P. 1
jwaneng_udp

jwaneng_udp

|Views: 280|Likes:
Published by miguisbernal

More info:

Published by: miguisbernal on Feb 09, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/09/2011

pdf

text

original

REPUBLIC OF BOTSWANA

JWANENG URBAN DEVELOPMENT PLAN 2 : 2003 – 2009

Jwaneng

“Towards Realisation of Vision 2016: Sustainable and Diversified Development Through Competitiveness in Global Markets”

JWANENG CITY COUNCIL JWANENG URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE MINISTRY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT

FOREWORD
For the second time in Botswana‟s planning history, the Urban Development Plan 2 and NDP9 preparations have been done simultaneously with the same planning periods, resulting in better integration of the two documents. The Jwaneng Urban Development Plan 2 therefore outlines development strategies, policies, programmes and projects, which will guide Jwaneng for the next six years starting April 2003 to March 2009. Extensive consultations were made with the community and other stakeholders before the finalisation of this UDP2. It is therefore necessary to refer to this plan before any representations are made regarding introduction of new projects that may be generated as the plan goes through its implementation. Jwaneng Town Council will be relying strongly on public officers to ensure the successful implementation of this plan. We expect diligence and commitment from them in fulfilling their duty of implementing development proposals as outlined in the plan. Government is in turn urged to ensure that public officers are adequately provided with logistical and other resources necessary to implement the plan. We look forward to the next six years with confidence that the plan will be implemented successfully.

Councillor Christopher Ramolemana JWANENG TOWN COUNCIL MAYOR, FEBRUARY 2003

ii

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Foreword Table of Contents Appendices List of Tables List of Acronyms ii iii xi xi xiii

1

TOWN AND PEOPLE

1
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6

1.1 URBAN GEOGRAPHIC SETTING 1.1.1 Location and Size 1.2 1.2.1 1.2.2 1.2.3 1.3 1.3.1 1.3.2 1.3.3 1.3.4 1.3.5 1.4 1.4.1 1.4.2 1.4.3 1.4.4 1.4.5 1.4.6 1.4.7 1.4.8 INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENT Governance Coordination of plans Communications and Linkages TOWN ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES Climate Topography Geomorphology Hydrology Natural Resources TOWN SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT Culture Population characteristics Population Distribution & Density Settlement Pattern Migration Population Projections and Prospects Poverty and Poverty alleviation Employment and Unemployment

1.5 TOWN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 1.5.1 Major Economic Developments 1.5.2 Major Infrastructure Development 1.6 STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES

2
2.1 2.2 2.3 2.3.1 2.3.2 2.3.3 2.3.4 2.3.5 2.3.6

REVIEW OF THE UDP1 AND LONG TERM DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL 8
INTRODUCTION THE UDP1 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES WERE AS FOLLOWS: 8 8

ACHIEVEMENTS/OPPORTUNITIES OF THE URBAN DEVELOPMENT PLAN ONE 8 Social 8 Economic 9 Environmental 10 Climate Change 11 Operational and Performance Indicators 11 Monitoring and Evaluation Strategy 12 12 12 iii

2.4 CONSTRAINTS / CHALLENGES IN UDP 1 2.4.1 Social and Economic

3 4.4 PROPOSED ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES TO IMPLEMENT URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS 28 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 Issues and Strengths Performance Targets for UDP II Development Budget for UDP 2 Plan Monitoring Programme 28 28 29 29 30 5 5.5 LONG TERM POTENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS 2.2 4.4 3.2 Evaluation Of Policies And Programms Against Overall Goals And Objectives Of UDP II 23 4 4.1.6.2 3.1.4 4.1 5.2.5 UDP2 DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES PLANNING FRAMEWORK Alignment to Vision 2016 National Environmental Key Issues District Key Issues Strategic Plan For The Ministry Of Local Government Long Term District Plans UDP 2 OVERALL GOALS AND OBJECTIVES UDP II Development Goals UDP II Environmental Goals Specific Objectives In Relation To Overall Goals Framework For Monitoring Sector Goals And Objectives Framework For Monitoring Environmental Goals And Objectives 15 15 15 17 17 19 19 19 19 19 20 21 22 3.3 3.3.2.2.1.1 3.2.1 Development Potential 2.6.2.1 4.1 5.1 4.2 Development Constraints 2.3 5.2.1 3.3 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION INTRODUCTION Institutional framework Strategic Plans Environmental Conservation Consultation Priorities ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION National Policy on Natural Resources Conservation and Development Waste Management Act Environmental Impact Assessment Act (Draft) National Conservation Strategy UDP 2 ENVIRONMENTAL GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 24 24 24 24 25 25 25 25 26 26 26 27 27 4.4 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 4.3 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 22 3.2.1.6 4.3 3.1 3.2 3.5.1.1.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues With Overall Goals and Objectives of UDP II 22 3.2 3.6 LINKS TO NDP 9 THEME 14 14 14 14 3 3.3.1 4.2 4.3 4.1.2 4.4 3.1.6.2 5.2.5 3.1.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives 4.4.6.1.3 4.4 LAND USE PLANNING INTRODUCTION Institutional Framework Strategic Plan for the Ministry of Lands and Housing Consultation Priorities Alignment to Vision 2016 31 31 31 32 32 33 iv .2.1.5.2.1 4.5 4.1.2 4.

1 6.1 6.2 6.6 5.5.3 6.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes 5.2 5.3 6.1 7.2 7.4 SETTLEMENT AND HOUSING INTRODUCTION Institutional framework Strategic Plans Consultation Priorities NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION National Housing Policy Self Help Housing Agency (SHHA) Institutional Housing SETTLEMENT AND HOUSING Housing Demand Housing Supply General Infrastructure and Services SETTLEMENT AND HOUSING SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 40 40 40 40 40 41 41 41 42 42 42 43 43 43 44 44 44 6.2 6.2.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes 6.5.4 5.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 6.2 AGRICULTURE INTRODUCTION Institutional Framework Strategic Plans for Respective Ministries Agriculture Consultation Priorities NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 47 47 47 48 48 48 v .1 7.1.3 6.2 6.5 5.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives 6.2 5.2.6.1 6.6.3 LAND USE POLICIES AND LEGISLATION Town and Country Planning Act Building Control Act Physical Development Plans Tourism Policy Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) LAND USE PLANNING SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 33 33 33 34 34 34 34 35 35 35 5.7.2.1 6.3.4 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE SETTLEMENT AND HOUSING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 44 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP II Issues and Strengths Performance Targets for UDP II Development Budget for UDP 2 Plan Monitoring Programme 45 45 45 46 46 7 7.7 6.2 5.3 7.7.1.1.3 5.2 6.4 PROPOSED STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE LAND USE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR UDP 2 36 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP II Issues and Strengths Performance Targets for UDP II Development Budget for UDP II Plan Monitoring Program 37 37 37 38 38 6 6.2.4.1.5.6.3 5.3 6.1 5.3.2.1 5.1.3 6.7.2 6.3.6.1.7.2.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives 5.6 6.4.4 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 5.5 5.2.2.1 6.

3 7.3 TRADE.7.1 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programs 8.1 8.6.1.2 7.1 Development Expenditure and Performance Targets for UDP II 7.5 The National Licensing Act 55 8.1 Industrial Development Policy 55 8.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 7.2 Financial Assistance Policy (FAP) and Small. 1992 57 8.5.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes 7.1.3 8.1 Crop Production and Forestry Sub Sector 52 7.1. WILDLIFE AND TOURISM INTRODUCTION Strategic Plans for other Ministries Role of the Private Sector Consultation Priorities 54 54 54 54 54 8. 1986 56 8.2 Animal Health and Production Sub Sector 52 7.2 7.2.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 8.1 7.3 AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ACTIVITIES Crop Sub Sector Horticultural Sub Sector Livestock Sub Sector Cooperatives Sub Sector AGRICULTURAL SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Crop Production and Forestry Sub Sector Animal Health and Production Sub Sector Cooperatives Sub Sector 49 49 49 49 50 50 50 50 50 51 51 51 7.3 Cooperatives Sub Sector 52 7.3.2.4 Consumer Protection Act 55 8.8 Wildlife Conservation Policy.9 Wildlife Conservation and National Parks Act.2. Medium and Micro Enterprises Policy (SMME) 55 8.1 8.4 7.5.2.4.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 55 8.5.2 Plan Monitoring Program 53 53 53 8 8.1 7.6 Tourism Policy 56 8.2.2.10 Community Based Natural Resources Management (CBNRM) Policy 57 8.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 7. TOURISM AND WILDLIFE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 59 8.3 Citizen Entrepreneurship Development Agency (CEDA) 55 8.3.7.2 8.4 TRADE AND INDUSTRY Trade and Industry CEDA Tourism Wildlife and National Parks 57 57 57 58 58 TRADE.3 8.2 8.4.1 Evaluation Of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives 7. INDUSTRY.6. INDUSTRY.2.4.1 8. WILDLIFE AND TOURISM SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 58 59 59 8.3.3.2.4 7.3. INDUSTRY.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE TRADE.2.2.3.1 Mitigation measures 60 vi .4 8.7 Tourism Enterprise Licensing 56 8.6.3 7.7.3.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE THE AGRICULTURE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 52 7.3.6.

1.1.2 Evaluation of sector policies and programmes 9.1.1 Schools 9.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE EDUCATION AND TRAINING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 72 75 75 76 9.3.4.3.4.1 9.5.4 10.2 Strategic Plans for Respective Ministries 10.5 Public Health Act 10.4.1 9.3.2 9.3 Health Strategy and Plans 10.3 HEALTH 10.4 9.3 Role of the Private Sector 10.2 9.3 EDUCATION 9.1.7.1.4.2.1 Development Budget for UDP2 60 60 9 9.2 Hospital Services 10.1.2 Environmental Health Goals and Objectives .4 9.7.4.2 Training 9.7.1 National Policy on HIV/AIDS 10.2.4 Health Consultation Priorities 10.1 Revised National Policy on Education 9.5.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 8.3.5 Control Measures for Pandemic Diseases 10.1 Environmental Health 10.2.3 9.1 9.4.4 EDUCATION AND TRAINING INTRODUCTION Institutional Framework Strategic plans for respective ministries The role of the private sector Consultation Priorities 61 61 61 62 62 63 63 63 64 64 64 67 68 68 69 69 70 70 70 70 71 9.4.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 9.2.3 9.2.2.4 Waste Management Act 10.4 Primary Health 10.3.2.1 INTRODUCTION 10.1 Evaluation of environmental Key Issues with sector goals and objectives 9.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 10.1 Institutional Framework 10.1.1.5 EDUCATION AND TRAINING SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Secondary Education Vocational Education Non-formal Education Centre for Continuing Education (UB) BOCODOL 9.2 Policy on Tertiary Education 9.4 HEALTH SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 10.1 Development Budget and Performance Targets for UDP II 9.2 National Health Policy 10.3.8.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 9.1 Clinics Goals and Objectives 10.3 District Health Systems 10.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 9.3.2 Plan Monitoring 10 HEALTH 77 77 77 78 78 79 81 81 81 82 82 83 84 84 85 86 86 88 88 88 89 vii 10.

1 Issues and Strengths of the Health Sector 10.3.4 Plan Monitoring Programme 12 MINERALS.3 Sports and Recreation 11.1 Institutional Framework 11.1 Issues and Strengths 11.2 Performance Targets for UDP II 11.4 Information and Broadcasting 11.6 National Library Services 11.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 11.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 12.1 Youth and Culture 11. CULTURE AND SOCIAL SERVICE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 100 100 100 101 101 101 11.3.7.10.3.1.1 Institutional Framework 12.1.2. ENERGY AND WATER 102 102 102 104 104 104 105 105 105 105 106 viii 12.6.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE LABOUR.3.3 Water Sector .5.7 NGOs.3 LABOUR.1 Mineral Sector 12.1.4 Consultation priorities 12.3 Development Budget for UDP II 11.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 11.7.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 10.7.1 Evaluation Of Environmental Key Issues With Sector Goals and Objectives 10. CULTURE AND SOCIAL SERVICE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 99 99 99 99 11.1.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 11.6.1.3 The role of the Private Sector 12.5 Civil and National Registration 11.1 INTRODUCTION 12.5 Alignment to Vision 2016 12.2 Strategic Plan for the Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs 11. CULTURE AND SOCIAL SERVICES 11.1.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes 10.3 Consultation Priorities 11.2.3.2 Botswana National Youth Council (BNYC) 11.5.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 10.2 Potential Impacts of Proposed Projects 92 10.5.2 Evaluation of sector policies and programmes 11.2.1.7.2 Strategic Plans for various ministries 12.6.1 Evaluation of environmental key issues with sector goals and objectives 11.2 Energy Sector 12.3.4 LABOUR.3.7.1.3 Mitigation Measures 92 10.5. Community Based and Voluntary Organizations 11.1 Proposed Projects 91 10.7.2 Development Budget for UDP 2 10.6 90 90 90 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE THE HEALTH SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 91 10.3 Plan Monitoring Programme 93 93 93 94 11 LABOUR AND HOME AFFAIRS 95 95 95 95 95 95 96 96 97 97 97 98 98 98 11.7.1 INTRODUCTION 11.

2.3 WORKS. 13.4. 13. TRANSPORT COMMUNICATION GOALS AND OBJECTIVES.3.3. 13.1.3 Water Sector 12.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives 12.4 Postal Services 13.4 TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS GOALS AND OBJECTIVES.4.1 INTRODUCTION 13.1 Road Traffic Act 13. ENERGY AND OBJECTIVES 12.2.2.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIROMENTAL ASSESSMENT.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 12.7.2 National Road Safety Policy 13.2 Energy Sector Goals and Objectives 12.1 Assessment of Environmental Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives 13.3 Water Sector goals and objectives WATER SECTOR GOALS 106 106 107 107 AND 108 108 108 108 109 109 110 110 110 110 111 12.4 Department of Architectural and Building Services.3 Transport and Road Safety 13.4 MINERALS.3.3. 13.4 Roads Transport Permit Act 13. ENERGY AND WATER 12.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programms 13.1.3.5 Town and Country Planning Act 13.1 Institutional Framework 13.5. TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS 112 112 112 113 113 113 113 114 114 114 114 114 114 114 114 114 115 115 115 115 116 116 116 116 116 116 117 117 117 AND 118 118 118 ix 13.2 Strategic plans for respective ministries 13.4.2 Energy Sector 12.3.3 MINING. 13.1.2 Evaluation of sector policies and programmes 12.3 Alignment to Vision 2016 13.2 Roads 13.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION.5.5.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE WORKS.4 The role of the private sector 13.1 Mining Sector 12.1.1 Meteorological Services 13.5 Consultation Priorities 13.5 Department of Architecture and Building Services (DABS) 13.6 Central Transport Organisation (CTO) 13.1.3.1 Issues and Strengths 12.4.4.1 Mineral Sector Goals and Objective 12.3.5.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2.1 Meteorological Services 13.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 12.1 Development Budget .4.7.12.2 Roads 13.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 12. TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS.3 Telecommunications Policy 13.3.7.2.3.4.3 Transport and Road Safety 13.2 Development Budget 13 WORKS. 13.7 Telecommunications (BTC) 13. 13.2.

2.1.3 Customs And Exercise 129 14.2 Plan Monitoring and Review.5 Fire Services 14.6.2 Police 14.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE LAW JUSTICE AND SECURITY SECTOR.6.1 Institutional Framework 14.5.4 Consultation Priorities 14.6 Bye-Law Enforcement 14.1 INTRODUCTION 14.2 Botswana Police Service 128 14.4 LAW.3.1.7 Labour and Social Security 14.4.4.1 Customary Law and Courts 14.2.3.7 Fire Services 130 14.7 Immigration Act 14.5 1Trade and Liquor Act 14.3 LAW JUSTICE AND SECURITY 14. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 128 14.1 Bye-Law Enforcement Section 14.2.1 Immigration 128 14.4.7 Fire Services 14.2.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 14.2 Botswana Police Service 14.6 Road Traffic Act 14.2.2.2 Strategic Plans 14.6 Magistrate 14.1.3 Employment of Non Citizens Act 14.6.5.3.6.3.3.2.3 Immigration 14.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives 14.4 Botswana Police Act 14.4 Customs And Exercise 14.6.3.2 Plan Monitoring Programme 130 130 131 15 LOCAL GOVERNMENT 132 x .1 Immigration 14.9 Magistrate Act 14.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes 14.5 Labour and Social Security 14.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 14.2 Botswana Local Police Act 14.4 Botswana Local Police 14.2.4.6.3.1 Development Budget for UDP II 14.4 Botswana Local Police 129 14.3 Customs And Excise 14.5 Alignment to Vision 2016 14. JUSTICE AND SECURITY 120 120 120 120 121 122 122 122 122 122 123 123 123 123 123 123 124 124 124 124 124 125 125 126 126 126 126 126 127 127 127 127 127 127 127 128 14.7.6.13. JUSTICE AND SECURITY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 14.4.3 The role of the private sector 14. 118 14 LAW.4.2.6 Bye-Law Enforcement 129 14.1.1.7.7.8 Customs and Excise Act 14.5 Labour and Social Security 129 14.5 FRAME WORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 14.4.

1.2 Tribal Administration 15.2 17.1 Primary Education Facilities Successfully Put Up During UDP 1 (Up To March 2001) Table 2.2.1 INTRODUCTION 16.3 Town Council 15.3.2.2.4 15.3 17.6 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 15.1 National Disaster Management Plan 16.3.1 District Administration 15.1 Plan Monitoring Programme 16 CONTINGENCY PLANNING 145 145 145 145 146 146 146 146 147 147 16.1.2 The role of the Private Sector 16.3 District Administration 15.4 16.1 17.5 CONTINGENCY PLANS FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 17 17.2.4 PLAN MONITORING AND EVALUATION INTRODUCTION ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING ACTIVITIES FINANCIAL AND PERSONNEL CONSTRAINTS PROPOSED PLAN MONITORING ACTIVITIES DURING UDP2 148 148 148 148 149 APPENDICES APPENDIX A: URBAN DEVELOPMENT PLANNING MATRIX 150 LIST OF TABLES Table 1.3 The Consultation Process 15.1 Institutional Framework 15.3 LOCAL GOVERNMENT 15.1.1.1 Employment Statistics Table 2.5 LOCAL GOVERNMENT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 132 132 132 133 133 134 134 135 135 135 137 137 138 138 138 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE LOCAL GOVERNMENT SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 140 140 143 15.2 Tribal Administration 15.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 15.1 Disaster Relief Sector Priorities 16.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 16.2 Role of the Private Sector 15.1 INTRODUCTION 15.5 Alignment to Vision 2016 15.2.2 Primary Education Projects Currently Under Construction xi 5 9 9 .15.1.1 Urban Councils 15.4 Consultation Priorities 15.2 National Food Security Strategy 16.6.1.3.1.3 16.

1 Strategies to Achieve Settlement and Housing Goals and Objectives Table 6.3 FAP Funded Projects Table 2.Table 2.2 Environmental Conservation Performance Targets For UDP 2 Table 4.4 Table 9.2 Table 10.1 Table 8.1 Evaluation Of Policies And Programms Against Overall Goals And Objectives For UDP II Table 4. Wildlife and Tourism Sector Goals and Objectives Total Enrolment of Jwaneng Town Council‟s Primary Schools JC/BGCSE BOCODOL Enrolment Statistics 2001/2002 [Per Subject] .3 Table 9. Industry.3 Table 11.8 Table 7.11 Table 9.7 Table 9.1 Strategic Plans for Respective Ministries Table 7.9 Table 7.3 Animal Health and Production Sub Sector Goals and Objetives Table 7.2 Crop Production and Forestry Sub Sector Goals and Objectives Table 7.3 Land Use Planning Development Budget for UDP 2 Table 6. culture and social services sector goals and objectives Performance Targets for UDP II Development Budget for the Labour and Home Affairs Sector Jwaneng Mine Employment Forecast Strategic Plans For Various Ministries .1 Table 11.3 Environmental Conservation Development Budget For UDP 2 Table 5.1 Table 9.10 Table 9.3 Table 10.2 Table 9.2 Settlement and Housing Performance Targets Table 6.6 Animal Health and Production Sub-Sector Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Table 7.4 Table 12.1 Table 12.4 Table 11.1 Table 10.4 Training Activities Table 3.2 Objectives Cooperatives Sub-Sector Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Evaluation Of Sector Policies And Programmes Strategies To Achieve Crop Production And Forestry Sector Goals And Objectives Strategies to Achieve Animal Health and Production Sub Sector Goals and Objectives Strategies to Achieve Cooperatives Sub Sector Goals and Objectives Development Expenditure and Performance Targets for the Agriculture Sector Tourism Enterprises and Ownership Status Trade.11 Table 7.2 Table 11. Culture and Social Services Sector Goals and Objectives Strategies to achieve labour.5 Table 9.2 Land Use Planning Performance Targets for UDP II Table 5.4 Cooperatives Sub Sector Goals and Objectives Table 7.7 Table 7.5 Crop Production and Forestry Sub-Sector Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives 10 10 23 28 29 29 36 37 38 44 45 46 48 50 50 50 51 51 51 51 52 52 52 53 56 58 65 66 66 72 72 73 73 74 75 75 76 76 76 90 92 93 93 99 100 101 101 102 104 xii Table 7.12 Table 9.8 Table 9.13 Table 10.2 Table 9.Junior Certificate Subjects offered Strategies to Achieve Pre-Primary Education Sector Goals and Objectives Strategies to Achieve Primary Education Sector Goals and Objectives Strategies to Achieve Secondary Education Sector Goals and Objectives Strategies to Achieve Vocational Education Sector Goals and Objectives Strategies to Achieve Non Formal Education Sector Goals and Objectives Development Budget and Performance Targets for Pre-Primary Education Development Budget and Performance Targets for Primary Education Development Budget and Performance Targets for Secondary Education Development Budget and Performance Targets for Vocational Education Development Budget and Performance Targets for Non Formal Education Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Potential Impacts of Proposed Projects Issues and Strengths of the Health Sector Development Budget for UDP II Labour.12 Table 8.9 Table 9.6 Table 9.1 Town Environmental Action Program Table 4.10 Table 7.3 Development Expenditure for The Settlement and Housing Sector Table 7.1 Strategies to Achieve Land Use Planning Sector Goals and Objectives For UDP 2 Table 5.

Municipal Services Table 15.18 Performance Targets And Resource Requirements for UDP II Table 15.1 Resource Requirements for LG104 .4 Table 12.17 Strategies to Achieve Fire Services Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.4 Resource Requirements for LG 1105 . Table 14.10 Fire Services Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.7 Resource Requirements For LG 1112 . Transport and Communication Goals and Objectives Table 13.13 Strategies To Achieve Customs and Exercise Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.3 Table 12. Transport and Communications Sector Table 14.3 Topsoil Stripping During 2003 – 2007 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes Strategies to Achieve Sector Goals and Objectives Strategic Plans for Respective Ministries Assessment of Environmental Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Strategies to Achieve Works.2 People Entering and Leaving the Country in the Years 2001 and 2002 Table 14.15 Strategies To Achieve Labour and Social Security Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.Rural Administration Centres and Offices Table 15.8 Labour and Social Security Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.16 Strategies to Achieve Bye Law Enforcement Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.1 Table 13.8 Resource Requirements for LG 1114 – Urban Sewerage 106 109 110 110 113 117 118 118 124 125 125 126 126 127 127 127 127 127 128 128 129 129 129 129 130 130 140 140 141 141 141 142 142 142 LIST OF ACRONYMS NC AZT AHP AIDS ALDEP ALSP BEDIA BMC BNYC BOBS BOCODOL BOFWA Antenatal Care Zidovudine Animal Health And Production Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome Arable Lands Development Programme Accelerated Lands Servicing Programme Botswana Export Development And Investment Authority Botswana Meat Commission Botswana National Youth Council Botswana Bureau of Standards Botswana College of Distance Learning Botswana Family Welfare Association xiii .2 Table 13.7 Botswana Local Police Sector Goals And Objectives Table 14.11 Strategies To Achieve Immigration Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.Table 12.5 Resource Requirements for LG 1107 – Labour Intensive Public Works Table 15.3 Activities Carried out by the Jwaneng Immigration Office During the Years 2001 and 2002.4 Immigration Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.5 Table 12.2 Resource Requirements for LG 901 – Customary Courts Table 15.6 Table 13.9 Byelaw Enforcement Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.1 Reported Cases in Jwaneng Table 14.12 Strategies to Achieve Botswana Police Service Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.Recreational Facilities Table 15.6 Resource Requirements for LG 1109 – Community Projects Table 15.4 Development Expenditure for the Works.5 Botswana Police Service Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.6 Customs And Excise Sector Goals And Objectives Table 14.Local Authority Fleet Development Table 15.3 Resource Requirements for LG 1103 .14 Strategies to Achieve Botswana Local Police Sector Goals and Objectives Table 14.

