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AP Literature and Composition Exam Multiple Choice from 1982

THE COLLEGE BOARD

Advanced Placement Examination

ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COM POSITION

1982

ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION

SECTION I

Time—60 minutes

Directions: This section consists of selections from literary works and questions on their content,
form, and style. After reading each passage or poem, choose the best answer to each question and
blacken the corresponding space on the answer sheet.

: This section consists of selections from literary works and questions on their content, form, and
style. After reading each passage or poem, choose the best answer to each question and blacken
the corresponding space on the answer sheet.
Note: Pay particular attention to the requirement of questions that contain the words NOT, LEAST, or
EXCEPT.

: Pay particular attention to the requirement of questions that contain the words NOT, LEAST, or
EXCEPT.
Questions 1-13. Read the following poem carefully before you choose your answers.

. Read the following poem carefully before you choose your answers.

A Dialogue Between the Soul and Body Joy’s cheerful Madness does perplex:

Or Sorrows other Madness vex.

Which Knowledge forces me to know,

(40) And Memory will not forgo.

0 who shall, from this Dungeon, raise What but a Soul could have the wit

A Soul inslav’d so many ways? To build me up for Sin so fit?

With bolts of Bones, that fetter’d stands So Architects do square and hew,

In Feet; and manacled in Hands. Green Trees that in the Forest grew.

(5) Here blinded with an Eye; and there,

Deaf with the drumming of an Ear. —Andrew Marvell

A Soul hung up, as ‘twere, in Chains *physic: medicine

Of Nerves, and Arteries, and Veins.

Tortur’ d, besides each other part,

1. (10) In a vain head, and double Heart.


Body 1. The headings of the stanzas, Soul and Body,

indicate which one of the two is

O who shall me deliver whole,

From bonds of this Tyrannic Soul? (A) being addressed

Which, stretcht upright, impales me so, (B) acting as the deliverer of the other

That mine own Precipice I go; (C) being described

(15) And warms and moves this needless Frame: (D) winning the struggle at the moment

(A Fever could but do the same.) (E) speaking

And, wanting where its spite to try,

Has made me live to. let me die.


2. In the poem, which of the following best describes

A Body that could never rest, the relationship between the body and the soul?

(20) Since this ill Spirit it possest.

(A) The body controls the soul.

Soul (B) The soul owns and manages the body.

(C) They are separate and independent.

What Magic could me thus confine (D) Each is subject to the demands of the other.

Within another’s Grief to pine? (E) In time, they become completely unified.

Where whatsoever it complain,


I feel, that cannot feel, the pain.

(25) And all my care its self employs, 3. Which of the following devices is dominant in the

That to preserve, which me destroys: first stanza?

Constrain ‘d not only to endure (A) An extended metaphor of cruel imprisonment

Diseases, but what’s worse, the Cure: (B) An extended definition of the soul

And ready oft the Port to gain, (C) Names of parts of the body to represent the

(30) Am Shipwrackt into Health again, whole

1. (D) Internal rhyme to emphasize the internal nature of the

Body struggle

struggle
But Physic* yet could never reach (E) End-stopped lines to temper the urgency of

The Maladies thou me dost teach; the message

Whom the first Cramp of Hope dost tear:

And then the Palsy shakes of Fear.


(35) The Pestilence of Love does heat:

Or Hatred’s hidden Ulcer eat.

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The poem is reprinted below for your use in answering the remaining questions.

A Dialogue Between the Soul and Body 4. The notion of an eye that can blind and an ear that

can deafen (lines 5-6) suggests that the

Soul (A) body is in fact in worse condition than the soul

(A) body is in fact in worse condition than the soul


o who shall, from this Dungeon, raise (B) soul claims to have senses, but those senses

A Soul inslav’d so many ways? fail

With bolts of Bones, that fetter’d stands (C) eye and ear impede the soul’s perception in-

In Feet; and manacled in Hands. stead of aiding it

(5) Here blinded with an Eye; and there, (D) eye and ear try continually to perceive the soul

Deaf with the drumming of an Ear, but never do

A Soul hung up, as ‘twere, in Chains ‘ (E) fragile eye and ear are stronger than the soul

Of Nerves, and Arteries, and Veins.

