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GEH-6126A Volume I (1 of 2)

g
(Supersedes GEH-6126)

GE Industrial Systems

For SPEEDTRONIC™ Turbine Control

Operator’s Guide
Document: GEH-6126A Volume I (1 of 2)
Issued: 2002-02-14

For SPEEDTRONIC™ Turbine Control

Operator’s Guide
© 2002 General Electric Company, USA.
All rights reserved.

Printed in the United States of America.

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warranty of merchantability or fitness for particular purpose.

These instructions do not purport to cover all details or variations in equipment, nor to provide for
every possible contingency to be met during installation, operation, and maintenance. The
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accuracy of the information included herein. Changes, modifications, and/or improvements to
equipment and specifications are made periodically and these changes may or may not be reflected
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trained personnel familiar with the GE products referenced herein.

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The furnishing of this document does not provide any license whatsoever to any of these patents.
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(“+” indicates the international access code required when calling from outside the USA)

This document contains proprietary information of General Electric Company, USA and is
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maintenance of the equipment described. This document shall not be reproduced in whole or in
part nor shall its contents be disclosed to any third party without the written approval of GE
Industrial Systems.

Document Identification: GEH-6126A Volume I (1 of 2)


Technical Writer/Editor: Teresa Davidson
Technical Responsibility: Michael Good

ARCNET is a registered trademark of Datapoint Corporation.


CIMPLICITY and Genius are registered trademarks of GE Fanuc Automation North America, Inc.
Ethernet is a trademark of Xerox Corporation.
Excel, Microsoft, NetMeeting, Windows, and Window NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft
Corporation.
Modbus is a registered trademark of Schneider Automation.
Pentium is a registered trademark of Intel Corporation.
PI-ProcessBook is a registered trademark of OSI Software Inc.
SPEEDTRONIC is a trademark of General Electric Company, USA.
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strictly followed in order to optimize these applications.

Note Indicates an essential or important procedure, condition, or statement.

GEH-6126A, Volume I Operator’s Guide Safety Symbol Legend • a


To prevent personal injury or equipment damage
caused by equipment malfunction, only adequately
trained personnel should modify any
programmable machine.

The example and setup screens in this manual do


not reflect the actual application configurations. Be
sure to follow the correct setup procedures for
your application.

b • Safety Symbol Legend HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
To:

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Contents
Safety Symbol Legend

Reader Comments

Chapter 1 Overview
Introduction ..............................................................................................................1-1
HMI Overview..........................................................................................................1-2
Product Features ................................................................................................1-2
HMI Components ..............................................................................................1-3
Graphic Displays ...............................................................................................1-4
Communications................................................................................................1-6
Optional Features ..............................................................................................1-7
Application-Specific Features ...........................................................................1-7
Technical Specifications...........................................................................................1-7
Related Documentation ............................................................................................1-8
How to Use This Document .....................................................................................1-9
Text Conventions ..............................................................................................1-9
How to Get Help.....................................................................................................1-10

Chapter 2 Quick-Start Procedures


Introduction ..............................................................................................................2-1
Starting Up HMI.......................................................................................................2-2
Alarm Displays.........................................................................................................2-3
Opening Projects ......................................................................................................2-4
Other Tools...............................................................................................................2-5
Dynamic Rung Display .....................................................................................2-5
Trip History .......................................................................................................2-5
Trip Log Viewer................................................................................................2-5
Demand Display................................................................................................2-6
Alarm Logger Control .......................................................................................2-6
Hold List Display (Steam Turbine Applications)..............................................2-6

Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs


Introduction ..............................................................................................................3-1
Dynamic Rung Display ............................................................................................3-2
File Structure .....................................................................................................3-2
Dynamic Rung Display Windows .....................................................................3-3
Starting the Dynamic Rung Display..................................................................3-6
Selecting a Sequencing Display Screen.............................................................3-7
Using the Find All Function ..............................................................................3-7
Viewing Tabular Data .......................................................................................3-8
Trip History ..............................................................................................................3-9
Trip History File................................................................................................3-9
Starting Trip History .......................................................................................3-11
Trip History Dialog Box..................................................................................3-11
Data History Results Window.........................................................................3-12
Trip History on the Mark VI ...........................................................................3-13

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Contents • i


Contents — Continued
Trip Log Viewer .....................................................................................................3-14
Trip Log File ...................................................................................................3-14
Trip Log Viewer Dialog Box...........................................................................3-14
Viewing Results...............................................................................................3-15
Starting the Trip Log Viewer...........................................................................3-15

Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs


Introduction ..............................................................................................................4-1
Demand Display .......................................................................................................4-2
Starting Demand Display...................................................................................4-2
Working with Files ............................................................................................4-3
Demand Display Windows................................................................................4-4
Data Area Description ............................................................................... 4-6
Command Target Types ............................................................................ 4-6
Using Demand Display......................................................................................4-7
Displaying, Creating, and Modifying Screens........................................... 4-7
Working with Command Targets ............................................................ 4-11
Other Options .......................................................................................... 4-13
Command Line Configuration.........................................................................4-13
Commands and Arguments ..................................................................... 4-13
Using Multiple Arguments ...................................................................... 4-14
Alarm Logger Control ............................................................................................4-15
Starting the Alarm Logger Control.......................................................... 4-15
Hold List (Steam Applications) ..............................................................................4-16
Hold List Points...............................................................................................4-16
Hold List Programs..........................................................................................4-16
Hold List Rules................................................................................................4-16

Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays


Introduction ..............................................................................................................5-1
CIMPLICITY ActiveX Objects................................................................................5-2
Manual Synchronizing Display .........................................................................5-2
Triggered Plot (Valve Travel) ...........................................................................5-6
Alarm Filtering in HMI Servers................................................................................5-8
Configuring Users .............................................................................................5-8
Configuring Resources ....................................................................................5-12
Configuring Alarm Filters ...............................................................................5-14
Examples of Screens for Filtered Alarms ........................................................5-23
Currently Implemented Filters.........................................................................5-25
Extended Alarm Commands...................................................................................5-26
Reactive Capability Display ...................................................................................5-28

ii • Contents HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I


Contents — Continued
Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration
Introduction ..............................................................................................................6-1
Using Workbench.....................................................................................................6-2
Opening a Project .....................................................................................................6-3
Signal Manager.........................................................................................................6-4
Setup..................................................................................................................6-4
Signals ...............................................................................................................6-5
Alarms ...............................................................................................................6-6
Importing Signals ..............................................................................................6-8
External Alarm Manager ........................................................................................6-10
SDB Exchange .......................................................................................................6-10
SDB Utilities ..........................................................................................................6-10
®
Modbus Data Interface .........................................................................................6-11
OLE for Process Controls (OPC) ...........................................................................6-12

Appendix A HMI Function Reference


HMI Functions for GE Turbine Controllers ............................................................A-1
CIMPLICITY HMI Supported Functions ...............................................................A-4

Appendix B Alarm Overview


Introduction ............................................................................................................. B-1
Hold List Alarms (Steam Turbine Only) ................................................................. B-2
Process Alarms ........................................................................................................ B-2
Process (and Hold) Alarm Data Flow............................................................... B-2
Diagnostic Alarms ................................................................................................... B-3

Glossary

Index

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Contents • iii


Notes

iv • Contents HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I


Chapter 1 Overview

Introduction
GE document GEH-6126A The Human-Machine Interface (HMI) for SPEEDTRONIC turbine control is a user-
Volume 2 describes HMI friendly operator interface for real-time control of power-plant processes and
maintenance features equipment. It runs on a pc-based workstation using a Microsoft® Windows NT®
introduced in this chapter. client-server architecture. The HMI provides operator display and control for the
Mark IV, Mark V, Mark V LM, and Mark VI turbine controllers.
This document covers HMI operation. It is written as a guide to assist the operator in
using applicable HMI and supported CIMPLICITY® HMI functions with the
SPEEDTRONIC Mark IV, Mark V, Mark V LM, and Mark VI turbine controllers.
Refer to How to Use This Document for more information.
This chapter provides a brief overview of the HMI, including both operator and
maintenance features. Additionally, it defines the document content and structure to
help the user better understand the information provided.
This chapter is organized as follows:
Section Page

HMI Overview..........................................................................................................1-2
Product Features ................................................................................................1-2
HMI Components ..............................................................................................1-3
Graphic Displays ...............................................................................................1-4
Communications................................................................................................1-6
Optional Features ..............................................................................................1-7
Application-Specific Features ...........................................................................1-7
Technical Specifications...........................................................................................1-7
Related Documentation ............................................................................................1-8
How to Use This Document .....................................................................................1-9
Text Conventions ..............................................................................................1-9
How to Get Help.....................................................................................................1-10

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 1 Overview • 1-1


HMI Overview
The CIMPLICITY HMI is a HMI functions (listed in Appendix A) are provided by the Turbine Control Interface
product of GE Fanuc (TCI), CIMPLICITY Bridge (TCIMB), and GE Turbine Control Systems Solutions
Automation. CD. Additionally, the HMI supports many functions of the CIMPLICITY HMI, for
graphical interface and some support functions (see Appendix A).
The HMI can be configured to operate with a variety of system devices, integrating
plant operation at a single level. Plant operators and engineers can view and control
plant equipment through a common interface.
The toolbox is GE’s Windows-
based software package used Note The GE Turbine Control Systems Solutions CD contains the Turbine Control
for controller configuration and System Toolbox (toolbox), Data Historian, and Trend Recorder programs. Mark VI
diagnostics. turbine controllers use the toolbox as a configuration and diagnostic interface.

An operator can use the HMI for the following turbine control functions:
• Monitor one or more turbines through graphical displays (for example, alarms,
wheelspace temperatures, and vibration feedback)
• Issue commands to the selected turbine or driven device (for example, Start,
Stop, Cooldown On, Auto, and Raise Speed/Load)

Product Features
The HMI contains a number of product features important for power plant control:
• Dynamic graphics
• Alarm displays
• Process variable trending
• Point control panel display (for maintenance)
• HMI access security

1-2 • Chapter 1 Overview HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
HMI Components
The turbine control HMI consists of the following functional components (refer to
Figure 1-1):
GFK-1180 provides a detailed • CIMPLICITY HMI is used primarily to display turbine status screens, which
description of the CIMPLICITY enable an operator to monitor the unit(s). Refresh rate is typically 1 second.
product’s capabilities. CIMPLICITY cannot configure the turbine control.
– HMI Server is the hub of the system, channeling data between the Unit Data
Highway and the Plant Data Highway (Mark VI only), and providing data
support and system management. The server also provides device
communication for both internal and external data interchanges.
– HMI Viewer provides the visual functions, and is the client of the server. It
contains the operator interface software, which allows the operator or
maintenance personnel to view screen graphics, data values, alarms, and
trends, as well as to issue commands, edit control coefficient values, and
obtain system logs and reports.
• Turbine Control Interface (TCI) is used to display higher speed data (faster
than 1-second updates), and to configure and control a turbine unit. TCI allows
remote access to turbine data and controls the following data functions:
– Provides real-time device communications to the turbine control (Mark IV
and V)
– Provides turbine control configuration capabilities (Mark IV and V)
– Collects data, alarms and forwards commands to the turbine control (Mark
VI)
– Maintains a data dictionary (Mark IV and V)
• TCIMB (TCI/CIMPLICITY Bridge, previously called CIMB or CIMBridge) is
an interface between the CIMPICITY and TCI, as follows:
– Enables CIMPLICITY to collect data and alarms from a turbine unit
– Forwards points (Mark IV, V, V LM) and alarms (all) to CIMPLICITY
• System database (Mark VI only) establishes signal management and definition
for the control system. It provides a single repository for system alarm messages
and definitions, and defines mapping between controller software and physical
I/O. Additionally, it defines Ethernet Global Data (EGD) exchanges. The
database is used for system configuration, but not required for running the
system.
Depending on the size of the system, these elements can be combined into a single
pc, or distributed in multiple units. The modular nature of the HMI allows units to be
expanded incrementally as system needs change.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 1 Overview • 1-3


CIMPLICITY TCIMB TCI

Point Alarm
Database Queue

Alarm External Alarm


Alarms
Point Data

Manager Alarm Queue


Manager
s
m
ar

Devices
A l Device
int Collector
Po

Point Point Data Mark V Data


Manager RP Dictionary

Devcom
(EGD...)

Devices

Figure 1-1. Data Flow Between HMI Components

Graphic Displays
The HMI uses the graphics and alarm features of the CIMPLICITY software to
integrate controls from a variety of applications. The graphical displays offer
realistic viewing in a real-time environment.
Screens are developed using The HMI displays data and processes operator commands using screens that
preconfigured graphic building represent a variety of signals, their values, and units. Display items change color
blocks that provide based on logic signals, while certain objects are dynamic and refresh with every data
commonality to different plant update, like bar graphs. High-speed viewing allows the displayed data to be updated
applications that use the HMI. once per second, and special tools allow collection and storage of data at rates as fast
as 10 ms.
HMI graphic displays include main unit, vibration, sensor readings, control setpoints,
alarms, permissives, logic forcing, demand display, sequence editor, dynamic rung
display, trip history display, trending, and many others depending on the application.
An operator can view alarms from any HMI on the network as they occur and to
freeze the scrolling as needed to address an alarm condition. The alarm management
feature provides options for response.
Figure 1-2 illustrates a typical Viewer screen using graphics to display real-time
turbine data.
The associated printer(s) enables the operator to manually select and copy any
display, to automatically log selected parameters, and to log alarms.

1-4 • Chapter 1 Overview HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Alarm Viewer Setpoint Entry Alarm Detail Shaft Vibration
window selection display selection display selection

Figure 1-2. Sample HMI Display Showing Steam Turbine and Generator Data

The graphic system performs key HMI functions and provides the operator with real-
time process visualization and control using the following:
GFK-139 provides a detailed • CimEdit is an object-oriented program that creates and maintains the user
description of the CimEdit and graphic screen displays. Editing and animation tools, with the familiar Windows
CimView applications. environment, provide an intuitive, easy to use interface. Features include:
– Standard shape library
– Object Linking and Embedding (OLE)
– Movement and rotation animation
– Filled object capabilities, and interior and border animation
• CimView is the HMI run-time portion, displaying the process information in
graphical formats (as shown in Figure 1-2). In CimView, the operator can view
the system screens, and screens from other applications, using OLE automation,
run scripts, and get descriptions of object actions. Screens have a 1-second
refresh rate, and a typical graphical display takes one second to repaint. HMI
opens in CimView.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 1 Overview • 1-5


• Alarm Viewer provides alarm management functions such as sorting and
filtering by priority, by unit, by time, or by source device. Also supported are
configurable alarm field displays, and embedding dynamically updated objects
into CimView screens.
• Trending, based on Active X technology, gives users data analysis capabilities.
Trending uses data collected by the HMI or data from other third-party software
packages or interfaces. Data comparisons between current and past variable data
can be made for identification of process problems. Trending includes multiple
trending charts per graphic screen with unlimited pens per chart, and the operator
can resize or move trend windows to convenient locations on the display.
• The point control panel provides a listing of points in the system with real-time
values and alarm status. Operators can view and change local and remote set
points by direct numeric entry.
• The basic control engine allows users to define control actions in response to
system events. A single event can invoke multiple actions, or one action can be
invoked by many events. The program editor uses a Visual Basic for
Applications compliant programming language.

Communications
Refer to GEH-6126 Vol. II Figure 1-3 shows the networks used by the HMI to communicate within a
and individual controller SPEEDTRONIC turbine control system.
documents for more detail
about the networks and
protocol used for HMI Mark VI Plant Data Highway (Ethernet)
communication.

Data Data

HMI
HMI Server # 1 HMI Server # 2 Viewer Historian

TR

Mark VI Unit Data Highway (Ethernet)

Mark IV Control System Freeway (CSF)

Mark V Stagelink

Mark VI Mark IV Mark V


Turbine Turbine Turbine
Control Control Control
I/O I/O I/O

Figure 1-3. Example of a Turbine Control Communications Network

1-6 • Chapter 1 Overview HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
For Ethernet TCP/IP communication to third party equipment, such as a distributed
control system (DCS ), the HMI provides GE Industrial Systems standard messages
(GSM) and Modbus® protocol. GSM application layer protocols support four classes
of application-level messages: administration, event-driven, periodic data, and
common request messages.
Alternatively, communication to remote DCS equipment is available through a
Modbus interface, where the HMI acts as a slave to the DCS master. Such a system
allows an operator at a remote location to initiate any operator command and to
monitor turbine data.

Optional Features
Document GEH-6422 provides The HMI supports a Windows NT®-based Historian computer, which collects and
information about the stores data from the control units for later analysis. OSI’s PI-ProcessBook® provides
Historian. historical and real-time trending of all process data, and can run in the Historian
and/or HMI Viewer. The HMI communicates with the Historian through the
Ethernet-based Plant Data Highway (PDH) and through RS-232C lines.
The HMI includes a time synchronization capability in both low- and high-
resolution forms. When redundant time masters are available, all turbine controllers
and operator interface units on a system automatically select the same, highest
quality time master.
A Web Gateway allows operators to access HMI data from anywhere in the world
over the Internet. Third party interfaces allow the HMI to exchange data with the
DCS, programmable logic controllers, I/O devices, and other computers.

Application-Specific Features
When the HMI is paired with either the Mark V or the Mark VI turbine
controllers, the turbine control software tools can be added to as an integral part of
the HMI. The Mark VI features are based on the GE Control System Toolbox
(toolbox).
When the HMI is used in our Integrated Control Systems (ICS) product line or as a
Balance-of-Plant (BOP) control interface, the ICS/BOP toolset becomes part of the
HMI.

