they became known as “leadpoint”. Styluses were made from a soft metal. On the other hand. ArtSpeak Stylus (sometimes called leadpoint or metalpoint) refers to a thin metal stick used for drawing. styluses were also made from silver. Therefore. Some styluses had a fine point at one end and a blunter point at the opposite end so artists could draw both thin and thick lines. During the Renaissance. When you look closely at old drawings. such as lead. . On the downside. WARNING! Stay away from poor-quality graphite! When most people think of drawing. However. Artists also used styluses to do underdrawings for more detailed drawings (and paintings). thin rods (referred to as “styluses”).

To make shopping a little easier. Artists often sharpened a chunk of graphite into a point and set it into a metal holder. Clay is hard and makes light marks. Graphite is very black and soft and makes dark marks. Farmers are thought to be the first people who found a practical use for graphite. a 6B pencil has more graphite than clay and makes very dark marks. and graphite quickly became a valuable drawing medium within artistic communities. These sharpened chunks became the very first graphite pencils! Making the Grade As you now know. Many art supply stores carry a broad range of grades. News of the discovery of graphite soon traveled far and wide throughout the known world. Figure 203: A cartoon sheep proudly displays a big “X” marked on her wool with graphite. . For example. They used a lump of graphite to mark their sheep so they could easily identify their flocks. Figure 204: A computer-generated image shows the base value of 17 different grades of graphite.Chapter 2: Getting a Grasp on Graphite and Grades 19 The link between graphite and sheep Graphite was discovered in England somewhere between 1500 and 1560. An HB grade is in the middle and can be called either an H or a B (Figure 204). A 2H pencil has less graphite and therefore makes very light marks. pencils are labeled with a number-letter code depending on the amounts of graphite and clay in the mixture. graphite pencils are made with a mixture of graphite and clay. Check out the cartoon drawing of a sheep in Figure 203.

For drawings needing a softer touch. and 6B. On the other hand. your goal is to choose whichever grades of pencils can best give you the results you want. 4B. For example. 2B. some grades make almost identical marks. Whenever you draw. Figure 206: A realistic drawing of a dagger is created with 2H. HB. bolder approach. a combination of B and H grades is a perfect choice. And more often than not. 4B and 6B grades of pencils. . B grades may work better for drawing subjects needing a darker. 2B. Figure 205: A range of different values can be created by each of these five grades of graphite. HB. the advanced drawing of a replica of a medieval dagger (Figure 206) is drawn with only these five grades. you may prefer to use mostly H grades. Artists can draw a full range of values (Figure 205) with only five grades of graphite: 2H.20 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Trying to draw with 17 different pencils can be a nightmare! Besides.

they work best for small to medium drawings (unless. . The drawing in Figure 209 is almost completely rendered with four different grades of hard pencils. you have lots of patience). brittle medium ► Make light to medium marks ► Wear down slowly ► Need very little sharpening ► Create very thin to medium-width lines The lines made by H pencils are mostly thin and delicate. they can create light to medium marks (Figure 207) that work well for some drawings. and the pencil becomes very difficult to sharpen.Chapter 2: Getting a Grasp on Graphite and Grades 21 Hard is light Hard pencils can’t make very dark values. hence. ArtSpeak TIP! Always lay your graphite pencils somewhere safe so they don’t fall! Info Tidbit The word pencil comes from the Latin word pencillus (which means “little tail”). circular part of an eye that adjusts its size under different lighting conditions. Figure 208: An arrow points to the pupil of an eye. the graphite inside the core breaks. When a pencil falls to the floor. dark. Figure 207: Values created with four H pencils (HB is considered the darkest hard pencil). Graphite is quite fragile . hard (H) pencils: ► Have a hard. of course. Small pieces of broken graphite can jam up the inside of the sharpener. However.especially the softer grades. Pupil of an eye is the tiny. As a rule.

. such as the pupils of his eyes and tiny sections of the darkest shadows. However. 2H. by pressing very gently with B pencils. Figure 210 shows the base value of four B grades of graphite. 4H.22 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started I used a 2B (soft) pencil for only a few dark accents. Figure 210: Values created with four B pencils (HB is the lightest B pencil). Soft is dark B pencils tend to “B” soft. HB. and 2B pencils. Figure 209: This drawing of a friend (Christopher Church) playing a violin took more than a month to complete with 6H. and can make very dark marks because they have more graphite than clay. you can also create light and medium values.

Combining soft and hard grades When you draw a subject with lots of light and dark values. Check out the sketch of the young man (Figure 211) created with only 2B and 4B pencils. medium.Chapter 2: Getting a Grasp on Graphite and Grades 23 Generally speaking. Figure 211: Loosely rendered sketch of a side-on view of a young man. . Figure 212: Drawing of a peach using HB. B grades of pencils: ► Have a soft medium ► Make light. and dark marks ► Wear down quickly ► Need to be sharpened frequently ► Can make thin to thick lines The darker marks created by B pencils are ideal for loosely rendered sketches on medium to large sheets of paper. Info Tidbit My favorite brands of graphite pencils are made in Germany. 2B. and 6B pencils. and don’t mind constantly sharpening their points. B pencils were used for the small drawing of a peach in Figure 212. B pencils can also work well for rendering detailed subjects on small sheets of paper. 4B. and are sold under the names Staedtler and Faber-Castell. If you are patient. you may need to use both B and H grades of pencils.

and 2B. But don’t be fooled! The grade of the graphite is written somewhere on the wood part of each pencil (Look closely at Figure 215). expect to be surprised by how many different brands of pencils are available. Figure 215: Can you see the grade written on these three brands of pencils? . and 6B. Figure 213: A drawing of a baby zebra (named Spot) is created with both H and B grades of graphite. 2B. even though the grades are different (Figure 214). Finding out your grade When you go to an art store. different grades of drawing pencils may all look the same. 4B. Figure 214: At first glance. Professional pencils often look identical. HB.24 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started And what animal could show you a combination of B and H pencils better than a zebra (Figure 213)? The white stripes are shaded with 2H. and the black stripes are drawn with HB.

Figure 302: A few different types of Figure 301: Shopping for drawing mediums is a big challenge when you have to choose from so many different types. In this chapter. I show you what each looks like. I tell you about a few popular drawing mediums. the happier you are with the outcomes. and the kind of marks it makes. Charcoal sticks are made by compressing powdered charcoal into round or rectangular sticks. you need to begin learning to draw with mediums that are specifically designed for artists. charcoal comes in various grades. the better the tools. As with graphite. ArtSpeak Charcoal is a drawing medium made from burnt organic material (such as wood). charcoal that are designed for drawing. .Chapter 3: More Drawing Mediums 25 Chapter 3 More Drawing Mediums ***************************************************************** In addition to graphite pencils. As with most activities. Charcoal pencils have a thin cylindrical stick of compressed charcoal inside a wooden casing.

Woodless pencil (2) is a thick cylindrical stick of graphite wrapped in a vinyl casing. loosely rendered drawings or very complicated. Pablo Picasso . Picking out Proper Pencils In this section. intricate drawings on small to medium-sized surfaces. through the tip. from the tiny tube inside the holder. (2) woodless pencil. Figure 303: Four types of drawing tools: (1) sticks. and (4) wood-encased pencils. The problem is how to remain an artist once he (she) grows up. mechanical. Charcoal pencils are fantastic for medium to large drawings on large sheets of paper. Figure 304: Pencils last longer if you sharpen only their points on a sandpaper block. Wood-encased pencil (4) (better known as a regular pencil) has a thin cylindrical stick of graphite or charcoal inside a wooden casing. Art Quote Every child is an artist. Sandpaper block is an artist’s tool with tear-off sheets of fine sandpaper used to sharpen the points of pencils. Several drawings invite you to compare the abilities of these pencils. (3) mechanical pencils. and woodless.26 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started ArtSpeak Drawing stick (1) is made by compressing and shaping a medium (such as graphite or charcoal) into a cylindrical or rectangular chunk. I discuss three types of drawing pencils: wood-encased. Mechanical pencil (3) has an internal mechanism that pushes a thin graphite lead. Wood-encased pencils Graphite pencils are ideal for either simple.

but (thanks to the wooden holder) less messy than sticks of charcoal. Figure 307: Thin lines drawn with freshly sharpened graphite pencils. Graphite pencils are a favorite drawing tool of many artists. Others constantly sharpen the graphite points to make thin marks (Figure 307). The drawing in Figure 308 was created with graphite pencils. Charcoal pencils Charcoal pencils are a lot more messy than graphite. some fine sandpaper. wood-encased drawing pencils. You can sharpen the points of regular pencils with a pencil sharpener. The pencil points were slightly worn down to shade the eyes. .Chapter 3: More Drawing Mediums 27 Graphite pencils Figure 305: Most art supply stores carry a huge selection of professionalquality. or a sandpaper block. Figure 306: Marks made with the worn-down points of graphite pencils. Some artists prefer to draw with a slightly worn-down pencil point (Figure 306). Figure 308: Cartoon drawing of an emu is created with regular pencils. A sandpaper block kept the pencil points nice and sharp to do the scraggly feathers.

Figure 309: Most charcoal pencils are a little thicker than graphite pencils. Figure 310: Various marks made by a charcoal pencil. but can do everything a pencil can do (and more). remember to tell that person to be very careful!) You may even want to completely stay away from charcoal pencils and use charcoal sticks instead. . (And. They should only be used by responsible adults who are handy with tools. So.28 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Wonderful black marks can be made with charcoal (Figure 310). A heavy-duty utility knife works best for cutting away some of the wood so you can sharpen the exposed charcoal with a sandpaper block. which is much softer than graphite. Hard grades of charcoal can be carefully sharpened in a pencil sharpener with an oversized opening. If you want thin lines. Charcoal is fun to work with and is ideal for drawing anything . if you don’t want to “draw blood.” ask someone to help you sharpen charcoal pencils. Soft grades of charcoal simply crumble and break when you try to sharpen them in a pencil sharpener. you need to keep the point sharpened with a sandpaper block. WARNING! Utility knives are VERY dangerous! Utility knives are as sharp as razors! One small slip of the knife can cause permanent damage to your hand or fingers.including people. scenery. Check out the charcoal drawing in Figure 311. They are a little messier. and objects.

professional mechanical pencils that are designed for drawing can only be found in art supply stores. but in the long run.Chapter 3: More Drawing Mediums 29 Figure 311: A loosely rendered charcoal sketch of Christopher Church playing his violin. Mechanical pencils Mechanical pencils (Figure 312) are a super alternative to pencils that need to be sharpened constantly. TIP! Purchase only professional-quality mechanical pencils You can find inexpensive novelty mechanical pencils in many stores. a mechanical pencil can last a very long time. A professional-quality mechanical pencil designed for drawing is expensive. When well cared for. Most are expensive. but they tend to last much longer than the department store variety. I have several that are more than 15 years old. it tends to be more economical than constantly buying woodencased pencils. Other fun pencil mediums Two other types of pencil mediums that are well worth having are: mechanical pencils (they never need sharpening) and woodless pencils. The marks they make stay approximately the same size. even after hours of drawing. Figure 312: A sampling of mechanical pencils. . However.

and are great for subjects needing wider. to make sure they are the right size for your mechanical pencil. you should load only one grade at a time.7 mm is a great choice for sketching loosely or drawing on a large surface (or both). 0. woodless pencils do not have a wooden casing! A thick rod of graphite is surrounded by a thin (usually vinyl) casing. Figure 314: Marks made with a woodless pencil. check the size! Read the label on each package of leads you want to buy.5 mm mechanical pencil. A mechanical pencil can be loaded with leads of different grades ranging from very hard to soft.5 mm is the most popular size and works best for drawing on small to medium-sized sheets of paper.5 mm mechanical pencils and various grades of leads. Woodless pencils rarely need to be sharpened in a pencil sharpener. A 0. A 0. hence. completely rendered with 0. (However.30 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Mechanical pencils come in different sizes. For example. you may have to buy a package of each of the grades you want to use. bolder strokes than regular pencils.) Leads of the same grade are sold in a single package. Figure 313: Drawing of an unusual glass bottle TIP! Before you buy leads for a mechanical pencil. they can also make very thin lines (Figure 315). A few strokes on sandpaper and the points are sharp! They can make lots of different marks (Figure 314). Woodless graphite pencils Obviously. When the points are sharpened.7 mm leads are too big to fit through the pointed end of a 0. . your hands stay clean as you work. so.