Tortur’d, besides each other part, 5. In the context of the first stanza, lines 1-2 express

(10) In a vain Head, and double Heart. a longing to be

(A) freed from an actual prison

Body (B) separated from physical life

(B) separated from physical life


O who shall me deliver whole, (C) saved from eternal damnation

From bonds of this Tyrannic Soul? (D) cured of a crippling ailment

Which, stretcht upright, impales me so, (E) released from enslavement to vice

That mine own Precipice I go;

(15) And warms and moves this needless Frame:

(A Fever could but do the same.) 6. Which of the following best sums up what is said in

And, wanting where its spite to try, lines 13-14 7

Has made me live to let me die. (A) The body would prefer death to the dictates of

A Body that could never rest, the soul.

(20) Since this ill Spirit it possest. (B) The soul puts the body in the position of always

being a danger to itself.

Soul (C) The body becomes a danger to others when it


(C) The body becomes a danger to others when it
What Magic could me thus confine ignores what the soul teaches.

Within another’s Grief to pine? (D) The body is the stepping-off place for any

Where whatsoever it complain, attempt to understand the nature of the soul.

I feel, that cannot feel, the pain. (E) The soul offers the body the chance to achieve

(25) And all my care its self employs, new heights.

That to preserve, which me destroys:

Constrain ‘d not only to endure 7. What does line 15 suggest about the nature of the

Diseases, but what’s worse, the Cure: soul? And ready oft the Port to gain,

(30) Am Shipwrackx into Health again. (A) It is the divine element in a person.

(B) It is the source of evil as well as good.

(C) It confuses by introducing conflicting emotions.

Body (D) It is the animating force in a person.

(D) It is the animating force in a person.


(E) It makes one conscious of physical sensations.

But Physic yet could never reach

The Maladies thou me dost teach;

Whom the first Cramp of Hope dost tear:

And then the Palsy shakes of Fear.

(35) The Pestilence of Love does heat:

Or Hatred’ s hidden Ulcer eat.

Joy’s cheerful Madness does perplex:

Or Sorrow’s other Madness vex.

Which Knowledge forces me to know,

(40) And Memory will not forgo,

What but a Soul could have the wit

To build me up for Sin so fit?

So Architects do square and hew,

Green Trees that in the Forest grew.

—Andrew Marvell

*Physic: medicine

: medicine
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8. Which of the following best restates the question 12. The last four lines, which extend the length
of the

posed in lines 21-22 ? last stanza, have the effect of

(A) What constrains me to suffer from experiences (A) offering a solution to the dilemma of the body

that are not naturally my own? and soul

(B) What can make me sorrow for the body in its (B) providing an epigrammatic summary of the

ill state when I have no natural sympathy? body’s view of the soul

(C) What struggle of good and evil makes me both (C) providing comic relief from the serious

cause the misfortunes of the body and then conflict in the poem

regret them? (D) breaking through the irony of the poem to

(D) Why must the body ultimately come to grief reveal the whole person, body and soul

and I be saved? . combined

(E) Why must I dwell in another body after my (E) finally allowing the soul to argue back within

original dwelling place has died? a stanza devoted to the view of the body

9. Lines 25-26 are best understood to mean that the 13. Which of the following most fully expresses
the

(A) soul can neither care nor feel, and so the body’ cleverness of the body in its impingement on the

has no reason to try to preserve it

(B) body ignores the souls efforts to influence it (A) "0 who shall, from this Dungeon, raise/A

(C) soul’s best attempts to exist In unity with the Soul inslav‘d so many ways 7’ (lines 1-2)

body end by killing the body (B) "And, wanting where its spite to try, /Has

(D) body refuses to recognize that it could not live made me live to let me die," (lines 17-18)

without the soul (C) "And alt my care its self employs, /That to

(E) soul ‘s efforts are used by the body for its own preserve, which me destroys:" (tines 25- 26)

maintenance and, consequently, for the (D) "But Physic yet could never reach/The

the soul Maladies thou me dost teach;" (lines 31-32)

ruination of

(E) "Which Knowledge forces me to know, /And

Memory will not forgo." (lines 39-40)

10. "Port" (line 29) refers metaphorically to

(A) death

(B) the body

(C) the unity of body and soul

(D) illness
(E) hell

1. 11. Which of the following best describes the effect

of the metaphors in lines 31-36 ?

1. (A) The likening of emotion to illness suggests

that the soul and body are really one,

1. (B) The very number of ailments exaggerates

the weakness of the body and the strength of

the soul.

1. (C) The mention of Leaching implies that knowing

oneself well is the key to healing the breach

between body and soul.

1. (D) The metaphors stress that the body perceives

the emotions physically and, further, that

it perceives only their negative effects.

(E) The metaphors indicate that the obsession

of the body with its own ailments keeps it

from giving expression to the soul,

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Questions 14-29. Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answers.