BOTA BPC CAP CBD CEDA CHBC CHBCP CPF CVA DABS DAHP DCC DEMS DVET DWA DYC EIA EMS EU FAP GDP BGCSE HBCB HIV IFS IPT JC JTC Jtec LA LAC LEA LPP MFDP NAMPAADD NDMO NGO PACT PLWHA PMS PMTCT PNC SBPA SEA SHHA SMME TB TGLP UCCSA UDC UDP VCT VET WHO WUC Botswana Training Authority Botswana Power Corporation Chapter Central Business District Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency Community Home Based Care Community Home Based Care Programme Crop Production and Forestry Cerebra Vascular Accident Department of Architectural Buildings Services Department of Animal Health and Production Day Care Centres Department Electrical and Mechanical Services Department of Vocational Education and Training Department of Water Affairs District Youth Council Environmental Impact Assessment Environmental Management System Environmental Unit Financial Assistance Programme Gross Domestic Products Botswana General Certificate of Secondary Education Home Based Care Programme Human Immune Virus Integrated Field Services Isoniazed Preventive Therapy Junior Certificate Jwaneng Town Council Jwaneng Technical College Local Authority Livestock Advisory Centre Local Enterprise Agency Local Procurement Programme Ministry of Finance Development Planning National Master Plan for Arable Agricultural and Dairy Development National Disaster Management Office Non-Governmental Organization Peer Approach to Counselling by Teens People Living with HIV/AIDS Performance Management System Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission Post Natal Care Small Business Promotion Agency Strategic Environmental Assessment Self Help Housing Agency Small Medium and Micro Enterprises Tuberculosis Tribal Grazing Land Policy United Congregational Church of Southern Africa Urban Development Committee Urban Development Plan Voluntary Counselling and Testing Vocational Education Training World Health Organization Water Utilities Corporation xiv .

xv .

2. the State President. Trade and Industry.CHAPTER ONE 1 TOWN AND PEOPLE 1.3 TOWN ENVIRONMENTAL FEATURES 1. There is ungazzetted road. and joins the highway from Sekoma to Ghanzi commonly known as the Trans-Kgalagadi Highway. which runs northwards along the pipeline to the Magagarapa well fields connecting the central areas of Kweneng to Jwaneng. 1. The Town Council.1. along the main highway to Ghanzi. 1. consisting of the districts of Kgatleng. Jwaneng plays a role as a service centre for the villages along this road. The Sir Seretse Khama Highway passes through Jwaneng. Also represented are the Ministries of Agriculture. and its sub committees such as the Child Welfare Committee. 1.3 Communications and Linkages Jwaneng lies 80 km west of Kanye.1 Climate The annual rainfall is between 400 and 450 millimetres (mm).2 INSTITUTIONAL ARRANGEMENT 1.2. these being.2. The Mine and the hospital are represented at these meetings.3. Jwaneng planning area occupies approximately 340 square kilometres and it is the second smallest town in the country after Sowa Township. and the Multi-sectoral HIV/AIDS Committee. Kweneng. Jwaneng thus forms part of the Southeast settlement structure and contributes to the infrastructure of the region.2 Coordination of plans General coordination of departmental and local authorities‟ plans and activities is carried out via the Urban Development Committee.1 Location and Size Jwaneng is located almost in the middle of what is generally referred to as the Southeast Region. Ghanzi. Southern and Kweneng Districts. assisted by the Town Clerk.1 URBAN GEOGRAPHIC SETTING 1.1 Governance The Ministry of Local Government is represented by 3 local authorities. Jwaneng is located within the Southern District. Southeast and the towns of Lobatse and Gaborone. Labour and Home Affairs. Its position makes it the „gateway‟ to Kgalagadi. which is the sixth largest district in the country. on the other hand. the Town Council. Education. manages its business by use of the Full Council and its sub committees. 1. the Tribal and the District Administration. Rainfall is almost exclusively confined to a few weeks in the wet season (October – March) and on average the total of 1 . which are chaired by the District Officer. and the Administration of Justice.

3. eland. The mining company operates a Wildlife Park in the mine lease area. of significance. The park is currently home to species as diverse as ostrich. the wells are expected to last more than the lifetime of the mine. The sandveld is almost flat to gently undulating with vast low-lying areas in between higher areas.3. The only topographic feature. The average slope of the ground in the area where the town is located is roughly 1:500m. and with current consumption levels. blankets the Jwaneng area and various crates with bedrock found at a depth of 30 meters. 1. The soils in the sandveld are not suitable for cultivation. The Boreholes were drilled through a reliable Ecca Sandstone aquifer. reddish brown to strong brown sands with lamellae of clay accumulation which occur at about 80-100 cm depth.4 Hydrology Water in Jwaneng is extracted from wells located north of Jwaneng. which descends from the southeast towards northwest.3. The vegetation structure in Jwaneng ranges from grassland to tree savannah.3.3 Geomorphology Generally. gemsbok. giraffe. 1. The soils in low-lying areas are also very deep but textures are loamy sand with lamellae of clay accumulation occurring at shallower depths.about 450 mm is recorded during this period. Dongas are rare. The ground slopes down very gently from two sides towards the Naledi Valley. estimated to be 30 years. is a small hill of approximately 6 meters in height located close to Jwaneng. duiker.2 Topography It is only in these weeks that rainfall Jwaneng is situated at an altitude of 1 200 meters above sea level. The dominant soils in the higher areas are very deep. 1.3. approaches or exceeds evaporation.5.2 Vegetation Vegetation types are closely correlated with climate.5 Natural Resources 1. This area does not seem to be very much affected by erosion.5.3 Wildlife Wildlife is virtually non-existent in the town. steenbok & hyena 2 . The valley is considered to have been an ancient riverbed. which comprises of loose sands. impala.3.3. 1. kudu. The Ecca Sandstone aquifer is reliable. zebra. or are absent on even higher areas.5. The bedrock in Jwaneng comprises argillaceous sediments of the Transvaal Super Group within which diamondiferous kimberlites were intruded. 1. The underground water in this aquifer flows in a northwesterly direction. except for some few animals in the golf course area. springbok.1 Soils The soils in Jwaneng are of a sandveld type. hartebeests. 1. the superficial cover of the Kalahari semi-desert. unless they are man made ones. which is equal to 2 meters per kilometre.

The potable water used in the town is obtained from about 60 km north of the town. However.5 Water The types of soils found in Jwaneng have a poor drainage system.6 Minerals Jwaneng Town came into being as a result of the diamonds. 468 in 2010. rainwater is not used.3.3.e. and the crude birth rate of 28. which were discovered in the area. 3 . Jwaneng also has a significant number of expatriates who are mainly employed by the mining company and the Jwaneng Town Council.4 Energy Firewood is still the major source of energy in terms of cooking. The majority of Jwaneng residents are Setswana speaking. Other districts are represented as well though in small numbers. from an underground source.2 Population characteristics Population analysis facilitates the production of a realistic development plan. Rainfall is very erratic in this area.5. followed by the Central District. Mining of diamonds started in 1982 and the future lifespan of this mine is estimated to be 24 years (i. which is being mined in Jwaneng. Rainwater disappears within a short space of time without any meaningful usage. To appreciate the characteristics of the Jwaneng population.7%.5. in spite of the crude death rate of 12. Diamond is the only mineral. The census shows that the population of this town has increased from 11. comparisons will be made as well as deductions. firewood is found quite a distance from the town. Jwaneng Mine is the largest producer of diamonds in Botswana.4/1000. The 1995 Jwaneng baseline study revealed that the majority of people in the town originate from the Southern District.8/1000. from the population factors as presented by the 2001 Botswana census.1. showing an increase of 35. Generally. except for gardening purposes.179 (2001). It is therefore important to analyse the existing and future population characteristics. It is only institutions like schools with big water tanks.5. 1. distribution. The other source of energy is solar power for those who have the necessary equipment.1 Culture Jwaneng as an employment centre has attracted people of various ethnic backgrounds.4.188 (1991) to 15. Projections made by this census are that the population will have increased to 25.4. 1. which can hardly carry any water even after intense rainfall.2002 2026).3.4 TOWN SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT 1. 1. growth trends and density as all these have a strong bearing on the provision of services. which are able to make use of this rainwater. 1. However. after this period the mining operations will change from open cast to underground mining according to the mining company reports. particularly for low-income earners who reside within the Self Help Housing Agency (SHHA) areas.

The reasons for migration to Jwaneng include: Employment opportunities offered by the mining industry and related industries.681 households.5 Migration The population explosion that Jwaneng experienced during the last inter-censul period is partly attributed to a high net inflow of migrants. Botswana Housing Corporation. Likewise. However. In 1991 the household size was 3.4.179 is made up of 7. The development of social services in Jwaneng which renders the town more attractive as a place of residence. Therefore.4. and out of town. which predominantly have houses constructed for the Jwaneng Mine staff. However. Lack of or scarce employment opportunities in the surrounding villages. small projects and orphan-hood programs. Though. and so on. 1. domestic waste management. The prolonged drought and scarcity of water in the rural areas around Jwaneng.8 (1991) to 3. Environmental units 1. 4 .4. the development of Environmental Unit 8 and the Central Business District (North) are likely to attract more people who will move into the town. The settlement pattern is mixed as SHHA. the short and/or long term visits by migrants are bound to affect the services provided by all organizations present as some services provided may be perceived to be better. for purposes of acquisition of both commercial and/or residential plots and therefore settling in town.1 in 2001.613 males and 7. Debswana.1 (2001). These migrants are from all over the country and outside. such as schools. Due to being situated in the Southern district. 2 and 3 are almost all fully developed.7 Poverty and Poverty alleviation The Ministry of Local Government policies and programs are used to address issues pertaining to poverty. provision of potable water. the town will experience a constant movement in.1. 1. the population density increased from 112 in 1991 to 152 in 2001. 1. on the other hand the census depicts a drop of the household size. This will also cause a fluctuation of the number of people in town.566 females. the population distribution increased from 0. as it is depicted in the Jwaneng UDPII.8. Mine/Government employees are transferable. and these constitute a densely populated area as they make up a good percentage of SHHA houses. This implies that if the diamond mine was to close. electricity. at any given moment. who are distributed in 4. from 3.4 Settlement Pattern The town is divided into 7 Environmental Units.4.3 Population Distribution & Density The population of 15. while it would also require upgrading and expansion of some services such as the sewerage system. and others are located side by side.8 % in 1991 to 0. 1. clinics.6 Population Projections and Prospects Jwaneng owes its existence to the mine. though regularly replaced. which decreased tremendously to 3. These include destitution. This would therefore put an overall pressure on existing services.4. the town would experience a population decline.9 % in 2001.

A bus rank with market stalls and an amusement/learning park are planned to be constructed. a.1 Major Economic Developments The economic base of Jwaneng is dominated by mining activities and related construction work. There are major commercial activities taking place within the Central Business District (CBD). Secondary manufacturing industries have not yet emerged. Table 1. Jwaneng has potential for growing into a commercial and service centre because of the availability of serviced land. b.8 Employment and Unemployment Table 1. bars. Being located in a remote and sparsely populated area. bottle stores as well as hawkers and vendors. To create employment. Located within the CBD are commercial operations such as butcheries.1 shows the employment and unemployment statistics of the town as per the 2001 census. shops.4. The generally high purchasing power of the mine employees has promoted the development of a number of retail businesses as well as wholesalers. This is certainly of benefit to people in the surrounding areas. the Town Council is facilitating availability of 30 plots for commercial purposes.while programs by the Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs are used to provide technical advice to help the youth prepare for employment. The economic 5 . banks and other commercial establishments. The Ministry of Agriculture has programs toward poverty alleviation. The service sector however seems to have developed well.5. Only a few enterprises like brick moulding and panel beating are in operation. which indirectly benefit the town.5 TOWN ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 1. it is hoped. 1. will help generate incomes and reduce poverty.1 Employment Statistics Number 3475 151 44 6041 126 1400 1257 2558 48 71 3 5 15 179 Employment/Unemployment Not applicable Seasonal work paid Seasonal work unpaid Non seasonal work paid Non seasonal work unpaid Job seeker Home maker Student Retired Sick Other Unknown Total Source: Central Statistics Office 2001 1. These.

1.5. It promotes the movement of both goods and passenger traffic between settlements. (For example. 1. All streets within the township are tarred and lit apart from a small portion of access roads. as well as postal services is well provided. There are also culverts constructed along all the roads within the town to facilitate easy movement of storm water.1 Road Network A reliable and effective road network is important as it facilitates transportation linkages between towns and settlements. 1. This in turn.activities in the surrounding areas are concentrated more on traditional subsistence agriculture and to a certain extent on commercial cattle ranching.2.6 STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) is an environmental assessment applied at the strategic level of the planning hierarchy. The positive impacts of the highway on Jwaneng are being felt because of motorists who make a stopover in Jwaneng. The area set aside for sewerage ponds is not enough to cater for future expansion of the town.2 Major Infrastructure Development 1. The Jwaneng airfield is also opened for other air users. This tarmacked road forms part of the Trans-Kalahari Highway. There are also daily bus services between Kanye and Jwaneng as well as Jwaneng and the districts of Kgalagadi and Ghanzi. plans and programmes. This road links the southern and far western areas of the country to the more developed eastern corridor. which links Botswana to Namibia and South Africa.3 Storm Water Drainage There is a natural storm water drainage due to the sandy soil conditions. There are daily mine flights between Jwaneng and South Africa. that is. 6 . Other roads in the region are mainly gravel or sand tracks.2. for shopping etc. While the Jwaneng Mine has a tremendous economic impact nationally. the overall role of Jwaneng in the development of economic activities in the region seems to be restricted to being an employment centre for mining activities and a commercial centre for western Kweneng..2.5. 1. 1. to market centres. thus promoting business within the town. and movement of agricultural goods. Kgalagadi and Ghanzi Districts. The Sir Seretse Khama Highway passes through Jwaneng. Analysis of potential environmental consequences at this level performed concurrently and interactively with the planning process enables incorporation of environmental considerations into plans.5.4 Communications Jwaneng is well served by both road and air traffic.5. Ngwaketse. An additional fifteen hectares of land will be required to cater for the anticipated expansion of the sewerage ponds. livestock) etc.2. Almost all the streetlights are now monitored with the aid of a telemetric monitoring system. policies.2 Sewerage The sewerage ponds were expanded during NDP 7 to cater for Environmental units 6 and 7. Telecommunication. policies and programmes.5. facilitates the growth of settlements and towns.

The Strategic Environmental Assessment will examine the effect of overall goals and objectives and sector goals and objectives on policies and programmes. The intention of SEA focuses on strategic or priority issues and creates guidelines or terms of reference and criteria to address detailed issues later at planning stages. SEA examines the effect of development on environment and has potential to inform policy and plan making. 7 . thus promoting sustainable development and ensuring informed decision-making.

e. 2. p.3 ACHIEVEMENTS/OPPORTUNITIES DEVELOPMENT PLAN ONE OF THE URBAN In terms of the implementation of the Urban Development Plan One there have been a number of significant achievements.1 INTRODUCTION Preparations for the Jwaneng Urban Development Plan 1 (UDP 1) started in early 1996. g.3. Maintaining the current status of Jwaneng as the commercial centre and administrative headquarters for Ngwaketse West by: Providing an integrated office block for central government departments. To improve health standards and achieve the goals of Health for All by the year 2016. b. Introducing special incentive packages for entrepreneurs investing in Jwaneng. To establish Jwaneng as a residential centre through: Provision of social amenities. l. Timely delivery / allocation of serviced land to potential investors. m. h.2 THE UDP1 GOALS AND OBJECTIVES WERE AS FOLLOWS: Achieving Economic Diversification through: a. To implement the Revised National Policy on Education. UDP1 and NDP8. AND LONG TERM 2. d. j. To act as Trans-Kalahari highway route centre. Encouraging the development of all allocated plots within the CBD. o. n. f. 2.1 Social Achievements have been made in the provision of social amenities such as primary schools. Setting up of wholesalers. Encouraging people to construct permanent houses by provision of adequate residential plots Affordable prices for residential plots. k. children‟s parks and sporting facilities as well as the establishment of Mpule Kwelagobe‟s 8 . c. To act as tourist transit point to the Kalahari & Namibia. i. with the final document ready early 1997.CHAPTER TWO 2 REVIEW OF THE UDP1 DEVELOPMENT POTENTIAL 2. both with a six-year planning horizon were designed to run concurrently. The whole plan formulation process took almost a year to complete. especially those related to servicing the mine. Provision of adequate serviced land Encouraging the setting up of all types of manufacturing industries in Jwaneng.

Children‟s orphan home. Medium & Micro Enterprises (SMME) scheme by Central Government. be it commercial or industrial. Table 2.2 Economic The economic achievements are as follows: a. Part of the agreement is for the two sister towns to assist each other in the attraction of investors to the two towns. Economic Empowerment and Poverty Alleviation Programme benefits. This Office was responsible for administering the FAP in Jwaneng. this committee is charged with the responsibility of assisting genuine investors acquire land. The strategy is being developed with assistance from the City of Kimberly. attempts were made to develop a marketing strategy of the town. create more job opportunities and diversify the economy of Jwaneng away from diamond mining. e. FAP has been the main incentive programme used by Jwaneng town to stimulate investment. f. Revival of the State Land Allocation Committee in Jwaneng. Pursuant to the objective of economic diversification of the town. Amongst other things. 9 . Introduction of the Small. which was previously administered from Kanye.2 School Dinonyane Teemane Kgalagadi Jwana Total Primary Education Projects Currently Under Construction Resource Centre 1 1 2 Teachers quarters 6 6 6 6 24 C/rooms 2 4 6 Dining hall 1 1 Source: Education Department (JTC.1 depicts facilities that have been successfully put up.1 School Dinonyane Teemane Kgalagadi Total Primary Education Facilities Successfully Put Up During UDP 1 (Up To March 2001) C/rooms 2 2 2 6 Science rooms 1 1 1 3 Dining hall 1 1 1 3 Kitchen 1 1 1 3 School bus 1 Source: Education Department (JTC. 2001) Table 2. The establishment of the Integrated Field Services Offices in Jwaneng.3. Although some achievements were made there is still a backlog of education facilities. 126 female participants graduated from training and 16 of them got engaged in the FAP funded sewing projects. c. 2001) 2. b. The aim of the strategy is to lure investors to Jwaneng. From 1998 until 2001. Table 2. The establishment of a twinning program with the City of Kimberly in South Africa. d.

Self-allocation of land either for residential or for commercial purposes. 2. The topsoil has been removed in some areas. save for the landfill project that had a full EIA. On the other hand. Of beneficiaries 6 4 6 20 36 Approved 6 4 6 4 20 Source: Social & Community Development (JTC) -2002 2. overgrown vegetation.3 Environmental The key environmental issues facing the town during UDP1 included the following: 2. 10 .3. Of projects applied 6 4 6 20 36 Type of projects Sewing Sewing Sewing Sewing 4 No. commercial and industrial plots.1 Land Pressure Scarcity of serviced land contributed to developments in non-serviced areas. 2001 Table 2.3. to mention but a few. arose from this undeveloped land.3. specifically Environmental Unit 8 where a new fire station has been built.3 shows the FAP funded projects approved and employment created since the office became operational in Jwaneng 2000.3 Sector/Type Sewing & Knitting Brick moulding Printing Welding Meat processing Carpentry Total FAP Funded Projects Approved 16 4 2 2 1 1 26 Currently Operating 9 4 0 0 0 0 13 Number of the People Employed 21 24 0 0 0 0 45 Source: IFS Office -Jwaneng. Extraction of sand in the outskirts of the town by the construction industry has as a result generated considerable concern.2 Extraction/Excavation of Mineral Resources Construction projects in Jwaneng were approved without any Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) studies undertaken. totally displacing the native flora and fauna. Table 2.3. some serviced and allocated land in the town remained undeveloped. Some residents took advantage and used the burrow pits as dumping pits.4 Year 1998-1999 1999-2000 2000-2001 2001-2002 Total Training Activities No. pest infestation. by way of squatting was also a major problem in the town. This includes residential.Table 2. Some large open burrow pits were abandoned without any rehabilitation measures put in place.3. Environmental nuisances such as litter. squatting.

thus they are highly likely to limit species biodiversity and unbalancing the ecosystem in and around Jwaneng.2.3. which will be implemented during NDP9.3. 2.3 Pollution and Waste Management Overflowing sewage remained a common phenomenon in the town.3. An environmental impact assessment of the whole vegetation control strategy is ideal.4 Biodiversity Bushfires destroy flora and fauna. It would also be ideal to provide public toilets for designated public markets at respective environmental units in the next plan period. The increase in temperatures have been predicted and actually observed over the years and Jwaneng is no exception to this phenomenon. Although the Environmental Health Department continues to provide pest control services to the community. Although a block of public convenience facilities was built at the industrial site. Informal activities such as the mushrooming of street vendors. In Jwaneng. hawkers and shebeens are not adequately regulated. vegetation control by way of cutting trees may be conflicting with a national biodiversity strategy and action plan. Since the landfill started operating in 11 . Poor management of garden waste is still a topical issue in Jwaneng. and 4. 2. Bush fires and rubbish burning within the township caused localised air pollution. exposing the inhabitants to respiratory tract health problems. These include: The construction of the landfill that has significantly improved waste management services in the town. The indiscriminate disposal of used oil was also observed to be a potential environmental threat as it could contaminate groundwater resources or render valuable land derelict. some need for more public toilets was felt in some areas of the town.3. Noise pollution from such areas is also on the increase.4 Climate Change Climate change is a global concern.5 Operational and Performance Indicators Some planned projects and programmes for environmental management were undertaken during UDP 1. it is probable that de-bushing could be having a negative impact on the habitat of the native species. The likely consequence could be desertification if some species fail to recover at all. there is no inventory or programme in place to monitor the use of ozone depleting substances in the town. Although undocumented. The proliferation of some pest species has been observed in the town and it is most likely that climate change has an important role to play in their breeding rate. some investigations into the actual reasons for invasive species in the town could help in control measures. resulting in littering and indiscriminate excreta disposal in some areas of the town.3. more especially at Environmental units 1. 2. This is especially true for the cemetery where there are no toilets at all. 2.3. Currently.

Waste management and sanitation services are now regulated in the Waste Management Act 1998 and are the mandate of the Department of Sanitation and Waste Management. Such development has improved the general appearance of the town and also reduced public complaints on the danger of bushy neighbourhoods. The Jwaneng Town Council is also in the process of identifying more suitable sites where sand and gravel could be sourced. The objective here is to prevent any further environmental degradation caused by extraction of these materials. A consultancy was engaged to investigate the problems of sewage overflow in the town. The town noticed more plot development following the increase of the SHHA loan from P6000.00 to P20 000. Plans to implement the provisions of the Act in Jwaneng are underway. The absence of plots has hampered the implementation of community projects as well. The failures have been summarised as follows: 2.4.4 CONSTRAINTS / CHALLENGES IN UDP 1 2. As a result there has been a mushrooming of squatters all over the town. Monthly progress reports for all projects were presented to the Finance and General Purposes Committee of the Council. who otherwise would have invested in Jwaneng. had serviced land been availed. Environmental impacts of such mining will be taken into consideration and appropriate licensing procedures will be put into place. failures have also been recorded. 2.December 2002.6 Monitoring and Evaluation Strategy Quarterly project reviews were undertaken together with the Ministry of Local Government to review the progress and reprioritize the plans where necessary. Rehabilitation of the old landfill and some burrow pits has also improved the image of the town.1. indiscriminate dumping of waste. The town has also lost potential investors.1 Delay in allocation of serviced land The delay in the allocation of serviced land (be it residential.3. Construction of the public convenience facilities at industrial site will improve access to excreta disposal facilities and reduce the incidence of diarrhoeal diseases. This plan will spill over to UDP2 and it will be undertaken under recurrent budget. commercial & industrial) has been one of the constraints during UDP1. Plans are underway to evict the squatters.1 Social and Economic Though giant strides have been made in achieving the broad goals & objectives. 2. The results provided information of mitigation measures and more specifically the upgrading and/or overhauling of the whole sewerage system including the pump stations and sewage ponds all of which are to be implemented in the next plan period. The Department of Sanitation and Waste Management conducted waste audits on the operation of the landfill and the registration and licensing of waste carriers and waste management facilities.4. They have been addressed and some have already moved to their respective places of origin. It is hoped that this will reduce the land pressure experienced during UDP1. 12 .00 in 2000. The squatting problem is currently being handled by the Department of Lands together with the Attorney General‟s Chambers. more especially garden waste has greatly declined thus enhancing the cleanliness of the town. Environmental Units 8 and 9 are planned to be serviced during UDP2.

