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Grammar 1 Games and Activities
Teacher’s Notes
Up, down, left, right Time: 20-30 minutes Type of activity: Giving and receiving instructions in pairs Grammar points Using the imperative to give instructions start, go, copy Prepositions in, up, down, left, right, above, below Method 1 Revise prepositions up, down, left, right using arrows on the board. Then draw two stars to revise above, below. Divide the class into pairs (A and B) and give each student the appropriate handout. They must keep this sheet a secret from each other. If necessary, revise the names for the ten objects on the sheet. Student A starts by reading the instructions 1-6 out loud to Student B, slowly enough for Student B to follow them and draw the object in the appropriate square. Student A can repeat the instructions but must not point to the correct square or give any other help. When this is finished, students change roles and it is now Student B’s turn to read out their instructions (1-6) for Student A to follow. When both have finished, they look at the answer on each other’s sheets. As a follow-up, ask students to draw in five more objects in their answer grid (these could be the same objects or completely new ones). Then they find a new partner and give this partner instructions. This is good practice of the grammar points as of course they have to use the imperatives and prepositions in their own sentences. This could be extended to homework where they make up grids and write the instructions.

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60 fun activities per book for practising and revising key grammar points Wide range of activities at all levels including jigsaw-reading, bingo, questionnaires and much more Photocopiable handouts, full teaching notes and answer keys

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Up, down, left, right

Student A

Read the following out to your partner. He/she is going to draw what you tell him/her to draw. (Don’t let him/her see your paper.)

1 Start in the square above the picture of a flower. 2 Go left 2 squares, then down 2 squares. In this square copy the picture in the square below. 3 Go right 4 squares and copy the picture in the square on your left. 4 Go up 2 squares, then left 1 square. In this square copy the picture in the square above. 5 Go left 3 squares then right 2 squares. In this square copy the picture in the square below. 6 Go down 2 squares then left 3 squares. In this square copy the picture in the square above.

Answer

Now check your drawings. Now it’s your turn to listen to instructions. Have a pen or pencil ready. Follow your partner’s instructions and draw what he/she tells you to draw. When you have finished, check your drawings.
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Up, down, left, right

Student B

Have a pen or pencil ready. Follow your partner’s instructions and draw what he/she tells you to draw. When you have finished, check your drawings. But hide the bottom part of your paper from Student A.

Now it is your turn to give your partner instructions. Read out the following. He/she is going to draw what you tell him/her to draw. 1 Start in the square below the house. 2 Go down 2 squares, then left 1 square. In this square copy the picture in the square on your left. 3 Go left 2 squares, then up 2 squares. In this square copy the picture in the square on your right. 4 Go down 1 square, then right 4 squares. In this square copy the picture in the square on your left. 5 Go down 1 square, then left 5 squares. In this square, copy the picture in the square above. 6 Go up 3 squares, then right 3 squares. In this square copy the picture in the square on your left. Now check your drawings.

Answer

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Grammar 2 Games and Activities
Personal pronouns he/she/it can/cannot/can’t He can’t come this weekend. Subject and object personal pronouns Maya and I have the same birthday./She invited Maya and me. Use of apostrophe (it’s/its) It’s a nice day./The cat cleaned its ears.

Method 1 Write the words ‘Grandma Grammar’s Problem Page’ on the board and invite students to tell you what they would expect it to be about. Tell them Grandma Grammar has taken a holiday and so they are going to have to answer the letters she has received this week. Give each student one of the letters (numbers do not have to be equal). They have ten minutes to circulate in the class to tell different people their problem and note down any answers. They should underline the answers they think are true. After this, students should form small groups with others who had the same problem and talk together to come up with the best and clearest answer. They should write this in a few sentences and give some examples. Now proceed to whole class feedback. Each group reads out their problem and their answer. The rest of the class can be invited to comment. Do they find the answer clear and useful? If not, how could it be better?

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60 fun activities per book for practising and revising key grammar points Wide range of activities at all levels including jigsaw-reading, bingo, questionnaires and much more Photocopiable handouts, full teaching notes and answer keys
3

Teacher’s Notes
4

Ask Grandma Grammar!
Time: Activity type: Preparation: 25 minutes Mingle and group work Make enough copies of pages 6 and 7 so that each student has one of the problems to answer; cut out the individual letters.

Grammar points
Use of definite and indefinite articles the sea/a river Future idea expressed by present continuous I’m visiting my mother on Sunday. There is/There are There is a woman with a baby. few/little with countable and uncountable nouns a little butter/a few apples

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Ask Grandma Grammar!
Dear Grandma Grammar, Please help me! Why do we talk about the sun but a star? Is it a moon or the moon? Dear Grandma Grammar, I have a question about the future tense. Is it better to say ‘I’m having a party next week. Would you like to come?’ or ‘I’ll have a party next week. Would you like to come?’ Or are both correct?

Dear Grandma Grammar, In an English cookbook, I read ‘You need a little milk and a few eggs’. How do you know when to use ‘few’ and when to use ‘little’ and can you say ‘little eggs’?

Dear Grandma Grammar, I know ‘he’ and ‘she’ are only used for people in English, but what do I use when I talk about my cat, Sooty. Do I say ‘she’ or must I say ‘it’?

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Ask Grandma Grammar!
Dear Grandma Grammar When do you use ‘there is’ and when do you use ‘there are’? I’m confused by this sentence: ‘There is a man and three children at the door’. Is it correct? Dear Grandma Grammar What’s the difference between ‘can’, ‘can not’ and ‘cannot’ and what tense are they?

Dear Grandma Grammar I’m not always sure when to use ‘I’ and when to use ‘me’. Is it ‘He gave the tickets to Helen and me’ or ‘He gave the tickets to Helen and I’?

Dear Grandma Grammar I know ‘it’s’ has an apostrophe so why is there no apostrophe in this sentence: ‘The dog ate its dinner hungrily’?

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Grammar 2 Games and Activities
Asking for information What does this mean?/What does this refer to?/Could you tell me about this please? etc. Explaining That means/refers to, etc.

Method 1 You might like to start by holding up the picture of the London Eye and explaining that it is a big wheel sponsored by British Airways and erected next to the River Thames in London to celebrate the Millennium. It’s called the ‘Eye’ because it’s round and gives you a great view of the capital. Then go on to say: Would you be afraid of going on this?/I’d be afraid/not afraid of going for a ride. Are you impressed by it? In the answers focus attention on the use of adjective plus preposition (afraid + of/impressed + by) Now divide the class into pairs (A and B) and give each person a copy of page 9 (the London Eye) and the appropriate half of page 10 with ten questions. Explain that they are going to answer these questions about themselves and write the answers in the capsules of the London Eye. Allow time for this and circulate to give help where needed. At this stage, everyone is working individually and they should not discuss their choices with others. When people are ready, explain that they are now going to work in pairs and ask each other to explain what is written in each capsule. You might like to revise appropriate questions: What does this mean?/What does this refer to? etc. Remind students that in their answers they will be using adjective plus preposition constructions, e.g. This is somebody I’d love to talk to./This is something I’m saving up for. etc. Give about ten minutes for students to discuss their answers together. Then go on to whole class feedback, going round ‘the Eye’ and asking for interesting or unusual answers to the questions.