Technical Specifications
Exact hardware and software specifications for the HMI are determined according to
the customer’s needs and purchased options. The HMI workstation is typically sent
to the customer with the HMI program already installed.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 1 Overview • 1-7


Related Documentation
The following documents apply to the HMI and SPEEDTRONIC turbine controllers
and may assist in understanding HMI operation:
“GEH-####” is the document HMI-related documents:
identification number.
• GEH-6126A Volume II, HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control, Application
Guide
• GEI-100165, GEDS Standard Message Format
• GEI-100279, SDB Exchange User’s Guide for Control System Solutions
• GEI-100500, System Database Utilities for Control System Solutions
• GEI-100513, HMI Time Synchronization for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control
• GEI-100514, Power Block Control for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control,
Product Description
• GEI-100515, Microsoft NetMeeting® 3.0 for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control,
Installation and Setup
• GEI-100516, GE Industrial System Standard Messages (GSM)
• GEI-100535, Modbus Communication Interface for SPEEDTRONIC Mark VI
Turbine Controllers
• GEH-6422, Turbine Historian System Guide
• GFK-1180, CIMPLICITY Base System User's Manual
• GFK-1181, CIMPLICITY HMI Plant Edition, Base System Device
Communications Manual
• GFK-1396, CIMPLICITY HMI CimEdit Operation Manual
• GFK-1675, CIMPLICITY HMI, OPC Server Operation Manual
Mark VI controller and related documents:
• GEH-6403, Control System Toolbox for Configuring a Mark VI Turbine
Controller
• GEH-6408, Control System Toolbox for Configuring the Trend Recorder
• GEH-6421, SPEEDTRONIC Mark VI System Guide, Volumes I and II
• GEJ-7485, SPEEDTRONIC Mark VI Turbine Control, Software Maintenance
• GEI-100278, Data Historian
Mark V and V LM controller and related documents:
• GEH-5979, SPEEDTRONIC Mark V Turbine Control User’s Manual
• GEH-5980, SPEEDTRONIC Mark V Turbine Control Maintenance Manual
• GEH-6195, SPEEDTRONIC Mark V Turbine Control Application Manual
Overview
• GEH-6354, Mark V LM SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control <I+> User’s Manual

1-8 • Chapter 1 Overview HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
How to Use This Document
The user of this document should be familiar with the Microsoft Windows pc
interface and experienced with SPEEDTRONIC controllers and operating turbine
control systems.
For an exact outline of the This document is organized into the following chapters and appendices to assist an
document’s content and operator in understanding and using the HMI.
organization, refer to the Table
Chapter 1, Overview, provides an introductory product summary with related
of Contents.
reference information to assist the user.
Chapter 2, Quick Startup, serves as a reference to assist the operator in starting up
the HMI.
Chapter 3, Display-Only Applications, describes HMI programs for data display,
including sample screens.
Chapter 4, Control (Command) Applications, describes HMI programs for
displaying and controlling data, including sample screens.
Chapter 5, CIMPLICITY Displays, covers HMI functions that use CIMPLICITY
screens, including ActiveX objects and filtered alarms.
Chapter 6, CIMPLICITY Project Configuration, defines applications used to
configure a CIMPLICITY project.
Appendix A, HMI Function Reference, lists all current HMI functions and
identifies which SPEEDTRONIC controller includes each function.
Appendix B, Alarm Overview, a general overview of turbine controller alarms
viewed and addressed using the HMI.

Text Conventions
The following symbols, formatting, and presentation conventions are used in this
document to assist the user.
Convention Meaning

Ø A procedure follows.
Numbered list Procedural steps to be followed in order (for example, 1, 2, 3).
Alphabetized list Procedural substeps (of numbered steps) to be followed in
order (for example, a, b, c).
Bulleted (•) list Related items or procedures, but order does not matter.
w A procedure with only one step.
Boxed (¨) list A checklist.
Arial Bold When describing software, indicates the actual command or
option that is chosen from a menu or dialog box, or typed in a
text box or at the command prompt.
Monospace Represents examples of DOS screen text or display.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 1 Overview • 1-9


How to Get Help
If help is needed beyond the instructions provided in the system documentation,
contact GE as follows:
“+” indicates the international GE Industrial Systems
access code required when Post Sales Service
calling from outside the USA. 1501 Roanoke Blvd.
Salem, VA 24153-6492 USA
Phone: + 1 888 GE4 SERV (888 434 7378, United States)
+ 1 540 378 3280 (International)
Fax: + 1 540 387 8606 (All)

Note Please have the GE requisition or shop order number and the equipment serial
or model number available to exactly identify the equipment when calling.

1-10 • Chapter 1 Overview HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Chapter 2 Quick-Start Procedures

Introduction
A facility receives the HMI pre-loaded with all the programs and customized
software required for the customer’s application. It is then configured during
installation to automatically log on and open to the main operator screen when
powered-up.
This chapter provides basic startup procedures to help the operator use the HMI.
Detail of these HMI features is covered in the other sections of this document.
This chapter is organized as follows:
Section Page

Starting Up HMI.......................................................................................................2-2
Alarm Displays.........................................................................................................2-3
Opening Projects ......................................................................................................2-4
Other Tools...............................................................................................................2-5
Dynamic Rung Display .....................................................................................2-5
Trip History .......................................................................................................2-5
Trip Log Viewer................................................................................................2-5
Demand Display................................................................................................2-6
Alarm Logger Control .......................................................................................2-6
Hold List Display (Steam Turbine Applications) ..............................................2-6

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 2 Quick-Start Procedures • 2-1


Starting Up HMI
Ø To start up the HMI and open your application
w Power up the pc if it is off, or press the three keys Ctrl+Alt+Delete all at once if
the system needs to be restarted.
GFK-1180 describes CimView When the pc starts up, it opens the CIMPLICITY Viewer (CimView) and displays
in detail. the main operation screen for its custom application (see Figure 2-1). All needed
programs are loaded and CIMPLICITY is started.

Note The HMI displays for your system are CimView screens (*.cim files), which
may open before CIMPLICITY finishes loading. If at first the screen is not animated
or setpoints fail, wait a few minutes for the startup to complete before beginning
operation.

Click buttons and


other animated
objects to open
additional screens or
objects.

Click to open screen


displaying all alarms.

Select an alarm listed, then click the button for the desired Alarm Display (see Figure 2-2)
for action

Figure 2-1. Example of HMI Starting Screen

2-2 • Chapter 2 Quick-Start Procedures HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Alarm Displays
OCX is an object linking and Alarm Viewer is an OCX object embedded into a CIMPLICITY HMI screen, as
embedding (OLE) custom shown in Figure 2-1. It provides alarm management functions such as sorting and
control. filtering by priority, unit, time, or source device. Also supported are configurable
alarm field displays.
Custom TCI programs are used to enhance the CIMPLICITY alarm viewer for
Turbine applications. TCI provides the Silence, Lock, and Unlock Alarm Viewer
features (see Extended Alarm Commands in Chapter 5).

To apply a button to an alarm, highlight the alarm from the list, then click the button

Alarms are listed


in the display.

Figure 2-2. Example of Alarm Display Screen

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 2 Quick-Start Procedures • 2-3


Opening Projects
Document GFK-1180 provides The CIMPLICITY Workbench is an application used to view, configure, organize,
detail about using Workbench. and manage projects. Refer to Chapter 5 for examples using Workbench.
Ø To open a project
1. Open the Windows File Explorer.
2. Open the f:\cimproj directory.
3. Double-click on the .gef file.
The Workbench display opens (see Figure 2-3).

Left to right:
Left to right: - Configuration update
- Dynamic update - Status log
- Stop project - Project properties Right pane Search
- Start project - Project wizard views Help Properties Field chooser

Screens
Points

Application folder

Objects in application

Runtime

Alarms

Files or records Fields chosen for


associated with object display

Figure 2-3. Sample Workbench Display

2-4 • Chapter 2 Quick-Start Procedures HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Other Tools
The following sections provide simple Windows-based start-up instructions for HMI
display-only and control applications. However, they can also be started up and
configured using typed in commands, as described in Chapters 3 and 4 of this
document.

Dynamic Rung Display


Refer to Chapter 3 for more The Dynamic Rung Display program is used to step through the control
information. programming of a Mark V controller. It displays the control rungs and blocks in a
control sequence segment for a given unit. (Mark VI uses the toolbox for this
function.)

Ø To open the Dynamic Rung Display


w On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Dynamic Rung Display.

Trip History
Refer to Chapter 3 for more The Trip History program provides a chronological record (log) of relevant data
information. gathered by the unit control. The data is organized according to post-trip, pre-trip,
and alarm categories.

Ø To view the Trip History


1. On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Trip History.
2. From the Trip History dialog box (see Figure 3-3), select a valid unit from the
Select Unit list.
3. Click a Select Log option button for the type of historical data to be collected.
4. Click the Collect button to retrieve the data or the Cancel button to stop.
You can retrieve only one type of data at a time. When the data retrieval completes
successfully, the program displays the results in a separate window.

Trip Log Viewer


Refer to Chapter 3 for more If TCI and HMI are running during Mark V controller trips, the program
information. automatically collects and stores data of the last ten trips in the HMI. (The HMI
must also be communicating with the control.)

Ø To view the Mark V Trip log


1. On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Trip Log Viewer.
2. From the Trip Log Viewer dialog box, select a valid unit from the Select Unit list
box.
3. From the Select a Previous Trip Log, select a log to display by highlighting it.
4. Click the Go To button to display the selected log (file) with data from that trip.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 2 Quick-Start Procedures • 2-5


Demand Display
Refer to Chapter 4 for more This display allows you to view values of a selected list of points.
information.
Ø To load an existing Demand Display file
1. On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Demand Display.
2. From the File menu, select Open.
3. Select the file from the directory that displays.
If no existing file is specified when using Demand Display, the default file
DEMAND01.DM2 (located in the F:\RUNTIME directory) loads.

Alarm Logger Control


Refer to Chapter 4 for more The HMI’s Alarm Logger Control program allows you to select alarms and events to
information. output to the printer.

Ø To print alarms or events using this program


1. On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Alarm Logger Control.
2. Select the Unit and the Logger Function from the dialog box.
3. Click OK.

Hold List Display (Steam Turbine Applications)


Refer to Chapter 4 and The Hold List is required for the HMI to support Mark V large and medium steam
Appendix B for more turbine controls on systems that have Automatic Turbine Startup (ATS). Turbine
information on the Hold List. operating conditions may cause a hold, which prevents ATS from setting the speed
or load target to a higher value.
The CIMPLICITY Alarm Viewer displays the Hold List on the HMI, to view and
override the current hold points. Refer to Alarm Displays in this chapter.

2-6 • Chapter 2 Quick-Start Procedures HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs

Introduction
The HMI provides an online database for collecting and storing data from multiple
controllers. Refer to the controller documentation for a description of this.
Chapter 4 describes control The HMI’s display-only programs allow you to view turbine control data as needed
(command) programs. to monitor the system. You cannot, however, send control commands from these.
This chapter describes display-only programs. It is presented as follows:
Section Page

Dynamic Rung Display ............................................................................................3-2


File Structure .....................................................................................................3-2
Dynamic Rung Display Windows .....................................................................3-3
Starting the Dynamic Rung Display..................................................................3-6
Selecting a Sequencing Display Screen.............................................................3-7
Using the Find All Function ..............................................................................3-7
Viewing Tabular Data .......................................................................................3-8
Trip History ..............................................................................................................3-9
Trip History File................................................................................................3-9
Starting Trip History .......................................................................................3-11
Trip History Dialog Box..................................................................................3-11
Data History Results Window.........................................................................3-12
Trip History on the Mark VI ...........................................................................3-13
Trip Log Viewer .....................................................................................................3-14
Trip Log File ...................................................................................................3-14
Trip Log Viewer Dialog Box ..........................................................................3-14
Viewing Results ..............................................................................................3-15
Starting the Trip Log Viewer ..........................................................................3-15

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs • 3-1


Dynamic Rung Display
Mark VI uses the toolbox for The Dynamic Rung Display program is used for viewing the control programming of
this function. a Mark V controller. It displays the control rungs and blocks in a control sequence
segment for a given unit. The program features the following:
• Animation to show the current state of the control
• Rung Ladder Display (RLD) rungs displayed with green representing continuity
in contacts and the energized state in a coil
• Primitive and Big Block rungs sometimes displayed with their associated picture
files showing either signal names or actual point values
• A Demand Display (see Chapter 4) with all of the signal names and values from a
rung
• A Find utility to display the locations and usage of all occurrences of a signal in
the unit’s Control Sequence Program (CSP).
The following rules apply to the Dynamic Rung Display:
• TCI must be running
• More than one control segment from a given unit can be open at a time
• Can display only segments from a single unit at any time
• Cannot be used to alter the unit’s CSP

File Structure
Table 3-1. Dynamic Rung Display File Description

File Name Description


MSTR_SEQ.CFG Lists the sequencing source files (*.SRC) used in the
control
*.SRC The source files for the individual control sequence
segments
\PROM\BIGBLOCK.DEF The block definition file for the unit
\PROM\PRIMITIVE.DEF The primitive definition file for the unit
\PROM\*.PIC The picture files for the big blocks and primitives
\PROM\*.SPC Sequencing BBL source files

The files are used by the Dynamic Rung Display to coordinate and accurately display
the unit control data. These files are also used for unit control configuration and
cannot be altered by the Dynamic Rung Display. It is imperative that the
configuration and sequencing files in the unit control and in the operator interface
match. The Dynamic Rung Display does not independently verify that the operator
interface files match the unit control files. If these files do not match, the Dynamic
Rung Display may display data that does not reflect the state of the unit control.

3-2 • Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
The Dynamic Rung Display can save picture file displays in a text format for future
reference. These text files may be opened by any text editor or word processor. It
also creates temporary Demand Display files (*.DM2) in the system temporary
directory when the Demand Display is used to show the points and values from a
given rung. These files are automatically deleted when the Demand Display closes.

Dynamic Rung Display Windows


The Dynamic Rung Display is a multiple document interface that allows you to open
windows with different segments or the same segment. The user may also have
picture file windows and sub rung windows open. The windows are sized to display
a full view of a rung. However, the window may be resized and repositioned.
There are three major types of windows: rung, picture, and main frame, described
below.

Rung Windows
Rung windows (see Figure 3-1) are used to display the animation of the control
sequencing and navigate through the control sequencing segments. They can display
data from main sequencing rungs or sub rungs that are predefined into Big Blocks.

Title bar displays unit name and


segment name

Header, which displays the


following data:
• Unit, site, program, and
segment name
• Rung number
• Timetag

The Header can scroll off the


screen or be hidden by other
windows. However, it is good
practice to keep it visible because
it contains valuable process
information.

Figure 3-1. Example of a Dynamic Rung Display Window

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs • 3-3


Dynamic Rung Display windows can contain the following types of data:
• RLD rung
• Primitive rungs
• Big blocks
• Comment rungs

Header data is located in the The type of information in the header timetag depends on the type of display:
upper left of the window.
• In both the RLD and primitive rung displays, the timetag provides the oldest
piece of data being displayed in the RLD portions of the rung. If it has not
received data from the unit, the timetag display is No Valid Data. If the oldest
piece of data in the rung has not been updated for at least five seconds, the
timetag is highlighted. Rung animation occurs once per second (see Table 3-2).
• In both the big block and comment rung displays, the timetag indicates the
operator interface time when the rung was displayed. It does not update.

Note RLD Rung displays update automatically, and thus are animated in the rung
window. Parameter information passed in Primitive Block and Big Block rungs is
not animated in the rung window, although you can update the display manually.
Comment Rungs do not update.

Table 3-2. Animation Rules for Both RLD and Primitive Rungs

Rung
Component Animation Rule
Normally • A green rectangle between the contacts shows continuity.
Open
Contacts • No rectangle between the contacts shows an open circuit.
• A ">" symbol between the contacts means forced signals.
• A rectangle outline around the ">" symbol highlights contacts that are forced to the open condition.

Normally • A slash through the contact indicates normally closed.


Closed
Contacts • A green rectangle between the contacts shows continuity.
• No rectangle between the contacts means an open circuit.
• A rectangle outline around the ">" symbol highlights contacts that are forced to the open condition.
The slash through the contacts is broken in the middle to highlight the ">" symbol.

Normal Coils • A coil circle filled with green is energized.


• A coil circle filled with the window background color is de-energized.
• A ">" symbol in the coil circle indicates forced signals.

Inverted Coils • A slash through the coil indicates that it is inverted.


• A coil circle filled with green is energized.
• A coil circle filled with the window background color is de-energized.
• A ">" symbol in the coil circle indicates forced signals. The slash through the contacts is broken in
the middle to highlight the ">" symbol.

3-4 • Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Ø To update the Primitive Block Rung or Big Block Rung display to
show passed parameters
w Select either Picture File or Demand Display from the View menu.

Ø To update Big Block Rung display to show automatic parameters


w Select Demand Display from the View menu.

Picture File Windows


Picture file windows (see Figure 3-2) are used to display the picture file and
animation of the passed parameters for Primitive and Big Blocks.

Title bar displays:


• Unit name
• Segment name
• Rung number
• Picture file name

Header, which displays


the following data:
• Unit, site, segment, and
picture file name
• Rung number
• Timetag (differs for Static
and Values displays)

The Header can scroll off the screen or be


hidden by other windows. However, it is good
practice to keep it visible because it contains
valuable process information.

Figure 3-2. Dynamic Rung Display’s Picture File Window

The type of information in the header timetag depends on the type of display:
• For a values display, the timetag provides the oldest piece of data being
displayed as a passed parameter. This includes the coil output for primitive
blocks. If it has not received data from the unit, the timetag display is No Valid
Data. If the oldest piece of data in the rung has not been updated for at least five
seconds, the timetag is highlighted.
• For a static display, the header timetag provides the operator interface time of
when the rung was displayed.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs • 3-5


Note Picture files cannot be opened directly by selecting Open from the File menu.

Ø To open a picture file


1. Open a sequencing segment (see Selecting a Sequencing Display Screen).
2. Navigate to the rung that contains the applicable Primitive or Big Block.
3. Select Picture File from the View menu.
A static picture file window displays with the passed parameter point names
represented as inputs and outputs to the block.
4. Select Values from the View menu to change to a values type display.
The parameter point names are replaced with their current values from the real-
time database. The data is updated once per second.

The following rules also apply to the picture file displays:


• To toggle between the values display and the static display, select Values from
the View menu.
• Big Block automatic parameters are not animated in the picture file window. You
can only view their values by selecting Demand Display from the View menu.
• You cannot navigate to other rungs or picture file windows from a picture file
window.
• A picture file window remains open until you close it by selecting Close from
the File menu.

Main Frame Window


This is the outer window that contains the rung and picture file windows. If no
control sequencing files or picture files are open, this window is empty.

Starting the Dynamic Rung Display


There are four ways to start the Dynamic Run Display:
• Double-click the program icon (if it is available on the desktop).
• On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Dynamic Rung Display.

• Enter dynrung.exe in the Run dialog box in the Start menu.