2.1. The shortage of residential and civic & community plots has resulted to the mushrooming of squatter settlements in the town. In fact only 3 out of 29 churches have been allocated plots ever since the programme was introduced in Jwaneng in 1990. before any allocation can be effected. Currently the waiting list is 1935 and it continues to increase. Lack of political will to repossess plots has also contributed to the high rate of undeveloped plots.undeveloped residential. the Jwaneng Town Council has not managed to meet the demand for SHHA plots during the Planning period under review as evidenced by the increase in the SHHA waiting list from 799 during 1996/97 to 974 during the 1998/99 and the mushrooming of squatters at the town‟s industrial area. There exist many allocated. poor performance of contractors (both citizen owned and expatriates) and inadequate funding from the Ministry of Local Government. If the Department of Lands repossessed all the allocated land within the stipulated four-year period. Potential entrepreneurs still have to wait for up to five or more years before they can be allocated plots. only 21% of the planned projects had been implemented. Repossession of plots for reallocation has also not been possible as the political wing of the council is not in favour of such action. The failure to meet the target was attributed to the low implementation capacity of the Jwaneng Town Council. commercial & industrial plots all over the town. service levy & SHHA loan arrears.3 Backlog of planned primary education projects There is a backlog of planned projects under primary education.The Accelerated Land Servicing Programme (ALSP) has not been able to meet the overall demand for residential. processed FAP applications & monitored approved projects. Regarding the SHHA scheme. Failure by the Department of Lands to enforce the 4-year development period has also exacerbated problems of shortage of serviced land. This problem is also attributed to the almost impossible task of distinguishing between genuine land developers and land grabbers/speculators. industrial or civic and community plots. commercial.4. the absence of an Adult Basic Education and Training Policy greatly hampered the efficient implementation of the programme. The condition of service for the literacy group leaders has proved to be a major constraint for the department because it made it practically impossible to retain them in the literacy programme.4. The other problem 13 . some date back as far as 1991.2 Collapse of FAP projects Most FAP projects have collapsed because of poor monitoring due to a shortage of staff. Currently there are about 26 churches without plots. 2. Up to March 2001. Currently it is estimated that there are 1426 squatters in Jwaneng.1.1.4. Quite a significant number of SHHA plots remain undeveloped many years after they have been allocated.4 Absence of adult basic education and training policy Under Non-Formal Education. Technical advice and support from IFS was not always readily available because the same staff attended to clients. despite having submitted their applications to the Department of Lands many years ago. Some projects which collapsed could have been saved had the necessary support from the IFS office been rendered. such action would encourage those just allocated to develop before the stipulated fouryear period elapsed. which the Department is supposed to do. 2.

2.5. This is certainly of benefit to communities in the surrounding villages that do their shopping in Jwaneng. Most tourism activities are concentrated in the north where interest is on the unique flora and fauna and the Okavango swamps.1 Development Potential Jwaneng has potential for growing into a major commercial and service centre. In addition. which is estimated to be about 6 000. 2. 14 .5. but a few considered paramount are as follows: a. Secondary manufacturing industries are beginning to emerge. The service centre seems to have developed well. d.5 LONG TERM POTENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS 2. tourism is one of the fastest growing industries in the country and the third largest revenue earner of government after diamonds and customs. The generally high purchasing power of the mine employees has promoted the development of a number of retail businesses as well as wholesalers. due mainly to the uncertainty of the world diamond market. The high prices paid for serviced land The high construction costs The small working population. However. Jwaneng serves mainly as a transit route to these places. which needs to be fully exploited if the region is to be a major tourist destination.2 Development Constraints There are many factors contributing to the slow pace of industrial and commercial development in the town. Without doubt. a potential exists in Jwaneng. Business tourists who use the Trans-Kgalagadi road could be attracted to existing facilities such as the Game Park. Mining activities and related construction work dominate the economic base of Jwaneng. 2. A lot of effort needs to be put in educating the public about the vision. banks and other commercial establishments. b. c. most of the people at the grass root level know little about Vision 2016. monument and the recycled sewerage water could be used to make attractive sites for recreation such as the planned Amusement Park. is in line with the vision as it shows the need to diversify the economy of Jwaneng from diamond mining to other industries.6 LINKS TO NDP 9 THEME Even though the theme for NDP9 is “Towards Realisation of Vision 2016: Sustainable and Diversified Development through Competitiveness in Global Markets”. including tourism. The possible long-term economic insecurity of the mine. For example enterprises like brick moulding and panel beating are now in operation and with the necessary support these could grow into well-established industries.that crippled the operation of the department in Jwaneng is the absence of suitable office accommodation. the Jwaneng Town Council is still looking into the possibility of establishing an Information Centre to sufficiently market the town. The plan however.

CHAPTER THREE
3 UDP2 DEVELOPMENT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES
3.1 PLANNING FRAMEWORK
The planning process in Botswana is aimed at maximising benefits derived from the limited financial resources available to government by prioritising policies, programmes and projects. In recognition of the links between district and national planning, the Jwaneng Urban Development 2 outlines development strategies, programmes and projects that will guide Jwaneng for the next six years. This is essential for bottom-up planning as development is a process of increasing people‟s capacity to determine their future. 3.1.1 Alignment to Vision 2016 The project proposals during UDP2/NDP9 planning period are as identified by people locally. The proposed projects are in line with Vision 2016. The theme for NDP 9/UDP2 is “Towards Realisation of Vision 2016: Sustainable and Diversified Development Competitiveness in Global Markets”. For the vision therefore to be realized, strategies must be put in place to increase production, impart skills to the local people and all to be committed to the vision. The plan will be encompassing the vision in the following manner: 3.1.1.1 An Educated & Informed Nation This plan does not only focus on the classroom situation for white-collar job training, but also combines with blue-collar training. This is clearly indicated by the existence/operation of the Jwaneng Technical College. There are both pre-schools, primary and Community Junior Secondary Schools in the town. The examination performance of these schools is graded well in the sense that Kgosimpe CJSS was top of the performance at a national level. The Councils therefore plans to take on board the other schools to yield good results through provision of adequate school facilities. The council is intending to clear the UDP 1 backlog on provision of education facilities. The township has no library facility denying both the children and adult learners the opportunity to supplement the information they get from schools... 3.1.1.2 A Prosperous, Productive and Innovative Nation Generally public performance in the township is poor. Different sectors have seriously put in place the PMS and WITS interventions to address the productivity issue. Programs like CEDA and FAP encourage people to venture into different types of businesses, thus diversification of the economy will be achieved. The plan envisages that by the end of the plan period at least a number of local residents will have started business projects through these programs. The Council is also trying to make provision of serviced land, both for residential and commercial, the idea being to avail land for business people, which will then address the problem of unemployment.

15

3.1.1.3 A Compassionate, Just and Caring Nation This will be achieved through implementation of policies by departments such as those of the S & CD for the poor. The Mine Hospital and the two Jwaneng Town Council clinics provide preventive and curative services. One council clinic is planned for this planning period to improve access to health services. Areas in the periphery enjoy health services from the township even though they are serviced by the Kanye/Moshupa (Southern District) catchment area sub-district. In combating the spread of HIV/AIDS the district offers Voluntary Testing and Counselling Centre services through Tebelopele Testing & Counseling Centre. The council clinics are also offering the same. The Mine hospital administers the ARVs. A Home Based Care group is already in existence to care for the sick at their places of abode. The Masedi Project and other organizations support orphans and the sick with garden produce. The project encourages abstinence from sex to the school going children. The project is still at the teething stage but hopes to improve its services throughout the planning period. 3.1.1.4 A safe and secure nation Services of Central and Local Police for combating crime locally include reduction of crime through organisations (Crime Prevention Groups). The Department of Women Affairs is to liaise with the UDC for Gender and Development issues to reduce violence against women and children. The Immigration department is to repatriate illegal immigrants in the township. Road Safety – The Office of the Road, Transport & Safety is to impart information on the road safety to the Jwaneng community. Disaster Preparedness measures have been put in place through the Disaster Management Office though the climatic conditions is semi-arid Administration of Justice - wrong doers will be handled properly which promote a sense of security. 3.1.1.5 An Open, Democratic and Accountable Nation The IEC ensures public education as a way of addressing poor attendance of political fora. IEC has embarked on public campaigns educating the community on their political rights. Such campaigns are normally conducted through Kgotla meetings. 3.1.1.6 A Moral and Tolerant Nation and a United and Proud Nation This plan envisages a proud community for Jwaneng residents in the sense that there exists an abstinence group called Masedi Abstinence Group, which encourages the school going children to abstain from sex before marriage. There are also consultations with religious groups to promote moral ethnics among the community members. Pastors involved in the fight against HIV/AIDS through the District Multi Sectoral Aids Committee are spearheading the programme.

16

3.1.2 National Environmental Key Issues The Environmental Keynote Paper of 2002 came as a result of concerns over equity between and within generations and the need to use natural resources efficiently, fairly and sustainably. The national issues are as outlined below: 3.1.2.1 Land Pressure on land and its scarcity are leading towards conflict arising from inequitable land distribution, competing livestock, arable and wildlife uses, speculative land acquisition, self allocation, non development, increasing land disputes and dual grazing rights. These have led to pressure on land, its scarcity and degradation. 3.1.2.2 Natural Resource Utilisation Trends in wildlife population indicate stability or a decline in species with the exception of protected species like elephants. Problem animals cause damage to natural resources and community based natural resource management activities have expanded rapidly and contribute significantly to rural incomes. 3.1.2.3 Water scarcity Water consumption trends indicate increases, which make water to become a scarce resource. Various water sources like boreholes and wells are drying up and underground water resources (both known and unknown) are getting polluted. These points to the need for an integrated water resources management programme. 3.1.2.4 Pollution and waste management Localised air pollution occurs around mine operations, industrial areas, waste and mine dumps. Veld fires and rubbish burning also increases air pollution and noise pollution is also becoming an issue in urban areas. Land and soil pollution also takes place through littering and unmonitored industrial practices. 3.1.2.5 Energy Land degradation and indiscriminate cutting of live trees remains a serious concern for firewood usage as a source of energy. Solar energy has great potential but it is not fully utilised. The national electricity grid is also expanding and more electricity is imported regionally. 3.1.3 District Key Issues 3.1.3.1 HIV/AIDS Like the rest of the country, there is a very high prevalence of HIV/AIDS in the township attributed to a number of factors some of which are unemployment, alcohol abuse, rape, defilement and incest. The estimated infection rate of HIV/AIDS in the township is 34 %. 3.1.3.2 Waste disposal and littering Littering and illegal waste dumping are common in Jwaneng. There has been an increase in waste production over the years as a result of increase in population and business activities in the township. This has resulted in indiscriminate waste disposal in some parts of the township. Poor garden waste disposal and collection still remains problematic and this poses problems for environmental pollution and harm to human and animal life. 17

The offices are hence scattered and this makes accessibility by the public very difficult.1. for example.1. This has resulted in indiscriminate extraction of sand and gravel within the planning area and ultimately the mushrooming of burrow pits.3.8 Increased demand for serviced land There has been an increased demand for serviced land in the township and this is evidenced by the number of applications for residential. 18 . especially on foot. where people have to walk long distances from one office to the other. central government departments have had a serious shortage of office accommodation.3. There is plenty of wildlife in and around the planning area. However. commercial and industrial plots.1. people continue to migrate into the town in search of job opportunities and as such end up squatting mainly because there is a serious shortage of residential plots and higher residential rentals. people choose to hang around the township without anywhere to stay resulting in squatting within the township. This has resulted in a serious shortage of residential plots. 3.1. upon not finding employment. which has hit the whole country.3. Most central government offices operate from rented residential.4 Unemployment Like in the rest of the country.3.3. 3. Squatting has resulted in overcrowding in the squatter areas. 3.10 Shortage of office accommodation for Central Government Departments For a long time. 3.1. there is a very high unemployment rate in the township mainly brought about by people migrating into town in search of employment opportunities.3 Resource use Deforestation is occurring as a result of cutting of some live trees for firewood and a prevalence of veld fires in and around the planning area.3.5 Squatting and Overcrowding Being a mining town. 3. there is currently a backlog of at least 7 000 residential plots in the township and there are currently 2100 residential plots in units 8 and 9.1. which have however not been serviced yet. which the community could benefit from as a way of diversifying the economy of the town 3. which are also very scarce.1. commercial and industrial premises.3.7 Veld fires There have been a lot of veld fires in and around the planning area especially over the past two years because of dry seasons resulting from the drought.1.3.3.6 Mushrooming of borrow pits Jwaneng is a fast developing town characterised by a construction boom in most parts of the town. 3.9 Shortage of teachers‟ quarters From the consultations the major outcry was with regards to the shortage of accommodation for teachers.

customer focused centre of excellence in social service delivery. 19 .2 Jwaneng Development Plan The Jwaneng Development Plan will be a 24-year plan prepared in this plan period (UDP II) to provide a statutory document that will guide and shape the future growth of Jwaneng Planning Area. where goals and objectives of these local authorities will be aligned to the Ministry‟s goals and objectives and ultimately to Vision 2016.5 Long Term District Plans 3. To provide social safety nets for the vulnerable and under privileged members of the community. Southern. 3.2.1 UDP II Development Goals Most of the goals of the UDP1 are still relevant for UDP 2 because some of the set goals have not been fully achieved. Consultants have been engaged by the Department of Town and Regional Planning to prepare the plan.1. equitable local participation in tourism projects and development of tourism awareness through the town. Lobatse. 3. development coordination and capacity building as well as maintaining a transparent culture in keeping with the ideals of vision 2016.3.1 South Eastern Region Master Plan The South Eastern Region Master Plan comprises of the urban districts of Gaborone.2.5.4 Strategic Plan For The Ministry Of Local Government Being one of the stakeholders in the implementation of Vision 2016. Jwaneng and the rural districts of Kweneng. 3. Tribal Administration and District Administration. To maintain the current status of Jwaneng as a commercial centre To enhance the status of Jwaneng as the transit point to the Kalahari and Namibia. 2003 – 2027. The Ministry of Local Government‟s implementation of Vision 2016 will be realised through local authorities in the township namely the Jwaneng Town Council.1. These are To diversify the economy of the Town To monitor and implement the Revised National Policy on Education. 3. the Ministry of Local Government is committed to a competitive.2 UDP 2 OVERALL GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 3. To create employment opportunities through tourism activities. The goal of the South Eastern Region Master Plan is to promote economic growth and maintain sustainable development in the region over a 24-year planning period. Kgatleng and South East. To provide an interface between the central government and the local people. The preparation of the plan is still on going and has not been finalised.1.1.5.2 UDP II Environmental Goals To foster environmentally friendly practises through the implementation and enforcement of relevant environmental policies and legislation. To improve health and safety standards. To establish Jwaneng as a residential centre.

To monitor and implement the Revised National Policy on Education through: Provision of adequate facilities in all primary schools Increasing the absorption capacity of the Jwaneng Technical College Intensification of the literacy programme Encouraging the establishment of day care centres. truck driver‟s accommodation & truck servicing. To maintain the current status of Jwaneng as the commercial centre through: Provision of an integrated office block for central government departments Encouraging the development of all allocated plots within the Central Business District (CBD) Encouraging the setting up of business establishments To enhance the status of Jwaneng as the transit point to the Kalahari and Namibia.3. Encouraging the setting up of all types of manufacturing industries in Jwaneng. To create employment creation through tourism activities. To ensure the keeping and maintaining of minimum health and safety standards at business premises.2. Equitable local participation in tourism projects. This can be achieved through: Provision of adequate serviced land. To establish Jwaneng as a residential centre through: Provision of social amenities Provision of affordable residential plots and encouraging people to construct permanent houses. It would be helpful to diversify the economy of the town from diamond mining. Community participation and education. h. To provide an interface between the central government and the local people through: Periodic accounting by Council as a democratically elected institution to the Jwaneng community. equitable local participation in tourism projects and development of tourism awareness in town. f. To improve health and safety standards through: Intensification of the campaign against the spread of HIV/AIDS Provision of primary health care services/facilities. c. strengthening support Programmes on Home Based Care for terminally ill patients. i. Facilitating and promoting preventive health measures To equip the community with information that will create awareness and enhance positive attitudinal and behavioural change towards their health. e. k. g. d. Provision of shopping facilities. 20 b. To diversify the economy of the Town. The town owes its existence to the mine. especially those related to servicing the mine.3 Specific Objectives In Relation To Overall Goals a. Kgotla meetings addressed by Council leadership and central government departments to inform the community about their business and get feedback regarding their expectations. . j.

To provide social safety nets for the vulnerable and under privileged members of the community through: Orphan care programme Home based care programme Destitution programme Assistance to needy students To foster environmentally friendly practises through the implementation and enforcement of relevant environmental policies and legislation will be achieved by the following objectives: To undertake Environmental Impact Assessments for major development projects in Jwaneng until the end of the plan period. To completely eradicate squatting by the end of the plan period. m. To rehabilitate all existing burrow pits by December 2006.2. implementation problems and project proposals for the subsequent year.1 Annual Project Review This is done on a yearly basis. As a result of the mid term review.2.4.l. financial and physical progress reports are presented with a view to monitor whether projects are going according to plan. In this committee. To carry out litter picking campaigns every six months until the end of the plan period and erect billboards at strategic locations in the town.2.2. the mid term review will begin to look into goals achievement.4.2 Mid Term Review Half way through UDP2. a mid term review will take place. To control veld fire by and grading fire breaks every six months until the end of the plan period.3 Quarterly Urban Development Committee meetings /Briefs The Urban Development Committee is responsible for coordination. The Urban Development Committee sits every 3 months and it is co-chaired by the District 21 . Apart from considering progress in implementation. 3. 3.4 Framework For Monitoring Sector Goals And Objectives The monitoring and review of the plan will be carried out on a regular basis with the purpose of establishing physical and financial progress in plan implementation. detecting implementation problems so that corrective measures can be taken and re prioritising projects in view of changing circumstances. 3. to what extent has project implementation led to the achievement of goals and whether the goals are still realistic in view of the changing circumstances. implementation strategies and planned projects for the remaining three years of the plan can be revised. Before drafting the next annual plan. To prepare both short and long term management plans for collection of gravel and pit sand by December 2004. determine any bottlenecks to plan implementation and take corrective measures. the previous one is reviewed with regard to progress in implementation.4. 3. To educate the community on environmental problems and mitigation measures by addressing ward meetings every year until the end of the plan period. management and implementation of the Urban Development Plan.

3. non-governmental organisations and government departments being members.2 Environmental Impact Assessment An Environmental Impact Assessment will be carried out for all major projects. Because these projects/activities involve construction.Officer and the Town Clerk. One of the Jwaneng goals for UDP II is to diversify the economy of the township from the predominantly mining sector and this will be achieved through among other things. The other objective is the provision of primary health care facilities. 3. conditions. loss of biodiversity. the mushrooming of burrow pits and the creation of dust and noise from construction sites. management systems or information about these. the purpose of which would be to determine the impacts of certain projects/activities on the environment and mitigation measures thereof.2. increase in solid waste. resource centres and toilets.5.5. The other UDP II goal is implementing the Revised National Policy on Education. Finance and General Purposes Committee and the Health and Social Services Committee. events. The council committees include the Planning Committee.1 Environmental Audits As a way of monitoring environmental goals and objectives. teachers‟ quarters. encouraging the development of plots ad provision of shopping facilities within the township.2. 3. conform to audit criteria and communicating the results of the process to the proponent or client.2. which will entail the provision of adequate school facilities like classrooms. 22 . with heads of parastatal organisations. the provision of serviced land and the setting up of manufacturing industries.3 FRAMEWORK ASSESSMENT FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL 3.4 Full Council and Council Committees In addition to the above. This is a “verification process of obtaining and evaluating audit evidence to determine whether specific environmental activities.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues With Overall Goals and Objectives of UDP II The set goals and objectives for UDP II may have adverse environmental impacts.3. the following environmental impacts are anticipated: Requirement for more land. which are going to be undertaken in the planning area. Education Committee.5 Framework For Monitoring Environmental Goals And Objectives 3. 3.2. The other goals and objectives which involve educating the community on different government policies and projects are not anticipated to have any adverse impacts on the environment. the Council and different Council committees are among other things responsible for monitoring the progress of different council projects. an environmental audit system would be employed. indiscriminate extraction of sand and gravel. vegetation clearance.4. indiscriminate dumping of building rubble.

for example. extraction of gravel and sand. manufacturing industries in the township. increase in solid waste. indiscriminate dumping of the waste. indiscriminate dumping of the waste. pressure on water sources. Their construction will ultimately have the following environmental impacts: clearance of vegetation. mushrooming of borrow pits. To prepare an environmental impact assessment for every major project prior to development To diversify the economy of the town Equitable local tourism projects. pressure on water sources. pressure on water sources. more land will be required. extraction of gravel and sand. extraction of gravel and sand. for example. mushrooming of borrow pits.1 Evaluation Of Policies And Programms Against Overall Goals And Objectives For UDP II Goals and objectives on a) Provision of adequate facilities in all primary schools b) Increasing the absorption capacity of the Jwaneng Technical College c) Intensification of the literacy programme d) Encouraging the establishment of day care centres. participation in Environmental issues Construction of education facilities will result in clearance of vegetation. more land will be required. No negative environmental impacts anticipated The setting up of tourism related infrastructure as a way of diversifying the economy will result in the following environmental impacts: clearance of vegetation. cutting of trees. building rubble. for example.3. The provision of financial assistance is intended to encourage the setting up of among other things. Policies and programmes Revised National Education Policy Environmental Assessment Act Tourism Policy Impact Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) Encouraging the setting up of all types of manufacturing industries in Jwaneng. and indiscriminate dumping of the waste. increase in solid waste. mushrooming of borrow pits. building rubble. increase in solid waste. more land will be required. building rubble. 23 .2 Evaluation Of Policies And Programms Against Overall Goals And Objectives Of UDP II Table 3. cutting of trees. especially those related to servicing the mine.3. cutting of trees.