Chapter 3: More Drawing Mediums 31 Sticks and Stones (oops!) Powders Graphite and charcoal sticks are not considered pencils. Both are messy. but lots of fun! For instance. Sticks are great for rendering any subject. Figure 316: Drawing powder can be made from graphite or charcoal sticks. strong lines. but they are well worth having. charcoal and graphite sticks are one of the few art mediums that work well when broken! The crisp edges of broken pieces are fantastic for rendering thin. you can rub a charcoal or graphite stick on sandpaper to make powdered charcoal or graphite (Figure 316). Then. you simply dip your finger into the powder and draw! Or. Figure 315: A wood-encased graphite pencil worked well for creating three sketches of my grandson. Brandon. The flat ends and sides can be used for broad strokes (Figure 317). and especially for medium to large sketches and drawings. Surprisingly. (if messy isn’t your style) you may prefer to wrap your finger in a piece of paper towel first. .

and sticks.but not both together. Figure 317: A small sample of marks you can make with a stick. you can combine a graphite stick and graphite powder with various graphite pencils to create a drawing. Figure 319: A winter scene created with charcoal pencils. as well as erasers. powder. . Try to combine graphite and charcoal in a drawing and you can see what I mean! Use either graphite or charcoal mediums in a drawing . Figure 318: Various marks created by erasing sections of a layer of charcoal. In addition. charcoal and graphite do not usually play (or work) well together. charcoal powder. You simply apply some powder to the paper’s surface and erase sections to create an image. and a charcoal pencil in the same sketch. You can also use erasers to draw with either charcoal or graphite (Figures 318 and 319). However.32 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started You can use a charcoal stick.

Figures 401 to 403 show you highly magnified views of shading with a 6B pencil on papers with a smooth. medium tooth has a slightly uneven texture. Figure 402: Drawing paper with a medium tooth. medium. Figure 403: Watercolor paper with a rough tooth. Some papers are great for drawing and others are not. To further confuse artists.Chapter 4: Sketchbooks and Drawing Papers 33 Chapter 4 Sketchbooks and Drawing Papers ***************************************************************** Picking out drawing paper is a scary task for even the most experienced artists. ArtSpeak Tooth refers to the surface texture of paper. almost every store with an arts or crafts department carries some type of drawing paper. Paper with a smooth tooth is flat and silky. . In this chapter. and rough tooth is bumpy with lots of craters and peaks. and rough tooth. sizes. I tell you about the textures. You examine artworks done on different papers to give you an idea of how a paper can affect the look of a drawing. and weights of various drawing papers so you can make wise choices when you go shopping. I also explain how artists (not dentists) protect the tooth of paper. Figure 401: Printer paper with a smooth tooth.

. Flattened sheets of fibers were stacked into a pile with a layer of woolen cloth or felt in between each. I also show you how a paper’s tooth can influence the look of a drawing. vegetable matter. can you imagine having to make your own drawing paper? During the Renaissance. Check up on Tooth (without a Dentist!) The more tooth a paper has. and rags were chopped up into fibers. 6. When completely dry. leaving a flattened layer of fibers. the paper was usually coated with a substance (such as a gelatin mixture) to make it suitable for drawing. This time-consuming process included the following seven basic steps: 1. Most of the remaining moisture was squeezed out by pressing down on the stack. Water was then added to create a soupy mixture. 4.34 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Info Tidbit Drawing Papers during the Renaissance Shopping for drawing papers is no doubt a challenge. the rougher it feels. 5. Figure 306: A single drop of liquid can appear so shiny that it almost sparkles. 7. a sense of touch. 3. The sheets of paper were then hung to dry. However. 2. The type of texture can be identified with vision. Figure 305: A child’s knit sweater is bumpy and soft. Some artists like smooth drawing paper. Figure 304: Short fur (as on cats) is soft and silky. ArtSpeak Texture refers to the surface detail of an object. The mixture was scooped up with a screen and placed into a wooden mold. and a general knowledge of the object. In this section. I discuss the tooth of three common types of paper. The mold was shaken until most of the water drained through the screen. and many prefer paper that is somewhere in between. others prefer very rough paper. drawing papers were handmade. Materials such as plants.

Chapter 4: Sketchbooks and Drawing Papers 35 The surface of a smooth tooth The surface of smooth tooth papers (that are designed specifically for artists). Artists who prefer drawing highly detailed subjects often choose papers with a smooth tooth. The realistic drawing of a cat in Figure 407 was rendered with graphite on a professionalquality. feels relatively even and silky. Figure 407: A detailed drawing of Bill the cat on smooth paper. . smooth watercolor paper. His beautiful coat of striped fur looks very soft. but is not shiny.

They work beautifully for creating a full range of values and lots of different textures. Figure 408: Sketchbook paper with a medium tooth is perfect for capturing the texture of an owl’s feathers. Glossy paper is toothless. .36 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Big smile for a medium tooth Medium tooth papers are ideal for most drawing subjects. Many sketchbooks have paper with a medium tooth and are a fantastic choice for beginners. TIP! Stay away from papers with a glossy surface! Smooth drawing paper is wonderful. and therefore too smooth for graphite or charcoal to properly stick to it. but glossy paper is just plain awful.

Many smooth watercolor papers are hot pressed.Chapter 4: Sketchbooks and Drawing Papers 37 ArtSpeak Acid-free refers to a high-quality and long-lasting paper that has had the acid removed from the pulp in the papermaking process. look for a label that says the paper is acid-free. Textures on a rough tooth Rough paper is terrible for tiny detailed drawings. He who works with his hands and his head and his heart is an artist. The peaks and craters of rough watercolor paper helped create the wonderful textured shading in Figures 410 and 411. but ideal for sketching on large sheets of paper. Softcover sketchbooks are inexpensive. and some craters show through as white. Art Quote He (or she) who works with his hands is a laborer. Hot pressed refers to a paper that is pressed through hot cylinders during its manufacture. Drawing books and papers often have labels that tell you the paper is acid-free. Fun patterns and textures often appear when the peaks of the paper grab the graphite. you need to handle them carefully so the paper doesn’t wrinkle. Saint Francis of Assisi Figure 409: A hardcover sketchbook protects your papers and drawings from being wrinkled. WARNING! Stay away from acid! Don’t be fooled by cheap imitations of goodquality drawing paper. . however. Just because the cover of a sketchbook says it’s suitable for drawing doesn’t mean it’s acid-free. He who works with his hands and his head is a craftsman. Hardcover refers to a durable type of book cover that is made from a thick and unbendable material. Before you buy a sketchbook. Drawings can be ruined when papers with acid deteriorate and turn yellow. Softcover describes a flexible book cover that is usually made of paper.

. jagged textures of trees are captured on watercolor paper with a rough tooth. As an extra perk. The quality. Figure 411: A close-up view shows how rough paper can help render the texture of a tree trunk. and weight of paper. acidfree. this paper is similar to that used by the masters during the late Renaissance. 100% cotton. The surface works beautifully for most drawing media and all subjects. Sketchbooks and Papers Art supply stores sell individual sheets of papers that are designed specifically for drawing.38 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Figure 410: The bumpy. hot pressed watercolor paper with a 140 lb weight. are much more important than whether you purchase individual sheets or a sketchbook (or both). A sketchbook has several sheets of drawing paper in a book format. size. Info Tidbit My favorite drawing paper is Arches.

If your shading begins to look shiny. but is easily torn and damaged.switch to a softer B pencil instead. The weight of a paper is usually marked on the packaging or front cover. and protects the paper inside. A hardcover sketchbook is much more durable. Figure 412: A small sampling of drawing papers and sketchbooks. As an extra perk. it’s much too expensive for everyday use. For example. Softcover sketchbooks have to be carefully stored on a flat surface. Avoid pressing too hard when you want darker shading . Thick paper is more durable than thin because it weighs more. the paper can be easily wrinkled and damaged. the hard cover provides a solid surface on which to work when you’re away from your desk or table. everyday printer paper has a 20 lb (75 g/m²) weight and therefore is too thin (and too smooth) for drawing. the tooth is flattened beyond repair. hardcover. TIP! Always take good care of a paper’s tooth! The tooth of any paper can be easily destroyed by pressing too hard on its surface with your pencil. remember to apply only a little bit of pressure to your pencil when you draw. Heavy Arches drawing paper has a 140 lb (300 g/m²) weight and is perfect for drawing masterpieces. So. or sheets? Even though softcover sketchbooks are relatively inexpensive. Additional shading will no longer hold fast to the paper’s surface. You can also feel the paper to make sure it’s thick. inexpensive.Chapter 4: Sketchbooks and Drawing Papers 39 Softcover. However. . A professional-quality paper for everyday use should have at least a 50 lb (260 g/m²) weight. Thin paper weighs very little. Weighing in on paper The “weight” of paper describes the thickness of individual sheets of paper. Individual sheets of drawing paper need to be stored on a flat surface inside a hard-sided portfolio.

In Chapter 9. Some types are inexpensive and others can be quite costly. Individual sheets of paper (Figure 413) come in many sizes. if you prefer making large drawings. you finally have a chance to pick up a pencil and begin drawing! . A really big sheet can be cut down into smaller sheets. most large sketchbooks (over 16 by 20 inches) are softcover. you need to store the sketchbook on a large.40 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Larger is not always better Choose a sketchbook or drawing papers in a size that is easy to transport when you travel. I give you a checklist so you know exactly what you need to buy (or find at home). hard surface to prevent the paper from bending. you’ll know all you need to know about drawing supplies. In Chapter 7. Hence. stay away from sketchbooks under 9 by 12 inches or your drawing options become too limited. Are you tired of reading yet? Keep going . However. stationery. you can select the best type of paper for your needs (and budget!). and department stores in your community to find out what types of drawing paper are available. Figure 413: A large sheet of drawing paper can be attached to a drawing board with clamps. Then.by the end of Chapter 6. On the other hand. Info Tidbit TIP! Check before you buy! Check out art supply.

however. such as pencil sharpeners and erasers. and (5) spray fixative. (If the edges of your vinyl eraser are worn. they do provide a fun way to strengthen your visual and drawing skills. Figure 501: A few more art supplies: (1) pencil cases. They can erase small or large sections of drawings. as well as pull out (erase) light sections from a layer of graphite or charcoal.Chapter 5: Adding to the Basics 41 Chapter 5 Adding to the Basics ***************************************************************** In addition to pencils and paper. Vinyl erasers Vinyl erasers (Figure 502) have many practical uses. For example. I tell you about the supplies that work best for drawing. (3) manikins. I also suggest a few extra items to consider adding to your shopping list. you can use the sharp edge of a regular block eraser. manikins are certainly not necessary for learning how to draw. and the ones you should avoid. Tools for Erasing In this section. To erase tiny details or draw thin lines. Erasers that are designed specifically for artists can be purchased in an art supply store. (2) a metal ruler. In this chapter.) . you find out about two types of art erasers that are very gentle to the surface of your paper: vinyl and kneaded. a sharp knife can be used to cut off the end. (4) a small knife for cutting paper. you need to have a few other drawing supplies.

The drawing of a sphere in Figure 504 was created with the help of both vinyl and kneaded erasers. I pulled out light values with a kneaded eraser. so pick up some extras. a three-dimensional sphere seems to come out of the dark. kneaded erasers eventually get too dirty to work well. You can also use a kneaded eraser to carefully pat or gently rub a section of a drawing to lighten lines or values. Figure 503: Kneaded erasers are simple boring blocks until you begin molding and stretching them. I show you how to draw with your kneaded eraser (Action 9D: Playing with Erasers). TIP! To clean a kneaded eraser. Then. you simply stretch and reshape it (also known as “kneading”) several times. and can easily be molded into a point or wedge for erasing. In Chapter 9. I covered my paper with a layer of charcoal. First of all. Kneaded erasers Kneaded erasers (Figure 503) are a real joy! They don’t leave annoying eraser crumbs on your paper. The sharp edge of a vinyl eraser created the brightest whites. Figure 504: With the help of erasers. (2) eraser wheel. and (3) pencil erasers and refills. However.42 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Figure 502: Three popular types of vinyl erasers: (1) regular blocks. Dark shadows and crisp outlines were added with a charcoal pencil. .