• Enter dynrung.exe at the DOS command line, then press Enter.
To quickly bring the display to a desired configuration, you can launch the Dynamic
Rung Display from the DOS command line with the following arguments:
/UNIT:
You can use the command line
arguments to customize the /FILE:
Dynamic Rung Display startup. /RUNG:
For example:
G:\EXEC\DYNRUNG.EXE /UNIT:T1: specifies the unit as T1
G:\EXEC\DYNRUNG.EXE /UNIT:T1 /FILE:SEQ_40.SRC: specifies the file name
G:\EXEC\DYNRUNG.EXE /UNIT:T1 /FILE:SEQ_40.SRC/RUNG:23 specifies the
rung number

3-6 • Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Selecting a Sequencing Display Screen
Sequencing files contain the Control Sequence for each control segment. The
following rules apply when opening these files:
• Selecting File then Open can only open a regular sequencing segment from the
files listed in the MSTR_SEQ.CFG.
• You must select a unit before you can open a sequencing file.
• You can open more than segment at a time, or have multiple views of the same
segment.
• Use the Window menu to change between views.
• To navigate within a segment, use the Rung menu and toolbar buttons.

Using the Find All Function


The Dynamic Rung Display includes a Find All function, which allows you to find
the occurrence of a particular signal anywhere within the control sequencing. This
function will find the following:
• Signal names in RLD rungs
• Signal names as passed parameters
• Signal names as automatic parameters
• Primitive names
• Big Block names
Find All does not do the following:

• Locate signals and block names used in sub rungs


• Search Comment Rungs. The Find All Function is available only after a valid
unit has been selected.

Ø To display results using the Find All function


1. Select Find All from the Edit menu.
2. In the dialog box, enter the desired signal or block name.
3. Select Find to display the results.

The Find All Results dialog box contains four columns, as follows:
• The first column displays the rung number where the rung was found.
• The second column shows the segment name.
• The third column shows the rung type.
• The fourth column shows how the signal is used in the rung.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs • 3-7


Ø To open a segment from the Find All results with the desired rung
displayed
w On the rung number, double-click the left mouse button.
-Or-
w Highlight the rung number and click the Goto button.

Note The Find All Results dialog box remains open until you select the Close
button or change units.

Viewing Tabular Data


Viewing tabular data can be useful when studying the behavior of a BBL with
automatic parameters.
The Dynamic Run Display allows you to launch the Demand Display to view RLD
elements, Big Block and Primitive passed parameters, and Big Block automatic
parameters. The data is in tabular form.
The Demand Display is a
Ø To view tabular data in a Demand Display
separate program outside of the
Dynamic Rung Display. Refer w Select Demand Display from the View menu.
to Chapter 4 for more
This displays all of the points from the current rung.
information.

3-8 • Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Trip History
Mark VI uses the Control The Trip History program provides a chronological record (log) of relevant data
System Toolbox for this gathered by the Mark V or V LM unit control. The data is organized according to
function. post-trip, pre-trip, and alarm categories. The program is used to help evaluate turbine
trip events.
You can use this program to retrieve data from the unit control and view it on the
operator interface (see Trip History Dialog Box below).
Control Signal Database Points (CSDBs) can be defined for collection. These
definitions (64 max.) are made in a single file (HIST_B.SRC). All data in the display
is chronologically indexed according to Mark V controller time and a separate
controller counter (HIS_AGE).

Trip History File


Trip History stores the results of the data retrieval in a read-only temporary text file.
This file is displayed using Microsoft Notepad (see Data History Results Window).
The Trip History file contains the points for collection and retrieval by the Trip
History program. This file for the unit is HIST_B.SRC, located in the unit
configuration directory. Information logged in the alarm section of the display is not
user-definable. You can use any text editor to modify the file.
SOEs are sequence of events. For pre-trip and post-trip screens, timetag (TIME) definitions are listed for the
displayed Control Data Point information. These designations provide a
chronological index that ties the exhibited signal information to the unit control time.
This register can provide valuable information for determining the SOEs that lead to
a turbine trip.
If the controller time is reset during an event, this index is lost. To prevent this, the
Trip Log Display includes a second counter (HIS_AGE) that is internal to the unit
control, but runs independently of the controller clock. This counter updates once-
per-second. It advances until a maximum value is reached, at which point the counter
returns to zero and restarts.
Figure 3-3 provides a sample HIST_B.SRC file in which the counter increments only
when the turbine is in a run condition. HIS_AGE must always be the first point in the
HIST_B.SRC file.

Note After modifying the Trip History file, you should process and downloaded it.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs • 3-9


;------------------------------------------
; HIST_B.SRC
; HIS_AGE MUST BE THE FIRST POINT!
;
; Signal Name
; -----------
HIS_AGE
DWATT
TNH
FSR
L52GX
L14HR
L14HM
L14HA
L14HS
L94X
L4
L3
L2TV
L28FDX
TTXD_1
TTXD_2
TTXD_3
TTXD_4
TTXD_5
TTXD_6
TTXD_7
TTXD_8
TTXD_9
TTXD_10
TTXD_11
TTXD_12
TTXD_13
TTXD_14
TTXD_15
TTXD_17
TTXD_18
FQG
FQL1
FSG
CTIM
CSGV
CPD
TTXSPL
TTXSP1
TTXSP2
TTXSP3
L4CT

Figure 3-3. Example of a Trip History File (HIST_B.SRC)

3-10 • Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Starting Trip History
You can start the Trip History program any of four ways:
• Double-click the program icon (if it is available on the desktop).
• On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Trip History.

• Enter tripdlog.exe in the Start menu’s Run dialog box.


You can use the command line • Enter tripdlog.exe at the DOS command line, then press Enter.
arguments to customize the
Trip History startup. When the program starts, the Trip History dialog box displays (described below).
From there, you select the unit and type of data to display.
To quickly bring the display to a desired configuration, you can launch the Trip
History Program from the DOS command line with the /UNIT argument, as follows:
G:\EXEC\TRIPDLOG.EXE /UNIT:T1 specifies the unit as T1

Trip History Dialog Box


The Trip History dialog box controls the collection of Trip History data and
Historical log data from the unit control.

Ø To view the Trip History log


You can retrieve only one type 1. From the Trip History dialog box (see Figure 3-4), select a valid unit from the
of data at a time. Select Unit list.
2. Choose the type of historical data to be collected from the Select Log options.
3. Click the Collect button to collect the data or the Cancel button to stop it.
When the data collection completes successfully, the results display in a separate
window (see Data History Results Window). A message box displays if the data
retrieval fails or is stopped by a user command.

Click to start data collection.

Click to close the Trip History dialog box.

Select the Unit from the list.

Select the type of data to be collected.

Trip History is saved when the turbine trips. For Mark V LM unit
controls, the data is saved in the control even after the control is reset.

Saved Data is saved into the control memory when you collect New
Data. It remains in memory until it is overwritten by New Data or until
the control is reset.

New Data is saved to the control memory when the user collects New
Data. The data reflects the most recent control data. The data remains
in the control memory as Saved Data until it is overwritten or until the
control is reset.

Note Collecting New Data overwrites the Saved History Data in


the control. On Mark V units, New Data overwrites the Trip History
Data in the control.

Figure 3-4. Trip History Dialog Box

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs • 3-11


Note Trip History data is lost in Mark V controllers if the unit control is reset. The
trip history data is preserved in the controller memory over a unit control reset or
reboot in Mark V LM units.

Data History Results Window


When the data retrieval completes successfully, the program opens Microsoft
Notepad and displays the results in a separate viewer window (see Figure 3-5). The
data is designed to be displayed in a fixed pitch font (all characters have the same
width) and word wrapping disabled. The results shown are stored in a read-only
temporary file.

Ø To save the Trip History data displayed by Notepad


1. From the Notepad File menu, select Save As.
2. Select the directory and name for the .txt file.
3. Click the Save button.

The results saved are in the following format:


• Post Trip List: three 1 second post trip records. These three records are filled
with data only when there has been an actual trip. Otherwise, they are blank.
• 10 Second List: ten 1-second records
• 1-Minute List: five 10-second records
• 10-Minute List: nine 1-minute records
• 1-Hour List: five 10-minute records
• 4-Hour List: four 1-hour records
• Last 60 Process Alarms

Enumerated state variable data Each record consists of the following fields:
is displayed as numbers, not as
text strings. • Timetag
• Value of from 1 to 64 points from the CSDB.

3-12 • Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Header, identifies the unit and location.

Up to 64 points can be viewed. HIS_AGE is


always reserved as the first point.

Post trip list


Three 1-sec records

10-sec. list
Ten 1-sec records

1-min. list
Five 10-sec records

Figure 3-5. Trip History Results Displayed in Notepad

Trip History on the Mark VI


Refer to Data Historian The Mark VI controller uses the Data Historian, a toolbox program to collect and
document GEI-100278 and view trip history data. The Historian trip log is a combination of historical analog
Trend Recorder document and discrete data collected at a rate of one second, and multiple capture buffers
GEH-6408 for more collected at high speed. Ethernet Global Data (EGD) is available for 24 hours. The
information. controller capture buffers hold 60 seconds of data.
This trip history data is viewed using the Trend Recorder, another toolbox program.
With this, multiple analog signals are trended on a full-page screen, which also
contains information on the configured discrete variables. High-speed discrete data
including all events, alarms, and SOEs can also be viewed in a list format showing
the logic state and time of the event.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs • 3-13


Trip Log Viewer
Refer to GEH-6126 Volume 2 A Mark V controller loses the trip history data stored in its memory if the unit
for information on the Trip Log control is reset or rebooted. A Mark V LM controller keeps the data for the last trip
Collection utility. if a reset or reboot occurs. However, the Turbine Control Interface (TCI) includes a
Trip Log Collection utility that automatically collects and stores the data. (Both the
utility and HMI must be running during the trip.)
You can access this data, which is displayed in a separate viewer window, using the
HMI’s Trip Log Viewer.

Trip Log File


The Viewer reads the previously saved trip text files stored on the disk. It determines
the trip times associated with each file from the name of the file, which is encoded
with the trip date and time information. Viewer opens Microsoft Notepad and
displays the valid trip times for the selection.

Ø To save the trip times


1. From Notepad, select Save As from the File menu.
The Trip Log Collection utility 2. Type in a file name and click Save.
stores the last 1 – 10 trips .
The files are stored in the C:\HMIDATA directory. The automatic collection
After that, it overwrites the
program manages the file names in the format YYYYMMDD_UU_TRx.CSV, as
oldest trip file with any new trip
follows:
data.
YYYYMMDD_HHMMSS_UU_TRx.CSV
File extension (to allow Microsoft Excel
viewing and analysis)

TRP indicates that the file contains trip


information; TRQ indicates a normal
shutdown or an aborted startup

Unit name

Data and time of trip (Y = year; M = minute,


D = day, H = hour, S = second

Figure 3-6. Trip History File Name Convention

Trip Log Viewer Dialog Box


The Trip Log Viewer dialog box controls the selection of Trip History data stored on
the disk.

Ø To view the trip log data (refer to Figure 3-7)


1. From the Trip Log Viewer dialog box, select a valid unit from the Select Unit
list box.
2. From the Select a Previous Trip Log, select a log to display by highlighting it.
3. Click the Go To button to display the selected log (file) with data from that trip.
4. Select the Close button to exit.

3-14 • Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Select to view log
Identifies location
Select to exit dialog box

Select the Unit from the list

Listed by Trip Date and


Time stamp.

Logs of past trip events.


Select to display
The number of trips is set
by the Trip Log Collection
utility. Default is 10.
The most recent is listed at
the top. Additional trips
overwrite the oldest log.

Figure 3-7. Mark V and Mark V LM Trip Log Viewer Dialog Box

Viewing Results
Refer to the previous Data History Results Window for a detailed description of the
data format and viewer program.

Starting the Trip Log Viewer


There are four ways to start the Trip Log Viewer:
• Double-click the program icon (if it is available on the desktop).
• On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Trip Log Viewer.

• Enter tripvwr.exe in the Start menu’s Run dialog box.


You can use the command line • Enter tripvwr.exe at the DOS command line, then press Enter.
arguments to customize the
Trip Log Viewer startup. When the program starts, the Trip History dialog box displays (described previousy
in this chapter). From there, you select the unit and type of data to display.
To quickly bring the display to a desired configuration, you can launch the Trip
History Program from the DOS command line with the /UNIT argument, as follows:
G:\EXEC\TRIPVWR.EXE /UNIT:T1 specifies the unit as T1

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs • 3-15


Notes

3-16 • Chapter 3 Display-Only Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Chapter 4 Control (Command)
Programs

Introduction
Chapter 3 describes display- The HMI’s control (command) programs allow you to control system operation by
only programs. sending commands to the controller.
This chapter describes the HMI control programs. It is presented as follows:
Section Page

Demand Display .......................................................................................................4-2


Starting Demand Display ..................................................................................4-2
Working with Files............................................................................................4-3
Demand Display Windows................................................................................4-4
Figure 4-1. Example of Menu Window............................................................4-4
Data Area Description............................................................................... 4-6
Command Target Types ............................................................................ 4-6
Using Demand Display .....................................................................................4-7
Displaying, Creating, and Modifying Screens .......................................... 4-7
Working with Command Targets ............................................................ 4-11
Other Options .......................................................................................... 4-13
Command Line Configuration.........................................................................4-13
Commands and Arguments ..................................................................... 4-13
Using Multiple Arguments...................................................................... 4-14
Alarm Logger Control ............................................................................................4-15
Starting the Alarm Logger Control ......................................................... 4-15
Hold List (Steam Applications) ..............................................................................4-16
Hold List Points...............................................................................................4-16
Hold List Programs .........................................................................................4-16
Hold List Rules................................................................................................4-16

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs • 4-1


Demand Display
This program is used on Mark Demand Display is a Microsoft® Windows®-based program that offers flexible
IV, V, and V LM controllers. monitoring and control of a variety of datapoints and multiple units. It provides the
For Mark VI, refer to the Con- following turbine control features:
trol System Toolbox documen-
tation, • Ability to monitor several datapoints at a time
• Ability to issue simple commands to the unit(s)
• Alterable displays that conform to the user needs
• Easy conformance to the displays required for testing and special procedures
• Control of special unit functions while monitoring associated data
• Ability to accommodate different types of units in one Demand Display file (see
Working with Files in this chapter).

Only qualified personnel knowledgeable about turbine con-


trol and protection should create and execute commands.
The commands can affect the control state and action of the
unit control.

The Demand Display program can be started and customized through either Win-
dows or a DOS-based line command (see Starting Demand Display). This chapter
includes instructions using Demand Display with Mark IV, V, and V LM controllers.
For Mark VI controllers, use the toolbox.

Starting Demand Display


There are four ways to start Demand Display:
• Double-click the program icon (if it is available on the desktop).
• On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Demand Display.

• At the DOS command prompt, type DEMAND then press Enter.


• On the Windows desktop, select Start and Run, then enter DEMAND.EXE in the
dialog box.
DEMAND01.DM2 is located in Demand Display automatically opens a generic default file DEMAND01.DM2, which
the F:\RUNTIME directory can use data from multiple units. The program provides two types of working win-
dows:
For description and operation • A Menu window contains a list (menu) of all of the screens available in the se-
of these program windows, see lected Demand Display file.
the Demand Display Windows
section in this chapter. • Data windows contain data associated with a particular unit. These screens are
selected from the Menu window.

4-2 • Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Ø To load an existing .DM2 file from the Demand Display
1. From the File menu, select Open.
Or click .
2. Select the file from the directory that displays.
If no existing file is specified when executing Demand Display the default file
DEMAND01.DM2 (located in the F:\RUNTIME directory) loads.

Ø To create a new .DM2 file from the Demand Display

Or click . w From the File menu, select New.


A blank Demand Display Menu screen displays with the single menu item De-
mand Display. This is a template that must be renamed after modification.

Saving a new Demand Display file without renaming it over-


writes the existing file data with the new file data.
Saving the Demand Display template screen without a new
screen name causes the template to no longer be a blank.

Note Exiting either the screen or file without saving loses changes to the file.

Working with Files


Demand Display uses the following files:

File name Location (Directory) Description


DEMAND.EXE G:\EXEC (executable directory) Opens the Demand Display program. The program opens files with
.DM2 extensions (for example, DEMAND01.DM2).

To ensure that the Demand Display program


functions correctly, do not modify the
DEMAND.EXE file.

xxxxx.DM2 RUNTIME directory in the F:\ Demand Display files, which are in binary format, contain defini-
drive (typically). The Demand tions for all of the Data screens listed on the Demand Display Menu
Display program saves new for that file. One file generally saves several Demand Display
files in the directory in which screens. One unit may use several of these files. Open, modify,
the program was executed, and save these files using the Demand Display program (do not
unless a different directory is edit the files directly).
selected.

unitname.DD Files that make up the Data Data Dictionary files contain the point list available for use in the
(unitname varies Dictionary for a unit are stored Data screens. Demand Display obtains points values directly from
as needed.) in its unit-specific directory and the Data Dictionary. (SYSTEM.DD is the master data dictionary file,
should always be kept there. which contains pointers to all *.DD files used by the Demand Dis-
plays).

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs • 4-3


Demand Display Windows
As defined previously, there are two types of Demand Display windows:
To display a screen listed on • The Menu window lists all screens available in the selected *.DM2 file (see Fig-
the menu, select that item using ure 4-1). It is the starting point for working with Data screens. .
the mouse or Enter key.
• Data windows are screens selected from the Menu window. The name and defi-
nition of Data screen is associated with a particular unit. (For example, Unit 1
would differ from Unit 2 in the names and definitions of the Data displays.)
There are two types of Data screens: Point List and Data Dictionary (see Fig-
ures 4-2 and 4-3).

The titlebar displays the filename currently in the Demand Display.

Menu selections include both standard Windows


and program-specific commands.

The toolbar provides quick access to menu


commands. Holding the cursor over the
button displays the button function (see Note).

Header, which contains process identification


d t )
Data Area, which contains menu of available data
screens. New screens can be added.

Note Selecting the Help button opens the


Help window. Selecting the Context Sensitive Help
button changes the cursor to an arrow with a
question mark. You can then select an item with
this cursor to open the item’s Help information.

Figure 4-1. Example of Menu Window

The Point List data screen is created and edited


from points and commands entered by the user
from the Demand Display program. It is the most
common type of display.

