lyp

the founder of The Oz Project,

experiences to disadvantaged

M

children. For merly of Texas, she

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M
on
a
rc

comes this gorgeous and infor mative
introduction to the world of butterflies.
From the tiny Arian Small Blue to the
grand Queen Alexandra’s Birdwing,

l

an incredible variety of butterflies are
celebrated here in all their beauty and

a

ce

wonder.

w

i ng

Poetic in voice and elegant in design, this
book introduces children to an astounding array of butterfly facts, making it

by her love of animals and the
outdoors. She lives in Scottsdale,
Arizona, with her husband and
their dogs, Jackson and Tr uman.
Her prev ious books include Sylvia
Long’s Thumbelina, Sylvia Long’s
Mother Goose, and Hush Little
Baby. Learn more about Sylv ia at

Mala

y L
ac

k

ea
tr

rs
eg
gs

Her detailed paintings are inspired

a
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il

best-selling books for children.

ta

winning illustrator of many

parent’s lap.

a
ll o
w

is the award-

circle as it is being read to a child on a

t P

p
ur

le

H

a

i

P R A I SE FOR AN EGG IS QUIET
“A delight for budding naturalists.”

Kirkus Reviews, starred review

“. . . pleases on both an

Sw

at w w w.diannahuttsaston.com.

equally at home in a classroom reading

aesthetic and intellectual level.”

ev
in
e

Mexico. Learn more about Dianna

Publishers Weekly, starred review

“. . . a jewel of a picture book . . .

Pip

A Butterfl y Is Patient

now lives in San Miguel de Allende,

w w w.sylv ia-long.com.

oo

h
lig

w

An Egg Is Quiet and A Seed Is Sleepy

L

v ides inspirational hot air balloon

Je

e

U.S.
U.K.

From the creators of the award-winning

y

a nonprofit foundation which pro-

Sylvia Long

£11.99

Ma l a

books for children. She is also

B

og

the author of many best-selling

Co m m

on

$16.99

Hier

is

ic

t

k

g

Aston/Long

Dianna Hutts Aston

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Fl

uc

e
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eg

awe-inspiring”
—Book Sense Picks
2006 Cybil Award for nonfiction
2007 NCTE Outstanding Nonfiction

e
w

for Children

in

g
P R A I SE FOR A SEED IS SLEEPY
“. . . will stretch children’s minds and
imaginations.”

CHRONICLE BOOKS publishes distinctive
books and gifts that are instantly recognizable for their spirit and creativ ity.
To become part of our community,
v isit w w w.chroniclebooks.com.

n

L on
g

School Library Journal, starred

review
“. . . will encourage kids to wonder
about the plant world’s mysterious,
gorgeous spectrum of possibilities.”
—Booklist

e

m

o

Gre
Ba
r

Bucke

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om

M A N UFACT UR E D IN CHINA , IN JA N UARY 2011.

H

Sylvia
en n
o

C

JACK ET IL LUS TR ATION S © 2011 BY SY LVIA LONG.

D

ia

a
nn

s
u tt

Aston

S

a

tyr

y

te

d

r

ar

For my father—Frank J. Carlisle, Jr.—the blue-eyed

Sp

ot

Dilshan Madawala. —D. A.

F

For my Sri Lankan friend and diviner of codes,

ll
i ti

sailor, who is my source for all things wise and wonderful.
Among other things, he taught me the value of an interest
in the natural world and our place in it. —S. L.

B

lu

e-E

yed S
a

il o

r

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:
Victoria Rock, editor, and Sara Gillingham, book designer,
for their wisdom and dedication to quality in children’s books.
Jeffrey S. Pippen, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University; Nicky Davis, Wild Utah Project, Butterflies
and Moths; Linden Gledhill, photographer, Philadelphia, PA; Adrian Hoskins, LearnAboutButterflies.com, Hampshire,
England; Teh Su Phin, Panang Butterfly Farm, Malaysia; Lizanne Whiteley, Conservation of Butterflies in South Africa;
Robert N. Wiedenmann, Dept. of Entomology, University of Arkansas; Silvia Mecenero, South African Butterfly
Conservation Assessment; Steve Woodhall, President, Lepidopterists’ Society of Africa; Jean-Claude Petit,
Butterflies of Sangau National Park, Ecuador; Niklas Wahlberg, Dept. of Biology, University of Turku, Finland;
Andr Victor Lucci Freitas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, S o Paulo, Brazil;
Museum Victoria’s Discovery Centre, Victoria, Australia; Gareth S. Welsh, Butterfly World,
Stockton-on-Tees, England; Thomas Neubauer, ButterflyCorner.net, Germany; John J. Obrycki, Chair,
Dept. of Entomology, University of Kentucky; Halmar Taschner, South African Nursery Assoc.; Melani Hugo,
Butterfly Garden at Ludwig’s Rose Farm, Gauteng, South Africa; Tim Loh, British Columbia, Canada

©

Text
2011 by Dianna Aston.
Illustrations
2011 by Sylvia Long.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced
in any form without written permission from the publisher.

