Farm Pond

Neighborhood Report
UNCC Community Planning Workshop
December 16, 2010
This project was made possible by the generous guidance and support
of Dr. Janni Sorensen and Dr. José Gámez from the University of North
Carolina at Charlotte.
Financial support for conducting community outreach and engagement was
provided by the Charlotte Action Research Project.
This project would not have been possible without the time and dedication of
Judith Gamboa, CHARP Farm Pond Community Liaison.
The project team is also grateful for the time and support from:
• Eugene Bradley, City of Charlotte
• Kim Barnes, City of Charlotte
• Martina Jones, Community Activist
• Ray Terry, Four Seasons Homeowners’ Association President
• The Four Seasons Homeowners’ Association, including Lanny Emanuel,
Robert Dannely, and Alponzo Morwell.
Thank you everyone for your time!
- The Farm Pond Project Team -
• Daniella Fergusson
• Melissa Manak
1 Executive Summary
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Farm Pond, a neighborhood located in the City of Charlotte and Mecklenburg
County, is completing a neighborhood study for a variety of reasons.
First, Farm Pond has rapidly changed over the past decade, becoming home to a
very diverse and young population that includes recent immigrants from Latin
America, Asia, and Eastern Europe. This diversity provides challenges for the
City of Charlotte and other service providers in communicating with residents
andcreatingprogramsthatfttheirneeds.
Second, Charlotte’s 2010 Neighborhood Quality of Life survey lists Farm
Pond as “transitioning upward.” This indicates that with additional attention,
resources, and assistance, Farm Pond can become a more enjoyable place to
live, with lower crime rates, improved health and education indicators, and a
more stable population.
Third, Farm Pond is known for its higher rates of crime within the city,
declining property values, and a very high percentage (70%) of renters. Farm
Pond residents want to take back their neighborhood from criminal activity and
begin using amenities like parks and shopping centers again. Having a more
stable population where people know each other is a step towards getting there.
This report aims to provide context and background on Farm Pond, so
residents,theCityofCharlotte,thenon-proftcommunity,andtheCharlotte
Action Research Project can see a snapshot of Farm Pond in 2010. The report
also describes a nascent process by which residents of Farm Pond have come
together to form a neighborhood association. Organizing gives residents a voice
with the City of Charlotte and service providers, as well as access to grants
that can fund activities that residents want to undertake. A neighborhood
organization also gives the City and service providers a point of contact to
address the community.
The report is divided into 4 sections: “Where have we come from?”; “Where
arewenow?”;“Wherearewegoing?”;and,“Howdowegetthere?”.Thefrst
section describes the context of Farm Pond and describes anecdotal history
of the neighborhood. The second section provides data about Farm Pond,
spanningthepast10totwentyyears.Thethirdsectionidentifesgoalsand
actionsfortheFarmPondneighborhood.Thefnalsectionprovidesresources
and case studies that can help residents, the City, and service providers reach
theidentifedgoals.Thisreport’sappendixdescribestheprocessbehindthis
report in more depth.
2 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
3 Table of Contents
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Table of Contents
Executive Summary ......................................................................... 1
Table of Contents .............................................................................. 3
How do I use this report? ................................................................ 5
Where have we come from? ............................................................. 7
Where is Farm Pond? ................................................8
What is the history of Farm Pond? ............................... 8
Why is Farm Pond organizing? ................................... 10
Why is Farm Pond faced with so many challenges? ... 10
Where are we now? ......................................................................... 13
Overview ...................................................................... 14
People ..........................................................................................15
1. Demographics .......................................................... 16
2. Households .............................................................. 18
3. Social Indicators ...................................................... 22
Place ........................................................................................... 25
1. Civic Assets ...............................................................26
2. Neighborhood Assets ............................................... 26
3. Circulation ...............................................................28
4. Land Use ..................................................................30
Environment .............................................................................. 31
1. Natural Features ...................................................... 32
Summary .................................................................................... 33
Opportunities ............................................................... 34
Challenges .................................................................... 34
Where are we going? ....................................................................... 37
Preliminary Meetings ..................................................38
Second Neighborhood Meeting ...................................38
Third Neighborhood Meeting .....................................38
Four Seasons Homeowners’ Association Annual General
Meeting ........................................................................39
4 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Eagle Woods Movie Nights ......................................... 39
Eagle Woods Apartment Complex Party ..................... 39
Conclusion ................................................................... 39
How do we get there? ..................................................................... 41
Introduction .................................................................42
Vision ...........................................................................42
Actions .........................................................................42
Goals ............................................................................43
Case Studies .................................................................44
Resources in Charlotte ................................................ 47
Important Contacts .....................................................50
Appendix ..........................................................................................51
First Neighborhood Meeting ....................................... 52
Second Neighborhood Meeting ................................... 55
Third Neighborhood Meeting ..................................... 58
Movie Nights ................................................................60
Eagle Woods Apartment Complex Party ..................... 62
Latin American Coalition Meeting .............................. 63
5 How do I use this report?
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The Farm Pond Neighborhood Report looks at Farm Pond in Charlotte, NC, to
identify possible futures for the neighborhood and partnerships that can realize
those futures.
The report is organized into the following sections:
Where have we come from?
Thissectionofthereportdescribescontext.Thechapterbriefydescribeswhere
Farm Pond is in East Charlotte and how Farm Pond was developed. This section
also mentions Charlotte’s internationalization in the past decade in order to
provide a framework to explain Farm Pond’s diversity.
Where are we now?
This chapter describes Farm Pond in relation to Charlotte in the spheres of People,
Place, and Environment.
Within the People sphere, the report contains data to describe demographics,
household qualities, social indicators, and community amenities. Within the Place
sphere, the report maps land use, neighborhood amenities (like grocery stores),
major roads, bus routes, and walking conditions. Floodplain conditions are the
only item within the Environment sphere, owing to available data.
This chapter is summarized by showing opportunities and challenges in Farm
Pond based on current conditions.
Where are we going?
This chapter of the report describes the vision, goals, and actions that Farm
Pondresidentshaveexpressedinterestinpursuing.Thechapteralsobriefy
describes the process of outreach that has been undertaken in Farm Pond in
conjunction with this report’s development. Outreach includes three neighborhood
meetings, conversations with City of Charlotte staff, and meetings with local non-
governmental organizations, such as the Latin American Coalition. More details
about the meetings are contained in the appendix.
How do we get there?
Thefnalchapterofthereport,“Howdowegetthere?”,offersexamplesofcase
studies and resources that Farm Pond residents and the City of Charlotte can use
toachievesomeofthegoalsandactionsidentifedinthereport.
6 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
7 Where have we come from?
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This chapter describes:
• Farm Pond’s location in Charlotte
• Oral history of Farm Pond
• Background information about the Charlotte Action
Research Project
• Context to explain why Farm Pond has become so diverse in
the last decade
8 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
once an incorporated part of Mecklenburg County,
called Crab Orchard Township. Crab Orchard stretched
from Old Concord Road to Monroe Road and included
a small community called Hickory Grove, which is
where Farm Pond is today.
John Orr Plantation
The John Orr Plantation, known as Orr Quarters, was
located in Farm Pond. The slaves of Orr Quarters were
branded in case they left “illegally.” The slaves also took
the slaveholder’s last name, Orr, as custom in those
days. Although there is little history about the Orr
Quarters, after emancipation the Orr family’s land was
divided up and given to the slaves so they could start
over in life. One of the slaves, Alexander Orr, received
land located off Hickory Grove Road. He raised thirteen
children and then divided the property among them.
One of the children, Lawrence Orr, kept his land and
built several homes and a road. He eventually bought
land that is now part of the Farm Pond community. As
a land owner, he was thought well of throughout the
community by black and white residents. Lawrence Orr
Road, located off Hickory Grove Road, is named after
him.LawrenceOrr’sfrsthomeremainsonJohnette
Drive, and his grandchildren hope to restore it to retain
history of the community.
After Emancipation
Lawrence Orr knew many black families continued
to suffer from racism after emancipation, so he
formed a brotherhood with many former slaves.
The organization helped to develop a voice in the
community. The Brotherhood was important ,
because this area had a high concentration of black
property owners, and they were an active part of
the Hickory Grove community. The Brotherhood
helped construct a school for black students, who
previously had to attended church for education.
The school, built in 1925, graduated hundreds of
students until 1966 when it was closed. The county
eventually tore the school down; however, the
memories of cold classrooms and education is still
Where is Farm Pond?
The City of Charlotte describes Farm Pond as a Neighborhood Statistical Area
bounded by Hickory Grove Road to the north, East WT Harris Boulevard to the
east (Highway 24), Albemarle Road to the south, and Farm Pond Lane to the
west.
What is the history of Farm Pond?
To fully understand Charlotte’s
East Side, which includes Farm
Pond, it is important to learn
its history. Farm Pond has
undergone many transitions,
and much of its history is lost.
Recorded history dates back to
time after the Civil War. As a
Southern state North Carolina
had many plantations, with one
located on the site where Farm
Pond is today. Farm Pond was
3 miles
Farm Pond
Uptown
Charlotte
Did you know?
Farm Pond residents are
very knowledgeable about
the area’s history.
Residents were kind
enough to provide us with
their personal newspaper
clippings. Unfortuntaly,
the authors, newspaper
names, and dates of
publications for many of
the clippings were missing.
The following represents a
recording of sources using
all available information.
(Charlotte). “10 Years...
Merchants Recall
Excitement of First Day.”
Newspaper clipping from
resident.
City of Charlotte. “Annexa-
tion History.” http://www.
charmeck.org/Planning/
Annexation/Annexa-
tion_History.pdf
Douglas, William. “A Bit of
Black History Will Die With
Schoolhouse.” Newspaper
clipping from resident.
Emanuel, Lanny. “History
of Farm Pond.” Interview
by Melissa Manak. Novem-
ber 29, 2010.
Four Season Homeowners’
Association Map. Provided
by Lanny Emanuel.
Franklin, Tom, comp.
“The Changing Face of
Hickory Grove.” Meck-
lenburg Neighbor, July
30, 1969. Included Photo
Compilation.
“General Description of the
Area.” Raw data about the
Annexation of Charlotte
East Side from resident.
Haag, Richard. “A New
Hickory Grove.” Mecklen-
burg Neighbor.
Land Given to Orr Family Slaves
(A. Morwell)
Map of Crab Orchard Township (Alponzo Morwell)
J.L. Carter Store (A. Morwell)
Schoolhouse (A. Morwell)
Lawrence Orr (A. Morwell)
9 Where have we come from?
family-friendly Homeowners’
Association, which offered many
amenities like swimming lessons
and a well-maintained greenway
system. A ballpark,, which is now
nearly impossible to access, was
built in Campbell Creek Park.
Many residents enjoyed playing
games there on weekends, and
children played in the streets.
Residentsevenwentfshingina
pond where the Wallace Creek
neighborhood is located today.
Four Seasons is remembered as
being a close-knit community,
with homes ranging in the low to
mid hundred thousand dollars.
East Side Decline
Between 1980 and 1990,
Charlotte’s East Side experienced
decline. Residents attribute
the decline to the phenomenon
of IBM employees purchasing
properties in Farm Pond and
the concurrent revitalization
of Uptown Charlotte. The
mass purchase of Farm Pond
properties by out-of-town-ers
led to many homes becoming
rental properties. Furthermore,
residents believe that bad lending
practices in the 1980s and 1990s led low-income residents to believe that they
could own homes. The bad loans caused many foreclosures in Farm Pond. At the
same time, the revitalization of Uptown Charlotte increased rent and the cost of
living , forcing many lower-income residents to leave Uptown for the East Side,
which is a convenient commute from Uptown. Many Farm Pond residents recall
thatatfrstthechangingdemographicshiftinFarmPondwasnotaproblem.
However, it became clear that the neighborhood had changed when apartment
rents declined from $900 per month to around $400 to $500. Break-ins and
shootings became commonplace, and the Four Season Homeowners’ Association
homeowners selling to absentee landlords. Property values declined to under
$100,000, and are continuing to fall. Devastation hit when many Charlotte
talked about by alumni residents in Farm Pond. Unfortunately, many black land
owners lost their land to the government due to property tax issues when Jim
Crow Laws came into effect.
Hickory Grove Community
Hickory Grove was a small community located around the square at Hickory
Grove and Delta Road, which later became the W.T. Harris Boulevard
extension. Many residents who lived in Hickory Grove before it was annexed
by the City of Charlotte fondly remember the close knit community. Residents
reminisce about how people lived by the honor system; store owners trusted
that patrons would return to pay their tab. Many older folks say the town would
close down for the July Fourth Parade and other festivals. Historic Charlotte
newspaper articles state that the area was full of wilderness, country roads,
and large ponds, which have since been drained and graded. An airport, which
still exists today on W.T. Harris Boulevard (formerly Delta Road) was used
by private residents. Many residents miss the quiet and intimate life before
Charlotte Annexed Hickory Grove and built Eastland Mall.
Four Seasons Neighborhood Construction
In the 1970s, Charlotte annexed Hickory Grove, although many residents
fought it. Annexation of East Side communities cost about $1.6 million.
Annexation caused immediate impacts in Farm Pond; Eastland Mall became
thelocalhotspot,solivelythatitwashardtofndparkingaroundChristmas.
The land around Eastland Mall was purchased by developers; however, legal
road blocks delayed construction. Erwin
Construction bought land, drained the
ponds, and resurfaced roads. Years
later, Erwin Construction built the Four
Season neighborhood. Four Seasons was a
desirable place to live for people in the mid
to high social economic class, with many
residents making over $20,000 in the
1970s.
Four Seasons was an attractive
neighborhoodthatgavefrsttimehome
buyers the option of buying a condo or a
single family home. Four Seasons’ patio
homes and split-level homes attracted
two types of families: those who wanted
a more urban lifestyle with maintenance
free common areas, and those who desired
suburban land tracts. Residents recall the
Morwell, Alponzo. “History
of Farm Pond.” Interview
by Melissa Manak. No-
vember 29, 2010. Also
provided: Photographs and
family history -Obituary
-Family Land Plots -Family
Tree -Grandfather Photo
-Crab Orchard Township
Map.
Muse, Amy. “The Wake of
the Boat” 1969. Article from
resident.
Rhyne, Sara M. “They
Shared Great Times On
Area’s ‘Country Roads’.”
Newspaper clipping from
resident.
Terry, Ray. “History of Farm
Pond” Interview by Melissa
Manak. December 6, 2010.
Four Seasons Plans (L. Emanuel)
Eastland Mall Opening Day (A. Morwell)
1970s East Side growth map (Mecklenburg Neighbor)
10 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
residents began going to Carolina Place Mall and SouthPark Mall, forcing the
Eastland Mall stores to close. Eventually the entire mall closed.