Energy and Water Affairs One of the strategic goals of this ministry is to contribute towards a sustainable environment by minimising damage and harmful side effects from energy. institutional. Within the context of Jwaneng.CHAPTER FOUR 4 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION 4. which is chaired by the District Officer. 2001). concerns have been raised over the environmental impacts of some development projects.1. The preparation of the Jwaneng UDP 2 should ensure that environmental considerations are fully integrated into the planning process in order to prevent conflicts and maintain the integrity of the environment if sustainable development is to be achieved.2.1 INTRODUCTION Environment includes the physical. Wildlife and Tourism The strategic goal for this ministry relevant to environmental conservation in Jwaneng is to reduce major human – wildlife conflict. Some of these institutions are the Jwaneng Town Council.1. 24 . aesthetic. As such. 4.3 Strategic plan for the Ministry of Trade. economic. ecological.1. some of which have been undertaken without regard to environmental conservation. If for example. human health and social aspects of the surroundings of a person (Environmental Planning Manual.1 Institutional framework Environmental conservation in Jwaneng is the responsibility of various institutions. 4.2.1. it is possible that solving one problem may create several others. archaeological. the location of projects is not chosen with care in relation to natural resources in the environment.2 Strategic Plan for the Ministry of Minerals. Animal Health and Production etc. Coordination of the institutions is the responsibility of the Urban Development Committee. minerals and water resources exploitation. as environmental issues cut across sectors. District Administration. The Jwana and Tholo Parks owned by Debswana Jwaneng Mine are an effort to illustrate the importance of conserving the wildlife resource within the planning area. 4. The integration of environmental planning as part of district and national planning is long overdue.1 Strategic Plan for the Ministry of Agriculture One of the strategic goals of the Ministry of Agriculture is to enhance agricultural resources conservation sustainability through the application of environmentally friendly practices and to promote resources conservation and sustainability by reviewing and strengthening enforceable legislation. efforts will be made to intensify environmental conservation awareness among various stakeholders through workshops and Kgotla meetings. Industry.2. Crop Production and Forestry.2 Strategic Plans 4.1. 4.

to minimize pollution of the environment.2. wildlife. facilitation and implementation of advanced systems for regulating the management of controlled waste in order to prevent harm to human. Some of these are the National Conservation Policy.2 Waste Management Act This was formulated “to provide for the establishment of the department of Sanitation and Waste Management. archaeological and other related features.2.4. review and implementation of relevant environmental policies and legislation and also to promote environmental awareness programmes and facilitation of its integration into the formal education. Waste Management Act.2 ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION The government has formulated a number of policies and legislation that were intended to address national environmental problems/concerns so as to try to conserve the environment. There has been evidence that a lot of these resources are under pressure and this has given rise to concerns about the ability of the resources to sustain the needs of future generations. The government attaches great importance to the wide range of natural resources and features. which exist throughout Botswana. human. National Policy on Natural Resources Conservation and Development etc. Many people directly depend upon these for their livelihood. 4. to make provision for the planning.2.3 Environmental Conservation Consultation Priorities Environmental concerns/problems that were raised during consultation seminars included the following: Garden waste Littering Indiscriminate dumping of building rubble Mushrooming of burrow pits for extraction of gravel and/or pit sand Veld fires Squatters Waste water 4. for example.1.1 National Policy on Natural Resources Conservation and Development This policy was formulated solely to conserve and develop our natural resources in order to achieve sustainable development as one of the four main planning objectives of the National Development Plan. cultural. to conserve natural resources. 1998). Draft Environmental Impact Assessment Act. to cause the provision of the Basel Convention to apply in regulating the trans-boundary movement of hazardous wastes and their disposal. 25 .4 Strategic plan for the Ministry of Lands and Housing The strategic goals for this ministry with regards to environmental conservation are to foster environment friendly practices through formulation. Community Based Natural Resource Management. livestock. These resources include fresh air. animal. and soils.1. the community is continually informed/educated about the dangers of littering under the Waste Management Act and the fines for non-adherence. and plant life. vegetation. 4. In line with these goals it is intended to prepare an Environmental Impact Assessment for every major project that is going to be undertaken within the planning area such that impacts of certain projects on the environment and their mitigation measures will be identified. and for matters incidental and connected to the foregoing”(Waste Management Act. Council will continue to educate the public about policies and programmes geared towards environmental conservation. clean water. 4.

transport. The Act is very relevant to Jwaneng because being a developing town. To prepare both short and long term management plan for collection of gravel and pit sand by December 2004. transfer. To carry out litter picking campaigns every six months until the end of the plan period and erect billboards at strategic locations in town.2.The Act provides for the management of all kinds of waste ranging from clinical waste. In order to achieve the above broad goal. collection and disposal. To completely eradicate squatting by the end of the plan period.3 Environmental Impact Assessment Act (Draft) The government is in the process of finalizing the Draft Environmental Impact Assessment.2. management meaning the collection. To integrate the work of many sectoral ministries and interest groups throughout the country. interim storage.4 National Conservation Strategy The National Conservation Strategy was adopted by government to give guidelines on issues related to environmental planning and conservation. thereby improving the development of natural resources through conservation. It would be easier then to determine which ones require an EIA and which ones do not. storage. deposit. This Act makes it a requirement that large-scale developments should have an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) conducted prior to their implementation. household waste. hazardous waste. To educate the community on environmental problems and mitigation measures by addressing ward meetings every year until the end of the plan period. The primary goals of the strategy are: To increase the effectiveness with which natural resources are used and managed. To control veld fire by and grading fire breaks every six months until the end of the plan period. projects are going to be carried out. 4. 4. 4. industrial waste and litter. treatment and final disposal of waste. so that beneficial interactions are optimised and harmful environmental side effects are minimised. the following objectives are proposed: To undertake an Environmental Impact Assessment for every major Development projects in Jwaneng until the end of the plan period.3 UDP 2 ENVIRONMENTAL GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The main goal of this plan with regard to environmental conservation and preservation is: To foster environmentally friendly practices through the implementation and enforcement of relevant environmental policies and legislation. The growth of Jwaneng points to the urgent need to address issues of waste generation. 26 . commercial waste. To rehabilitate all existing burrow pits by December 2006. which will have negative impacts on the environment.

This is so that all projects carried out are socially. indiscriminate waste disposal resulting in land pollution and possible fire hazards because cooking is done in small unventilated structures. The anticipated environmental impacts are dust and noise pollution and loss of biodiversity. productivity and innovation. Squatting itself has many environmental impacts some of which are overcrowding resulting in rapid spread of communicable diseases. As such it is not envisaged that any environmental impacts will occur as a result of the preparation of an EIA. for example. the vision has emphasized the need to preserve the environment in the process of development. As such the environmental impacts might include cutting of vegetation and the resultant loss of flora and fauna. mainly attributed by an acute shortage of residential accommodation and higher residential rentals.4 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT One of the pillars of Vision 2016 is prosperity. Objective 7:To completely eradicate squatting in the township by the end of the plan period. Because the objective is to eradicate squatting not many and not serious environmental impacts are anticipated.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Objective 1: To undertake an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) for every major development project in Jwaneng until the end of the plan period. Squatting is a very serious problem in the township. Objective 4: To control veld fires by grading fire breaks every six months until the end of the plan period. Negative environmental impacts could include cutting of vegetation and loss of biodiversity. economically and environmentally sustainable.4. Objective 3: To carry out litter picking campaigns every six months until the end of the plan period and erect billboards which sensitise the public on the dangers of litter. This exercise is in itself aimed at identifying possible impacts certain projects might have on the environment and ultimately come up with mitigation measures that are to be employed either to reduce or completely eradicate the impacts. tuberculosis. Objective 6: To rehabilitate all existing burrow pits by December 2006. 27 . The erection of billboards might involve the clearing of the site within which the billboard is going to be erected.4. 4. In order that this pillar is achieved. which are detrimental to the environment. Some impacts might include dust and noise pollution resulting from the bulldozers evicting the squatters if government decides to take that route and solid waste. The UDP II set goals and objectives and the policies and programmes that the Jwaneng Township has come up with to improve the livelihood of the community might possibly have negative impacts on the environment such that in trying to solve problems several other ones might be created as a result.

4.5 PROPOSED ENVIRONMENTAL STRATEGIES IMPLEMENT URBAN ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS Town Environmental Action Program Activity/Project Continue to engage private contractors as and when necessary Increase the number of skips so that each environmental unit has some skips Information.6 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 4.1 Environmental concern Garden Waste Littering Nil Nil Indiscriminate dumping of building rubble Mushrooming of borrow pits as a result of extraction of gravel and pit sand for construction Veldfires Nil Nil Loss of biodiversity Wildlife mortality Preparation of an EIA Clearance vegetation of Plant the shrubs and the trees out of the way of the fire break Nil Squatters Nil 4.6. Education and Communication Continue Anti littering campaigns and Information Education and Communication Encourage Community Participation Fully implement the Waste Management Act (Enforcement) Supervision/follow up contractors Fully implement the Waste Management Act (enforcement) Identify areas where gravel and pit sand could be extracted Prepare a management plan for collection of gravel and pit sand Regular Maintenance of firebreaks by grading the fire breaks Disaster Management Committee to prepare guidelines for management of disasters/veldfires Education Liase with Southern District Council and Ngwaketse Landboard about the possible relocation to Sese Potential impacts Nil Action Nil TO Table 4.1 Issues and Strengths Issues Squatters Veld fires Indiscriminate dumping of building rubble Mushrooming of borrow pits Strengths Regular maintenance of firebreaks Identification of areas where gravel and pit sand could be extracted 28 .

Reports to PMC.2 Objective To undertake an Environmental Impact Assessment for major development projects in Jwaneng until the end of the plan period. Consultant to be engaged. Table 4. Environmental Conservation Performance Targets For UDP 2 Activity Environmental Impact Assessment for servicing of unit 8. proper disposal of garden waste. To rehabilitate existing burrow pits and identify sources of gravel and pit sand by December 2004.6. April 2003 December 2004 Report to UDC Backfill the burrow pits using the rubble adjacent to the burrow pits April 2003 December 2006 Report to UDC Relocate squatters to Sese April 2003 March 2006 Report to UDC 4. Since some of the above proposed projects are not financially provided for under the capital budget.6. To control veld fire by maintenance fire breaks every six months until the end of the plan period. To educate the community on environmental problems and mitigation measures by addressing ward meetings every year. Amount (P) P1 million 29 . Quarterly progress reports.4. Start date April 2003 End date March 2004 Monitoring Monthly report to Steering Committee. Disaster Management Committee Grading of existing fire breaks by Council Roads Department Disaster Management Committee to prepare guidelines for management of veld fires Prepare management plan April 2003 January 2004 March 2009 December 2004 To prepare both short and long term management plan for collection of gravel and pit sand by December 2004. for example. To completely eradicate squatting by the end of the plan period. they will be financed under the recurrent budget. as it has been the case.3 Objective To undertake an Environmental Impact Assessment for major development projects in Jwaneng until the end of the plan period.2 Performance Targets for UDP II Table 4.3 Development Budget for UDP 2 In order that Jwaneng town realises its environmental goals and objectives. April 2003 March 2009 Carry out litter picking by the council environmental health department April 2003 March 2009 Bi-monthly report to the Health & Social Welfare Committee Report to F&GP committee and UDC. UDC and council Quarterly reports to UDC and council Addressing ward meetings by all UDC members and Councillors. To carry out litter picking campaigns every six months until the end of the plan period. Consultant to be engaged. there is a need for resources like manpower and finance. Environmental Conservation Development Budget For UDP 2 Activity Environmental Impact Assessment for servicing of unit 8.

4 Plan Monitoring Programme Lastly.00 Carry out litter picking campaigns by the council environmental health department Grading of existing fire breaks by council Roads Department Disaster Management Committee to prepare guidelines for management of veld fire Prepare management plan P10 000 P100 000 To prepare both short and long term management plan for collection of gravel and pit sand by December 2004. This would help us see if we are going according to plan or not and through constant monitoring. 0. we would identify implementation problems and come up with solutions where possible. To completely eradicate squatting by the end of the plan period. To control veld fire by maintenance fire breaks every six months until the end of the plan period. Amount (P) P5 000.00 Backfill the burrow pits using the rubble adjacent to the burrow pits P1 million Relocate squatters to Sese P1 million 4.6. 30 . To carry out litter picking campaigns every six months until the end of the plan period. In addition to quarterly progress reports to the Urban Development Committee. Activity Addressing ward meetings by all UDC members. the mid term review would also pave the way forward as far as environmental monitoring is concerned. for Jwaneng to achieve the above goals and objectives there is need for close monitoring.Objective To educate the community on environmental problems and mitigation measures by addressing ward meetings every year. To rehabilitate existing burrow pits and identify sources of gravel and pit sand by December 2004.

the subdivision of state land. develops and also maintains land related information (Physical Planning Handbook for Botswana. Department of Lands. These include the Jwaneng Town Council. DTRP prepares comprehensive development plans for planning areas as well as other areas in need of development plans. This therefore means that the administration of the Town and Country Planning Act for the planning. Department of Lands The Department of Lands at the Ministry of Lands and Housing is responsible for the administration of land. 5.CHAPTER FIVE 5 LAND USE PLANNING 5. Jwaneng Town Council The Jwaneng Town Council is the responsible Planning Authority for the Jwaneng Planning Area. The department manages the government land estates. 1997).1 Institutional Framework There are institutions carrying out the responsibility of land use issues in town. Department of Surveys and Mapping The Department of Surveys and Mapping is responsible for the production of base maps. The Town Council refers specific applications to the Town and Country Planning Board for final consideration. the provision and maintenance of land information systems. This department is therefore vital for the mapping requirements of the Physical Planning Unit – and especially for base maps which are essential for the preparation of development plans and layouts (Physical Planning Handbook for Botswana. state and free hold land. and for land use planning. It is within the Southern District and it therefore forms a border with areas that are within the jurisdiction of the Southern District Council. zoning and coordination of such activities. Department of Town and Regional Planning. It is therefore responsible for the administration of relevant land statutes. advises other government departments and land boards on matters of land administration. and the Department of Crop Production and Forestry. this 31 . With regards to planning areas.1 INTRODUCTION Jwaneng is one of the smallest towns in the country. The department ensures proper utilization of land by directing and monitoring all types of development on communal. 1997). provides professional and technical advice to both the Minister of Lands and Housing and the Town and Country Planning Board.1. the Department of Surveys and Mapping. In addition to these functions. and the spread of geodetic control framework. Department of Town and Regional Planning The Department of Town and Regional Planning (DTRP). implementation and control of development within the planning area is the Town Council‟s responsibility. DTRP is responsible for drafting and reviewing of national policies dealing with physical planning.

as it is rent-free. One of the priorities therefore of this development plan would be to prepare a comprehensive management plan for collection of resources such as sand and gravel. 32 . 1997). intends to prepare layouts for 20 000 plots by 31st March 2006. is a result of contracting companies who were given permission by the Department of Lands to camp at the Industrial Site. which are both unsightly and a danger to both animals and people. In line with this objective.function is performed on behalf of the Minister according to Part II of the TCPA. Most of the people who are squatting at the industrial area were initially renting rooms in SHHA areas in Jwaneng. 5. most allocated land remains undeveloped for a long time. Non-observance of development covenants – As seen earlier. Squatting problem due to unavailability of plots/land. with the understanding that they would demolish their camp structures after finishing their works in Jwaneng. so the intention is to seek a strict monitoring and enforcement of land development covenants. but consequently the structures were left intact. commercial. and some people inherited them. implementation and control of development plans. The department also provides guidance and professional support to physical planners in local authorities in all matters related to the preparation. 5.3 Consultation Priorities The following are some of the consultation priorities as regards land use planning in Jwaneng: Indiscriminate collection of sand and gravel as a result of the construction boom has resulted in open burrow pits. civic and community and industrial.1. detailed layouts and all other relevant planning issues (Physical Planning Handbook for Botswana. The existence of the squatter camp. hence more and more people illegally settled in the area. Delay in the servicing of plots results in delay in allocation of plots for different uses such as residential. and they allege that because they could not afford the rent. The department also monitors the implementation of town and regional plans and advises both government and the private sector on specific issues about potential land uses and coordinates the issuance of enforcement notices. the population of the squatter camp was found to be 1426 with 475 households.2 Strategic Plan for the Ministry of Lands and Housing One of the goals of the Department of Lands‟ in the Ministry of Lands and Housing is to increase the amount of land available for distribution to eligible customers and the strategic objective relevant to Jwaneng is to make available 5000 plots in cities/towns for allocation to applicants by March 2006. which is commonly known as the “Industrial Site”. From a survey conducted in February 2002.1. The Department of Town and Regional Planning in its strategic plan. In order to facilitate the implementation of this strategic objective. the Council intends to prepare residential layout plans for units 10 and 11 by March 2005 as alluded to in the above paragraph. they opted to squat. the Council intends that residential layout plans for units 10 and 11 are prepared and in addition for plots to be available the Council intends to service units 8 and 9.

electrical installations e.c. This will be achieved by the servicing of unit 8.2 LAND USE POLICIES AND LEGISLATION The main statutory instruments for the planning.2 Building Control Act The Building Control Act and Regulations chapter 65:02 provides for uniformity in the law relating to the erection of buildings and for prescribing building standards. Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) and any relevant policies aimed at financially assisting potential investors/developers. implementation and control of developments in towns are the Town and Country Planning Act (Cap 32:09) and the Building Control Act. use of building material.4 Alignment to Vision 2016 The theme for Vision 2016 is. procedures for erection of a building.1 Town and Country Planning Act The Town and Country Planning Act was enacted to assist the orderly and progressive development of land in both urban and rural areas and to preserve and improve the amenities thereof by means of planning permission (Physical Planning Handbook for Botswana. protection from moisture. productive and innovative nation by 2016. Productive and Innovative nation In order to meet the vision pillar of a prosperous. part of unit 9 and the Central Business District. structural fire precautions. This will be met through the objective of preparing a management plan for the collection of pit sand and gravel.2. section 12 of the Town and Country Planning Act. the Jwaneng Town Council through the Planning Committee. This education will be in the form of addressing different communities either in Kgotla meetings or in arranged seminars and workshops the main thrust being to empower citizens in taking advantage of government programmes.t. 5. Prosperous. the township has set an objective to provide infrastructure to attract private investors to the township. structural stability of walls. change of land use and demolition. standards of accommodation.. Also as a way of making industrial and commercial land available the Department of Lands being the land authority in the Township. 5. This Act covers procedures related to building permission. The Jwaneng Urban Development Plan II will take account of the preservation of the environment. soil and waste drainage.2. In trying to implement this Act. 5.5. 1997. considers applications for planning permission under paragraph 4. sanitation appliances. 1997). will be encouraged to repossess and reallocate to potential and serious investors all undeveloped land. mitigation measures will be taken for possible environmental impacts of different projects and an Environmental Impact Assessment prepared before the execution of large development projects like the servicing of unit 8 and 9 for example. In addition to this. 33 . This Act also deals with issues related to dangerous buildings. preparation of site. for any development of land to be carried out. as alluded to in Table 5. “Towards prosperity for all” the plan strives to achieve the following vision pillars in as far as land use planning in the township is concerned: Educated and Informed nation One of the land use planning objectives is to educate the community on government policies like the Tourism Policy.1. which has remained as such beyond the development covenant period.

parks. The Department of Town and Regional Planning in the Ministry of Lands and Housing has the responsibility to among other things prepare development plans for different towns and villages in the country. in order to realise one of the government‟s major challenges for NDP 9 of Diversification of the economy. which is chaired by the Physical Planner with the Senior Technical Officer as the secretary. allocated areas of land for agricultural use. 5. After plans have been approved the buildings department and other departments.2. mining.4 Tourism Policy This policy‟s main goal is to promote tourism in Botswana as a way of diversifying the economy of the country from the mining and cattle industries.5 Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) CEDA was introduced by government in place of the Financial Assistance Policy. A development plan in particular defines sites for proposed roads. 5. It is also a priority of this plan to educate and inform the community of Jwaneng about CEDA. The preparation of the Jwaneng development plan is long overdue. the land use planning objectives during UDP 2 are as follows: Goal 1 To facilitate efficient and equitable land distribution through appropriate policies.The Technical Committee of council. Goal 2 To speed up land allocation through land servicing and streamlined land allocation procedures. It is therefore worth mentioning that Jwaneng does not have a development plan. nature reserves. solely to provide financial assistance (loans) to small scale. residential or any other purposes as it deems fit. it will be a priority for this plan to educate the community of Jwaneng about what this policy is all about. As such. open spaces. it is worrying that the only major economic activity is the mining industry. industrial. peruses plans for planning and building permission before making recommendations to the Town Planning Committee. medium scale and large-scale investors. carry out inspections at each stage of construction to see if construction is as per approved plans. 5.2. public and other buildings. 34 . The policy basically promotes the development of tourism infrastructure and facilities for Batswana to participate in the industry. This is intended to facilitate the development of plots in the town.3 Physical Development Plans Section 6 of the Town and Country Planning Act provides that.2. in any planning area (Jwaneng inclusive) the minister submits a development plan consisting of a report of survey together with a plan indicating the manner in which he proposes that the land in the planning area may be used and the stages by which any such developments may be carried out.3 LAND USE PLANNING SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Based on consultation priorities and assessment of issues in the district. airfields. Being one of the mining towns of the country. forestry. Jwaneng is well placed to realise the provisions of this policy. 5. and thereafter issues an occupation permit.

4. The implementation of CEDA in the township is very likely to put pressure in the township because more land would also be required for different projects. 35 .4 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 5. 2 and 5 as follows: Vegetation clearance.Goal 3 To facilitate speedy development of allocated land in the planning area through relevant policies. To educate the community on government policies like the Tourism Policy.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes The anticipated environmental impacts include the fact that more land will be required for tourism related infrastructure such as lodges and hotels. Objectives a. the Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) and any relevant policies aimed at financial assistance for potential investors/developers every six months until the end of the plan period. The Building Control Act and the Town and Country Planning Acts are about applying standards during development of land and on a positive note their implementation will ensure that structures are constructed and developments are carried out according to the set standards. To service the CBD North including the bus rank and relocate the existing bus rank by the end of the financial year 2006/2007. To prepare a management plan for collection of pit sand and gravel by the year 2004 To prepare detailed residential layout plans for units 10 and 11 by March 2005. To prepare a Development Plan for Jwaneng Planning Area by December 2005 To service Environmental Unit 8 by March 2006 To start the servicing of Environment unit 9 in April 2008 To repossess and reallocate all undeveloped plots in the planning area by the end of financial year 2004/2005 b. c. which in turn is going to have an effect on the natural environment in terms of trees and vegetation being cut to pave way for industrial and commercial developments. 5. it will result in loss of animal life.4. which might have some adverse ecological effects during the actualisation of the Tourism Policy. In addition. and loss of biodiversity which may result in soil erosion Mushrooming of borrow pits Increase in solid waste and waste water Congestion along existing roads Dust and noise from construction 5.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Environmental impacts are only anticipated in trying to achieve objectives 1.

The key land policy will be to use land for the most suitable land use alternative.5 PROPOSED STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE LAND USE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES FOR UDP 2 During UDP2. To start the servicing of unit 9 in April 2008 LG 1113 .1 Objective To service Environmental Unit 8 by March 2006 Strategies to Achieve Land Use Planning Sector Goals and Objectives For UDP 2 Program/Project LG 1113 – URBAN LAND SERVICING Servicing of Environmental Unit 8 (2004 – 2006) Potential impacts Vegetation clearance which may result in soil erosion Mushrooming of borrow pits resulting from high demand for extraction of sand and gravel Increase in solid waste and waste water Congestion along existing roads Dust from construction Action Planting of trees and vegetation Identification of proper areas for extraction of sand/gravel where there could be proper monitoring. Extension of sewer lines Provision of litterbins at strategic places within the town and within residential.URBAN LAND SERVICING Servicing of the CBD North (2006/2007) LG 1113 – URBAN LAND SERVICING Servicing of unit 9 (2008/2009) The same impacts as above The same impacts as above The same mitigation measures as above To Prepare a management plan for collection of pit sand and gravel by the year 2004 To prepare detailed residential layout plans for units 10 and 11 by March 2005.5. Public education on the dangers of littering Environmental Impact Assessment The same mitigation measures as above To service the CBD North including the bus rank and relocate the existing bus rank by the end of financial year 2006/2007. The table below shows strategies with which we intend to achieve the set goals and objectives. commercial and industrial plots. This will be achieved through sensitisation and involvement of the public in land use planning. Table 5. To prepare a Development Plan for Jwaneng Planning Area by December 2005 To repossess and Prepare plan management Nil Nil Prepare layout plans Nil Nil Prepare Plan Development Nil Nil Repossess and Nil Nil 36 . the key issue in land use planning will be management and sustainable use of land.

6 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP II 5. UDC.2 Goal/Objective To service Environmental Unit 8 by March 2006 Land Use Planning Performance Targets for UDP II Activity Servicing of unit 8 Start date April 2004 End date March 2006 Monitoring Quarterly reports to UDC and Council.2 Performance Targets for UDP II Table 5. Form a steering committee Quarterly reports to UDC and Council. Program/Project reallocate undeveloped plots Potential impacts Action To hold one day seminars for owners of undeveloped commercial and industrial plots To address Kgotla meetings Littering Place waste bins at strategic places during the workshop 5.Objective reallocate all undeveloped plots in the planning area by the end of financial year 2004/2005 To educate the community on government policies like the Tourism Policy. Steering committee Council Planning Committee. the Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) and any relevant policies aimed at financial assistance for potential investors/developers every six months until the end of the plan period. To start the servicing of unit 9 in April 2008 To prepare layout plans for units 10 and 11 To educate the community Service the CBD North April 2006 March 2007 Start servicing unit 9 Preparation of the layout plans To hold one day April 2008 March 2009 Quarterly reports to UDC and Council.6. form a Steering Committee To service the CBD North including the bus rank and relocate the existing bus rank by the end of financial year 2006/2007. Reports to UDC April 2004 Every six March 2005 Every six 37 .6.1 Issues and Strengths Issues Shortage of serviced land Indiscriminate extraction of sand and gravel Strengths Servicing of unit 8 and 9 Preparation of a management plan for collection of sand and gravel 5.

To repossess and reallocate all undeveloped plots in the planning area by the end of financial year 2004/2005 To prepare a management plan for collection of pit sand and gravel by the year 2004 To prepare a Development Plan for Jwaneng Planning Area by December 2005 Activity seminars for owners of undeveloped commercial and industrial plots and to address kgotla meetings Start date months End date months Monitoring Repossess and reallocate undeveloped plots Prepare management plan Prepare Development Plan April 2003 March 2005 Reports to UDC April 2003 December 2004 Reports to UDC April 2003 March 2005 Reports to UDC 5.Goal/Objective on government policies like the Tourism Policy. the Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) and any relevant policies aimed at financial assistance for potential investors/developers every six months until the end of the plan period.3 Development Budget for UDP II Table 5. In addition there will be quarterly UDC meetings in which progress reports of all development projects and activities are discussed to see if projects are going 38 . there is an implementation schedule in which the starting and ending dates of each activity or project are indicated. This will facilitate follow-ups.4 Plan Monitoring Program In order to monitor the activities and projects during UDP 2.6.completion Servicing CBD North * Servicing portion of EU 9 Jwaneng Planning Development Plan Recurrent Budget Area To hold one day seminars for owners of undeveloped commercial and industrial plots To address kgotla meetings Repossess and undeveloped plots reallocate 0.3 Programme LG 1113 Land Use Planning Development Budget for UDP 2 Project component Servicing of EU 8 Servicing of continuation EU 8 Estimated cost (p) 18 000 000 12 000 000 4 000 000 2 912 000 18 340 000 3 000 000 20 000 yearly Financial year 2003/2004 2004/2005 2005/2006 2006/2007 2008/2009 2003/2004 – 2004/2005 Every six months Servicing of EU 8 .6.00 20 000 10 000 2003/2004 – 2004/2005 April 2003 – December 2004 2004/2005 Recurrent Budget Recurrent Budget Prepare management plan Prepare Layout plans 5.

