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BHT: Mar 2010

BHT: Mar 2010

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Bulk Handling Today
Bulk Handling Today

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EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O ´

' EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O o
March 2010
Contents
Cover Story
5 Loading Bulk Efficiently
Trucking
9 Promise of Stronger 2010 Truck Sales
11 New Name, Bigger Footprint
Conveying
13 Technical Communique
15 One of a Kind
19 Just 30 Minutes
21 Setting the Benchmark
Weighing
25 Mill Magnetic Systems
29 Precise and Reliable
SAIMH
31 Annual General Meeting
33 Market Forum
Endorsing Bodies
CMA (Conveyor Manufacturers
Association)
HCASA (Hydraulic Conveying
Association of SA)
LEEASA (Lifting Equipment Engineering
Association of South Africa)
RFA (Road Freight Association)
SAIMechE (SA Institution of Mechanical
Engineering)
SAIMH (SA Institute of Materials Handling)






Proprietor and Publisher:
PROMECH PUBLISHING
Tel: (011) 781-1401
Fax: (011) 781-1403
E-mail:
bulkhandling@promech.co.za
Website: www.promech.co.za
Managing Editor:
Susan Custers
Joint Editor: Andrew Lanham
Advertising Sales:
Surita Marx
DTP: Zinobia Docrat and
Sanette Lehanie
Printed by:
Typo Colour Printing
Tel: (011) 402-3468
Our e-mail address is
bulkhandling@promech.co.za
Visit our website on www.promech.co.za
The monthly circulation
is 4 016
Copyright
All rights reserved. No edi-
torial matter published in
“Bulk Handling Today” may
be reproduced in any form
or language without written
permission of the publishers.
While every effort is made to
ensure accurate reproduction,
the editor, authors, publishers
and their employees or agents
shall not be responsible or in
any way liable for any errors,
omissions or inaccuracies
in the publication, whether
arising from negligence or
otherwise or for any conse-
quences arising therefrom.
The inclusion or exclusion of
any product does not mean
that the publisher or editorial
board advocates or rejects its
use either generally or in any
particular field or fields.
Featured on the cover:
Bateman Engineered
Technologies
Tel: (011) 201-2300
Email:
philip.leroux@bateman-bet.
com
4 EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
CONVEYOR MANUFACTURERS ASSOCIATION
From the Chairman’s Desk
W
hat made the day even more special was that
one of the players, Quentis Venter, who plays
off a 7 handicap and was in the Fenner fourball,
achieved the perfect fluke on the 12th hole: a
Hole-in-One. Many congratulations, Quentis!
A big “thank you” to all who participated in whatever way to make the most successful CMA Annual Golf
Day in the 17 years that the tournament has been running! This year the event was again held at the Benoni
Country Club. The weather was superb on that Wednesday and the 29 fourballs made it round the magnificent
course without having to don their rain jackets, although some of the fairways were still suffering the effects
of heavy rain over the past few weeks. The resident Pro, Bryan Pritz and his team do an excellent job and al-
ways go out of their way to ensure that everything runs smoothly.
Hole-in-One, Quentis Venter, pictured on the right
Nearest-longest, Frikkie Ras
The Fenner team
Quentis Venter achieved the perfect
fluke on the 12th hole
The Fenner
team then went
on to win the
t our nament
on 87 points,
retaining the
silverware for
another year.
Well done to
Neels Venter,
Quentis Venter,
Gavin McKen-
zie and Neville
Conchar. Run-
ners up with 86
was the David
Brown three-
ball, with Roy-
mec2 finishing on 83 and Bosworth on 82. The
Nearest-the-Pin and Longest Drive were both won
by Frikkie Ras playing for Bauer Geared Motors.
RSV Enco came in with the longest day.
Excellent use
A special thank you to Jay Pil-
lay (Brelko) for assisting Chris
in getting the guys to part with
their money for the raffle – a
whopping R2 760 was collected,
netting over R2 470 for the
South African Guide Dogs for
the Blind Association. Thank
you all for your generosity: the
money will be put to ex-
cellent use by SAGA.
And lastly, let me
extend thanks to
all the sponsors of
holes and for the
generous dona-
tion of prizes.
Simon Curry,
Chairman
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COVER STORY
B
ulk Handling Today” speaks to Project
Manager, Albert Hardie, of Bateman En-
gineered Technologies about a manganese
load-out station the company has recently
built in the Northern Cape. “We’ve just completed
the cold commissioning of this project in a record
time of just 32 weeks, compared with the usual
twelve to fourteen months it takes to build such a
station,” he says.
“As it was for manganese, we had to give special
consideration to the highly abrasive nature of the
product, but our experience with iron ore and
other load-out stations provided a good base to
work from.”
This latest addition adds to a reference list dating
over 38 years and includes over 24 load-out sta-
tions constructed around the world. These stations
handle commodities such as iron ore, coal, coke,
limestone, fertiliser and manganese ore.
Transit point
Although the manganese station currently only loads
2 000 tons an hour, other stations have been built
to handle capacities of 7 000 tons an hour.
Trains move through the station at a continuous
speed of about 0.5 km/h, with each rail wagon
being filled with the loaded commodity in less than
a minute. This allows the train, which consists of
over 100 wagons, a two hour turnaround time
before it departs for the export terminal.
How it works
Willem du Toit, the Bulk Materials Handling Me-
chanical Engineer who worked on the manganese
Loading Bulk Efficiently
Load-out stations are in big demand for mining operations
which depend on rail transport of their raw materials. The
Transnet rail system works on strict allocation times for trains
to be loaded to very strict specifications and if these are not
met, penalties are imposed.
The llatest load-out staion from Bateman for manganese
We had to give special consideration to the highly
abrasive nature of the product
o EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
COVER STORY
Project Manager, Albert Hardie, of Bateman Engi-
neered Technologies
Willem du Toit, the Bulk Materials Handling Mechanical
Engineer who worked on the manganese project
project explains how the
system works. “For the
manganese mine, we
chose a concrete silo,
because of the storage
capacity required. Over
a certain tonnage storage
capacity, a concrete silo is
more cost effective than
a steel silo.
“A weigh-flask-loading
system was used for
the load-out station,
which consists of the
silo equipped with a mass
flow cone,” he says.
Learning capability
The Bateman load-out
station incorporates a pro-
grammable logic controller (PLC) and computer
controlled measurement system which has a
learning capability.
The ore is fed into a weigh flask from the
silo’s mass flow cone via a controlled slot. The
weighed load is then passed through the profile
chute into the wagons. The flow of ore out of
the storage silo and weigh flask is controlled
by single, long radial gates which are activated
hydraulically. The design ensures that the gates
close fully without spillage.
Distribution
The profile chute, which is fail-safe in the event
of an electrical or hydraulic power failure, is
designed to provide the load distribution accu-
racy. The flask system accurately weighs each
wagon’s load prior to depositing the material
into the moving wagon. With a built-in ‘learn-
ing capability’, the system then assesses the
effect of the loaded material’s density and flow
characteristics as the wagons are loaded.
The system automatically accounts for changing
conditions such as particulate size, moisture
and temperature. It then loads the train wagons
accurately. The profile chute system ensures
that axle-loading specifications are met. The
load-out station’s control systems are based on
client-specified hardware and Windows-based
software, allowing overall supervisory and data
acquisition (Scada) control of the operation.
The truck numbers are automatically validated
as they are entered into the Scada system
and operations are visually monitored through
closed-circuit television systems.
Accuracy
“Our load-out stations are custom built for each
Ensures that the gates close fully
without spillage
EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O ¯
application,” adds Willem. “The loading rates go up
to 7 000 tons an hour and are designed to load to
specific accuracies, meeting most countries’ statu-
tory requirements. The stations have the ability to
handle various rail wagons of differing capacities
and types and allow for a variation in
particle size and bulk density of the
loaded material. The load-out stations
also have the ability to handle different
types of material through the same facil-
ity. At the manganese mine, for example,
they’re currently loading two products
that differ in particle size, flow rate and
bulk density.”