If the only form of tradition, of handing down,

consisted in following the ways of the immediate

generation before us in a blind or timid adherence to its successes, "tradition" should positively be

(5)

discouraged. We have seen many such simple currents soon lost in the sand; and novelty is better

(10)
than repetition. Tradition is a matter of much wider significance. It cannot be Inherited, and if you
want it you must obtain it by great labour. It involves, in the first place, the historical sense, which
we may call nearly indispensable to anyone

who would continue to be a writer beyond his

(15)

twenty—fifth year; and this historical sense Involves a perception, not only of the pastness of the
past, but of its presence; the historical sense compels a man to write not merely with his own
generation in

his bones, but with a feeling that the whole of the

literature of Europe from Homer and within it the

whole of the literature of his own country has a

(20)

simultaneous existence and composes a simultaneous order. This historical sense, which is a sense
of

the timeless as well as of the temporal and of the

timeless and of the temporal together, is what

makes a writer traditional. And it is at the same

(25)

time what makes a writer most acutely conscious

of his place in time, of his own contempora

neity. To proceed to a more intelligible exposition of

the relation of the writer to the past: he can

(30)

neither take the past as a lump, an indiscriminate

bolus, nor can he form himself wholly on one or

two private admirations, nor can he form himself

wholly upon one preferred period. The first course

is inadmissible, the second is an important

(35)

experience of youth, and the third is a pleasant and

highly desirable supplement. The writer must be very conscious of the main current, which does not

at all flow invariably through the most distinguished

reputations. He must be quite aware of the obvious

(40)
fact that art never improves, but that the material

of art is never quite the same. He must be aware

that the mind of Europe—the mind of his own

country—a mind which he Learns In time to be much

more important than his own private mind—is a

(45)

mind which changes, and that this change is a

development which abandons nothing en route,

which does not superannuate either Shakespeare, or

Homer, or the rock drawing of the Magdalenian

draughtsmen. That this development, refinement

(50)

perhaps, complication certainly, is not, from the

point of view of the artist, any improvement. Per

haps not even an improvement from the point of

view of the psychologist or not to the extent which

we imagine; perhaps only in the end based upon a

(55)

complication In economics and machinery. But the

difference between the present and the past is that

14.

The primary distinction made in the first paragraph is one between

(A) a narrow definition of tradition and a more

inclusive one

(6) the concerns of a contemporary writer and

those of one from the past

(C) an understanding of the past and a rejection of

the present

(D) the literature of Renaissance Europe and that

of ancient Greece

1. (E) a literary tradition and a historical period


15

Which of the following best describes the function

of the first sentence of the passage?

(A) It states the main thesis of the passage as a

whole.

(B) It provides concrete evidence to support the

central idea of the first paragraph.

(C) It clears the way for serious discussion by

dismissing a common misconception.

(D) It poses a rhetorical question that is debated

throughout the passage.

(E) It establishes the reliability of the author as

an impartial arbiter.

16

The phrase "lost in the sand" (line 6) is best read

as a metaphor relating to

(A) forgotten masterpieces

(B) prehistoric times

(C) ephemeral trends

(D) the sense of the timeless

1. (E) literary enigmas

17

In context, the clause "anyone who would continue

to be a writer beyond his twenty- fifth year"

(lines 11-13) suggests which of the following?

I. Mature writers need to have a historical

sense.

II. Few writers can improve their perceptions

after their twenty-fifth year.

Ill. Young writers cannot be expected to have a

developed historical sense.

(A)1 only
(B) II only

(C) Ill only

(D) I and II only

(E) I and Ill only

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the conscious present is an awareness of the past

in a way and to an extent which the past s awareness

of itself cannot show.

(60)Someone said: "The dead writers are remote

from us because we know so much more than they

did." Precisely, and they are that which we

know. -

TIe passage is reprinuxi below for your use in answering the renwning qucstwns.

18. According to the passage, writers who are most 22. The author implies that the "first cour3e is in
t~ -

aware of their own contemporaneity would be missible" (lines 33-34) because following it

those who leads to

(A) have rejected the sterile conventions of earlier (A) failure to discriminate among the various

literature in order to achieve self-expression literary works of past centuries

(B) have refused to follow the ways of the imme- (B) abandonment of the commitment to read older

diately preceding generation in favor of literature

novelty and originality (C) relaxation of the standards that make a work o~

(C) have an intimate acquaintance with past and art Likely, to endure

present literary works (D) neglect of the study of present-day writers who

(D) understand that contemporary works are will become part of the tradition

Likely to lose their popularity in time (B) forgetting that a writer’s first duty is to

(B) prefer the great literature of the past to the preserve his or her integrity

works of modern writers

23. The "main current" (line 37) is best understood

19. In the first paragraph, the author is most concerned as that which

with

(A) explaining how writers may be aware of their (A) changes and improves constantly

(B) is and has been durable in literature


own contemporaneity

(13) defining the historical sense as it relates to (C) has had wide popular appeal

(D) is suitable for stylistic imitation

writing

(C) berating those who dismiss the notion of (E) epitomizes the characteristics of one period

tradition

(D) developing a theory of what is durable in 24. In line 45, the "mind which changes" refers to

literature which of the following?