• • •

60 fun activities per book for practising and revising key grammar points Wide range of activities at all levels including jigsaw-reading, bingo, questionnaires and much more Photocopiable handouts, full teaching notes and answer keys

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Teacher’s Notes Pre-intermediate/ Intermediate
The London Eye
Time: Activity type: Preparation: 20–25 minutes Pair work – personal discussion Make one copy of page 9 per student. Make one copy of page 10 per pair of students and cut in half. 4 3

Grammar points
Adjectives followed by prepositions nice to/talk about/take part in/depend on/shocked by/good at/bad at/impressed by/bored by/anxious about, etc.

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The London Eye
The London Eye is the name of a big wheel on the bank of the River Thames in London. Write your answers to the questions in the capsules.

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The London Eye
Student A 1 Something I’m good at. 2 Something I’m afraid of. 3 A public figure I’m impressed by. 4 A subject or hobby I’m bored by. 5 Something I sometimes get anxious about. 6 Something I have dreams about. 7 Something I would really like to succeed in. 8 A famous person I would love to talk to. 9 Something I am saving up for. 10 A team sport I would not like to take part in.

Student B 1 Something I’m bad at. 2 Something I’m shocked by. 3 A public figure I’m not impressed by. 4 A subject or hobby I’m interested in. 5 Somebody I can always depend on. 6 A subject I like to talk about. 7 Somebody who is usually very nice to me. 8 A team sport I would like to take part in. 9 A word or expression that is typical of me. 10 A person I would like to go on holiday with.

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Games and Activities Book 1
Teacher’s Notes
The most . . . Level 2

The aim of this activity is to promote fast reading for overall understanding of the information in a text. Method 1 Copy the two handouts on pages 12–13 – two sheets for each student. 2 Explain that students have fifteen minutes to read the eight texts and to decide which six texts best fit the descriptions in the grid below the texts. They tick the boxes which correspond to their decisions. For example, if they think Text 1 is the most exciting, they tick that box. 3 When time is up, students work in groups of four and compare their results. They should discuss any disagreements. 4 Groups then report back in full class session. Put the grid on the board or overhead projector (OHP). Groups then vote for ‘The most . . .’ in each category. Texts with the most support are the final choices. Discuss the results. Were there any texts which were put in more than one category? Were there any texts which were not chosen at all? Variation Divide the class into eight groups. Give each group one of the eight texts and the grid sheet. Groups are then given just five minutes to decide which box to tick for their text. Groups then exchange texts with another group and repeat the process. Continue until each group has read every text. Follow-up Rewrite one of the extracts as a gap passage and give it to students.

• • •

This series features 50 varied and enjoyable photocopiable activities per book, including role-plays, card games, discussions, prediction and quizzes. Photocopiable lessons help prepare and motivate students to read but can be used with or without the Penguin Readers titles. Detailed teacher’s notes and keys provided.

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THE MOST. . .

Read the eight texts. Then decide which of them are ‘The most . . .’ in the grid below the texts and fill in the boxes.

1

When Bowen woke up, he was inside the dragon’s mouth. He pulled out his sword and shouted, ‘Don’t bring your teeth down, Dragon. Or my sword will go up.’ Nothing happened. Bowen sat in the dragon’s mouth all day. Outside, Brother Gilbert watched and waited. In the evening the dragon tried to speak, but it was difficult with Bowen in his mouth.

2

She listened to his quick, quiet words. She closed her eyes. ‘I can’t answer,’ she thought. ‘I want to marry you, you see,’ he said again quickly. He waited for her answer. She was very near him and he wanted her. But he waited.

(The Fox. pp.10–12. Level 2.)

(Dragonheart. p.16. Level 2.)

3

‘Slowly take out your gun,’ they told him. ‘Put it on the floor and stand back.’ ‘Mr Bean was very afraid. He carefully put his hand in his jacket . . . and took out his two fingers. ‘It was only a game,’ he said. ‘I haven’t really got a gun.’ The policemen looked at him. Who was this strange little man?

4

Harry spoke on the radio to the scientists at the hotel. ‘Is anybody there?’ he asked. ‘Harry, where are you?’ said Dreyfus. ‘Up at the lake,’ Harry said. ‘We’re OK, but there’s no road for us to come back down the mountain.’ ‘Harry,’ Paul said, ‘this mountain is going to explode . . . and soon. I’ll send a helicopter up to get you.’

(Mr Bean. p.7. Level 2.)

(Dante’s Peak. p.32. Level 2.)

5

‘Alan!’ Sarah screamed. They turned and saw two big crocodiles in the water. A table moved out of the next room on the water. Alan climbed on to it, then pulled the others up with him. ‘Where are the crocodiles?’ said Sarah. Suddenly a crocodile jumped up, and she screamed. ‘Climb!’ shouted Alan.

6

He walked with the two old sisters back to their hotel and tried to tell them about seeing Laura with them in the boat that afternoon. ‘Yes, you did see us with her,’ the sister with the white hair said, stopping outside their little hotel and looking at him again with her strange, empty eyes, ‘but not today. You saw us with her next week. Coming back to Venice, next week. Not today.’

(Don’t Look Now. p.32. Level 2.)

(Jumanji. pp.27–8. Level 2.)

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THE MOST. . .

(CONTINUED)

7

Do you really think I’m crazy? Listen to me, and you won’t think that. I had to do something with the body. I had to be very careful. I didn’t have a lot of time before the morning, so I worked quickly, but quietly. First, I cut up the body. I cut off the head, the arms, and the legs. Then I pulled up the floor. I put everything into the place under the floor, then I carefully put the floor back.

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‘The helicopter is coming back!’ says Andy, in the kitchen. ‘They can’t see us, they’re too far away,’ George tells him. Suddenly, Harry shouts, ‘Something’s burning! Look! There’s smoke coming from the back of the barn!’ Everybody looks out of the window and sees the light and smoke from the fire. ‘Stay with the boy!’ George tells Petra. The three men run out of the house and round to the back of the barn. Harry sees the black bags. ‘Somebody’s burning our money!’ he shouts.

(The Tell-Tale Heart, from A White Heron. p.35. Level 2.)

(Money to Burn. p.26. Level 2.)