You can define additional Header


point names and command
targets or remove existing ones
from Point List data screens. Legend

Data Area

Command Target Field

Figure 4-2. Example of Point List Type of Data Screen, User-Defined

4-4 • Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
The Data Dictionary data screen is built auto-
matically from point information stored in the
Data Dictionary. It configures the screens from
options that select the points and commands to
display. The Value field updates once each
second.
Header
This data screen is used for
examining specific point types Legend
and command options.

Adding and deleting point names


and command pushbuttons from
a Data Dictionary data screen is Data Area
temporary and cannot be saved.

Figure 4-3. Example of Data Dictionary Type of Data Screen Using Logics

Both Demand Display windows are made up of three main regions (refer to Figures
4-1 through 4-3):
GE recommends that you keep • The screen Header is non-scrolling process identification data. It contains the:
the screen header visible at all – Unit name
times. – Site name
– Program name
– Display screen name
– Timetag (pc time) for the oldest piece of data in the Data Area.
Although the header cannot scroll off the screen, you can toggle it on or off by
selecting Header from the View menu.
The Timetag displays the oldest of the displayed point name timetags in the
controller. If the Data Area is empty (contains no valid points), or the Data Area
contains valid points but no data has been received from the unit, then the timetag
is No Valid Data. A highlighted timetag indicates that the oldest piece of data in
the Data Area has not been updated for five seconds.
GE recommends that you keep • The Legend displays the non-scrolling column headers for the Data Area. Al-
the column headers visible at though the header cannot scroll off the screen, you can toggle it on or off by se-
all times. lecting Header from the View menu.
• The Data Area is below the Header and Legend. In the Menu screen, the Data
Area consists of a list of the Data screens available for viewing. In a Data screen,
the Data Area consists of an unlimited list of point names, their values, and units.
This information is in a tabular format. (See Data Area Description below for
more details.)
Any Command Targets defined display on the right side of the window. (See
Command Target Types below for more details.)

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs • 4-5


Data Area Description
Unlike the Header and Legend, the point names and command targets in the Data
Area scroll with the scroll bars. Demand Display updates only the visible points. The
following sections in the Data Area provide information or require input:
• The Point Name field holds the control signal point name (or synonym) of valid
unit database points. Entering the point name causes Demand Display to use the
currently selected unit’s data, which is the unit listed in the Header. Entering the
unit name with a colon before the point name, as in T2:{Pointname}, displays
data from the requested unit.
The Point Name field is 15 characters in length. Demand Display allows you to
enter other text into this field for commenting and separating sections of points.
Invalid point names are treated as text to allow for entering textual separations of
the data.
• The Value field contains point value information. This field updates once each
second, is right justified, and may contain up to 10 characters. If the value is
larger than 10 characters, 10 asterisks display. Enumerated state values display
across both the Value field and the Units field. The Demand Display program
centers the Enumerated state values across these fields and truncates them if they
are over 17 characters long. A blank Value field indicates either of 2 conditions:
– The point information is invalid
– There is no data for the point in the Data Dictionary
• The Units field displays engineering units for valid point names exactly as en-
tered in the Data Dictionary file. This field is blank for invalid point names, but
indicates the units for valid points without data in the Data Dictionary. The Units
field combines with the Value field to display the text for enumerated points.
• The Command Target field is to the right of the Units field. It contains Unit
Command Targets (buttons) for sending control commands to the unit.

Command Target Types


Command Targets (see Figure 4-2) are essentially buttons that you select to perform
the action identified on its label. There are three Command Target types:
Feedback logic is optional. • Immediate Action type sends a command to the control immediately without
requiring further action. They typically perform an incremental change to the
control, such as Raise or Lower.
These targets are red and their text turns yellow if the feedback logic is supplied
and met.
• Arm/Execute type typically performs changes to the control state, such as Start
and Stop. When selected, it opens the Execute Command dialog box to confirm
execution. Selecting OK sends the command to the unit. Selecting Cancel can-
cels the command. No response causes the Demand Display to cancel the com-
mand through default.
These targets are green and their text turns yellow if the feedback logic is sup-
plied and met.

Note Requiring command confirmation before sending them to the unit prevents
execution of false commands.

4-6 • Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Speed or Temperature references • Analog Setpoint type changes the setpoint value of the specified control. It does
are examples of control signals. not use feedback logic. When selected, a Setpoint Dialog box (see Figure 4-4)
opens, requesting the new value for the control signal. No response cancels the
command through default.
These targets are gray and their text turns yellow if the feedback logic is supplied
and met.

Enter new value Uses the current


display engineer-
ing units

Sends new value Cancels command


to unit and closes box

Figure 4-4. Example of Change Setpoint Dialog Box

Using Demand Display


Each unit can have more than As described previously, each Demand Display file (*.DM2) contains its own Menu
one Demand Display file. window and set of Data screens. After you select a *.DM2 file (see Starting Demand
Display), Demand Display opens into a Menu window. This is the starting point for
working with Demand Display data screens within that file.

Note You can also use command line arguments to start Demand Display and open
specific screens and files. Refer to the Command Line Configuration section of this
chapter for the instructions.

Save Demand Display files Ø To save a Demand Display file


anytime a Demand Display
1. Select Save or Save As from the File menu.
screen is saved or added.
2. Save As displays the Save As dialog box, allowing you to select the directory
and a new file name.
If you exit the Demand Display program before saving changes to the Menu or
Data screens, the program asks if you want to save the file.
3. Select Yes to save the file and No to exit the program without saving.

Note Saving a Demand Display file and a Demand Display screen require different
steps. How to save a screen is described below.

Displaying, Creating, and Modifying Screens


Ø To open (display) an existing Data screen
1. From the list in Menu window select a data screen that you want to open.
2. Either double-click on the selection or press Enter to open the screen.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs • 4-7


Ø To create (add) a new Data screen
1. From the Menu window, place the cursor at the point in the list where you want
to insert the new screen title.
2. Select Insert Line from the Edit menu.
This adds a new, blank data screen and its title as Untitled:#, where the # is the
number of the new screen.
3. Give the screen a new name as described in the modify instructions below.

Ø To modify a Data screen (title, type, options)


1. From the Menu window, place the cursor at line with the screen name.
2. Select Modify Line from the Edit menu. Or, select Definition from the Display-
menu.
The Display Definition dialog box opens (see Figure 4-5).

Data screen title (see


guidelines below).

Allows you to change the


Data screen type.

Select the point types to


display in a Data Dictionary
type Data screen.

Display Title guidelines:


• Screen title can be up to 25
characters long.
• Names should not be
duplicated, empty, or all
blanks
• The use of ellipsis (.....)
placed before the title of a
Data Dictionary type Data
screen is recommended to
differentiate it from a Point
List type Data screen.

Figure 4-5. Display Definition Dialog Box

4-8 • Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
3. In the Display Title text box, type a new name, if desired.
Figures 4-2 and 4-3 provide 4. Use the Display Type options to change between a Point List type or a Data
samples of these types of Data Dictionary type, as desired.
screens.
5. Select OK to save the changes.
6. Save the Data screen, as described below.

Ø To save a Data screen


7. Select Save or Save As from the Display menu.
– Save saves the screen changes to the same screen title on the Menu window.
– Save As saves the screen changes to a new screen title on the Menu window.
It also opens the Display Definition dialog box.
8. If the Display Definition dialog box opens, type a new name in the Display Title
text box (see Figure 4-5).
9. Select OK or Save As from the Display menu to save changes. Keep in mind the
following:
– Save As does not change the old Display Title to a new one. It inserts the title
of the new Data screen at the bottom of the Menu list.
– If you do not enter a new Display Title, another Demand Display screen with
the same name is added to the bottom of the Demand Display Menu. You
should rename the edited Demand Display screens if you keep the original.
– If you exit the Demand Display program before saving changes to the
screens, the program asks if you want to save changes before exiting. Select
Yes to save the changes in the *.DM2 file and No to exit without saving.

Ø To copy a Data screen from one unit to another


At locations with duplicate or 1. From the Menu window, open the desired screen.
similar units, it may be useful to
2. Select Unit from the Edit menu.
copy a Demand Display screen
from one unit to another. 3. Select the new unit.
4. Select Save from the Display menu.
5. To make this change permanent to the Demand Display file (*.DM2), select Save
or Save As from the File menu.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs • 4-9


Working with Point Names

Lines can be added, deleted, or Ø To add a point name or line


modified in either Data screen
1. On the Data screen, place the cursor on the line below where you want to add the
type, but saved only in a Point
point name or line.
List type.
2. Select Insert Blank Line from the Edit menu.
This inserts a blank line above the selected line.
3. Give the screen a new name as described in the modify instructions below.

Ø To modify a point name or line


1. On the data screen, place the cursor on the line to modify.
2. Select Modify Line from the Edit menu.
The Modify Line dialog box displays (see Figure 4-6).
3. Enter the desired point name then select OK to change the information on the line
or add information to a blank line.
4. Save both the Demand Display screen and Demand Display file to make the
changes permanent.

Type new Point Name in


text box.

Click to save Point Name


entries and exit box.

Click to cancel Point Name


entries and exit dialog box.
Displays only when you can add or modify a
Command Target associated with the line.

Figure 4-6. Modify Line Dialog Box

Ø To delete a point name or line


1. On the Data screen, place the cursor on the line to modify.
2. Select Delete Line from the Edit menu.
If the line corresponds to the first line of a Command Target, the target deletes.
3. Save both the Demand Display screen and Demand Display file to make the
changes permanent.

4-10 • Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Working with Command Targets

Refer to the Command Target Ø To add a Command Target


Types section in this chapter.
1. Place the cursor on the line that corresponds to the Command Target. You must
Command targets can be added insert one blank line between targets in the Target Field.
in either Demand Display
2. Select Modify Line from the Edit menu.
screen type, but saved only in a
Point List type. The point name dialog box displays (see Figure 4-6).
3. Enter the desired point name if adding to a blank line. Typically, the point name
on the line corresponding to the first line of the Command Target has direct rele-
vance to the target (button) and its action.
4. Select the Define Command button.
The Command Definition dialog box displays (see Figure 4-7). It contains fields
for information to define a Command Target and its feedback (optional).
5. Enter values and selections into the Command Definition dialog box (Figure 4-7
provides descriptions):
– Target (button) text in Text Line 1 and Text Line 2, as needed.
– Point name of the unit command in the Point Name field.
– Target Type.
– Unit command Value of the point.
– Value Type.
– Feedback Signal Pointname and Sense.
6. Confirm, check, or cancel as needed by selecting any of the following buttons on
the dialog box:
– Check Form checks the command definition entries for consistency and er-
rors.
– OK saves any changes and creates the target.
– Help initiates the help data for this dialog box.
– Cancel stops all changes to the command definition.
– Delete resets the Command Definition and destroys the Command Target.

Ø To delete a Command Target


1. Place the cursor on the point name in the line that corresponds to the to the text
line of the target
2. Select Modify Line from the Edit menu.
The point name dialog box displays (see Figure 4-6).
3. Select the Define Command button.
The Command Definition dialog box displays.
4. Select Delete to reset the Command Definition and delete the Command Target.
-Or-
1. Place the cursor on the point name in the line corresponding to the top text line of
the target.
2. Select Delete Line from the Edit menu to delete the point name and the Com-
mand Target.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs • 4-11


Target Text should indicate the Command Target’s action.
Text appears black, but turns yellow if the associated feed-
back logic is supplied and the sense met.
Allows two lines of up to eight characters per line.
Text is automatically centered on the target (button).

Unit command Point Name is the control signal pointname


that receives the target’s value. Only command pointnames are
allowed. They can be pushbutton, logics, or analog setpoints.

Target Type defines which Command Target to use.


For definitions, refer to Command Target Types.

Value holds the value the Command target sends to the unit.
Use the following guidelines (based on pointnames):
• A Target’s value is the number of scans to hold the
target (pushbutton) true. The minimum value is four scans.
• Logic States require a value of 1 or 0.
• Analog setpoints require a value in the engineering units
specified for the command signal point.

Value type determines how the Command Target sends the


value to the unit:
• Set (=) sends the value from the value type to the unit.
It is required for Pushbuttons and Logic States and optional
for Analog Setpoints.
• Increment (+) adds the value in the value field to the
current value of an Analog Setpoint and sends it to the unit.
• Decrement (-) subtracts the value in the value field from the Feedback Signal contains the feedback signal’s
current value of an Analog Setpoint and sends it to the unit. definition. Immediate Action and Arm/Execute
types can use feedback signals. Analog Setpoint
target types cannot.
Pointname is for the control signal point name of the
feedback signal, which can only be logic point types.
Sense can invert the sense of the feedback signal.

Figure 4-7. Example of Command Definition Dialog Box

Ø To modify a Command Target


1. Place the cursor on the point name in the line that corresponds to the to the top
text line of the desired Command Target.
2. Select Modify Line from the Edit menu.
The point name dialog box displays (see Figure 4-6).
3. Select the Define Command button.
The Command Definition dialog box displays.
4. Modify the definition as defined above using the procedure to add a Command
Target.

4-12 • Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Other Options
There are several other options available in the Demand Display program:
• Selecting Set Font from the Edit menu displays the Windows Font dialog box.
You can then select the font and color of the Demand Display screen. The selec-
tion applies to all Demand Display screens, except for the Command Targets,
whose colors are predefined.
• Selecting Select Unit from the Edit menu allows you to select a unit. In multiple
unit sites, any unit can be monitored from one Demand Display screen. Select
Unit displays the Unit Selection dialog box. The currently selected unit is high-
lighted. The available units display in alphabetical order. Select the desired unit.
This option is not available in single unit sites.
• Selecting Menu from the View menu toggles between the menu and the most re-
cently viewed Data screen. Toggling to the Menu screen from a Data screen loses
any changes if the Data screen is not saved. The Demand Display program asks
whether or not to save the Demand Display screen. Selecting Yes saves the
screen, No toggles to the Menu window without saving. Selecting Menu from
the Demand Display Menu screen displays the most recently viewed screen.

Command Line Configuration


The Demand Display program For Mark IV, V, and V LM controllers, you can use command line arguments to start
is executable from any direc- Demand Display and open specific windows and files.
tory.
Ø To load an existing Demand Display file from the command line
w Type in the DEMAND command with the /FILE argument and complete filename.
For example:
F:\RUNTIME>DEMAND /FILE:{FILENAME}.DM2
where {filename}.DM2 is a Demand Display filename such as OPERATOR.DM2.

Commands and Arguments


To configure Demand Display more specifically from the command line, type
DEMAND then any of the following arguments at the command prompt, as needed:

• The /UNIT: argument starts the Demand Display program for the unit specified.
For example:
F:\RUNTIME>DEMAND /UNIT:T1
The unit name must be a valid unit. Selecting an invalid unit or no unit displays
the Unit Selection dialog box. Single unit sites ignore this argument and default
to the single unit.
• The /FILE: argument executes the Demand Display program and loads a re-
quested Demand Display file. For example:
F:\RUNTIME>DEMAND /FILE:OPERATOR.DM2
or
F:\RUNTIME>DEMAND /FILE:F:\RUNTIME\OPERATOR.DM2
Incorrect entries cause error This argument requires permission to read the file and/or directory. Entering an
messages. invalid path or filename displays an error message and a blank, untitled Demand
Display file. When entering no filename, the program attempts to open the de-
fault file F:\RUNTIME\DEMAND01.DM2. If it cannot open the file, the program
displays an error message and a blank file.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs • 4-13


• The /DISPLAY: argument displays the screen in a particular file. For example:
F:\RUNTIME>DEMAND /FILE:OPERATOR.DM2 /DISPLAY:”LUBE OIL”
If the screen name is invalid, the program displays the menu for the file re-
quested. If the file is invalid, a blank, untitled file displays.
• The /TYPE: argument displays the data screen with points specified at the com-
mand line. For example:
F:\RUNTIME>DEMAND /TYPE:(L1,F4)
The program displays a blank Demand Display file if the point types are invalid.
If a filename is entered, it ignores the point types.

Using Multiple Arguments


You can enter multiple arguments to configure Demand Display more specifically.
The following combination rules apply:
• File and Display ignores the Type argument
• File ignores an invalid Display argument
• Type can only be used with the Unit argument or alone
• Unit can be used with any other argument, unless it is a single unit system (then
the Unit is ignored
• Unit ignores any following invalid argument
• Display requires a File argument preceding it
Examples of valid combinations:
F:\RUNTIME>DEMAND /UNIT:T2 /FILE:OPERATOR.DM2/DISPLAY:”LUBE OIL”
or
F:\RUNTIME> DEMAND/UNIT:T2 /TYPE:(F4)

4-14 • Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Alarm Logger Control
This program is used with Mark Several classes of turbine control actions can be automatically logged to a printer.
IV, V, V LM, and VI control- The HMI’s Alarm Logger allows you to select alarms and events to output to the
lers. printer using the Alarm Logger Control dialog box (see Figure 4-8).
The Alarm Logger Control does not access any files when making its changes. In-
stead, it writes its output to a special section of global memory that is then read by
the Alarm Logger program, which writes the alarms and events to the alarm printer.

Note Alarm Logger Control does not configure individual points.

Exits dialog box without saving


Process identification data changes.
Saves selections and exits.
Cancels changes and exits.
Click on drop-down box arrow to
select unit (displayed in alpha- Applies current unit’s settings to all
numeric order). units.
Immediately deletes all pending
There are four functions (categories alarm print jobs for all units from
of information that can be printed. the Alarm Printer (does not require
Click on box to select. (Blank is OK to be selected).
unselected; a check is selected.)
You can select each function on a
unit basis by selecting the Unit and
Function, then OK button.

Figure 4-8. Alarm Logger Control Dialog Box

Starting the Alarm Logger Control


You can start the Alarm Logger Control program any of four ways:
• Double-click the program icon (if it is available on the desktop).
• On the Windows desktop, select Start, Turbine Control Maintenance Group,
Unit T#, then Alarm Logger Control.

• Enter logger.exe in the Run dialog box in the Start menu.


• Enter logger.exe at the DOS command line, then press Enter.
You can use the command line To quickly display the desired configuration, start the Alarm Logger Control from
arguments to customize the the DOS command line with following argument:
Alarm Logger Control startup.
G:\EXEC\LOGGER.EXE /UNIT:T1 specifies the unit name as T1

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs • 4-15


Hold List (Steam Applications)
This program is used with Mark The Hold List is required for the HMI to support Mark V controllers on systems that
V and Mark VI controllers. have Automatic Turbine Startup (ATS). The ATS code resides in ROM in the <C>
processor only.
ATS is active only when the Automatic mode is selected. It is used to set speed con-
trol targets and valve positions based on various inputs (such as steam temperatures
and pressures, calculated valve stresses, turbine rotor stresses, and turbine shell
stresses, metal temperatures, speed and operating mode.)
Turbine operating conditions may cause a hold, which prevents ATS from setting the
speed or load target to a higher value. In the HMI, the Hold List display enables you
to view the current points on the Hold List and to override any or all hold points, if
desired. Overriding a hold allows the ATS to advance its targets as operating condi-
tions permit.