Not new
Load-out station design is not new to
Bateman. The first stations were built
back in 1972 and the demand is growing
steadily. “Today, the trend is for quicker
and more efficient materials handling
systems,” says Albert in conclusion. “In
terms of load-out stations, we’ve refined
the technology to be cost effective while
catering to the very specific requirements of each
individual mine.”
Philip le Roux, Bulk Materials Handling Marketing
Manager, Bateman Engineered Technologies, Tel: (011)
201-2300, Email: philip.leroux@bateman-bet.com
COVER STORY
Catering to the very specific
requirements of each individual
mine
8 EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O O
S
ays Man Truck and Bus (SA) CEO Thomas
Hemmerich, “While the TGS WWW looks
similar to the earlier TG models, underneath
the body it is a completely new truck. Changes
to the engine and drivetrain have resulted in an
even higher reliability factor.”
Surviving the downturn
While the global economic crisis plunged the global
truck industry into its worst crisis in years, severely
punishing Man and its rivals, in Southern Africa the
market has remained relatively buoyant, compared
with Europe and the other parts of the world.
In 2009, Man acquired 25 +1 share of Sinotruk,
the market leader in heavy truck manufacture.
Thomas explains that the main reason for the
South African fleet owners can look forward to August 2010,
when Man Truck and Bus (SA) will introduce the TGS WWW
truck to the South African market.
25 +1 purchase, which gives Man a veto right
in major decision-making on the supervisory or
advisory board, is because the company brought
Man technology into this deal. As part of this deal,
Man licensed its TGA truck engine, chassis and
axle technologies to Sinotruk.
In 2010, various measures are being taken to ensure
the company operates at a moderate profit. In 2009,
Man SE divested itself of its majority shareholding
in Man Ferrostaal. Since then, the company has
focused on building its two major business areas,
Commercial Vehicles and Power Engineering.
The Workshop business also showed an improve-
ment over 2008. Thomas comments, “The economic
engine is still running here in South Africa despite
2009, which has been described as the worst year
for business in the past century.”
Thomas Hemmerich
Promise of
Stronger 2010
Truck Sales
In January, we almost doubled our sales figures
´O EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
TRUCKING
The Spare Parts business also performed
well. Says Thomas, “You can build the
best truck on the road but without the right
backing and spare part support, it will not
be able to continue to perform.
Exciting start
“In 2010, the year has kicked off with
truck sales that are very exciting,” says
Thomas. “In January, we almost doubled
our sales figures, and in terms of market
share in the extra heavy segment, we
increased our position from No 5 by the
end of 2009 to No 2 in February 2010.
This is a most exciting time with sales in
January being up about 100%.” In Febru-
ary, Man Truck and Bus (SA) sold
almost 200 units.”
Thomas is confident that Man Truck
and Bus (SA) will increase its busi-
ness in 2010 compared with 2009
by 20% to 30%.
“In 2009, we launched the MAN CLA
truck, manufactured by our joint ven-
ture with Man Force Trucks in India,
in all the right hand drive countries
in Africa. At the beginning of this
year, we achieved homologation in
America, in Germany, and in Egypt
– those are the big markets where you
can really put volume in – so sales
have been excellent so far, and we
expect to sell three times more than
last year,” concludes Thomas.
MAN Truck & Bus South Africa, Tel.: (011)
928-6800, Fax: (011) 974-3241, Email:
info@za.man-mn.com
Those are the big markets where
you can really put volume in
EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O ´´
W
hat is the reason for the name change?
Johan Richards, chief executive of
Nissan Diesel South Africa explains,
“We believe that evolving from Nis-
san Diesel into UD Trucks provides the company
with a clear vision and dedicated path going into
the future.”
Into Southern Africa
In its new guise, UD Trucks South Africa will now
be embarking on a major expansion into Southern
New Name,
Bigger Footprint
Africa. “As part of a new strategy adopted by the
Nissan Diesel Motor Corporation in Japan, NDSA will
from now on take responsibility for the company’s
activities in the entire Southern African region - a
total of 20 countries,” says Johan. “We strongly
believe that there are a number of untapped op-
portunities to provide quality products and services
to transport fleets across the region, especially in
countries like Nigeria and Angola.”
NDSA already has dealers in the SAF Economic
Zone which includes Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi,
Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Zambia and
Zimbabwe.
We don’t believe in merely ‘dumping’ sub-standard
products and services in Africa
The new UD 300WF which was recently released to the South African market
These are exciting prospects in
store for Nissan Diesel South
Africa (NDSA) in 2010. NDSA
is changing its name to UD
Trucks South Africa, and the
company is going to be releasing
a new range of Medium
Commercials this year.
TRUCKING
´' EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
share, down 6.6% on 2008’s results. MCVs made
up the majority of the market with 38.2% (up
3.2%), followed by the EHCVs, HCVs with 20.3%
(up 0.2) and Buses with 7.6%, up by 3.2%.
“We also expect some last minute buying leading up
to the World Cup Soccer in June, in order to fulfil
all the logistical requirements of the event,” says
Johan. “Although an event of such magnitude might
lead to a drop in productivity and a loss of trading
days, we expect substantial Government expendi-
ture afterwards, which could have another positive
effect on the truck industry,” he explains.
Vehicle finance
In addition, the availability of credit and loans is
showing some signs of improvement, and a revi-
sion in fleet companies’ strategies to rather replace
vehicles instead of sweating their assets, could
influence volumes in the year to come.
To enhance customers’ access to vehicle finance,
NDSA has announced the launch of UD Financial
Services as part of a joint venture with Wesbank.
“UD Financial Services will offer a range of products
and services to our customers as part of our aim to
provide a complete service throughout a vehicle’s
lifespan, which includes sales, vehicle financing,
fleet planning, training, parts and service support,”
says Johan.
These vehicle financing products include instalment
sales, financial and operating leases, financial rent-
als as well as full maintenance agreements.
“We believe that 2010 will be a year of consoli-
dation, with perhaps some marginal growth and
hopefully some much-needed job creation,” Johan
concludes.
Ray Schulz, Manager: Marketing & Retail Services., Tel:
(012) 564-9550, Email: raymonds@nissandiesel.co.za
No dumping
“We are in the process of establishing dealer-
ships across the region who all have to adhere to
the same stringent quality requirements we have
here in South Africa. We don’t believe in merely
‘dumping’ sub-standard products and services in
Africa,” emphasises
Johan.
The new Medium
Commercial Vehicle
range the company
will be introducing
into the country ad-
heres to Euro II emis-
sion regulations.
Market dynamics
Looking at the market
dynamics, the EHCV
segment only man-
aged to claim 34%
of the total market
The new UD Trucks logo
Fleet companies’ strategies to rather
replace vehicles instead of sweating
their assets
TRUCKING
A testing 2009
The South African truck market experienced a
very challenging year in 2009, recording a 45.4%
crash in sales over the twelve-month period end-
ing in December.
According to statistics released by the National
Association of Automobile Manufacturers of South
Africa (NAAMSA), the combined segments that
make up the local truck market, only managed a
total of 18 934 units last year, compared with the
34 659 trucks that were sold during 2008.
All the various market segments experienced a
decline in sales, most notably the Extra Heavy
Commercial Vehicles (EHCV) which recorded a
54.2% drop in sales to a total of 6,432 units.
Sales of Medium Commercial Vehicles (MCV)
declined by 40.4% to 7,229 units, sales of Heavy
Commercial Vehicles were 44.8% down to 3,839
units, while Buses recorded a total of 1,434 sales
- a 5.3% decline on 2008’s results.
EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O ´o
W
hen a splice linking an endless conveyor
belt fails, the costs to the mine or
industry using it can be astronomical,
and fatal accidents can also occur.
A standard that gives practical guidance on how
to splice parts of a conveyor belt together – and
that lessens the chance of hugely expensive splice
failures – is of considerable importance to the
mining industry.
Important news
The publication of SANS 486,
Conveyor belting – Finger splicing of
solid woven construction conveyor
belting (and related standards
SANS 484-1, 484-2, and SANS
485) is therefore important news
for the mining industry, and may
be called up in legislation.
SANS 486 specifies the require-
ments for hot-vulcanised finger
splicing of solid woven construction
conveyor belting.