©

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Aston, Dianna Hutts.
A butterfly is patient / by Dianna Aston ; illustrated by Sylvia Long.
p. cm.
ISBN 978-0-8118-6479-4
1. Butterflies—Juvenile literature. I. Long, Sylvia. II. Title.
QL544.2.A87 2011
595.78’9—dc22
2010008548
Book design by Sara Gillingham.
Handlettered by Anne Robin and Sylvia Long.
The illustrations in this book were rendered in watercolor.
Manufactured by Toppan Leefung, Da Ling Shan Town, Dongguan, China, in December 2010
1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2
This product conforms to CPSIA 2008.
Chronicle Books LLC
680 Second Street, San Francisco, California 94107
www.chroniclekids.com

D

ia

nn

a

t
Hu

ts

on
Ast

Sylvia Long

y

te

d

r

ar

For my father—Frank J. Carlisle, Jr.—the blue-eyed

Sp

ot

Dilshan Madawala. —D. A.

F

For my Sri Lankan friend and diviner of codes,

ll
i ti

sailor, who is my source for all things wise and wonderful.
Among other things, he taught me the value of an interest
in the natural world and our place in it. —S. L.

B

lu

e-E

yed S
a

il o

r

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS:
Victoria Rock, editor, and Sara Gillingham, book designer,
for their wisdom and dedication to quality in children’s books.
Jeffrey S. Pippen, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University; Nicky Davis, Wild Utah Project, Butterflies
and Moths; Linden Gledhill, photographer, Philadelphia, PA; Adrian Hoskins, LearnAboutButterflies.com, Hampshire,
England; Teh Su Phin, Panang Butterfly Farm, Malaysia; Lizanne Whiteley, Conservation of Butterflies in South Africa;
Robert N. Wiedenmann, Dept. of Entomology, University of Arkansas; Silvia Mecenero, South African Butterfly
Conservation Assessment; Steve Woodhall, President, Lepidopterists’ Society of Africa; Jean-Claude Petit,
Butterflies of Sangau National Park, Ecuador; Niklas Wahlberg, Dept. of Biology, University of Turku, Finland;
Andr Victor Lucci Freitas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, S o Paulo, Brazil;
Museum Victoria’s Discovery Centre, Victoria, Australia; Gareth S. Welsh, Butterfly World,
Stockton-on-Tees, England; Thomas Neubauer, ButterflyCorner.net, Germany; John J. Obrycki, Chair,
Dept. of Entomology, University of Kentucky; Halmar Taschner, South African Nursery Assoc.; Melani Hugo,
Butterfly Garden at Ludwig’s Rose Farm, Gauteng, South Africa; Tim Loh, British Columbia, Canada

©

Text
2011 by Dianna Aston.
Illustrations
2011 by Sylvia Long.
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced
in any form without written permission from the publisher.

©

Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
Aston, Dianna Hutts.
A butterfly is patient / by Dianna Aston ; illustrated by Sylvia Long.
p. cm.
ISBN 978-0-8118-6479-4
1. Butterflies—Juvenile literature. I. Long, Sylvia. II. Title.
QL544.2.A87 2011
595.78’9—dc22
2010008548
Book design by Sara Gillingham.
Handlettered by Anne Robin and Sylvia Long.
The illustrations in this book were rendered in watercolor.
Manufactured by Toppan Leefung, Da Ling Shan Town, Dongguan, China, in December 2010
1 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2
This product conforms to CPSIA 2008.
Chronicle Books LLC
680 Second Street, San Francisco, California 94107
www.chroniclekids.com

D

ia

nn

a

t
Hu

ts

on
Ast

Sylvia Long

Gr
ea

t

Pu

rp

le

H airstreak

It begins as an egg beneath an umbrella of leaves,
protected from rain, hidden from creatures that might
harm it . . . until the caterpillar inside chews free
from its egg-casing, tiny, wingless, hungry to grow.