Hold List Points


The points for the Hold list are listed in the HMI unit configuration directory
F:\UNITN\TOTT_B.SRC file. The list can hold 64 points, maximum. The points are
either Alarms or Events, which display on the Alarm and Event Logger.
This file must be compiled by the table compiler G:\EXEC\TABLE_C.EXE. For Mark
V, the point list is then downloaded to <C> and <D> processors with the EEPROM
downloader G:\EXEC\EEPROM.EXE. Select TOTT for the section to download.
Reboot the processors activate any list changes.

Hold List Programs


For Mark V, the Hold List is maintained in the <C> and <D> processors by programs
in PROM. The Hold List receiver in the HMI is automatically started by the TCI
system service.
Refer to Chapter 2 and Appen- The CIMPLICITY Alarm Viewer displays the Hold List on the HMI. You should
dix B for more information on configure a separate CIMPLICITY Alarm Viewer for the Hold List to allow only the
alarm displays. holds from a given unit on the display and to exclude holds from the regular alarm
list. You can change this at any time.

Hold List Rules


The Hold List is maintained according to the following rules:
• A point that is picked up is entered in the Hold List as (0 - > 1).
• Unacknowledged entries have an N character in the ACK field.
• Acknowledged entries have a Y character in the ACK field.
• A hold point whose state is a picked up (logic 1) displays the ALARM state.
• A hold point whose state is a dropped out (logic 0) displays the NORMAL state.
• A point has been acknowledged is removed from the Hold List display.

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• A picked up hold point may be overridden by an operator using the Lock com-
mand button.
• An overridden point displays Locked as the first part of their long name text.
• An overridden point loses its override when it drops out (1 -> 0).
• The Hold List displays the time of the last pickup or override, unit, acknowledge
state, current state, override status, and the short and long name of each hold
point in the list.
• The text Hold displays in the drop number field and the CSDB offset displays in
the reference field. The reference field is typically not displayed.
• The Hold List program in <C>, not <D>, outputs a logic signal indicating that
there are one or more active holds that have not been overridden. This point is
named L68DW_ATS_HL. ATS and the turbine control use this signal to set speed,
load, and valve position targets.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs • 4-17


Notes

4-18 • Chapter 4 Control (Command) Programs HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays

Introduction
The CIMPLICITY HMI product The CIMPLICITY HMI collects data from plant sensors and devices, then
must be installed before these transforms the data into dynamic text, alarm, and graphic displays. Operators can
applications can be used. access real-time information when monitoring and making control decisions. The
turbine control HMI supports many CIMPLICITY applications for operation.
GFK-1180 provides a detailed CIMPLICITY is used primarily to display turbine status screens, which enable an
description of the CIMPLICITY operator to monitor the unit(s). Refresh rate is typically 1 second. CIMPLICITY
display features. cannot configure the turbine control.
CIMPLICITY supports OLE and ActiveX applications for automation displays.
CIMB (CIMPLICITY Bridge) enables CIMPLICITY to collect data and alarms from
a turbine unit with Mark V. (Mark VI used EGD) TCIMB provides the following
software functions:
• MARKV_RP collects data from a turbine using TCI and forwards the information
to the CIMPLICITY Point Manager.
• EXTMGR collects alarms and forwards them to the CIMPLICITY Alarm
Manager. (See Chapter 6.)
• LOCKOUT sends a lockout command to a unit using TCI. (See Extended Alarm
Commands below.)
• SILENCE sends a silence command to a unit using TCI. (See Extended Alarm
Commands below.)
This chapter identifies these functions, as follows:
Section Page

CIMPLICITY ActiveX Objects................................................................................5-2


Manual Synchronizing Display .........................................................................5-2
Triggered Plot (Valve Travel) ...........................................................................5-6
Alarm Filtering in HMI Servers ...............................................................................5-8
Configuring Users .............................................................................................5-8
Configuring Resources ....................................................................................5-12
Configuring Alarm Filters ...............................................................................5-14
Examples of Screens for Filtered Alarms........................................................5-23
Currently Implemented Filters ........................................................................5-25
Extended Alarm Commands...................................................................................5-26
Reactive Capability Display ...................................................................................5-28

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-1


CIMPLICITY ActiveX Objects
Microsoft Corporation ActiveX controls allow different types of software objects to communicate if the
developed ActiveX controls software supports ActiveX. The controls are interactive within an application. They
originally to support the can be gauges, charts, displays, graphs, or any other object that allows a user to
creation of Internet-enabled access the particular functionality of the object.
applications.
For operator control, the HMI includes two CIMPLICITY add-ons supplied by
Industrial Systems (Salem, VA) and identified as ActiveX objects: Manual
Synchronizing Display and Triggered Plot. These are described below.

Mark V, V LM. Manual Synchronizing Display


To bring a generator online with a power grid, the speed (frequency) and phase angle
of the generator’s ac waveform must match that of the power grid. The preferred
method is to use the turbine controller’s auto-synchronizing function.
OLE is “Object Linking and For Mark V and V LM, a Manual Sync Object (an OLE object) is provided in
Embedding” (see the Glossary CIMPLICITY HMI to allow the user to see a display representing this
for a more detailed definition). synchronization process (see Figure 5-1). The object contains all the fields that need
to be updated at a fast rate. For Mark V and V LM, all data in the object is updated at
16 Hz. For Mark VI, this operation is at 10 Hz.
The Manual Synchronizing Display must be run from a CIMPLICITY server for the
desired controller. This is because the object uses the messaging services of TCI.
The object consists of five parts, which you can set using tabs on the CIMPLICITY
HMI Properties dialog box for that object. These tabs are described below.

Synchroscope -- Resets green dots at end of pointer


Configure using Scope tab (see Figure 5-2)

Breaker close times --


Configure using
Breaker tab

Breaker Trip and Breaker


Close buttons --
Configure using Buttons
tab (see Note below)

Values that need updating


quickly -- Configure using Permissives needed to close
Values tab the breaker -- Configure using
Permissives tab.

Figure 5-1. Manual Sync Object (Used in CIMPLICITY HMI)

Note When you push the Breaker Close or Breaker Trip button, a dialog box
displays with two buttons for command confirmation:
• Command sends the breaker close or trip command when selected and released
• Done exits the dialog box and cancels the breaker close or trip command

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Configuring the Synchroscope
To configure the Synchroscope part of the object, enter parameters into the Scope
tab.

Signal that drives synchroscope pointer. Pointer is


Name of positioned at this angle as long as slip frequency is
ActiveX control less than the Maximum slip frequency.

Select unit from drop-down list.

Signal used to determine current slip frequency.


If greater than maximum slip frequency, pointer
is positioned at bottom of scope.

Maximum slip frequency.

Locations marks on scope. Entered in degrees


separated by spaces.

(Optional.) Signal used to change pointer color. If


signal is not defined, pointer is white. If true, pointer
is green. If false, pointer is red.

(Optional.) Signal indicating state of Sync relay. Each time signal is true
and pointer is updated, a green dot is drawn at end of pointer. Scope’s R
button (located top right; see Figure 5-1) is used to reset dots.

Configuring Breaker Close Times


To configure the object’s breaker close times, enter values into the Breaker tab.

BMS Socket (usually 15) used to obtain TCEA


diagnostic message. (Message is how object gets
breaker close times.)

I/O Processor (usually 2F hex) used to obtain


TCEA diagnostic message.

Diagnostic Message type (usually 5).

Offset (usually 40) into the Diagnostic Message


to the Nominal Close Time value.

Offset (usually 42) into the diagnostic message


to the Learned Close Time value.

Offset (usually 48) into the diagnostic message


to the Actual Close Time value.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-3


Configuring Permissives
To configure the Permissives part of the object, add or edit the list entries in the
Permissives tab.

Logic signal used. String displayed next to


box. Permissives display
Determines color of box in object in the same
displayed by variable. If order as in list box.
variable value equals
Sense value, box is
green. If not equal, box is Move currently selected
red with a dash next to it. entry up one row in the
list.
Add entries to list. Move currently selected
entry down one row in
Delete currently selected list.
entry.

Edit currently selected


entry.

Configuring Breaker Close and Trip Buttons


To configure the object’s Breaker Close and Breaker Trip buttons, enter parameters
into the Buttons tab.

(Optional.) Signal to send Breaker Close


pushbutton command to. If not filled in, button is
not displayed. Set length of pushbutton command
in duration box.

(Optional.) Signal to send the Breaker Trip


pushbutton command to. If not filled in, button is
not displayed. Set length of pushbutton command
in duration box.

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Configuring Values
To configure the object’s Values, enter data into the Value tab.

Values in display in the object in the same order


as in the list box

Sets number of digits for displaying the value.


Uses number of decimal places and units string
specified in the scale code.

Signal used for the value.

String that displays to the left of the value.

Add entries to end of list.

Apply to the currently selected entry.


Up moves currently selected entry up one row;
Down moves it down one row.

Configuring Object Colors


The change colors in the object, edit the Colors tab.

Click down arrow to


select area to change –
Background or
Foreground (text) color
Box shows current color
of selection (Background Click to change color of
or Foreground) selection.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-5


Mark V, V LM Triggered Plot (Valve Travel)
The Triggered Plot function is an ActiveX object that provides a graph of high-speed
turbine data. The graph can be triggered by the change in state of a logic signal in the
unit. Turbine commands can be sent from here, making it useful for initiating turbine
tests (such as valve travel tests).

Like the Manual Synchronizing Display, Triggered Plot is run from a CIMPLICITY
server for the desired controller (see Figure 5-2). You configure the object by setting
configuration information on the Triggered Plot Control Properties tabs, which is a
CIMPLICITY HMI Properties dialog box (see Figure 5-3).

Plotted data displays within


graph box, up to two data points
versus time.

Data (status points) collected at


a sample rate of 8 times per
second for an elapsed time of 1
to 120 seconds, as selected by
user. Updates once per second.

Plot is triggered by user-specified


logic signal and its desired state
to trigger.

Figure 5-2. Inactive Triggered Plot Screen

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Configuring Object Properties
There are six tabs for configuring Triggered Plot Control Properties (see Figure
5-3).

Specify up to 2 push- Set status points Select Elapsed time for


buttons for sending (up to 8) and position object data collection
commands to unit on the display. colors. (1 to 120 sec.)

Select unit from drop-down list

Name of variable that determines beginning of test

State of trigger to begin the plot

Plot points for left and right axis

Range for low and high plot (in raw counts)

Select color for each plot line

Selected plot points are plotted from the time the


trigger first reaches the specified state until the end
of the entered elapsed time.

Figure 5-3. Inactive Triggered Plot Screen Showing Version Window

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-7


Alarm Filtering in HMI Servers
GFK-1180 provides a detailed Normally, all alarms for the roles assigned to your CIMPLICITY User ID are
description of the CIMPLICITY displayed in the separate Alarm Viewer window (an OCX control). You can also
display features. filter alarms to display subsets using the Alarm Setups dialog box.
The Alarm Filter feature allows specific displays for alarms. These can be based on:
• Various Resources or Types. An example of a resource would be each single Gas
or Steam Turbine, the Exciter, BOP, or the system itself.
• Alarm type or function (for example, Diagnostic, Process, Low, Medium, High).
To configure alarms for filtering in HMI servers, you need to do the following:
1. Configure users
2. Configure resources
3. Configure the alarm filters

All procedures must be followed and completed in the order


presented.
It is good practice to check off each procedure when you
complete it. For this purpose, this chapter includes checkboxes
next to each procedure heading

Note The procedures in this section require that you have a working knowledge of
CIMPLICITY, including its Workbench application, User Configuration, Resource
Configuration, and various aspects of Alarms. Document GFK-1180 provides this
information.

Configuring Users
A user is an individual person working with a CIMPLICITY HMI project. Each
CIMPLICITY HMI user has the following attributes, which must be configured:
Security – A user may be assigned a Password. If a Password is configured and
enabled, then a user cannot access CIMPLICITY HMI project functions without
entering both the User ID and Password.
Roles and Privileges – A user is assigned a role. Each role in the CIMPLICITY
HMI project has certain privileges assigned to it. The privileges define the functions
the user can access. If a user lacks the privilege to access a secure function, an error
message is displayed and access is denied.
View of Resources – A user’s view determines the accessible resource data.
Alarms for resources outside a user’s view do not display on the user’s Alarm
Viewer window.
¨ All procedures in this Ø To configure Users for the CIMPLICITY HMI project
section were completed
1. Open the project in the CIMPLICITY Workbench (refer to Chapter 6 for an
successfully.
overview).

2. In the Workbench left pane under the Security folder, select Users, as shown
below.

5-8 • Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Left pane
displays
CIMPLICITY
application
folders

Select

Right pane
displays files
or records of
selected object.

3. Open the New User dialog box and add a new user called OPERATOR.

Type in the new name


(User ID) then click OK.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-9


4. Open the User Properties dialog box for the user OPERATOR and enter
Operator as the User name.

Select tab.

Type in the new


User Name
then click OK.

The Resources properties let 5. Select the Resources tab and add all resources T1 through T8.
you define the resources for
which the user can view
alarms. Select tab.

Displays resources
currently assigned
to user.

To add resources,
select from
Available box then
click Add .

Note Resources can be added or removed based on the User’s rights. For example
if you want to have a User name as User1 who is supposed to operate only Gas
Turbine T1 (GT1), then add only T1 as the Resource for the User1.

5-10 • Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
6. Define the Role Properties for the user OPERATOR, as shown below.

Select
options Click boxes
to select

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-11


Configuring Resources
¨ All procedures in this Ø To configure Resources for the CIMPLICITY HMI project
section were completed
successfully. 1. In the Workbench left pane under the Security folder, select Resources, as
shown in the figure below.

Select

2. Add a New Resource T1 and click OK, as shown in the figure below.

Type in the new name


(Resource ID) then click OK.

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3. Add the Resource Definition for T1, as shown in the figure below.

Type in Description.

Displays Users currently assigned to Resource.

To add Users for this Resource, select from


Available Users box, then click Add.

Displays Users available for this Resource.

4. Using the procedures in steps 2 and 3, add resources from T1 to T8 for GT1 to
GT8, as shown in the figure below.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-13


Configuring Alarm Filters
¨ All procedures in this Ø To configure Alarm Filters for the CIMPLICITY HMI project
section were completed
successfully. 1. In the Workbench left pane under the Advanced folder, select Alarm
Classes, as shown below.

Select

2. Add an Alarm Class named DIAG, as show below.

Type in

Select
The Order value is the priority for the
Alarms that fall under that particular class.
The lower the Order number, the higher
the priority.

Select options

Click to apply inputs

Click to exit

5-14 • Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
3. Using the procedures in step 2, add the classes and descriptions shown in the
figure below.

Enter values as shown here Colors selected in Alarm Class


into Alarm Class dialog box dialog box are displayed as a
(as shown in step 2). numerical equivalent here.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-15


4. In the Workbench left pane as shown below, select Screens. Alarm.cim
(standard template from Cimproj) then displays in the right panel. Select
Alarm.cim.

1. Select

2. Select

5-16 • Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
5. Right click in CimEdit, then select Edit to open the following Alarms screen.
Open Frame Container from the menu, as shown below.

Select

Note CIMPLICITY HMI uses frame animation (frame containers) to navigate


between individual screens. This enables you to access all control and monitoring
features needed. The frame displayed can be changed by clicking buttons or other
frames.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-17


6. Right click in CimEdit, then select CIMPLICITY AMV Control Object and
Properties from the menu, as shown below. This displays the CIMPLICITY AMV
Control Properties dialog box.

1. Select
2. Select

5-18 • Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
7. Add the project, by clicking Add Project, as shown below.

Select (the
Select Project
dialog box
displays).

Projects are
listed here after
being added.
For servers, select.
(Connect to the remote project
only when the alarm is not
available locally

Select the project from the drop-


down list.

Click OK. The project displays in the


Projects tab.

8. In Projects tab, double-click the newly added project ALARM_FILTER. This


displays the Project Settings dialog box, as shown below. Add the Alarm setup
as shown below.

Click to select Alarm


setup and exit back to
the previous Projects
dialog box.
Type in

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-19


Project and
Setup listed.

Select to apply
changes, thus
adding new
project.

9. Open the Alarm.cim file in CimVview and click Setup, as shown below. The
Alarm Setup dialog box displays.

Click

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Bet sure to include the “$” 10. Add a Setup called $DIAG_GT1, as shown below.
symbol at the beginning of
the Setup name. This makes
it accessible to all users.
Without the symbol, it can be
accessed only by the user
account that created it.
Type in Setup name

Click

The Modify Setup box then


displays (see below).

11. Select the Classes tab, then select DIAG from the list box.

Click

Click
(Do not click
OK)

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-21


12. Select the Resources tab. Then select T1 from the list box and OK to return to
the Alarm Setups dialog box, as shown below.

Click

Click

Click

13. Click Save to save this setup.

14. Follow the same procedure (steps 10 to 13) to create other setup.

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Examples of Screens for Filtered Alarms
After configuring filtered alarms, triggered alarms display according to the filter
setup for that particular screen. Figures 5-4 through 5-6 show examples.

Figure 5-4. Screen for Gas Turbine T1, Displaying Alarm Only for T1

Note Typically the top alarm window is for process alarms and the bottom one for
diagnostic alarms.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-23


Figure 5-5. Screen for Gas Turbine T2, Displaying Alarm Only for T2

5-24 • Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Figure 5-6. Screen for All, Displaying Alarms for All

Currently Implemented Filters


Available setups:
• $DIAG_GT1 (TO GT8)
• $PROC_GT1 (TO GT8)
• $EX200_GT1 (TO GT8) or $EX2K_GT1 (TO GT8)
• $ALL
• $SYSTEM
• $BOP

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Extended Alarm Commands
To display alarms, a stand- Custom TCI commands are used to enhance the CIMPLICITY Alarm Viewer for
alone Alarm Viewer is turbine applications. These include the Silence and Lockout (Lock and Unlock),
embedded into a CIMPLICITY which are configured as buttons in the CIMPLICITY Alarm Viewer.
screen.
Silence, Lock, and Unlock buttons are usually configured so that you must highlight
and select an alarm before pressing the buttons.