(E) summarizing ‘historical trends in literary I. "the mind of Europe" (line 42)

criticism II. "the mind of his own country" (lines 42-43)

20. In lines 22-23, the repeated linkage of the words III. "his own private mind" (line 44)

"timeless" and "temporal" can be interpreted as an (A) I only

emphasis on the (B) Ill only

(A) author’s assumption that the two words are (C) I and II only

used carelessly by contemporary writers (D) I and III only

(B) necessity of allying two concepts usually (B) I, II, and III

thought of as opposites

(C) ironic conclusion that all that is temporal is 25. In lines 48-49, the author refers to the "rock
meaningless drawing of Magdalenian draughtsmen" as

(D) author’s disgust that contemporary writers

have focused only on the timeless (A) an example of an artistic style that has been

(E) unresolved debate as to which of the two imitated by contemporary artists

concepts is more important (B) a part of a continuing artistic tradition that is

still changing

21. According to lines 28-36, which of the following (C) evidence of the kind of re-evaluation that

would be a natural and tolerable attitude for a takes place when new critical theories are

young writer to hold? proposed

(A) The opinion that older literature is probably (D) an example of art that had no self-conscious

irrelevant to contemporary men and women. ness about being part of an artistic tradition

1. (B) The idea that writing is more a matter

of natural talent than of hard work. (E) evidence of the need to use the same standards
{C) The idea that Shakespeare and Dickens are in evaluating literature and painting
the only writers that he or she need use as

models.

(D) The notion that older literature is inherently

superior to the works of contemporary

writers

(E) The belief that genius is more likely to spring

from one region or historical period than from another.

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If the only form of tradition, of handing down,

consisted in following the ways of the immediate

generation before us in a blind or timid adherence

to its successes, "tradition" should positively be

TIe passage is reprinuxi below for your use in answering the renwning qucstwns.

1. (5) discouraged. We have seen many such simple

currents soon lost in the sand; and novelty is better

than repetition. Tradition is a matter of much

wider significance. it cannot be inherited, and if

you want ft you must obtain it by great labour. It

1. (10) involves, in the first place, the historical sense,

which we may call nearly indispensable to anyone

who would continue to be a writer beyond his

twenty-fifth year; and this historical sense involves

a perception, not only of the pastness of the past,

1. (15) but of its presence; the historical sense compels a

man to write not merely with his own generation in

his bones, but with a feeling that the whole of the

literature of Europe from Homer and within it the


whole of the literature of his own country has a

1. (20) simultaneous existence and composes a simultaneous

order. This historical sense, which is a sense of

the timeless as well as of the temporal and of the

timeless and of the temporal together, is what

makes a writer traditional. And it is at the same

1. (21) time what makes a writer most acutely conscious

of his place in time, of his own contempora-

neity. . .

To proceed to a more Intelligible exposition

of the relation of the writer to the past: he can

1. (30) neither take the past as a lump, an indiscriminate

bolus, nor can he form himself wholly on one or

two private admirations, nor can he form himself

wholly upon one preferred period. The first course

is inadmissible, the second Is an important

(35) experience of youth, and the third is a pleasant and

highly desirable supplement. The writer must be

very conscious of the main current, which does not

at all flow invariably through the most distinguished

reputations. He must be quite aware of the obvious

(40) fact that art never improves, but that the material

of art is never quite the same. He must be aware

that the mind of Europe—the mind of his own

country—a mind which he learns in time to be much

more important than his own private mind—is a

(45) mind which changes, and that this change is a

development which abandons nothing en route,


which does not superannuate either Shakespeare, or

Homer, or the rock drawing of the Magdalenian

draughtsmen. That this development, refinement

(50) perhaps, complication certainly, is not, from the

point of view of the artist, any improvement. Per-

haps not even an improvement from the point of

view of the psychologist or not to the extent which

we imagine; perhaps only in the end based upon a

(55) complication in economics and machinery. But the

difference between the present and the past is that

the conscious present is an awareness of the past

in a way and to an extent which the past’s s awareness

of itself cannot show.