Gr
ea

t

Pu

rp

le

H airstreak

It begins as an egg beneath an umbrella of leaves,
protected from rain, hidden from creatures that might
harm it . . . until the caterpillar inside chews free
from its egg-casing, tiny, wingless, hungry to grow.

om
C

38

leaves, eating so much

D

38

that it must molt, or

M

A

T

A

U

Y

R

S

:

E

YS

A

A caterpillar feeds on

D

A

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eye
Buck
n
o

P

U

P

shed its skin, many times.
It can grow up to 30,000
times larger than it was
2

E

W

S

:

PU

PA

WL

N

D

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NE

when it took its first bite.

6

A

IN

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5T

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1

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YS

H

IN

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AR

RGED
Y EME

S

S

26

DA

AYS
15 D

Once a caterpillar has eaten all that it needs, it creates
AY
21 D

S

a protective covering called a chrysalis. Curled inside the
PR

EPUP A

chrysalis, it is growing wings. Now it is time for

3R

metamorphosis, changing from one form to another.

D
IN

ST

A
R

om
C

38

leaves, eating so much

D

38

that it must molt, or

M

A

T

A

U

Y

R

S

:

E

YS

A

A caterpillar feeds on

D

A

m

eye
Buck
n
o

P

U

P

shed its skin, many times.
It can grow up to 30,000
times larger than it was
2

E

W

S

:

PU

PA

WL

N

D

Y

NE

when it took its first bite.

6

A

IN

R

5T

A

1

T

T

YS

H

IN

ST

AR

RGED
Y EME

S

S

26

DA

AYS
15 D

Once a caterpillar has eaten all that it needs, it creates
AY
21 D

S

a protective covering called a chrysalis. Curled inside the
PR

EPUP A

chrysalis, it is growing wings. Now it is time for

3R

metamorphosis, changing from one form to another.

D
IN

ST

A
R

Z

r
eb

ongw ing
a L

Butterflies, like bees, help pollinate plants so that they
st
Ea

er

can reproduce, or make seeds. As a butterfly flits from
n

Sw

flower to flower, sipping nectar, tiny grains of pollen
all

Ti

cling to its body, then fall away onto other flowers. Seeds
are only produced when pollen is transferred between
flowers of the same species. This is called pollination.

il
ta

g
er

ow

Z

r
eb

ongw ing
a L

Butterflies, like bees, help pollinate plants so that they
st
Ea

er

can reproduce, or make seeds. As a butterfly flits from
n

Sw

flower to flower, sipping nectar, tiny grains of pollen
all

Ti

cling to its body, then fall away onto other flowers. Seeds
are only produced when pollen is transferred between
flowers of the same species. This is called pollination.

il
ta

g
er

ow

Or

an

ge

Oa
kl
e
f
a

O
w

l

Wings can help butterflies camouflage,
or hide, themselves in the environment.
One kind of butterfly, the peacock butterfly,
makes a hissing sound by rubbing its
Pea

birds, lizards, and other insects. Some
butterflies have markings on their wings
called eyespots. Scientists don’t know what
they are used for—perhaps to scare away
predators or attract mates!

k

themselves from predators such as hungry

coc

Butterflies use their wings to protect

wings together when it is alar med.

Or

an

ge

Oa
kl
e
f
a

O
w

l

Wings can help butterflies camouflage,
or hide, themselves in the environment.
One kind of butterfly, the peacock butterfly,
makes a hissing sound by rubbing its
Pea

birds, lizards, and other insects. Some
butterflies have markings on their wings
called eyespots. Scientists don’t know what
they are used for—perhaps to scare away
predators or attract mates!

k

themselves from predators such as hungry

coc

Butterflies use their wings to protect

wings together when it is alar med.

Pi

pe
vi

ne
al
Sw

low

il
ta
M

The warning colors of some butterflies’ wings—yellows,
reds, oranges, whites, and blacks—tell predators that
they are poisonous or bad-tasting. Monarchs, wanderers,
and pipevine swallowtails eat poisonous plants as
caterpillars so that they become poisonous as adults.
Birds and other insects have learned not to eat them!

on

ar

ch

Pi

pe
vi

ne
al
Sw

low

il
ta
M

The warning colors of some butterflies’ wings—yellows,
reds, oranges, whites, and blacks—tell predators that
they are poisonous or bad-tasting. Monarchs, wanderers,
and pipevine swallowtails eat poisonous plants as
caterpillars so that they become poisonous as adults.
Birds and other insects have learned not to eat them!

on

ar

ch

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