Ø To edit custom alarm features for the Silence, Lock, and Unlock
buttons
1. Right-click on the white background of the Alarm window.
A menu displays, as shown below.
2. Select CIMPLICITY AMV Control Object, then Properties.
The properties window displays. Make the Buttons tab selections, as shown in
the figure below.

Select tab to display


Button properties options.

Select to move
highlighted button up
Button list. Highlight or down.
button name to select for
modifying. Select to modify
highlighted button’s
properties.
Select to display the
Lock, Unlock, and
Silence button list. (A
different list displays for
each selection.)

3. In the Button Caption window, modify the button properties as shown in the
figure below.

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Enter button name

Enter button function

Enter configuration
properties command

Use the following command strings to configure the buttons:


Required data and data format • LOCKOUT uses the syntax:
can be viewed from the DOS
LOCKOUT: <action><unitname><Encoded_drop><RefID>[(nodename)]
command line by typing
SILENCE and LOCKOUT. LOCK lockout 1 %res %id %refid [(nodename)]
UNLOCK: lockout 0 %res %id %refid [(nodename)]
• SILENCE uses the syntax:
SILENCE %res [(node)].

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 5 CIMPLICITY Displays • 5-27


Reactive Capability Display
The Reactive Capability Display is a real-time graphic that shows the turbine
Mark IV, V, V LM, VI generator's current MW and MVAR operating point (see Figure 5-7).
You can use this display to check how close the generator is operating to its thermal
limits.

Three static curves represent the


generator’s thermal limits at three discrete
operating points. The curves are plotted at
constant generator hydrogen pressure or Red dot represents the current turbine
constant ambient temperature, depending operating point. It moves as the point
on the application. changes.

Figure 5-7. Example of Generator Capability Curves Screen

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Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project
Configuration

Introduction
The CIMPLICITY HMI product This chapter provides information about configuring CIMPLICITY projects for use
must be installed before these with the turbine control HMI product. To understand and implement the information
applications can be used. in this chapter, you should have a working knowledge of CIMPLICITY projects.
Document GFK-1180 provides this information.
CIMPLICITY HMI should be configured with the following project properties:
Project Name – Appropriate name (for example, SVR1)
Sub Directory – Must be Cimproj
Path – F:\Cimproj
General options – Basic control, external alarm manager
Protocols – MarkV+ Communication (this is TCIMB)
Others determined by the type of controller
The project properties can be examined using the CIMPLICITY Workbench (see
Figure 6-2).
This chapter is organized as follows:
Section Page

Using Workbench.....................................................................................................6-2
Opening a Project .....................................................................................................6-3
Signal Manager.........................................................................................................6-4
Setup..................................................................................................................6-4
Signals ...............................................................................................................6-5
Alarms ...............................................................................................................6-6
Importing Signals ..............................................................................................6-8
External Alarm Manager ........................................................................................6-10
SDB Exchange .......................................................................................................6-10
SDB Utilities ..........................................................................................................6-10
®
Modbus Data Interface .........................................................................................6-11
OLE for Process Controls (OPC) ...........................................................................6-12

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration • 6-1


Using Workbench
Document GFK-1180 provides The CIMPLICITY HMI Workbench is an application used to view, configure,
detail about using Workbench. organize, and manage projects. It is similar to the Microsoft Windows Explorer in its
display of the file structure and menu options across the top of the window. Refer to
Alarm Filtering in HMI Servers (Chapter 5) for examples of the Workbench
window.
Ø To open Workbench
1. Click Start on the Windows task bar.
2. Select Programs, then CIMPLICITY, HMI, and Workbench.
-Or-
w Select the .gef file in the f:\Cimproj directory.
Figure 6-1 shows the File menu for starting a New Project. Figure 6-2 shows the
Project menu selection for examining project Properties.

Figure 6-1. Workbench Menu Figure 6-2. Workbench Menu


Showing Selections for Showing Selections for
Starting a New Project Examining Project Properties

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Opening a Project
Using the CIMPLICITY HMI, there are three ways to open a project, as described
below.
Ø To open a CIMPLICITY project through the Windows Start menu
1. Click Start on the Windows task bar.
2. Select Programs, then CIMPLICITY, HMI, and Workbench.
A blank CIMPLICITY Workbench now opens.
3. From the Workbench window, select Open from the File menu.
4. Select the project you want to open.

Ø To open a CIMPLICITY project from the Windows File Explorer


1. Open File Explorer.
2. Open the f:\cimproj directory.
3. Double-click the .gef file.

Ø To open a CIMPLICITY project from the Start Menu


1. Click Start on the Windows task bar.
2. Select Documents.
3. Click the .gef file.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration • 6-3


Signal Manager
The program can be found on In Mark IV, V, and V LM, the Signal Manager is a program for configuring
the HMI in CIMPLICITY points and alarms for the turbine controllers. The TCI service must be
G:\EXEC\CSDBUtil.EXE. running before using this utility, since it accesses data from each unit’s Data
Dictionary, which is built and maintained by the TCI service.
For Mark IV, Mark V, and Mark V LM controllers, the Signal Manager is used to
configure both points and alarms. Point information is retrieved from the Control
Signal Database (CSDB) and used to populate the CIMPLICITY Point Manager
Database. Alarm information is configured for run-time retrieval of the alarm text
from the TCI.
For a Mark VI, signal management is through an HMI device.

Setup
Ø To enable alarms for CIMPLICITY
1. Create a new project.
2. Select options in the New Project dialog box , shown below.

Click
when
completed

Select
directory

Select

Select
applicable

After creating a new CIMPLICITY project, you must configure a CIMPLICITY Port
for the communications protocol. This enables signals to be imported into the
project. Refer to the CIMPLICITY Base System User’s Manual GFK-1180 for more
information on creating projects and configuring ports.

6-4 • Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Vol. I
When the Signal Manager imports controller signals into CIMPLICITY, it
configures any needed CIMPLICITY devices and resources, if they are not already
present. For example, when importing signals for unit T1, the utility configures a
CIMPLICITY device and a CIMPLICITY resource, both called T1.
MARKV_RP is TCIMB function For each device that Signal Manager configures, it a also configures three virtual
that collects data from a points needed by the MARKV_RP program. For example, for a device called T1, the
turbine using TCI and forwards utility produces the following virtual points:
the information to the
CIMPLICITY Point Manager. • T1_TIME, which contains the unit’s current time
• T1_DATE, which contains the unit’s current date
• T1_VALID, a Boolean value that indicates if the HMI is currently
communicating with the unit

Signals
CSDB is Control System Signal Manager displays data from the Data Dictionary, which describes the unit’s
Database. CSDB. Each row of the display shows information about a signal, divided into
columns that display the following signal attributes:

Signal
attribute Description
Name Signal’s name
Access Read /write
Cim Type CIMPLICITY point type that corresponds to this signal
Description Description of the signal
Eng. Units Engineering Units
Flags Signal attributes (for example, alarm, command, permanent)
High Limit High limit for the signal’s value
Low Limit Low limit for the signals value
Offset Offset into the CSDB where this signal is located
Precision Numeric precision for display of the signal’s value
Scale Code Scale code for engineering unit conversion
Synonym Optionally specified synonym for this signal
Type Datatype for this signal
Value Signal’s current value

You can configure the items listed. The display is a standard Windows List Control,
which supports the expected user interface commands for selecting items, sorting
rows, and sizing columns.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration • 6-5


Alarms
The Signal Manager can also CIMPLICITY alarms are only placeholders that are given the appropriate parameters
be used to configure alarms for at run-time when they occur. The Signal Manager can be used to configure the
EX2000 and EX2100 exciters. alarms for Mark V, Mark V LM, and Mark VI turbine controllers, as well and other
events. It uses the following configuration IDs:

Alarm use Alarm ID for configuration


Process alarms for turbine P<n>*
Diagnostic alarms for turbine D<n>* (Mark V only)
Hold list points** HOLD (Steam only)
Sequence of events** SOE
Digital events** EVENT
* n is the drop number reported by the controller.
** These CIMPLICITY alarms are generated multiple times at run-time with different
parameters for each instance.

When the Signal Manager configures alarms, it also configures alarm classes, as
follows:
• If a needed alarm class is not configured, it is added to the CIMPLICITY
configuration
• If the alarm class is already configured, the existing alarm class definition is used
• The following alarm classes apply:
Class Definition
PRC Process alarms
DIAG Diagnostic alarms
HOLD Hold list entries
SOE Sequence of events
EVENT Digital events
EX2K Exciter alarms (see below)

Configuring Exciter Alarms


Exciter alarms are configured from information contained in the file F:\EX2000.DAT.
This information is specific to the EX2000 exciter and represents interpretations of
the fault codes generated by the EX2000 exciter. The exciter alarms are not
placeholders and are configured with all parameters fully defined.

Ø To configure alarms for controllers


w Select Alarms from the Action menu.
Signal Manager then configures process and diagnostic alarms, as well as alarms for
Hold List, SOEs, and digital events.

6-6 • Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Vol. I
Ø To configure alarms for EX2000 exciters
1. Select EX2000 Alarms from the Action menu.
Signal Manager then configures exciter alarms as defined in F:\EX2000.DAT and
displays the Exciter Fault Code dialog box.
2. Make the signal selections as shown in the figure below.
Signal Manager then runs command line utilities and displays their output in a
scrolling text box. In CIMPLICITY, these utilities configure events and actions
that generate alarms when the value of the fault code CIMPLICITY point
changes value.

Type in signal name (Point ID)

Select exciter core that generates the fault

Click when selections for the signal are


completed in this box. The box remains open

Click when no more signal selections are to


be made. This closes the dialog box.

3. After these events and actions are configured, specify additional exciter fault
code points using the Exciter Fault Code box as in step 2.
4. When completed, select Done.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration • 6-7


Importing Signals
When the Signal Manager is started, an empty list displays.

Ø To add signals to the Signal Manager list


1. Select New from the File menu.
2. A dialog box displays, allowing you to specify which signals to get from the Data
Dictionary.

Type in name with wildcards to filter signals retrieved


from the Data Dictionary. Supported are:
• Asterisk (*), which matches zero or more occurrences
of any character
• Question mark (?), which matches zero or one
occurrence of any character

Select box(es) to filter the signals by type. (A check mark


in a box allow signals of the corresponding type to pass
through the filter).

Select Unit from list of available units.

Click when completed, adding signals to Signal Manager.

6-8 • Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Vol. I
Ø To individually import signals individually into CIMPLICITY
w In Signal Manager, select the desired signals from the displayed list.

Ø To import all signals at once into CIMPLICITY


1. In Signal Manager, select Select All from the Edit menu.
2. Select Import from the Action menu.
This displays a dialog box that allows you to select the .gef file for the desired
CIMPLICITY project (see Figure 6-6).

Figure 6-6. Example of CIMPLICITY Project Selection Dialog Box

You may sometimes want to populate the CIMPLICITY point database with points
from a set of screens.

Ø To populate the Signal Manager’s displayed list of signals with the


signals referenced in a set of screens
1. Select Match from the Action menu.
Signal Manager then scans all the screens and displays any points not found in
the Data Dictionary.
2. Select the signals as desired and import them into the CIMPLICITY point
database using the procedures described previously.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration • 6-9


External Alarm Manager
The External Alarm Manager is a software component of the CIMPLICITY Bridge
(CIMB). It functions as an interface that collects turbine controller alarms and
forwards them to the CIMPLICITY Alarm Manager, where they are displayed.
For Mark IV and VI controllers, only process alarms can be displayed. For Mark V
controllers, both process and diagnostic alarms can be displayed. Mark VI
controllers use the toolbox to display diagnostic alarms (refer to GEH-6403).

SDB Exchange
The System Database (SDB) Exchange is available for Mark VI controllers. It
provides a way to populate the CIMPLICITY point and alarm databases with the
data extracted from the Mark VI SDB.
Refer to GEI-100279 for more information about the SDB Exchange.

SDB Utilities
The SDB Utilities must run on The SDB Utilities are available for Mark VI controllers. They provide a way to
the PC that is the CIMPLICITY populate the CIMPLICITY point and alarm databases with the data extracted from
Server. the Mark VI SDB. The SDB Utilities support four sources for importing signal and
alarm data into the CIMPLICITY HMI Project:
• Signals from the SDB, which contains data used by one or more system devices.
• Signals from a comma separated variable file (*.csv), which is a common text
format for spreadsheet and database output.
• Signals from a shared name file (*.snf), associated with the Series 90™-70
programmable logic controller (PLC).
• Alarms imported from the SDB into the CIMPLICITY HMI Project alarm
definitions.
Refer to GEI-100500 for more information about the SDB Utilities.
.

6-10 • Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Vol. I
Modbus® Data Interface
This utility is used with Mark The HMI acts as a Modbus slave (see Figure 6-7). This means that it waits for
IV and VI controllers. requests from another computer (a Modbus master) and answers them by returning
the current value of the variables requested. When the HMI receives turbine control
Modbus is an industry standard
commands, it forwards them to the turbine controller. Both RS-232C and Ethernet
communication link used by the
links are supported.
HMI to provide the current
value of variables from the CimMod is a program supplied by Industrial Systems (Salem, VA) as part of the
HMI to any system that CIMPLICITY project. Its function is to communicate between the CIMPLICITY
requests it via the Modbus link. point database and the TCI Modbus slave. This allows transfer of data to the Modbus
master.

HMI Server
Mark VI

TCI
Mark IV TCI CIMMOD Modbus DCS
CIMPLICITY
Slave

Mark V
& Mark
V LM

Figure 6-7. Data Flow from Controllers in Modbus Slave Mode

CimMod_L is a command line utility (CIMMOD_L.EXE) that reads the necessary


configuration files in the TCI to create a Modbus list for CIMPLICITY
(CIMMOD.LST). The list defines the format and scaling of each mapped coil and
register. It also indicates which signals are controller commands.
Refer to document GEI-100517 for more information about using CimMod and
CimMod_L.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration • 6-11


OLE for Process Controls (OPC)
OPC was developed by the OPC is a standard communications mechanism for moving data between HMIs and
OPC Foundation and endorsed I/O Servers. It is based on Microsoft OLE technology.
by Microsoft.
CIMPLICITY OPC Client software provides CIMPLICITY users with access to
process data from OPC servers. The OPC Client supports all CIMPLICITY data
types and the following CIMPLICITY features:
• Collection of unsolicited data from an OPC Server
• Poll after setpoint
• Triggered reads
• Analog deadband through CIMPLICITY filtering
Refer to GE Fanuc document GFK-1181 for OPC Client information.
OPC Servers provide real time data by firing events whenever the value of an item
added by the OPC client changes. The CIMPLICITY HMI OPC Server provides a
standards-based way to access run-time information from a CIMPLICITY HMI
project.
Refer to GE Fanuc document GFK-1675 for OPC Server information.

6-12 • Chapter 6 CIMPLICITY Project Configuration HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Vol. I
Appendix A HMI Function Reference

Section Page
HMI Functions for GE Turbine Controllers ............................................................A-1
CIMPLICITY HMI Supported Functions ...............................................................A-4

HMI Functions for GE Turbine Controllers


GE’s Turbine Control HMI functions are provided by the TCI, TCIMB, and GE
Turbine Control Systems Solutions CD. The following table lists these functions and
identifies their applicability in the SPEEDTRONIC turbine controllers. Functions are
provided through CIMPLICITY, unless otherwise noted.

Mark Mark Mark Mark


HMI Function Application Notes
IV V V LM VI
Data and Control Displays
Demand Display ü ü ü ü Toolbox graphics for Mark VI

Logic Forcing ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Dynamic Rung Display ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Pre-vote Data Display ü ü ü TSM for Mark VI

Diagnostic Counters Display ü ü ü TSM for Mark VI

Control Constants Display ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Control Constants Adjust Display ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Autocalibrate Display ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Trip History ü ü ü Capture blocks for Mark VI

CIMPLICITY Add-ons
CIMPLICITY Bridge ü ü ü ü
Signal Manager ü ü ü ü SDB Exchange for Mark VI

External Alarm Manager ü ü ü ü


Reactive Capability Display ü ü ü ü
Manual Synchronizing Display ü ü ü Implemented with CIMPLICITY for Mark VI

Emissions Analysis ü ü
Triggered Plot ü ü

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Appendix A HMI Function Reference • A-1


Mark Mark Mark Mark
HMI Function Application Notes
IV V V LM VI

Unit Communications
Stagelink ü ü
CSF ü Not available in some Mark IVs

MAMSP ü Not available in some Mark IVs

TCI Modbus™ Master ü ü Not available in some Mark IVs

EGD ü
Unit Communications (continued)
Process Alarms ü ü ü ü
Diagnostic Alarms ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Events ü ü ü ü
SOEs ü ü ü ü
Hold List ü ü Controllers with Steam ATS only

SDB Utilities / Exchange ü


Unit Configuration Tools
Sequence Editor ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Sequence Compiler ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Sequence Documentor ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

CSP Printer ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Table Compiler ü ü
Application Code Downloads ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Firmware Downloader ü ü Toolbox for Mark VI

Mark V Make ü ü
Card Identification ü ü ü TSM for Mark VI

Alarm List ü ü ü ü
FMV ID ü
LDB Configuration Tools ü
I/O Configuration Tool ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

Time Synchronizing
Timesync Function ü ü ü ü NTP for Mark VI

High Resolution (IRIG) ü ü ü ü Option

GPS ü ü ü ü Option

NTP ü ü ü ü Option

A-2 • Appendix A HMI Function Reference HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A, Volume I
Mark Mark Mark Mark
HMI Function Application Notes
IV V V LM VI

Other Functions
Alarm Printing ü ü ü ü
Alarm History ü ü ü ü
Trip History Automatic Collection ü ü ü Capture Blocks + Data Historian for Mark VI

Normal Data Collection ü ü ü ü Toolbox function for Mark VI

High-speed Data Collection ü ü ü Toolbox Trend Recorder for Mark VI

Control Constants Compare ü ü ü


Optional Functions
TCI Modbus Slave ü ü ü ü
TCI Modbus Master ü ü ü For external device interface

GSM ü ü ü ü
Power Block Control ü ü ü ü
Performance Monitor ü ü ü Simple cycle only

Web Diagnostic Functions


Demand Display ü ü ü
Logic Forcing Display ü ü
Alarm Display ü ü ü ü
Control Constants Display ü ü
HMI Log Files ü ü ü ü
ARCWHO Utility ü ü ü
Diagnostic Programs
Product Code File Verification ü ü ü ü

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Appendix A HMI Function Reference • A-3


CIMPLICITY HMI Supported Functions
The turbine control HMI supports many functions of the CIMPLICITY HMI. The
following table lists and identifies these functions.