Farm Pond Today
Although Farm Pond has experienced many changes, the community is trying
to transition upwards to resemble what it used to be. Farm Pond residents feel
that the children have no outlets, resulting in petty crimes. Residents believe
that involving children and apartment complex residents into Four Seasons
Homeowners’ Association-sponsored activities will help improve the feeling of
community. Furthermore, there is a need for Campbell Creek Park and the Four
Seasons greenway to be maintained since, since it has been neglected for the
past20years.Manyresidentsagreeandremainconfdentthatthisisabeautiful
neighborhood that will come back as Charlotte’s East Side as a whole transitions
forward.
Why is Farm Pond organizing?
Farm Pond is receving assistance from the Charlotte Action Research Project and
the City of Charlotte to organize. Farm Pond is organizing to get better access to
City services, resources, and support. A Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
would be able to serve as a point of contact with the City, too.
The Charlotte Action Research Project (CHARP) is an organization that brings
together community-based organizations in challenged Charlotte neighborhoods
and students and faculty at University of North Carolina at Charlotte. CHARP
helps local communities to obtain technical and logistical assistance while
giving students real world experience in a diverse and challenging environment.
CHARP’smissionistoestablishamutuallybenefcialpartnershipthatbuilds
capacity and engagement between Charlotte neighborhoods and the university.
CHARP believes in empowering community partners to build community
capacity and recognizes that long term involvement with neighborhood groups
is essential to the success of community-based projects. Community partners
include: City of Charlotte Neighborhood Stabilization Program, Windy Ridge
Neighborhood Association, Peachtree Hills Neighborhood Association, Reid Park
Neighborhood Association, Camp Greene Neighborhood Association, Revolution
Park Neighborhood Association, Enderly Park Neighborhood Association, College
Downs Neighborhood Association, West Boulevard Neighborhood Coalition,
Habitat for Humanity, Charlotte NC, and Charlotte Urban Ministry Center.
CHARP was awarded a $25,000 grant from the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation in
Winston-Salem for continuing work.
Why is Farm Pond faced with so many
challenges?
Farm Pond is a very diverse area of Charlotte. Residents of Farm Pond include
people who have been homeowners for 15 to 20 years , as well as new immigrants
from Latin America, Asia, and Europe.
According to the 2000 Census, historically a predominantly White neighborhood
of single family homes, Farm Pond has been rapidly changing with White
residents becoming a minority. Newcomers to Farm Pond include Black and
Hispanic residents. In the 1990s, Census data shows an absence of Hispanics in
the area. Incredibly, the Hispanic population grew dramatically from virtually
zerotofvehundredpeoplewithinadecadeCurrently,themajorityofresidents
in Farm Pond are Black. Most residents of Farm Pond live in renter-occupied
housing units, which are primarily apartment complexes on Albemarle Road.
Farm Pond has also become home to many young people. The 2000 Census
estimates that 25 to 29 year-olds are the largest age bracket in Farm Pond.
By comparison, census tracts around Farm Pond are generally home to more
families with children.
Farm Pond’s diverse and young population is a wonderful asset to the
community. However, the wide range of languages and cultures in Farm Pond
can make it challenging for service providers to effectively communicate with and
tailor services to the community. Also, the high rate of new residents combined
with the short time that many residents spend living in Farm Pond creates an
opportunity to communicate to residents about all of the opportunities available
for them in Farm Pond.
Latin Americans in Mecklenburg County
Farm Pond is a microcosm of immigration patterns experienced in Charlotte and
Mecklenburg County as a whole. Over the past 15 years, Charlotte has received a
lot of national attention due to the fast pace of population and economic growth.
During this time, newcomers to Charlotte have included domestic and
international migrants. In particular, the city has become home to many Latino
immigrants. In the 1990s and previous decades, Mecklenburg County was
predominantly home to White and Black populations. However by 2004, the
number of Latinos immigrating to Mecklenburg County increased by 887%.
The University of North Carolina at Charlotte’s Urban Institute and the Latin
American Coalition partnered in 2006 to research the Latino population in
Charlotte and provide recommendations for how to better service the Latino
population for the City’s Vision 2015 plan and goal “of celebrating diversity and
Did you know?
You can fnd out more
about the Charlotte Action
Research Project (CHARP)
by looking at their website:
http://geoearth.uncc.edu/
people/cubabuco/charp/
The website is updated
with news articles about
CHARP and participating
communities, like Farm
Pond, too!
You can also read more
about CHARP’s work
in Reid Park here: “A
neighborhood is reborn”
by David Perlmutt (August
12, 2010) at http://www.
charlotteobserver.com
11 Where have we come from?
Many cultural differences are apparent within the Latino population and between
the Latino population and the greater Mecklenburg population. For example
within the Latino communities, the population in Mecklenburg is diverse.
According to the study, 62 percent of Latinos in Mecklenburg come from Mexico.
The remainder are largely from South America and many of them, from Brazil,
speak Portuguese. People with the same nationalities tend to cluster together in
neighborhoods or even within apartment complexes.
In terms of differences between Latinos and the wider Mecklenburg population,
the principle difference is language, but cultural practices are varied too. Many
Latinos who immigrate to Charlotte have experienced little formal education. As a
result, many are illiterate in Spanish. This makes it harder for the new immigrants
to learn English. An example of a cultural difference is that men tend to be the
dominant heads of Latino families. Respecting family structure is incredibly
important.
Finally,theLatinopopulationissignifcantlychallengedbyCharlotte’s
transportation system, especially in East Charlotte where someone may need to
take three or more buses to get uptown. Many buses in Charlotte are not equipped
with Spanish-language announcements or Spanish-speaking drivers.
Overall,theresearchshowsthatsignifcantengagementinFarmPondwillhaveto
recognizetheculturaldiversityoftheneighborhoodbeforespecifcprogramscan
be formed or implemented.
promoting equality for all.”
Thekeyfndingsofthe2006 Mecklenburg County Latino Community Needs
Assessment include:
• 68% of the Latino population are foreign born
• 61% of the working Latino population is young, aged 18 to 34 years old
• 50% of the Latino population do not have a high school diploma
• The median income for Latinos in Mecklenburg County in 2007 was
$39,000
• Compared to other populations in Mecklenburg County, the Latino
population suffers more economic disadvantages and at a higher rate.
For example, 22 percent live in poverty and 35 percent of Latinos live in
crowded conditions.
Challenges faced by the Latin American Population in Mecklenburg
County
the 2006 Mecklenburg County Latino Community Needs Assessment found
that the Latino population is in need of:
• Employment opportunities
• Bilingual and culturally aware services
• Affordable and accessible health care
• ESL classrooms and educational opportunities
• Improved mobility through public transportation
• Improvement in immigration policies
The greatest barriers experienced by the Latino population include:
• Inadequate English Skills
• Discrimination
• Immigration challenges and undocumented status
• Lack of formal education
• Lack of Spanish language-speaking service providers
• Cost of and access to health care services
• Mobility and access to transportation
Did you know?
If you are interested in
learning more about Latino
immigration to Charlotte,
there are two great
resources you can use.
UNCC’s Urban Institute
and the Latin American
Coalition’s 2006 Report,
Mecklenburg County
Latino Needs Assessment,
is available online here:
http://www.thoughtbox-
charlotte.org/content/
mecklenburg-county-
latino-community-needs-
assessment
In 2007, the Mayor’s
Immigration Commission
also published a report
about the impact of im-
migration on the City of
Charlotte. The report is
available here: http://www.
greencards.com/docs/
Immigration+Final+Report.
pdf
12 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
13 Where are we now?
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As a microcosm of the City of Charlotte, Farm Pond represents
the city’s changing nature as Charlotte globalizes and grows.
This chapter examines data to see what Farm Pond is like today.
For much of the analysis, we use the basemap that appears to
the left. You can print out this map and use it to gather your own
data about Farm Pond.
The chapter includes three sections:
People:
1. Demographics
2. Households
3. Social Indicators
Place:
1. Civic Assets
2. Neighborhood Assets
3. Land Use
4. Circulation
Environment:
1. 100 Year Floodplain
14 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
majorityinFarmPond(55.9%).TheBlackpopulationisasignifcantproportion
of the surrounding tracts’ population, too: Hickory Grove (44.3%), Eastland/
Wilora Lake (48.2%), Idlewild Farms (46.6%), and Hickory Ridge (44.7%). By
comparison, about 1/3 of Charlotte’s population was Black in 2000.
Home ownership, Renting, and Foreclosure
The 2000 Census states there were 2,337 housing units available. While only 640
units were owner-occupied in 2000, the vast majority (1,656 units) are renter-
occupied. Within Farm Pond, the level of crime is greatest along Albemarle
Road, which is the primary commercial center of the neighborhood.
Employment
In Farm Pond in 2000, the employment ratio of males to females was
approximately equal. With an unemployment rate of 4.2%, Farm Pond had a
very low unemployment rate in 2000. Today, the unemployment rate in Farm
Pond is much higher, ranging between 10 and 15% (See Map 6).
Summary
There are some points of interest in the data:
• There is a tenuous connection between the type of housing and crime level.
While residents associate the multifamily housing along Albemarle Road
withhigherratesofcrime,Map7showsthatsignifcantpolicereportshave
been made throughout Farm Pond. Although violent crimes like armed
robbery tend to occur near Albemarle Road, police reports online show that
domestic disturbances occur throughout Farm Pond.
• The majority of properties are valued between $50,000-100,000. It is
unclear why property values are lower than average in Farm Pond, but
contributing factors include the closing of Eastland Mall, general decline as
development focused in Uptown Charlotte and exurbs, and crime.
• SignifcantlymorepeopleinFarmPondrent(in2000andtoday)compared
to people who are homeowners. This is especially interesting considering
the single family home design of the neighborhood.
• The average rent was between $500-1,000 per month in 2000.
Farm Pond’s long term goals should focus on the social and employment aspects
oftheneighborhood,embracingdemographicchangesandfndingwaystobuild
community and local economic opportunities despite the economic downturn.
Overview
Before studying People, Place, and Environment in Farm Pond in more depth,
this overview compares Farm Pond to its neighboring census tracts to identify
signifcantissuesintheneighborhood.FarmPond’sCensusTractis19.12,and
the following tracts are used in comparison:
• 15.03 to the north, Hickory Grove
• 16.04 to the west, Eastland/Wilora Lake
• 19.10 to the south, Idlewild Farms
• 19.13 to the east, Hickory Ridge
Tract 19.12 is bordered by Albemarle Road, Farm Pond Lane, W.T. Harris
Boulevard, and Hickory Grove Road. The surrounding tracts are similar in
population, except for two: 15.03 to the north (Hickory Grove) and 19.13 to the
east (Hickory Ridge).
This comparative research of Farm Pond and the neighboring census tracts shows
that Farm Pond is unique in three areas: the residents’ communication barriers;
housing affected by sprawl; and, higher unemployment.
Social Issues
Farm Pond has been challenged by the decline of Eastland Mall, with property
valuesdecliningsignifcantlyfollowingtheMall’sclosing.Primarilyhometoa
predominately White population when Four Seasons neighborhood was built
in the 1970s, other races began moving into the neighborhood at a fast pace in
the 1990s. With 19.8% of residents speaking a language other than English,
multiculturalism presents challenges and opportunities in Farm Pond. In 1990,
Census data shows a virtual absence of Hispanic residents. However, the number
of Hispanic residents grew from only 96 residents to more than 500 in 2000,
which was approximately 9.6% of the neighborhood’s population. In the tracts
around Farm Pond, the Hispanic community comprised a large share of the
popultion in 2000, too: Hickory Grove (19.1%), Eastland/Wilora Lake (13.1%),
Idlewild Farms (14.5%), and Hickory Ridge (6.5%). By comparison in 2000, only
7.4% of Charlotte’s population was Latino.
This led to an increased need for ESL formatted classrooms. Younger Hispanics
are having to help parents communicate within the community. While the
Hispanic population is growing quickly, the Black population remains the
Did you know?
Our source for this
comparison between Farm
Pond and the neighboring
census tracts comes from
the 2000 Census.
U.S. Census Bureau.
(2010). American
Faultfnder reference
tract: Census Tract:15.03,
16.04,19.10,19.12,19.13
Generated October 25th,
2010 from http://factfnder.
Census.gov/servlet/DT-
Table
15 Where are we now?
P
e
o
p
l
e
This topic covers Farm Pond Demographics, Households, and
Social Indicators. The data is compared both over time and to
CharlotteandMecklenburgCountyfgures.
Overall, Farm Pond is growing more slowly than Charlotte. The
people who live in Farm Pond are younger and more racially and
ethnically diverse than the average mix of people in Charlotte.
Households in Farm Pond are on average smaller than
household sizes in the rest of Charlotte. Farm Pond also has a
higher proportion of single-person and single-parent households
compared to the city as a whole. Almost three-quarters of people
in Farm Pond are renters, having moved into the neighborhood
relatively recently. Residents who are homeowners are likely to
have lived in Farm Pond for at least 15 to 20 years.
Of total housing units, 95% of homes in Farm Pond are single
family homes or condominiums. Only 5% of housing units are
apartments.
People in Farm Pond have been especially hard-hit by
foreclosures and high rents. Over a quarter of residents of Farm
Pond paid 35% or more of their household income to rents or
mortgages in 2000. Farm Pond has had at least 26 foreclosures
by the time the 2010 Quality of Life survey was published. A
foreclosure data map from City of Charlotte Neighborhood &
Business Services published in September 2010 shows at least
an additional 20 foreclosures. Unemployment in Farm Pond is
in the range of 10 to 15 percent.
16 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Did you know?
There are many places
where you can fnd out
demographic information.
One great resource is the
City’s Quality of Life Study
(http://charmeck.org/city/
charlotte/nbs/community-
commerce/QOL/Pages/
Default.aspx). Farm Pond
is Neighborhood Statistical
Area (NSA) number 148.
A really fun place to
explore census data is
the New York Times’ new
Census Explorer: http://
projects.nytimes.com/
census/2010/
Another place to fnd
demographic information is
the United States Census
(http://census.gov). In the
2000 and 1990 Censuses,
Farm Pond was Census
Tract 19.12.
We got the information
in Table 1 from the 1990
and 2000 Census, as well
as the 2006, 2007, 2008,
2009, and 2010 Quality of
Life Studies. The informa-
tion in Figure 1 is from the
2000 Census, Summary
File 1.
1. Demographics
Demographics is a study that examines a population and its structure. This
includes how many people there are in a particular time and area, how old the
people are, how fast the group of people is growing, and how many men and
women there are.