Sandpaper blocks are not expensive. you simply tear it off. you need a pencil sharpener. The sharpeners in Figure 505 last a very long time. Figure 505: Four of my favorite pencil sharpeners.especially if they carry school supplies. throw it away. so pick up more than one. and battery-operated or expensive sharpeners. WARNING! The wrong eraser can ruin your drawings! Stay away from erasers that are colored (especially the pink ones) or very hard (such as those on the ends of some pencils). art supply stores are your best bet. Sandpaper sharpens just the exposed sections of medium instead of both the wood and the medium. Sandpaper blocks are more difficult to find.Chapter 5: Adding to the Basics 43 Sharpening your Mediums Pencil sharpeners and sandpaper (blocks or sheets) are a must for keeping your mediums (also called media) in shape. choose a simple. Instead. When the top sheet of sandpaper becomes worn and dirty. sturdy. check out a building supplies store or a department store with a hardware department. You simply hold the wooden handle as you sharpen your pencil point on the sandpaper. Sandpaper blocks have sheets of fine sandpaper attached to a wooden base. The best ones have two openings: a small one for regular graphite pencils and a large one for oversized pencils. Make sure the surface is a fine grade (look for anything that falls between 100-180 grit). Stay away from toy sharpeners. hand-held (preferably metal) pencil sharpener. especially those for which you can purchase replacement blades (available at most art supply stores). Lots of different stores carry sharpeners . As for sheets of sandpaper. Pencil sharpeners If you use any type of pencil media. . and use the next sheet. Sandpaper blocks and sheets Sandpaper preserves the wooden sections of your pencils that could otherwise get quickly eaten up by your sharpener.

ruler. I speak from experience when I say this is not a great idea! A good-quality ruler does a far better job and is much easier to use (plus. (In Chapter 7 you find step-by-step instructions for making a portfolio and viewfinder frame.44 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started A Few Extras Have fun wandering through art supply stores! However. Metal rulers are easy to clean. A ruler comes in handy for outlining drawing spaces. you can avoid the frustration of always searching for misplaced items. TIP! You can make a sanding tool similar to an artist’s sandpaper block. but can last a lifetime with proper care. portfolio. You can buy many types of wonderful portfolios in art supply stores. damaged. or destroyed. I discuss four more necessities: pencil case. An all-metal ruler with raised edges may be a little more expensive. and use a heavy-duty stapler to hold them together at one end. and pets safe! Always put your supplies away in a container when you are done drawing.) Pencil case A container for storing your pencils. many tend to be very expensive (especially those made of leather). Ruler At some point in your life. you may have tried using something like the edge of a book as a ruler. (I have two large dogs who consider pencils and erasers to be chew toys!) In addition. Cut sheets of fine sandpaper into long. resist the temptation to pick up a bunch of stuff you really don’t need and may never use. however. small children. WARNING! Keep your drawing supplies. it has measurement guidelines). and viewfinder frame. if you keep everything together in one place. and as a guide for cutting straight pieces of drawing paper. narrow pieces. Portfolio Drawings stored in a pile on a shelf (or anywhere that’s dusty or within direct sunlight) can be damaged easily. and their raised edges protect your drawings from being smudged as you draw lines. A hard-sided portfolio can protect your drawing paper and completed drawings from becoming wrinkled.especially if you have small children or pets in your home. You don’t need to spend a lot of money on supplies to learn how to draw well. Stuff you can’t do without In this section. erasers. . and other smaller drawing supplies is essential .

Viewfinder frame Beginners to drawing often include too many objects in their drawings. Composition refers to the arrangement of the various parts of your drawing subject within the borders of a drawing space. or circle. see-through rectangle or square that allows you to look at a drawing subject from various viewpoints. Drawing space (also called a drawing surface or a drawing format) is the area in which you render a drawing within a specific perimeter. It can be the shape of a sheet of paper itself. you can remove most of the clutter and unnecessary objects from your view. rectangle. As you adjust its size. A viewfinder frame helps you visually weed out boring stuff in a scene. so you can draw only the exciting parts. In doing so. such as a square. and spray fixative should be the top three items on your list. a spider within a square drawing space.Chapter 5: Adding to the Basics 45 ArtSpeak Viewfinder frame is an adjustable. but not necessary Before you go shopping for additional drawing supplies. Figure 507: Drawing of Figure 506: A simple viewfinder frame. . Nice to have. Small ones are great for planning compositions from photos. or a shape you outline on your paper. Large viewfinder frames are ideal for finding a composition when you are outside trying to choose a drawing subject. you can choose an ideal composition for a drawing. Figure 508: A section of a cartoon face is viewed through the opening of a viewfinder frame. display board. a manikin.

However. Manikins Often made of wood. require no bathroom breaks. Spray fixative A spray fixative that is designed for graphite and charcoal can protect your completed drawings from being accidentally smudged. ► Make sure you read the directions carefully. You can even choose a wall in your home (or use your fridge) for an ongoing exhibition of your work. . you can also purchase animals. In addition to female and male figures.46 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Display boards Bulletin or display boards (I especially love the metal ones with magnets) are relatively inexpensive and provide display space for your drawings. WARNING! Don’t use spray fixative on your unfinished drawings! You can’t erase problem areas after your drawing has been sprayed. manikins are wonderful models: they don’t move. keep the following in mind: ► Spray only in a well-ventilated area (such as outdoors). Figure 509: A simple sketch of a figure is created with the help of a manikin. and don’t talk your ears off! Manikins can be manipulated into numerous poses and viewed from any angle. ► Two or three thin coats are better than one thick coat (less is more!). before you use a spray fixative.

Part 2: Get Set! 47 PART 2 GET SET! ► Ideal surfaces on which to draw ► Proper lighting for drawing ► Good posture for sitting to draw ► What to pack in a portable studio ► Creating your shopping list ► Make an artist’s portfolio ► Construct a simple viewfinder frame ► Three ways to hold your drawing medium ► Discover your natural hand movement .

48 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started .

and properly hold your pencils as you work. A Comfy Place to Sit and Draw Your special artistic place in your home should be as relaxing. Figure 602: A sketch of a horse is attached to a drawing board with a clip. smooth surface (often made of wood) used for sketching and drawing (Figure 602). lightweight. . Clips (usually made of metal) can be used to attach sheets of paper to a drawing board (Figure 603). Figure 601: A simple drawing of a drafting desk (and chair) that is adjusted for drawing. I show you how to sit comfortably for drawing. ArtSpeak Drafting desk (or drafting table) is an adjustable worktable with a slanted top (Figure 601). peaceful. In addition. Drawing board is a portable. be sure to check around your home. I tell you about drawing surfaces and lighting that work well for creating art in your home. When assembling your drawing supplies. you may already have many of these items.Chapter 6: Setting up for Drawing 49 Chapter 6 Setting up for Drawing ***************************************************************** In this chapter. and free of distractions as possible. Figure 603: A popular type of clip is called a Boston Bulldog. I also tell you how to pack up a portable drawing kit so you can take your love of drawing wherever you go.

. Many art stores sell different types of inexpensive drawing boards in various sizes. Shedding light on your art To prevent your eyes from becoming tired or strained. desk. Another option is to prop up a drawing board at an angle on a regular table or desk. or drawing board. drafting desk. smoothly finished plywood. Drawing papers can be held in place with either clips or tape. Plexiglas. Experiment with your tape on a small piece of drawing paper to find out if it can be safely removed. always make sure you have good lighting. TIP! Some types of tapes can damage your paper. Masking tapes designed for painting the interiors of homes. An adjustable sloped table or drafting desk is a fantastic choice. Figure 604: An artist is sketching on paper that is attached to a drawing board with a clip. Info Tidbit A drawing board is easy to make (if you know an adult who is handy with a saw). A flexible-neck study lamp is designed to focus light directly on your drawing surface (Figure 605). Use sandpaper to sand it until its surface and edges are very smooth. also work fairly well. Simply cut a piece of thin. or another sturdy product to a size slightly larger than your favorite drawing paper. Art supply stores usually carry large clips and special tapes for attaching paper to a drawing board. Consider such options as a table.50 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Choosing a drawing surface You can easily find a surface on which you can comfortably draw. Consider a natural light source from a window in the daytime and from a lamp for evenings and overcast days.

I think it comes from a mixture of your surroundings. I don’t think people are born artists. the top of your paper is farther away from you than the bottom. you can end up with all sorts of problems trying to draw accurate proportions. but also for improving your drawing skills. so. Figure 605: An artist sits comfortably at a drafting desk with an attached lamp shedding light on his drawing. if you are drawing a figure. Unfortunately. check out the cost of replacement bulbs. and luck. When you create large drawings on a flat surface (such as a table or desk). not just for your health. As a result. some types can cost almost as much as (or more than) the lamp itself. his or her head may end up too big for the body.after your drawing is complete. the people you meet. Art Quote WARNING! Don’t attempt large drawings on a flat (horizontal) surface! Instead. use something to prop up your sketchbook or paper so your drawing surface is sloped. For example. read the packaging carefully before you buy! Also.Chapter 6: Setting up for Drawing 51 An ideal lamp mimics natural daylight. . Francis Bacon Good Posture First! Sitting correctly (and eating your vegetables) is very important. you usually find this out the hard way .

52

Drawing Book 1: Getting Started

Good posture and a comfortable, adjustable chair can prevent your muscles from becoming strained and sore. Arrange your chair and drawing surface so you can easily move your hand, arm, shoulder, and upper body as you draw.

How NOT to sit!
Many people do not sit up straight. They hunch or lean over too much, and twist their bodies into all sorts of positions that place their back out of proper alignment (Figure 606).

Figure 606: How NOT to sit!
You become uncomfortable very quickly when you are not sitting properly.

TIP!
To prevent cramping and repetitive movement injuries, move your fingers and wrist as little as possible when you draw. You should be moving your lower and upper arm (and sometimes your shoulder and upper body as well). If you absolutely have to move your fingers and wrist (for example, to draw tiny details), take a break every ten minutes to relax your hand and wrist.

Sitting correctly
Most drafting tables and some office chairs have height adjustments. You can also position your chair closer or farther away from your table. Refer to Figure 607 and arrange your table and chair until you can: ► Sit up straight with your feet flat on the floor (or on a raised surface such as a footstool). ► Distribute your body weight evenly on both hips. ► Bend your knees at a right angle. ► See your drawing clearly without bending your lower back. ► Comfortably rest your lower arm on the table.

Chapter 6: Setting up for Drawing

53

Once you are used to sitting correctly, you can fully focus on drawing.

Putting Together a Portable Studio
In this section, I suggest practical supplies for bringing your love of drawing on any type of excursion, such as to a local park or a picnic at the beach. Learning to draw is learning to see! The more you practice the faster your skills improve!
Figure 607: A cartoon artist shows you how to sit
properly at a drafting desk.

Doing sketches on a regular basis trains your brain to see as an artist (a fun way to see the world). A very thorough visual examination of your drawing subject imprints its image into your mind. You can then draw what you see in your sketchbook - often with only a few simple lines. For example, sometimes all you need is a wiggly line to capture a section of land. Figure 608 shows a simple sketch of the lake behind my home.

Figure 608: Simple lines capture a sky, hills, a lake,
trees, and a few plants.

You should keep a few drawing materials packed and ready to travel.