1. (60) Someone said: "The dead writers are remote

from us because we know so much more than they

did." Precisely, and they are that which we

know. . .

26. Which of the following is implicit before "That this development . . . improvement" (lines 49-51)?
(A) The difference between the past and the present is

1. (B) We all unconsciously believe

1. (C) The significance of art is

2. (D) The writer must be aware

(E) A historian would deny

27. The function of the quotation in lines 60-62 is primarily to

(A) support ironically an idea different from the one apparently intended by "Someone’

(B) refute the Idea that art does not Improve

(C) ridicule the idea that writers of the past were ignorant

(D) show that although "Someone’s" ideas are obviously to be respected, literary critics do often
have disagreements
(E) add a new definition to the concept of ‘remoteness," while subtly indicating approval of the ideas
expressed

28. The development of the argument can best be described as progressing from the

(A) assertion of an idea to an elaboration of its meaning

(B) summary of an argument to an analysis of the Logic of the conflicting sides

(C) statement of a hypothesis to a summary of possible objections to it

1. (D) criticism of a process to a defense of its value

(E) description of an abstract idea to a compilation

of concrete examples of it

29. Taken as a whole, the passage is best described as

(A) a narrative with a historical perspective

(B) a technical discussion of a point of literary criticism

(C) an argument developed through the use of anecdotes

(D) an expository passage largely concerned with definition

(E) a descriptive passage that makes use of concrete examples

I.

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TIe passage is reprinuxi below for your use in answering the renwning qucstwns. — IHW~! ‘T —

Questions 30-42. Read the following poem carefully before you choose your answer.

Advice to a Prophet

When you come, as you soon must1 to the streets of our city,
Mad-eyed from stating the obvious,

Not proclaiming our fall but begging us

In God’s name to have self—pity,

1. (5) Spare us all word of the weapons, their force and range,

The long numbers that rocket the mind;

Our slow, unreckoning hearts will be left behind,

Unable to fear what Is too strange.

Nor shall you scare us with talk of the death of the race.

(10) How should we dream of this place without us?—

The sun mere fire, the leaves untroubled about us,


A stone look on the stone’s face?

Speak of the world s own change. Though we cannot conceive

Of an undreamt thing, we know to our cost

(15) How the dreamt cloud crumbles, the vines are blackened by frost,

How the view alters. We could believe,

If you told us so, that the white-tailed deer will slip

Into perfect shade, grown perfectly shy,

The lark avoid the reaches of our eye,

(20) The jack-pine lose its knuckled grip

On the cold ledge, and every torrent burn

As Xanthus once, its gliding trout

Stunned in a twinkling. What should we be without

The dolphin’s arc, the dove’s return,

(25) These things in which we have seen ourselves and spoken?

Ask us, prophet, how we shall call

Our natures forth when that live tongue is all

Dispelled, (hat glass obscured or broken

. Read the following poem carefully before you choose your answer. When you come, as you soon
must
In which we have said the rose of our love and the clean

(30) Horse of our courage, in which beheld The singing locust of the soul unshelled, And all we mean
or wish to mean.

Ask us, ask us whether with the worldless rose

Our hearts shall fail us; come demanding

(35) Whether there shall be lofty or long standing

When the bronze annals of the oak-tree close.

Xanthus: in Greek myth, a river scalded by Hephaestus, god of fire.

30. The speaker assumes that the prophet referred to in lines 1-12 will come proclaiming

1. (A) a new religious dispensation

2. (B) joyous sell-awareness

3. (C) a new political order

4. (D) the horror of self-destruction

5. (E) an appreciation of nature


© 1959 by Richard Wilbur. Reprinted from his volume Advice to a Prophet and Other Poems by
permission of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.
31. According to the speaker, the prophet’s "word of the weapons" (line 5) will probably not be
heeded because

(A) human beings are really fascinated by weapons

(B) nature is more fascinating than warfare

(C) men and women are more concerned with love than with weapons
(D) people have heard such talk too often before

(E) people cannot comprehend abstract descriptions of power

TIe passage is reprinuxi below for your use in answering the renwning qucstwns. — IHW~! ‘T —

Advice to a Prophet

When you come, as you soon must1 to the streets of our city,
Mad-eyed from stating the obvious,

Not proclaiming our fall but begging us

In God’s name to have self—pity,

1. (5) Spare us all word of the weapons, their force and range,

The long numbers that rocket the mind;

Our slow, unreckoning hearts will be left behind,

Unable to fear what Is too strange.

Nor shall you scare us with talk of the death of the race.