Population
Table 1 shows population growth in Farm Pond, Charlotte, and Mecklenburg
County between 1990 and 2010. As you can see from the table, Farm Pond is a
small proportion of Charlotte’s total population - in 2008 less than 1%.
1990 2000 2006 2008 2009 2010
Farm Pond 5,014 5,263 5,521 5,504 5,807
Charlotte 395,934 540,828 652,202 687,971 704,422 772,483
Mecklenburg 511,433 695,454 833,791 892,456 913,639
Between 1990 and 2000, Farm Pond’s population grew by 5% compared to more
than 36% population growth in Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. In other
words, Farm Pond grew by population much more slowly than Charlotte.
Between 2000 and 2010, Farm Pond’s population grew by more than
10%. Compared to 43% population growth in Charlotte and 32% growth in
Mecklenburg County during the same period, again Farm Pond grew more slowly
than Charlotte. However, 10% population growth is still a rapid rate of growth for
a neighborhood.
Sex
As shown in Figure 1, in 2000 the proportion of males to females in Farm Pond
wasnotsignifcantlydifferentfromCharlotteorMecklenburgCounty.Inallthree
cases, there were slightly more females than males.
Age Structure
Figure 1 also shows that in 2000, Farm Pond had a higher proportion of 20 to
30 year old people compared to Charlotte and Mecklenburg County. Within the
Baby Boom generation, Farm Pond had a smaller proportion of men compared to
Charlotte and Mecklenburg County.
Figure 4 shows that the higher concentration of 20 to 30 year old people in Farm
Pond compared to Charlotte and Mecklenburg County existed in 1990, too. This
suggests that young people in Farm Pond are not ageing in place, but rather new
young people are moving into the neighborhood.
The median age for people in Farm Pond is 30, compared to 34 years old in
Charlotte.
85+
75 to 79
65 to 69
55 to 59
45 to 49
35 to 39
25 to 29
15 to 19
5 to 9
-20%-15%-10%-5% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
85+
75 to 79
65 to 69
55 to 59
45 to 49
35 to 39
25 to 29
15 to 19
5 to 9
-20%-15%-10%-5% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
85+
75 to 79
65 to 69
55 to 59
45 to 49
35 to 39
25 to 29
15 to 19
5 to 9
-20%-15%-10%-5% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20%
Farm Pond (2000) Charlotte (2000) Mecklenburg County (2000)
Men
Women
Figure 1: Age Structure in 2000
Table 1: Population Change in Farm Pond, Charlotte, and Mecklenburg County
17 Where are we now?
Race
Compared to the City of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, Farm Pond’s
population in 2000 consisted of a higher percentage of African Americans
and American Indians/Alaskan Natives. It is likely that many Latino residents
identify as American Indians.
Under 5 years
5 to 9 years
10 to 14 years
15 to 19 years
20 to 24 years
25 to 29 years
30 to 34 years
35 to 39 years
40 to 44 years
45 to 49 years
50 to 54 years
55 to 59 years
60 to 64 years
65 to 69 years
70 to 74 years
75 to 79 years
80 to 84 years
85 years and over
0% 10% 20% 30% 40%
Under 5 years
5 to 9 years
10 to 14 years
15 to 19 years
20 to 24 years
25 to 29 years
30 to 34 years
35 to 39 years
40 to 44 years
45 to 49 years
50 to 54 years
55 to 59 years
60 to 64 years
65 to 69 years
70 to 74 years
75 to 79 years
80 to 84 years
85 years and over
0% 10% 20% 30% 40%
Under 5 years
5 to 9 years
10 to 14 years
15 to 19 years
20 to 24 years
25 to 29 years
30 to 34 years
35 to 39 years
40 to 44 years
45 to 49 years
50 to 54 years
55 to 59 years
60 to 64 years
65 to 69 years
70 to 74 years
75 to 79 years
80 to 84 years
85 years and over
0% 10% 20% 30% 40%
Farm Pond Charlotte Mecklenburg County
1990
2000
Figure 4: Age Groups by Percentage in 1990 and 2000
35%
56%
1%
2%
0%
3%
3%
58%
33%
0%
3%
0%
4%
2%
64%
28%
0%
3%
0%
3%
2%
Farm Pond (2000) Charlotte (2000) Mecklenburg County (2000)
White
Black / African American
Native American
Asian
Pacifc Islander
Other
Two or more races
Figure 2: Racial Comparison
10%
90%
7%
93%
6%
94%
Farm Pond (2000) Charlotte (2000) Mecklenburg County (2000)
Figure 3: Latino Population
Ethnicity
Compared to the City of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, Farm Pond’s
population in 2000 had a higher proportion of Hispanics.
Did you know?
We got the information in
Figure 2 and Figure 3 from
the 2000 Census, Sum-
mary Fule 1.
The data in Figure 4 is
from the 1990 and 2000
Census, Summary File 1.
Hispanic
Not Hispanic
18 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
2. Households
Household information tells us about how many groups of people live in Farm
Pond. Households include single people, couples that are married or not married,
and people who are married or not married with children, whether their children
are biological, adopted, foster, or relatives’ children.
Number of Households
Table 2 shows household growth in Farm Pond, Charlotte, and Mecklenburg
County between 1990 and 2000. As you can see from the table, the average
household size in Farm Pond is 2.29, compared to 2.5 for Charlotte and 2.6
nationwide. This makes sense for the age of the residents; many retired people,
young couples, and single-parents live in two-person households.
1990 2000
Farm Pond 2,255 2,298
Charlotte 158,991 215,449
Mecklenburg 200,219 273,416
Household Composition
The 2000 Census shows that Farm Pond has a higher proportion of single-
person households and single-parent households compared to Charlotte and
Mecklenburg County. Farm Pond also has more “other” households, which
include family and non-family households with no children or children over 18
years old.
Did you know?
We got household informa-
tion in Table 2 and Figure
5 from the United States
Census Summary File 3
(http://census.gov). In the
2000 and 1990 Censuses,
Farm Pond was Census
Tract 19.12.
The information in Table
3 and Table 4 came from
the 2010 Quality of Life
Survey.
Zillow.com reports on
changing home values
over time, which is where
Figure 6 comes from.
The Zillow Home Value
Index is a proprietary for-
mula used by the website
to estimate home values.
Figure 6 comes directly
from Zillow.com and was
updated in November
2010.
21%
37%
1%
6%
7%
28%
26%
20%
2%
8%
9%
35%
23%
33% 1%
6%
7%
29%
Farm Pond (2000) Charlotte (2000) Mecklenburg County (2000)
1 Person Household
Married Couple
Figure 5: Household Composition
Table 2: Number of Households
Single Dad with children
Single Mom with children
2+ Person Non-Family Household
Other 2+ Person Households
Household Income
The 2000 Census reported that in Farm Pond, over a quarter of all people paid
more than 35% of their household income to rent. This is considered to be an
unsustainable level, leaving little income for food, utilities, medical expenses,
and other necessities. As household incomes are lower in Farm Pond, it is not
surprising that almost 1/3 of residents receive food stamps.
2010 Values Farm Pond Charlotte
Median Household
Income
$33,849 $52,148
Percent of People
Receiving Food Stamps
28.1% 13.1%
Home Value
The average home value is also much lower than the Charlotte average.
Unfortunately, home values in Farm Pond are declining, while Charlotte’s have
been rising despite the recession.
2010 Values Farm Pond Charlotte
Average Home Value $83,344 $228,128
Change in Home Value -3.4% 5.1%
Zillow.com reports that in August 2010, the Zillow Home Index Value of homes
sold in Farm Pond was $102,000, while the median sale price was $90,000.
Table 3: Household Income
Table 4: Average Home Value
Figure 6: Home Values in Farm Pond compared to Charlotte
19 Where are we now?
Types of Homes in Farm Pond
Map 1 shows the various neighborhoods in Farm Pond. Farm Pond has two
homeowner’s associations (Four Seasons includes townhomes) and 6 apartment
complexes. It is unclear whether the northern portion of Farm Pond has
homeowners associations. Thus, forming a neighborhood association in Farm
Pond would give a voice and representation to people who live in the northern
half of the neighborhood, as well as apartment residents.
Types of Homes in Farm Pond
Farm Pond is primarily comprised of 75% single family homes, 20%
condominiums, and 5% apartments. In 2010, Farm Pond had 2,707 occupied
housing units. Most of the single family homes in Farm Pond are split-level or
ranch-style homes, giving the neighborhood a uniform feel. Some newer two-storey
homes with garages also exist. The photos also illustrate some of the apartment
homes in Farm Pond. The newer apartments are behind fences and gates.
Map 1: Types of Housing in Farm Pond
Did you know?
You can use the Polaris
tool on the Charlotte-Meck-
lenburg website to look up
ownership information for
homes in your neighbor-
hood.
We found out the composi-
tion of housing types in
Farm Pond (above the
photographs) from Zillow.
com. The various neighbor-
hood associations in Farm
Pond, like Four Seasons
Neighborhood Association,
gave us details of their
boundaries for Map 1.
To get the information
shown in Map 2, Map 3,
and Map 4, we grabbed the
information on Polaris in a
format that is “geo-coded”
and made these two maps
using software called
ArcGIS.
Even if you do not have
software like ArcGIS, you
can use the Charlotte-
Mecklenburg Polaris
website to look up who
owns the property where
you live, how old the
property is, whether tax
has been paid on the
property, and other similar
details.
To show typical homes in
Farm Pond, we conducted
a “windshield survey,”
which means that we drove
through Farm Pond and
took photographs.
Four Seasons: Split Level Four Seasons: Ranch Four Seasons: Ranch
Wallace Creek Outside of Four Seasons Outside of Four Seasons
Forest Hills Regal Oaks Somerstone
1
8
2
3
5
7
6
4
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Legend
1 Four Seasons Homeowners
2 Wallace Creek Homeowners
3 Delta Crossing Apartments
4 Somerstone Apartments
5 Regal Oaks Apartments
6 Eagle Woods Apartments
7 Farm Lane Apartments
8 Forest Hills Apartments
20 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Hickory Grove Road
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Out of State Landlords
In Farm Pond, most of the apartment complexes are owned by companies more
than 500 miles away. As you can see from this map, quite a few homes in Farm
Pond have owners that live outside of Charlotte. In Wallace Creek and Four
Seasons neighborhoods, out of state landlords can make collecting homeowners’
association fees challenging. These neighborhoods may need assistance tracking
down property owners and putting liens on delinquent properties.
Home Ownership
Farm Pond has a much higher proportion of renters (70.6%) compared to
Charlotte as a whole (44.7%). Renters have lived in Farm Pond less time than
homeowners. According to the 2000 Census, 55% of renters in Farm Pond moved
in between 1999 and March 2000. Another 33% of renters moved in between
1995-1998. By contrast, almost 50% of homeowners moved into Farm Pond
between 1990-1998. Another 25% moved to Farm Pond between 1980-1989.
Map 2: Owners vs Renters in Farm Pond Map 3: Out of State Landlords in Farm Pond
Did you know?
To get the information
shown in Map 2 and 3, we
grabbed the information
on Polaris in a format that
is “geo-coded” and made
these two maps using
software called ArcGIS.
To fgure out whether a
property is occupied by
a renter or the owner, we
compared the mailing
address listed in Polaris to
the physical address of the
property.
In Map 3 to fgure out how
far away property owners
live from Farm Pond, we
calculated the distance
between Farm Pond’s zip
code and the zip code of
the property’s listed mailing
address in Polaris.
Mecklenburg County
GIS prepared the data in
Map 5 for us and got the
foreclosure data from City
of Charlotte Neighborhood
& Business Services
Hickory Grove Road
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Legend
Owners
Renters
Concentration
of renters
21 Where are we now?
Age of the Housing Stock
Much of Farm Pond was developed in the 1970s and 1980s. A few older
buildings (6.8% of total stock) remain from when Farm Pond was rural in the
1950s. A newer subdivision was built in the past decade. As you’ll see on the a
following map, this new subdivision has a high concentration of foreclosures.
Almost a third of Farm Pond homes were built from 2000 onwards.
Map 4: Age of Housing Stock in Farm Pond
Foreclosures
This map shows foreclosure and unemployment data in Farm Pond in 2009.
The 2010 Quality of Life Study states that Farm Pond had 26 foreclosures
compared to 2,407 in Charlotte. This map, with data from Charlotte Mecklenburg
Neighborhood and Business Services, shows 46 foreclosures in Farm Pond
recorded through September 2010. Four Seasons and Wallace Creek may need
assistance managing foreclosures and collecting HOA dues from foreclosures.
Map 5: Foreclosures in Farm Pond
Did you know?
To get the information
shown in Map 4 we
grabbed the information
on Polaris in a format that
is “geo-coded” and made
these two maps using
software called ArcGIS.
Mecklenburg County
GIS prepared the data in
Map 5 for us and got the
foreclosure data from City
of Charlotte Neighborhood
& Business Services
Hickory Grove Road
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Legend
Foreclosure
Property
22 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
3. Social Indicators
Education
According to the 2000 Census, almost half of all residents in Farm Pond had
graduatedhighschoolorhadsomecollegewithoutfnishingadegree.
2010 Values Farm Pond Charlotte
High School Dropout Rates (2010) 7.6% 5.1%
Percent of children scoring at or above grade level (2010) 68.8% 75.9%
Social Mosaic Profle
Zillow.com uses the 2000 Census to examine age, occupation, and income to
segment populations and describe what kind of people live in an area. According
to Zillow, many of Farm Pond’s residents are:
• Melting Pot — Low-income, foreign-language-speaking urbanites. Lower-income
population mainly employed in service jobs. Most have a high school education or lower.
• Bright Lights, Big City — Very mobile singles living in the city. Singles ranging in
age from early 20s to mid-40s who have moved to an urban setting. Most rent their
apartment or condo. Some have a college education and work in services and the
professional sector.
• Bringing Up Baby — Younger urban couples just starting families. Mixed educational
status with some having a high school education and some college. Income from the
low- to high-end.
Did you know?
The information in Table
5 about education comes
from the 2010 Quality
of Life Survey. We also
looked at the 1990 and
2000 Census Summary
File 3 for information about
high school and college
graduation in Figure 7.
Mecklenburg County GIS
prepared the data in Map 6
for us and got the unem-
ployment data from City of
Charlotte Neighborhood
& Business Services on a
Census Block level.