Technical Communique
Important news for the mining industry: new standards
(Sans 486, 484-1, 484-2 and 485) published for splicing
conveyor belting
Paul Nel, Chairman of the Working Group on
Conveyor Belting that compiled these standards,
comments as follows:
Why were these standards written?
“The primary reason for writing national standards
such as these is to have safer installations and be-
cause poor conveyor belt splicing has traditionally
been a significant source of downtime to the mines
in South Africa. Often the incorrect equipment is
used to perform the splice, or incompatible com-
pounds are used, or the splice contractor simply
does not know and uses incorrect temperatures,
times or pressure in the curing press.
“Needless to says, this would
result in an inferior splice
which is at risk of breaking
once tension is applied to
the conveyor belt and the
system starts operating. The
specifications will not direct
the splice company on how
to do the splice, but it will
give both contractor and cli-
ent a very good idea of best
practice, and actions that are
not allowed during the splicing
process.
What is the importance
of these standards to
the local mining indus-
try?
”Using vendors who comply
with the standards will result
in more cost-effective instal-
CONVEYING
Give both contractor and client a very good
idea of best practice
´4 EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
lations, reducing total cost of ownership, and also
very important, safer installations. Let’s consider a
300 m long incline conveyor, conveying coal at a
material mass of 150 kg/m. Should it break, it is
quite possible to have the belt run back down the
structure, burying whatever is at the tail under 45
tonnes of coal.
Qualified splicer
“Naturally, this would be a significant safety risk. In
the end, we want to see a qualified splicer, trained
in the intricacies of splicing, perform a high quality
splice as governed by the specification.
“It is also anticipated that splicing will become a trade,
similar to boilermaker or fitter. In this manner the
mine will obtain peace of mind, knowing a qualified
individual performed the splice,” Paul concludes.
Standards Sales at the SABS, Tel: (012) 428-6883, Fax:
(012) 428-6928, Email sales@sabs.co.za. The standard
can also be downloaded directly from our secure standards
webstore: (http://www.sabs.co.za/Business_Units/Stan-
dards_SA/WebStore/WebStoreHome.aspx) on entry of a credit
card number.
CONVEYING
Burying whatever is at the tail under 45
tonnes of coal
EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O ´o

Rula’, derived from the Tswana word meaning
‘ruler’, stands for measurement, accuracy
and fit for purpose. It’s a company that
literally provides all the equipment needed
to move bulk materials. “Bulk Handling Today”
speaks to managing director of Rula, Roelf
Odendaal, at their premises in Honeydew near
Johannesburg, about the challenges of offering
such an extensive range of solutions.
“When we started off, we specialised in pneumatic
conveying systems, but
over the years
One of a Kind
we gradually got involved on the mechanical side
as well and now we manufacture most items in-
house,” he says. “Today, we have several unique
solutions that our team of design engineers have
come up with over time to solve specific bulk
handling problems.”
Coal feeder
Just one example is a coal feeder system Rula
designed, built and installed recently. “It is a South
African first and is typical of how we approach a
project,” says Roelf. “Mill coal feeders are usually
imported from overseas but we realised there was
a need in the market for feeders that are purpose
built for specific local conditions, so we did some
thorough research before developing our own
system.
“Already experienced in designing and manufactur-
ing belt conveyors, chain conveying systems, bins
and chutes, we weren’t fazed by the scales, pres-
sure vessel design and all the other components
that go into a coal feeder system,” adds Roelf.
“The principle is the same as other coal feeders,
but we custom-made everything in ours. Even the
belt scale, which is normally bought as a unit, was
designed and built by Rula. It has been installed
and, after sorting out minor teething problems, we
are well within the accuracy tolerances allowed
for coal feeders.”
Roelf Odendaal, managing director, Rula
Not many companies in the bulk handling industry in
South Africa offer full turnkey solutions in terms of
manufacturing an entire bulk handling system under
one roof. Most specialise in either pneumatic or me-
chanical conveying, structural fabrication or process
design and automation, so clients have to shop around
all over the place to get a plant built.
CONVEYING
We weren’t fazed all the components
that go into a coal feeder system
´o EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
CONVEYING
Ash and cement
One of the company’s specialities is ash and
cement handling systems. “Our main focus lies
in the energy, cement, mining and alumina
sectors, where we supply turnkey plants
from concept design to commissioning,”
says Roelf. “In addition to long distance
pneumatic handling system for these indus-
tries, we also produce silo filling, storage and
discharge systems.
“In ash handling, for example, we initially
implemented German-based technologies,
but have since adapted these, transforming
them into something we believe to be unique in
the world and specifically oriented to South African
conditions. One of our strengths is our ability to
learn, assimilate, adapt and improve significantly
on our equipment, processes and technology.”
Tailor made
Rula has an extensive range of in-house intellectual
property and designs that extends across all engi-
neering disciplines. “This enables us to comfortably
cope with sizeable contracts from designing original
concepts to the final commissioning of the project,
encompassing civil works right through to electrical,
control and instrumentation,” says Roelf.
“Because we have such a thorough working expe-
rience of prevailing South African conditions, our
designs cater for eventualities and contingencies
not necessarily specified in documents. Instead
of using standard data sheets to determine the
layout, we tailor-make the equipment to ensure the
dynamic and efficient flow
of material.”
Accuracy
The mark of true profes-
sionalism is revealed in
the company’s approach
to product process design
and the quest for accuracy.
“An extensive knowledge of
bulk materials handling is
necessary. You can’t just
go on the internet and find
information to build a bulk
handling plant. It comes
with many year’s experi-
ence,” says Roelf.
“Take wear protection for
example. It’s not just a case
of reinforcing areas of high
impact. The key is in pro-
viding for particles to flow
in a more elegant manner,
so that you actually remove
Cater for eventualities and contingen-
cies not necessarily specified in docu-
ments
EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O ´¯
the areas of turbulence. The equipment and plant
has to be designed to address all aspects of the
specific particle flow analysis. To aid us in this, we
make use of software design packages that include
2D as well as parametric packages dealing with
3D modelling. Finite element analysis is used to
optimise design and forms an integral part of our
design approach.
Quality
“Quality is never an accident,” stresses Roelf. “It is
always the result of high intention, sincere effort,
intelligent direction and skilful execution and it rep-
resents the wise choice of many alternatives. With
this in mind, we are proud of our newly-awarded ISO
9001:2008 certification. This achieve-
ment is based on a strong skills-set,
integral to our core business.
“All employees are committed to the op-
timisation and improvement of efficiency
because we all share the same goal that
enables us to move effortlessly and freely
through the consulting, manufacturing
and construction disciplines. Continuous
and extensive in-house training ensures
a low staff turnover and our people take
immense pride in our achievements. I am
also extremely proud of the individually
strong employees that have supported me
in carrying and building the company.”
Roelf says.
The future
Roelf has big plans for the future, not
just for the company, but also to boost
the bulk handling industry in general.
“We’re awaiting the final go-ahead for a
concept I call the Rula Tecno Park,” he
says in conclusion. It’s a
new 35 000 square metre
facility within a kilometre
of our existing premises.
In addition to offices,
construction facilities,
shops, warehousing and
assembly areas, we envis-
age a section dedicated to
entrepreneurs.
We know from experience
that there are many people
who have ideas that could
revolutionise business or
industry, but don’t have
the facilities to develop
them. Our vision is to ac-
commodate those who are
involved in the bulk materials handling or power
industries in some way, we’ll give them access to
our expertise, support services and corporate facili-
ties such as accounting, marketing, manufacture
and distribution, whether they’re manufacturing
components for us or to market themselves, as
long as it is for the bulk handling industry.”
Roelf Odendaal, Rula, Tel: (011) 795-1040, Email: roelf@
rula.co.za, Website: www.rula.co.za
CONVEYING
Providing for
particles to flow in a
more elegant
manner
´8 EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
The beat goes on
With the participation of: Principal sponsor:
Silver sponsor:
25 - 28 July 2010
Sun City
T 011 805 6616 or upavon@icon.co.za
www.sapics.org.za
The 2010 Soccer World Cup will offer
many challenges for the operations
management profession. But what
happens when it is all over? Supply
Chain and Operations Management
professionals must maintain a steady,
reliable beat as we continue to move
African industry forward to ensure our
sustainable footprint.