There will also be council meetings where such reports will be discussed. Lastly. the Jwaneng Plan Management Committee has been revived and one of its responsibilities would be to oversee the implementation of the Urban Development Plan.according as planned and to try and solve any bottlenecks that might have arisen during implementation. 39 .

In addition.1. However. economic and environmental reasons. the overall National Housing and Settlement issues are the responsibility of the Ministry of Lands and Housing and the Ministry of Local Government. 6.4. Self Help Housing Program Facilitation of housing delivery system through a sustainable loan system. 6.CHAPTER SIX 6 SETTLEMENT AND HOUSING 6. 40 . information on surveying. facilitation of housing delivery as well as promotion of environmental protection with and for Batswana and our partners in development”. Administration of land both in urban and rural areas. infrastructure provision and progressive land administration. In trying to realize this mission.1. Securing land in advance for staff houses. as outlined at 6. which will be addressing the housing demand and supply in the township. National physical planning which entails determining the optimal utilization and proper ordering of landscape through laws and policies. mapping and remote sensing that lays the foundation for physical planning.1 INTRODUCTION This chapter specifically looks at policies and Acts that deal with housing and settlement. Provision of basic housing for Local Authorities (District Councils). it looks at government‟s deliberate policies.1.3 Consultation Priorities The following are specific consultation priorities for Jwaneng: Institutional housing Provision of adequate housing for the staff of Jwaneng. Establishment of settlements with consideration of different social. The primary responsibility for housing and settlement lies mainly with the Ministry of Lands and Housing whose main functions are as follows: Provision of services. 6. which seek to facilitate the housing delivery system especially to low income people. It focuses on government with regard to the improvement of housing in the country and specifically in Jwaneng.1 Institutional framework The issue of housing cuts across sectors since it involves all ministries and government departments. Jwaneng town has developed its own strategic goals and objectives.2 Strategic Plans The mission statement for the Ministry of Lands and Housing is “ to provide excellent services in management and development of land.

Consistent with Vision 2016. in this coming plan period will strive to facilitate the housing delivery system through relevant government policies. SHHA continues to play an important role in the provision of housing delivery for the low income and middle-income low groups in the Jwaneng Township. This will provide safety and security to the community of Jwaneng. In its quest to uplift the living environment and the living standards of SHHA dwellers.2. Implementation of the housing programme will be aligned to Vision 2016 and the mandate of the Ministry of Lands and Housing reflected through strategic goals and objectives.Provision of adequate land for SHHA beneficiaries. Vision 2016 provides that all Batswana will be able to obtain access to good quality basic shelter. Water reticulation. Safe and Secure Nation. Jwaneng. 6. Out of a total number of 868 plots allocated.2. either in the rural or in the urban areas. electricity and construction of sewer lines have been completed in these areas and plot holders started to connect to these utilities at reasonable prices.1 National Housing Policy The National Housing Policy provides policy direction for the housing sector during UDP II.2 Self Help Housing Agency (SHHA) Botswana Vision 2016 envisages that by the year 2016. Productive and Innovative nation.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION Vision 2016 envisages settlement growth and development in Botswana to be sustainable by the year 2016. facilitation of housing delivery and promotion of home ownership. the 2000 National Policy on Housing aims at the provision of decent and affordable housing for all Batswana. 2 and 3. the focus will be on housing policy effectiveness. 620 are fully developed. The provision of SHHA loans to low income and low-income medium groups aims at financially assisting the low-income groups of the community to construct houses thereby providing shelter. 6. The government of Botswana has formulated a number of policies in order to try to address national housing concerns and settlement issues. 99 are partially developed and 149 are still undeveloped. 41 . The vision goes on to state that all Batswana will be able to obtain good quality basic shelter. In order to realise the provisions of the vision. In view of this. The major thrust of the housing sector during UDP II will be to ensure that all Batswana will be able obtain access to good quality basic shelter in both urban and rural areas. 6. Alignment to Vision 2016 Settlement and Housing in the Jwaneng Township will strive to achieve the following vision pillars: Prosperous. all Batswana will be able to obtain access to good quality basic shelter in both urban and rural areas. The Jwaneng Town Council through the SHHA programme will continue to play an important role in the provision of housing delivery for the low and the middle income low earners in the township and facilitate citizen housing ownership by expeditiously providing SHHA loans to eligible citizens. Council upgraded the old SHHA areas in Environmental Units 1. within a safe and sanitary environment.

unfinished and in need of improvement particularly the old SHHA areas. 6. Some structures still look unsightly. income generation and shelter provision. employment creation. that is. To address these problems the Council has engaged a Debt Collector and plot holders are encouraged to sign stop orders and pay the first instalment upon signing the loan agreement.00 in terms of the National Policy on Housing.00 to P6 000.00 per annum and hence do not qualify for SHHA loans. 6.3 SETTLEMENT AND HOUSING Physical Development Growth The preparation of a Physical Development Plan for the Jwaneng Planning Area is long overdue.1 Housing Demand The present demand for SHHA plots in Jwaneng Township is substantially in excess of the land supply.3 Integrated Poverty Alleviation and Housing Scheme Integrated Pilot Poverty Alleviation and Housing Schemes were started in Mahalapye.2.2 SHHA Loans Building material loans continue to be an avenue through which low-income households access housing finance. 6. Those with unsightly and incomplete structures are advised to apply for improvement loans in terms of the National Policy on Housing. The amount of SHHA loan was increased in 1998 from P3 600.2.2. The scheme will assist plot holders whose income is below P4 400. This is mainly due to the fact that more government programs are introduced which result in more personnel being employed who in turn increase the demand for houses. The focus of the scheme is to assist households who do not qualify for SHHA to establish income-generating ventures to enable them to generate enough money to construct houses.2.3. 6.6.2. the need for more staff houses continues to grow. Francistown and Ghanzi in order to integrate skills acquisition. Council and Tribal Administration have constructed and continue to construct houses for their employees and the Botswana Housing Corporation continues to house those government employees who could not secure staff houses. Currently the waiting list for plots is 2 104 and it continues to grow creating a further backlog. District Administration. The number of plots normally allocated to SHHA by the Department of Lands is very little and it fails to absorb the number of applicants on the waiting list.2.3 Institutional Housing Even though the three Local Authorities in Jwaneng.1 Shortage of Plots The Accelerated Land Servicing Programme has failed to meet the demand for serviced land in Jwaneng as evidenced by the long waiting list of 2 104 for residential plots as at 30th June 2003.2. The funds can now be used for purchase of building materials as well as payment for labour costs. The 42 . 6. During the UDP II plan period it is planned to prepare a development plan for the planning area.00 and further increased in the year 2000 to P20 000. There is a general concern that the SHHA loans have not been efficiently utilized and beneficiaries fail to service the loans regularly.

attract possible investors into an area. 6.servicing of Environmental units 8 and 9 will alleviate the problem thereby reducing the backlog for residential plots. In order to augment the existing infrastructure in the township the Urban Development Plan II has planned for the servicing of environmental units 8 and 9 and the Central Business District North. Home ownership will be promoted through the SHHA and other schemes such as the Poverty Alleviation and Housing Programme and the Turnkey SHHA Programme.3 General Infrastructure and Services For any physical and economic development of a settlement. 43 .3.4 SETTLEMENT AND OBJECTIVES Goal HOUSING SECTOR GOALS AND To facilitate housing ownership and delivery Objectives To encourage plot holders to develop plots within the stipulated development period (two years) by conducting 4 workshops annually. To integrate income generation with shelter provision as a strategy for poverty alleviation by December 2006. Goal To develop a sustainable and efficient SHHA loan repayment collection system Objectives To provide SHHA loans to eligible citizens on a monthly basis.2 Housing Supply Housing delivery will be facilitated through the design and development of affordable housing schemes for the low income and the middle-income low groups.3. To continue to make stop order arrangements every month and continue with the services of debt collectors in case of defaulters. Goal To secure land/acquire land for distribution to eligible customers Objective To service Environmental Unit 8 by the end of financial year 2005/2006 thereby making plots available for allocation to applicants. which in turn would among other things. there is need for provision of infrastructure and services. To provide assistance to households who do not qualify for the SHHA programme and can not afford BHC houses by December 2006. 6. 6.

The following environmental impacts are anticipated: Vegetation clearance. Environmental impacts anticipated as a result of the construction include: Cutting of trees and vegetation Sand and gravel extraction Possible mushrooming of borrow pits Indiscriminate dumping of building rubble.5.5. Strategies to Achieve Settlement and Housing Goals and Objectives Activity/Project Servicing of unit 8 Potential Impacts Cutting of trees Sand and gravel extraction Building rubble Vegetation clearance Action Planting trees Identify areas for sand and gravel extraction For small projects use labour for clearing the project area because then they would be selective in cutting trees Extend sewer lines to cover Increase in solid waste & 44 .1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives To encourage plot holders to develop plots within the stipulated development period (two years) by conducting 4 workshops annually.1 Goal/objective To secure adequate land in town for distribution to eligible customers.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes The National Housing Policy and the SHHA programme are geared towards provision of housing for all income groups. Requirement for more land Loss of bio-diversity 6.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE SETTLEMENT AND HOUSING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Table 6.5 FRAMEWORK ASSESSMENT Objective 1 FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL 6. Objective 5 To service Environmental Unit 8 by the end of financial year 2005/2006 thereby making plots available for allocation to applicants. The anticipated environmental impact is litter during the workshops. which may result in soil erosion Mushrooming of burrow pits within the planning area Increase in solid waste and waste water Congestion along existing roads Dust and noise from construction Loss of bio-diversity 6. which will basically entail construction of houses.6.

To facilitate citizen housing ownership and delivery Settlement and Housing Performance Targets Activity Servicing of unit 8 Start Date April 2004 April 2003 End Date March 2007 March 2009 Monitoring Steering Committee.Goal/objective Activity/Project Potential Impacts waste water Possible increase HIV/AIDS in Action new areas Provision of condoms at construction sites HIV/AIDS education Nil To facilitate citizen housing ownership and delivery To encourage plot holders to develop plots within the stipulated development period (two years) To develop a sustainable and efficient SHHA repayment collection system Provision of SHHA loans to eligible citizens.2 Goal/Objective To secure adequate land in town for distribution to eligible customers.2 Performance Targets for UDP II Table 6. Quarterly reports to UDC and Council Report to Committee Planning Provision of SHHA loans to eligible citizens.7. Consideration of applications for SHHA loans will be done monthly through the Planning Committee Stop order arrangements and continue with the services of debt collectors Conducting annually 4 workshops To develop a sustainable and efficient SHHA repayment collection system To encourage plot holders to develop plots within the stipulated development period (two years) April 2003 March 2009 Progress reports to Planning and Finance Committees Report to Committee Planning April 2004 March 2007 45 .7.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP II 6.1 Issues and Strengths Issues Shortage of residential plots Non-development of residential plots Non repayment of SHHA loans by some beneficiaries Strengths Servicing of environmental units 8 and 9 Stop order arrangements to repay SHHA loans and engaging debt collectors 6. Conducting 4 workshops annually Nil Litter Provision and Placement of waste bins at strategic places during the workshops Stop order arrangements and continue with the services of debt collectors Nil Nil 6.

7.6.7.3 Financial year 2003/2004 Development Expenditure for The Settlement and Housing Sector Programme LH 201 – Development SHHA Project component SHHA Loans Estimated cost 1 920 000 LH 1003 – Government office blocks 2004/2005 2005/2006 2006/2007 2007/2008 2008/009 Grand Total LH 201 – Development LH 201 – Development LH 201 – development LH 201 – Development LH 201 – Development SHHA SHHA SHHA SHHA SHHA Integrated office block SHHA Loans SHHA Loans SHHA Loans SHHA Loans SHHA Loans 50 000 000 1 920 000 1 920 000 1 920 000 1 920 000 1 920 000 63 440 000 6.4 Plan Monitoring Programme The monitoring of the SHHA programme as a whole is monitored by the Council Planning Committee. which convenes every month. 46 .3 Development Budget for UDP 2 Table 6. Progress reports will be presented to the committee to determine progress and constraints and come up with solutions in cases where there are constraints.

1 Institutional Framework The Ministry of Agriculture operates through five departments of Animal. Department of Crop Production and Forestry This department‟s main function is to provide extension and technical services to farmers and the general public with a view to improving agricultural productivity and efficiency and ultimately improving people‟s living standards. The Ministry will continue to introduce new technologies for the farming community to cope with technological advancements and attain food security at the household and national level. Department of Cooperatives The department is responsible for promoting registration and development of societies and ensuring compliance with the Cooperative Societies Act.CHAPTER SEVEN 7 AGRICULTURE 7. Department of Animal. The department also provides business advice to the cooperative movement. 47 . The ministry will take its stakeholders on board. Agricultural Research. Alignment to Vision 2016 The Ministry of Agriculture‟s programmes and services envisage a situation where by the year 2016. Health and Production The main function of the department is to provide technical extension services to the farmers in order to maximise agricultural production and enhance better livestock management practises. agricultural services are provided by the Departments of Crop Production and Forestry. the programmes will have contributed in building a Prosperous. Health and Production. Jwaneng is mainly serving as an administrative centre for the three departments with only a few activities taking place in the township.1. Cooperatives and Ministry Management. Productive and Innovative Nation and an Educated and Informed Nation. Crop Production and Forestry. in its effort to improve the welfare of the farming community through training and introduction of appropriate technologies and enhanced service delivery. In Jwaneng.1 INTRODUCTION 7. Animal Health and Production and Cooperatives Department through its regional office in Kanye.

48 . crop pests.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION During UDP 2. Industry.1 Ministry Ministry of Agriculture Strategic Plans for Respective Ministries Strategic goal To promote agricultural productivity through an effective and efficient service delivery system and training To promote science and technology based agriculture development through research extension linkages To prevent and diseases and pests Ministry of Trade. It also provides for establishment of conservation committees and prescribes their functions.3 Agriculture Consultation Priorities The Jwaneng Township is a service centre for villages outside the town and there were few issues raised by the farmers.2 Strategic Plans for Respective Ministries Table 7.2.1.3 National Forest Policy (Draft) The overall objective of the policy is to optimise the contribution of the Forestry Sector to the long-term socio-economic development of Botswana by ensuring an enhanced and sustainable flow of benefits from forestry activities to all sectors of the population. 7. The Ministry of Agriculture will undertake programs and activities under the broader framework of the following policies and programmes: 7.2.1.1. shortage of land for horticultural projects and high tariffs for water.1 Forestry Act Number 29 of 1980 This Act provides for the better regulation and protection of forest produce in Botswana and provide for matters incidental thereto. The Act is not implemented in Jwaneng. These include poor soil fertility in town for backyard gardening. establish an Agricultural Resources Board and to define its powers and functions.2 Agricultural Resources Conservation Act The Act provides for conservation and improvement of agricultural resources in Botswana.1. 7. Wildlife and Tourism Ministry of Lands and Housing control animal To vaccinate animals To avail data and information for processing by the ministry To engage in annual dialogue with stakeholders to capture industry specific information needs Develop land allocation criteria to ensure equitable distribution of land to eligible customers throughout the country Strategic objective To establish an agriculture communication and information centre and network by 2003 To establish a research and development stakeholder forum by 2003 To facilitate equitable distribution of land through appropriate policies and programmes 7.2. as there are no forests in the township.7.1. 7.

3 Livestock Sub Sector The livestock sub sector will undertake the following: Compulsory annual vaccinations against rabies will be conducted on house-tohouse basis in Jwaneng Town.3. Training farmers in Jwaneng on how to produce good quality hides and skins and adoption of good husbandry and management practices for poultry/dairy cattle. is another prohibitive factor to horticultural development in the town.3. all the Arable Land Development (ALDEP) backlog that may recur from NDP8/UDP1. However. Crop productivity will be enhanced by striving to complete.3. 7. and it is hoped that more projects shall be established following the successful implementation of the program. The water development policy as covered in the National Master Plan for Arable Agricultural and Dairy Development (NAMPAADD). 7.4 National Policy on Agriculture Development The main objectives of the policy are to improve food security at both household and national levels. There shall also be increased thrust on the utilization of acquired ALDEP packages. There is nothing in terms of policy implementation in the township. Private vaccination of dogs and cats against canine distemper and provirus enteritis. mainly as a result of shortage of irrigation water.2. which goes to all urban centres as well as settlements so that farmers can have access to the LAC requisites. Other available options include re-use of sewerage water in areas where such is in abundance and a more organized system.2 Horticultural Sub Sector There is no significant horticultural potential in Jwaneng.1. Provision of drugs/feeds/livestock management inputs at subsidized cost through the Mobile LAC. In Jwaneng.7. which has been sanctioned in the sitting of the fourth session of the eighth Parliament. seeks to address various ways in which all available resources could be harnessed and put to maximum possible use. diversify the agricultural sectors production base for income opportunities. 7. except for some pilot projects in certain parts of the Southern District.1. encourages backyard gardening to increase household food security.1 Crop Sub Sector In order to address its objectives the department will intensify transfer of appropriate technologies to the farming communities by way of staging crop demonstrations and providing relevant extension messages. the Department of Crop Production and Forestry. 49 . within the first two years of NDP 9/UDP 2. increase employment opportunities for the fast growing labour force and provide a secure production environment for those engaged in agriculture. routine treatment of household pets against infectious diseases will also be undertaken. possibilities are being explored to find alternatives to promote production of vegetables in small backyard and institutional vegetable gardens for domestic consumption and/or Community Home Based Care centres. The relatively high tariffs charged by the Water Utilities Corporation (WUC).3 AGRICULTURAL SECTOR ACTIVITIES 7. 7.2.5 National Master Plan for Arable Agriculture and Dairy Development The programme focuses on rain fed and irrigation arable agriculture and dairy farming.

Animal Health and Production Sub Sector Goals and Objetives Objective 1. To provide appropriate services and prevent pets diseases.To provide drugs through the Livestock Advisory Centre (LAC) and vaccinate pets against rabies annually 7.3. To provide cooperative services to the Jwaneng community Cooperatives Sub Sector Goals and Objectives Objective 1.4.It is worth mentioning that the main activities of the DAHP are focused in rural/ extension areas where most of the farmers live. The department also provides business advice to the cooperative movement. 7. It is planned during UDP II to construct an office block at a cost of P600 000.4 Goal 1.4.4. In Jwaneng. the Department does not have an office and the farming community depends on the Kanye regional office for services.3 Cooperatives Sub Sector Table 7. To facilitate establishment of horticultural projects 2.00.2 Goal To promote agricultural production Crop Production and Forestry Sub Sector Goals and Objectives Objective 1.To build an office block 50 . To build an office block To motivate staff by providing a conducive working environment To develop staff skills and competency through formal and on the job training 3.3 Goal 1.4 Cooperatives Sub Sector The department is responsible for promoting registration and development of cooperative societies and ensuring compliance with the Cooperatives Societies Act. To orientate newly appointed officers on agricultural policies and form one Work Improvement Team 7.1 Crop Production and Forestry Sub Sector Table 7.4 AGRICULTURAL SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 7. The DAHP has got limited role to play in urban centres. 7.2 Animal Health and Production Sub Sector Table 7.

To facilitate establishment of horticultural projects 2. increased demand for land.1. for example. for example.3 Cooperatives Sub Sector Table 7. To provide appropriate services and prevent pets diseases. building rubble.1 Evaluation Of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives 7. cutting of trees.1 Crop Production and Forestry Sub-Sector Table 7.To provide drugs through the Livestock Advisory Centre (LAC) and vaccinate pets against rabies annually Environmental Issue No environmental impact 7.To promote agriculture production in Jwaneng 2.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes Table 7.6 Goal 1.7. To motivate staff by providing a conducive working environment Crop Production and Forestry Sub-Sector Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Objective 1.To build an office block Environmental Issue Loss of vegetation. increase in solid waste.5.5.5. To build an office block Environmental issue Cutting of trees during bush clearing Loss of vegetation.5.1.5.1.2 Animal Health and Production sub sector Table 7. Animal Health and Production Sub-Sector Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Objective 1. demand for land.5 Goal 1. building rubble 7. To provide cooperative services to the Jwaneng community Cooperatives Sub-Sector Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Objective 1.7 Goal 1. increase in solid waste. No environmental anticipated impacts 3. To orientate newly appointed officers on agricultural policies and form one Work Improvement Team 7.8 Policy National Policy of Agriculture Development Evaluation Of Sector Policies And Programmes Objective Improve food security and diversify agriculture production sector base Improve rain fed and irrigation arable agriculture and dairy farming Environmental Issue Disturbance of free wildlife movement and limited access to communal land by small scale farmers Potential for pollution of underground water resources as a result of use of pesticides NAMPAADD 51 . cutting of trees. To develop staff skills and competency through formal and on the job training 3.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 7.

9 Strategies To Achieve Crop Production And Forestry Sector Goals And Objectives Potential Impacts No potential anticipated impacts Action No mitigation measures Proposed projects/Strategies 1. for example.1 Crop Production and Forestry Sub Sector Table 7.3 Cooperatives Sub Sector Table 7. proper of building rubble to the landfill.2 Animal Health and Production Sub Sector Table 7. requirement for more land to put up staff houses No potential anticipated impacts 5. increase in solid waste. requirement for more land to put up staff houses Action Landscaping and planting trees. Provide technical expertise on how to grow fruit trees and vegetables More land will be required No potential anticipated impacts No mitigation measures Landscaping and planting trees. use of recycled water 2. Staff training on WITS 6.Policy National Forest Policy Objective Optimise the contribution of the forestry sector to the long term socio-economic development of Botswana Environmental Issue Deforestation 7.Identification of alternative water sources. for example.6.10 Strategies to Achieve Animal Health and Production Sub Sector Goals and Objectives Proposed projects/Strategies 1.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE THE AGRICULTURE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 7. building rubble. construction of high rise buildings. construction of high rise buildings. Vaccinate once a year Potential Impacts 1. increase in solid waste. Identify potential agricultural land around the sewerage ponds 3. Used needles and vaccine containers Action Proper disposal by incineration at the landfill 7.6. No mitigation measures 4. building rubble. 52 . Construction of office block Vegetation clearance cutting down of trees.6. proper disposal of building rubble to the landfill. for example.11 Strategies to Achieve Cooperatives Sub Sector Goals and Objectives Proposed projects/Strategies Construction of office block Potential Impacts Vegetation clearance cutting down of trees. To conduct workshops and seminars 7.

7.1 Development Expenditure and Performance Targets for UDP II Table 7.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 7.12 Development Expenditure and Performance Targets for the Agriculture Sector Programme AG 315-Development Extension Services AG 501 – Development of Project component District Office Agricultural Estimated cost 3 247 668 600 00. The monitoring part of it is the responsibility of DABS and in turn should brief the Urban Development Committee on quarterly basis on both physical progress and constraints met should the project start.7.00 Performance targets Start Date: April 2003 End Date: March 2004 Start Date: April 2003 End Date: March 2004 Cooperatives Office Block 7.2 Plan Monitoring Program The proposed project is construction of an office block.7. 53 .

To facilitate the availability infrastructure and services of industry specific Speedy and efficient land allocation and management.1 Strategic Plans for other Ministries Ministry Finance and Development Planning Trade. Department of Trade and Consumer Affairs. To ensure development of viable and sustainable citizen owned business enterprises. there is the Department of Industrial Affairs and the Jwaneng Town Council. 54 . ??have a role to facilitate the diversification and expansion of Botswana‟s economy in line with Vision 2016. Wildlife and Tourism Lands and Housing CEDA Local Government Strategic goals To ensure efficient and sound economic management.1. Industry. WILDLIFE AND TOURISM 8.1. The shortage of manpower in the district to support and advice entrepreneurs is also a problem.1 INTRODUCTION The Ministries of Trade and Industry and that of Environment. and Tourism. Several departments hold key responsibilities to this end: Department of Industrial Affairs. The private sector also provides tourism facilities though at a very low rate (For example. To promote local governance through participatory development and to enhance service delivery.3 Consultation Priorities Lack of serviced land.1. which provide support services to business ventures. INDUSTRY. these are the Botswana Development Corporation Limited (financing industrial development projects). NDB and CEDA offer services to the Jwaneng community through their offices in Kanye. In Jwaneng. Registrar of Companies as well as Department of Tourism and Department of Wildlife and National Parks. 8. and National Development Bank (NDB) and the Citizen Empowerment Development Agency (CEDA) both of which provide finance in terms of loans. Botswana Export Development and Investment Authority (inward/outward investment promotion).2 Role of the Private Sector There are a number of agencies and parastatal organisations under these ministries which play a vital role in business activities. 8. The objective on economic diversification cannot be realized because of a shortage of industrial and commercial plots. The absence of these presents constraints to existing and potential entrepreneurs. The Citizen Entrepreneurial Development Agency (CEDA) also assists business enterprises in Jwaneng through its office in Kanye 8.CHAPTER EIGHT 8 TRADE. Mokala hotel and Sawasawa Guest House). Wildlife. The need to establish a CEDA office in Jwaneng to service the township and surrounding villages has also been expressed.