54

Drawing Book 1: Getting Started

When you feel like drawing outdoors, you can just grab your portable studio and go. First of all, you need something in which to carry your art materials. A backpack or fabric bag with handles is great. Select something large enough to hold everything you need. Naturally, you need a surface on which to draw. You can bring a drawing board, paper, and clips (or tape). A hardcover sketchbook is a great alternative to sheets of paper; its hard cover serves as a drawing surface. Add a pencil case filled with pencils, erasers, sandpaper blocks, and a pencil sharpener. Here’s a list of additional things you may want to bring along: ► A viewfinder frame. ► Your portfolio (if you use sheets of drawing paper). ► Plastic bags to protect your drawings (and you) in case of rain. ► Beverages and snacks. ► Wipes or paper towels for clean-up (especially if you use charcoal). ► A small camera to take photos of inspirational scenes and objects. ► Depending on where you go, you may need bug repellent. ► Oh, and don’t forget your sunscreen and a hat!

Art Quote

When we speak of Nature it is wrong to forget that we are ourselves a part of Nature. We ought to view ourselves with the same curiosity and openness with which we study a tree, the sky or a thought, because we too are linked to the entire universe.
Henri Matisse

Save all your sketches! By examining your older sketches, you can measure how much your skills have advanced. In addition, as your creativity and artistic vision improves, you may look back on your early works with a new appreciation. For example, a face may be hidden within a sketch of an old log. (Remember the stone faces hidden in Figure 101 in Chapter 1.)

acid-free paper: 9 by 12 inches (or larger) ► Package of inexpensive sheets of paper (printer/copy paper works well) . ► Sketchbook with medium tooth. (I show you how to use a viewfinder frame in Action 9F in Chapter 9. The following lists are guides for making your own shopping list. and Viewfinder Frame 55 Chapter 7 Making a List.Chapter 7: Making a List. Portfolio. your first exercise is to make a shopping list and buy your drawing supplies. Portfolio. You then follow step-by-step illustrated instructions to make a portfolio and viewfinder frame. Supplies needed: Paper and pencil (or pen).) ► AC T I O N 7 A ◄ The Shopping List Goal: Write out a shopping list so you can go shopping for your supplies. Must have Plan to purchase (or find around your home) the items on this list first: Figure 701: Shopping for art supplies. and Viewfinder Frame ***************************************************************** In this chapter.

2B. your eye is grabbed by the loud color.) Nice to have As your skills improve and you have extra money. and 6B wood-encased pencils ► Sturdy handheld pencil sharpener ► Sandpaper blocks or sheets of fine-grit sandpaper ► Drawing surface. such as a drafting desk. 4B. making it hard to concentrate on the view inside. HB. . HB.56 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started ► Regular vinyl eraser ► Kneaded eraser ► Pencil case ► 2H. you can shop for items from this list: ► Wooden manikins ► Bulletin or display board ► Spray fixative ► Mechanical pencils with 2H. and 2B leads ► A selection of good-quality drawing papers ► Camera ► Hardcover sketchbook ► Graphite sticks and woodless pencils ► Pencil-type vinyl eraser TIP! When buying matboard or cardboard to make a viewfinder frame. When using a brightly colored viewfinder frame. stay with neutral rather than bright colors. or table with a drawing board ► Lamp ► Metal ruler ► Metal clips (if you plan to use a drawing board) ► Comfortable chair ► Portfolio case (for storing your completed drawings) ► Viewfinder frame (Supplies for making a portfolio and viewfinder frame are on the next page.

and a ruler. as well as some of the extra items suggested on Page 54. thin rope. ► AC T I O N 7 B ◄ Making a Portfolio Goal: Make and design your very own unique portfolio. and Viewfinder Frame 57 Supplies for making a portfolio If you (or someone else) plan to make a portfolio. ► Strong string.Chapter 7: Making a List. Figure 702: A homemade portfolio. you need the following: ► Roll of wide tape (duct tape is great and comes in lots of fun colors) ► Heavy-duty. or shoelaces (long enough to tie the portfolio closed in three places) ► Acid-free cardboard or matboard (usually offered in a wide selection of colors at framing and art supply stores) ► Drawing supplies for adding a design (optional) Supplies for making a viewfinder frame Besides acid-free board. sharp utility knife ► Straight edge or long ruler with a metal edge ► Sharp tool (such as a scratch awl or a large nail) for punching holes for ties. Portfolio. . you also need two large paper clips. Supplies for a portable studio You need a second set of basic drawing supplies. a utility knife.

flat surface that can’t be damaged with a sharp knife. Hence. Measure the board first . the finished portfolio will be half the size of your board. Place your large sheet of board (colored side facing up) on a flat surface. One large folded sheet of board makes a slightly stronger portfolio than two smaller pieces . or two pieces at 20 by 30 inches each). Option 1: Using one large sheet of board 1. cutting the board on the dining room table may not be the best idea! You may want to ask an adult for help. TIP! Some boards (such as matboard) are colored on one side and white on the other. you may want the colored side facing outward on your portfolio.it may not need to be trimmed. When choosing board. ► 20 by 30 inches (one sheet at least 40 by 30 inches. Deciding on a size The finished size of your portfolio needs to be a little larger than your largest sheet of drawing paper. go to step 2. If you buy two pieces (one for each side). you can use either one large sheet or two smaller pieces. each needs to be the finished size. . Keep in mind that it needs to be folded in half (peek ahead to Figure 703). For example. or two pieces at 16 by 20 inches each).especially along the bottom. If your board is the same color on both sides. Trim the large piece of board to the overall size you want. Refer back to the previous section for suggested sizes.58 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Gather your supplies on a large. If you decide on one large sheet. Suggested portfolio sizes include: ► 16 by 20 inches (one sheet at least 32 by 20 inches. If your board is already the size you want. The colored side in the illustrations is shown as gray. simply ignore references to color. take into account that you need to fold it in half. 2. In other words.

See Figure 704. The sides have one dot. Use a sharp tool to punch holes where each of the six dots is marked.Chapter 7: Making a List. Figure 704: Dots mark the spots where the ties attach. Add wide tape to all four edges of the large board. and an HB pencil to mark the points. This line shows you where you later score (slightly cut) the board (Figure 703). if your board is 32 by 20 inches. Figure 703: A straight line is drawn down the center of the board. and each is halfway between the edge and the center line. For example. 5. 6. and the edges are made strong with wide tape. 4. If your board is 40 by 30 inches. Measure. . and Viewfinder Frame 59 3. the middle points are at 16 inches. Portfolio. Use an HB pencil. the center points need to be at 20 inches. The top and bottom edges have two. 7. Measure the board and mark the center points along the width. Use a ruler to measure. and then mark the halfway distances of the sides and top of each half with a dot (to mark where the ties go). Use a long ruler or straight edge to draw a straight line along the points.

10. . Be very careful. The colored side should now be on the outside. tape over the scored seam at the bottom. The basic construction of the portfolio is complete (Figure 706). With the portfolio closed. Gently fold the large sheet of board inward along the scored line. 12. use two strips of tape (Figure 705). 9. all is not lost. Figure 705: Portfolio is folded along the score line. cut very slightly (sometimes referred to as “scoring”) along the straight line on the colored side. Figure 706: The bottom edge of portfolio (the folded edge) has been reinforced with strong tape.60 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started 8. 11. you’ll have two pieces of board instead of one scored piece. and the inner fold line section is reinforced with wide tape. To make this seam super strong. Continue on to the Adding ties and final touches section on page 62. With your knife and a straight edge. if you cut too deeply into the board. Open the portfolio and tape over the inside center seam. TIP! If you accidentally end up with two pieces. Simply continue on and follow the instructions for working with two pieces instead of one.

Using wide tape. and then mark dots at the halfway distances of the sides and top of each piece of board. The inside surfaces should now be facing you (Figure 708). the holes for the ties are marked and then punched with a sharp tool. . 2. 5. These sides are the bottom of your portfolio. Do not mark dots on the sides without tape. reinforce all but one long edge of each piece of board. Measure. 6. These dots show you where to punch holes for the ties (Figure 707). To make the seam super strong. Butt the bottoms of each piece of board tightly together on a flat surface. Use a sharp tool to punch holes where the dots are marked. 3. 4. Place the boards colored side up so the two wide edges that are not taped (the bottom of the portfolio) are close together. use two strips of tape (Figure 708). Tape both pieces together.Chapter 7: Making a List. Figure 707: Three sides of each piece are reinforced with wide tape. and Viewfinder Frame 61 Option 2: Using two pieces of board 1. Portfolio. Figure 708: The boards are butted together and then taped together with wide tape. You end up with three holes on each piece of board.

Tie a knot in the end of each tie. If using a half. 1. See Figure 709. you finish your portfolio by adding ties. You have the option of decorating either one side or both with creative designs. Adding ties and final touches Figure 709: The bottom edge of the portfolio is reinforced with strong tape. it doesn’t matter on which end you tie a knot. The holes for ties should line up on the top and sides. If you use a full shoelace for each tie. Fold the portfolio so the colored sides are on the outside. .62 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started 7. In this section. 8. you may get away with using half for each tie (if they are long). Figure 712: Wide tape covers the knotted ends Figure 710: A knot is tied on one end of a shoelace. Use wide tape to secure the knotted ends of the ties to the inside (Figure 712). tie the knot in the end that has been cut. 3. Use at least two strips of wide tape to reinforce the bottom edge on the outside. Each of the six ties needs to be between 12 to 16 inches long. Thread a tie through each of the six holes from the inside. If the hole is bigger than the knot. you can tie additional knots on top of the first so the end won’t go through the hole. If you use shoelaces. 2. The end with the knot needs to be on the inside. Figure 711: The laces are threaded through the holes from the inside toward the outside. Refer to Figure 711. Refer to Figure 710.

You can probably think of oodles of other ideas to decorate your portfolio. 5.Chapter 7: Making a List. Figure 713 shows the outside of an undecorated portfolio. ► AC T I O N 7 C ◄ Making a Viewfinder Frame Goal: Make a viewfinder frame. Set up your supplies on a flat space that is adult-approved. Figure 714: A drawing of daisies graces one side of a portfolio case. Portfolio. and Viewfinder Frame 63 4. Figure 715: A homemade viewfinder frame. You may prefer to use it as is. Add a design or drawing to the sides of your portfolio. Figure 713: The portfolio awaits a spiffy design. Place your drawing paper and drawings inside and tie the ties. . Decorating your portfolio is completely optional. Close the portfolio. The portfolio in Figure 714 has a drawing of daisies on the front.

Use two large paper clips to join the two pieces together to form a frame. 2. the more you can block distracting and unwanted objects from your view. Figure 716: Each L-shaped piece of matboard needs to be cut perfectly square. keep in mind that the wider your frame. Figure 718: A closeup view of my grandson (Brandon) is selected with the help of a viewfinder frame. Smaller ones are great for planning compositions from photos. Figure 717: Two L-shaped pieces of matboard are joined with paper clips so the inside becomes either a square or rectangle.64 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Consider making several viewfinder frames in different sizes. . Bigger ones are ideal for finding a composition when you are outside trying to choose a subject. Again. Refer to Figures 717 and 718. Use a ruler and a utility knife to cut two identical L-shaped pieces of cardboard any size you want. Refer to Figure 716. don’t be afraid to ask for help using a knife. 1. When choosing a size. This means that the corners should form a ninety-degree angle (also known as a right angle).

Creating smoothly flowing lines requires broad.Chapter 8: Give Yourself a Helping Hand 65 Chapter 8 Give Yourself a Helping Hand ***************************************************************** Moving your drawing hand naturally and rotating your paper as you work can improve your artistic outcomes. vertical. Figure 801: Several straight lines that are drawn in six different directions. In this chapter. shoulder. arm. If you move only your fingers and wrist. Adjust your chair and table until you can easily move your hand. gentle movements of your whole arm. or on an angle ► The size of your drawing paper ArtSpeak Straight line provides the shortest connection between any two points. you discover how these simple actions can quickly advance your current drawing skills. Choosing the most comfortable way to hold your medium depends on the following: ► Your choice of medium ► Whether your drawing surface is flat. Straight lines can be drawn in any direction. . your lines may end up looking shaky and rigid. and upper body as you draw. Holding Your Mediums The way you hold your drawing mediums can affect the look of your drawings.