1 Most exciting Most romantic Most violent Most mysterious Most humorous Most visual

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Games and Activities Book 1
Teacher’s Notes
From text to picture
The aims of this activity are:
q q q

Level 2

to develop students’ ability to visualize scenes and characters from reading texts. to encourage discussion about different views of what a scene means. to introduce students to a sample of interesting texts from the Penguin Readers series, so that they go on to read the full stories later.

Method 1 Copy enough of the handouts on page 15 to allow every 1 student to have one text. (You would need six sheets for a class of eighteen students.) Students will need blank sheets of paper to draw on. Cut out the texts and distribute one to each student. 2 Students should read the text carefully. Walk round 2 and check students understand the text – give them help if they need it. Tell them to be especially attentive to visual detail. Then tell them to draw their visualization of the scene they have just read. Point out that most of the extracts describe a sequence of events, but that students need draw only one scene, (probably the final one). Emphasize that you are not looking for artistic talent – even a very rough picture will do. Allow 10–15 minutes for students to do this. 4 Students then work with a partner who has been using 3 a different text from theirs. They exchange their drawings but do not show each other the texts. They then describe to each other what they think their partner’s picture represents. The student who has drawn the text may need to correct his/her partner’s description and the person describing the text may want to ask questions. Examples of language that students may need to use are: Present continous tense, there is/are, I can see, this is/these are. 5 Finally, students exchange texts so that they can read 4 the text that the picture was actually based upon. Leave time for them to discuss any points of disagreement.

• • •

This series features 50 varied and enjoyable photocopiable activities per book, including role-plays, card games, discussions, prediction and quizzes. Photocopiable lessons help prepare and motivate students to read but can be used with or without the Penguin Readers titles. Detailed teacher’s notes and keys provided.

5 6 If you wish, students can change partners and go through the same process with a new drawing. If you have time, students could work through all the texts/pictures.
Follow-up Make a wall display of the pictures alongside the texts which inspired them. x Where a phrase has been omitted from the Penguin Readers edition it is indicated by three dots (. . .) in this activity.

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FROM TEXT TO PICTURE
Cut out the passages. Students work in pairs. They read one of the passages and draw the scene. Then their partner describes their picture.

1

No smoke came from the house. He was afraid. He did not want his wife or the children to go into the farm. ‘Do what I say, please,’ said Nat. She pulled Jill and Johnny under a tree out of the wind and he went into the farm without them. He saw the car in front of the house, not in the garage. There was no glass in any of the windows of the house and there were hundreds of dead gulls near the front door. There was a crowd of living birds on the roof and on the trees round the house. They did not move. They watched him. (The Birds. p.33. Level 2.)

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One morning in June a large crowd of people waited outside the prison door. They wore dark clothes. ‘Hester Prynne is the child of the Devil,’ said an ugly woman in the crowd . . . ‘Be quiet!’ somebody called from the front of the crowd. ‘They are opening the prison door.’ The crowd was quiet. The door opened and a small man in black clothes came out. A woman in a colorful dress followed him. She was a tall woman with a strong, beautiful face and large, dark eyes. Her long, black hair shone in the sunlight. There was a baby in her arms and a big, red letter ‘A’ on the front of her dress. (Adapted from The Scarlet Letter. p.1. Level 2.)

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It is a wet afternoon in November, and the winds are strong. On a road near the river, three men are cutting down a tree. When the tree is down, they pull it on to the road and then go to wait behind some other trees. Their red car is near them, ready to drive away quickly. It is a small, quiet road. A hundred metres away, a woman called Petra is watching the big road from the city. She is waiting for a blue security van. Next to Petra, there is a sign across the road near the river. It says: ROAD CLOSED. (Money to Burn. p.1. Level 2.)

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Instant Lessons Book 1
Write the words town and village on the board and elicit/teach the meaning. Elicit the following questions and answers: Is there a town on the island? Are there any villages? There aren’t any villages/towns. Point out that we use some with affirmative sentences and any with interrogative and negative sentences. Then write the structures on the board for students to copy. Put students into pairs. Each student draws an island and puts four items from Exercise 1 in it. (Three villages counts as one ‘item’.) With their partner, each student then describes his/her island, using the structures given in the example. Then as a whole class activity, ask some students to describe their island and correct where necessary. 3 (Optional activity) Put students into different pairs. Students do not show each other their island drawings. They take turns to ask each other questions about their islands, as in the example. Then as a whole class activity, listen to some student pairs and correct where necessary.

• • •

This series features 45 one-hour ready-to-go lessons, which focus on a particular language area and can be used immediately in the classroom. Extracts from a variety of Penguin Readers titles, promoting reading skills, are used. With language presentation and plenty of practice, students are able to read more effectively. Detailed teacher’s notes and answer keys included.

Practice

(15 minutes)

4 Put students into pairs. Ask students to read the passage and answer question 1. Check answers orally, explaining and helping students to guess the answers from the context. Students then read the passage again and answer questions 2–5. Encourage them to use their dictionaries to look up new vocabulary. Check answers orally, explaining and correcting where necessary. If there is sufficient time, ask students to write answers to question 5.

Teacher’s Notes
Level: Skills: Function: Language: Vocabulary: Easystarts Reading; speaking; writing Describing places There is/are + a/some/a lot of; Is/are there + a/any? There aren’t any . . . ‘Nature’ words

Further practice

(20 minutes)

5 Look through the passage and pre-teach any vocabulary you think necessary. Students read the passage and complete the gaps. Check answers orally, correcting and explaining where necessary. 6 Put students into pairs. Read through the rubric and check students understand what they have to do. Students then do the exercise, without referring to Exercise 5 if possible. Walk round and give help where needed. As a whole class activity, listen to some students. Correct major errors and teach any new vocabulary that arises.

Presentation

(25 minutes)

1 Put students into pairs. Students match the words with the pictures. Encourage them to use their dictionaries to look up new vocabulary. Check students’ answers and if necessary, teach the words. 2 Teach the word island by sketching an island on the board and drawing the sea around it. Then quickly sketch in some mountains and three rivers. Sketch in a lot of trees. Also sketch in a lake. Say: Tell me about the island. Elicit: There’s a lake, there are some mountains and rivers. There are a lot of trees. Point out that if there are three or more, we usually say some.

Key
1 1 hill 2 mountain 3 tree 4 river 5 town 6 lake 7 village 4 2 They find water in a river. 3 They sleep on the beach. 4 They start to make a small house. 5 The island is big. There’s grass and there are a lot of tall, thick trees. There’s a small river with cold, clean water. There are coconuts on the island. There’s a beach. 5 1 a 2 any 3 any 4 some 5 some 6 a lot/lots 7 are 8 is 9 a

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Describing places
1

Work in pairs. Look at the pictures. Write the words below beneath the right pictures.
lake mountain town village tree river hill

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Work in pairs. Answer the questions below.
The island is big and has lots of tall, thick trees. First Sam and Jenny look for food and water. They find a small river. The water is cold and clean. They drink and drink and drink. There are coconuts on the island too . . . Sam opens two of them and gives the first one to Jenny. That night Sam and Jenny sleep on the beach. They are very tired. In the morning they start to make a small house with grass and wood. They work very hard. After four days they finish.
(Adapted from Tinker’s Island. pp.8-9. Easystarts.)