8.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION
8.2.1 Industrial Development Policy The main emphasis of the policy is on diversification of the industrial base. Its objective is to encourage a highly productive and efficient export industry, which emphasizes utilization of local natural resources. It is on this basis that the potential of leather products needs to be enhanced. There is a local Council abattoir in Jwaneng where people can source skin / hides. 8.2.2 Financial Assistance Policy (FAP) and Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises Policy (SMME) The main objectives of the policies at district level were: To foster citizen entrepreneurship and empowerment To promote exports oriented manufacturing sector To achieve economic diversification To encourage the development of a competitive and sustainable business community. However, to foster efficient cost recovery measures, these two policies have been replaced by CEDA. It must be noted that FAP was 90% grant, while SMME offered loans at 15% interest rate. The rate of defaulting cases was high due to lack of a proper monitoring systems. There are currently 23 industries that are operational in Jwaneng that were financed by FAP and SMME. 8.2.3 Citizen Entrepreneurship Development Agency (CEDA) CEDA is an agency for the development of viable, sustainable citizen owned business enterprises. It provides financial assistance in the form of loans at subsidized interest rates. Through CEDA one can get a loan from P500 to P150 000 at a 5% interest rate per annum and P150 001 to P2 million at 7% per annum. Citizens aged 18 years and over qualify for such loans. One can fund expansion of an existing business or a totally new business venture. There is a CEDA office based in Kanye that assists the district‟s prospective entrepreneurs with financial assistance for viable and sustainable proposals. 8.2.4 Consumer Protection Act The aim of this legislation is to provide protection and support to consumers by means of investigation, prohibition and control of unfair business practices. During UDP2 the district will continue its education campaign on consumer rights and promotion of formation of consumer groups as well as mediation in consumer complaints through the Department of Consumer Affairs, which is mandated to do so. There is an office at Kanye that also covers Jwaneng. 8.2.5 The National Licensing Act It empowers the National Licensing Authority to issue licenses for certain trading activities. This Act is however under review. Licensing helps to ensure that health and safety standards are met, prevents illegal aliens from establishing businesses and provides an opportunity to gauge the magnitude of the manufacturing sector, including other important attributes such as employment, level of exports and type of product. 55

8.2.6 Tourism Policy The general objective of the policy is to obtain, on a sustainable basis, the greatest possible net social and economic benefits for Botswana from their tourism resources, scenic beauty, wildlife and unique ecological, geological and cultural characteristics. Specifically it aims to: Increase foreign exchange earnings Generate employment, mainly in rural areas Raise income in rural areas to reduce urban drift Generally promote rural development and to stimulate service provision in remote areas. There is nothing definite planned for tourism in this plan period. However, the Jwaneng Town Council is exploring the possibility of developing an amusement park during the plan period as a way of promoting tourism in the township. 8.2.7 Tourism Enterprise Licensing The requirement is that any tourism enterprise to operate, it should be licensed. There are four broad categories of tourism enterprises as shown in Table 8.1. Their ownership status is also indicated.
Table 8.1
Category Definition

Tourism Enterprises and Ownership Status
Ownership Status in Jwaneng Town Citizen 0 2 Non Citizen 0 0 Joint 0 1 Unknown 0 0 Total 00 3

A B

Operations that offer facilities only on site such as hotel, motels, guesthouses, & apartments Operations that offer facilities on and off site such as tourist Camps, lodges, caravans, hunting camps and tented tourist Camps which operate tours that require the services of professional hunters Operations that offer facilities off site only, such as Safari or tour operators and any enterprises that receives and transport travellers and guests Operations that act as agents only, such as travel agents.

C

0

0

0

0

0

D Total

0 2

0 0

0 1

0 0

0 3

Source: Tourism Office Gaborone, 2003

It should also be noted that the Trans Kalahari highway forms part of tourism as the town benefits from tourists going through to Namibia when they stop overnight for lodging in Jwaneng. 8.2.8 Wildlife Conservation Policy, 1986 The aim of this policy is to encourage long-term commercial development of the wildlife industry, in order to create economic opportunities, jobs and incomes for the rural population in particular and the nation at large for them to appreciate and conserve wildlife and other resources. There is a lot of wildlife within the planning area, which the town is not directly 56

benefiting from, as the parks are owned by Debswana. The species include giraffe, baboons, springbok, hyena, heart-beast and kudu. 8.2.9 Wildlife Conservation and National Parks Act, 1992 The Act provides for conservation and management of the wildlife of Botswana; giving effect to CITES and any other international convention for the protection of fauna and flora to which Botswana is, from time to time, a party. It also provides for the establishment, control and management of National Parks, Game Reserves, and for matters incidental thereto or connected therewith. The Parks available in the planning area are owned by Debswana, and these are Tholo and Jwana Parks. The parks are used for mine employees‟ refreshments, camping facilities by everybody and for conservation, environmental and educational purposes by schools. 8.2.10 Community Based Natural Resources Management (CBNRM) Policy The CBNRM policy which is in draft form, aims at improving the conservation of Botswana‟s resources, enhance economic and social development in rural areas and to provide opportunities for community participation and capacity building regarding natural resource management of forest resources, national parks and game reserves. Currently, there is nothing for CBNRM within the planning area.

8.3 TRADE AND INDUSTRY
8.3.1 Trade and Industry Trade in the district is largely retail-based, with only one wholesale outlet. More needs to be done to attract more investors to the township to make it an attractive investment location for industrial and commercial development. The ongoing construction of a shopping complex will offer consumers a wide choice of goods and services. Industrial activity is limited to small-scale enterprises and the full potential of industrial development in the district has not been adequately explored. 8.3.2 CEDA The Government has introduced CEDA to encourage citizens to undertake industry related activities after the phasing out of FAP. CEDA was established as a result of the recommendations from the National Conference on Citizen Economic Empowerment and 4th evaluation of FAP. Unlike FAP, CEDA will be providing loans to all forms of businesses. CEDA focuses specifically on the development of viable, sustainable citizen owned businesses, through the development of an access to entrepreneurial and management skills, training, monitoring and mentoring, provision of finance and sharing of risks. The scheme will assist small, medium and large-scale enterprises. Promoters are encouraged to contribute something towards the project cost as equity or owner‟s contribution to share the risk. CEDA emphasises fostering citizen entrepreneurship and empowerment to achieve economic diversification in line with the National Development Plan 9 and create sustainable employment opportunities. The CEDA office in Kanye assists the township‟s potential entrepreneurs with finance for viable, sustainable citizen owned businesses

57

Wildlife and Tourism Sector Goals and Objectives OBJECTIVES 1. To have facilitated the development of efficient. strengthened and continually reviewed. the Environmental Clubs of Botswana.4 Wildlife and National Parks The Department of Wildlife and National Parks office situated in Kanye. 58 .To have conducted a gap analysis on industrial and business skill training for capacity building relevant to industrial needs. To have implemented cost sharing measures on entrepreneurial training.To have the industrial development policy reviewed and updated by March 2004.3.3 Tourism Generally there are limited developed tourism activities in the planning area.To have identified and facilitated the development of industries which have potential for export.3. 8. To enhance Industrial Affairs department partnership and cooperation with the private sector and other stakeholders. competitive and export oriented industry. In this township there is nothing in place for the planning period.To continuously encourage local Authorities in cooperation with business communities to provide infrastructure facilities and promotion strategies for their communities. 1. INDUSTRY. To have industrial sector specific programs and entrepreneurial support programs developed. GOALS TRADE AND INDUSTRY To have the industrial development policy continually reviewed. 2. 3. 4.To have identified and facilitated the development of service industries that support competitive manufacturing by 2003. 2.2 Trade. 2.8. adaptation and transfer of appropriate technology through the application of science and research by December 2003. 4. With the advent of CEDA it is hoped that more citizens will be able to successfully venture into the industry and explore CBNRM activities in and around the township. In addition there are no serviced plots. To have a strategy for entrepreneurship development taking on board commercialisation/ privatisation opportunities by December 2003 1.To have facilitated the development. 5. 3.To have facilitated a user friendly access to business infrastructure services on a continuous basis. 2. To have industrial sectors identified and specific sectoral programs developed 2. for example. sees its role as effectively conserving the biodiversity of Botswana whilst ensuring that Batswana appreciate. It will also continue to support conservation education through.4 TRADE. 3. 1.To facilitate the availability of industry specific infrastructure and services. Industry. participate in and benefit from sustainable utilization of wildlife resources. 8. 1. This is due to citizens regarding the town as a mining town. WILDLIFE AND TOURISM SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Table 8. lack of training and difficulties in sourcing start up capital. To develop a strategy to enhance partnership with the private sectors and other stakeholders. To have sectoral consultative mechanism for a developed and strengthened department.

This will result in more physical projects hence more demand for land.5. Develop an inventory of tourism opportunities by 2006. WILDLIFE There are no goals and objectives for the department in this district.To empower citizens through increasing their ownership and management of tourism enterprises. Small entrepreneurs were assisted through FAP grants to enable them to start businesses as a way of encouraging diversification of the economy. As a way of achieving this the department will. more especially that clients transport themselves to and from the course venues.1 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programs The implementation of CEDA through financial assistance to the community will result in more investment from different sectors such as Tourism. to equip them with skills compatible with their projects. OBJECTIVES To have identified all potential tourism opportunities by 2006.5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 8. INDUSTRY. 59 .6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE TRADE. To update stakeholders on tourism developments on a continuous basis. increase in solid and liquid waste and indiscriminate extraction of gravel and sand. 8. Continue monitoring of operating projects and extensive training to these entrepreneurs. 8. 3. Wildlife and Industrial activities into the township. 3. Dissemination of information on tourism investment opportunity to citizens. it is essential that training centres and / or facilities be effective. it is essential that manpower be improved in the town. 2. newsletters. and look for their own accommodation. TOURISM AND WILDLIFE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The Integrated Field Services has been mainly set to support the development of small-scale enterprises in urban centres. Facilitate extensive coverage of projects. Development of district business advisory centres. To increase economic benefits to local communities through identifying and developing other tourism products 2. Commercial. tourism attraction inventory and produce a regional brochure by end of the plan period.To increase citizen participation in the tourism industry. There will also be vegetation clearance.To have readily available tourism information.GOALS TRADE AND INDUSTRY TOURISM 1. The above goals and objective are national level goals and objectives and there is nothing planned for Jwaneng during UDP II.

32 60 . water pollution and clearing of vegetation for industrial projects. 8. The major constraint is unavailable serviced industrial plots. landfill facilities must be used. planting of trees to replace debushed vegetation during structure construction. There are however. Most offices and / or organizations that promote and advise small business communities are mainly established in Kanye and Gaborone. 8. strict monitoring on disposal of waste from investment. there is a need to depend on regional and global markets to offer wider and diversified market opportunities.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 The district is faced with a big challenge of achieving sustainable economic growth and diversification by broadening the base of the manufacturing and tourism sectors. issues of concern in the district that make it difficult if not impossible to achieve the goals and objectives. This has a negative impact on the progress of businesses in the township. waste from investment activities.1 Development Budget for UDP2 Development Budget for The Industrial Affairs Department Project title Construction of IFS staff houses Objective Provide accommodation officers for Implementation period 2008 /2009 Funding P694 580.Proposed projects The department of Industrial Affairs is proposing to build two staff houses in Jwaneng. such as litter.7. Potential impacts of proposed projects There are environmental threats. 8. destruction of vegetation. and have not opened their service centres in the township. During this plan period there are no proposed projects for Tourism and Wildlife and National Parks for this town. Given the small market size.6.1 Mitigation measures Ensuring strict adherence to waste management in all investors‟ factories. proper drainage systems and landscaping must be taken into account. This constraint will continue disadvantaging the small enterprises.

the Departmental Management Division oversees the overall administration of the department.1. in terms of training.CHAPTER NINE 9 EDUCATION AND TRAINING 9. Vocational Education and Training and non-formal education. through its Programme Development and Delivery Division also deals with the curriculum. The Department. Overall policy direction and provision of education is the responsibility of the Ministry of Education through its various departments. advising local authorities and other stakeholders on educational developments and provision. The Human Resources Management Division is responsible for recruitment and development of teachers. empowerment of school management teams and managing the development of pre-primary and primary education system in general. such as whether the curriculum adheres to the Revised National Policy on Education and Vision 2016.1 Institutional Framework The Jwaneng Town population benefits from the Ministry of Education (MoE) provisions at pre-primary. primary. It assists teachers in the implementation of the curriculum. 61 . equipment. The department also supervises development services through its inspectorate section. Department of Vocational Education and Training This department deals with the development of policies of institutions in consultation with other stakeholders and coordination of development projects through its Policy Development and Delivery Division. inspection of schools. Department of Primary Education The Department of Primary Education has an overall responsibility of providing appropriate and effective primary education that would enable young learners within the country to acquire basic skills. These departments include primary education. Lastly. manages and trains secondary school teachers and implements the curriculum. The department specifically deals with the identification and review of educational needs. facilitation of in-service training of teachers and department of primary education staff. Department of Secondary Education The Department of Secondary Education in the Ministry of Education is responsible for the provision of secondary education throughout the country mainly in terms of provision of facilities. secondary education. setting. secondary and tertiary levels. in colleges. abilities.1 INTRODUCTION 9. and school furniture. and general knowledge and develop talents thereby becoming self-reliant and useful members of society. monitoring and evaluation of educational standards.

This is also in line with the Revised National Policy on Education. The main objective of this is to reduce the existing backlog of such facilities to ensure a conducive learning environment for students. This will ensure equity and equal opportunity in the provision of secondary education. the Jwaneng Town Council operates a Day Care Centre and plans to upgrade the existing Day Care Centre by constructing 4 more classrooms so as to increase the intake thereby contributing to the enhancement of learner‟s readiness.2 Strategic plans for respective ministries Ministry of Education The Ministry of Education strategic goals relevant to Jwaneng are outlined below: a. The Ministry of Local Government on the other hand has responsibility over provision of primary education facilities and equipment through local authorities such as councils. 9.Department of Non-formal Education The Department of non-formal education is responsible for out of school education in the country. The Jwaneng Town Council therefore in line with this goal. The Debswana Jwaneng Mine operates and owns a pre primary school (Acacia Day Care Centre) and an English Medium Primary School (Acacia Primary School). toilets and resource centres. The Jwaneng Junior Secondary Schools will expose students to computer literacy by training students in computer programmes. 9. These are Mmelegi Day Care Centre. there are 5-Day Care Centres in the township operated by different members of the community. The Jwaneng Technical College on the other hand will introduce new vocational training programmes. To provide comprehensive and innovative pre-primary programme in order to enhance learner‟s readiness.1. has planned to provide education facilities in the township schools by constructing classrooms. Rainbow Day 62 . multi-media production and tourism).1. To ensure equity and equal opportunity in the provision of education and training. b. increase the number of physical facilities to accommodate day release programmes.3 The role of the private sector In Jwaneng the private sector plays a very important role in the education sector through the provision of pre-primary and primary education. This will also ensure equity and equal opportunity in the provision of vocational education To promote access and use of information and communication technology (ICT) in the management and delivery of education and training. Ministry of Local Government The strategic goal for the Ministry of Local Government relevant to Jwaneng is “To improve quality of life of Batswana by coordinating and providing basic infrastructure and social services” The Ministry‟s mandate in education is the provision of primary education facilities and equipment through local authorities such as Jwaneng Town Council. (Agriculture. increase the boarding capacity and gradually increase under each institutional intake. In addition. teachers‟ quarters. The junior secondary schools‟ goal for the plan period is to sustain universal access to Junior Secondary Education by promoting readmission of school dropouts in Jwaneng. c. the numbers of physically challenged students and remote area dwellers. which is executed through the National Literacy Programme. In line with this objective.

construct a new one and provide teachers‟ accommodation to facilitate access by the highest number of pupils to education opportunities with a view to enhancing the educated and informed nation pillar of vision 2016. tertiary education.1. The Jwaneng Town Council will therefore continue to make efforts to expand the Day Care Centre to increase its admission capacity and encourage the private sector to establish additional Day Care Centres. Government will however continue to provide an enabling environment for the expansion of this level of education as well as provision of trained teachers and effective supervision. as well as access to education the 1994 Revised National Policy on Education. 9. 63 . which is unable to absorb all children of preschool going age. However. vocational and technical training. Council has a Day Care Centre. Government recognises the need to expand access at senior secondary in order to meet the demand for people with qualification of this level both by the economy and training institutions. it is currently not possible for government to commit itself to the provision of pre-primary education on a universal basis given the scale of government commitment to other areas of support. Primary School Government recognises the need to achieve universal access to primary education. Secondary Education Enrolments have increased in absolute terms at senior secondary school level and government has provided a nationwide network of schools with adequate resources. primary education.4 Consultation Priorities The following are consultation priorities that were raised by the community during consultations: Provision of another council Day Care Centre Construction of a primary school in unit 6 Shortage of accommodation for teachers 9.2.Care Centre. The Jwaneng Town Council will continue during the plan period to expand the schools. In Jwaneng. Broadvision Day Care Centre and Ikageng Day Care Centre. increased access to primary education has not been accompanied by a corresponding provision of educational inputs such as classrooms and teachers‟ housing. However.1 Revised National Policy on Education Government has committed itself to continued and sustained improvements in the relevance and quality of education. Busy Kids Day Care Centre. The policy outlines the government‟s commitment in relation to pre-primary education. secondary education.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 9. special education and out of school education as shown below: Pre-primary education There is recognition by government of the need to develop an effective and comprehensive policy on pre-primary education in order to link it to the formal education system in the long run.

In line with the vision 2016 pillar of an Educated and Informed Nation. Special Education Provision of education for children with disabilities still remains limited partly as a result of lack of data on incidence and categories of disability among children. 9. Provide continuing education in order to equip society with life long skills to cope with existing and future problems in a rapidly changing world. which is operated by the Jwaneng Town Council. The Council has in fact started with purchase of special education materials for the disabled pupils at Dinonyane Primary School where all disabled children have been grouped from all the four primary schools. 9. Vocational Education The Revised National Policy on Education advocates increased access to Vocational Education and Training.2 Policy on Tertiary Education The University of Botswana in conjunction with other tertiary institutions strives to: Equip students with knowledge. The college will also enhance the spirit of empathy through various school clubs to extend their hands to the less privileged members of the community. Council and the Ministry of Education will during the plan period provide facilities. Diversify methods of delivery of its academic programmes in order to enhance access to higher education. In Jwaneng. skills. which also equips students with vocational training. Jwaneng Technical College will provide a state of the art resource centre and enrich the curriculum by introducing more courses.3 EDUCATION 9. Just and Caring Nation. The present capacity of the existing Council day care centre is unable to absorb all 64 .It is proposed during the plan period to construct academic facilities. accommodation facilities and provide furniture and equipment for the two schools in line with the vision 2016 pillar of an Educated and Informed Nation.3. Government remains committed to all children‟s education including disabled ones and will therefore intensify efforts to increase access to education for disabled children.1 Schools Pre-schools Education There is currently 1 Day Care Centre in Jwaneng. thereby achieving the vision 2016 pillar of a Compassionate.2. In Jwaneng. the above objectives are facilitated through the UB Centre for Continuing Education based at Morama CJSS and at the Jwaneng Technical College. and attitudes suitable for their future employment. The intention during the plan period is to construct a special education classroom block to meet the needs of disabled children. It is estimated on the basis of international data that about 10 % of children have some form of disability in Botswana. The Technical College in Jwaneng will embark on upgrading of the college during the plan period in terms of provision of school facilities and construction of teachers houses. which are user friendly by disabled children.

As a result of inadequate teaching space. The age range is 18 to 25 for new entrants and 25 to 40 for National Craft Certificate programmes graduates. kitchens and resource centre deficits. Council through the Social and Community Development Department and in line with the recommendation of the 1994 Revised National Policy on Education will continue to make efforts to expand it‟s Butler Dintwa Day Care Centre.the children in Jwaneng of pre-school going age. As such in the four Council Primary Schools. This is intended to facilitate access by the highest possible number of pupils. The ratio of male students to female is 1:3. In keeping with the pillar of Vision 2016 of an Educated and Informed Nation. lack of art laboratories and high maintenance costs as a result of lime deposits in water. some classes end up using specialist rooms as base rooms.1 Table 9. The current enrolment within the four council primary schools is as shown on Table 9. UDP II plan period will address the increase in the intake in terms of curriculum and the provision of new facilities at the college. The Department of Non-Formal Education has therefore developed programmes to fulfil part of this primary goal by providing out of school 65 . Primary Education There are four (4) primary schools in Jwaneng. The current enrolment of the existing council Day Care Centre is 100 with 5 teachers and the teacher: pupil ration is 1:25. priority will be devoted to implementing aspects of the Revised National Policy on Education. There is need for expansion at this level of education. It has a total attendance enrolment fluctuating from 350 to 530. It is planned that more facilities will be introduced and new facilities constructed so as to increase the intake. These are Jwana. Common problems faced by both schools include inadequate teaching space. toilets. administration blocks. The backlog on classrooms in all the primary schools is currently 18 and the backlog for teachers‟ houses is 64. Secondary School Education There are two Community Junior Secondary Schools (CJSS) in Jwaneng namely Morama CJSS and Kgosimpe CJSS with a total teacher establishment of 73 and a student enrolment of 927. which lead to clogging of water reticulation systems in both schools. Teemane.1 School Jwana Primary School Dinonyane Primary School Teemane Primary School Kgalagadi Primary School Total Enrolment of Jwaneng Town Council‟s Primary Schools Enrolment 468 703 837 486 The current teacher: pupil ratio ranges from 1:25 to 1:36. which are owned by Council. Non-formal Education The Ministry of Education‟s primary goal is to create learning and educated society where learning is seen as a lifelong learning process. The main aim being to reduce classrooms. Kgalagadi and Dinonyane. the Jwaneng Town Council will increase facilities of its Day Care Centre. which results in destruction of installations in the specialist rooms. Vocational Training The Jwaneng Technical College was officially opened in August 1988.

Formal Education sector in Jwaneng is covered by the Mabutsane office. These are Mmelegi Day Care Centre.2 Subjects English Maths Social Studies G/Science R/Education O/Procedures Commerce Book-keeping & Acc Setswana P/Agric Total JC/BGCSE BOCODOL Enrolment Statistics 2001/2002 [Per Subject] . Rainbow Day Care Centre. Busy Kids Day Care Centre. Ikageng Day Care Centre and Acacia Day Care Centre operated by Debswana Jwaneng Mine.. Broadvision Day Care Centre.learning opportunities with an aim to teach adults and youth who wish to learn new skills and acquire more knowledge to apply in their day to day life activities.3 CABS Basic English Subjects offered DABS Financial Management Advanced accounting Business management Auditing Costing Business English Data processing Economics Business Economics Intermediate accounting Commerce & Law Book keeping Principles of Cost accounting Business mathematics Business Administration 66 . Botswana College of Distance Learning (BOCODOL) Morama Community Study Centre falls under the Gaborone region and it started operating in April 2001 with about 41 new learners who enrolled for different subjects in JC. Table 9. The Debswana Mine owned primary school is well catered for in terms of facilities. The Non.Junior Certificate 2001 13 10 4 9 5 1 1 2 11 2 2002 1 25 12 25 9 2 4 0 23 27 Totals 14 35 16 34 14 3 5 2 34 29 186 Table 9. GCE and BGSE programmes. which are privately owned by different members of the community. There is also one English Medium Primary School owned by the Debswana Jwaneng Mine. Private Schools There are 5 Day Care Centres in the township.