(10) How should we dream of this place without us?—

The sun mere fire, the leaves untroubled about us,

A stone look on the stone’s face?

Speak of the world s own change. Though we cannot conceive

Of an undreamt thing, we know to our cost

(15) How the dreamt cloud crumbles, the vines are blackened by frost,

How the view alters. We could believe,

If you Told us so, that the white-tailed deer will slip

Into perfect shade, grown perfectly shy,

The lark avoid the reaches of our eye,

(20) The jack-pine lose its knuckled grip

On the cold ledge, and every torrent burn

As Xanthus once, its gliding trout

Stunned in a twinkling. What should we be without


The dolphin’s arc, the dove’s return,

(25) These things in which we have seen ourselves and spoken?

Ask us, prophet, how we shall call

Our natures forth when that live tongue is all

Dispelled, (hat glass obscured or broken

In which we have said the rose of our love and the clean

(30) Horse of our courage, in which beheld The singing locust of the soul unshelled, And all we mean
or wish to mean.

Ask us, ask us whether with the worldless rose

Our hearts shall fail us; come demanding

(35) Whether there shall be lofty or long standing

When the bronze annals of the oak-tree close.

Xanthus: in Greek myth, a river scalded by Hephaestus, god of fire.

© 1959 by Richard Wilbur. Reprinted from his volume Advice to a Prophet and Other Poems by
permission of Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.
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(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

(E)

The poem is reprinted below for your use in answering the remaining questions. r 32. In the phrase,
"A stone Look on the stone’s face,’ (line 12). the speaker is suggesting that
(A) a stone is the most difficult natural object to comprehend

(B) such a stone is a metaphor for a human lack of understanding

(C) it is human beings who see a face on stones


(D) nature is a hostile environment for the human race

(E) the pain of Life Is bearable only to a stoic

33. In Line 13 the speaker is doing which of the following?

Anticipating the prophet’s own advice

Despairing of ever influencing the prophet

Exchanging his own point of view with that of the prophet

Heeding the prophets advice

Prescribing what the prophet should say

34. In lines 14-16, the speaker is asserting that we


(A) learn more or less about decay in nature according to our point of view

(B) can never understand change in nature

(C) are always instructed by an altering of our perspective

(U) have all experienced loss and disappointment (E) realize that the end of the world may be near

35. The speaker implies that without "the dolphin’s arc, the dove’s return" (line 24) we would
(A) be less worried about war and destruction

(B) crave coarser pleasures than the enjoyment of nature

(C) have less understanding of ourselves and our lives

(D) be unable to love

(E) find ourselves unwilling to heed the advice of prophets

36. The phrase ‘knuckled grip" (line ~) implies that the jack-pine

(A) will never realty fall from the ledge

(B) has roots that grasp like a hand

(C) is very precariously attached to the Ledge

(D) is a rough and inhuman part of nature

(E) is very awkwardly placed

37. ‘The dolphin ‘ s arc" (line 24) refers to the

1. (A) biblical story of Noah

2. (B) leap of a dolphin

3. (C) hunting of dolphins with bow and arrow

4. (D) rainbow

(E) migration pattern of the dolphin

38. The phrase that live tongue" (line 27) is best understood as

(A) a metaphor for nature

1. (B) an image of the poet’s mind

2. (C) a symbol of the hlst9ry of the world

3. (D) a reference to the poem Itself

4. (E) a metaphor for the advice of the prophet

39. According-to the speaker, we use the images of the rose (line 29), the horse (line 30), and the
locust (line 31)

(A) literally to denote specific natural objects


(B) as metaphors to aid in comprehending abstractions

(C) as similes illustrating the speaker’s attitude toward nature

(D) to reinforce images previously used by the prophet

(E) to explain the need for scientific study of nature

40. WhIch of the following best describes an effect of the repetition of the phrase "ask us" in line
33 ?

(A) It suggests that the prophet himself is the cause of much of the world ‘ s misery.

(B) It represents a sarcastic challenge to the prophet to ask the right questions.

(C) it suggests that the speaker is certain of the answer he will receive.
(D) It makes the line scan as a perfect example of Iambic pentameter.

(E) It provides a tone of imploring earnestness.

41. Which of the following best paraphrases the meaning of line 36 ?

(A) When the end of the year has come

(B) When the chronicles no longer tell of trees

1. (C) When art no longer Imitates nature

2. (D) When nature has ceased to exist

3. (E) When the forests are finally restored

42. Which of the following best describes the poem as a whole?

(A) An amusing satire on the excesses of modern prophets

(B) A poetic expression of the need for love to give meaning to life

(C) A lyrical celebration of the Importance of nature for man

(D) A personal meditation on human courage In the face of destruction

(E) A philosophical and didactic poem about man and nature

GO ONTO THE NEXT PAGE

The poem is reprinted below for your use in answering the remaining questions. r

Questions 43-55. Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answers.