Platinum sponsors:
The SAPICS Annual Conference is the Leading
Event in Africa for Supply Chain and Operations
Management Professionals.
32
nd
Annual Conference & Exhibition
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as well as training in the correct use of the Mato
system is provided for the mine’s team respon-
sible for the conveyor belt advances. This free
service ensures that the strength, integrity and
durability of the system is not compromised dur-
ing installation.”
Only one of its type
The complete conveyor belt fastening system
combines a lacer, cutter, skiver, lacing pins,
wavemaster and clips to produce a cost-effective,
durable alternative to hot and cold splicing. The
conveyor belt fastening clips are manufactured
at the South African ISO 9001:2000
accredited facility using high quality
technology on the only machine of its
type in Africa. “Best practice quality
systems ensure the highest integrity
of the product with additional quality
checks done on random samples by our
German principals, all of which enables
us to verify the quality through traceable
batch numbers,” adds Trevor.
This conveyor belt fastening system
has attracted a lot of repeat business
for the company, with the primary
benefit being quick installation – half
an hour to three quarters of an hour
on a 1 200mm wide PVC belt, includ-
ing clamping and cutting. Following
this, the average life of a mechanical
spliced belt is in the region of six to
twelve months depending on condi-
tions, yet some customers have splices
that have achieved a lifespan of up to
three years
Fast fasteners
The strength of the clip joint can be
traced to its engineering design whereby
a minimum pressure of 3 tons is exerted
by the lacer on each clip and staple as
it is inserted in the conveyor, pressing
the plates into the surface of the belt
and pushing the staples through the
carcass and two-stage bending.
The pressure causes an interference
fit, ensuring that the fasteners have
considerable pullout strength and
resistance to the splice being ripped
out of the belt.
Using high quality technology
on the only machine of its type
in Africa

A major advantage when using our belt lac-
ing systems is that this locally-manufactured
product is available ex-stock,” Trevor Jeffries,
manager at Mato Products, says.
“In addition, a high level of technical assistance
Just 30 Minutes
The Mato belt lacing system is available ex-stock from Mato Products
CONVEYING
A broken conveyor belt is a safety hazard and a major con-
tributor to lost production. With the Mato high quality belt
fastening system, a conveyor belt can be joined or repaired
within just 30 minutes, a significant saving in downtime when
compared with hot or cold splicing.
'O EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
CONVEYING
A total of four fastener sizes cover all belt require-
ments needed by the mining industry and all have
a low profile for better scraper interaction, as well
as less wear and reduced noise on pulleys and
idlers.
Half an hour to three quarters of an hour on a 1 200mm
wide PVC belt, including clamping and cutting
The strength of the clip joint can be traced to its engineering design
Two types
Two specific types of belt lacing systems are pro-
duced by Mato in South Africa – the U30 Series for
conveyor belts with a tensile strength greater than
1 200 kN and the S30 Series for conveyor belts
with a tensile strength less than 1 200 kN. The
U and S fasteners are manufactured in 200mm
strips and in standard belt widths of 1 050mm,
1 200mm, 1 350mm and 1 500mm.
The U30 (Ultimate System Series) has stainless
steel plate and spring steel staple material, resulting
in the strongest possible connection of the splice
and longest service life. The S30, on the other
hand, is recommended for medium strength belts
in coal mining applications, quarries, cement and
steel plants and general industry.
Important components
A number of accessories have been developed to
supplement the belt fastening system, including a
novel belt cleaning system and plate fasteners.
Research and development led to the manufacture of
the belt skiver in South Africa. This is an important
component in the fastening of nitrile covered PVC
and rubber conveyor belts, and is now exported
worldwide. A wavemaster system is also available
to counteract the wave effect when the clips are
used on rubber conveyors belts.
“These systems have a proven track record,” Trevor
concludes proudly. “And have been approved by,
among others, the Sasol and BHP Billiton stan-
dardisation committees due to their durability,
competitive price and ease of installation.
Bernadette Wilson, Multotec Group, Tel: (011) 923-6193,
Email: marketing@multotec.co.za, www.multotec.com
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Any standard oil-operated coupling can be easily
modified to run with water
T
he new closed loop TPKL model can be
controlled during any starting process to
allow inspection speed applications as well
as reduced speed applications under full
load. Globally there are hundreds of successful
installations and companies such as USA based
BHP Billiton have standardised the product for the
group’s conveyor systems.
Hans reports that there are four local reference sites
with installed units ranging in sizes from 1 X 562TPKL-
E, 2 X 650DTPKL-E and 10 X 650TPKL-E. “Another
sixteen 650TPKL-E units will be commissioned
soon with a further order for twenty 650TPKL-R’s
currently being negotiated. All the installed units
are running well with no reported failures. The
new Voith Fill Controlled Coupling type TPKL is be-
coming increasingly
popular in longer
overland conveyor
installations”, he
adds.
Eliminating slip
While using the
same hydrodynam-
ic process as the
TPKL, the TPKL-
syn coupling will
at full speed, clutch
the input to the
output, eliminating
slip (speed loss),
normally associated
with fluid coupling
applications.
This feature offers
increased efficien-
cy to applications
with high power
consumption such
as mills or kilns
and with a power
correction on the
motor optimises
the installation’s
CONVEYING
Setting the Benchmark
According to Voith Manager – Engineering Services, Hans Voshol, the proven technology of their fluid cou-
plings keeps abreast of modern demands and remains the most cost-effective installed product in drive sys-
tems for the protection of the drive train as well as the driven machine. Although lucratively applied in various
controlled power sharing applications, these open loop systems are mainly installed to slowly accelerate belt
conveyor systems to full speed. The couplings are also used as clutching devices to stop and restart the con-
veyor without shutting down the main motor.
Voith fill controlled couplings at Saldanha Port
Hans Voshol, Voith Manager, Engineering Services
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Without disturbing the drive alignment which saves time
as the need for alignment before restarting operation is
eliminated
efficiency and which translates to dramatically
reduced operating costs.
These cost savings offset against the cost of the
TPKL-syn couplings, create a long-term saving
benefit for the customer. Two units manufactured
for the US market were tested in December 2002
and have since been operating successfully.
Significant specification
Voith fluid couplings were adjusted to ensure ad-
herence to Atex standards and specifications, prior
to Europe’s development of an Atex standard for
equipment manufactured for potentially explosive,
dangerous applications. The specification is sig-
nificant in that it provides proof that the surface
temperature will never exceed a certain value
during operation.
Hans elaborates, “The specification therefore
presents various levels of intensity for a range of
applications of values and standards. Atex speci-
CONVEYING
Voith TurboSyn coupling
fications require fusible plugs located
closer to the operating medium to ensure
that temperatures are accurately moni-
tored and that the plug is immediately
activated when the temperature rises
excessively.
“The new BTM unit features an improved
non-contacting thermal switch to provide
constant temperature monitoring with
feedback to the control PLC.”
Water as an operating medium
Voith has also developed a standard
coupling range that uses water as an
operating medium which is fully com-
pliant with ISO 1400I environmental
specifications so that when a coupling
actuates a fusible plug, only potable
water leaks into the soil keeping the
environment free of any oil contamina-
tion. Water also increases the coupling’s
torque capability as water density is
higher than that of the usually speci-
fied grade 32 hydraulic oil.
“With environmental issues high on
the global agenda for all industry, our
water operated couplings are rapidly
becoming an increasingly popular, cost
effective, environmentally friendly
choice for diverse applications. It is
also important to note that we have
engineered the products over the
past few years so that any standard
oil-operated coupling can be easily
modified to run with water.
Although conditions apply, cou-
plings from 1985 onwards can be modified as they
already contain the correct parts for the sealed
bearing chamber, comments Hans.
Single drive conveyors
The constant filled T-syn coupling is capable of
locking the driving with the driven side at full speed
to operate without slip, thus no losses (power
saving). The coupling (Type T- syn) was tested for
two years in one of the six test facilities at Voith
Crailsheim, Germany, and also field tested on a mill
application in that country before being marketed.
T-syn couplings are now operating successfully in
various applications worldwide and VTZA is cur-
rently negotiating the upgrading of mill drives in
Botswana converting existing soft starter to a more
efficient T-syn coupling.