1 _______________

2 _______________

4 _______________ 3 _______________

1 Guess the meaning of these words: coconut, grass, beach 2 Where do Sam and Jenny find water? 3 Where do Sam and Jenny sleep? 4 What do they start to make the next morning? 5 Describe the island.
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6 _______________ 5 _______________

Read the passage and fill in the gaps. Choose from these words:
some any is are a lot a

7 _______________
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We live on (1) _____________ small island. There aren’t (2) _____________ houses or phones. There aren’t (3) _____________ people. We are all alone. How do we live? There are (4) _____________ small animals and we kill them. We have two guns. But

Draw an island. Choose four items from Exercise 1 to put on your island. Then find a partner and make sentences about your island.
Example: There’s a lake. There are some hills. There aren’t any mountains. There are a lot of trees.

(5) _____________ animals are dangerous and we must be careful. There are (6) _____________ of trees. We take the wood and make fires with it. Then we cook our

3

Work with a different partner. Don’t show your partner your island. Ask your partner questions about his/her island.
Example: Is there a lake? Yes, there is.

food. There (7) _____________ some fruit trees too. We eat the fruit. There (8) _____________ a river and the water is very clean. It’s hot here and we like that. We live in (9) _____________ small grass house.

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Are there any mountains? No, there aren’t.

Work in pairs. Imagine that you are on this island. Talk about the island and your life there.

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Instant Lessons Book 1
b Go through the example with students. Elicit/explain the fact that kind is an adjective and tells us more about a noun. Elicit/explain the fact that kindly is an adverb and tells you more about a verb. Elicit/explain the fact that you make an adverb by adding –ly to the verb. Ask students to think of more adjectives and write them on the board in a column. Get students to tell you what the adverbs are and write them in a second column. Point out that adverbs ending in consonant + y add –ily. Point out also that there are some exceptions where the adjective and adverb are the same (hard – hard, fast – fast, early – early, late – late). Elicit/point out the fact that the adverb of the adjective good is well. Students then do the exercise in pairs. Check answers orally and give explanations where necessary.

Practice

(30 minutes)

• • •

This series features 45 one-hour ready-to-go lessons, which focus on a particular language area and can be used immediately in the classroom. Extracts from a variety of Penguin Readers titles, promoting reading skills, are used. With language presentation and plenty of practice, students are able to read more effectively. Detailed teacher’s notes and answer keys included.

2 Put students into pairs. Check that students understand the questions. Students read the passage and answer the questions. Encourage them to use their dictionaries to look up new vocabulary. Check answers orally and give explanations where necessary. Encourage discussion for question 4. 3 Explain that in this exercise, students’ task is to add in verbs describing speech (i.e. the verbs used in Exercise 1) and adverbs to the dialogue in the passage in Exercise 2. Go through the example given and elicit more examples. Point out that we can say said Morris or Morris said. Students then do the exercise in pairs. Walk round and give help where needed. Check students’ work. Ask some pairs to read out their work and correct where necessary.

Further practice

(15 minutes)

Teacher’s Notes
Level: Skills: Function: Language: Vocabulary: 2 Reading; speaking; writing Describing how people say and do things Adverbs Verbs describing speech

4 Put students into pairs. One student in each pair plays Catherine, the other plays her best friend. Ask students to imagine that Catherine tells her friend that Morris has left her. Her friend is shocked and sympathetic. Students make the conversation. Walk round and give help where needed. Ask some pairs to act out the conversation for the class. Correct major errors. Then students write the conversation, adding at least five adverbs. Walk round and give help where needed. If time allows, check students’ work.

Key
1 a 1 asked 2 shouted 3 reply, said 4 whispered 5 screamed 6 said 7 cried 8 spoke b 1 slowly 2 angrily 3 carefully 4 deeply 5 loudly 6 badly, late 7 well, hard, early 8 fast 2 1 They are engaged (going to marry). 2 He’s not interested in her and feels cold towards her. He wants to leave her. 3 She loves him and wants him to stay with her. She ‘gave up everything’ for him. 4 Open answer

Presentation

(15 minutes)

1 a Put students into pairs. Ask students to read the sentences. Write the words say and answer on the board and ask students to underline verbs like these that tell us that someone is speaking or describe how someone speaks. Encourage students to use their dictionaries. Check answers orally and give explanations where necessary.

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Love
1

Work in pairs. a Underline the verbs describing speech in the sentences below. b Change the adjectives in brackets into adverbs.
Example: She smiled (kind) at him. She smiled kindly at him. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ‘Why are you driving so (slow)?’ he asked. ‘Get out!’ he shouted (angry). ‘Think (careful) before you reply,’ he said. ‘I love you (deep),’ Matthew whispered. Maria screamed (loud) and then jumped out of the window. ‘You do your job (bad) and always arrive (late),’ said Mr Morrell. ‘That’s not true. I do my job (good). I work (hard) and always arrive (early),’ Peter cried. He spoke (fast) and she couldn’t understand him.

2

Work in pairs. Read the passage. Answer the questions below.
Morris came to see Catherine. He said suddenly, ‘I’m going away to New Orleans. I’m going to buy some coffee.’ ‘Take me with you,’ said Catherine. ‘No, it’s a dirty and dangerous place. People get ill there.’ ‘Then you must not go. When people are going to marry, buying coffee is not important. Think about me, not coffee. We must not wait too long.’ She spoke strongly, her hands on Morris’s arm. Was this the time to break with Catherine? ‘I don’t like this noisy Catherine. I like you when you’re quiet,’ said Morris. ‘But I don’t ask much of you. When are you coming again?’ ‘Saturday,’ he answered and smiled. ‘Come tomorrow. I’m very quiet now. Please, tomorrow.’ ‘I said Saturday,’ he said, but did not smile this time. ‘Tomorrow I’ll be in the office.’ She looked at his hard, cold eyes. ‘Morris,’ she said quietly, ‘you’re going to leave me.’ ‘Yes. I’ll write to you – that’s better.’ ‘Morris, I gave up everything for you!’ she cried. ‘You can have it all back.’ ‘Morris, why are you doing this now? What is different?’ ‘Wait for my letter.’ ‘Ah, you’re not coming back.’ He got away from her and closed the door behind him.
(Washington Square. pp.34-35. Level 2.)