Table 5: Education in Farm Pond
Farm Pond
Charlotte
Mecklenburg
Figure 7: Educational Attainment
1990
Less
than 9th
grade
9th to
12th, no
diploma
High
School
graduate
Some
college,
no degree
Associate
Degree
Bachelor
Degree
Graduate or
Professional
Degree
Less
than 9th
grade
9th to
12th, no
diploma
High
School
graduate
Some
college,
no degree
Associate
Degree
Bachelor
Degree
Graduate or
Professional
Degree
2000
Unemployment
Map 6 shows unemployment in Farm Pond, which is more than double
the unemployment rate in Farm Pond in 1990. At between 10 and 15%
unemployment, the rate in Farm Pond is similar to Mecklenburg County’s
unemployment rate of 10.2% (Employment Security Commission October 2010)
and the national average of 9.3% (Bureau of Labor Statistics November 2010).
Map 6: Unemployment
Hickory Grove Road
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Legend
8.85% - 10.05%
10.08% - 14.61%
23 Where are we now?
Crime
ThefollowingimageshowssignifcantpolicereportsbetweenJanuaryand
November2010.Signifcantpolicereportsincludearmedrobbery,assaultwith
a deadly weapon, and missing persons. According to the Charlotte Mecklenburg
Police Department’s website, the most common crimes in Farm Pond between
January and November 2010 were non-aggravated assault, vandalism, and
residential burglaries.
Map 7: Crime in Farm Pond
Did you know?
The crime data in Map
7 comes from Charlotte
Mecklenburg Police
Department. The Police
Department has a Com-
munity Crime Mapping
System at http://maps.
cmpdweb.org/cmpdnet/
map.aspx
EveryBlock.com has
an easier to use crime
mapping system that only
shows signifcant police
events, like armed robbery,
armed assault, sexual
assault, fatalities, stolen
vehicles, and other such
incidents. To fnd Farm
Pond, go to http://charlotte.
everyblock.com and
then browse for “Public
Records,” then “Signifcant
Police Events,” and display
events in Police Division
12 Hickory Grove.
Hickory Grove Road
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Legend
1 Armed Robbery
1 Assault with a Deadly Weapon
1 Missing Person
24 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
25 Where are we now?
P
l
a
c
e
This topic covers Civic Assets, Neighborhood Assets, Circulation,
and Land Use.
Overall, Farm Pond is well served peripherally by transit,
grocery stores, restaurants, and civic facilities. However, as
the neighborhood was designed in the 1970s and 1980s as
a suburban “loops and lollipops” format, many residents at
the interior of the neighborhood have to drive to reach these
facilities.
26 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
1. Civic Assets
FarmPondiswell-servedwithschools,parks,freservice,apubliclibrary,ftness
and community centers, and faith centers.
2. Neighborhood Assets
Farm Pond has a wide variety of businesses, including grocery stores,
convenience stores, hair and nail salons, launrdomats, restaurants, and discount
stores. These amenities are at a walkable distance for people in the multifamily
residences, but at a driving distance for much of the single family home residents.
Map 8: Civic Assets in Farm Pond Map 9: Shopping Centers in Farm Pond
Did you know?
We found out about neigh-
borhood Civic and Social
Assets from talking to City
of Charlotte staff, spending
time in the community and
by Google Maps.
Hickory Grove Road
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Four Seasons Plaza (in pink)
Hickory Grove Market (in blue)
Hickory Grove Road
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Food Lion
Family Dollar
Subway
Library
Backyard
Burgers
Jiffy Lube
BB&T
Papa John’s
Hickory Grove
Automotive
Hair Harmony
Petro Express
Queen City
Treatment
Center
Rite Aid
Hickory Grove
Baptist Church
14
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Taylor’s Barber
Shell Gasoline
Family Restaurant
Sno-White Laundry
McDonalds
Save-A-Lot
Bestway
Family Dollar
It’s Fashion
Check Cashing
Beauty Plus
Coin Laundry
Alterations PDQ
JJ Fish & Chicken
Bank of America
US Post Offce
Sherwin Williams
Wendy’s
Cookout
KFC
Sunrise Restaurant
ABC Store
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Legend
1. Hickory Grove Baptist Church
2. CMS Pre-K and Kindergarten
3. Hickory Grove Elementary
4. Albemarle Road Middle School
5. Campbell Creek Park
6. Charlotte Fire Department
7. Charlotte Mecklenburg Library
8. Social Security Administration
9. YMCA
10. Charlotte Police Department
11. ESC Job Link
12. US Post Offce
27 Where are we now?
Restaurants within
1/4 Mile
• Mc Donald’s
• Paradise Garden
Restaurant
• Pizza Hut
• Supermercado E
Taqueria Jalisco
• Kyoto Japanese/
Korean Restaurant
• Han’s Fish &
Chicken
• Chin Chin
• Golden Palace
Restaurant
• Arby’s
• Sunrise Restaurant
• KFC
• Cook Out
• Pollos Mario
Restaurant
• Wendy’s
Groceries within 1 mile
• Q A Food Stores Inc
• Save-A-Lot
• Bi-Lo Drug Store
• Aldi
• Island Grocery
• Neo Silver Express
• Fahmo Grocery and
tawakal express
• Sam’s Mart
• La Palmita Grocery
Store
• La Luna II
• Variedades En Mi
Esquina
Schools within 2 miles
• Albemarle Road
Middle School
• Albemarle Road
Elementary School
• Idlewild Elementary
School
• Hickory Grove
Baptist Christian
School
• Winterfeld
Elementary School
• Windsor Park
Elementary School
• Hickory Grove
Elementary School
• Charlotte Islamic
Academy
• Trinity Christian
Preparatory School
• Our Lady of the
Assumption School
Other
• USPostOffce
• Campbell Creek
Park
• Albemarle Road
Park
• Charlotte
Mecklenburg
Library
Map 10: Community Amenities
Did you know?
We found out about
neighborhood amenities
via many sources. WalkS-
core.com and Yelp.com
are very useful for fnding
neighborhood services
close to where you live.
We used Google Maps
to make Map 10. Google
Maps is great, because
you can collaborate with
other people online to put a
map together.
In the next section,
you’ll see that we asked
neighborhood residents to
tell use about their favorite
neighborhood amenities,
which are different from
this list.
Legend:
Police Department
US Post Offce
Fire Department
Library
Grocery Store
Bank
Childcare
School
Senior Center
Recreation Center
Cleaning and Laundry
Convenience Store
Restaurant
Hair and Beauty Salon
Medical Clinic
Place of Worship
Pharmacy
Community Center
Bike Lane
28 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
3. Circulation
Roads
The main roads, Hickory Grove, WT Harris, and Albemarle Road form the
boundaries for Farm Pond. Farm Pond Lane and Lawrence Orr Drive form the
main routes through the neighborhood. Lawrence Orr has speed bumps to keep
vehicular speeds lower.
Transit
Farm Pond is well-served by bus routes. The 40X is an express bus to downtown
Charlotte. The 23 and 9 also go downtown, while the 221 and 222 serve the local
neighborhood. However, the single family homes in the middle of Farm Pond
remain largely unserved by transit, as the “loops and lollipops” street pattern
affords poor connectivity. Zillow.com states the Farm Pond average commute
time is over 32 minutes, compared to 26 minutes for Charlotte and nationwide.
Did you know?
You can fnd out transit
information using Google.
You can go to maps.
google.com and type in
your starting point and
destination. When it
gives you directions, click
the transit button to get
directions!
We got transit data and
bus stops from CATS and
Google Transit. Zillow.com
has data on Farm Pond,
Charlotte, and Nationwide
commuting times.
Map 11: Roads Heirarchy Map 12: Transit Routes
Hickory Grove Road
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Legend
Arterial Roads
Local Thru Roads
Legend
Express Bus: 40X to Downtown
Bus: 23 to Downtown
Bus: 9 to Downtown
Local Bus: 221 and 222 to Eastland
Community Transit Center
Bus Stops with 10 minute walking
radius
29 Where are we now?
Walk Score Info:
• 90–100: Walker’s Paradise — Daily errands do not require a car.
• 70–89: Very Walkable — Most errands can be accomplished on foot.
• 50–69: Somewhat Walkable — Some amenities within walking distance.
• 25–49: Car-Dependent — A few amenities within walking distance.
• 0–24: Car-Dependent — Almost all errands require a car.
Walking
Farm Pond offers a slightly better walking experience compared to Charlotte on
average. We grabbed this image from WalkScore.com, and it shows that Farm
Pond has access to many amenities on Albemarle Road. WalkScore.com ranks
Farm Pond as the 63rd most walkable community in Charlotte. With a Walk
Score of 45, Farm Pond’s Walk Score is 6 points higher than Charlotte’s average
Walk Score of 39. This means that Farm Pond is better served by transit than
Charlotte, generally speaking.
Did you know?
You can use the website
WalkScore.com to fnd
out how many shops,
restaurants, pharmacies,
grocery stores, banks,
and other places you can
walk to. The website also
calculates approximately
how much on transporta-
tion you could be spending
depending on where you
live!
Map 13a: Charlotte Walk Score
Map 13b: Farm Pond Walk Score
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Legend
90-100: Walker’s Paradise
70-89: Very Walkable
50-69: Somewhat Walkable
25-49: Car Dependent
0-24: Very Car Dependent
30 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
4. Land Use
FarmPondisprimarilyasingle-familyneighborhoodwithretailandoffceparks
along Albemarle Road. Hickory Grove Baptist Church is the main feature on
W.T. Harris and Hickory Grove Road. Apartments and condominium buildings
separate the single family homes from commercial activities. It is generally good
planning practice to separate single family homes and commercial uses with
higher density residential use.
Map 14: Land Use
Did you know?
We found out about land
use designations using
the Parcel Search on
Charlotte-Mecklenburg Po-
laris. If you’re interested in
how zoning affects where
you live, you can search
the City of Charlotte’s
Zoning Website for msps:
http://maps.charmeck.org/
zoningmaps/ and for the
zoning rules: http://www.
charmeck.org/city/char-
lotte/planning/Rezoning/
Pages/ZoningOrdinance.
aspx.
Hickory Grove Road
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31 Where are we now?
E
n
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t
Thistopiccoversthe100yearfoodplaininFarmPond.As
data becomes more available in the future, this topic can be
expanded to include air quality, biodiversity, and greenhouse
gas emissions data.
In Farm Pond, some apartments and townhomes are in the 100
yearfoodplain.
32 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
1. Natural Features
100-Year Floodplain
This map helps explain why Farm Pond feels separated from the neighborhoods
to the west. A creek and Floodplain runs behind the apartment and
condominium complexes on Farm Pond Lane. Some apartments and townhomes
offofFarmPondLanearewithinthe100yearfoodplain.
Map 15: Floodplanes
Hickory Grove Road
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33 Where are we now?
S
u
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y
Farm Pond is well-served by transit and neighborhood retail.
Foreclosures and crime occur throughout the neighborhood, and
do not appear to be correlated to areas where lots of renters live
or there are many absentee landlords.
34 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Opportunities
To summarize this section, here are some of the opportunities in Farm Pond. The
Campbell Creek Park connects to the Four Seasons greenway (1) and walking
trails. If extended, the greenway could reach transit on Albemarle Road. Hickory
Grove Baptist Church (2) is another major landholder in the area that could
connect central neighborhood homes to transit.
Challenges
Challenges in Farm Pond include crime, foreclosures, the high percentage
of renters, and out-of-state ownership. As this map shows, there is no clear
correlationbetweenareaswithhighforeclosures,signifcantpoliceevents,and
renters. In other words, the whole of Farm Pond is challenged by these issues,
rather than isolated pockets.
Map 16: Opportunities Map 17a: Challenges
Hickory Grove Road
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Signifcant
Police Events
Foreclosures
Legend
1. Four Seasons Greenway and Campbell
Creek Park
2. Hickory Grove Baptist Church
Bus Stops with 10 minute walking
radius
35 Where are we now?
Map 17a: Challenges
Hickory Grove Road
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Signifcant
Police Events
Foreclosures
36 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
37 Where are we going?
W
h
e
r
e

a
r
e

w
e

g
o
i
n
g
?
This chapter describes the process that people in Farm Pond
have been participating in to form a neighborhood association.
• Preliminary Meetings and CHARP Farm Pond Liaison
outreach
• First Neighborhood Meeting
• Second Neighborhood Meeting
• Third Neighborhood Meeting
• Four Seasons Homeowner’s Association Annual General
Meeting
• Eagle Woods Movie Nights
• Eagle Woods Apartment Complex Party
38 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Second Neighborhood Meeting
On November 6 2010 at the Hickory
Grove Public Library, students at UNC
Charlotte facilitated a second meeting
of residents from Farm Pond and
adjacent neighborhoods. More than 23
people attended the meeting, with most
attendees being retired homeowners in
Farm Pond.
The purpose of the meeting was to
maintain momentum in Farm Pond for
neighborhood organizing, to continue to communicate to residents about City
of Charlotte services in Farm Pond, and to learn about Farm Pond issues and
concerns from residents.
Katie Lewis (Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department Hickory Grove
Community Coordinator), Eugene Bradley (City of Charlotte), and Martina Jones
(Community Activist) attended the meeting and made presentations.
Third Neighborhood Meeting
On December 11 2010 at the Hickory Grove
Public Library, students at UNC Charlotte
facilitated a third meeting of residents from
Farm Pond and adjacent neighborhoods.
Approximately 20 people attended the
meeting, representing a broader spectrum
of Farm Pond residents, such as people
from Eagle Woods, Wallace Creek, and the
homes above Four Seasons Homeowner’s
Association.
The purpose of the meeting was to re-examine the purpose of the Farm Pond
Neighborhood Association, identify goals for the community, brainstorm actions
to reach goals, and gather ideas for possible activities to undertake during 2011.
Unlike previous meetings, the discussion with residents shifted away from
crime frustration with youth, renters, and unkept properties. Instead, residents
vocalized a willingness to act in Farm Pond and a desire to start doing something.
Preliminary Meetings
Before beginning community engagement in earnest, Judith Gamboa and the
project team met with community leadership to gain insight into Farm Pond.
The Hickory Grove Police Department offered the project team the opportunity
toridearoundtheneighborhoodwithpatrolingoffcers.Theprojectteamtoured
Farm Pond with Kim Barnes and Eugene Bradley from the City of Charlotte, as
well as Martina Jones.
J. Gamboa contacted and visited with apartment managers to gauge their interest
and potential for involvement. She discovered that there is a high turnover of
apartment managers.
Initial attempts to meet with the Latin American Coalition and Mi Casa Es Su
Casawerenotsuccessfulduetoschedulingconficts.
J. Gamboa successfully met with Gabriel Kussin, Volunteer Coordinator at the
Latin american Coalition (now Bonnie Carter), to discuss how the organization
is involved in Farm Pond. The Latin American Coalition has a large volunteer
database in addition to having access to a lot of people who live in Farm Pond.