The couplings provide the full hydrodynamic starting
process and lock-up at full speed. Should speed
reduction occur for any reason, eg, a voltage drop
on a mine, caused when big motors are started
directly on line, the coupling will declutch at ap-
proximately 5% under speed, re-accelerate the
driven machine hydrodynamically up to full speed
and lock-up again for operation without any speed
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or torque loss. “There is however one drawback to this
coupling (T-syn),” says Hans. “It can only be used on
single applications such as fans, pumps, crushers,
mills and on single drive conveyors”.
Buffer changes
Various proven connecting technologies are avail-
able to support the fluid couplings on the motor and
to ensure that it is possible to change the coupling
radially without disturbing the drive alignment which
saves time as the need for alignment before restarting
operation is eliminated.
Voith BR (Buffer Roller) couplings installed with
these connecting methods are ideal to ensure buffer
changes in situ which radically reduce maintenance
and downtime. The company has also designed and
engineered cradle supports for larger size couplings
to eliminate the overhung weight effect on the motor
shaft and bearings.
The coupling now becomes self- supported and can
be exchanged as a unit by disconnecting the flex-
ible connecting couplings and radially removing and
installing the coupling and cradle minimising the
alignment required.
Worldwide patents
“Voith adds approximately 400 new patents per an-
num to the more than 7 000 worldwide patents we
already hold and we always ensure that our product
range is compliant with the latest requirements of
international specifications. We are able to offer our
customers service and maintenance contracts where
outsourcing of these services is needed or where the
OEM’s expertise would better serve the customer’s
operation,” concludes Hans.
Hans Voshol, Voith Turbo South Africa, Tel: 011 418 4000 /
Fax: 011 418 4080, Email: hans.voshol@voith.com
Roy Webster, Tel: (011) 418-4036 (direct)/(011) 418-4000 /
Fax: 011 418 4080, Email: roy.webster@voith.com
CONVEYING
2010 Lifting Guide
“Bulk Handling Today”, a magazine endorsed by
LEESA (Lifting Equipment Engineering of SA),
will be publishing the first ever Lifting Guide
in May 2010. The guide will be distributed
together with the May 2010 edition of “Bulk
Handling Today” and from our stand at Electra
Mining in October 2010.
The guide will advise industry users on how
to choose, use and maintain lifting equipment
that is ‘tailor-made’ for their specific needs
and applications.
Generic type of cranes and their specifications
are discussed in detail.
Contact: Surita Marx on
Tel: (011) 781-1401, Fax: (011) 781-1403,
Email: bulkhandling@promech.co.za
'4 EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
30 Supply Chain Today Jan 2010
This prestigious award recognises
people, projects and products
that have gone above and
beyond the call of duty to
enhance the environment in which
they operate.
The inaugural awards in 2009
enjoyed a wonderful response
from the supply chain community
and everything is on track to make
this year’s event one of the indus-
try’s most prestigious accolades.
Come and see who walks away
with the coveted trophies and
enter your product or project for
this year’s event.
Entries for this year’s event close in
June and the awards ceremony is
being planned for 26 August 2010.
Green
Supply
Chain
Awards
Contact: Catherine Larkin on
Tel: (011) 789-7327/787-9127,
Cell: 083 300 0331, Fax: (011) 787-7865
Email: cvlarkin@ciltsa.org.za
Are You
Doing
Your
Bit?
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T
his waste steel material ends up in the final
processing stage, contaminating the final
product. But, more importantly, tramp iron
causes a substantial amount of damage along
the way: wearing away the rubber-lined cyclones,
pumps, and pipelines… and this will occur many
hundreds of times as it gets re-circulated through
the mill.
Fortunately, there is a simple solution to this prob-
lem. “Bulk Handling Today” speaks to Jacques
Henning, director of Eriez Magnetics, a company
that designs and manufactures mill trunnion magnet
systems for the removal of errant magnetic waste
products from milling circuits.
“We have supplied four such permanent mill magnetic
Mill Magnetic Systems
One of the greatest enemies of any milling operation comes from the system itself – the media, such as steel
balls, used to grind the mined ore. While it’s grinding down the ore, the balls are wearing itself away at the
same time. Eventually worn balls pass out of the system through the cyclone overflow.
systems for African operations, and many more for
international companies. But Eriez wasn’t always
this big,” he says.
Could create a spark
“We started off as a family business supplying
permanent magnets to facilities in the USA that
grind wheat and grain. The magnets remove any
possible contaminants from the final product as
well as any other debris such as bolts or nuts,
which if they were to impinge on any steelwork,
could create a spark. With the amount of dust
involved in these operations, this could create a
huge explosion.
“Insurance companies insisted that these facilities
be fitted with magnets, so our business grew, and
as it grew, the applications became more apparent
to mineral processors.”
A system under construction in the Eriez workshop
WEIGHING
In an industry that may use up to three to five tonnes of
grinding media each day, the implications are clear
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A magnetics system from Eriez
A clear idea
Eriez has also seen local demand for
permanent magnets grow, although
Jacques believes the company still has
a long way to go.
“We have supplied systems to gold mines
in Mali and to the platinum industry.
Randgold Resources are standardising
on these types of installations on all
their mines such as Morila Gold Mine,
Loulo and Tongon-Mali (West Africa),
replacing the trommel screens. But South
African engineers are catching on. They
go overseas to conventions and mining
operations, see these permanent magnets
in operation, and gain a clear idea from
practical examples on how they could
benefit at home.”
How it works
Jacques describes a mill permanent
magnetic system: “Envisage this: at the
discharge end of the mill we’ve installed
a system of permanent magnets. As
the worn ball is discharged, making its
way to the pump sump, it becomes attracted to
the magnetic field. It adheres to the inside of the
mill trunnion as it is conveyed to the edge of the
magnet, where it is released at the point where
the magnetic field ends. The worn ball then drops
into a chute to be fed away from the main slurry
stream.”
The benefits are substantial. According to Jacques,
in a case study performed by an independent body,
as much as 40% of the grinding material was re-
moved as small waste iron particles. Average power
consumption dropped from 7600 kW to 6800 kW,
and the time required to grind the material to a
size where it could pass onto the next stage of the
processing system, was improved by 5%.
Slight advantage
In an industry that may use up to three to five
tonnes of grinding media each day, the implications
are clear. “Improved grinding efficiency, higher
throughput, lower power consumption and reduced
maintenance are clear benefits of such a system.
Mining and mineral processing is becoming more
competitive, and the company which gains a slight
advantage wins,” asserts Jacques.
He points out, however, that such a system is not
applicable to everyone. “Some mines use the very
ore they’re mining as the grinding media itself.
They may also be mining magnetic minerals, in
which case you don’t want our magnets to remove
anything. But any mill that uses steel balls as a
grinding media, such as ball-mills and semi-au-
togenous-mills, will benefit by using a trunnion
magnet system.
Upfront
This magnet system is also best suited for new
WEIGHING
It’s a lot simpler to work from the initial design stage of
the mill
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Jacques Henning, director at Eriez Magnetics
WEIGHING
We need to find out what size they’re keen on removing as a
first step
mines and projects
although certain ex-
isting operations
may be able to in-
stall the system.
”While it can be
retrofitted in certain
cases, it’s a lot sim-
pler to work from the
initial design stage
of the mill. We look
at the size of balls
they may use, what
magnetic strength is
required to pick up
the material and the
force, volume and
specific gravity of
slurry coming out
of the mill. From
there, we come up
with a design and
a quotation.
“Ultimately, it depends on what the customer wants. We can overkill
and make a very powerful magnet capable of picking up anything
including full-size steel balls, but the price escalates. So we need to
find out what size they’re keen on removing as a first step.”
The Goods
The systems are manufactured wholly in South Africa including cut-
ting, sizing and magnetising of the magnetic material. Eriez supplies
both rare-earth and traditional barium-ferrite permanent magnets. The
only overseas connection is that the magnetic material is imported
from Eriez China. “Their quality is excellent,” says Jacques, “We used
to import from the USA, but they’re no longer as price-competitive
as they once were. In today’s market, most magnetic material comes
from China. We use a variety of grades and thicknesses to meet the
specific needs of each application.”