1 What is Catherine and Morris’s relationship at the beginning of the conversation? 2 How does Morris feel about Catherine?
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3 4

How does Catherine feel about Morris? How do you feel about Morris?

In pairs, read the passage in Exercise 2 again. Write in more verbs describing speech and adverbs.
Example: ‘Come tomorrow. I’m very quiet now. Please, tomorrow,’ she said quietly.

4

Imagine that Catherine tells her best friend that Morris has left her. Make that conversation. Then write the conversation, using five adverbs.

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Instant Lessons Book 1
Practice
(20 minutes) 2 Explain to students that regular verbs end in three different sounds: phonetic symbol d (stayed, rained); phonetic symbol t (talked, danced); phonetic symbol Id (started). Write these phonetic symbols on the board in three columns. Students copy them down, also in three columns. Give the examples above very clearly, so that students can really hear the ending and understand that it is the sound of the ending that matters, not the spelling. Check students understand the list of verbs in the exercise. Slowly read out the following list of verbs, which are the same as the list in the worksheet, but in a different order: started, closed, listened, watched, waited, stopped, worked, opened, lived, shouted, wanted, finished. Students put each verb in the appropriate column according to the sound of the ending. Check answers orally. If time allows, explain that the pronunciation of the endings depends on the base form of the verb. If it ends with a soft sound (live, listen) the pronunciation of the –ed ending has a d sound. If the end is hard (stop, work) the pronuncation of the –ed ending has a t sound. If the base form ends with a –t sound (wait, shout), the –ed ending is pronounced Id. Note: If time is short, omit Exercise 2.

• • •

This series features 45 one-hour ready-to-go lessons, which focus on a particular language area and can be used immediately in the classroom. Extracts from a variety of Penguin Readers titles, promoting reading skills, are used. With language presentation and plenty of practice, students are able to read more effectively. Detailed teacher’s notes and answer keys included.
Level: Skills: Function: Language: Vocabulary: 1 Reading; speaking; writing Understanding a dramatic scene Past simple, affirmative form, with emphasis on irregular verbs ‘Crime’ words

Key
1 a Story 1 Two students, a boy and a girl, went into a small shop. It sold old stamps and coins. The coins were very valuable. They looked at some of the coins. The shopkeeper watched the students carefully. The girl student thought, ‘He thinks we’re going to steal the coins!’ There was a girl shop assistant. The girl student smiled at her, but the girl did not smile back. ‘She isn’t very friendly,’ the girl student thought. The telephone rang in the room behind the shop. The shopkeeper went to answer it. After some minutes, the students left and went to a café. Suddenly, the shopkeeper came into the café. ‘Where are my coins?’ he said. ‘They’re not there. You stole them!’ b Story 1 Someone stole some valuable coins from a shop. Story 2 A man had a bag of dangerous drugs. c went/to go; sold/to sell; were/to be; looked/to look; watched/to watch; thought/to think; ran/to run; put/to put; was/to be; smiled/to smile; rang/to ring; left/to leave; found/to find; came/to come; said/to say; took/to take; saw/to see; had/to have; stole/to steal; started/to start 2 d closed, listened, opened, lived; t watched, stopped, worked, finished; Id started, waited, shouted, wanted 3 (1) had (2) held (3) stopped/arrived (4) got/climbed (5) had (6) shouted/said (7) shouted (8) picked up (9) threw (10) hit (11) fell (12) took (13) threw 4 b The shop assistant took the coins and went to the window. There was a flute player outside. She threw the coins into his hat. He walked away with the coins.

Presentation

(25 minutes)

1 a Put students into pairs. Their task is to separate out the two stories in the texts. To do this, they should underline the sentences of one story. The easiest way for students to do the exercise is to start with the first sentence and go through the text, underlining that story. They can read through the second story (which has not been underlined) and check that they have done the exercise correctly. Encourage students to use their dictionaries for new words. Check answers orally. b Elicit answers to the question from a number of students and give help where necessary. c Check that students understand how to form the past tense of regular verbs. Check that students understand that they must learn the past simple tense of irregular verbs. In pairs, students then go through the stories and do the exercise. Check answers orally.

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Crime
1

a Work in pairs. There are two stories in the text below. Both stories are about two students, a boy and a girl. The stories are mixed up. Separate the two stories. Underline the sentences of one story.
Two students, a boy and a girl, went into a small shop. It sold old stamps and coins. Two students, a boy and a girl, were on holiday in Barcelona, Spain. The coins were very valuable. They went for a walk in the little streets behind the market. They looked at some of the coins. The shopkeeper watched the students carefully. The girl student thought, ‘He thinks we’re going to steal the coins!’ Suddenly a man ran out of a house. He ran across the street and put something in a rubbish bin. There was a girl shop assistant. The girl student smiled at her, but the girl did not smile back. Then he ran away. ‘She isn’t very friendly,’ the girl student thought. The telephone rang in the room behind the shop. The students went to the rubbish bin and looked inside. The shopkeeper went to answer it. After some minutes, the students left and went to a café. They found a small white bag. Suddenly, the shopkeeper came into the café. ‘Drugs!’ said the boy student. ‘We’ll take this to the police.’ The girl student took the bag. ‘Where are my coins?’ he said. ‘They’re not there.’ Then they saw the man again. He had a knife. ‘You stole them!’ ‘Give me the bag,’ he said in Spanish. The girl student started to run.
(Based on The Missing Coins and Run for your Life. Level 1)

b In your own words, answer this question: What is the crime in each story? c Write down all the past simple verbs in the story. Beside each verb, write the infinitive form. Example: went/to go
2

Listen to the pronunciation of these regular verbs. What sound do they end in? Draw a table and put the verbs in the right column.
stopped listened started wanted lived closed finished worked waited opened shouted watched

3

Work in pairs. The passage below finishes the story about drugs in Exercise 1. In this story, the girl is called Kim. The man who wants the drugs is called Vidal. Complete the gaps with a verb in the past tense.

4

a Work in pairs. Look at this picture. It shows who stole the coins. The girl at the window is not the girl student. Who is she, do you think? b Explain how the two people in the picture stole the coins. You will need these words: shop assistant flute player

Vidal (1) _______ a knife in his hand. He (2) _______ the knife near Kim’s face. A car (3) _______ and a policeman and policewoman (4) _______ out of the car. They (5) _______ guns. ‘Throw the knife down!’ (6) _______ the policeman. But Vidal (7) _______ ‘No!’ Suddenly, Dave (8) _______ _______ a rubbish bin and (9) _______ it. It (10) _______ Vidal and he (11) _______ down. Kim quickly (12) _______ the knife and (13) _______ it away.

(Based on Run for your Life. Level 1.)

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Instant Lessons Book 2
Further practice
(20 minutes) 3 a Look through the passage and pre-teach any vocabulary you think necessary. Students read the passage and choose the ending they like best, A or B. Ask a number of students which ending they like best. Ask them to explain why. b Elicit answers and explanations. (B is the real ending.) c Ask two students to each tell part of the story. Other students can help if necessary. Then put students in pairs to tell the story, choosing the ending they like best. Give help where necessary. Note: If time is short, omit part c and do it as a follow-up activity. 4 Look through the exercise and pre-teach any vocabulary you think necessary. Students tell the story in pairs. Point out that a dash (–) does not necessarily mean that students must put in a word. Walk round and give help where necessary. As a whole class activity, elicit the story from students and correct where necessary. If time allows, students can then write the story.

• • •

This series features 45 one-hour ready-to-go lessons, which focus on a particular language area and can be used immediately in the classroom. Extracts from a variety of Penguin Readers titles, promoting reading skills, are used. With language presentation and plenty of practice, students are able to read more effectively. Detailed teacher’s notes and answer keys included.
(20 minutes)

Key
1 a . . . his girlfriend did not want to marry him. He decided to kill himself for love. He chose to jump in front of . . . He was not seriously hurt and was able to leave hospital after a few hours. . . . the doctors asked him to talk to someone about his problem. Finally, Mr Ruiz agreed that it was foolish to kill himself. He decided to go on living and look for a new girlfriend. Glad to be alive, he left the hospital . . . They took him back to the hospital for the third time that day . . . b 1 Because his girlfriend did not want to marry him. 2 He tried twice. 3 The first time he jumped in front of a train. The second time he jumped in front of a lorry. 4 The train went safely over him. When he jumped in front of a lorry he only got a few knocks. 5 Ruiz decided to go on living and find a new girlfriend. But when he left the hospital, a horse knocked him down and he was seriously hurt. 6 Six (want, decide, choose, be able to, ask someone to, talk to) 7 Open answer 4 Seventy-five prisoners agreed to try to escape from prison in Northern Mexico. They planned to dig a tunnel under the prison wall. They started to dig the tunnel in November 1975 and managed to finish it in/by April 1976. They went through the tunnel and came up in a courtroom. The judges were very surprised. They sent the prisoners back to prison.

Presentation

1 a Put students into pairs. Tell them that this passage tells an amusing story. Explain that the word to has been omitted in this passage. Students read the passage, using their dictionaries to look up new vocabulary. They write to in where necessary in the passage. Check answers orally and give explanations where necessary. b Check students understand the questions. For

Practice

(20 minutes)

2 Explain that all the sentences in this exercise contain verbs that are followed by the infinitive. Go through the sentences with students and check they understand them. Make sure that students understand that sentences 1 and 3 ask them to say something to their partner. If you feel students need the help, go through the sentences, eliciting answers. Students should speak in complete sentences. Students then do the exercise in pairs. Walk round and give help where necessary. When students have completed the exercise, as a whole class activity, elicit answers from them and correct where necessary.

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Humour
1

a Work in pairs. The word ‘to’ has been omitted from this passage. Put ‘to’ in the passage where necessary.
In 1978 Señor Abel Ruiz of Madrid found out that his girlfriend did not want marry him. He decided kill himself for love. There are many ways of dying for love. He chose jump in front of the fast Gerona to Madrid train. But when he jumped, he landed between the railway lines and the train went safely over him. He was not seriously hurt and was able leave hospital after a few hours. Later that day Ruiz tried again. This time he jumped in front of a lorry, but only got a few knocks. When they saw him back at the hospital so soon, the doctors asked him talk someone about his problem. Finally, Mr Ruiz agreed that it was foolish kill himself. He decided go on living and look for a new girlfriend. Glad be alive, he left the hospital and a horse knocked him down in the street. They took him back the hospital for the third time that day, seriously hurt this time.
(The Book of Heroic Failures. pp.32-34. Level 3.)

b Read the passage again. Answer the questions.
1 2 3 4
2

Why did Ruiz decide to kill himself? How many times did he try? How did he try? What happened each time?

5 6 7

What is the ‘twist’ at the end of this story? How many verbs are there in this passage that have ‘to’ after them? What are these verbs? What would you like to say to Ruiz?

Work in pairs. Answer the questions below or follow the instructions. Talk in complete sentences.
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Make a promise to your partner. (I promise to . . .) Do you intend to keep your promise? Ask your partner to do something impossible. What did you ask your partner to do? Did he/she refuse to do it? What are you trying to do at the moment? What do you aim to do after this lesson? Do you want to do it or is it something you have to do? Is there anything that you planned to do in the last week but didn’t manage to do? What was it?

3

a Work in pairs. Read this story. Which ending do you like best, A or B? Explain why. b This is a true story. Which is the real ending, do you think? Why do you think this? c Tell the story.
In 1969 Mrs Beatrice Park decided to take her driving test – for the fifth time. During the test she managed to drive into the River Wey at Guildford. She and her examiner climbed on to the roof of the car and waited for someone to come and save them. The examiner went home feeling ill. He was still holding his test paper and pencil. A Mrs Park decided to take her test again. She had the same examiner as the last time. When he saw her, he fainted. He then refused to sit in the same car as Mrs Park. She agreed to have another examiner. B Mrs Park wanted to be sure: Was that all right, she asked, or did she have to take the test again? They told her, ‘We cannot say anything until we have seen the tester’s report.’
(Based on The Book of Heroic Failures. p.14. Level 3.)

4

Work in pairs. Tell the story outlined below. Put the verbs into the correct tense.
Seventy-five prisoners – agree – try – escape – prison – Northern Mexico. Plan – dig – tunnel – under – prison wall. Start – dig – tunnel – November 1975 and – manage – finish it – April 1976. Go through – tunnel – come up – courtroom. Judges – very surprised. Send – prisoners – back – prison.
(Based on The Book of Heroic Failures. pp.22-24. Level 3.)

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Instant Lessons Book 2
b Do the first example with the whole class. Explain that many adjectives (for example, frightened) must be used with a particular preposition. Students then do the exercise in pairs. Check answers orally. c Check students understand the questions. What things actually happened and what things were invented to make a good story for the film? Students discuss this in pairs. Elicit answers, encourage discussion and ask them to give reasons.

Practice

(20 minutes)

4 3 Pick out the adjectives in the exercise (frightened, jealous, cruel, angry, excited, pleased, surprised, polite) and write them on the board, followed by their prepositions. Ask students to make sentences using these adjectives and prepositions. Students can then do the exercise in pairs. Check answers orally.

Further practice

(15 minutes)

• • •

This series features 45 one-hour ready-to-go lessons, which focus on a particular language area and can be used immediately in the classroom. Extracts from a variety of Penguin Readers titles, promoting reading skills, are used. With language presentation and plenty of practice, students are able to read more effectively. Detailed teacher’s notes and answer keys included.

5 If possible, put students into pairs or groups of the 4 same nationality to do this exercise. Ask students to prepare a two-minute talk about the person they have chosen. Encourage students to use adjective and preposition combinations they have practised. Choose some students to talk in front of the class.

Key
1 Five men have surrounded three soldiers. The soldiers look very surprised. The men have swords and knives. They are going to attack the soldiers. (It’s the thirteenth century, and it takes place in Scotland.) 2 a His men were good at trapping and killing groups of English soldiers. b 1 of 2 to 3 of 4 with 5 at 6 by c Open answer

Teacher’s Notes
Level: Skills: Function: Language: Vocabulary: 3 All four skills are practised Talking about interactions Adjective + preposition Gender nouns

3 1 . . . of flying. 2 . . . of each other. 3 . . . to me. 4
4 . . . with his son. 5 . . . about the party. 6 . . . with your work. 7 . . . by/at his words 8 . . . to him.

Follow-up
In pairs, students say what they know about the real William Wallace.

Presentation

(25 minutes)

1 Elicit answers to the questions. (Students will find the answers in the next exercise.) 2 a Ask students: What do you know about the film Braveheart? Tell students that the passage that follows is about William Wallace, the man called Braveheart in the film. Pre-teach any vocabulary necessary. In pairs, students match the picture with the relevant sentence in the passage. Check answers orally.

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Heroes
1

Work in pairs. What is happening in this picture? What century is it, do you think? What country could it be?
3 4 3

c Which parts of the story are true, do you think? Which parts do you think are probably untrue and are there to make a good story? a Listen to this passage about William Complete the second sentence so that it has Wallace. It gives you the facts that we know the same meaning as the first. Use these are true. Were you correct in your answer to prepositions: Exercise 2, part c? What parts of the story in Exercise at are not included in with passage? 2 about by to this of
He is again. flying. He things do we b1Listen afraid ofWhat new is frightened ______ . 2 Jealousy often a problem with brothers and learn in thisispassage?

2

a What do you know about the film Braveheart? The passage below tells the story of the novel and film Braveheart. The story is based on the life of William Wallace. Read the passage and match the picture in Exercise 1 with a sentence in the passage.

During the thirteenth century, the English wanted to control Scotland. The Scots were frightened (1) _______ the English, who were very cruel (2) _______ them. The Scottish nobles were jealous (3)_______ each other and fought each other, not the English. William Wallace was a farmer’s son. The English killed his father, his brother, and many years later, the woman he loved. Wallace was very angry (4) _______ the English. He started fighting the English and many Scots came to fight with him. His men were good (5) _______ trapping and killing groups of English soldiers. Then the English sent an army of ten thousand men to Stirling in Scotland. With an army of only two thousand men, Wallace defeated the English. Because of this, he was made Guardian of Scotland by the Scottish nobles. Shocked (6) _______ England’s defeat, the King of England sent his son’s wife, Isabella, to talk to Wallace. The young man and woman were very attracted to each other. Then, in a second battle at Falkirk, the English defeated Wallace and the Scots army. This was because many Scottish nobles fought with the English! Once again the English King sent Isabella to talk to Wallace. The King wanted to trap Wallace, but Isabella told the Scotsman and he got away. The English finally killed Wallace with great cruelty in 1305. As he died he cried, ‘We will be free!’
(Based on Braveheart. Level 3.)

4

the same meaning as the first. Use these prepositions: 5 4 Work in pairs or small groups, if possible, of at about by to with of the same nationality. Choose a national hero or heroine and prepare a short talk about 1his/her life. of flying. He is frightened ______ . He is afraid
2 Jealousy is often a problem with brothers and sisters. Brothers and sisters are often jealous ______ . 3 Please don’t treat me so cruelly. Please don’t be so cruel ______ . 4 He spoke angrily to his son. He was angry ______ . 5 The idea of the party is exciting. I feel excited ______ . 6 Your work really pleased me. I was pleased ______ . 7 His words surprised everyone. Everyone was surprised ______ . 8 Please be polite when you talk to him. Please be polite ______ .
5

sisters. Brothers and sisters are often jealous ______ . c Write down the sentences in this listening 3 Please don’t treat me so cruelly. Please don’t passage that have the same meaning as the be so cruel ______ . sentences below. 4 He spoke angrily to his son. He was angry 1 The English were very cruel to the Scots. ______ . 2 The Scottish nobles fought each other, not the 5 The idea of the party is exciting. I feel excited English. ______ . 3 With an army of only two thousand men, 6 Your work really pleased me. I was pleased Wallace defeated the English. ______ . 4 In a second battle at Falkirk, the English 7 His words surprised everyone. Everyone was defeated Wallace and the Scots army. surprised ______ . 8 Please be polite when you talk so him. Please Complete the second sentence to that it has be polite ______ .

b Complete the gaps in the passage with these prepositions: by of (2) with to at

Work in pairs or small groups, if possible, of the same nationality. Choose a national hero or heroine and prepare a short talk about his/her life.

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Instant Lessons 1 Elementary

Foot + ball = football
Aim Preparation To teach the students some common compound nouns. Copy handouts on pages 27 and 28 – one copy per student. Cut up the words in Activity B. put two words together to form a completely new word. Give them another example, namely football. (Draw it if you can!) Ask the students for any other examples they know.

Presentation (20 minutes)
Activity A Divide the class into pairs. Give each student a copy of the handout. Explain that they have to use the clues to match words from column 1 with words from column 2 to make ten completely new words. Some words in the columns will not be used.

Practice (15 minutes)
Activity B Students work alone at first. Give each student one of the words on page 27 plus a copy of the blank drawing sheet on page 28. Before they start, make sure they understand the meaning of the word they are going to draw. Tell them to try to represent the word on the blank sheet of paper by drawing two pictures, one for the first part of the word and one for the second. Allow approximately 5 minutes. When everyone is ready, they now walk around the class talking to as many people as possible. They take it in turns to try and guess each other’s words. At the end of the activity, get one or two volunteers to draw their word on the board.

• • •

This series features 45 one-hour ready-to-go lessons, which focus on a particular language area and can be used immediately in the classroom. Extracts from a variety of Penguin Readers titles, promoting reading skills, are used. With language presentation and plenty of practice, students are able to read more effectively. Detailed teacher’s notes and answer keys included.

Introduction (5 minutes)
Draw the following on the board:

Conclusion (10 minutes)
Activity C This is a quick check to see if the students have remembered some of the words practised in the lesson. They can work in pairs. Check orally.

+
Ask the students if they can guess what the word is from the drawing. (The answer is earring.) Tell them it is common in English to

Homework
Ask the students to draw and make up gapped sentences for the following compound nouns: bookcase, bagpipes and haircut.

Key
A 1 waistcoat 2 keyboard 3 postcard 4 toothbrush 5 bathroom 6 birthday 7 armchair 8 suitcase 9 handbag 10 lighthouse

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A B C

Foot + ball = football

A Match words from column 1 with words from column 2 to make compound

words. 1 It’s something people wear – usually men. _____________ 2 A musical instrument. It’s like a piano. _____________ 3 You can write this when you’re on holiday. _____________ 4 You use it to keep your teeth clean. _____________ 5 Where you have a shower. _____________ 6 Everybody has one of these once a year. _____________ 7 You can sit in it. _____________ 8 You put clothes in this when you go on holiday. _____________ 9 Women keep their money and makeup in this. _____________ 10 A tall building near the sea. It helps boats. ____________ column 1 arm bath birth boy hand key lamp light post suit tooth waist column 2 bag ball board brush card case chair coat day house room table


B Words

bedroom

butterfly

nightdress

cowboy

penknife

screwdriver

schoolgirl

farmhouse

headphones

lipstick

seatbelt

sunglasses

lamppost

housewife

rainbow

moonlight

timetable

basketball

cupboard

postman

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A B C

Foot + ball = football (continued)

B Drawings

Which word is it?

+
C Fill in the missing words. To help you, the first and last letters of each word are

given. 1 ’What’s your favourite sport?’ ‘F____________l, of course.’ 2 I got this camera from my parents for my b____________y. 3 Shall I buy a suit with or without a w____________t? 4 John Wayne often played a c____________y in films. 5 ‘Where’s Paula?’ ‘She’s in the b____________m washing her hair.’ 6 When you travel by car you should always wear a s____________t. 7 Don’t forget to send me a p____________d from Spain! 8 ‘Is there a letter for me?’ ‘I don’t know. The p____________n hasn’t come yet.’ 9 Sit down in that a____________r over there. 10 ‘Where are the plates and glasses?’

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Instant Lessons 2 Intermediate

Prefixes
Aim Preparation To show how prefixes are used in forming the opposites of adjectives. Copy the handouts on pages 30 and 31 – one copy per student.

Presentation (20 minutes)
Activity A Let the students work in pairs. Give everyone a copy of the handout. Explain what is to be done (do the first example orally in class, if necessary) then let them complete the exercise. Check orally, pointing out that the prefix non- is used differently from the other prefixes – a hyphen is needed to connect it to the adjective, for example non-existent. As a quick revision, the students can test each other. One student reads out an adjective while his/her partner gives the opposite, using the correct prefix. They can take it in turns to read out and answer.

Practice (15 minutes)
Activity B This is an exercise to check that they have learnt the words in Activity A. It can be done individually or in pairs. Give each student/pair a copy of the handout. Go through the first one with the whole class, then let them complete the rest. Check orally.

• • •

This series features 45 one-hour ready-to-go lessons, which focus on a particular language area and can be used immediately in the classroom. Extracts from a variety of Penguin Readers titles, promoting reading skills, are used. With language presentation and plenty of practice, students are able to read more effectively. Detailed teacher’s notes and answer keys included.

Homework
Ask the students to write sentences about themselves, their family, etc. using five of the words learnt during the lesson (i.e. including the prefixes).

Conclusion (10 minutes)
Activity C This is an open-ended activity. Tell them to fill in the gaps using their own words. When they have finished, they find a partner and compare answers.

Teacher’s Notes
Introduction (5 minutes)
Introduce the subject by writing the following on the board: legal conscious possible correct Ask the students if they can give you the opposites of the above (illegal, unconscious, impossible, incorrect). Explain that il-, un-, imand in- are called prefixes. Ask the students if they know any other adjectives that start with these prefixes. Add them to the board. Tell the students that in this lesson you will be looking at various prefixes used with adjectives to give the opposites of the words.

Key
A dis- honest, loyal, satisfied il- legal, literate, logical im- mature, patient, possible in- accurate, considerate, correct, dependent, experienced, sane, sincere ir- regular, relevant, responsible mis- understood non- existent, resident, violent un- avoidable, comfortable, conscious, employed, necessary, popular, ripe B 1 illiterate 2 unavoidable 3 uncomfortable 4 incorrect 5 dishonest 6 unpopular 7 irregular 8 non-resident 9 unconscious 10 inconsiderate 11 unemployed 12 illegal 13 immature 14 unnecessary 15 impossible 16 irresponsible 17 misunderstood 18 non-violent 19 independent 20 inexperienced

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A B C

Prefixes

A Which prefix would you put in front of these adjectives? Arrange the words

under the correct headings. (The number in brackets after each heading says how many words are needed.) accurate avoidable comfortable conscious considerate correct dependent employed existent experienced honest legal literate logical loyal mature necessary patient popular possible regular relevant resident responsible ripe sane satisfied sincere understood violent

dis- (3)

in- (7)

non- (3)

il- (3)

un- (7)

ir- (3) im- (3)

mis- (1)

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A B C

Prefixes (continued)

B Fill in the missing adjectives in the following sentences. (They are all to be found in Activity A) To help you, the start of the words are given for sentences 1-10. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 If you are unable to read or write, you are il______. The accident couldn’t be helped. It was un___________. What an un_________ chair! I’d hate to sit on this for too long! Sorry, that answer is in________. Please try again. It was very dis__________ of him to keep the money. The present government is very un_________ at the moment. In a recent poll, only 15% of the population think they are doing a good job. My visits to church are very ir_________ – just once or twice a year, maybe. Since he was a non-______________ he didn’t have to pay income tax. The boxer was knocked un___________________ . It was very in__________ of you not to phone me to say you would be late coming home for dinner. My uncle lost his job just before Christmas, and has been _____________ ever since. It is ___________________ in Britain to buy alcohol at a pub if you are under eighteen. Generally speaking, boys at the age of thirteen are more ___________ than girls of the same age. You don’t need to meet me at the airport – it’s quite ___________________. They say it is _____________ to sneeze and keep your eyes open at the same time. It was very ________ of your sister to let the children play with matches. That’s not what I meant. I’ve been _____________ again! They didn’t believe in fighting. They preferred to solve problems using ____________ means. Our country has been ___________ since 1965. That’s when the French left. They told her she was too ____________ for the job. They needed someone who had taught for at least two years.

C Fill in the gaps using your own words. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 It was very inconsiderate of him to ______________________. ___________________ is unavoidable. People who are unemployed should ______________________. In my country it is illegal to ______________________. I get very impatient when ______________________. One of the most unpopular people in my country is ______________________. He/she is unpopular because ______________________. It is impossible to ______________________. I was once very dissatisfied with ______________________. An example of immature behaviour is ______________________. Of all the things ever invented, ______________________ must be the most unnecessary one.

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