Figure 803: How to hold a pencil when you are creating big. but with practice you do get used to them. Experiment with each of the three ways to hold your drawing mediums.66 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Figure 802 illustrates how most people hold their pencil when first beginning to write and draw. The second way of holding a pencil (Figure 803) is great for rendering a medium to large sketch (or drawing) on a sloped or vertical surface. This method requires movement from your arm. (Remember to move your arm rather than just your fingers and wrist. You may find a couple of these methods a little awkward at first. The method shown in Figure 804 requires movement from your arm and shoulder. Figure 802: Holding a pencil in the most familiar and traditional manner. bold sketches. Figure 804: An ideal way to hold various types of drawing mediums for sketching. and is ideal for holding pencils or sticks of graphite and charcoal. and sometimes your shoulder and upper body as well. You can hold your pencil this way when you work on a sloped or vertical surface.) This method is ideal for creating small drawings on a flat or sloped surface. .

and helps you find and use yours. Examine the close-up view of the shading lines in Figure 806).Chapter 8: Give Yourself a Helping Hand 67 Becoming a Natural As discussed in the previous section. As a matter of fact. Leonardo’s shading lines appear to be rendered from the upper left to lower right. and from the lower right to the upper left. I took the time to check out some of Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings. Many aspiring artists simply jump into drawing without taking the time to discover their natural hand movement. you can choose from three different ways to hold your pencil. The next logical step is to find the most natural way to move your pencil as you draw. I found myself in awe of his shading lines . I used a graphite pencil to render a study of one of Leonardo’s pen-andink drawings.mostly drawn at the same angle. most people don’t even know they have one! This section explores the natural hand movement of Leonardo da Vinci. . Recently. Figure 805: This drawing of an old man (including the marks and age spots on the paper) is copied from a drawing by Leonardo. Figure 805 shows my drawing of an old man’s face. Figure 806: I turned this drawing sideways as I worked so I could imitate Leonardo’s lines with my own natural hand movement. Leonardo the lefty You can tell a lot about artists by examining their art.

Info Tidbit Many experts claim that Leonardo da Vinci was left-handed because of the way he drew straight lines (slanted from the upper left to lower right). Art Quote The artist ought first to exercise his hand by copying drawings from the hand of a good master. However. In addition to using their natural hand movement. they often rotate their paper. This is the natural hand movement of many left-handed artists.68 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Finding your natural hand movement You natural hand movement may not be the same as either Leonardo’s or mine. Remembering to always rotate your paper takes lots of practice. Pay attention to how you make these lines. But. you are rotating your paper all the time without even thinking about it. Leonardo da Vinci . and you should try to use it to your advantage whenever possible. This is your natural hand movement. You should rotate your drawing paper as you work to take full advantage of your natural hand movement. Try your hand at drawing sets of slanted straight lines in your sketchbook (Figure 807). Right-handed artists (like me) often draw lines from the upper right to the lower left. Figure 807: A sketchbook page has lines that slant in many directions. Rotating your paper as you draw Professional artists have many secret ways to make sure their drawings turn out well. Some will feel comfortable and others will feel awkward. there will be one motion that feels the most comfortable. Use many different ways of moving your pencil or changing the slant of your lines. In Action 9E in Chapter 9. before you know it. you can try your hand at drawing shapes by rotating your paper.

Part 3: Go Draw! 69 PART 3 GO DRAW! ► Action 9A: Sketching a Self-Portrait ► Action 9B: Creating Values with Squirkles ► Action 9C: Playing with Pencils ► Action 9D: Playing with Erasers ► Action 9E: Drawing Shapes by Rotating Your Paper ► Action 9F: Framing with a Viewfinder ► Action 10A: Drawing a Caveperson ► Action 10B: A Realistic Eye ► Action 10C: Mugly Wigglebottom .

70 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started .

TIP! Always sharpen your pencils before you begin a drawing project. sign your name. Supplies needed: Paper. When you’re finished. write the date on the back.Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work 71 Chapter 9 Putting Your Supplies to Work ***************************************************************** Finally! Time to draw! In this chapter. Draw a portrait of yourself as realistically as possible. You also discover how to use a few basic drawing techniques. you complete a few exercises and projects designed to teach you how to use your supplies. put your drawing away in a safe place. ► AC T I ON 9 A ◄ Sketching a Self-Portrait Goal: Document your current drawing skills by drawing yourself. erasers. a 2B pencil. and give yourself a big hug! . Set yourself up for drawing where you can clearly see your reflection in a mirror. and a mirror.

What do you get when you cross squiggles with circles? You get Squirkles! Squirkling is a simple method of shading that uses randomly drawn curved lines to create values. Figure 903: A value scale created with squirkles. Many of my students from the past three decades are very familiar with this word! In this project. Apply a medium amount of pressure. . as well as highly realistic works by professional artists (Figure 902). 4B.72 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started ArtSpeak Squirkling is a simple shading technique in which randomly drawn curved lines (called “squirkles”) create values. 2B. Squirkling is ideal for simple drawings by beginners (Figure 901). Figure 901: Squirkling is great for drawing wool on a cartoon sheep. HB. and 6B graphite pencils. you create five different values with five grades of pencils. ► AC T I ON 9 B ◄ Creating Values with Squirkles Goal: Find out the base value of each of your five grades of graphite pencils. Figure 902: Advanced drawing of a tiny section of a phone that is completely rendered with squirkles. Value scale is a range of different values that are drawn in order from light to dark or from dark to light (Refer to Figure 903). I chose this name based on the method of mixing squiggles with circles to create shading. Each grade of pencil has a different base value. Supplies needed: Paper and 2H. Don’t press too hard or too softly with your pencil. Allow your pencils to do most of the work.

Speed increases with lots of practice. Your goal is to create a light value. If you see a very large white space (the white of your paper). don’t add any more. Accuracy is much more important than speed. 2. and divide it into five squares that are each 2 by 2 inches. The white spaces can be many different shapes. Refer to Figures 906 and 907. use a 2H pencil to scribble (squirkle) curved lines that twist and bend in many directions. . TIP! Take your time! Work very slowly and closely watch your line as it curves around within this square. Surprise! Math is a very important part of drawing! But don’t grumble yet . In the first square. Small squirkles make much smoother values than large ones. Figure 905: Each square is marked with a grade of pencil from the lightest (on the left) to the darkest. Figure 904: I used a ruler to outline a drawing space that is 2 by 10 inches (divided into five squares). 3. but they should be approximately the same size. Mark the grade of one of your pencils under each square. If a section has a lot of lines. draw a curved line through it so it becomes two small spaces.Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work 73 1. Draw a rectangle that is 2 inches high by ten inches long.I’ll be introducing the various math skills very gently.

a 2B in the third. Make sure that each new value you draw is slightly darker than the previous one. . Figures 910 and 911: The middle value is made with a 2B pencil. Refer to Figures 907 to 915. Figures 908 and 909: A slightly darker value is created by an HB Pencil. a 4B in the fourth. and a 6B in the fifth.74 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Figures 906 and 907: A 2H makes a very light value. 4. Try squinting your eyes a little to see the squirkles as a value. Use the same method to draw squirkles in each of the other four squares. you can simply add a few extra squirkling lines to make it slightly darker. Use an HB pencil in the second square. If you make a value that looks too light.

Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work

75

Figures 912 and 913: A 4B
grade of pencil makes a dark value.

Figure 914:
The darkest value is drawn with a 6B.

Figure 915: A value scale of five
different values.

You have completed a value scale from light (on the left) to dark (on the right). Prop up your drawing and stand a few feet away. Can you see five different values from light (on the left) to dark (on the right)? 5. Draw another value scale from dark (on the left) to light (on the right). Refer to Figure 916. When you’re done, pat yourself on the back ten times.

Figure 916: A value scale from dark to light.

76

Drawing Book 1: Getting Started

► AC T I O N 9 C ◄

Playing with Pencils
Goal: Draw three sets of lines with each of your five pencils.
Figure 917: Many different values of lines can
be made with only five grades of pencils.

Supplies needed: Paper and 2H, HB, 2B, 4B, and 6B graphite pencils. As you know from Action 9B, each grade of pencil makes a different base value. However, did you know that each grade on its own can make several values? In this project I show you how to create light, medium, and dark lines with each of your pencils. To do this, you simply vary the pressure you apply to your pencil. 1. Use a 2H pencil to draw a light, medium, and dark set of three straight lines (nine lines in total). ► Set of three light lines: Apply very little pressure to your pencil. ► Set of three medium lines: Use a medium amount of pressure. ► Set of three dark lines: Press firmly with your pencil. Remember to rotate your paper so you can use your natural hand movement.

Art Quote

What we call creative work ought not to be called work at all, because it isn’t. I imagine that Thomas Edison never did a day’s work in his last fifty years.
Figure 918: Three different values of lines
made with a 2H grade of pencil. Stephen B. Leacock

Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work

77

2. Use the same technique to draw three different lines with each of your other four pencils (Figure 919).

Figure 919: Fifteen sets of lines result in a wide range of different values.

Congratulations! You now have a better idea of how artists make several different values with only one pencil. Put one finger on the tip of your nose and walk seven steps in a straight line.

► AC T I O N 9 D ◄

Figure 920:
Lines and shapes created with erasers.

WARNING!
This project is very messy!
Stay away from light-colored carpets or fabrics. Cover your drawing surface with paper or plastic before you begin.

Playing with Erasers
Goal: Draw lines and shapes with an eraser instead of a pencil. Supplies needed: Heavy white drawing paper with a medium tooth, a 2B or 4B charcoal stick, 2B or 4B charcoal pencil, vinyl eraser, kneaded eraser, and paper towels.

Gently does it! Don’t press hard with the charcoal. as you will soon see. Most artists are familiar with drawing dark values on a light surface. Don’t apply too much pressure. my section is 6 by 3 inches – but larger is even better! 2. Figure 922: The same shading after it was blended with a facial tissue. Use a piece of paper towel to VERY GENTLY blend the whole surface. you can also draw light values on a dark surface by using an eraser (or erasers). Figure 921: A section of shading before it is blended. you experiment with two different types of erasers as drawing tools. Use the side of a charcoal stick to smoothly fill in a section of your paper. 1. . or you’ll grind the charcoal into the paper so much that it won’t erase (thereby defeating the whole purpose of this project). Figure 923: A section of my paper is filled in with charcoal and then very gently blended. In this section. The charcoal needs to sit on the top of the paper’s tooth – not flatten it! In real life. However.78 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started ArtSpeak Blending is the process of gently rubbing shading with a blending tool (such as a facial tissue or paper towel) to evenly distribute the drawing medium over sections of the surface of drawing paper.

and shapes are pulled out of the charcoal with the edges of vinyl erasers. However. dots. Info Tidbit Thomas Edison is best known as an inventor (he helped invent many wonderful items such as the light bulb and motion picture camera). and kneaded erasers molded into various shapes. You can also use your charcoal pencil to draw more details after the white sections are erased (Figure 926). For a few ideas refer to Figures 924 and 925.Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work 79 3. did you know that he could draw well? He often sketched his ideas and drew diagrams of the inventions on which he worked. 4. Figures 924 and 925: A few lines. Use your imagination and the same process to create more drawings. Use your erasers however you wish to experiment with pulling light values from the darkened drawing surface. .

Thomas Edison When you’re done. a 2B graphite pencil. Supplies needed: Paper. vinyl eraser. . Figure 927: Three shapes created by using my natural hand movement and rotating my paper.80 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started TIP! Completed charcoal drawings should always be sprayed with a fixative so they don’t smudge too badly. Art Quote Genius is one percent inspiration. go wash the charcoal off your face. and kneaded eraser. and put a big smile on your face! Figure 926: I used a charcoal pencil to add a few dark lines to my eraser drawing. ninety-nine percent perspiration. ► AC T I ON 9 E ◄ Drawing Shapes by Rotating Your Paper Goal: Draw three different shapes by rotating your paper and using your natural hand movement.