Size is also not a problem. “We provide different sized systems for
different mills: anything from a one-metre diameter discharge to one
as large as 3,5 metres,” explains Jacques. Eriez’s magnet systems
have also found a home in many mining house research laboratories
at corporations such as Anglo American and BHP Billiton.
Just ask
Although this is hardly a new technology, Jacques states that most
engineers are aware of the system, but may not think it will work for
their projects. “Ask us,” encourages Jacques. “Is it feasible? Has it been
done in similar applications? We’re part of an international organisation,
with affiliates and projects all over the world. All the information is
available, so we’ll be able tell the client if our technology is applicable
to their needs. And if we don’t know, we’ll find out.”
Jacques Henning, Eriez Magnetics, Tel: (011) 444-9160, Fax: (011) 444-9166,
Email: jhenning@eriez.co.za
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Suffers little wear and tear, and retains accuracy for long
periods of time
H
owever, there is now a belt weigher on the
market that operates without load cells,
obviating these problems and deliver-
ing a precise, consistent accuracy that
requires very little maintenance. This is according
to Ian Fraser, managing director of Tshwane-based,
Rand Technical Services.
Says Ian, “Procon belt weighers are used through-
out the world in countries such as China, Sweden,
United Kingdom, Scotland and the United States.
Suitable for the toughest, harshest environments,
they function throughout a broad industry spec-
trum- particularly in mining, quarrying, power
generation, pharmaceutical, chemical and general
engineering. Materials weighed range from coal to
chemicals, ore, crushed stone, cement and even
food processing.”
Resonator
He continues, “At the heart of the Inflo Resometric
belt weigher is the Digital Resometric Force Trans-
Precise and Reliable
Most industries involved with bulk materials are familiar with
the frustrations of continuous belt weighing. Load cell support
structures become clogged with product and require regular
cleaning, and accuracy drift as a result of load pounding on
the load cells necessitates frequent calibration.
ducer, or resonator, which provides high measure-
ment performance levels over a long working life.
With no moving parts, the fine wire of the resonator
is tuned to the standard, zero-weight level of the
applied force from the weigh carriage itself.
This resonant frequency then changes in proportion
to the weight of the load passing over the carriage
rollers. The change in frequency is measured and
Ian Fraser, managing director of Tshwane-based,
Rand Technical Services
WEIGHING
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carriage has been installed and aligned, it will only
be sensitive to vertical forces.
Changing angles
Inflo belt weighers have also been used extensively
on mobile equipment such as ship loaders and
stackers or reclaimers. Despite the belt weighers
being continually subjected to changing angles of
operation, no significant cosine weighing errors
occur. Procon’s proprietary Astatic Mass Zero
Compensation system automatically compensates
for the changing angles, ensuing accurate weighing
of the suspended weigh carriage mass.
The Inflo belt weigher meets international weights
and measures requirements, and is certified ac-
cording to OIML recommendation R50 (continuous
totalising automatic weighing instruments.)
Ian concludes, “This technology is relatively new
to the local market, but it is well-known, and
well-proven internationally, under a broad range
of operating and climatic conditions. Saving time,
downtime, resources and maximising profit for
our customers, the belt weighers allow highly ac-
curate commercial product transfer and supply for
anything from power station coal stocks and iron
ore, to agricultural produce such as wheat or sugar.
The applications for this innovative technology are
almost endless.”
Richard Cooper, Rand Technical Services, Tel: (012) 993-
9620, Fax: (012) 993-9636, Email: richard@rtsafrica.
co.za, www.rts@edx.co.za/www.rtsafrica.co.za
processed by the electronics and, when combined
with the belt travel speed (as measured by a ta-
chometer) provides an accurate weight reading
per unit time.”
Minimal stress
As there is minimal physical stress on the reso-
nating wire itself, it suffers little wear and tear,
and retains accuracy for long periods of time.
Nevertheless, roll-over calibration weights allow
for easy, periodic calibration checks. Normally
parked across the conveyor stringers, these dead
weights are easily and simply lowered by a cam
mechanism whenever calibration is required, and
provide a good indication of the measurement
consistency achieved.
Interference from poor belt tracking, or badly
aligned loads, is prevented by the lateral chains
fitted between the weigh carriage and the rigid
conveyor. These chains ensure that, once the weigh
Despite the belt weighers being
continually subjected to changing
angles of operation, no significant
cosine weighing errors occur
The new EP50 beltweigher controller for use in new or upgrade installations
WEIGHING
Belt weighers are fitted on this stacker/reclaimer working at Tianjin Port,
China
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ENDORSING BODY
T
he meeting was chaired by Phil Staples
with Graham Downing answering general
questions, while Roy Barbour handled the
financial report of the
institute. Last year’s annual
Golf Day again turned out to be
a financial success that allows
the institute to present a charity
of choice with a donation every
year and this event is set to
continue in the future.
Invitation to join
Graham stressed the impor-
tance of recruiting more mem-
bers and explained some of the
actions the institute is taking
to encourage more people in
the industry to join.
One strategy is to write to ev-
eryone in the industry about the
courses the institute is offering.
Although the first course is
elementary, it’s aimed at junior
staff in companies involved in
materials handling. Graham
reported that just this year
more than ten candidates have
already submitted their assign-
ments to the institute. The sec-
ond course is near completion
and members in the audience
volunteered their expertise to
assist in either revising study
material or helping out with the
marking of assignments. This
SAIMH AGM
AGM’s are often long-winded affairs,
but the South African Institute of Ma-
terial Handling’s AGM, held last month
at the ERPM Golf Club in Boksburg,
was dealt with swiftly so that every-
one could settle back and listen to the
usual guest speaker presenting an ap-
propriate materials handling topic.
Company Affiliate Members
Company Represent
Bateman Engineered Technologies Ltd Mr R Pieterse
Brelko Conveyor Products (Pty) Ltd Mr P Ellis
CKIT Conveyor Engineers (Pty) Ltd Messrs P Staples/A Woollen
CPM Engineering Mr Doug Fenner
CT Systems cc Mr A.Singer
Conveyor Watch (Pty) Ltd Mr A Surtees
David Brown Gear Industries (Pty) Ltd Mr D Whitford
Deebar Mining & Industrial Supplies Mr D Soekoe
ELB Engineering Services (Pty) Ltd Dr S J Meijers
Engicon Systems (Pty) Ltd Mr Dave Morgan
Facet Engineering cc Mr C.D. Fairweather
Goba Moahloli Keeve Steyn Mr T Goba
Group Line Projects (Pty) Ltd Mr D Kelly
Hansen Transmissions SA (Pty) Ltd Mr C E Dicks
Illustech Mr Rick Du Toit
Ketapele Flexible Manufacturing cc Mr 0 L Leburu
Macsteel VRN Mr Ross Wylie
Martin Engineering Mr J Hickling
Melco Conveyor Equipment Mr Derek Cohen
Osborn Engineered Products(Pty)Ltd Ms C Fallows
P D Engineering Services cc Mr Kevin Thomas
PDNA M&I (PTY) LTD Mr Devan Govender
Quadrant PHS Mr H Pretorius
Renold Crofts (Pty) Ltd Mr N Pera
Sandvik Materials Handling Africa Mr A Pain
Screw Conveyors & Material Handling Mr M Overy
Secrivest (Pty) Ltd Ms Ann Dix
SEW Eurodrive Mr U Roos
Shatterprufe (Pty) Ltd Mr Q Van Meyren
Spar Western Cape Mr S Engelbrecht
Super Dock Systems Mr C Van Zyl
Unitek Engineering Mr Bruce Wilson
was welcomed by the committee.
Yet another term
After the formalities, and the current com-
mittee remaining in place for yet another
term, Phil Staples and Luigi Liccardo of
Ckit Conveyor Engineers presented a paper
on: ‘The procedure for module, gantry and
equipment selection for overland conveyors’.
Phil’s colourful presentation showed several
installations of elevated conveyor system and,
in some instances, his theories drew interesting
comments and questions from the audience.