Do not load unsupported CIMPLICITY functions on the HMI


for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine controllers.
Although the CIMPLICITY HMI function listed below will run
on the HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine controllers, they are
not necessarily supported by GE Power Systems for use on the
HMI. Please check with a GE Power Systems representative for
availability.
Options not listed as supported in the following table have not
been qualified.

Earliest
Supported CIMPLICITY Function Supported Application Notes
Version

Action Calendar Calendar-based Control

Alarm Blocking

Alarm Horn

3.2 SP7 Alarm Viewer ü Interactive ActiveX alarm viewing object

3.2 SP7 Basic Control Engine ü Visual Basic for applications scripting language

Data Logger Data logging via ODBC

DDE Server (CWSERV)

Dynamic Measurement Systems Dynamically switch between English and metric units

Genius Communication from HMI

Historical Data Analyzer Comprehensive data summarization

Historical Trends Interactive ActiveX object for viewing trend

HMI for CNC Integration with GE Fanuc CNC controllers

3.2 SP7 HMI Modbus Master ü


Marquee Display alarms and messages to marquee devices

3.2 SP7 Modbus Plus Communications ü


Modbus TCP/IP Communications

4.01 SP2 OPC Client Consult Salem, VA factory, Turbine Control


Application Engineering (540) 387-7388
4.01 SP2 OPC Server Consult Salem, VA factory, Turbine Control
Application Engineering (540) 387-7388
4.01 SP8 OpenProcess Pending

3.2 SP7 Pager ü Send alarm information to alpha-numeric pagers

PocketViewer WinCE CimView

A-4 • Appendix A HMI Function Reference HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A, Volume I
Earliest
Supported CIMPLICITY Function Supported Application Notes
Version

3.2 SP7 PointBridge ü Allows CIMPLICITY server to act as device to


another server
4.01 SP2 Quick Trends ü Pop-up trends for any points on a screen

3.2 SP7 Real-time Trends ü Interactive ActiveX object for viewing trend

Recipes Device-independent recipe management

Report Manager Report generation and management from process

3.2 SP7 Series 90™ PLC Fault Tables ü View PLC faults

Server Redundancy Complete mission critical redundancy support

4.01 SP2 SmartObjects™ ü Reusable drag and drop graphic and scripted objects

SPC New features for SPC

System Sentry Constantly watches HMI and system parameters

Tracker Option Track items through a production facility

3.2 SP7 Web Gateway ü Send CIMPLICITY HMI data to web pages

Web Viewer Send screens over web to standard web browsers

3.2 SP7 XY Plots ü ActiveX object for plotting multiple x-y data

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Appendix A HMI Function Reference • A-5


Notes

A-6 • Appendix A HMI Function Reference HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A, Volume I
Appendix B Alarm Overview

Introduction
The turbine controllers generate three types of alarms, which are viewed on the HMI
or toolbox: Process, Hold List, and Diagnostic (see Figure B-1).

Alarm Diagnostic
HMI HMI Toolbox
Display Display

UDH

<R> Process & <S> <T> Diagnostic


Hold List
Controller Controller Controller Alarms
Alarms

Diagnostic
I/O I/O I/O
Alarm Bits

Figure B-1. Three Types of Alarms Generated by the Mark VI Controller

This appendix provides a general overview of turbine controller alarms viewed and
addressed using the HMI. It is intended to assist the operator in understanding how to
use the HMI for monitoring, using the features described in this document.

Note The information in this appendix applies specifically to the Mark VI


controller. However, it should also apply to Mark IV, Mark V, and Mark V LM
controllers, except in discussion of Control System Toolbox features.

This information is provided as follows:


Section Page

Hold List Alarms ..................................................................................................... B-2


Process Alarms ........................................................................................................ B-2
Process (and Hold) Alarm Data Flow............................................................... B-2
Diagnostic Alarms ................................................................................................... B-3

GEH-6126A, Volume I Operator’s Guide Appendix B Alarm Overview • B-1


Hold List Alarms (Steam Turbine Only)
Refer to the Hold List section in Hold List alarms are similar to process alarms with the additional feature that the
Chapter 4. scanner drives a specified signal True whenever any Hold List signal is in the alarm
state (hold present). This signal is used to disable automatic turbine startup logic at
various stages in the sequencing. Operators may override a hold list signal so that the
sequencing can proceed even if the hold condition has not cleared.

Process Alarms
Process Alarms are caused by machinery and process problems, and alert the
operator by means of messages on the HMI screen. The alarms are created in the
controller using alarm bits generated in the I/O boards or in sequencing. The user
configures the desired analog alarm settings in sequencing using the toolbox.
Process Alarms are generated by the transition of Boolean signals configured by the
toolbox (for Mark VI) with the alarm attribute. The signals may be driven by
sequencing or they may be tied to input points to map values directly from I/O
boards. Process alarm signals are scanned each frame after the sequencing is run. In
TMR systems, process signals are voted and the resulting composite diagnostic is
present in each controller.
A useful application for process alarms is the annunciation of system limit checking.
Limit checking takes place in the I/O boards at the frame rate, and the resulting
Boolean status information is transferred to the controller and mapped to Process
Alarm signals.
Two system limits are available for each process input, including thermocouple,
RTD, current, voltage, and pulse rate inputs. System limit 1 can be the high or low
alarm setting, and system limit 2 can be a second high or low alarm setting. These
limits are configured from the toolbox in engineering units.
There are several choices when configuring system limits. Limits can be configured
as enabled or disabled, latched or unlatched, and greater than or less than the preset
value. System out of limits can be reset with the RESET_SYS signal.

Process (and Hold) Alarm Data Flow


The operator or the controller Process and Hold alarms are time stamped and stored in a local queue in the
can take action based on controller. Changes representing alarms are time stamped and sent to the alarm
process alarms. queue. Reports containing alarm information are assembled and sent over the UDH
to the CIMPLICITY HMIs. Here the alarms are again queued and prepared for
operator display by the Alarm Viewer.
Operator commands from the HMI, such as alarm Acknowledge, Reset, Lock, and
Unlock, are sent back over the UDH to the alarm queue. There they change the status
of the appropriate alarms. An alarm entry is removed from the controller queue when
its state has returned to normal and it has been acknowledged and reset (refer to
Figure B-2).
Hold alarms are managed in the same fashion but are stored on a separate queue.
Additionally, hold alarms cannot be locked but may be overridden.

B-2 • Appendix B Alarm Overview HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Mark VI Controller UDH Mark VI HMI

Input Signal 1

. . Alarm
Report
Alarm
Receiver
Alarm
Viewer
Alarm
. . Scanner

. . Alarm
Com-
mand Alarm Queue
Input Signal n Operator Commands
Alarm
Queue - Ack
Alarm Logic Including - Reset
Variable Time - Lock
- Unlock
Alarm ID - Override for Hold Lists

Figure B-2. Generating Process Alarms

Diagnostic Alarms
Diagnostic Alarms are caused by equipment problems, and use settings factory
programmed in the boards. Diagnostic Alarms identify the failed module to help the
service engineer quickly repair the system. For details of the failure, the operator can
request a display on the toolbox screen (Mark VI) or review the details in the HMI
Alarm Display screen.
The controller and I/O boards all generate diagnostic alarms, including the VCMI,
which generates diagnostics for the power subsystem. The controller has extensive
self-diagnostics, most that are available directly at the toolbox (for Mark VI).
Diagnostic alarms can be viewed from the toolbox by selecting the desired board,
clicking the right mouse button to display the drop down menu, and selecting display
diagnostics. A list of the diagnostic alarms for any I/O board can be displayed, and
may be reset from the toolbox.

GEH-6126A, Volume I Operator’s Guide Appendix B Alarm Overview • B-3


Notes

B-4 • Appendix B Alarm Overview HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I
Glossary

ActiveX
ActiveX, developed by Microsoft, is a set of rules for how applications should share
information. With ActiveX, users can ask or answer questions, use pushbuttons, and
interact in other ways with the web page or compatible program. It is not a
programming language, but rather a model for writing programs so that other
programs and the operating system can call them. ActiveX technology is used with
Microsoft Internet Explorer® to make interactive web pages that look and behave
like computer programs, rather than static pages.

ActiveX control
A control (object) using ActiveX technologies to enable animation. An ActiveX
control can be automatically downloaded and executed by a web browser.
Programmers can develop ActiveX controls in a variety of languages, including C,
C++, Visual Basic, and Java. ActiveX controls have full access to the Windows
operating system.

alarm
A message notifying an operator or administrator of equipment, network, or process
problems.

Alarm Viewer
A standalone window within CIMPLICITY (an OCX control) for monitoring and
responding to alarms.

AMV
Alarm Viewer.

application
A complete, self-contained program that performs a specific function directly for the
user. Application programs are different than system programs, which control the
computer and run application programs and utilities.

ARCNET
Attached Resource Computer Network, a LAN communications protocol developed
by Datapoint Corporation. ARCNET defines the physical (coax and chip) and
datalink (token ring and board interface) layer of a 2.5 MHz communication
network.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Glossary • 1


Balance of Plant (BOP)
Plant equipment other than the turbine that needs to be controlled.

board
Printed wiring board, or circuit board, used for electronic circuits.

Boolean
Digital statement that expresses a condition that is either True or False, also called a
discrete, or logical signal.

breaker (circuit breaker)


A switching device, capable of making, carrying, and breaking currents under
normal circuit conditions and also making, carrying for a specified time, and
breaking currents under specified abnormal conditions, such as those of short circuit.

<C>
The turbine controller’s Communicator core (processor).

CimEdit
An object-oriented graphics editor tool of CIMPLICITY HMI that functions with its
runtime viewer CimView. It can create graphical screens with animation, scripting,
colors, and a variety of graphical elements that represent power plant operation.

CIMPLICITY HMI
Pc-based operator interface software from GE Fanuc Automation, configurable to
work with a wide variety of control and data acquisition equipment.

cimproj
The required subdirectory name for a CIMPLICITY HMI project (F:\Cimproj). The
project configuration Workbench (.gef) is located in this subdirectory.

CimView
An interactive graphical user interface of CIMPLICITY HMI used to monitor and
control power plant equipment, displaying data as text or a variety of graphic objects.
Its screens were created with CimEdit. They include a variety of interactive control
functions for setting point values, displaying other graphic screens, and initiating
custom software routines and other Windows applications.

client-server
Software architecture where one software product makes requests on another
software product. For example, an arrangement of PCs with software making one a
data acquisition device and the other a data using device.

command line
The line on a computer display where the user types commands to be carried out by a
program. This is a feature of a text-based interface such as MS-DOS, as opposed to a
graphical user interface (GUI) such as Windows.

configure
Select specific options, either by editing disk files, or by setting the location of
hardware jumpers, or by loading software parameters into memory.

2 • Glossary HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I


control system
Equipment that automatically adjusts the output voltage, frequency, MW, or reactive
power, as the case may be, of an asset in response to certain aspects of common
quality such as voltage, frequency, MW, or reactive power. Such equipment
includes, but is not limited to, speed governors and exciters.

Control System Solutions


Product software provided on a CD for a GE control system. For example, this may
include the Control System Toolbox or SDB Exchange programs.

Control System Toolbox


See toolbox.

CRC
Cyclic Redundancy Check which is used to detect errors in data such as
transmissions or files on a disk.

cross plot
Display of two variables, plotted one against the other over time, in an X-Y type plot
to detect signal correlations and to analyze performance.

CSDB
Control Signal Database, used in the turbine controller to store real time process data
used in the control calculations.

CSF
Control System Freeway, a token passing communication network, typically using
TWINAX cabling, running at 2.3 MHz.

<D>
The turbine controller’s backup Communicator core (processor). (Also see <C>.)

data dictionary
A system file that contains the information needed to operate a database in a
database management system. This file includes basic operating information about
the records and fields of a certain database, the limits on acceptable data values, and
access-authorization information. For the HMI, the data dictionary files contain
information about unit-specific control signal database pointnames, alarm text
messages (for both process and diagnostic alarms), and display information for
signal pointnames (type/units, messages, and such). The primary unit Data
Dictionary file, UNITDATA.DAT, can be created on an HMI in the unit-specific
directory.

DCS
Distributed Control System, used for process control applications including control
of boilers and other power plant equipment.

deadband
Range of values inside of which the incoming signal can be altered without changing
the output response. The Historian uses a sophisticated deadband algorithm to decide
whether to save or discard incoming data, as part of its data compression function.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Glossary • 3


Demand Display
An HMI function that allows you to monitor several turbine data points at a time and
issue simple commands. It supports multiple units.

device
A configurable component of a process control system.

Devcom
Application program that serves as a communications bridge between the
CIMPLICITY HMI Point Manager and a device being monitored.

dynamic
An attribute emphasizing motion, change, and process as opposed to static.

EGD
Ethernet Global Data, a network protocol used by some controllers. Devices share
data through periodic EGD exchanges (pages of data).

Ethernet
LAN with a 10 or 100 megabaud data rate, used to link one or more computers
and/or controllers together. It features a collision avoidance/collision detection
system. It uses TCP/IP and I/O services layers that conform to the IEEE 802.3
standard, developed by Xerox, Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC), and Intel.

event
Discrete signal generated by a change in a status of a logic signal in a controller.

EX2000
GE generator exciter control. It regulates the generator field current to control the
generator output voltage.

fault code
A message from the controller to the HMI indicating a controller warning or failure.

firmware
Set of executable software, stored in memory chips that hold their content without
electrical power, such as EPROM or Flash memory.

filter
A program that separates data or signals in accordance with specified criteria.

forcing
Setting a signal to a particular value, regardless of the value the blockware or I/O is
writing to that signal.

frame rate
Basic scheduling rate of the controller. It encompasses one complete input-compute-
output cycle for the controller.

4 • Glossary HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I


GSM
GE Industrial Systems Standard Messages. Application-level messages processed in
gateway to the DCS. The gateway serves as a protocol translator and can
communicate directly with several process controllers. No data is emitted from the
gateway unless previously requested by the DCS equipment.

Global Time Source (GTS)


Worldwide system supplying UTC (Coordinated Universal Time) using a network of
satellites.

graphical user interface (GUI)


An operating system interface between the user and the computer, based on graphics.
GUIs typically use a mouse or other tracking device and icons. First developed by
Xerox as an easier to learn interface than text-based ones, it was adopted by Apple
for the Macintosh, Microsoft for Windows, and even forUNIX systems as
XWindows.

header
Textual information, such as a title, date, name, or other applicable identifying
information, positioned at the top of a screen, column, or page, and usually repeated
at every occurrence.

Historian
A client/server-based data archival system for data collection, storage, and display of
power island and auxiliary process data.. It combines high-resolution digital event
data from the turbine controller with process analog data to create a sophisticated
tool for investigating cause-effect relationships.

HMI
Human-Machine Interface. The GE HMI is a Windows NT-based operator interface
to the turbine controllers and auxiliary power plant equipment. The HMI uses
CIMPLICITY as the operator interface, and supports the Historian Client Toolset for
viewing Historian data.

HRSG
Heat Recovery Steam Generator. This uses exhaust heat from a gas turbine to
generate steam.

icon
A small picture intended to represent something (a file, directory, or action) in a
graphical user interface. When an icon is clicked on, some action is performed, such
as opening a directory or aborting a file transfer

ICS
Integrated Control System. The GE ICS combines various power plant controls into
a single distributed control system.

initialize
Set values (addresses, counters, registers, and such) to a beginning value prior to the
rest of processing.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Glossary • 5


IONet
The Mark VI I/O Ethernet communication network.

LAN
Local area network (communications). A typical LAN consists of peripheral devices
and controllers contained in the same building, and often on the same floor.

logical
Statement of a true/false sense, such as a Boolean.

Mark IV
SPEEDTRONIC gas turbine controller, introduced in 1983. The first GE triple
modular redundant (TMR) control for fault-tolerant operation.

Mark V
All-digital SPEEDTRONIC gas and steam turbine controller, introduced in 1991,
available in Simplex and TMR control versions. At first equipped with a DOS-based
pc operator interface, later upgraded to use the NT-based CIMPLICITY HMI.

Mark V LM
SPEEDTRONIC gas turbine controller, introduced in 1995, designed specifically to
support the aeroderivative Dry Low Emissions (DLE) technology developed by GE
Aircraft Engines. Equipped to use the NT-based CIMPLICITY HMI.

Mark VI
VME-based SPEEDTRONIC gas and steam turbine controller, available in Simplex
and TMR control versions. Equipped to use the NT-based CIMPLICITY HMI and
Control System Toolbox.

menu
(Software.) A list from which the user may select an operation to be performed.

Modbus
Serial communication protocol, initially developed by Gould Modicon for use
between PLCs and other computers.

network
A data communication system that links two or more computers and peripheral
devices.

object
(Software.) Generally, any item that can be individually selected and manipulated.
This can include shapes and pictures that appear on a display screen, as well as less
tangible software entities. In object-oriented programming, for example, an object is
a self-contained entity that consists of both data and procedures to manipulate the
data.

OCX
OLE custom control. An independent program module that can be accessed by other
programs in a Windows environment. ActiveX (Microsoft’s next generation of
controls) is backward compatible OCX.

6 • Glossary HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I


OLE
(Pronounced as separate letters.) Object linking and embedding. A compound
document standard developed by Microsoft Corporation. It enables you to create
objects with one application and then link or embed them in a second application.
Embedded objects retain their original format and links to the application that
created them. Support for OLE is built into the Windows.

OPC
OLE for Process Controls. The OPC Specification is a non-proprietary technical
specification that defines a set of standard interfaces based upon Microsoft’s
OLE/COM technology. The application of the OPC standard interface makes
possible interoperability between automation/control applications, field
systems/devices, and business/office applications.

panel
The side or front of a piece of equipment on which terminations and termination
assemblies are mounted.

pc
Abbreviation for personal computer.

PDH
See Plant Data Highway.

permissives
Conditions that allow advancement from one state to another.