Draw the first part of the shape (Figure 928). the lefty one is on the left and the righty one is on the right.Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work 81 You find two illustrations beside each step. 1. 2. Part 1: Circular shape Your goal in this section is to draw a shape using only curved lines. It’s more important to get used to rotating your paper so you can use your natural hand movement. Figure 928L Figure 928R Figure 929L Figure 929R . Rotate your paper so the word “TOP” is on the side (Figure 929). 3. one for righties and the other for lefties. TIP! Don’t worry about copying my drawings exactly! Just take your time and do your best. To help you remember which drawing is which. Write the word “TOP” at the top of your paper so you don’t get lost.

Draw the third part of the shape (Figure 932).82 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started 4. Rotate your paper until the word “TOP” is on the bottom (Figure 931). Figure 930L Figure 930R 5. Draw the second part of the shape (Figure 930). Figure 931L Figure 931R 6. Figure 932L Figure 932R .

they are mirror images of one another. Examine your drawing of a circular shape while patting yourself on the head and standing on one foot. Figure 935L Figure 935R . Then. Figure 934L Figure 934R 9. compare my final lefty and righty drawings (Figure 935).Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work 83 7. Draw the final part of the shape (Figure 934). Figure 933L Figure 933R 8. Rotate your paper until the word “TOP” is on the other side (Figure 933). When placed side by side. Rotate your paper until the word “TOP” is on the top again.

84 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Part 2: Straightsided shape In this section. Lefty’s need to rotate their paper for this step and righties don’t. I have numbered each line (Figure 936). locate lines 1 and 2 in Figure 936. you draw a ten-sided shape with straight lines. Before you begin. 1. Info Tidbit In Drawing Book 2: Lines and Spaces. Make sure you leave lots of room on your paper for the other eight lines that outline this shape. Write the word “TOP” at the top of your paper. righty illustrations are on the right and lefty ones are on the left. you still need to turn your paper in different directions as you work. and refer to Figure 937 as you draw lines 1 and 2. Figure 936: The lines are numbered in the order in which you draw them. I show you how to draw very straight lines freehand (without a ruler). Righties and lefties draw the exact same shape this time (rather than mirror images). To help keep you on track. Again. However. Figure 937L Figure 937R .

Take your time and refer back to Figure 936 if you get lost. Complete your drawing of the straight-sided shape by following along with figures 940 to 943. Rotate your paper and draw line 3 (Figure 938). By now you know how to follow along with illustrations to complete a drawing. . Figure 939R Figure 939L 5.Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work 85 3. Rotate your paper again and draw line 4 (Figure 939). Figure 938L Figure 938R 4.

86 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Figure 940L Figure 940R Figure 941R Figure 941L Art Quote “When I was a boy of 14. my father was so ignorant I could hardly stand to have the old man around.” Mark Twain . I was astonished at how much the old man had learned in seven years. But when I got to be 21.

and upside-down. what would it be? Try looking at it sideways. slanted.Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work 87 Figure 942L Figure 942R Figure 943R Figure 943L Rotate your paper until your shape is right-side-up again (Figure 944). . Then stand up and wiggle your whole body! Figure 944: If this shape was part of a familiar object.

If so. Figure 946L Figure 946R . Part 3: Circle Most artists consider circles to be the most difficult shape to draw. Follow along with Figures 946 to 950 to draw a circle. Figure 945: When you want a really good-looking circle. In this section. You may prefer to draw a circle without drawing the square first.88 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started TIP! A square can help you draw a better circle! 1. You may be quite surprised by how well you do with help from your new skills using your natural hand movement and rotating your paper. try drawing it inside a square. you try your hand at drawing a circle. Measure and then mark a small dot (or line) at the halfway point of each of the four sides. Your circle should only touch the sides of the square at each of these four marks. 1. 2. Use a ruler to measure and draw a square on your paper (Figure 945). simply ignore the square outlines in the illustrations.

Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work 89 Figure 947L Figure 947R Figure 948L Figure 948R Figure 949L Figure 949R .

. now you have three very boring shapes (Figure 951). Challenge: Draw three more shapes: one with curved lines. and a circle. A few lines and squirkles (and an imagination) gave my shapes a little personality (Figure 952). Erase your square outline (if you drew it). Figure 950 Figure 951 Figure 952: As a child. Stand up and turn around in a circle three times. Have fun transforming your shapes into something more interesting. How can you make them more interesting? Easy! Turn them into something or somebody. I spent many hours drawing random shapes and giving them faces (as well as noses. another with straight lines. You can turn each shape around in any direction. Then. Remember to use your natural hand movement and rotate your paper as you draw. hair.90 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started 2. use your imagination to turn each into something or somebody. and hats). Just for fun! So. ears.

Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work

91

ArtSpeak
Drawing from life refers to the process of drawing from an actual person, animal, or scene, rather than from a photograph or computer image. Landscape format (sometimes called a horizontal format) is a rectangular drawing space that is rotated so the two longer sides are at the top and bottom (Figure 953). Portrait format (sometimes called a vertical format) is a rectangular drawing space that is rotated so the two shorter sides are at the top and bottom (Figure 954).
Figure 953: A fun drawing of a
cartoon snake fits nicely into a landscape format.

Figure 954: A portrait format works well for this drawing of a giraffe.

► AC T I ON 9 F ◄

Framing with a Viewfinder
Goal: Use a viewfinder frame to choose a composition from a photograph, then set up a drawing space, and draw what you see inside the borders of the frame. Supplies needed: Photograph, viewfinder frame, ruler, drawing paper, pencils, erasers, and pencil sharpener.
Figure 956: Fishing shacks viewed
through a viewfinder frame.

92

Drawing Book 1: Getting Started

Info Tidbit
Unfortunately, I was unable to put any actual scenes into this book (grin). Hence, this project (and many others) are based on photographs. However, keep in mind that the basic process for using a viewfinder frame with a photo is almost identical to viewing drawing subjects from life.

Three steps for framing a view
To give you an idea of how a viewfinder frame works, I have broken down the process into three basic steps (refer to Figure 957): 1. I choose a photo that I really like. It’s a landscape format, and I want to draw the fishing shacks in a portrait format. 2. I adjust the two parts of the viewfinder frame until I find a portrait format that I like. 3. I draw what I see inside the frame. (I decided not to draw the boat on the right.)

Figure 957: Working with a viewfinder frame includes:
(1) choosing a photo, (2) deciding on a composition, and (3) drawing what you see inside the frame’s opening.

Chapter 9: Putting Your Supplies to Work

93

Create a sketch by framing your view
1. Choose a photograph. If you want to draw from a valuable or cherished photo, scan and print a copy rather than work from the original. Better still - take a photo of something simple that you want to draw and then print it. 2. Place your viewfinder frame on top of the photo and choose the section you want to draw. Continuously adjust both sections of the viewfinder frame until the part you want to draw is completely in view. Remember, you can choose either a square, vertical, or horizontal drawing format. Use a pen or pencil to mark small dots on the photo inside the four corners of the frame. Check out the small dots marked in blue in Figure 959. Remove the viewfinder frame, and use a ruler to connect the dots to outline a square or rectangle (Figure 960).

TIP!
Choose a photo that you really like! Make sure your subject is something that looks like it might be fun to draw. You may become bored with a subject that doesn’t appeal to you. Make sure the photo isn’t fuzzy, out of focus, or in really bright light or dark shadows. You can’t draw something you can’t see.

Figure 958: Photo
I took of a fun duckshaped candle that I wanted to draw.

Figure 959: The
section of the photo that I want to draw is framed inside a viewfinder frame.

decide if you want to leave out something that you see in your photo. Figure 960: The section of the photo that I want to draw is outlined. Figure 961: I decided to do a simple line drawing of the duck-shaped candle. you can make a larger drawing by using a drawing format that is 4 by 6 inches (twice the size). the background clutter. or 6 by 9 inches (three times the size of the original). For example. Examine the cast shadow (cast by the duck candle) on the surface of the table in the lower right of Figure 960. 3. First of all. For example. Draw your subject with any medium and in any way you want. I decided to not include the edge of the table. When you are done. quack like a duck as you flap your arms like wings! . A fun part of being an artist is that you can decide to change what you see in a photo before you draw. or the cast shadow in my drawing.94 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started ArtSpeak Cast shadow is a dark section on a surface adjacent to (beside) an object (or living being) that receives little or no direct light. outline a drawing space on your paper that is the same shape and proportions as the outlined section of your photo. Then. if the outline on your photo is 2 by 3 inches.

erasers. Use a ruler to draw a rectangular drawing space that is approximately 3 inches wide by 5. and a 2B pencil. drawing lines and shapes freehand requires lots of practice before you can do it well. and the third takes you through the entire process of drawing .5 inches long. you use curved lines to draw a body. then add a head. The first challenges you to draw several shapes with curved lines. Remember to rotate your paper so you can use your natural hand movement. the second encourages you to put your squirkling skills into action to draw the pupil of an eye. Supplies needed: Paper.Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 95 Chapter 10 Three Simple Drawings ***************************************************************** This chapter presents three fun projects that put your new drawing skills into action. two arms and two legs. ► AC T I ON 1 0 A ◄ Drawing a Caveperson Goal: Draw a human figure that looks like a prehistoric cave drawing. and finally draw hands and feet.from sketching lines to adding shading. In this project. . 1. Figure 1001: A simple drawing of a caveperson. ruler. Be patient with yourself.

the torso. arms. For example. the torso is a little closer to the left side of the rectangle than the right. head. arms. Draw a partial oval-shape (Figure 1002) as the main section of the body (called a torso). Draw the upper part of the arms (Figure 1004). 3. Figure 1002 Figure 1003 4. if you look closely. Draw the lower sections of the arms and the hands (Figure 1005). Add a head and neck (Figure 1003). 5. Plan where to draw the torso on your paper so you leave room for a head. and legs. The upper part of the body is finished .96 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started 2. Also. and hands all fit nicely into the upper half of your drawing space. the whole torso fits into the top half of the drawing space. .

Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 97 Figure 1004 Figure 1005 Art Quote Info Tidbit “The way to learn to do things is to do things. Begin with the determination to succeed. they used bones or sticks dipped into paint to draw their stories on the walls of caves. . Their paint was often made from plants or animal blood.” Henry Ford Long before people learned to write. and the work is half done already. Success teaches how to succeed. The way to learn a trade is to work at it.

Figure 1006 Figure 1007 Challenge: Use your imagination to create other prehistoric drawings. 3.98 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started 2. you can draw animals. Draw the lower parts of the legs and the feet (Figure 1007). Figure 1008: Five prehistoric cave drawings. For instance. Refer to Figure 1008 for ideas. or people dancing around a fire. hunters with bows. Add the upper legs and knees (Figure 1006). .

Upper eyelid (4) is a movable fold of skin that opens and closes to protect the eyeball. you focus on the highlight. 1. kneaded and vinyl erasers. Use an HB pencil to lightly sketch a circular shape as the iris of an eye. pupil. In this project. ► AC T I ON 1 0 B ◄ A Realistic Eye Goal: Lightly sketch the shapes of an iris. Figure 1011: Simple drawing of a pupil. and white of the eye (5). and the edge of the upper eyelid. and highlight (3). . and 6B pencils. upper eyelid (4). sandpaper block. Figure 1009: The parts of an eye include the: iris (1). highlight (3). and highlight and add shading with squirkles. and a pencil sharpener. a highlight. pupil (2). Remember to press very lightly. and iris. pupil.Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 99 ArtSpeak Iris (1) is the colored circular part of an eyeball surrounding the pupil (2) (defined on page 21). 2B. HB. Refer to Figure 1012. Eyeball (also called the white of the eye) is the entire spherical section of an eye that is protected inside an opening in the skull (Figure 1010). an iris. as well as the edge of the upper eyelid. Supplies needed: Paper. Figure 1010: A drawing of an eyeball with an iris (1). Highlight (3) is the brightest area where light bounces off the surface of the eye. pupil (2).