9.3.2 Training Until recently, education has been supported largely by the concept that the door of democracy is unlocked by education. Education and training therefore are key to a successful economy, hence they have to be planned appropriately to harvest good economic returns. During this plan period, the Department of Vocational Training will endeavour to (inline with the Revised National Education Policy on Education, the vocational training act and regular instruments from the Ministry of Education) increase enrolment by providing both short and long term courses with full certificates and certificates of attendance to the community in general. The target groups include the unemployed, school leavers, those in employment and adult returnees wishing to revitalize their careers or improve their employability. 9.3.2.1 Commercial Technical and Vocational Training In Jwaneng, this responsibility is carried out by the Jwaneng Technical College on behalf of DVET and MTTC to offer a four-year National Craft Certificate programmes to sponsored employees from industry and to train school leavers for 2 years for trade test C under the same programme. This tripartite system is in the process of being streamlined for the betterment of the new training system. DVET on the other hand is implementing BTEP programmes in Technical Colleges as empowered by the vocational training Act. As part of its mandate and based on its vision and mission statements the Jwaneng technical College responds to the empowerment of youth and employees to offer vocational training in the district. Opened in August 1988, the college is now 15 years old. It has a total attendance enrolment fluctuating from 350 to 530. The ratio of male students to female is 1:3. The age range is 18 to 25 for new entrants and 25 to 40 for NCC programmes graduates. A master plan UNDP9/ UDP2 will address the increase in the intake in terms of curricular and the provision of new facilities at the college. The present training programme capacity status quo is described below: Programmes and courses a. Building Construction Engineering Painting and decoration Plumbing Carpentry Construction Mechanical Engineering Machine fitting Maintenance fitting Welding and fabrication Electrical Engineering Electrical Installation Business Studies Secretarial Accounts Information Communication and Technology Computer Operators course Word processing – Excel, Access, Power Point Design and Textile 67

b.

c. d.

e.

f.

g.

h.

Knitting Dress making New areas of BTEP Electrical and Mechanical Engineering courses Information and communication technology Key Skills Other areas of BTEP to be implemented are: Business studies: Construction Design and textile

Under UDP2 and in addition to the existing training programmes the expansion programme will address the following areas of training: Agriculture, Tourism, and Multi media communication. It is anticipated that at the end of the plan period the Jwaneng Technical College will be able to cater for 1000 students (boarding and day students inclusive). Hostels capacity: 5 students‟ hostels per room (240), and 2 students‟ Hostels for female students (120).

9.4 EDUCATION AND OBJECTIVES

TRAINING

SECTOR

GOALS

AND

During the plan period Jwaneng educational sectors will endeavour to achive the following in line with the revised National Policy on Education and the general guidelines from the Ministry of Education: Pre-School Goal To make pre-schooling accessible to more children. Objectives To construct additional four classrooms, at Butler Dintwa Day Care Centre so as to increase intake. To employ four (4) teachers and four (4) assistants, and ancillary staff Primary Education Goal To increase access and equity, in order to achieve universal access to primary education Objectives To provide adequate primary school facilities (classrooms, teachers‟ quarters, toilets and resource centres) in all primary schools every financial year until the end of the plan period. 9.4.1 Secondary Education Goal 1 To enhance capacity for further training of junior secondary school-leavers 68

Objective Implementing new diversified curriculum to include technical and business subjects. Goal 2 To sustain universal access to junior secondary education. Objective To promote readmission of school drop outs To construct academic and accommodation facilities and provide furniture and equipment in both the secondary schools Goal 3 To expose all students to computer literacy and provide computer literacy to the public. Objective To train students and the public through the facilities that schools have in place. 9.4.2 Vocational Education The overall goal for Vocational Education and Training is “to develop the full potential of Botswana's human resources to meet the current and future needs of the individual and those of the entire country's economy”. As part of this plan, the Jwaneng Technical College will endeavour to pursue amongst others, Department of Vocational and Training objectives. a. To increase access to Technical and Vocational Training through DVET expansion programmes based on the Jwaneng Technical College master plan by: Introducing new vocational training programmes. (Agriculture, multi-media production and tourism). Increasing the number of physical facilities to accommodate day release programmes Increasing the boarding capacity To facilitate access to VET for disadvantaged groups by implementing DVET policy on access and equity by: Gradually increasing under each institutional intake, the numbers of physically challenged students and remote area dwellers. Prospective students in this category shall constitute 1/3 of the total intake). To intensify training for self-employment for various target groups. (The target groups include enrolled students, the unemployed, school leavers, those in employment and adult returnees wishing to revitalise their careers or improve their employability). By offering courses in enterprise education, that is, entrepreneurial and key skills courses.

b.

c.

9.4.3 Non-formal Education

69

for example. graduates of Diploma in accounting and business studies (DABS) will be able to progress and proceed to part time Degree programs that will be available at the individual centres. Jwaneng inclusive. the post literacy and life skills programme and the out of school children‟s education programme that are accredited. mushrooming of burrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel and increase in solid waste.5 BOCODOL During the plan period. Dust and Noise from construction. which may result in soil erosion. vocational & professional management courses Roll out programmes to other areas especially in rural areas around Jwaneng. HIV/ AIDS 9. 9. Recruit capable lecturers who will handle degree and other professional programs effectively. The anticipated impacts are listed below: Vegetation clearance.5 FRAMEWORK ASSESSMENT Pre-Primary Education FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL 9. CIMA. and ICSA. 9.4.4 Centre for Continuing Education (UB) During the Plan period.5. To achieve the above.4. They will also have a chance to take up other professional qualifications such as ACCA.1 Evaluation of environmental Key Issues with sector goals and objectives The pre-primary education objective of constructing 4 classrooms at Butler Dintwa Day Care Centre so as to increase the intake is anticipated to have negative impacts on the environment. BOCODOL will endeavour to: Develop new programmes -post basic. the centre will: Get affiliated to International professional bodies in order to receive the relevant information and examinations. Provide guidance & counselling through all the stages of learning cycle. Objectives To strengthen the support system for learners and facilitators To strengthen the infusion and management of HIV/AIDS/STI education in the Department of Non-formal education programmes.Goal To implement the Adult Basic Education Programme. 70 . To construct a learning resource centre during financial year 2005/2006.

These objectives will entail construction of new facilities within the Jwaneng Technical College such as Boarding houses and classrooms. which may result in soil erosion. mushrooming of burrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel. teachers‟ quarters. Other goals and objectives are not anticipated to have any environmental impacts. mushrooming of burrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel and increase in solid waste. Non -formal Education The construction of the learning resource centre will have the following environmental impacts: Vegetation clearance. Secondary Education The objective of secondary education of constructing academic and accommodation facilities will have the following environmental impacts: Vegetation clearance. increase in solid waste and increased demand for land. There will also be requirement for more land especially for the construction of teachers‟ quarters. kitchens and resource centre deficits. Vocational Education Vocational education in Jwaneng plans to increase the number of physical facilities to accommodate day release programmes and increase boarding capacity. more land would be required. mushrooming of burrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel. 9. 71 . toilets. which may result in soil erosion. mushrooming of burrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel. These new projects are likely to have the following negative impacts on the environment: Vegetation clearance. The other goals and objectives result in non-physical projects and therefore no environmental impacts are anticipated from their implementation.Primary Education The goal of primary education is to increase access to universal primary education by providing classrooms. Dust and Noise from construction. increase in solid waste and increased demand for land. which may result in soil erosion. The goals and objectives of BOCODOL are not anticipated to have any environmental impacts mainly because there are no construction activities involved. which may result in soil erosion.2 Evaluation of sector policies and programmes One of the recommendations of the Revised National Policy on Education is the reduction of classrooms. The following environmental impacts are anticipated as a result of construction of these facilities: Vegetation clearance. increase in solid waste and increased demand for land. Dust and Noise from construction. teachers‟ quarters. Dust and Noise from construction. which may result in soil erosion. toilets and resource centres for all primary schools in Jwaneng. In order to implement this recommendation more such facilities will be constructed and the following environmental impacts are anticipated: Clearance of vegetation and bushes.5. Other objectives such as implementing new diversified curriculum to include technical and business subjects and facilitating readmission to schools are not anticipated to have any environmental impacts. administration blocks. Dust and Noise from construction.

6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE EDUCATION AND TRAINING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Table 9. 9. Provision of refuse receptacles. which may result in soil erosion. The other recommendations. such as the reduction of pupil: teacher ratio from 40:1 to 30:1 and provision of qualified teachers to primary schools are not anticipated to have adverse environmental impacts. the implementation of the policy will ensure equity and access to education in general thereby promoting the vision 2016 pillar of an Educated and Informed Nation. Dust and Noise from construction. dust and noise from construction. Provision of refuse receptacles. Teachers quarters. prepare an Environmental Impact Assessment for major projects like construction of a primary school 72 . identify areas where gravel could be extracted and prepare a management plan for collection of gravel. identify areas where gravel could be extracted and prepare a management plan for collection of gravel.5 Objective To provide adequate primary school facilities such as classrooms. is not anticipated to have adverse environmental impacts because it will strive to equip students with knowledge and skills for their future employment. mushrooming of burrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel. To employ 4 teachers and 4 teacher assistants Employment teachers assistants No mitigation measures Table 9. Action Tree planting and landscaping. toilets and resource centres in all primary schools in Jwaneng Strategies to Achieve Primary Education Sector Goals and Objectives Projects/Strategies 6 classrooms (Jwana) 13 teachers quarters (Jwana) New primary school in unit 6 25 teachers quarters (new school) 8 classrooms (Kgalagadi) 8 teachers quarters (Dinonyane) 12 teachers quarters (Kgalagadi) 4 classrooms (new school) Potential Impacts Vegetation clearance. On a positive note. Increase in solid waste and wastewater and requirement for more land. vegetation clearance. The implementation of the Policy on Tertiary Education in Jwaneng however.4 Objective To construct additional 4 classrooms at Butler Dintwa Day Care Centre so as to increase the intake Strategies to Achieve Pre-Primary Education Sector Goals and Objectives Projects/Strategies 4 Classrooms Potential Impacts Demand for more land. mushrooming of borrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel and solid waste of 4 and No impacts anticipated Action Tree planting and landscaping. increase in solid waste and demand for more land. which do not involve provision of school facilities.Dust and noise will result from construction. provide continuing education and diversifying methods of delivery of its academic programmes in order to enhance access to higher education.

No impacts anticipated Tree planting and landscaping.e.Table 9. Tree planting and landscaping.e. mushrooming of burrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel. the numbers of physically No anticipated impacts 73 . which may result in soil erosion. Communication and Technology in the school program and conduct evening classes for the public Table 9. withdrawal and readmission of a student to the parent/guardian Construction academic accommodation facilities of and No impacts anticipated No mitigation measures To provide academic and accommodation facilities in both secondary schools Vegetation clearance. mushrooming of burrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel. Introducing new vocational training programmes. Increasing the number of physical facilities to accommodate day release programmes.6 Objective To implement new diversified curriculum to include technical and business subjects To promote readmission of school dropouts Strategies to Achieve Secondary Education Sector Goals and Objectives Projects/Strategies Inclusion of Technical and Business subjects Potential Impacts No impacts anticipated Action No mitigation measures Confirm in writing. identify areas where gravel could be extracted and prepare a management plan for collection of gravel. by: Vegetation clearance. c. which may result in soil erosion. Dust and Noise from construction. Dust and Noise from construction. No mitigation measures To facilitate access to VET for disadvantaged groups by implementing DVET policy on access Gradually increasing under each institutional intake. BTEP (I. agriculture. identify areas where gravel could be extracted and prepare a management plan for collection of gravel. multi-media production b. Inclusion of Information. Provision of refuse receptacles. tourism and. No mitigation measures To train students and the public through the facilities that schools have in place. I. prepare an Environmental Impact Assessment where it is required. prepare an Environmental Impact Assessment where it is required. Increasing the boarding capacity Potential Impacts No anticipated environmental impacts Action No mitigation measures To increase access to Technical and Vocational Training through DVET expansion programmes based on the JTeC master plan.7 Goal/Objective Strategies to Achieve Vocational Education Sector Goals and Objectives Projects/Strategies a. increase in solid waste and demand for more land. increase in solid waste and demand for more land. Provision of refuse receptacles.

entrepreneurial and key skills courses.Goal/Objective and equity). To construct a learning resource centre during financial year 2005/2006 Vegetation clearance. identify areas where gravel could be extracted and prepare a management plan for collection of gravel. (The target groups include enrolled students.8 Objective 1. Train literacy group leaders on aspects of the job 4. No anticipated environmental impacts No mitigation measures The unemployed. Dust and Noise from construction. Strategies to Achieve Non Formal Education Sector Goals and Objectives Projects/Strategies 1. No anticipated environmental impacts No mitigation measures Table 9. Projects/Strategies challenged students. that is. Include rural remote dwellers participation. Tree planting and landscaping. Provide enterprise education. increase in solid waste and demand for more land. 74 . Introduction of caution fees Potential Impacts Action To intensify training for self-employment for various target groups. Access and equity lifelong education and training for out of school population. Construction of a resource centre Potential Impacts No anticipated environmental impacts Action No mitigation measures 2. which may result in soil erosion. Provision of refuse receptacles. prepare an Environmental Impact Assessment where it is required. mushrooming of burrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel. those in employment an Introduce cost recovery to meet all the costs (Budget Speech 2002). Continuation of adult literacy classes Establishment of Village Out of School Education Advisory Committees 3. school leavers.

March 2007 2 Classrooms (Kgalagadi) Sub Total LG 1102 4 classrooms (new school) 2 Teachers‟ Quarters (Jwana) Sub Total LG 1102 2 Teachers‟ Quarters (Dinonyane) 5 Teachers‟ Quarters (Jwana) 13 Teachers‟ Quarters (new school) 2 Classrooms (Kgalagadi) 2 Resource Centres (Jwana.9 Programme LG 1112 Development Budget and Performance Targets for Pre-Primary Education Project Component 4 classrooms Estimated (P) 1 000 000 Cost Performance Targets 2003/04 – 2008/09 Table 9.April 2007 End date. Dinonyane) 530 000 2 750 000 1 060 000 370 000 1 430 000 370 000 925 000 2 405 000 530 000 1 600 000 Start date .April 2006 End date.April 2004 End date.7.March 2006 Performance targets Start date .April 2008 End date.10 Development Budget and Performance Targets for Primary Education Programme LG 1102 Project component 6 classrooms (Jwana) 6 Teachers‟ Quarters (Jwana) 4 classrooms (Dinonyane) 8 Teachers‟ Quarters (Teemane) 4 Teachers‟ Quarters (Dinonyane) Estimated cost (p) 1 500 000 1 050 000 1 000 000 1 400 000 700 000 5 650 000 New primary school (14 classrooms.March 2005 2 100 000 8 600 000 1 000 000 1 050 000 2 050 000 2 220 000 Start date .9.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 9.March 2004 Sub Total LG 1102 Sub Total GRAND TOTAL 5 830 000 26 310 000 75 .April 2003 End date.1 Development Budget and Performance Targets for UDP II Table 9.March 2008 Start date .March 2009 Start date .April 2005 End date. Dinning Hall and Administration Block) 12 Teachers‟ Quarters school) Sub Total LG 1102 4 classrooms (Kgalagadi) 6 Teachers‟ Quarters (Dinonyane) Sub Total LG 1102 12 Teachers‟ (Kgalagadi) Quarters (new 6 500 000 Start date .

Quarterly reports will also be made to the Urban Development Committee and Full Council.7.April 2003 End date.March 2006 Total 3 000 000 9.2 Plan Monitoring The pre-primary education and the primary education projects will be monitored by council through the Education Committee. furniture and equipment. furniture and equipment. vocational and non-formal education. KgosiMpe CJSS accommodation facilities. Academic facilities. TOTAL Estimated Cost (P) 1 744 800 Performance Targets 2003/04 – 2008/09 2 587 725 2003/04 – 2008/09 4 332 525 Table 9.Table 9.13 Development Budget and Performance Targets for Non Formal Education Programme ED – 401 Out of school education Project component Learning resource centre Estimated (P) 3 000 000 cost Performance Targets Start date .12 Development Budget and Performance Targets for Vocational Education Programme Project Component 20 housing units (Jwaneng Technical College Estimated Cost (P) Performance Targets Start date .March 2004 14 500 000 2003/04 – 2008/09 14 500 000 ED 110 – Colleges of Education Technical upgrading TOTAL College Table 9. Morama CJSS accommodation facilities. monthly reports to Finance and General Purposes Committee and the Chief Officers Management Committee.April 2005 End date. 76 . progress reports will be presented to the Urban Development Committee quarterly. For the secondary.11 Development Budget and Performance Targets for Secondary Education Programme ED 800 – Secondary schools Project Component Academic facilities. In addition to these committees quarterly progress reports will be sent to the Department of Local Government and Development in the Ministry of Local Government.

detection and control of environmental hazards. The Jwaneng community will also be educated on the importance of knowing one‟s HIV status so that at the end of the plan period at least 50% of the population would have taken the HIV test at least once. Privatisation and/or contracting out of certain services such as waste management will also contribute to achieving a prosperous.1 INTRODUCTION 10. which mainly runs the Primary Health Care System through the District Health Teams comprising Clinics and Environmental Health. Wildlife and Tourism through its Department of Sanitation and Waste Management contributes to the health sector by coordinating and directing the sanitation and waste management development plans in accordance with the Waste Management Act. In order to reach the goal of maintaining a clean. among others. Vision 2016‟s theme of „Towards Prosperity for All‟ strives to achieve. private sector. The National Health Policy strategies aim to involve the government. religious and non-governmental organisations and others to all have a team role in the provision of health care services. productive and innovative nation The Health sector calls for effective „stakeholder partnership‟ where all parties recognise that co-operation will benefit everyone.CHAPTER TEN 10 HEALTH 10. Both Vision 2016 and the National Health Policy have envisaged that patients will have facilities that accommodate their special needs. healthy and habitable environment. The Ministry of Environment. the below mentioned pillars with regard to human health and environmental management matters. The essence of Primary Health Care System is the prevention. A compassionate. productive and innovative nation as required by vision 2016. just and caring nation The Ministry of Health has a challenge to direct the health services under the auspices of this pillar. The health sector strives to provide adequate health facilities to reduce congestion at the existing facilities and also to significantly reduce the distance travelled by patients to such facilities. especially on behavioural change in sexual related matters so that by the end of the plan period the percentage of HIV prevalence would have been reduced from 34% to 20%. the community would need to be educated on proper handling and disposal of waste. which affect human health and treatment of disease.1 Institutional Framework The Ministry of Health has the overall portfolio responsibility to attaining health for all through commitment to the Primary Health Care Strategy. An educated and informed nation The Health department aims to intensify health education. The provision of health services is however shared with the Ministry of Local Government. A prosperous. 77 . The Jwaneng Town Council plans to build an additional clinic at Environmental Unit 7 and provision will be made for the needs of the disabled.1.

10. but also for the surrounding villages in the Southern District as the town is located within the district. Jwaneng will strive to achieve these goals by aligning its own goals to the Ministry of Health‟s goals. The Ministry‟s key result areas include: Provision of and maintenance of infrastructure Human resource development management Customer satisfaction Policy implementation effectiveness Productivity and organisational effectiveness. The hospital has also been assigned the responsibility to coordinate the screening and treatment of the adult HIV/AIDS patients for the implementation of the Anti Retro Viral Therapy (ARV) programme. The goals of the Ministry of Health are as follows: To improve the efficiency and cost effectiveness of health care delivery. not only for the local clinics. promotive. The Jwaneng Mine Hospital acts as a referral facility. two pharmacies and one optometrist. The Ministry is committed to the Primary Health Care Strategy of attaining health for all through prevention. The goals and objectives of the ministry are upheld by the Jwaneng health care sector through the implementation of performance or productivity management tools such as Performance Management Systems (PMS) and Work improvement Teams (WITS) 10.1. the town has one private medical practitioner.3 Role of the Private Sector The Private sector is significantly contributing to the provision of health services in Jwaneng. Ministry of Local Government The Ministry of Local Government‟s core business is to provide basic physical and social facilities as well as Primary Health Care to communities through the Local Government Service Management.2 Strategic Plans for Respective Ministries Ministry of Health The Ministry of Health is responsible for the health policy formulation and facilitating the implementation of the policy. curative and rehabilitative care services. There is also a visiting ophthalmic team from the Kanye SDA Hospital on weekly basis.1. It also has a duty to provide a comprehensive preventive. 78 . To ensure equitable distribution of health care delivery. In addition to the mine hospital. detection and control of environmental hazards that affect human health and the treatment of human diseases as guided by the national Health Policy. Jwaneng community and the surrounding villages benefit from the services rendered by all these private entities. To improve the quality of health care To attain appropriate skilled personnel To strengthen primary health care Programmes.

Tebelopele VCT Centres provide free anonymous HIV/AIDS Counselling to those who seek the service. a multisectoral AIDS committee has been formed. Its aim is to curb the spread of HIV/AIDS and encourage youth to abstain from pre-marital sex. The Town Health Committee and Home Based Care Volunteers also take part in the dissemination of information pertaining to HIV/AIDS. for those who feel ready to receive them.4. HIV/AIDS counselling is also provided at Tebelopele Voluntary Counselling and Testing Centre and Thutano Centre. still maintains that an additional hospital should be built in Jwaneng. accessible. Tebelopele Voluntary Counselling and Testing. the membership of which comprises of all the stakeholders in Jwaneng including the private sector. Thutano centre. at least a primary hospital should be provided for the reasons given below:Very limited capacity of the mine hospital (84 beds only) Influx of the surrounding areas‟ residents to the Jwaneng health facilities. Tebelopele is a name given to a network of Voluntary Counselling & Testing (VCT) Centres in Botswana. The increase in home based care patients in an era of the antiretroviral therapy. The Centres are open to serve members of the public who would like to know their HIV/AIDS status. Only a code number is given to each client for identification of the test & for future reference. Priority for consultation is given to the mine employees. Voluntary Counselling and Testing Apart from Ditsweletse and Tshimologo clinic. 79 . Mpule Kwelagobe Orphanage Centre This centre is owned by the ministry of Local Government and run by the Roman Catholic Church and currently assists orphans with shelter and clothes. Some NGOs of importance in Jwaneng are as discussed below: Masedi HIV/AIDS Project This is a project. Some children are from other districts. To protect confidentiality clients are not required to give their names.1. confidential & user friendly Voluntary Counselling & Testing Services throughout Botswana.4 Health Consultation Priorities 10. through the ward development committees. This is an extension of the Jwaneng mine and its main functions include VCT.1 Additional Hospital The community. and support of People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). 10. They have planted various fruit trees in order to supply them to HBC patients in future. The mission of Tebelopele is to provide quality.1. Numerous seminars/workshops continue to be held to sensitise the community on various health issues. Currently they are providing free vegetables to HBC patients. which is under the United Congregational Church of Southern Africa (UCCSA) church.As part of efforts to intensify the fight against the spread of HIV/AIDS in the town. The centre should be expanded in the near future so that it can accommodate a larger number. If not a district hospital. HIV test results are available on the same day.

mostly at the mines. which are also attracted by greener pastures. transfer outs and resignations.4. including HIV/AIDS and TB. The team‟s importance is to plan.2 HIV/AIDS.4. The proposal for a hospital has been long outstanding but unfortunately the Ministry of Health rejected it in 2001. defilement and rape are highly likely attributable to alcohol abuse. incest. 10.1. This has left the few who are there to be overworked and demotivated. TB defaulters prevalence.Increasing population size of the town. 10. 10. The High incidence of HIV/AIDS.4. Tuberculosis (TB) Cases are gradually on the increase as a co.5 Staff Situation The council clinics experience a dire shortage of midwives as a result of training. The same applies to Environmental Health staff. Since there are no sanitation facilities people resort to use nearby bushes as their „toilets‟. for example STDs.1. mostly presenting as a core infection of HIV/AIDS. alcohol abuse and crime. implement and coordinate the health care services to meet the demands of the service users in the town. 80 . domestic violence. 10.4. All these fuel the spread of diseases. Overcrowding is more pronounced in Unit 1.1. Presently 34% of the Jwaneng population is affected according to the 2002 sentinel surveillance.4. Industrial Site and Unit 2 SHHA areas. This unhealthy state of affairs poses a lot of health problems since some people with infectious conditions indiscriminately dispose of their waste thus making the outbreaks of diseases highly likely.1.1.infection of HIV/AIDS. 10.4 Unemployment People from surrounding areas come in large numbers to look for employment opportunities in Jwaneng and upon not getting jobs they resort to unhealthy habits such as prostitution. Alcohol Abuse Alcohol abuse is another social ill significantly contributing to the health problems in the town.6 District Health Team Jwaneng also needs to have a well established District Health Team comprising of all the cadres stipulated by the National Health Policy.3 Social Ills Diseases Squatting and Overcrowding Squatters are an environmental disaster in Jwaneng and the problem is worsened by the delayed servicing of Environmental Unit 8 and 9 since those squatters who claim to have long applied for plots have resorted to putting up sharks at the industrial area.

provision and evaluating of basic health services mainly for persons resident in the township but will also continue to assist the Southern District residents like it has been doing consistently. non-governmental and community based organisations.1 National Policy on HIV/AIDS The National policy on HIV/AIDS outlines the national response to the epidemic in Botswana. in the national response.2 National Health Policy The National Health Policy adopted by the Government in 1995 clearly states that government can only provide services that it can afford and the community has to be made aware of what is within the financial capacity of the public health services. Jwaneng Town Council. different ministries and organisations will formulate their sectoral plans and projects for implementation. When planning health activities. in consultation with the Ministry. in line with the country‟ constitution. In Jwaneng.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 10. One of the strategies adopted has been to form AIDS committees in all government and non-government organisations as well as to train peer educators and HIV/AIDS counsellors in respective sectors. the private sector. persons living with the HIV/AIDS virus. 81 . as well as the right of society to that protection are taken into account. The preparation of the plan is deemed necessary to assist with strategies of dealing with the ever-evolving waste management challenges. the responsibility of the persons with HIV/AIDS to protect others from infection. The health care system is based on the principles of Primary Health Care contained in the Alma Ata Declaration of 1978.1. shall be responsible for planning. various government ministries. and individual community members. 10. The Waste Management Act 1998 requires that each local authority should prepare a waste management programme and submit the same to the Department of Sanitation and Waste Management for compilation of the National Waste Management Plan and subsequent incorporation into the National Development Plan. the cooperation of such sectors with the public sector will be encouraged. It describes the role of national leaders. cognisance is taken of the public health rationale for respecting the human rights.4.7 Waste Management A Waste Management Plan for Jwaneng Town is lacking.2. The major problem in Jwaneng is garden waste management and provision has been made in this plan to compost it and produce a more valuable soil conditioner. and disease prevention as top priorities. At the same time. The policy has a mandate to support the development of the private sector and in particular. In addition. Within the national strategic plan. privacy and self determination of persons living with HIV/AIDS.10. The guiding principles underpinning this policy are based on current scientific epidemiological and medical knowledge about the distribution and transmission of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases and proven effective interventions in prevention and care. government emphasizes on health promotion and care. the District Multi-Sectoral AIDS Committee (DMSAC) meets quarterly to formulate strategies to curb the spread of HIV/AIDS in the district.2. Similarly. 10. The policy forms the basis on which a national strategic plan will be developed.