Plant Data Highway (PDH)


Ethernet communication network linking the Historian, HMI Servers, HMI Viewers,
workstation, and printers.

PLC
Programmable logic controller. These are designed for discrete (logic) control of
machinery, and they also compute math (analog) functions and perform regulatory
control.

plot
To draw an image by connecting a series of precisely placed points on a screen or
paper, using a series of lines.

point
Basic unit for variable information in the controller, also referred to as signal.

product code (runtime)


Software stored in the controller’s Flash memory that converts application code
(pcode) to executable code.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Glossary • 7


reactive capability
The reactive power injection or absorption capability of generating sets and other
reactive power resources such as Static Var Compensators, capacitors, and
synchronous condensers. This includes reactive power capability of a generating set
during the normal course of the generating set operations.

reboot
Restart the controller or pc after a controlled shutdown.

relay ladder diagram (RLD)


A ladder diagram represents a relay circuit. Power is considered to flow from the left
rail through contacts to the coil connected at the right.

resources
Also known as groups. Resources are systems (devices, machines, or work stations
where work is performed) or areas where several tasks are carried out. Resource
configuration plays an important role in the CIMPLICITY system by routing alarms
to specific users and filtering the data users receive.

runtime
See product code.

Sequence of Events (SOE)


A high-speed record of contact closures taken during a plant upset to allow detailed
analysis of the event. Most turbine controllers support a data resolution of 1
millisecond.

server
A pc that gathers data over Ethernet from plant devices, and makes the data available
to pc-based operator interfaces known as Viewers.

setpoint
Value of a controlled variable, departure from which causes a controller to operate to
reduce the error and restore the intended steady state.

signal
Basic unit for variable information in the controller, also referred to as point.

Simplex
Operation that requires only one set of control and I/O, and generally uses only one
channel.

SOE
See Sequence of Events.

SRTP
Service Request Transfer Protocol. An Ethernet communications protocol for
communications between the turbine controller and the HMI.

8 • Glossary HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I


Stagelink
ARCNET-based communication link used by many controllers.

synchroscope
Instrument for detecting whether two moving parts are synchronized

tag
Identifying name given to a process measurement point.

TCEA
DS200TCEA Emergency Overspeed Board (TCEA), located in the controller’s
Protective Core <P1>, is used for the high-speed protection circuitry. It is often
referred to as the Protective Processor. The three TCEA boards used in the <P1>
core are referred to as the <X>, <Y>, and <Z> processors. These boards scale and
condition input for high and low shaft speed, flame detection, and automatic
synchronization. They then output the signals via the TCEA (location 1) board over
the IONET to the <R1> core’s DS200STCA board. The TCEAs send emergency trip
signals to the Turbine Trip Board (DS200TCTG). Each TCEA has its own power
supply and power supply diagnostics.

TCI
Turbine Control Interface. The GE-supplied software package on the HMI that
interfaces to the turbine control.

TCP/IP
Communications protocols developed to inter-network dissimilar systems. It is a de
facto UNIX standard, but is supported on almost all systems. TCP controls data
transfer and IP provides the routing for functions, such as file transfer and e-mail.

timetag
Information added to data to indicate the time at which it was collected. Also called a
time stamp.

TMR
Triple Modular Redundancy. This is an architecture that uses three identical sets of
control and I/O, and votes the results to obtain highly reliable output signals.

toolbox (Control System Toolbox)


Windows-based software package used to configure the Mark VI controllers,
exciters, and drives.

trend
Time-based screen plot showing the history of process values, available in the
Historian, HMI, and the Control System Toolbox.

trigger
Transition in a discrete signal from 0 to 1, or from 1 to 0, initiating an action or
sequence.

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Glossary • 9


Unit Data Highway (UDH)
Connects the Mark VI controllers, LCI, EX2000, PLCs, and other GE provided
equipment to the HMI servers. Sometimes used to refer to Stagelink.

UTC
Coordinated Universal Time, an international time-reference standard.

utility
A small helper program that performs a specific task, usually related to managing
system resources. Utilities differ from applications mostly in terms of size,
complexity, and function.

web browser
Pc software, such as Microsoft Internet Explorer or Netscape Navigator, allowing
screens and data to be viewed over a network from a server.

Windows NT
Advanced 32-bit operating system from Microsoft Corporation for 386-based PCs
and above.

Workbench
A CIMPLICITY HMI program used to view, configure, organize, and manage every
component of a CIMPLICITY project through a single window.

10 • Glossary HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I


Index B
Balance of Plant, 1-7, 5-8, 5-25
board (see printed wiring boards)
Boolean, 6-5, B-2
BOP (see Balance of Plant)
breaker (see circuit breaker)
A
ActiveX objects, 1-9, 5-1, 5-2, 5-6, A-4, A-5 C
Manual Synchronizing Display, 5-2, 5-6, A-1
CimEdit, 1-5, 1-8, 5-17
trends, 1-6, A-4, A-5
animation, 1-5, 3-3, 3-4, 5-17
Triggered Plot, 5-2, 5-6, 5-7, A-1
CIMPLICITY
alarm display, 2-3, 2-6, 4-16
ActiveX objects, 1-9, 5-1, 5-2, 5-6, A-4, A-5
Alarm Viewer, 1-6, 2-3, 2-6, 4-16, 5-8, 5-26, A-4, B-2
HMI, 1-3, 1-8, 2-3, 5-1, 5-2, 5-6, 5-8, 5-12, 5-14, 5-17,
CimView, 1-5, 1-6, 2-2
6-1 – 6-3, 6-10, 6-12, A-1, A-4, A-5, B-2
Extended Alarm Commands, 2-3, 5-1, 5-26
Cimproj, 5-16, 6-1, 6-2
Lock, 2-3, 4-17, 5-26, 5-27, B-2
CimView, 1-5, 1-6, 2-2, A-4
Lockout, 5-1, 5-26, 5-27
circuit breaker, 5-2, 5-3
Silence, 2-3, 5-1, 5-26, 5-27
client-server, 1-1
Unlock, 2-3, 5-26, 5-27, B-2
command line, 3-6, 3-11, 3-15, 4-13 – 4-15, 5-27,
alarm filters, 5-8
6-7, 6-11
configuring, 5-14
communications, 1-3, 1-6, 1-8, 6-4, 6-12, A-2, A-4
Alarm Viewer, 1-6, 2-3, 2-6, 4-16, 5-8, 5-26, A-4, B-2,
Ethernet, 1-7, 3-13, 6-1, 6-11
AMV, 5-18, 5-26
Modbus, 1-7, 6-11, A-2 – A-4
CimView, 1-5, 1-6, 2-2
configuration, 1-3, 1-9, 2-4, 4-7, 4-13, 4-14, 4-16, 5-1,
Extended Alarm Commands, 2-3, 5-1, 5-26
5-3 – 5-6, 5-8, 5-12, 5-14, 6-2, 6-4 – 6-7
Lock, 2-3, 4-17, 5-26, 5-27, B-2
alarm filters, 5-14
Lockout, 5-1, 5-26, 5-27
Demand Display, 4-13
Silence, 2-3, 5-1, 5-26, 5-27
resources, 5-12
Unlock, 2-3, 5-26, 5-27, B-2
users, 5-8
alarms, 1-3, 1-4, 1-6, 2-3, 2-5, 3-9, 4-15, 4-16, 5-1, 5-8,
Control Signal Database (CSDB), 4-17, 6-4, 6-5
5-26, 6-4, 6-5, 6-6, 6-10, A-4, B-2
control system, 1-3, 1-6, 1-9, 4-1
alarm display, 2-3, 2-6, A-3, B-3
Control System Freeway (CSF), A-2
Alarm Logger Control, 2-6, 4-15
Control System Solutions, 1-8
Alarm Viewer, 1-6, 2-3, 2-6, 4-16, 5-8, 5-26, A-4, B-2
Control System Toolbox (toolbox), 1-2, 1-7, 1-8, 2-5,
alarm.cim file, 5-16, 5-20
3-2, 3-9, 3-13, 4-2, 6-10, B-1 – B-3
AMV, 5-18, 5-26
Trend Recorder, 1-2, 1-8, 3-13, A-3
diagnostic, 6-6, 6-10, A-2, B-1, B-3
controllers
Extended Alarm Commands, 2-3, 5-1, 5-26
Mark IV, 1-1, 1-3, 4-2, 4-13, 4-15, 5-28, 6-4, 6-10,
Lock, 2-3, 4-17, 5-26, 5-27, B-2
6-11, A-1, A-2, B-1
Lockout, 5-1, 5-26, 5-27
Mark V, 1-1 – 1-3, 1-7, 1-8, 2-5, 2-6, 3-2, 3-9,
Silence, 2-3, 5-1, 5-26, 5-27
3-12 – 3-15, 4-2, 5-2, 5-6, 6-4, 6-6, 6-10, A-1 –
Unlock, 2-3, 5-26, 5-27, B-2
A-3, B-1 – B-3
External Alarm Manager, 6-10, A-1
Mark V LM, 1-1, 1-8, 3-12, 3-14, 3-15, 6-4, 6-6, A-1,
filtered, 1-9, 5-23
B-1
filtering, 5-8, 6-2
Mark VI, 1-1 – 1-3, 1-7, 1-8, 2-5, 3-2, 3-9, 3-13,
Hold List, 2-6, 4-16, 4-17, 6-6, A-2, B-1, B-2
4-2, 4-16, 5-2, 6-4, 6-6, 6-10, A-1 – A-3, B-1 – B-3
process, 3-12, 6-10, A-2, B-1 – B-3
controls
AMV, 5-18, 5-26
ActiveX, 1-9, 5-1, 5-2, 5-6, A-4, A-5
animation, 1-5, 3-3, 3-4, 5-17
CSDB (see Control Signal Database)
graphic displays, 1-2, 1-3, 1-4, A-1
CSF (see Control System Freeway)

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Index • 1


D G
Data Dictionary, 1-3, 4-3 – 4-6, 4-9, 6-4, 6-5, 6-9 GE Standard Messages (GSM), 1-7, A-3
data history, 3-9, 3-11, 3-12, 3-15 graphic displays, 1-2 – 1-6, 5-1, 5-28, A-1, A-5
database CimEdit, 1-5, 1-8, 5-17
Control Signal Database (CSDB), 4-17, 6-4, 6-5 CimView, 1-5, 1-6, 2-2
SDB Exchange, 1-8, 6-10 GSM (see GE Standard Messages)
SDB Utilities, 6-10, A-2
DCS (see Distributed Control System) H
Demand Display, 2-6, 3-2, 3-3, 3-5, 3-8, 4-2 – 4-11,
4-13, 4-14, A-1, A-3 Help, 4-11
configuring, 4-13 How to Get, 1-10
Find All Function, 3-7 Historian, 1-2, 1-7, 1-8, 3-13, A-3
starting, 4-2 HMI (see Human-Machine Interface)
timetag, 4-5 hold alarms
diagnostic alarms, 6-6, 6-10, A-2, B-1, B-3 data flow, B-1, B-2
displays Hold List, 2-6, 4-16, 4-17, 6-6, A-2, B-1, B-2
CimView, 1-5, 1-6, 2-2 Human-Machine Interface (HMI)
Demand Display, 2-6, 3-2, 3-3, 3-5, 3-8, 4-2 – 4-11, features, 1-2
4-13, 4-14, A-1, A-3 optional features, 1-7
Manual Synchronizing, 5-2, 5-6, A-1 other tools, 2-5
Reactive Capability, 5-28, A-1 program files, 4-3
Sequencing, 3-7 setup, 1-8, 5-19 – 5-21, 6-4
Distributed Control System (DCS), 1-7 specifications, 1-7
documentation, 1-8, 1-10, 4-2 startup, 2-2
DOS commands (command line), 3-6, 3-11, 3-15, 4-13 –
4-15, 5-27, 6-7, 6-11 I
Dynamic Rung Display, 1-4, 3-2 – 3-8
starting, 3-6 ICS, 1-7
timetag, 3-4, 3-5, 3-9
K
E keypad
EGD (see Ethernet Global Data), 3-13, A-2 menus, 1-9
Ethernet, 1-7, 3-13, 6-11
Ethernet Global Data (EGD), 3-13, A-2 M
EX2000, 6-6, 6-7
fault code, 6-6, 6-7 Manual Synchronizing Display, 5-2, 5-6, A-1
exciter, 5-8, 6-6, 6-7 Mark IV, 1-1, 1-3, 4-2, 4-13, 4-15, 5-28, 6-4, 6-10, 6-11,
Extended Alarm Commands, 2-3, 5-1, 5-26 A-1, A-2, B-1
Lock, 2-3, 4-17, 5-26, 5-27, B-2, 4-17 Mark V, 1-1 – 1-3, 1-7, 1-8, 2-5, 2-6, 3-2, 3-9, 3-12 –
Lockout, 5-1, 5-26, 5-27 3-15, 4-2, 4-16, 5-2, 5-6, 6-4, 6-6, 6-10, A-1 – A-3,
Silence, 2-3, 5-1, 5-26, 5-27 B-1 – B-3
Unlock, 2-3, 5-26, 5-27, B-2 Mark V LM, 1-1, 1-8, 3-12, 3-14, 3-15, 6-4, 6-6, A-1,
External Alarm Manager, 6-10, A-1 B-1
Mark VI, 1-1 – 1-3, 1-7, 1-8, 2-5, 3-2, 3-9, 3-13, 4-2,
4-16, 5-2, 6-4, 6-6, 6-10, A-1 – A-3, B-1 – B-3
F Modbus, 1-7, 6-11, A-2, A-3, A-4
fault code, 6-6, 6-7
file structure, 3-2, 6-2 N
filter, 5-8
filtered alarms, 1-9, 5-23 network, 1-4
Resource Definition, 5-13 Ethernet, 1-7, 3-13, 6-1, 6-11
Role Properties, 5-11 Modbus, 1-7, 6-11, A-2, A-3, A-4
User Properties, 5-10

2 • Index HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I


O Mark V, 1-1 – 1-3, 1-7, 1-8, 2-5, 2-6, 3-2, 3-9,
3-12 – 3-15, 4-2, 4-16, 5-2, 5-6, 6-4, 6-6, 6-10,
objects A-1 – A-3, B-1 – B-3
ActiveX, 1-9, 5-1, 5-2, 5-6, A-4, A-5 Mark V LM, 1-1, 1-8, 3-12, 3-14, 3-15, 6-4, 6-6, A-1,
OCX, 2-3, 5-8 B-1
OLE, 1-5, 2-3, 5-1, 5-2, 6-12 Mark VI, 1-1 – 1-3, 1-7, 1-8, 2-5, 3-2, 3-9, 3-13,
OPC, 1-8, 6-12, A-4 4-2, 4-16, 5-2, 6-4, 6-6, 6-10, A-1 – A-3, B-1 – B-3
OCX, 2-3, 5-8 startup, 1-5, 1-6, 2-2
OLE, 1-5, 2-3, 5-1, 5-2, 6-12
OLE for Process Controls (OPC), 1-8, 6-12, A-4
OPC (see OLE for Process Controls) T
TCI (see Turbine Control Interface)
P TCP/IP, 1-7, A-4
timetag, 3-4, 3-5, 3-9, 3-12, 4-5
panel, 1-6, 5-16 TMR (see Triple Modular Redundancy)
PDH (see Plant Data Highway) toolbox (see Control System Toolbox)
permissives, 1-4, 5-4 trend, 1-6, A-4, A-5
Plant Data Highway (PDH), 1-3 Trend Recorder, 1-2, 1-8, 3-13, A-3
PLC (see Programmable Logic Controller) Trip History, 2-5, 3-9 – 3-15, A-1, A-3
points, 1-3, 1-6, 2-6, 3-3, 3-8, 3-9, 3-12, 4-3, 4-5, 4-6, trends
4-14 – 4-17, 6-4 – 6-7, 6-9, A-5, B-2 ActiveX objects, 1-6, A-4, A-5
printed wiring boards, B-3 Triggered Plot, 5-2, 5-6, 5-7, A-1
process alarms, 3-12, 6-10, A-2, B-1 – B-3 valve travel, 5-6
data flow, B-1, B-2 Trip History, 2-5, 3-9 – 3-15, A-1, A-3
TMR systems, B-2 Data History Results Window, 3-9, 3-11, 3-12, 3-15
program files, 4-3 Dialog Box, 3-9, 3-11
Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), 6-10, A-5 Display, 2-5
projects, 1-9, 2-4, 5-8, 5-12, 5-14, 5-19, 6-1 – Log, 2-5, 3-14, 3-15
6-4, 6-9, 6-10, 6-12 Mark VI, 3-13
configuration starting, 3-11
Cimproj, 5-16, 6-1, 6-2 timetag, 3-9
Workbench, 2-4, 5-8, 5-12, 5-14, 5-16, 6-1 – 6-3 Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR), B-2
opening, 2-4, 6-3 Turbine Control Interface (TCI), 1-2, 1-3, 2-3, 2-5, 3-14,
4-16, 5-1, 5-2, 5-26, 6-4, 6-5, 6-11, A-1 – A-3
R
Reactive Capability Display, 5-28, A-1 U
requisition, 1-10 UDH (see Unit Data Highway)
Resource Definition, 5-13 Unit Data Highway (UDH), 1-3, B-2
resources, configuring, 5-12 User Properties, 5-10
Role Properties, 5-11 users, configuring, 5-8
rungs, 2-5, 3-2, 3-3, 3-6 – 3-8, A-1

V
S
valve travel, 5-6
SDB Exchange, 1-8, 6-10
SDB Utilities, 6-10, A-2
security, 1-2, 5-8, 5-12 W
Sequence of Events (SOE), 6-6 web, A-5
Sequencing Display, 3-7 Diagnostic Functions, A-3
setpoint, 4-7, 6-12, 4-7 Gateway, 1-7, A-5
Signal Manager, 6-4 – 6-9, A-1 Workbench, 2-4, 5-8, 5-12, 5-14, 5-16, 6-1 – 6-3
signals, importing, 6-8
SOE (see Sequence of Events)
specifications, 1-7
SPEEDTRONIC controllers
Mark IV, 1-1, 1-3, 4-2, 4-13, 4-15, 5-28, 6-4, 6-10,
6-11, A-1, A-2, B-1

GEH-6126A Volume I Operator’s Guide Index • 3


Notes

4 • Index HMI for SPEEDTRONIC Turbine Control GEH-6126A Volume I



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