This curved line begins and ends at the highlight. Its location indicates that a light is shining on the eye from the upper left. Figure 1015 Figure 1016 . This is the highlight. Use your kneaded eraser to gently erase the section of the iris above the edge of the upper eyelid (Figure 1016). This line represents the lower edge of the upper eyelid. The upper sections of irises are usually hidden under the upper eyelid (represented by a simple curved line). 3. Use a curved line (almost a circle) to draw the pupil of the eye (Figure 1014). Add a slightly curved line cutting through the upper section of the iris (Figure 1015). 5. Figure 1012 Figure 1013 Figure 1014 4.100 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started 2. Sketch a small circular shape in the upper left section of the iris (Figure 1013).

as well as a cast shadow (2) on the surface on which the egg sits. Also. 6. Figure 1018: The overall value of the iris is light. Add a few tiny squirkles to the iris with an HB pencil (Figure 1018). The upper section of an iris is often in the shadow of the upper eyelid. . Figure 1017: A light source from the upper left creates a shadow (1) on the lower right surface of an egg. or on a surface that is adjacent to an object or living being (called a cast shadow) (2). Therefore. Shadows can be on the surface of an object or living being (1). Press very gently on your pencil to keep the lines light. Press gently with a 2B pencil to make the shading closest to the edge of the upper eyelid even darker. The more uneven you draw the squirkles.Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 101 ArtSpeak Shadow refers to any dark area where direct light from a light source is blocked (or partially blocked) by an object or living being. the better the shading of the eye will look. and lots of white paper is showing through. Press firmly with an HB pencil to add slightly darker shading around the edges of the iris (especially next to the edge of the eyelid). make sure your squirkle lines curve in all different directions. 7. Use freshly sharpened HB and 2B pencils to shade in the dark values of the iris (Figure 1019). some lines need to have large curves and others should be smaller.

Relax your body and stay in this position for two minutes. Now. Add the darkest shading of the iris (Figure 1020). 10. Make sure your pencil is freshly sharpened. Figure 1020: The darkest shading in the iris is directly below the edge of the upper eyelid. sit comfortably in your chair and relax your eyes as follows: 1. At this point. Use your 2B pencil again. Some of the light shading is still showing around the lower section of the pupil. The darkest shading of all is in the pupil. Close your eyes lightly. Naturally. Figure 1019: The shading is darker in the upper section of the iris and around its edges. 5. Place your fingers lightly on your forehead. 3.102 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started 8. Use a 6B pencil and squirkles to fill in the pupil (Figure 1020). and this time press firmly (but not too hard) to make the outer edges of the iris and the shadow under the upper eyelid darker. Rub your hands together quickly until the palms of your hands feel warm. . Use your vinyl eraser to clean up any smudges or fingerprints on your drawing paper. the highlight is left white. Cover each of your eyes gently with the palm of a hand (the section close to your wrist). 4. you should see very few white spaces still showing in these sections. 2. 9.

Figure 1024: Mugley’s nose. kneaded and vinyl erasers. shapes. HB. and (or) values on opposite sides of a center line (which is often imaginary). On each side of a line of symmetry is a mirror image of the other side. Many drawing subjects. and a pencil sharpener. Supplies needed: Paper. and ears are symmetrical. such as vases and frontal views of faces. dividing it in half. Figure 1021: The wings in this drawing are symmetrical. Line of symmetry is a line (real or imaginary) down the center of a drawing (or section of a drawing). simple illustrated instructions guide you through the process of drawing an adorable puppy. 2H. In this project. both sides need to be symmetrical. ► AC T I ON 1 0 C ◄ Mugly Wigglebottom Goal: Use a line of symmetry to outline a cartoon and then add shading with squirkles. 2B. Figure 1023: The center of a drawing of wings that do not touch is marked with a line of symmetry. sandpaper block. face.Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 103 ArtSpeak Symmetry in drawing is a balanced arrangement of lines. Figure 1022: A line of symmetry (shown in blue) identifies the center point of wings that touch. look more believable when drawn the same on both sides. and 6B pencils. 4B. each is a mirror image of the other. In other words. .

This prevents you from smudging your drawing. 2. Keep your pencils sharpened so your lines stay crisp and thin. but feel free to make your drawing space larger. Refer to Figure 1025. Use your ruler and an HB pencil to outline a square drawing space. Each time you work on a new section. 1. Figure 1025 . Measure carefully! My line of symmetry is two inches from each side of my drawing space. remember to move your paper so it’s always under your hand.104 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started TIP! Protect your drawing as you work! Always place a piece of clean paper under your hand as you draw. Draw a very faint line of symmetry down the center of your page. Outlining Mugly with neat lines In this section. ears. your goal is to use a line of symmetry to draw Mugly’s head. and facial features proportionately correct. A line of symmetry helps you draw both sides of Mugly symmetrical. Mine is 4 by 4 inches.

5. Leave lots of space above and on the sides for the top of his head and ears.Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 105 3. Figure 1026 Figure 1027 . You can use a ruler to measure distances if you want. Use an HB pencil to sketch a wide oval as the lower section of Mugly’s head (also called a muzzle) (Figure 1026). Both sides of his muzzle are approximately the same size and shape. 4. Add a tiny circle below his nose as his mouth. His mouth is slightly to the right of the line of symmetry (just to give him a little extra personality). His nose and mouth need to fit inside this oval. Draw a smaller oval (his nose) inside the large one (Figure 1027).

Figure 1028 Figure 1029 . His very long ears will extend above this line and below the lower edge of his chin. 7.106 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started 6. Take note that these lines are also symmetrical. Examine the reflection of your drawing in a mirror to help locate problem areas. Add two curved lines as the sides of the upper part of his head (Figure 1028). Seeing his head in reverse gives you a brand new perspective on its symmetry. Draw another curved line as the top of his head (Figure 1029). Erase and redraw any sections with which you are not happy. Pay close attention to where each line begins and ends.

Draw his long floppy ears (Figures 1030 and 1031). Figure 1032 You may prefer to turn your drawing paper upside-down to draw his eyes.Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 107 8. Draw his eyes (Figures 1032 and 1033). Figure 1030 Figure 1031 9. Continue referring to your line of symmetry to keep his ears symmetrical. His eyes are upside-down U-shapes with circles inside. . Compare your drawing to Figure 1033 and make any changes you feel are needed.

your goal is to add shading and texture to Mugly with squirkles. Number each value from 1 to 5 and mark the grades of the pencils used. draw the value scale on a separate sheet of paper. Figure 1034 . You may have room in an upper or lower corner of the same sheet you are using for drawing Mugly. Squirkling shading for Mugly In this section. 10. If not. Refer to Action 9B on page 72.108 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Figure 1033 Use your vinyl or kneaded eraser to carefully erase your line of symmetry. Draw a value scale to use as a shading guide (Figure 1034). Redraw any sections that were accidently erased.

Figure 1035 Figure 1036 . Use your imagination to think of Mugly as threedimensional to help you decide which areas are in shadow. Therefore. Do not rush your shading. Assume a direct light source is shining from the upper left. Draw the squirkles very carefully and slowly. Use a 1-2H value (Figure 1034) to add the shading you see in Figures 1035 to 1038.Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 109 11. the overall shading on the left needs to be slightly lighter than on the right.

your speed will increase all by itself. take note of the locations of the squirkles. Before you add shading to the nose. A few extra squirkles are added to the nose over a small section of the first layer to create a crescent shape in the lower left. Very light squirkles are all around the edges of the nose except for a section in the upper right that is left white. this shadow area on the nose becomes even darker when you switch to a darker pencil. Figure 1037 Figure 1038 . As you soon discover.110 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started When your shading skills become strong.

Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 111 11. Don’t miss the dark shadows cast from his ears onto his upper head. Leave the inner sections of shading light. Begin with the ear on the left. Figure 1039 Figure 1040 . Use a 2-HB value to add medium values (Figures 1039 to 1042). Only add medium values over those light values that are closest to the edges of the various shapes. In Figure 1040. the highlights of the eyes are outlined so you remember to leave them white.

112 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Medium values are added along the edges of the lower section of his muzzle. Figure 1041 The crescent shape of the nose becomes darker when you add middle values (Figure 1042). and the tiny round opening that is his mouth (Figure 1041). Figure 1042 .

Also. Add shading to his eyes and the darkest shadow sections of his fur.Chapter 10: Three Simple Drawings 113 11. Feel free to outline the pupil before you begin shading the eyes. refer to the close-up view in Figure 1044. Use 3-2B and 4-4B values to add shading to his eyes. If you want. Use value 3-2B for the dark shading on the outer edges of his left ear and upper head. you can shade Mugly’s eyes the same as in Project 10B: A Realistic Eye. Figure 1043 Figure 1044 . Refer to Figures 1043 to 1046.

Don’t miss the shadow on his lower face cast by his nose (Figure 1046). Then. gather your drawing supplies and create more drawings of subjects you enjoy! Figure 1046 .114 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Additional dark values are added to tiny sections of his fur and nose in the darkest shadow sections. Put all your drawings away in a safe place. Sign your name and write the date completed on the back of each. 12. Figure 1045 Collect all the drawings you completed as you worked through this book. Use a 5-6B value to make the mouth and the pupils of his eyes a little darker.

clay is mixed with graphite to make graphite drawing mediums. ArtSpeak sidebars help you understand the meanings of drawing words and terms that appear in the exercises and projects in this book. Clips (Page 49) (usually made of metal) can be used to attach sheets of paper to a drawing board. As with graphite. Blending (Page 78) is the process of gently rubbing shading with a blending tool (such as a facial tissue or paper towel) to evenly distribute the drawing medium over sections of the surface of drawing paper. Composition (Page 45) refers to the arrangement of the various parts of your drawing subject within the borders of a drawing space. . Classical drawing (Page 3) refers to the drawing methods invented by ancient Greeks and Romans for creating realistic drawings (called realism). Charcoal pencils (Page 25) have a thin cylindrical stick of compressed charcoal inside a wooden casing. Charcoal (Page 25) is a drawing medium made from burnt organic material (such as wood). (As an aside. Hence. Cast shadow (Page 94) is a dark section on a surface adjacent to (beside) an object (or living being) that receives little or no direct light. ArtSpeak (Page 1) is a fun word used to describe the vocabulary of art. Drawings can be ruined when papers with acid deteriorate and turn yellow. your drawing experiences become more enjoyable.) Charcoal sticks (Page 25) are made by compressing powdered charcoal into round or rectangular sticks. Drawing books and papers often have labels that tell you the paper is acid-free. and less frustrating! Glossary Acid-free (Page 37) refers to a highquality and long-lasting paper that has had the acid removed from the pulp in the papermaking process. many archeologists have excellent drawing skills. Classical drawing was later enhanced by the great artists of the Renaissance. Clay (Page 17) is a naturally occurring material that becomes hardened when dried. For example. Archaeologist (Page 10) is a person who studies ancient peoples by finding and documenting the things they left behind. Knowing the meanings of these words allows you to better understand the text.Glossary 115 ***************************************************************** This glossary provides definitions of most of the art-related words and terms used throughout this book. charcoal comes in various grades.