Graham Downey, 082 372 5150
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Market Forum
Good economic sense
“Using metal spraying technology instead of purchasing a
new engine block can result in significant cost savings,”
Andrew Yorke of Metric Automotive Engineering says. “This
innovative technology costs one tenth of the price of a new
engine block, which should be music to any plant owner’s
ears.”
Andrew explains that as the pioneer of reclaiming engine
blocks in South Africa, Germiston-based Metric Automo-
tive Engineering has successfully brought numerous diesel
engine blocks back to OEM specifications. “We adopted
metal deposition technology some ten years ago and have
had great successes with this technique, which originated
in the United States.
“Engine blocks have a finite lifespan, with fretting invariably
occurring between the block face and the cylinder head
over time. It is possible to skim a block once or twice when
reconditioning an engine, but the stage is always reached
An engine block on which metal deposition technology has been used to bring it back to
OEM specifications
when the block must be replaced,” he
continues.
“Engines up to the size of Cummins
KT50C, Detroit Diesel 16V149, Komatsu
6170 and Cat 3516, can and have been
accommodated,” he adds.
Andrew says that data collected by the
company shows that, depending on the
condition of the old block, savings of up
to 90% can be realised on a new block.
Because the imported boring and mill-
ing machines used by the company are
computer controlled, accurate results are
achieved that conform to OEM standards,
and the time taken for set up and the
actual overhaul costs are considerably
reduced.
Andrew Yorke. Metric Automotive Engineering
(Pty) Ltd, Tel (011) 873-2350
Fast and efficient screening
Rotex Screeners feature a unique gyratory-reciprocating mo-
tion and highly efficient mesh cleaning system making it ideal
Level 5 BBBEE accreditation
Humboldt Wedag, one of the leading sup-
pliers of materials processing technology
to the mining and industrial minerals
industries in southern Africa, recently
achieved a BBBEE Level 5 accredita-
tion rating.
Johannes Kottmann, managing director
of Humboldt Wedag, says: “We are now
aiming to achieve a BBBEE contributor
level 4 rating to give our cutomers 100%
procurement recognition as part of the
medium term strategy.”
One of the next initiatives for the company
will be to significantly increase skills
development. “BBBEE is a dynamic process and attention
will obviously be given to all elements within the framework,”
Johannes notes. “Preferential procurement will also be a
major focus on the upcoming Assmang Khumani Expansion
Project contract for which we have recently been awarded a
contract for the jigs and ancillary equipment.”
Johannes Kottmann, Khd Humboldt Wedag International, Tel: (011)
397-4660, Website: www.humboldtwedag.co.za
o4 EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O Advanced Materials Today September 2007 39
the society for
animals in distress
FOR AS LITTLE AS R50 A MONTH YOU CAN MAKE A
DIFFERENCE IN THEIR LIVES WITHOUT MAKING A
HOLE IN YOUR POCKET!
We thousands of animals in nine townships and informal settlements that we visit five days a week.
We their sickness both on-site and at our professionally-run animal hospital in Vorna Valley, Midrand.
We ignorance by educating in 50 underprivileged schools and in the field.
We communities through education, training, skills’ development and capacity building.
PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.animalsindistress.org.za OR BETTER STILL, VISIT OUR PREMISES AT

PROTECT
HEAL
FIGHT
EMPOWER
“THE PADDOCKS”
PLOT 20, MOERDYK STREET
VORNA VALLEY, MIDRAND
BIG
TELEPHONE : 083 640 8825 OR 011-466-0261
FAX : 011-466-0262
ALTERNATE FAX : 086 626 5441
E-Mail : animals@animalsindistress.org.za
PO BOX 391164, BRAMLEY, 2018
BANKING DETAILS :
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
BRAMLEY, CODE 252105
ACCOUNT NUMBER : 5147 0054 747
FUNDRAISING NO : 01 100326 0001; 001-249 NPO; PBO : 930012662
ANIMALS
Healing
their
IGNORANCE
Fighting
Empowering
OTHERS
To do
SICKNESS
THE SAME
Protecting
T
H
E
S
O
CIET
Y
F
O
R
A
N
I
M
A
L
S
I N D
I
S
T
R
E
S
S
CARING FOR DISADVANTAGED ANIMALS SINCE 1958
D IT OR ER D A ON NSTRUC ON EB D ON TI I TI
NAM : _____ __________ _________ _________ _________ __________ __________ _________ E ___ ___ ____ ____ ___ ___ ___
POST L DDRESS :_________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __________ ________ A A ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ ___
E-MAI : _______ _________ _________ __ TELE HONE : ________ __________ _________ _____ L ___ ____ ____ P ___ ___ ____
BANK ________ _________ _________ __ BRA __________ __________ _________ _____ : ____ ____ ___ NCH : _ ___ ___ ____
RANCH CO : A UNT NO : B DE CCO
Y E OF ACCOU NT SAV S T AN MIS IO T P NT : CURRE ING R S S N
DATE OF IRS AY ENT : MONT LY NAT N MO : F T P M H DO IO A UNT

SIGNE __________ _________ _________ DAT : ______ _________ _________ ________ D : ___ ____ ___ E ____ ____ ___

R
Y S W THEM YOU C RE B MAKING A MONT L DONA ION! HO A Y H T
T
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S
O
CIETY
F
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R
A
N
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M
A
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I N D
IS
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S
S
T
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CIETY
F
O
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I N D
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S
s l t e 50 m hat u com ta o d, can ak fference n m ’s l fe. A i tl as R a onth, or w ever yo can for bly aff r m e a di i an ani al i IG B
AMT Sept 07 zin.indd 39 2007/09/11 10:28:49 AM
EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O oo
Market Forum
Rugged lightweight ramps
A range of lightweight aluminium loading
ramps for the safe loading and unload-
ing of wheeled, rubber and steel track
vehicles is now available from plant
equipment specialist, Bobcat Equipment
South Africa.
Manufactured from exceptionally high-
strength alloys by Italian company, CLM,
the meticulous design of the ramps in-
corporates double-T profiles which keep
the weight to a minimum and further add
to the ramps’ unrivalled strength; a very
small surface guarantees the highest
bending strength with the least weight.
In addition, the rugged structure and
thick beams easily withstand dents and
knocks, eliminating the risk of cracks or
splits in the ramp structure.
Ramps for wheeled and rubber track vehicles, available in
lengths up to 5 metres, handle load capacities from 200kg
to 14 000kg while ramps for steel tracks are designed to
support weights ranging from 2 500 kg to 28 600kg. Ramps
are supplied with and without edges and different connec-
tions are also available.
The ramps undergo rigorous testing, all parts are certified
and all CLM manufactured products comply with the highest
internationally adopted quality standards.
Deryck Jorda, Bobcat Equipment SA (Pty) Ltd, Tel: (011) 908-2377
/ (01)1 389-4400, Email: info@bobcatsa.co.za, Website: www.bob-
catsa.co.za
for use for a wide range of material screening applications
throughout many industries.
The screeners - available locally from materials handling
specialists Lockers Engineers - provide rapid distribution,
stratification and separation of particles through the gyratory-
reciprocating motion of the near horizontal screen surface.
Designed to maintain capacity, the positive screen mesh
system contains bouncing balls to keep screen openings
clear and aid particle stratification.
The gyratory motion begins with a horizontal circular motion
at the feed end that immediately spreads the material across
the width of the screen, maximising use. The circular motion
gradually diminishes along the length of the machines to
an elliptical path and finally to a near straight-line motion
at the discharge end.
This motion allows the
machines to process ma-
terial at a high capacity
and improves screening
performance with near-
size material. There is
no vertical component to
this motion, thus keeping
the material in constant
contact with the screen
surface.
The corrosion-resistant
design and construction
withstands even abrasive
applications including
mined salt, water softener
pellets and edible salt.
Johan Breet, Lockers En-
gineers SA (Pty) Ltd, Tel:
(011) 769-1420, Fax: (011)
762-4719
Advanced Materials Today September 2007 39
the society for
animals in distress
FOR AS LITTLE AS R50 A MONTH YOU CAN MAKE A
DIFFERENCE IN THEIR LIVES WITHOUT MAKING A
HOLE IN YOUR POCKET!
We thousands of animals in nine townships and informal settlements that we visit five days a week.
