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Combat Support in Korea

Combat Support in Korea

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Published by Bob Andrepont

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Published by: Bob Andrepont on Feb 09, 2011
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Capt. Rudolph A. Fallon, 5th Cavalry

In October 1950, the 1st Battalion, 5th Cavalry (for which I
was communications officer), overran a North Korean signal dump. In it
we found about thirty miles of single-conductor (strand) wire. We
were particularly interested in this wire because obviously it was Ameri-
can-made W-110. We deduced this from the fact that it was the familiar
four-copper, three-steel strands. Though the twisted pair had been sepa-
rated and each strand individually rolled, the spiral marks where another
strand had gone around and around were still plainly visible. Each roll of
wire was wrapped in burlap and marked in what appeared to be Russian.
We were short of wire at this time, so we picked up the abandoned
rolls on DR-4s and -5s. We often used the captured wire by rolling out
two lines. However, ground return was used successfully by our artil-
lery liaison officer. In one instance north of Kunu-ri, we laid about four
hundred yards of single-strand wire along a railroad, using the rail for the
return.

12.Intrenching Tools

Lt.Col. Arnold C. Gilliam, Quartermaster, 2d Infantry Division

During the winter of 1950-51, intrenching tools were discarded
by combat units while they were actually engaged with the enemy. The

220

Combat Support in Korea

reason was that the ground was frozen and the tools could not be used.
The quartermaster of the 2d Infantry Division did not become
aware that these tools had been abandoned until the spring of 1951.
when the ground began to thaw. Commanders then wanted replacement
intrenching tools as rapidly as possible. But the number of replacement
requests on this item was too great for the depot at Pusan to fill. It was
necessary to airlift them from japan. Unfortunately, this used air space
vitally needed for gasoline and ammunition.

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