. Read the following passage carefully before you choose your answers.
I sometimes dream of a larger and more popu-

lous house, standing in a golden age, of enduring

materials, and without ginger-bread work, which

shall still consist of only one room, a vast, rude,


1. (5) substantial, primitive halt, without ceiling or

plastering, with bare rafters and purlins supporting

a sort of lower heaven over one’s head, —useful to

keep off rain and snow; where the king and queen

posts stand out to receive your homage, when you

1. (10) have done reverence to the prostrate Saturn of an

older dynasty on stepping over the sill; a cavernous

house, wherein you must reach up a torch upon a

pole to see the root; where some may live in the

fire-place, some In the recess of a window, and

1. (15) some on settles, some at one end of the ball, some

at another, and some aloft on rafters with the

spiders, if they choose; a house which you have got

into when you have opened the outside door, and the

ceremony is over; where the weary traveller may

(a)) wash, and eat, and converse, and sleep, without

further journey; such a shelter as you would be glad

to reach in a tempestuous night, containing all the

essentials of a house, and nothing for house-keep-

ing; where you can see all the treasures of the

1. (25) house at one view, and every thing hangs upon its

peg that a man should use; at once kitchen, pantry,

parlor, chamber, store-house, and garret; where

you can see 80 necessary a thing as a barrel or a

ladder, so convenient a thing as a cupboard, and

1. (30) hear the pot boil, and pay your respects to the fire

that cooks your dinner and the oven that bakes your
bread, and the necessary furniture and utensils are

the chief ornaments; where the washing is not put

out, nor the fire, nor the mistress, and perhaps

1. (35) you are sometimes requested to move from off the

trap-door, when the cook would descend into the

cellar, and so learn whether the ground is solid or

hollow beneath you without stamping. A house

whose inside is as open and manifest as a bird’s

1. (40) nest, and you cannot go in at the front door and out

at the back without seeing some of its inhabitants;

where to be a guest Is to be presented with the free-

dom of the house, and not to be carefully excluded

from seven-eighths of it, shut up in a particular

1. (45) cell, and told to make yourself at home there, --in

solitary confinement. Nowadays the host does not

admit you to his hearth, but has got the mason to

build one for yourself somewhere in his alley, and

hospitality is the art of keeping you at the greatest

1. (50) distance. There is as much secrecy about the

cooking as if he had a design to poison you. I am

aware that I have been on many a man’s premises,

and might have been legally ordered off, but I am

not aware that I have been in many men’s houses.

1. (55) I might visit in my old clothes a king and queen who

lived simply in such a house as (have described, If


I were going their way; but backing out of a modern

palace will be all that I shall desire to learn, if

ever I am caught In one.

1. 43. Which of the following best describes the house in

the passage?

(A) A functional ideal that combines beauty and utility

(B) A reasonable, inexpensive alternative to expensive mansions

(C) A house to which the author hopes to bring his bride

(D) A solution to the problem of housing Large families

(E) A dream house, filled with every possible convenience

44. The opening sentence (which ends on tine 38) can best be described as

(A) a sentence that presents a lengthy and complex argument

(B) a syntactically complex but unified sentence

(C) an amorphous sentence indicating the contents of a pleasant dream

(D) a balanced sentence that describes first the house and next Its inhabitants

(E) a haphazard sentence that scrambles and repeats its topics

45. In line 3, "which" refers to

(A) "dream" (line 1)

1. (B) "house" (line 2)

2. (C) "age" (line 2)

3. (D) "materials" (Line 3)

4. (E) "work" (line 3)

46. The speaker contrasts his preferred house with which of the following?

1. (A) "primitive hall" (line 5)

2. (B) "cavernous house" (tines 11-12)

3. (C) "shelter" (line 21)

4. (D) "bird ‘s nest" (lines 39-40)

5. (E) "modern palace" (Lines 57- 58)


47. In lines 1-11, which of the following does NOT modify "house" (line 2) ?

(A) "standing" (line 2)

(B) "of enduring materials" (lines 2-3)

(C ) "without ginger-bread work" (line 3)

(D) "useful to keep off rain and snow" (lines 7-8)

(E) "where the king and queen posts stand out" (lines 8-9)

CO ON TO THE NEXT PACE

The poem is reprinted below for your use in answering the remaining questions. r
(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

(E)

1. 50. In lines 33-34, "put out" means which of the following?

I. to send out

(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

(E)

I only

I and II only

I and Ill only

II and Ill only

I, II, and Ill

48. Which of the following is true about the syntax of the clause "and every thing hangs upon its peg
that a man should use" (lines 25-26) ?

1. (A) The clause would better have been introduced


by "but."

1. (B) The possessive pronoun "its" has an unclear

reference.

1. (C) The clause would have no grammatical

ambiguity if the clause ‘that a man should

use" were placed after "every thing."

1. (D) The sentence would be clearer if the phrase

"a man should use" were placed before

"every thing."

2. (E) The verb phrase "should use" represents an

abrupt shift in tense within the sentence.

3. 49. The phrase "at once kitchen, pantry, . , . and

garret" (lines 26-27) modifies

(A) "shelter" (line 21)

(B) "house" (line 23)


(C ) "house-keeping" (lines 23-24)

(D) "treasures" (Line 24)

(E) "peg" (line 26)

II. to extinguish

III. To annoy

51. The best contrast with the image of "a bird’s nest" (lines 39-40) is

(A) "cell’ (Line 45)

4. (B) "hearth" (Une47)

5. (C) "alley’ (line 48)

6. (D) "premises" (line 52)

7. (E) "palace" (line 58)

52. After line 46, the author’s tone becomes more

conciliatory

nostalgic

testy and critical


expensive and self-dramatizing

light and cheerful

53. The most explicit suggestion that all who enter have the full freedom of the house is
contained in

(A) "where the king and queen posts stand out to receive your homage" (lines 8-9)

(B) "some aloft on rafters with the spiders (Lines 16-17)

(C) "where the weary traveller may wash" (Lines 19- ~)

(D) "every thing hangs upon its peg that a man should use" (lines 25-26)

(E) "pay your respects to the fire that cooks your dinner" (Lines 30-31)

54. When the author says "I am not aware that I have been in ma1’~y men’s houses" (Lines
53-54), he Is

commenting on

(A) the small number of invitations that he has accepted

(B) his general insensitivity to unpleasant surroundings

(C) a lack of what he considers genuine hospitality


(D) his own tack of skill In being a good guest

(E) the failure of his hosts to understand his thinking

55. Which of the following best describes the passage as a whole?

(A) An allegorical idealization of pioneering life in America

(B) A parody of an American utopian settlement

(C) A biting attack on the American home

(D) An oblique indictment of philistinism and selfish ostentation

(E) A parable applying the Golden Rule to personal hospitality

END OF SECTION 1

52.After line 46, the author’s tone becomes more

— 17 —

1982 Advanced Placement

English Literature and Composition Examination

An answer sheet with the correct responses gridded appears on page 19.

Below are listed the correct answer keys to the multiple—choice questions. Also listed is the
percentage of the sample candidates who selected the correct answer. The percentage is based on
an analysis of a sample of approximately 2,000 candidates. For example, for question number 6 the
correct answer, and 55 percent of the sample ~f 2,000 candidates answered the question correctly.
As a general rule, candidates who chose the correct answer to each individual question also
achieved a higher mean score on the test as a whole than did candidates who chose the wrong
answers. For a more complete explanation of how multiple—choice questions are written and how
the correct answers are arrived at see Multiple—Choice Testing in Literature: Advanced Placement
English.
Percentage Percentage

Answering Answering

Correctly Correctly
1. E 91% 29. D 39%

2. D 87 30. D 89

3. A 76 31. E 75

4. C 87 32. C 21

5. B 71 33. E 79

6. B 55 34. D 48

7. D 67 35. C 68

8. A 68 36. B 52

9. E 72 37. B 66

10. A 35 38. A 43

11. D 52 39. B 78

12. B 60 40. E 53

13. C 39 41. D 86

14. A 75 42. E 42

15. C 63 43. A 62

16. C 58 44. B 33

17. E 54 45. B 97

18. C 78 46. E 82

19. B 76 47. D 52

20. B 88 48. C 48

21. C 40 49. A 24
22. A 65 50. E 48

23. 8 38 51. A 62

24. C 67 52. C 84

25. B 48 53. B 29

26. D 55 54. C 85

27. A 50 55. D 21

‘~/ 28. A 55

IF YOU FINISH BEFORE TIME IS CALLED, YOU MAY CHECK YOUR WORK ON THIS SECTION.DO NOT GO
ON TO SECTION II UNTIL YOU ARE TOLD TO DO SO.

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