We their sickness both on-site and at our professionally-run animal hospital in Vorna Valley, Midrand.
We ignorance by educating in 50 underprivileged schools and in the field.
We communities through education, training, skills’ development and capacity building.
PLEASE VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT www.animalsindistress.org.za OR BETTER STILL, VISIT OUR PREMISES AT

PROTECT
HEAL
FIGHT
EMPOWER
“THE PADDOCKS”
PLOT 20, MOERDYK STREET
VORNA VALLEY, MIDRAND
BIG
TELEPHONE : 083 640 8825 OR 011-466-0261
FAX : 011-466-0262
ALTERNATE FAX : 086 626 5441
E-Mail : animals@animalsindistress.org.za
PO BOX 391164, BRAMLEY, 2018
BANKING DETAILS :
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
BRAMLEY, CODE 252105
ACCOUNT NUMBER : 5147 0054 747
FUNDRAISING NO : 01 100326 0001; 001-249 NPO; PBO : 930012662
ANIMALS
Healing
their
IGNORANCE
Fighting
Empowering
OTHERS
To do
SICKNESS
THE SAME
Protecting
T
H
E
S
O
CIET
Y
F
O
R
A
N
I
M
A
L
S
I N D
I
S
T
R
E
S
S
CARING FOR DISADVANTAGED ANIMALS SINCE 1958
D IT OR ER D A ON NSTRUC ON EB D ON TI I TI
NAM : _____ __________ _________ _________ _________ __________ __________ _________ E ___ ___ ____ ____ ___ ___ ___
POST L DDRESS :_________ _________ _________ _________ _________ __________ ________ A A ___ ____ ____ ____ ___ ___
E-MAI : _______ _________ _________ __ TELE HONE : ________ __________ _________ _____ L ___ ____ ____ P ___ ___ ____
BANK ________ _________ _________ __ BRA __________ __________ _________ _____ : ____ ____ ___ NCH : _ ___ ___ ____
RANCH CO : A UNT NO : B DE CCO
Y E OF ACCOU NT SAV S T AN MIS IO T P NT : CURRE ING R S S N
DATE OF IRS AY ENT : MONT LY NAT N MO : F T P M H DO IO A UNT

SIGNE __________ _________ _________ DAT : ______ _________ _________ ________ D : ___ ____ ___ E ____ ____ ___

R
Y S W THEM YOU C RE B MAKING A MONT L DONA ION! HO A Y H T
T
H
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S
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CIETY
F
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I N D
IS
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CIETY
F
O
R
A
N
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A
L
S
I N D
IS
T
R
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S
S
s l t e 50 m hat u com ta o d, can ak fference n m ’s l fe. A i tl as R a onth, or w ever yo can for bly aff r m e a di i an ani al i IG B
AMT Sept 07 zin.indd 39 2007/09/11 10:28:49 AM
oo EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
Market Forum
According to Jason Owen, Manager,
Conveyor Belting Division, Truco,
the company has an established
relationship with Protea Conveyors.
“Protea was contracted to supply the
complete conveyor system, includ-
ing structure, motors, gearboxes
and pulleys, as well as complete
the installation.”
Truco supplied almost 1 500
metres of textile reinforced rubber
belting for the conveyor which will
be transporting gold ore. The belt
carcass is manufactured from nylon
and polyester, while the belting’s
top and bottom covers are made
from a combination of natural and
SBR rubber. This ensures that
the belting is highly flexible and
abrasion and wear resistant, while
providing excellent tensile strength
and low elongation.
In addition, Truco has been awarded
the contract to supply belting spares to the project.
Jason Owen – Manager Conveyor Belting Division, Truco, Tel:
(011) 762 5291, Email: info@truco.co.za
Under construction: The Essakane Project in Burkina Faso
Conveyor belting order
Transvaal Rubber Company (Truco) has supplied conveyor
belting to the value of R1.2 million to Protea Conveyors for
use in a new Burkina Faso goldmine.
EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O o¯
Market Forum
Peace of mind
An innovative package deal provided through sole southern
African Caterpillar distributor, Barloworld Equipment, called
Cat Certified Used (CCU), offers the market an affordable
buying solution on Cat equipment.
“Barloworld Equipment is the only organisation in the market
to offer this Caterpillar solution, which can be compared
with the ‘premium used’ resale packages provided by the
automotive industry,” explains Sean Walsh, general manager:
rental and used, Barloworld Equipment.
“The CCU solution is exclusively available through Barloworld
Equipment’s South African dealer network, enabling contrac-
tors to buy a Cat at an affordable price, plus the associated
benefits of a world-leading brand with an exceptional re-sale
Cat’s latest generation 428E features a load-sensing, closed centre hydraulic system
that closely matches power and flow to the demand needed by the implements, which
in turn saves on fuel consumed
value. Additionally, all CCU units have low
operating hours relative to their respective
machine class,” Sean continues.
All CCU units sold into the market come
with a 12 month warranty, with the bulk
of these machines sourced from Barloworld
Equipment’s Cat Rental Store. Each unit
therefore already has a detailed and cared
for operational history, and only one previ-
ous owner.
All machines have been inspected and
serviced by Barloworld Equipment’s highly
skilled technicians. Each machine undergoes
a rigorous evaluation, covering fundamental
areas that include the engine dynamics
and condition monitoring, hydraulics, the
tyres or undercarriage, transmissions and
drivetrains, and electrical systems.
Sean Walsh, General Manager: Rental & Used,
Tel: (011) 929-0000, Email: swalsh@barloworld-
equipment.com
Eductor system
A new bulk bag weigh batch eductor system
loosens bulk solid material that has solidified
during storage and shipment, discharges
the material by weight, and blends it into
a liquid stream.
The skid-mounted system incorporates two
bulk bag unloading frames, each with an
integral bulk bag conditioner comprising a
hydraulic pump and two rams with contoured
end plates that press opposing sides of bulk
bags. The unloaders’ cantilevered hoists
and motorised trolleys allow conditioning
of bulk bags at various heights, as well as
loading and unloading of bags without the
need for a forklift. Safety interlocks disal-
low operation of the conditioner when the
unloaders’ doors are open.
Integral configuration of the conditioner eliminates the
time, labour and equipment needed for separate loading of
bulk bags into a stand-alone conditioner, while consuming
significantly less floor space than two separate pieces of
equipment and reducing capital cost.
The unloaders also feature a Spout-Lock clamp ring that
forms a high-integrity seal between the clean side of the bag
spout and the clean side of the equipment, while a Tele-Tube
telescoping tube maintains constant downward pressure
on the clamp ring and bag spout, elongating the bag as it
empties to promote complete discharge.
Immediately above the clamp ring is a Power-Cincher flow
control valve employing a series of curved, articulated rods
o8 EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O
The Bulk bag weigh batch eductor system features dual bulk bag
unloaders, each with integral bulk bag conditioners and flexible
screw conveyors feeding a central eductor that feeds solid mate-
rial into a liquid stream
that cinch the bag spout concentrically, allowing dust-free
retying and removal of partially-empty bags.
Flexicon Africa (Pty) Ltd., PO Box 10450, Linton Grange, Port
Elizabeth 6015, South Africa, +27 (0)41 453 1871, sales@fexicon.
co.za, www.fexicon.co.za
Afzelia 28
AST Inside Front Cover
Barpro 26
Bateman Outside Front Cover
Bearings International Outside Back Cover
Brelko 10
Chorus Call 14
Continental Crushing Inside Back Cover
Dymot 12
Engineer Placement 23
EPNS 7
Feel at Home 38
Green Supply Chain 24
ILS 8
Imperial Bank 32
Innov-X 36
JIP 20
Metso 27
SAID 34
Sapics 18
Wilec Bearings 14
Index to Advertisers
Please fax us if you wish to subscribe to “Bulk Handling Today” at
R400,00 (incl postage and VAT) per year; R945,00 per year for Af-
rica/Overseas. We will post you an invoice on receipt of your fax.
PROMECH PUBLISHING Fax No: (011) 781-1403
Email: editorial@promech.co.za
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EL¦¦ H/NL¦¦NC TOL/+ Marcn 'O´O oO
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