Drafting desk (Page 49) (or drafting table) is an adjustable worktable with a slanted top. or circle. Eyeball (Page 99) (also called the white of the eye) is the entire spherical section of an eye that is safely protected within an opening in the skull. Drawing space (Page 45) (also called a drawing surface or a drawing format) is the area in which you render a drawing within a specific perimeter. It can be the shape of a sheet of paper itself. Fresco (Page 12) is an artwork painted on a thin layer of plaster that covers a wall or ceiling. Highlight (Page 99) is the brightest area where light bounces off the surface of the eye. frescoes that date back more than 3500 years have been discovered in Greece. The hard cover protects your papers and drawings from being wrinkled. Curved lines can be drawn in any direction and be any length. the first figure in this book (Figure 01) is a drawing of a hand sketching a cartoon. Hardcover (Page 37) refers to a durable type of book cover that is made from a thick and unbendable material. Figure (Page 11) refers to the body of a human being. Drawing board (Page 49) is a portable. . It is often mixed with clay to make various types of drawing tools for artists. For example. Drawing (noun) (Page 1) is an image created on a drawing surface with a drawing medium. lightweight. For example. Drawing (verb) (Page 1) refers to the process of applying a medium to a surface to create an image. Grade (Page 17) refers to the softness or hardness of the mixture used in the manufacture of drawing mediums. Drawing from life (Page 91) refers to the process of drawing from an actual person. For example. Graphite (Page 17) is a soft black form of opaque (non-transparent) carbon found in nature. such as a square. drawing powder can be made by using coarse sandpaper to wear away sections of graphite and charcoal sticks. animal. smooth surface used to support an artist’s sketchbook or drawing paper. rather than a photograph or computer image. or a shape you outline on your paper.116 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Curved line is created when a straight line curves or bends. Drawing stick (Page 26) is a drawing tool that is made by compressing and shaping a medium (such as graphite or charcoal) into a round or rectangular chunk. Drawing powder (Page 31) refers to tiny loose particles of a drawing medium that have been broken down from a solid into a powder. The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel (in Rome) is also a fresco that was painted by Michelangelo between 1508 and 1512. rectangle. or scene. Figure (Page 1) is a diagram or picture that illustrates text.

mostly about the lives and activities of human beings and their environments. Landscape format (Page 91) (sometimes called a vertical format) is a rectangular drawing space that is rotated so the two longer sides are at the top and bottom. Kneaded erasers are designed to absorb and pick up particles of graphite and charcoal without leaving behind eraser crumbs. Media (Page 43) (also called mediums) refers to more than one drawing medium. Illustration (Page 2) is an image (such as a drawing or photograph) that is used to enhance the reader’s understanding of text and (or) make text more interesting. Iris (Page 99) is the colored circular part of an eyeball surrounding the pupil. through the tip. Manikin (Page 41) is a model of a figure or animal (often made of wood) that is used for learning how to draw.Glossary 117 History (Page 10) is a written record of the past. Leonardo da Vinci was a master of painting and drawing. Many smooth watercolor papers are hot pressed. Many date back to the Roman occupation of Egypt. in this book ArtSpeak sidebars are identified with a circular. or child that was attached to the face of a burial mummy. dividing it in half. historians (people who study and write about history) have documented that Leonardo da Vinci was born in Italy in the year 1452. Mechanical pencil (Page 26) is a drawing tool that has an internal mechanism that pushes a thin graphite lead. cartoon icon of Albert Einstein. For example. Leadpoint (Page 18) (also called a stylus) is a thin metal stick made of lead and used for drawing. Kneaded eraser (Page 42) is an artist’s tool made of a grey or white pliable material that can be shaped by hand for accurate erasing. Some books (such as a picture book) have only illustrations and no text. They do not wear away like other types of erasers. On each side of a line of symmetry is a mirror image of the other side. Mummy portrait (Page 12) is an ancient painting of a man. Icon (Page 2) is a visual image (such as a drawing) used to identify a specific task or information. For example. Others have mostly illustrations and a small amount of text to describe each illustration. . woman. Medium (Page 1) refers to a drawing tool (anything from a pencil to the burnt end of a stick) used to make marks on a surface. from the tiny tube inside the holder. but can become too dirty to work properly. Line of symmetry (Page 103) is a line (real or imaginary) down the center of a drawing (or section of a drawing). Most manikins have bendable joints so they can be manipulated into various poses. Master (Page 13) refers to someone who is an expert in a specific profession or area of study. For example. Metalpoint (Page 18) is a thin stick used for drawing and made from a type of metal. Hot pressed (Page 37) refers to a paper that is pressed through hot cylinders during its manufacture.

On the other hand. Sandpaper block (Page 26) is an artist’s tool with tear-off sheets of fine sandpaper used to sharpen the points of pencils. a mechanical pencil holds replaceable thin cylindrical sticks of medium that are manually loaded into a tiny tube inside a holder. . Portfolio (Page 10) is a case in which artists store (or carry) drawings and papers to protect them from damage. murals have been discovered on the walls of prehistoric caves and inside ancient Egyptian tombs. Portrait format (Page 91) (sometimes called a horizontal format) is a rectangular drawing space that is rotated so the two shorter sides are at the top and bottom. Sculptor (Page 12) is an artist who creates sculptures. and one of his most famous sculptures is the statue of David. Render (Page 3) describes the process of making something happen. Prehistoric (Page 10) describes the period in time before written language was used to record history. Realism (Page 3) is a way of drawing in which living beings and objects are drawn as they appear in real life. or other large surface. For example. Pupil of an eye (Page 21) is the tiny. the process of drawing a turtle can also be referred to as rendering a drawing of a turtle. a very well-known sculptor of the Renaissance was Michelangelo. rock. Shading (noun) (Page 2) refers to the various values within a drawing that make images appear three-dimensional. or marble. For example. Renaissance (Page 3) (from the French word for rebirth) refers to the changes within European culture from the early twelfth century to the late sixteenth century. Right angle (Page 64) is created when a horizontal straight line meets a vertical straight line at a ninety-degree angle. A self portrait is usually rendered by memory or by drawing his or her reflection in a mirror. Pencil (Page 1) refers to a broad category of drawing tools that have a medium inside a holder. For example.118 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Mural (Page 12) is a drawing or painting on a wall. Score (Page 59) is the process of cutting very slightly into a thin object (such as cardboard or heavy paper) so as to fold it evenly. ceiling. Sculpture (Page 12) is a threedimensional artwork that is made of a material such as bronze. The artist tries to draw what he or she sees as realistically as possible. Regular pencil (Page 1) (also called a wood-encased pencil) has a drawing medium encased inside a cylindrical wooden casing. Shading (verb) (Page 2) is the process of adding values to a drawing. a regular pencil (also called a woodencased pencil) has a medium encased inside a wooden cylinder. Self-portrait (Page 71) is a drawing or painting an artist creates using his or her own face and (or) body as a model. For example. dark circular-shaped part of an eye that adjusts its size under different lighting conditions. Many prehistoric humans drew pictures on the walls of caves instead.

shapes. Straight line (Page 65) provides the shortest connection between any two points. During the Renaissance. Many drawing subjects. Each side provides a mirror image of the other. Softcover (Page 37) describes a flexible book cover that is usually made of paper. you need to handle them carefully so the paper doesn’t wrinkle. In other words. . Subject (Page 11) refers to whatever an artist chooses to draw. Shadows can be on the surface of an object or living being. popular drawing subjects include people. objects. Squirkling is ideal for simple drawings by beginners as well as highly realistic works by professional artists. such as vases and frontal views of faces. Shape (Page 3) refers to the outward outline of a three-dimensional object. In this book. Sidebar (Page 1) is a box of text (some have illustrations) that provides additional information about a topic. patience. For example. and (or) values on opposite sides of a center line (the center line is often imaginary). Style (Page 11) refers to an artist’s approach to his or her own art. Sketch (verb) (Page 2) refers to the process of doing a sketch. realism is a well-known style. or copper.Glossary 119 Shadow (Page 101) refers to any dark area where direct light from a light source is blocked (or partially blocked) by an object or living being. gold. styluses were also made from silver. look more believable when drawn the same on both sides. flowers. go look in a mirror! With commitment. Stylus (Page 18) (sometimes called leadpoint or metalpoint) refers to a thin metal stick used for drawing. Sketch (noun) (Page 2) is a simple drawing of the important parts of a subject. Styluses made of lead have been traced back to ancient Rome. animals. An artist’s style may be based on his or her personal preferences and art education. however. A sketch is usually done quickly with simple lines and (or) shading. both sides are symmetrical. and dedication. Symmetry (Page 103) is a balanced arrangement of lines. Softcover sketchbooks are inexpensive. a sidebar called ArtSpeak provides you with definitions of art words and terms. Talent (Page 10) refers to the process of self-discovery during which you realize that you have the interest and motivation needed to become exceptional in a specific area. Squirkling (Page 72) is a simple shading technique in which randomly drawn curved lines (called “squirkles”) create values. Straight lines can be drawn in any direction. you can turn your talent into a skill. or on a surface that is adjacent to an object or living being (called a cast shadow). so the drawing doesn’t smudge. and scenery. For example. To find out what a talented person looks like. Spray fixative (Page 41) is a transparent coating sprayed onto an artwork to help the medium adhere to the paper.

Wood-encased pencil (Page 26) (better known as a regular pencil) has a thin cylindrical stick of graphite or charcoal inside a wooden casing. Viewfinder frame (Page 45) is an adjustable. figures. For example. all the drawings in this book are considered visual art. It’s an invaluable tool for planning a composition. Text (Page 2) refers to the words used in writing. medium tooth has a slightly uneven texture. Values (Page 2) are the different shades of gray made when adding shading to a drawing. and can be used for portraits. or any other drawing subject. . The type of texture can be identified with vision. paintings. For example. Hence.120 Drawing Book 1: Getting Started Technique (Page 11) is a well known method (such as a specific way to do shading) that is used to accomplish a particular activity or task. Vinyl eraser (Page 41) is soft. Paper with a smooth tooth is flat and silky. Value scale (Page 72) is a range of different values that are drawn in order from light to dark or from dark to light. an artist’s selection of a shading technique is generally based on his or her skill level. Tooth (Page 33) refers to the surface texture of paper. a sense of touch. Upper eyelid (Page 99) is a movable fold of skin that opens and closes to protect the eyeball. nonabrasive artist’s tool that erases graphite and charcoal more cleanly than a regular pink eraser (which has been known to make holes in paper and ruin drawings). more than one shading technique may be suitable for a specific drawing. and what works best to capture the subject. and sculptures) that can be appreciated by the sense of sight. and a general knowledge of the object. see-through rectangular or square frame that allows you to look at a drawing subject from various viewpoints. Visual art (Page 12) refers to artworks (such as drawings. Underdrawing (Page 16) is a loosely rendered sketch that is created as a guide for a final drawing (or painting). Texture (Page 34) refers to the surface detail of an object. Vision (Page 1) is the ability to see. and rough tooth is bumpy with lots of craters and peaks. Woodless pencil (Page 26) is a thick cylindrical stick of graphite wrapped in a vinyl casing. landscapes.

mechanical. portfolio.In this book: ► Simple history of drawing ► Process of learning to draw ► Fun history of graphite ► Grades of graphite ► Differences between B and H grades ► How grades affect the look of drawings ► Graphite and charcoal drawing mediums ► Wood-encased. and woodless pencils ► Drawing powders and sticks ► Textures. and weights of drawing papers ► How to select and protect the tooth of paper ► Vinyl and kneaded erasers ► Pencil sharpeners and sandpaper ► Pencil case. and ruler ► Manikins. display boards. sizes. viewfinder frame. and spray fixative ► Ideal surfaces on which to draw ► Proper lighting for drawing ► Good posture for sitting to draw ► What to pack in a portable studio ► Supplies to add to your shopping list ► Make an artist’s portfolio ► Construct a simple viewfinder frame ► Three ways to hold your medium as you draw ► Discover your natural hand movement ► Action 9A: Sketching a Self-Portrait ► Action 9B: Creating Values with Squirkles ► Action 9C: Playing with Pencils ► Action 9D: Playing with Erasers ► Action 9E: Drawing Shapes by Rotating Your Paper ► Action 9F: Framing with a Viewfinder ► Action 10A: Drawing a Caveperson ► Action 10B: A Realistic Eye ► Action 10C: Mugly Wigglebottom .

Roughley B. And now.$20.” Robert A. “My current positions have merged my credentials and focus into three main areas: teacher development (teaching professionals how to teach).A. University of Calgary Instructor. author of Drawing for Dummies. I have the pleasure of putting my academic “stamp of approval” in the front pages of this very unique and thorough approach to art education. the quest for knowledge also becomes enjoyable. visual artist.) Drawing Book 1: Getting Started is the first in a series of instructional books for homeschooling families and selfdirected learners. and Drawing Book 1: Getting Started. Published by http://www. M.. MC.S.Ed. BAEd.Ed. The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Drawing People.com.. B. and owner of Drawspace. Hence. Brenda Hoddinott Art educator.00 (U. Doctoral Student.drawspace. University of Calgary My philosophy on teaching art is to focus primarily on the enjoyment aspects while gently introducing the technical and academic. in creating a passion for the subject matter.. forensic artist (retired).. reflective practice. Teaching and Learning Centre. and inclusive education.com .. after years of study. illustrator.

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful