P. 1
Studio Man Ray: Photographs by Ira Nowinski (2007) Exhibition Panels, Images and Labels

Studio Man Ray: Photographs by Ira Nowinski (2007) Exhibition Panels, Images and Labels

|Views: 511|Likes:
Published by magnesmuseum
For more information, please visit the Magnes website:
http://www.magnes.org/visitors/exhibitions-programs/exhibitions/studio-man-ray-photographs-ira-nowinski
For more information, please visit the Magnes website:
http://www.magnes.org/visitors/exhibitions-programs/exhibitions/studio-man-ray-photographs-ira-nowinski

More info:

Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: magnesmuseum on Feb 09, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/31/2014

pdf

text

original

koshland gallery

March 5, 2007 – August 5, 2007

STUDIO MAN R AY
Photographs by Ira Nowinski

STUDIO MAN RAY
Photographs by Ira Nowinski
The studio on rue Férou (6th District) in Paris was also the home that Man Ray (1890-1976) shared with his wife Juliet for twenty-five years. The couple lived and worked there in the converted garage from 1951 to 1976, until the artist’s death. Juliet preserved the studio as homage to her late husband. Only select people were allowed into the studio on rue Férou, which was kept under three locks. In the series of photographs, taken in 1983 and 1985 San Francisco photographer Ira Nowinski captured the complex web of work, art, and life created by Man Ray and preserved by Juliet. The extreme close-up, the tight frames, the narrow angles, and the lyrical pans of Nowinski’s photographs emphasize the meaningful relationship of art objects, documents, and personal mementos in the studio. In 1989 a flood severely damaged the building. Juliet died in 1991, and in 1995 the studio’s contents were auctioned at Sotheby’s in London. The project is a unique document of Man Ray’s studio, which was published as a book by Nazraeli Press in 2006 as The Studio of Man Ray and is now exhibited for the first time. Alla Efimova Chief Curator My first visit to the studio in 1983 set the stage for subsequent visits. Upon entering, I picked up an ashtray containing two cigarette butts. Juliet politely told me to put it down exactly where I had found it. I was then informed that these cigarette butts were from the last visit to the studio by Marcel Duchamp. Then I knew where I was, or where I could be. Man’s presence was everywhere—looking over my shoulder, behind a mirror—and every time I returned I found that some of the objects had mysteriously re-arranged themselves, creating new possibilities and new layers to be discovered.
Ira Nowinski An excerpt from The Studio of Man Ray (Nazraeli Press, 2006).
Studio Man Ray has been made possible through a grant from The Reva and David Logan Foundation, along with generous support and loans from Michael Dawson Gallery, Paige Gallery, and Connie and Stephen Wirtz.

JUDAH L. MAGNES MUSEUM 2911 Russell Street Berkeley, CA 94705 510.549.6950 Fax 510.849.3673 www.magnes.org

March 5, 2007–August 5, 2007

Studio Man Ray Photographs by Ira Nowinski

Man Ray was born Emmanuel Radnitzky in Philadelphia and raised in Brooklyn. In 1911, the Radnitzky family changed their surname to Ray in reaction to the ethnic discrimination and anti-Semitism. In 1921 Man Ray moved to Paris where he made his living as a professional fashion and portrait photographer while radicalizing the use of photography in the context of Dada and Surrealist movements. He became internationally famous as the photographer of Parisian artists between the wars. This exhibition will display San Francisco photographer Ira Nowinski’s documentation of Man Ray’s studio inside and out, preserving the Paris studio on film exactly as it had been during Man Ray’s final days. Several of Man Ray’s three-dimensional works will be on loan from Stephen Wirtz of the Stephen Wirtz Gallery in San Francisco. Partial list of objects in the exhibition

Ira Nowinski, Silver print, Le Violon d’Ingres, with variation of It’s Springtime and parts of various objects, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Various objects on Le Beau Temps wall, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Leather shadow, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

The Studio of Man Ray by Ira Nowinski at the Magnes Page 1 of 5

Ira Nowinski, Mezzanine table with lamp, pipes, antique iron, and Café Man Ray, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Back shelf wall near kitchen with matchbox picture, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Surrealist library, with hand made book by Brassaï, 1983, Gelatin silver print (2002). Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Eye, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Darkroom with negative boxes and box of Agfa portrait film, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Danger Haute Tension, hand painted sign on vestibule door, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP
The Studio of Man Ray by Ira Nowinski at the Magnes Page 2 of 5

Ira Nowinski, Couch with photo of Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Couch with Le Manche dans la Manche and various objects, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Bedroom with L’Observatoire and two paintings, one of Juliet, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Shelf wall with various objects and drawings, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Imaginary portrait of the Marquis de Sade, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

The Studio of Man Ray by Ira Nowinski at the Magnes Page 3 of 5

Ira Nowinski, Mezzanine with tax box, various nails, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Objects on shelf wall, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Books, Rome Prize, Hommage a Sade, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, View of studio from mezzanine, with parachute that covered main space, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, The painting Le Beau Temps, with photographs, objects, and lithograph of L’Observatoire, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Surrealist library detail, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

The Studio of Man Ray by Ira Nowinski at the Magnes Page 4 of 5

Ira Nowinski, Photograph of Juliet and Man Ray, Los Angeles circa 1940s. Chess board painting, 1983, Giclée print on canvas (2007) . Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

Ira Nowinski, Rue Férou façade, 1983, Gelatin silver print. Copyright 2007 Man Ray Trust/ADAGP

The Studio of Man Ray by Ira Nowinski at the Magnes Page 5 of 5

Ira Nowinski Le Violon d’Ingres with variation of It’s Springtime and parts of various objects 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige
Le Violon d’Ingres was a print after the original 1924 image. This is perhaps Man Ray’s most celebrated photograph, an image of Kiki of Montparnasse. The title is a multi-layered pun. The French expression “Violon d’Ingres” means “artistic hobby” and derives from Ingres’ enthusiasm for the violin. Man Ray has transformed Kiki into an Ingreslike odalisque and through a simple graphic device has simultaneously evoked the form of a violin.

Ira Nowinski Various objects on Le Beau Temps wall 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Leather shadow 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige
Leather Shadow is a limited edition object executed in 1971. The illusion of the wooden spoon’s shadow is physically achieved with a black-leather cutout.

Ira Nowinski Mezzanine table with lamp, pipes, antique iron, and Café Man Ray 1983 Giclée print on canvas (2007) Courtesy of Kenneth Paige
Café Man Ray is made after the original object (1948). While living in Hollywood, Man Ray met the young gallery owner William Copley, who promoted the work of Surrealists. Copley organized an exhibition of Man Ray’s works with a catalogue titled To Be Continued Unnoticed. Unnoticed The original object served as a doorknocker at the opening night of the exhibition on December 13, 1948.

Ira Nowinski Back shelf wall near kitchen with matchbox picture 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige
In 1964 Man Ray made a small number of matchboxes mounted with photographs of many of his well-known images. Some were used by the artist to store small items in his studio on rue Férou, others were offered as gifts to visitors to the studio when they asked for a light for their cigarette.

Ira Nowinski Surrealist library, with handmade book by Brassaï 1983 Gelatin silver print (2002) Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Darkroom with negative boxes and box of Agfa portrait film 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Danger Haute Tension, hand painted sign on vestibule door 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Couch with Henri Cartier-Bresson’s photograph of Marcel Duchamp and Man Ray 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Couch with Le Manche dans la Manche and various objects 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige
This object (1967) was made after the original (1921) consisting of a hammer inserted in a mil bottle. Le Manche dans la Manche is a play on words in French, literally meaning the handle in the sleeve, which has obvious sexual connotations.

Ira Nowinski Bedroom with L’Observatoire and two paintings, one of Juliet 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige
A l’heure de l’observatoire—les amoureux is a painting (circa 1935), formerly in the collection of William Copley, was sold at Sotheby’s in New York in 1979, establishing a record price for a work by Man Ray.

Ira Nowinski Shelf wall with various objects and drawings 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Bedroom with L’Observatoire and two paintings, one of Juliet 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Man Ray’s self-portrait 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Mezzanine with tack box, various nails 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Objects on shelf wall 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Michael Dawson Gallery

Ira Nowinski Books, Rome Prize, Hommage a Sade 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Michael Dawson Gallery
Hommage a Sade is a limited-edition object consisting of stained glass mounted in bronze. The present object, which was mounted by the artist in a standing frame, was placed in a prominent corner of the studio, where light was projected from behind.

Ira Nowinski Hand and mailbox 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Michael Dawson Gallery

Ira Nowinski View of studio from mezzanine, with parachute that covered main space 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Back wall with stairs to the mezzanine. Parachute attached to the mezzanine covers main studio. 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Michael Dawson Gallery

Ira Nowinski Juliet in heart-shaped glasses 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski The painting Le Beau Temps, with photographs, objects, and lithograph of L’Observatoire 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige
Man Ray painted Le Beau Temps in 1939, immediately before the outbreak of World War II. The Surrealist fascination with the world of dreams coincided with Man Ray’s own habit of keeping a sketchbook by his bed to record his ideas immediately before sleeping and on awakening. Le Beau Temps (“Fair Weather”) is a compilation of eight separate nightmares from which he had been suffering.

Ira Nowinski Rue Férou façade 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Surrealist library detail 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Michael Dawson Gallery

Man Ray Indicateur II 1969 Metal Courtesy of Stephen Wirtz Gallery
Indicateur II (1952) consists of two sheets of wood in the form of triangles joined together at right angles, suggesting the image of a geometric mask. Based on the original wooden object, this variant in metal was executed in an edition of twenty-five.

Lou Jacobs Jr. Portrait of Man Ray in his Los Angeles studio 1949 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of California State Library, Sacramento
Lou Jacobs, Jr. (b. 1921) grew up in Pittsburgh, PA and graduated from Carnegie Mellon University, with a major in industrial design. After serving during World War II, he moved to California where he studied photojournalism at the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles. He worked on a series of portraits of Southern California artists during 1949-50. Man Ray is photographed in his studio on Vine Street in Los Angeles, where he and Juliet Browner lived for ten years.

Lou Jacobs Jr. Man Ray’s studio, Hollywood, CA 1949 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Michael Dawson Gallery

Man Ray Le pain peint (Book with Blue Bread) Alexandre Iolas, 1972 Courtesy of Stephen Wirtz Gallery
Based on an actual baguette which Man Ray painted blue in 1958, titled Pain Peint—Blue Bread: Favorite Food for Blue Birds. In addition to the play on words in the title, Man Ray likened the French title Pain Peint to the sirens of a fire engine.

Man Ray I 50 Volti Di Juliet (The 50 Faces of Juliet) Milano, Gabriele Mazzotta, 1981 Courtesy of Ira Nowinski

Ira Nowinski Photograph of Juliet and Man Ray, Los Angeles circa 1940s in front of chess board painting 1983 Giclée print on canvas (2007) Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

Ira Nowinski Photograph of Indicateur II, 1969 [Indicateur in italics] 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Michael Dawson Gallery

Ira Nowinski Various objects, Leather shadow 1983 Gelatin silver print Courtesy of Kenneth Paige

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->