First Neighborhood Meeting
On October 2 2010 at the Hickory
Grove Public Library, students at
UNC Charlotte facilitated a meeting
of residents from Farm Pond and
adjacent neighborhoods. More than
20 people attended the meeting, with
most attendees being homeowners in
Farm Pond.
Dr. Janni Sorensen from the University
of North Carolina at Charlotte
was present at the meeting to help
facilitate. Virginia Spykerman (candidate for the Board of City Commissioners),
Katie Lewis (Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department Hickory Grove
Community Coordinator), and Kim Barnes (City of Charlotte) also attended the
meeting.
Thepurposeofthefrstmeetingwastogaugeinterestinandfacilitatethe
creation of a neighborhood association. During the meeting, attendees introduced
themselves and described where they live in the neighborhood and how long they
had lived there for. The conversation during this meeting principally focused on
the level of crime in Farm Pond.
39 Where are we going?
Four Seasons Homeowners’ Association
Annual General Meeting
On November 20 2010 at the Four Seasons Club House (5050 Farm Pond
Lane), students at UNC Charlotte, Eugene Barnes (City of Charlotte), and
Mr. and Mrs. Jones (Neighborhood Activists) attended the Four Seasons
Homeowners’ Association Annual General Meeting.
Leadership in the Homeowner’s Association include:
• Ray Terry - President
• Bruce Dannelly - Vice President
• Lanny Emanuel - Treasurer
• Enid Thuemmel - Committee Coordinator
• Pat Covington - Secretary
• Roger Bruney - Attorney
• Diane Freed - Ambassador and Volunteer Coordinator
• Michael Anped
• Don Whyte and Ron Steele - Maintenance
• Gloria Ward - Patio 1 Committee
• Lucy Brian - Patio 2 Committee
Four Seasons Homeowners’ Association was one of Charlotte’s original HOAs,
with bylaws that were imitated throughout the state. After having experienced
setbacks in the Homeowners Association, such as the theft of the Association’s
reserve funds, Four Seasons HOA is re-assessing its position, improving
the appearance of the neighborhood, and re-establishing leadership in the
neighborhood.
Some disagreement with leadership has been expressed. In particular, Gloria
Ward and Carole Callaghan raised concerns about how the HOA bylaws should
be followed.
Eagle Woods Movie Nights
To ensure that Farm Fond is becoming a socially integrated neighborhood, a
community activist, Martina Jones, and her family have been hosting events
in their home to get to know their neighbors. Mrs. Jones began Friday movie
nights as a way to engage youth in her neighborhood and get them off the streets.
Eagle Woods Apartment Complex Party
As a pilot project to bring the
Farm Pond Neighborhood
Association to apartment
residents, J. Gamboa
organized a party at the
Eagle Woods Clubhouse on
December 10, 2010. CHARP
provided refreshments,
Power 98 played great music,
and Charlotte Mecklenburg
Parks and Recreation kindly
lent the project leam tables.
The event seemed to be
a great way to celebrate
neighborliness and raise
awareness about the Neighborhood Association. Involving local businesses and
giving residents more notice ahead of time would be ways to encourage more
people to attend future events.
Conclusion
The neighborhood meetings, with more than 20 people in attendance each time,
can be considered successful. However, the vast majority of attendees are members
oftheFourSeasonsHomeowners’Association.Onereasonforthisisthatthefrst
twotimestheprojectteamdistributedfyersaroundtheneighborhood,wedidnot
reach the north half of Farm Pond.
The Latino and African American populations in Farm Pond have not been well
represented, either. In the future, neighborhood meetings should be a consistent
time and place, so yard signs can be made and reused. There are also opportunities
to advertise the meetings in Latino newspapers (La Noticia and Que Pasa) and
radio stations, as well as local businesses.
Geo-Notifer,anautomaticphonecallingsystemprovidedbyCharlotte
Mecklenburg Police Department appears to be especially effective in reaching
residents.
40 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
41 How do we get there?
H
o
w

d
o

w
e

g
e
t

t
h
e
r
e
?
This chapter describes strategies for how the Farm Pond
community can organize itself. The chapter is based in
communityfeedbackanddiscussionswithnon-proftandCity
of Charlotte staff. Based on this information, we compiled the
following:
• Vision
• Goals
• Actions
• Case Studies
• Resources
• Important Contacts
42 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Actions
Immediately / Shorter Term
Action Goal Met Party Responsible for Implementation
Improve understanding of the benefts of a Neighborhood Association for Farm Pond Access Resources CHARP
Set up a Landlord-Tenant Forum through Community University Access Resources CHARP
Set up a Renter’s Rights Forum through Community University Access Resources CHARP
Invite a Section 8 and Housing Vouchers expert to attend and speak at a future meeting Access Resources CHARP, Charlotte Housing Authority
Invite a Code Enforcement Offcer to attend and speak at a future meeting Access Resources CHARP
Introduce residents to Community University, liaise between residents and service providers, continue outreach Access Resources, Increase Accountability CHARP
Establish leadership for the Neighborhood Association, improve social capital and capacity Accountability, Resources CHARP, Residents, Community University
Begin Farm Pond Pride activities, like park clean up, neighborhood cleanup, yard of the month, positive ticket... Maintenance + Beautifcation, Friendliness CHARP, Residents
Connect media and not-for-profts with activities being undertaken in Farm Pond Increase Friendliness CHARP
Continue to integrate home owners, apartment residents, and immigrants Increase Friendliness CHARP
Begin a Newsletter Increase Friendliness CHARP
Establish a Welcoming Committee Increase Friendliness Residents
Create a consistent time and place for meetings Increase Friendliness CHARP + Residents
Talk with neighbors and get people involved Increase Friendliness Residents
Farm Pond Yard Signage about meetings Increase Friendliness CHARP, Residents, City via grant
Knock on doors and get people involved Increase Friendliness CHARP
Learn how to apply for grants Access Resources City, Residents, CHARP
Talk to Villa Heights about their HOA Access Resources Residents
Tell neighbors to call 911 when things look suspicious Safety Residents
Increase police presence in Farm Pond Safety CMPD
Engage youth in volunteering Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, M. Jones
Keep junk from around your house, no trash in yard, pick up dog poop, maintain exterior and yard appearance Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents
Report code violations to 311 Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, City of Charlotte
Introduction
During the Third Community Meeting, residents brainstormed about things that
made them proud of Farm Pond and what kind of place they would like Farm
Pondtobe.Then,theresidentsidentifedwhatthemajorthemesintheseideas
were and grouped the ideas under the themes. The themes are the Goals listed
below.
The project team compiled the community’s goals from the Third Meeting, as
well as ideas generated during previous meetings, to make the following lists.
Vision
Farm Pond is a friendly place that is welcoming to young children and people
of all cultures. It is a clean place with curb appeal, where people can leave their
doors unlocked. In Farm Pond, neighbords get involved and everyone (home
owners, renters, apartment managers) is held accountable for maintaining a
beautiful, safe, and resourceful community.
43 How do we get there?
Goals
• Improve Accountability
• Improve Safety
• MaintenanceandBeautifcation
• Increase Friendliness and get to know more neighbors
• Obtain access and utilize resources
Longer Term
Action Goal Met Party Responsible for Implementation
Hold block parties and create welcoming committees Increase Friendliness Residents
Establish a crafting group Increase Friendliness Residents
Increase the proportion of homeowners Accountability Residents, City
Ensure the City stays responsible for sidewalk, curb, gutter improvements Accountability Residents, City
Hold Apartment Managers accountable Accountability Residents, CMPD, Apartment Managers, Apartment Owners
Ensure Apartment Managers treat people with respect Accountability Residents, Apartment Managers, Apartment Owners
Establish a neighborhood watch Safety Residents, CMPD
Create a feeling of youth belonging Safety Residents, M. Jones
Slow down traffc and put up “Children at Play” signs Safety Residents, City
Implement CPCC Construction Program Access Resources Residents
Get more successful businesses Access Resources Residents, City, Neighborhood Revitalization Group
Create a neighborhood book club Access Resources Residents
Obtain City grants Access Resources Residents, City
Demonstrate leadership Access Resources Residents, City, CHARP, CMPD
Obtain business development assistance Access Resources Residents, City
Neighborhood Improvement Grant Access Resources Residents, CHARP, City
Create a group for fowers and shrub landscaping Access Resources Residents
Obtain organizational skills Access Resources Residents, City
Update HOA bylaws Access Resources Residents, CHARP
Implement pilot project for on-site service provision Access Resources CHARP, Latin American Coalition
Make Farm Pond look like Idlewild Farms Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, CHARP, City
Get kids involved in weatherization and yard maintenance Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, CHARP, City, M. Jones
Get a neighborhood sign Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, City, CHARP
Make our community playground more attractive and usable Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, CHARP, City
Keep vacant homes attractive Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, City
Make Farm Pond not look like you’ve driven onto Wilkinson Blvd Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, City
Incentivize renters to maintain their homes Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, City
Rehabilitate Campbell Creek and Greenway System Maintenance + Beautifcation Residents, Parks + Recreation, Youth, CHARP
Improve Four Seasons Shopping Plaza Maintenance + Beautifcation Neighborhood Revitalization Group, City
44 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Case Studies
Social Enterprise as Developer - Casa Familiar, San Diego
After decades of battle between the City of San Diego and residents, Teddy Cruz
and Casa Familiar have created a new way to bring together residents while
using the city as a site for research and experimentation. Casa Familiar is a social
organization that is involved in community building and improving the quality of
lifeforitsresidents.Thenon-proftactsasamediatorwithinthecommunity,an
architectural practice, and a one-stop shop for government agencies.
Casa Familiar brings attention to the socio-cultural, political, and economic
forcesinplayinSanDiego,redefningtheroleofarchitectsinthecontextofcity
development. “Living Rooms at the Border” is a small project that anticipates
San Diego’s future densities and mixed uses. As Casa Familiar has evolved into
becoming a real estate developer, the organization now seeks to transform zoning
regulations for the border community of San Ysidro, California. Casa Familiar’s
practice demonstrates that the most experimental work in housing in the United
Statesliesinthehandsofprogressive,community-basednonproftorganizations
and within small communities.
Affordable Housing Developer - Hispanic Housing Development
Corporation, Chicago
The Hispanic Housing Development Corporation was
foundedin1975asanonproftorganizationtohelp
create affordable housing in Latino neighborhoods of
Chicago. The organization’s goal is to build comfortable,
affordable housing that people are proud to call home.
HHDC provides people with both new and renovated
homes. They organization lives among the community by speaking their
languages, listening to community input, and investing in construction and job
creation that gives back the community.
A notable feature of HHDC is that the organization hires within the community.
HHDC provides job training and offers employment within the organization.
TropicConstruction,thefor-proftconstructionarmoftheorganization,regularly
hires residents and establishes relationship with minority subcontractors. Their
investment makes a difference in long run, by inspiring neighbors to improve
their properties. This then leads investment and job growth.
From its initial focus of Hispanic neighborhoods, HHDC now owns more than 5
HUD properties and currently expanding outside of the city limits.
HDDC is currently are involved in:
• Housing Development: 31 projects and $249+ million in development costs
• Commercial Development: 82,000+ sq.ft. & $23+ million in development costs
• Residential Preservation: 1350+ units & $70 million in development costs
• Property Management: 3650+ rental units & 62,000 sq.ft. commercial space
• Tropic Construction: 2000+ residential units, 104,000 sq.ft. commercial space & $98 million in construction
costs
Did you know?
Casa Familiar has a great
website that describes
more in-depth the type of
projects that the organiza-
tion undertakes here: http://
www.casafamiliar.org.
You can also reach Casa
Familiar at 619 428 1115.
To fnd out more about
the Histpanic Housing
Development Corporation,
please see:
• Phone: 312 602 6500
• hhdcinfo@hhdevcorp.
com
• http://hhdevcorp.com
“At “Living Rooms at the Border,” estudio teddy cruz
will weave 12 affordable housing units across a
concrete framework. The open space underneath will
function as a marketplace, among other uses.”
Credit: estudio teddy cruz
45 How do we get there?
Social Enterprise as Low Income Housing Provider - Portland Hotel
Society, Vancouver Canada
ThePortlandHotelSocietyisanon-proftorganizationthatwascreatedin1993
to advocate, develop, and implement services for people living with concurrent
disorders.
The Portland Hotel itself was
initiated in 1991 by Vancouver’s
Downtown Eastside Residents
Association (DERA). The
Association converted a local
hotel and named it after the
US city of Portland, where
Canadian organizers had been
inspired by housing programs for
homeless people. The facility was
transferred to the Portland Hotel
Society on its completion. The
program moved to a new building
(re-named the Portland Hotel) in
the downtown eastside in 1999.
The Portland Hotel provides long
term housing for people with
mental illness, addictions and
other problems, which reduces
their susceptibility to harm.
Approximately 40 percent of
residents stay at the Portland
Hotel for about 10 years, while
the balance of residents stay 4
to 6 years. This contrasts dramatically with the prior history of residents, who
typically registered 6 to 8 addresses or were homeless during the year before
moving to the Portland Hotel.
As part of its investment in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside, the Portland Hotel
Society (PHS) purchased derelict historic buildings in the area. To fundraise
for additional long term housing, PHS utilized the City of Vancouver’s density
bonus program and facade grant. PHS inked a deal with a local developer,
ConcordPacifc,whopaidupfrontforthedensitybonusawardedtoPHSfor
renovating the historic Pennsylvania Hotel on Carrall Street.
Live-Work Artist Space Developer - ArtSpace, Minneapolis
Artspace was established to create and
retain affordable live/work space for
artistsandotherfneartsprofessionals.
Many creative people move into
dilapidated neighborhoods or warehouse
districtstotakeadvantageoflarge,openfoorplansandcheaprents.However,by
making these neighborhoods “cool,” the artists often become a victim of their own
successandgetpricedoutofthegentrifedcommunity.
Artspace’s mission is to create, foster, and preserve affordable space for artists
andartsorganizations.Thenon-proftpursuesthismissionthroughdevelopment
projects, asset management activities, consulting services, and community-
building activities that serve artists and arts organizations of all disciplines,
cultures, and economic circumstances. Artspace believes that by providing physical
space, the organization supports the continued professional growth of artists and
enhances the cultural and economic vitality of the surrounding community.
For example, Minneapolis’ historic warehouse district began to become hip in the
1970s.Thearea’sgentrifcationledtoArtspace’screationin1979.WhileArtspace
began by advocating for the artist community, the organization decided to take a
moreproactiveroleinthe1980s.ArtspaceisnowAmerica’sleadingnonproftreal
estate developer for the arts. In the last few years, Artspace has further expanded
its mission to incorporate the planning and development to other parts of the
country.Thenon-proftorganizationutilizesgreenbuildingtechnologiesindesign
and construction.
Artspace Currently sponsors:
• Property Development: Purchase of older buildings and remodeling.
Artspace develops a mix of affordable live/work units, retail space, and
administrative and performance space for arts organizations
• National Consulting: Art space acts as a consultant to communities,
organizations, and individuals seeking information a about developing
affordable housing
• Asset Management : Artspace owns the buildings and as well manage
• Resource Development: Community development with other partners
Did you know?
The City of Vancouver has
information about how the
Portland Hotel Society
used density bonuses and
facade grants to fnance
their project at this site:
http://vancouver.ca/
ctyclerk/cclerk/20060711/
documents/ph1.pdf
You can fnd out more
about Artspace by calling:
612 333 9012 or visiting
their website at http://www.
artspace.org
46 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Latino Empowerment Organization - United Neighborhood
Organization, Chicago
The United Neighborhood Organization was established
in 1984 by a group of community and religious leaders
in Chicago. The goal was to build grass-root leadership
within the city’s ever growing Hispanic neighborhoods to
organize and empower community members to address
issues plaguing the Latino population. UNO’s vision for Chicago is to create
a place where Hispanics emerge as the new middle class, employing the same
determination that drove immigrants to this country to make the right choices
for their families. They focus primarily on many Hispanic neighborhoods in
Southwest Side and Northwest Side, both areas have a high concentration of
Latino immigrants.
UNO’smissionistochallengeHispanicstodefneandattainstandardsof
excellence for themselves towards an overall enfranchisement of this community,
both in a broad sense of American social growth and at the local level in terms of
stable neighborhoods and healthy families.
An example UNO project is the revitalization of Little Village. From the 1980s to
the 90s, Little Village had experienced decline, and high rates of crime. UNO, in
partnership with the City of Chicago’s Planning Department and Housing and
Human Services, helped the Hispanic residents build their own business as well
as expand to the neighborhood. UNO also participates in community organizing,
school reform and local school councils, immigration, educational outreach, and
a Metropolitan Leadership Institute.
Community Center - Collingwood Neighbourhood House, Vancouver
Canada
Collingwood Neighbourhood House is one of
many Neighbourhood House organizations
that serves residents in Vancouver, Canada.
Neighbourhood House organizations provide
social, educational, cultural, and recreational
programs for residents in order to promote
a spirit of mutual respect and cooperation
within neighborhoods. Neighbourhood
Houses provide services and community
development on a neighborhood basis.
Vancouver generally and Collingwood, in particular, are very diverse places.
InLeonieSandercockandGiovanniAttili’sflm“WhereStrangersBecome
Neighbours,” Sandercock cites that 51% of people in Vancouver are from non-
English speaking backgrounds. This level of diversity means that neighbourhoods
are expected to provide a whole variety of religious, recreational, educational,
literacy, jobs training, health, and other social and well-being services to a very
broad set of people.
TheflmexploreshowCollingwoodmanagedtoabsorbmigrationandanewand
very diverse population. Just two decades ago, long-term Collingwood residents
were afraid of new residents, who were arriving from East, South, and Southeast
Asians, Africans, and Latin Americans. New immigrants, especially women, used
the Collingwood Neighbourhood House for language and childcare programs.
Over time, the new residents began volunteering in the organization, gaining
skills, and eventually getting jobs.
Collingwood Neighbourhood House is a great example of a community-based
organization that provides recreational, childcare, youth, and settlement services,
with programs for individuals and families. Another example of a successful
Neighbourhood House organization in Vancouver that has a diverse client base
is the South Vancouver Neighbourhood House. South Vancouver Neighbourhood
House specializes in Dialogue Circles, which are social meeting events where
people share with each other about their cultures from home and experiences
integrating into Vancouver. This storytelling creates bonds and understanding
between residents of the community.
Real Estate Value Stabilization - Neighborhood Stabilization Program,
Chicago
The City of Chicago established this program in 2008 after having received $55
million to revitalize lower income neighborhoods. The City partnered with Mercy
PortfolioServices,alocalnon-proftorganizationtocompletetheproject.This
partnership has been so successful, the Federal government funded the program
with a second payment of $98 million.
The Neighborhood Stabilization program purchases inexpensive real estate
through HUD, renovates the homes, and sells the homes to low-income
individuals and families. For example, 6324 South Campbell Street was
purchasedfor$18,000,upfttedforanadditional$20,000,andsoldtoafamily
who earned less than $87,000.
AfactorofsuccessinChicagoistheprogram’sconcentrationonspecifc
neighborhoods, purchasing a cluster of homes within that area.
Did you know?
You can contact UNO to
learn more about their
programs and the Little Vil-
lage revitalization project.
• Phone: 312 432 6301
• http://uno-online.org
YouTube.com has lots of
wonderful videos about
Collingwood Neighbour-
hood House. Just make
sure to search for it with
the “u” in “neighbourhood.”
YouTube also has a
trailer for Sandercock’s
flm, “Where Strangers
become Neighbours” here:
http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=YWzcGXUWsI8
Here’s a link for the
Collingwood Neighbour-
hood House: http://www.
cnh.bc.ca/
Here is a link to a video
about South Vancouver
Neighbourhood House:
http://www.youtube.com/
watch?v=0age-j0x5VA
For more information
about the Neighborhood
Stabilization program, see
http:www.chicagonsp.org
or call 312 447 4750.
47 How do we get there?
Did you know?
You can contac the
Latin American Coalition at
704-531-3848 and info@
latinamericancoalition.org
You can fnd more grants:
• http://www.grants.gov
• http://www.recovery.gov
• http://www.zsr.org
• http://www.
artsandscience.org
• http://www.ed.gov
Z. Smith Reynalds
Foundation is a non-proft
organization that is working
with UNC-Charlotte to
help build a neighborhood
association.
Arts and Science Council
has programs that could
assist Farm Pond’s
students. The Four Season
HOA would be a perfect
organization to apply.
Grants include:
• Special Project grant
geared to arts, science
and history.
• Cultural Project Grant:
Increasing access
to arts, science and
heritage offering as
well strengthening
the quality of cultural
programing in
neighborhoods within
Mecklenburg County
• Cultural Access Grant:
increases community
access to minorities
within art, science and
history experiences.
This would beneft Latin
American Coalition.
Promise Neighborhood
grant: is designed for the
improvement of distressed
neighborhoods, to help
education within the area
that is covered. This
program is through “Offce
of Innovation and Improve-
ment.”
upto$7500forqualifedbuyersintransitionneighborhoodsuchasFarmPond.
Thiswouldbebenefcialfortherentersaswellthehomeownersassociationto
increase ownership from 29% to 90% which can result less neighborhood crime
and more involvement from owners.
Housing Program: Home Ownership Rehabilitation
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/housing/Pages/
HomeownershipRehab.aspx
The program provides low interest loans to low and moderate
income homeowners. The goal is to correct code violations and
to help homeowners rehab their home while saving money.
The Charlotte Mecklenburg Coalition for Housing
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/housing/housingcoalition/Pages/default.
aspx
Geared to homeless and to help them get off the
street. A ten year plan to work with apartment
complexes and city to advocate for the homeless
population which will place them around the city
and provide them with the tools to succeed.
Resources in Charlotte
Latin American Coalition (LAC)
http://www.latinamericancoalition.org
LatinAmericanCoalition(LAC)isanot-for-proft
social service provider based in Charlotte, NC. The
LAC was established in 1990 to provide services that
address language, economic, educational, and cultural
barriers that face the Latino population, which has
tripled in size in Charlotte since the 1990s. The LAC
also aims to educate the general population about
Latino cultures using authentic cultural experiences.
Currently, the organization focuses on Charlotte’s East
Side, which is one of the city’s immigration gateways.
However,theneedtofndnewandinnovativewaystoaddresstheneedsofthis
under-servedpopulationhasarisen.Thenot-for-proftorganizationcurrently
offers educational services, advocacy and celebratory activities that feature
Latin American cultures, such as the annual Latin American Festival. Since
issues of unemployment, housing, and economic revitalization now plague not
only the Latin community in Charlotte, but the city at large, the LAC is faced
with new challenges and opportunities.
Latin American Coalition has brought awareness to the University of North
Carolina at Charlotte about several issues that they feel are important within
the community. The LAC has completed studies about the Latino community
with the Urban Institute to examine how best to serve the Latino population.
The Coalition’s goal is to expand and see what they can do to further help the
community.
Our goal was to help the LAC identify innovative organizational models from
othernot-for-proftsaroundthecountryinordertooutlinestrategiesand
goals that might help the LAC transform into a more effective player in the
transformation of Charlotte’s East Side. Hopefully the case studies mentioned
in this report can provide some insightful examples of ways that organizations
in other cities have tackled issues of housing, community gathering, and
neighborhood investment.
House Charlotte
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/housing/Pages/HouseCharlotte.aspx
This Program assists residents in purchasing homes. The organization offers
down payment assistance up to $10,000 in challenged neighborhoods, as well
48 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Neighborhood Matching Grant through “Weed and Seed”
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/communitycommerce/Pages/NMGFAQ.
aspx
The Matching Grant program has been helping Charlotte citizens improve their
neighborhood. The program awards funds that will help the neighborhood to
become a better place to live, work and play. The goal is to help strengthen and
empower the neighborhood.
As quoted from the program, the four primary goals are:
• “Help neighborhoods determine priorities and make improvements in their
communitiesinaneffcient,cost-effectivemanner.”
• “Improve the quality of life neighborhood and business associations through
participation in and management of neighborhood-based projects.”
• “Promote civic involvement and leverage resources to revitalize and reinvest in
Challenged and Transitioning neighborhoods as well as other community groups to
create projects and products that improve neighborhoods.”
• “Encourage partnerships among local government agencies, resident and business
associations and other community groups to create projects and products that improve
neighborhoods.”
The grants are awarded four times a year as well application dead lines are:
February 15th, April 15th, June 15th and September 15th.
Workshops are required to apply for the grant and neighborhoods with median
income of no more than $57,489 may be eligible to apply.
Energy Grant Program
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/
communitycommerce/fnancialprograms/Pages/
EnergyPrograms.aspx
The program encourages neighborhood to come
together and implement strategies to improve
neighborhood use of energy. The goal is to improve
neighborhoodeffcientlyandtobecomesustainable.
Therewillbefveneighborhoodsperyear,witha
$20,000 to $60,000 grant, with both providing
different scope of work. Residents are required to complete a workshop before
applying for the grant.
Mayor’s Youth Employment Program
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/ed/Pages/MYEP.aspx
ThisprogramwouldbebenefcialforFarmPond
neighborhood as it is providing paid and non paid
internship for at risk youth. This would help the
decrease the crime in the neighborhood, as there is
uprising numbers of youth moving in the area.
The requirement is the youth has to be between age
of 16 to 18 and attending the Charlotte Mecklenburg school system.
Business Investment Program Grant
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/
communitycommerce/fnancialprograms/Documents/
BusinessInvestmentGrantFactSheet.pdf
The object of this grant is seek the creation, retention or
expanding of new or existing businesses.
Business District Organization Program
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/communitycommerce/
fnancialprograms/Pages/BDOP.aspx
This program motive is to empower businesses to create positive change that
willbenefttheirneighborhood.Exampleofthiswouldbeexpansion,creating
jobs, or anything that can positively impact the residence area. This grant is a
matching grant with up to $30,000.
Facade Improvement Grant Program
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/communitycommerce/
fnancialprograms/Pages/FacadeImprovementGrantProgram.aspx
This program aims to
remove blight by helping
businesses and commercial
property owners improve
building appearance
with signs, parking, and
landscaping improvements.
The National Revitalization Group is currently on this grant to provide the
neighborhood’s Four Season shopping complex an improvement and improve
the economy in the selected area. The long term goal for this to merge with the
Did you know?
Crossroads Charlotte
unveiled a new opportunity
for anyone in the com-
munity who wants to make
a difference. Achieving
Community Today Grants
will be offered to help con-
nect people across lines of
differences through various
projects in the community.
The exciting part of the
process is that you as
members of the Charlotte-
Mecklenburg community
will have the chance to
decide who gets the
grants! Crossroads Char-
lotte will post the fnalists
online and allow the public
to vote for the ideas they
would like to see funded.
These awards will offer up
to $500 to individuals or or-
ganizations that have small
projects that need funding
and are only available via
the Crossroads Charlotte
Facebook Fan Page:
http://www.facebook.com/
crossroadcharlotte
49 How do we get there?
Did you know?
You can register for
Community University
classes, watch classes
online, and fnd out more
about Community Univer-
sity at http://charmeck.
org/city/charlotte/nbs/
communitycommerce/
CommunityUniversity/
Pages/default.aspx
If you have more than 10
people from your com-
munity organization that is
interested in customized
training,
Samples of topics:
• Leadership
• Organizational Basic
• Communication
• Neighborhood Finances
• Resources
farm pond neighborhood to get a space for their monthly meetings and eventual
events such as movie nights, parties and as well job training. (D- the meeting
from today, please add whatever you feel needs to be part of the book)
ThecompanyhasworkedinCharlottespecifcallyonTryonandEast-wayarea
to improve the economy there.
Big Box Demolition Grant
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/communitycommerce/
fnancialprograms/Pages/
BigBoxDemolitionGrantProgram.
aspx
This program is an component of
the facade improvement program.
The target is to tear down the big box
buildings that have been vacant over
two years. The program offers up to
50% of total project cost. An example
of this would be off Independence
Boulevard where there are torn down
places that will be an eventual business and living space there.
Security Grant
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/communitycommerce/
fnancialprograms/Pages/SecurityGrantProgram.aspx
As quoted from charmeck.org, “The objective of the Security Grant Program
is to reduce the opportunity for crime and create a safer environment for
employees and customers. The program provides
matching funds for the installation of eligible
security improvements to commercial property.”
This would help the Four Season Shopping
complex as they are in the process of improving
the complex and to deter the crime that is
happening.
Weed and Seed Program
http://charmeck.org/city/charlotte/nbs/communitycommerce/Programs/
Pages/WeedandSeed.aspx
Law enforcement agencies and prosecutors cooperate in “weeding out”
criminals who participate in violent crime and drug abuse, attempting to
prevent their return to the targeted area. “Seeding” brings human services to the
area, such as prevention, intervention, treatment, and neighborhood revitalization.
Charlotte Police Department’s current project is along Central Avenue and current
partners include:
• Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools
• Anuvia
• Gang of One
• Latin American Coalition
• Sisters of Mercy Foundation
• Jacob’s Ladder
• Girl Scouts Hornet’s Nest Council
• Briar Creek Road Baptist Church
Community University - Charlotte
Community University is a program that offers Charlotte and Mecklenburg County
residents classes on how to improve their neighborhoods. The goal is provide high
quality training to Charlotte residents to empower them to improve the quality
of life in their neighborhoods. Community University trains students to become
better advocates for themselves and gives students the tools needed to improve
and maintain local community and businesses organizations.
Other programs offered by Community University include Neighborhood
Symposium (which is offered to communities annually), the Good Neighborhood
Program, customized training, and online classes.
Example Community University Class
• Understanding the 2010 Quality of Life Study: Southeast District
• Tuesday, November 16 2010 from 6:30pm-8:00pm
• at Story Slam! located at 1401 Central Avenue
Good Neighborhood Program
The Good Neighborhood Program is a guide for residents to become good
neighbors to their community. Founded on the principle of respect, the following
are examples of Good Neighborhood actions:
Do:
• Cut your grass once a week
• Clean your gutters regularly
• Change batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors twice a year
• Empty excess water collecting in pots, buckets and containers that can attract and breed mosquitoes
• Plant perennials for the upcoming year
• Schedule bulky items for pickup
• Properly display house numbers
• Clean up after your pets
50 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
• Pour contaminants down the storm water drains
• Play loud music after 10 p.m.
• Park inoperable vehicles on your property
• Forget to retrieve trash rollout containers by midnight on your collection date
• Allow your dog to bark excessively during the night
• Pour contaminants down the storm water drains
Commnity University Workshop
Important Contacts
Name Title Contact Information
Judith Gamboa
Farm Pond Liaison, Charlotte Action Re-
search Project at UNCC
704 226 0261
farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Kim Barnes
Weed and Seed Program Manager, City of
Charlotte
704 336 8408
kbarnes@ci.charlotte.nc.us
Eugene Bradley
Southeast District Team Leader, Neighbor-
hood & Business Services for City of
Charlotte
704 336 2265
ebradley@ci.charlotte.nc.us
Katie Lewis
Hickory Grove Community Coordinator,
Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department
Craig Allen
Offcer, Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Depart-
ment
704 621 0260
tallen@cmpd.org
Erin Moraites
Property Manager, Neighborhood Revitaliza-
tion Group
1 866 260 4110
emoraites@nrgbuilds.com
Jess George Executive Director, Latin American Coalition
704 531 3845
jgeorge@latinamericancoalition.org
Bonnie Carter
Volunteer Coordinator, Latin American
Coalition
704 941 6735
bcarter@latinamericancoalition.org
Astrid Chirinos
Executive Director, Latin American Chamber
of Commerce
Carlos Beteta Coordinator, Mi Casa Es Su Casa
704 363 7439
heatwave1577@masn.com
Ramon Lomeli Property Manager, Eagle Woods Apartments
704 537 8353
eaglewoodsapts@yahoo.com
Leonard Spicer On-site Manager, Farm Lane Apartments
704 536 5643
farm-lane@cmc-nc.com
Luis Suarez Property Manager, Forest Hills Townhomes
704 568 4012
foresthills@bellsouth.net
Dian Threatt
Administrator, Four Seasons Homeowners
Association
704 536 2551
fourseasonscharlotte@yahoo.com
Martina Jones Neighborhood Activist
704 919 8983
mrs.m.jones@hotmail.com
Don’t:
• Park your car on the front lawn
• Store excess trash and debris around your home
• Play loud music after 10 p.m.
• Park inoperable vehicles on your property
• Forget to retrieve trash rollout containers by midnight on your collection date
• Allow your dog to bark excessively during the night
51 Appendix
A
p
p
e
n
d
i
x
The Appendix contains more information about the three Neighborhood
Association meetings, Martina Jones’ Movie Nights, and the Eagle Woods
Apartment Complex Party.
We’ve also included notes from a meeting that the project team had with Jess
George and Bonnie Carter from the Latin American Coalition.
52 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
tenants and they do not always cooperate with police efforts to ban certain
troublemakers.
• Inviting apartment complex managers to community meetings is an
effective way to encourage the apartment communities to take part in the
Neighborhood Association.
First Neighborhood Meeting
On October 2 2010 at the Hickory Grove Public Library, students at UNC
Charlotte facilitated a meeting of residents from Farm Pond and adjacent
neighborhoods. More than 20 people attended the meeting, with most attendees
being homeowners in Farm Pond. Dr. Janni Sorensen from the University of
North Carolina at Charlotte was present at the meeting to help facilitate. Virginia
Spykerman, candidate for the Board of City Commissioners, was also present.
City staff who attended the meeting included:
• Katie Lewis, Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department Hickory Grove
Community Coordinator
• Kim Barnes, City of Charlotte
Purpose:
Gauge interest in and facilitate the creation of a neighborhood association. A
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association would facilitate communication with the
City of Charlotte and make the area eligible for funding and grant projects.
Summary:
During the meeting, attendees introduced themselves and stated approximately
where they lived in the neighborhood and how long they have lived there. The
Vice President and Administrative Assistant of the Homeowner’s Association
were present. A representative from the Idlewild Farms Neighborhood
Association was at the meeting, too. Attendees asked questions about what the
purpose of the meeting was. Residents expressed a desire to get assistance with
using QuickBooks and expressed a deep concern about the level of crime.
The following observations about crime were made:
• Residents wanted to make use of the strip mall on Albemarle Road. It could
be a good site for a day care or youth center as well as a satellite police
station.
• Thestripmallhashistoricallyhadsignifcantamountsofvacancies,thus
lackingthefoottraffctomakeitfeelsafer.Securityisonlypresenton
limited days and times.
• There was a shooting on Albemarle Road. Although the details are unclear,
it appears to have been drug-related.
• Youth are at-risk for gang involvement and do not have enough to do
• Apartment complexes don’t always complete background checks on
53 Appendix
Outreach
WedistributedthefollowingfyertoFarmPondresidentstoletthemknow
about the meeting. It was English on one side and Spanish on the other. At the
meeting, we also handed out a paper so people could get in contact with us (see
next page). We also wanted young people to know about our photo contest. We
thought that a photo contest would be an exciting way to engage youth.
Please join us for the first October meeting of Farm
Pond Neighborhood Association
Farm Pond Neighborhood Meeting
Saturday October 2ND, 2010 AT 3:30-4:30pm
Hickory Grove Library
5935 Hickory Grove Road Charlotte, NC 28215
! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !
Mission of the meeting:
*Safer Community#
*Establishing Association*
*Free childcare Provided*
For more information, call
(704)266-0261 or email
farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Flyer in English
Júntate con nosotros para llevar a cabo la primera reunión
de octubre del Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
(Asociación de Residentes del Vecindario Farm Pond)
Reunión del Vecindario Farm Pond
Sábado el 2 de octubre de 2010 a las 3:30 – 4:30 de la
tarde
A la Biblioteca Hickory Grove
5935 Hickory Grove Rd. Charlotte NC 28215
Objetivos de la reunión:
*Conseguir una comunidad más segura#
*Establecer la asociación*
*Se cuidan niños gratis*
Para mayor información, llama a
(704)266-0261 ó
envía un email a
farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Flyer in Spanish
54 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
(704) 266-0261
email: farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Take a look at the FARM POND NEIGHBORHOOD Facebook page
to enter the YOUTH PHOTO CONTEST!!
¡¡Echa un vistazo a la página Facebook FARM POND
NEIGHBORHOOD para presentarte al CONCURSO de FOTOS
para JÓVENES!!
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
(704) 266-0261
email: farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Take a look at the FARM POND NEIGHBORHOOD Facebook page
to enter the YOUTH PHOTO CONTEST!!
¡¡Echa un vistazo a la página Facebook FARM POND
NEIGHBORHOOD para presentarte al CONCURSO de FOTOS
para JÓVENES!!
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
(704) 266-0261
email: farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Take a look at the FARM POND NEIGHBORHOOD Facebook page
to enter the YOUTH PHOTO CONTEST!!
¡¡Echa un vistazo a la página Facebook FARM POND
NEIGHBORHOOD para presentarte al CONCURSO de FOTOS
para JÓVENES!!
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
(704) 266-0261
email: farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Take a look at the FARM POND NEIGHBORHOOD Facebook page
to enter the YOUTH PHOTO CONTEST!!
¡¡Echa un vistazo a la página Facebook FARM POND
NEIGHBORHOOD para presentarte al CONCURSO de FOTOS
para JÓVENES!!
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
(704) 266-0261
email: farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Take a look at the FARM POND NEIGHBORHOOD Facebook page
to enter the YOUTH PHOTO CONTEST!!
¡¡Echa un vistazo a la página Facebook FARM POND
NEIGHBORHOOD para presentarte al CONCURSO de FOTOS
para JÓVENES!!
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
(704) 266-0261
email: farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Take a look at the FARM POND NEIGHBORHOOD Facebook page
to enter the YOUTH PHOTO CONTEST!!
¡¡Echa un vistazo a la página Facebook FARM POND
NEIGHBORHOOD para presentarte al CONCURSO de FOTOS
para JÓVENES!!
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
(704) 266-0261
email: farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Take a look at the FARM POND NEIGHBORHOOD Facebook page
to enter the YOUTH PHOTO CONTEST!!
¡¡Echa un vistazo a la página Facebook FARM POND
NEIGHBORHOOD para presentarte al CONCURSO de FOTOS
para JÓVENES!!
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association
(704) 266-0261
email: farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Take a look at the FARM POND NEIGHBORHOOD Facebook page
to enter the YOUTH PHOTO CONTEST!!
¡¡Echa un vistazo a la página Facebook FARM POND
NEIGHBORHOOD para presentarte al CONCURSO de FOTOS
para JÓVENES!!
Meeting Handout
55 Appendix
Afterwards, residents engaged in a facilitated “Day in the Life” activity. A poster on
the wall had a timeline with labeled three-hour increments from 6am to midnight.
As the facilitator moved through the timeline, residents called out typical activities
that they would be doing in Farm Pond at that time of day. This activity revealed
information about the attendees, including that many of them are retired, have
lived in the community for 15 or 20 years, and that the residents have many
favorite local amenities, such as Sunrise Cafe, Dollar Tree, and Aldi.
Second Neighborhood Meeting
On November 6 2010 at the Hickory Grove Public Library, students at UNC
Charlotte facilitated a second meeting of residents from Farm Pond and
adjacent neighborhoods. More than 23 people attended the meeting, with most
attendees being retired homeowners in Farm Pond.
The following people attended the meeting and made presentations:
• Katie Lewis, Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department Hickory Grove
Community Coordinator
• Eugene Bradley, City of Charlotte
• Martina Jones, Community Activist
Purpose:
Maintain momentum in Farm Pond for neighborhood organizing, continue to
communicate to residents about City of Charlotte services in Farm Pond, and
learn about Farm Pond issues and concerns from residents.
Summary:
The UNCC Charlotte Action Research Project Farm Pond Liaison began the
meeting by asking attendees to introduce themselves and state approximately
where they live in the neighborhood and how long they have lived there for.
OffcerLewisupdatedresidentswithmoreinformationaboutcrimeinFarm
Pond and when the police tower would return to the strip mall on Farm Pond
Lane and Albemarle Road. Eugene Bradley from the City of Charlotte spoke
about a federal grant for a “Weed and Seed” crime prevention program. The
grant has been applied for, but funding has not been received yet. Residents
epxressed interest in forming a community crime watch.
Martina Jones presented to the meeting about the bi-weekly Movie Night that
she holds for neighborhood children at her home. The purpose of Movie Night
is to engage youth, get them off the street for a few hours, and build a healthy
rapportbetweenyouthandpoliceoffcers,whoarealsoinvitedtotheevent.
Members of the Cross Creek neighborhood organization offered their club house
for Martina to use for movie night, so she could accommodate more people and
use the club house’s large television.
Members of the Four Seasons Neighborhood Association mentioned that the
neighborhood is meeting on December 22nd at the club house to sing Christmas
Carols. The neighborhood association is also developing a Welcome Packet for
residents.
56 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Meeting Flyer Community Feedback
Farm Pond
Neighborhood Assoc.
Meeting
Saturday, Nov. 6/
sábado el 6 de
noviembre
3pm
Hickory Grove Library
5935 Hickory Grove
Road, Charlotte, NC
28215
FarmPondPlanning@gmail.com
(704) 266-0261
Únete con nosotros para llevar a cabo
la Reunión de la Asociación de
Residentes del Vecindario Farm Pond
para noviembre en la Biblioteca Hickory
Grove.
Vamos a discutir:
La seguridad del vecindario
Cómo mejorar las zonas comerciales
El embellecimiento del vecindario
Tus preocupaciones y preguntas
¡Nos vemos allí!
Дорогие соседи!
Приглашаем вас
придти на встречу
жителей нашего
микрорайона Farm
Pond, которая
состоится
в субботу,
6 ноября, в 3 часа
дня в библиотеке
Hickory Grove.
Farm Pond �� �
� �� ��� ��
� �� ���. ��
� ��� ��� ��
��� 11� 6� �� 3
�� ����
Please join us for the November
Farm Pond Neighborhood
Association Meeting.
We will discuss:
Neighborhood Safety
Improving commercial areas
Neighborhood Beautification
Your concerns and questions
See you there!
As we learned more about Farm Pond, we came to realize how many different
cultures call the neighborhood home. So, to invite people to the Neighborhood
Association meeting, we included more languages.
During the meeting, community members told us about Farm Pond during
a mapping exercise. The blue area approximates what community members
perceive to be Farm Pond’s boundaries. Some people also considered the area
south of Albemarle Road to be Farm Pond, too. The red outlined areas are
generally considered to be dangerous. The orange lines represent the Four
Seasons greenway trails, which are considered a great community asset.
Hickory Grove Road
E
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Feet
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57 Appendix
Thisfnaldiagramrepresentscommunityfeedbackregardingwhatatypicaldayis
like for them in Farm Pond.
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Midnight to 6 AM
- Sounds of gunshots
- Lots of youth and “bad guys”
roaming the neighborhood in
the middle of the street
Day in the Life in Farm Pond
The following sites were labelled as
memorable assets to the community:
1. Hickory Grove Library
2. BB&T
3. Hickory Grove Baptist Church
4. Campbell Creek Park
5. Four Seasons Club House
6. McDonalds
7. Bi-Lo
8. Bank of America
9. Sunrise Cafe
10. PostOffce
11. Cookout, Taco Bell, KFC
58 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Farm Pond Neighborhood Association, which may result in more participation.
Actionable steps
• Inform news media outlets through press releases to media contacts about
upcoming Farm Pond events (DSRC event, Farm Pond Pride Celebration,
youth events, etc.)
ResidentsfeelthattheFarmPondNeighborhoodAssociationwouldbeneftfrom
increased neighborhood participation in the Neighborhood Association. They
would like to know how to be able to apply for grants through the neighborhood
association.Inaddition,theywouldliketofndouthowtoaccesstheresources
they need to improve the neighborhood.
Actionable steps
Third Neighborhood Meeting
On December 11 2010 at the Hickory Grove Public Library, students at UNC
Charlotte facilitated a meeting of residents from Farm Pond and adjacent
neighborhoods. More than 20 people attended the meeting, representing
residents of Four Seasons, the northern half of Farm Pond, Wallace Creek, and
Eagle Woods Apartments.
Purpose:
Brainstorm neighborhood goals and actions that the neighborhood association
could undertake in January and beyond.
Summary:
The meeting began with residents introducing themselves. Martina Jones
spoke about a program she is organizing for the holidays to express gratitude to
the Hickory Grove Division of the Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department.
Afterwards, the UNCC facilitators
Residents showed a lot of concern about the relationship between owners and
renters in Farm Pond. People attending the meeting expressed the feeling that
there should be more accountability on all parts: renters, absentee owners,
property managers of apartment complexes, and the City of Charlotte. Residents
said that more accountability would result in better home, landscape, and
neighborhood maintenance; higher property values; lower crime; and, a better
image of Farm Pond. Residents also noted that while an increased percentage of
owner-occupied homes in Farm Pond would be an improvement, renters need to
be included in the Farm Pond Neighborhood Association as much as possible.
Actionable steps
• Set up a Landlord-Tenant Forum through Community University.
• Set up a Renter’s Rights Forum through Community University.
• Have an expert on Section 8 housing at a future meeting.
• InviteCodeEnforcementOffcerstoafuturemeeting.
• Sponsor neighborhood clean-up/minor home repair event with MYLC.
ItwassuggestedthatFarmPondwouldbeneftbyreceivingincreasedpositive
publicity to counter existing negative publicity. Due to existing negative
publicity, Farm Pond is already a well-known neighborhood. This can be used
to Farm Pond’s advantage by building on its notoriety to start a cycle of positive
publicity. In turn, this publicity will help inform the neighborhood about the
59 Appendix
• Canvas the neighborhood to increase awareness about the Farm Pond
Neighborhood Association.
• Stabilize the meeting times and location.
• Solidify leadership structure and form by-laws.
• Set up a “How to Set up a Neighborhood Association” Forum through
Community University.
Farm Pond
Neighborhood Assoc.
Meeting
Saturday, Dec. 11/
sábado el 11 de
diciembre
11am
Hickory Grove Library
5935 Hickory Grove
Road, Charlotte, NC
28215
FarmPondPlanning@gmail.c
om
(704) 266-0261
¿Quieres ver cambios en tu vecindario?
Júntate con nosotros para la Reunión
de la Asociación de Residentes del
Vecindario Farm Pond para diciembre
en la Biblioteca Hickory Grove.
Vamos a discutir:
Cómo empezar una junta vecinal de
seguridad
La semana de eventos para celebrar
Farm Pond
Ven con tus propias ideas para mejorar
el vecindario.
Дорогие соседи!
Приглашаем вас
придти на встречу
жителей нашего
микрорайона Farm
Pond, которая
состоится
в Сатурдай, 11
декабря в 11 часов
дня в библиотеке
Hickory Grove.
Farm Pond �� �
� �� ��� ��
� �� ���. ��
� ��� ��� ��
��� 토요일 11 12 월
오전 11�� ����
Want to see changes in your
neighborhood? Join us at the
December meeting of the Farm
Pond Neighborhood Association.
We will discuss:
Starting a Neighborhood Watch
Celebrating Farm Pond Week
And more!
Bring your own ideas for
neighborhood improvement.
Happy Holidays!
¡Felices Fiestas!
С праздниками!
단어(들)과 일치하는 제목이
없�!
节�!
Chúc mừng ngày lễ!
Meeting Flyer
Brainstormed Ideas: “Farm Pond is
a place that...”
Accountability:
• help others with trash cans
• keep yard clean
• apartment managers are held accountable
• city is responsible for improvements
• more homeowners
• apartment managers treat people with respect
• neighbors get involved
• people to report code violations to 311
• watch out for strangers entering neighbors property
when not at home
Friendliness:
• is welcoming...
• by having block parties or welcoming committees
• full of activities for the youth
• newsletters
• talk to neighbors
• knock on doors and get people involved
• farm pond yard signs for meetings
• consistent time and place
• welcoming committees
• create groups for crafts
• Farm Pond Chamber of Commerce
• starting a neighborhood 4H
Safety:
• a place where I can leave my doors unlocked
• police presence in Farm Pond
• I want Farm Pond to be a place that is safe, friendly,
and clean
• youth belonging
• neighborhood watch
• safe for walking, riding, bicycling, and kids playing
• is welcoming to young children
• people driving slowly. Put up “children at play” signs
• all culture can live and feel safe
• Take back the night-type activity for the park
Resources:
• create a group for fowers and shrubs landscaping
• business development
• city grants and how to apply
• Charlotte Arts League
• leadership
• bylaws
• neighborhood improvements
• requires organization
• book reader group in the area
• more successful businesses
• CPCC construction program
• talk to Villa Heights HOA
• Charlotte School of Law pro-bono clinic to help HOA
MaintenanceandBeautifcation:
• looks like farm pond going toward Idlewild
• is safe and has curb appeal
• keep junk from around your home
• report code violations
• I help by picking up garbage- I help by being in the
HOA and committees
• doesn’t appear you’ve driven onto Wilkinson Blvd
• kids weatherization + yard maintenance
• renters maintain their homes
• pick up the dog poop
• vacant homes kept attractive
• keep my backyard clean
• youth volunteer
• pick all trash around my neighborhood
• is welcoming to young children
• make our community playground attractive and
usable
• inviting to live in
• is attractive......
• maintain home exterior and yard maintenance
• neighborhood sign
• NO trash in yards
• Positive Ticket program
• using the Neighborhood Matching Grants to improve
the park and greenway
60 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Movie Nights
Community activist Martina Jones and her family has been involved getting
know her neighbors. Mrs. Jones came up with Friday movie nights to give youth
a productive activity to do on weekends, in order to give her sons a healthy
community to grow up in.
October
October23rd’smovienightwasasmash.Thechildrengottomeettheoffcers
and ask them questions that they never get opportunity to ask. They even got to
playintheoffcer’scars,puttingsirenson.Thepurposeofthisistoencourage
mutual respect between the youth and police department in the neighborhood as
well as provide a safe and positive place for youth to spend time.
The whole apartment complex was intived to participate. The children enjoyed
the free goodies and food watching “The Transformers” before they all went
home. More movie nights coming soon to Farm Pond.
November
November movie night was another success! Mr. and Mrs. Jones hosten more
than 15 children and 5 teenages from Eagle Woods Apartments.
The kids played ice breaker games, enjoyed pizza, and had a great time together.
Everyoneenjoyedgettingtoknoweachotherbyfndingoutwhereotherpeople
are from, where they have been, and what activities they love to do.
This 2-hour event is a great time for kids to socialize, meet role models in their
community, and enter a warm and loving atmosphere.
To MOVIE NIGHT!
Join us in watching the PG-13 movie
Transformers Revenge of the Fallen.
Saturday, October 23rd
3:00-7:30 pm
The festivities will be held
in the Jones' Home Theater
at 3441 Springset Dr. #F
Need info contact?
Martina Jones 704.919.8983
Food 8 drinks will be served.
Special guest: Char-Meck Police 8 UNC students/ Farm Pond organ.
YOU'RE INVITED.
Movie Night Flyer
61 Appendix
Join us in watching “The Karate Kid”
w/ Jaden Smith & Jackie Chan…
Sunday, November 21
2:00 – 5:00pm
The festivities will be held
at Eagle Woods Apartments Clubhouse
6110 Forest Glen road
* Kids under 7yrs need to be escorted by a parent *
Need info contact?
Martina Jones 704.919.8983
Food & drinks will be served.
This movie is rated PG, due to bullying, martial arts, and mild language!
Farm Pond Community “MOVIE NIGHT”!
Movie Night Flyer
62 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Eagle Woods Apartment Complex Party
On December 10th, the project team supported a gathering of Eagle Woods
Apartment Complex residents for an evening of music, food, and fun. The party
was organized in order to engage apartment residents and raise awareness among
them about the Farm Pond Neighborhood Association. People heard about the
partyfrominformationspreadbyfyersandwordofmouthamongparentsand
children.
Eagle Woods offered their clubhouse to house the event, and the local radio
station, Power 98, provided the music. The kids were able to hang out, talk with
friends, dance to the music, and receive prizes from a ticket drawing. It was a
great opportunity to help the community kick off, what we aim to be, a regular
event.
CHARP provided food and refreshments for everyone who was able to come. The
project team is grateful to Charlotte Mecklenburg Parks and Recreation, who lent
us tables to bring to the party.
In the future, the project team will engage local businesses to secure donation
ofbeverages.Theteamwillalsotakecaretofyertheapartmentcomplexesand
nearby businesses in good time before the party.
For more information, call (704) 266-0261 or
email farmpondplanning@gmail.com
Para mayor información, llama al (704)
266-0261 o envía un email a
farmpondplanning@gmail.com.
Season’s Greetings!
Join Eagle Woods
Apartments and the Farm
Pond Neighborhood
Association for a rafe, food,
and holiday cheer at the
Year-End Holiday Party at
the Eagle Woods Clubhouse
located at 6110 Forest Glen
Rd., Charlotte, NC 28212 on
Friday, December 10 from
6-8.
¡Felices Fiestas!
Júntate con los Apartamentos
Eagle Woods y la Asociación
de Residentes de Farm Pond
para una rifa, comida y la
alegría de la temporada en la
Celebración de los Días
Festivos del Fin del Año a la
Casa Club de Eagle Woods,
ubicada en 6110 Forest Glen
Rd., viernes, el 10 de
diciembre de las 6 hasta las 8
de la tarde.
Movie Night Flyer
63 Appendix
Latin American Coalition Meeting
On December 7, 2010, the project team met with Jess George and Bonnie Carter
from the Latin American Coalition to tour their facilities and learn more about
the organization. The following is based on notes from the meeting.
With 17 full-time staff and 3 part-time staff, the Latin American Coalition has
three areas of focus:
• Educational Services
• Advocacy Initiatives
• Cultural Celebrations
Educational Services
Within its Educational Services scope of work, the Latin American Coalition’s
Resource Center functions as a direct service provider and referral service for
people who require assistance. The LAC helps all families in crisis that face
language, economic, education and cultural barriers. Work includes helping
families apply for food stamps if they qualify, mediating between landlords
and tenants, and working with the Fair Housing Program when people have
experienced discrimination when trying to rent a home. In these cases, the LAC
has partnered with other organizations to function as the Latino outreach arm
ofthoseagencies.TheLACrefersclientstootherprovidersandassistsinflling
out paperwork in cases of domestic violence and food/housing/utility crises
issues. Overall, the goal of these programs is to develop trust between Latino
families and Charlotte service-providers while also breaking down cultural
barriers between the two.
The Department of Social Services visits the Resource Center once a week to
provide assistance. The LAC also works with Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police to
help break down cultural barriers and build trust.
The LAC also offers programs to Latino families to help them adjust to the
Charlotte community. Job training programs, job search assistance, English as
a Second Language classes, small business and entrepreneurship training (like
Quickbooksclasses),computertraining,andHUD-certifedhomepurchasing
assistance all help immigrants integrate into Charlotte life. A focus of the classes
lately has been helping Latino artists learn about social media for promotion
and small business development for good business practices. Wherever
possible, the LAC seeks to create programs that work together and build off one
another.
Finally, the LAC has a Neighbor-to-Neighbor self-help center, which is staffed
by volunteers.
Advocacy Initiatives
The LAC advocates on behalf of Latinos in cases of labor rights, immigration
services, and consumer protection. Many immigrants are victims of fraud and poor
business practices, with people suffering from unpaid wages, lost persona property,
badly managed immigration paperwork, and other forms of discrimination. An
example of a common type of fraud experience by Latino families is famiies paying
for the services of a fake attorney, or “notario.”
The LAC educates immigrant workers about their workplace rights and makes
them aware of common fraudulent practices that they could be vulnerable to. The
LAC also offers direct and affordable legal services to immigrants by staff who
are accredited and recognized by the Board of Immigration Appeals. Many cases
deal with U-Visas and the Violence Against Women Act. Finally, the LAC makes
immigrants aware of predatory lending practices and consumer fraud, giving
peopleadviceonhowtorecuperatetheirmoneyandproperty,fleacomplaint,
and/or pursue legal action. The LAC is the only Spanish language foreclosure
mitigation program in Mecklenburg County!
A non-partisan organization, the LAC lobbies for policies and regulation that are in
the interests of Latino immigrants and generally create the space for immigrants to
participate political and volunteer-based activities. Some successes have included
organizing 10,000 people to go to the polls and advocating for illegal immigrants
to be able to attend local universities with affordable tuition rates.
Cultural Celebrations
The LAC believes that cultural celebrations build trust in the community and
help improve dialog and partnership between the Latino community and the
greater Charlotte community. Cultural celebrations also help create pride within
the Latino community and expose many people to authentic cultural activities.
In terms of economic development, the celebrations provide an economic vehicle
for Latino artists to support themselves, while also allowing the LAC to raise
unrestricted funds.
The principle celebrations organized by the LAC each year include:
• Latin American Festival, which has 20,000 attendees
• Cinco de Mayo
• A Night in Rio
• Azucar, a Caribbean Festival
• Dia de los Muertos
64 Farm Pond Neighborhood Report
Feedback and Ideas
• Canvas neighborhood - knock door-to-door to spread the word about the
neighborhood association
• Take events to community members and meet on their turf and offer
community members something for coming, like a free workshop. An
example event that the LAC holds in conjunction with the Public Library is
Conexiones Que Cuenta (Connections that Count), which is a program for
parents and pre-schoolers to celebrate reading and literacy. During these
events, the LAC takes the parents aside for a few moments to hold a class or
workshop.
• Teach Spanish at Movie Nights
• Jan. 6 Reyes Magos, Día de los Niños as events that could celebrate Latino
culture and attract Latino residents
• Feature a movie in Spanish with English subtitles for Movie Nights. For
example, Spykids is a great kids movie that is bi-cultural.
• Play Lotería
• Consider developing a pilot project with the LAC that does on-site outreach
• Celebrate Farm Pond! The neighborhood is a great family neighborhood
with great restaurants, affordable homes, and is close to downtown!

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