This will be achieved through the adoption of agreed strategies such as the formation of an enforcement committee comprising of all departments from which Waste Management Act Enforcement officers have been appointed. from time to time. The provisions of the Act will be implemented in Jwaneng to bring the offenders to book.4 Waste Management Act The Waste Management Act lays down the framework for the planning. facilitation and implementation of advanced systems for regulating the management of controlled waste in order to prevent harm to human. and referral if or when necessary. All health services in Jwaneng. Productive And Innovative Nation.‟ The National health policy further elaborates on the need to have appropriate staff and a management and support team to coordinate. and practices operated by various practitioners registered in accordance with the Medical. the District Health Team does not exist in Jwaneng. Environmental education will however continue to be given priority. Health care curative services. Dental and Pharmacy Act. It gives each council the mandate to determine the organisational structure of its Health Department (District Health Team) including the selection of its head. animal and plant life as well as to minimise pollution of the environment. and the clinics and health posts are directly administered by the councils in whose areas they are situated. Vision 2016 aspires to have „A Moral and Tolerant Nation. Most unfortunately. 10. encompassing diagnosis and treatment of patients.2. operated by the Government. whether private or public. executed and maintained in accordance with generally accepted technical and professional standards.Such services shall be in accordance with the Government policy and any guidelines as may be issued from time to time. and the Nurses and Midwives Act. in collaboration with the Primary Health Care Coordinating Committee in the Ministry of Local Government and the Ministry of Health. subject to. This will need to be addressed in the plan period. with existing legislation and such guidelines as may. Community health services and family health care services Environmental sanitation. All these components of the health system have a common goal and as such they shall cooperate and function as a coherent system. and run in accordance with relevant legislation. be issued by the ministry of Health. The Ministry of Health administers those hospitals operated by Government.1 will form an integral part of primary health care services and that will include waste management where the service will continue to be partly contracted out during the plan period. mine hospitals. 82 . plan and provide practical support and guidance in its district.3 Health Strategy and Plans The health services comprise public health services.‟ Jwaneng town also wishes to have residents who are law abiding and who possess high ethical standards. This will improve stakeholder partnership and contribute to the achievement of Vision 2016 pillar of „Building a Prosperous. Private sector involvement as outlined in section 10.2. 10. such as commercial private hospitals. and they include the following as a minimum:Health promotion and avoidance of ill-health. or by districts/ town/city councils or services supported by Government such as Christian mission hospitals and private health services. and ensure that their services and activities are planned. shall establish internal control systems.

5 Public Health Act The Public Health Act provides the framework for the notification of certain diseases compulsory and to control such diseases. to regulate the use of cemeteries.10. sanitary facilities and drainage system. and generally to provide for public health. including street vendors and hawkers will continue to be sensitised on the importance of food safety and consumer‟s health. health and welfare of persons employed in those factories and for the safety and inspection of certain plants and machinery to ensure that they do not pose any threat or risk to their users. to provide for the protection of foodstuffs and of water supplies. No Smoking Clinics will be arranged during the plan period to assist both smoking starters and quitters. The regulations include among others those of light and ventilation. Implementation of the Act will as usual be achieved jointly with the Engineering. It is also not permitted in business premises.2. Environmental Health Officers and the Community Health Nurse use the provisions of this statute to ensure protection of the health of the Jwaneng community. Food retailers. Housing and Fire Departments of the Jwaneng Town Council. Control of Smoking Act This act makes provision for the protection of some areas from smoking. to make provision regarding diseases subject to the International Health Regulations. Food Control Act This act provides protection to foodstuffs and empowers its enforcers to seize and destroy such foodstuffs that have been found not to be fit for human consumption. The Environmental Health Department will continue to work hand in hand with the Factories Inspectorate the Community Health Services Division (MOH) and the Private Safety Specialist to ensure compliance with the Act. to prevent the introduction of diseases into Botswana. Jwaneng was privileged to host the 2003 National Commemoration of World No Tobacco Day – on 31st May. Planning. Smoking is not permitted in public areas such as Government Offices. The authorized officers. to regulate sanitation and housing. 83 . and the Jwaneng Town Council Health Bye-Laws. It is hoped that this big activity brought to Jwaneng will add vigour and help reinforce the implementation of the smoking Control Act in the Town. Food inspections and seizure of unwholesome food stuffs will be intensified in the plan period due to increased manpower resources – realized towards the end of the current plan. Factories Act This act makes provision for the regulation of the conditions of employment in factories and other places as regards the safety. who include the Medical Officer. The policies and legislation discussed above are used together with other legal instruments mentioned below. Building Control Act This act ascertains that structures that are erected in the town are built in accordance with the regulations and as such proper housing would be provided.

pest control. health or survival. Waste Management This includes collection of refuse from residential. including Jwaneng Mine Hospital and Home Based Care. or for aesthetic or economic reasons. Landfill The importance of proper disposal of waste cannot be over emphasized. Abattoir Animals from in and outside Jwaneng are slaughtered at the abattoir. or may exercise. Environmental health Department of Jwaneng Town Council has the primary responsibility of waste management. Jwaneng residents should be able to take pride in their clean and un-littered surroundings by the year 2016. and is planned for a lifespan of 20 years. Other districts and hospitals are allowed to use the incinerator. will contribute to a prosperous. It is anticipated that the privatisation of the waste management service. The department carries out the following activities in order to achieve its goals and objectives. attract investors and also prevent problems that are brought about by indiscriminate disposal of waste. The mine pays for the service.3 HEALTH 10. This capacity allows it to receive clinical waste from all health facilities in Jwaneng. whenever they present their requests. During the planned period a compost plant is proposed to be built at the landfill. 84 . The plan will serve as a guiding tool that will provide alternatives and the Best Practical Environmental Option to deal with each stream of waste in the town. Ante and post mortem examinations are also carried out there to ensure that wholesome meat is supplied to residents of Jwaneng. commercial and industrial locations. a deleterious effect on his physical development. which exercise. The landfill has a medical waste incinerator with a capacity of 160kg/hr. The department controls these pests by reducing or eliminating pest populations in given situations. at a fee. The service is currently contracted out in some parts of the town. Wildlife and Tourism. A Waste Management Plan will be prepared during the plan period. Also. Pest Control A pest may be defined as a creature which in a particular situation is seen as undesirable whether for health and hygiene purposes. productive and innovative nation as more Batswana will take part in waste collection and disposal services and in the process realise some financial benefits. in whole or in part. the incinerator at Ditsweletse Clinic is kept as a standby facility in the event of an emergency breakdown of the landfill incinerator. Funds for composing will be sourced from the Ministry of Environment.3. There is a sanitary landfill in Jwaneng that started operating in December 2000.10. This is done to conserve the environment and make Jwaneng aesthetically pleasing. The most problematic pests that Jwaneng has are cockroaches and wasps. and water and food quality surveillance in the town.1 Environmental Health Environmental Health is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as being the control of all those factors in man‟s physical environment. This is basically a green waste recovery plant. and litter picking in the streets. With the waste management plan in place.

3. 85 . Wildlife and Tourism.2 Hospital Services Secondary health care services are provided by Debswana Mine Hospital. done by doctors and Family Nurse Practitioners (FNPs) Registered nurses only consult in the absence of the two. During the plan period. the department will intensify the inspections as more shopping centres come up.3. virology among others which are carried out at the national laboratory. people are powerless to change their behaviour themselves because they have limited knowledge of alternatives and therefore cannot make informed health choices. Consultation: Consultation is in most cases.Inspectorate Inspections in premises are done to check that compliance with the law is achieved. which caters for workers in the mine. Knowledge is power and without health knowledge. Diagnostic and therapeutic: The hospital has three Laboratory Technicians who carry out almost all necessary tests except cytology. or in South Africa. which are open to everyone while private services for the mine and non-mine employees (paying/or contributing patients) are also rendered. X-Ray: Two radiographers. The hospital has 8 doctors and 5 FNPs. whose services include. Kgalagadi and Kweneng Districts. among others. Jwaneng Town Council. The toilets will be funded by the Ministry of Environment. There are different health care services in the hospital. Sampling will also be done on foods stuffs and they will be tested for bacterial or chemical contamination to ensure that the public consumes wholesome food. Public Conveniences Under this section.1. The department will continue educating the Jwaneng Community about its activities and that will include the means and ways by which they could enhance prevention of ill health. These will be built at strategic points in public places so that they would benefit most of the members of the public. CD4 count Viral load and issuing of ART is also done at Jwaneng Mine hospital. Admissions/Inpatients: Public patients form the bigger part of admissions with 12% being private and paying patients. during the planned period the department hopes to build toilets in the town. Mortuary: The hospital also provides mortuary services. This clearly depicts the role of the mine in providing the service to the general public as indicate in section 10. there can be no informed decisions and actions to promote health. It is very essential that the toilets are available and kept clean at all times so that they would attract members of the public. Health Education Without education for health knowledge and understanding. The mine hospital has two clinics in the mine. ultrasonography. There is a longstanding agreement between the Government of Botswana and Debswana Mine Hospital that the Mine Hospital should serve as a referral hospital for Ngwaketse West. This is in line with one of the pillars of vision 2016 „ An educated and informed nation‟ 10.

Kaduwe. Sesung. Cerebra-vascular accident (CVA). health Service delivery is good during the week days. 86 . The District Health Team in Jwaneng is not fully established because there is no Public Health Specialist to coordinate the team.3. the total number of patients registered for home based care in Jwaneng stands at 112. It is hoped that this clinic will further reduce the distance travelled by patients to health facilities as required by vision 2016‟s pillar of a compassionate. serves as a referral facility for the Council clinics.2 above. There is an influx of patients hoping for better care looking at the small population in Jwaneng and better services by staff. Mahotshuane. which has a maternity wing and provides a 24-hour service. Other patients come from as far as Kgalagadi.4 Primary Health Primary Health Care in Jwaneng is the responsibility of the Town Council. Lehuku. He is on call from 4:30 pm to 10pm every day.3 District Health Systems The Jwaneng Town Council has two clinics.4. Due to the delayed plot allocation. 19 patients have since been transferred out of Jwaneng. but not during weekends when surrounding clinics and health posts are closed.10. case finding and follow-ups (especially TB) and home based care. Otherwise. 10. Pharmacy Technician and Family Welfare Educators. Primary Health Care services include: family planning/sexual and reproductive health. The Medical Officer is full time at Ditsweletse on week days. school health. The clinics are run by Nurses.3. Thankane. Laboratory Technician. namely Tshimologo at Environmental Unit II and Ditsweletse clinic at Environmental Unit V. Out of these. Sekoma. health education. the only hospital in the town. The third clinic is to be constructed at Environmental Unit 7 during 2003/04 plan period. with 54 remaining. Seherelela. diagnosis and treatment of common diseases. Pitseng.3. Services are dispensed to the public through the two clinics mentioned in section 10. the construction of the EU 7 Clinic has been delayed. one optometrist. The health system is further complimented by one private medical practitioner. Betesankwe.1 Community Home Based Care Programme (HBCP) Implementation of the Community Home Based Care Programme (HBCP) was started in Jwaneng in 1999. 49 deaths have been reported. laboratory tests. Jwaneng therefore has not been allocated a district number like it is the case with other districts. two pharmacies and a weekly visit by the ophthalmic team from the Seventh Day Adventist mission Hospital at Kanye. Since May 1999 up to-date.3. Some of the home based care clients are on ARV therapy either from the Jwaneng Mine Hospital or the national ARV programme. Ghanzi and Kweneng districts. 10. Disability due to road traffic accidents and Mental retardation. funds for the clinic construction and its personnel have been budgeted for. Discussions pertaining to when the construction can start are in progress. Mokhumba. HIV/AIDS. just and caring nation. Selokolela. The Jwaneng Mine Hospital. Gasita and Naledi. The coverage of the town‟s health facilities extends on a daily basis to the neighbouring villages such as: Sese. testing and counselling. resulting in overloading of Ditsweletse Clinic. which is the only 24 hours clinic in the Southern Health District. In Jwaneng. The following are the most common illnesses that are currently catered for by the HBCP in Jwaneng: Tuberculosis.

10. This poses a problem of follow-ups of programme defaulters.4.B. Post natal care (PNC) To encourage parents to utilise PNC services by health talks in health facilities and kgotla meetings.3 Voluntary testing and counselling centres The services are provided at both council clinics. The programme entails intensive pre and post test counselling by health workers and lay counsellors.3.4. Programme Jwaneng town is experiencing an increase in the prevalence of TB.3.5 National Anti Retroviral Therapy The programme is aimed at boosting the immune system of clients who are HIV positive and it was expected to start on the 1st April 2003 at Jwaneng Mine Hospital. 10. Talks have been held with pupils and the teachers addressing the dangers associated with teenage pregnancy. Those found HIV positive are given AZT tablets at 34 weeks (8 months) till delivery.4.7 EPI Programme The programme aims to increase immunization coverage from 95% to 100% by yearly house to house campaign aimed at reviewing the under 5 cards for immunization status. VCT is freely accessible to residents and those from neighbouring districts. including HIV/AIDS. The programme in addition caters for clients outside Jwaneng (surrounding areas) due to unavailability of the service and service providers. 10.3.6 T. Teenage pregnancy is still common in the town.4.10. In order to curb the situation.4. It is still being piloted elsewhere.4.3.8 Sexual And Reproductive Health To ensure correct use of available contraceptive methods and encourage male involvement. We are hopeful that this programme will be rolled out to the entire country during this planning period.3. Antenatal Care (ANC) To intensify the campaign towards male involvement in the programme via kotla meetings. 10.3. follow up of defaulters and referral systems have been put in place even though some patients make it very difficult by failing to provide their correct addresses.4.2 Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) The programme started in October 2001 and is aimed at reduction of HIV infection from mother to child. Family Planning 87 .3. an intensification of the contact tracing. 10. 10.4 Isoniazid Preventative Therapy (IPT) IPT has not yet been started in Jwaneng and it is hoped that it will be started during the Urban Development Plan 2.

This therefore makes it difficult to make follow-ups and referrals as in most cases health workers are not given the correct addresses. HIV/AIDS. Training of all health care providers as frequent as courses arise to acquire skills that will help them give optimum care to clients. e. no stringent measures need to be put in place to combat the problem. health workers will continue to participate in workshops and commemoration activities to keep them abreast with the current trends. Plans for training the councillors have been formulated.g. b. This is in line with the goals of vision 2026. the health sector still faces difficulties on how to contain it because most of the clients seen do not reside in Jwaneng.1 Clinics Goals and Objectives a. The plan is to hold talks with Southern.3. etc. 88 . All organisations therefore have Peer Educators whose task is to sensitise every employee about the disease and measures in place to halt its spread. To avail all necessary resources. Infection Control. manpower. Contacts are traced and screened and they are encouraged to test for HIV as early as possible. which will help with measures to curb the spread of the disease. 10. materials by budgeting annually and prepare an annual training plan. daily observed therapy (DOT) is adhered to. The community members will be expected to be very well informed on the various programmes by the end of the plan period. kgotla meetings and seminars for community leaders every 6 months. To enhance primary health care services through. To reduce the prevalence of HIV from 34% to 20% by the end of the plan period This will be a way forward in preparation of meeting the objectives of vision 2016 of having no new infections by 2026. Promotion of existing programmes within the area through holding ward development committee meetings.g.4. Construction of a new clinic and nurses' houses at Environmental unit 7. All these measures are aimed at reducing HIV prevalence from 34% to 20% by end of the plan period. Nonetheless. Provision of Health Education on different aspects e. Malaria Control Since Jwaneng is in a non-malaria zone. TB Although the disease in on the increase.4 HEALTH SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 10. Home Based Care (HBC).5 Control Measures for Pandemic Diseases HIV/AIDS Jwaneng Town Council and the District Multi-Sectoral Aids Committee decided to form committees in all government and Non-governmental organisations. This will be achieved through health talks every other month at the clinics and schools. Kweneng and Kgalagadi Districts to come up with workable solutions to the problems For those clients who take their treatment in Jwaneng.10.4 10. which is to have no new infections of HIV/AIDS and teenage pregnancies. It is ideal for all organisations operating in Jwaneng to have one or more counsellors who should help fellow employees with matters related to HIV/AIDS.

Provision of public toilets at strategic areas.2 Environmental Health Goals and Objectives During the plan period the department will be committed to: a. Conduct bi-annual mini surveys aimed at monitoring our progress. 89 b.Intensifying the campaign against the spread of HIV/AIDS through at least quarterly Kgotla meetings. Opening the landfill to the public for use everyday of the week including weekends. formation of peer education in churches. c. Promotion and strengthening of all programmes related to HIV/AIDS which include PMTCT. healthy and habitable environment through: Provision of refuse storage receptacles in communal places in the entire town. workplaces etc. Organizing workshops aimed at behavioural modification towards HIV/AIDS. To curb the spread of diseases which are caused by insects vectors and rodents as well as eliminate nuisance pests throughout the town through: Provision of vector control services throughout the township on regular basis and on request To report to the Entomology Unit of the Ministry of Health (Community Health Services Division) for assistance in any alarming incidences of pests at any given time. 10. commercial and institutional premises. Make health services user friendly especially to the youth through revival of peer education by teen organisations in schools. through weekly health talks at clinics and community leader‟s seminars once a year. Provision of a bi-weekly waste collection service to all housing estates and on daily basis to industrial. IPT. Putting up posters that promote final disposal by landfill at all public places in the town Ensuring that this goal is achieved by the third financial year of the plan period (2005/06).4. such that by the end of the plan period at least 50% of the population would know their HIV status. biannual house to house campaigns and bi-annual community based workshops aiming at behavioural modification and utilisation of testing centres. . To ensure sanitary disposal of waste from the town and to promote waste recycling to guard against environmental pollution in line with the National Policies and Regulations on waste management through: Ensuring that proper the final disposal of waste is at the landfill. Reclamation and recycling of garden and other waste streams. Maintain a clean. To intensify community education on proper waste disposal and on the use of sanitary land fills by: Inviting different community and civic groups to educational tours of the landfill. etc. HBC. Supporting community based organizations and support groups aimed at curbing the HIV/AIDS spread by reactivating the peer educator‟s activities and AIDS committees in the work places. d.

Land pressure -Possible soil erosion .1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Sector Goal To enhance primary Health Care Services Objectives Construction of Clinic at Environmental Unit 7 By 2003/2004 Environmental Key Issues -Vegetation clearance.5. Healthy and Habitable Environment To ensure sanitary disposal of waste from the town and to promote waste recycling to guard against environmental pollution in line with the national policies and regulations on waste management Construction of Public Toilets at Strategic Locations -Ensuring that proper final disposal of Waste is at the landfill -Reclamation and recycling of garden and other streams of waste 10. Giving health tasks to different groups in the town. -Sand and gravel extraction -Air pollution by dust -Noise pollution . -Accident potential -Visual impact As above -Underground water pollution -Vegetation clearance -Land requirements -Odour -Air pollution Maintain a Clean.e. plan and coordinate the implementation.Production of building rubble.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes The purpose of the National Heath Policy is principally to guide the health care providers on how to execute their duties to avoid administrative problems and slippages in standards of service provision.Health and safety of workers at site -interference with normal traffic flow. Table 10.1 Evaluation Of Environmental Key Issues With Sector Goals and Objectives The sector goals and objectives that are highly likely to have significant environmental impacts are evaluated on table 10.1. Waste Management promotes the aesthetic beauty and 90 . .5 FRAMEWORK FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT 10. monitoring and evaluation of all health education and promotion of related activities performed within the town through: Giving out health education materials to individuals and groups who need it. safe and wholesome through: Slaughtering animals in a hygienic manner Carrying out ante and post mortem inspections of food animals To initiate. To ensure that meat that is sold and subsequently consumed in the town is fit. Environmental Health programmes promote activities that are environmentally friendly.5. Encompassing health education in all programmes of the department Ensuring that health education materials that are distributed in the town are relevant and appropriate. -increased amount of vegetation waste. f. 10.

1. 10.6. The strategies discussed below cover projects under the Ministry Environment.6.1 Proposed Projects No major projects will be undertaken under the Ministry of Health. which is an important partner in health services provision. Training of Peer Educators and Counsellors throughout the plan period. No adverse environmental impacts are envisaged from the health sector policies or programmes. In Jwaneng.2 Clinics Projects Construction of clinic at Environmental Unit 7 by 2003/04 Construction of Nurse‟s Houses by 2004/05 and 2008/09 Purchase of Ambulance by 2003/04 Workshops and Seminars throughout plan period. not addressed the issue of medical waste collection and disposal as aggravated by the epidemic. 10. Other projects will be funded under the recurrent and general fund budget.1 Environmental Health Projects Provision of Public Toilets by 2004/5 and 2005/6 Provision of Refuse Storage Receptacles throughout plan period Green Waste Composting Project by 2004/05 Purchase of Landfill Compactor by 2003/04 Purchase of Garden waste Self Loading (Grab) Tipper Truck by 2003/04 Purchase of refuse compactor truck by 2004/5 and 2005/2006 Erection of bill-boards. 91 .conservation of the environment. save for possible funding of the workshops and special projects determined by the Ministry. Commemoration of Special Health Days throughout the Plan Period. This is especially true for waste generated from home-based care and it is now evident that the area needs attention.6. notice boards and posters throughout plan period Formation of the Waste Management Act Enforcement Committee by 2003 Workshops and Seminars. Commemoration of Special Health Days throughout the plan period. 10. it is anticipated that no major problems will be experienced during the plan period as regards clinical waste management because of the availability of the refrigerated clinical waste collection vehicle and a large capacity medical waste incinerator located at the landfill. however. The environmental impacts discussed in the earlier sections mostly result from the infrastructure developments carried out by the Ministry of Local Government. The Botswana National Policy on HIV/AIDS has.1. Wildlife and Tourism for Environmental Health and the Ministry of Local Government for Clinics.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE THE HEALTH SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 10.

3 Mitigation Measures New projects that would be likely to impact badly on the environment are construction of the clinic and staff houses. for example the Environmental Impact Assessment Act. The following specific measures will be implemented. Town and Country Planning Act and others. Maintenance of the plant and equipment to reduce noise pollution Composting of green waste to curb the impact of disposal of vegetation waste at the landfill.6. Environmental Impact Assessment study will be carried out for all construction projects Securing and protection of the excavations during construction period. Any suspected pollution by the medical waste incinerator will also be investigated with the assistance of the Department of Mines and the Jwaneng Mine. construction of public toilets and composting project.2 Potential Impacts of Proposed Projects Proposed Project Construction of Public Toilets Short term Impacts -Clearing of vegetation -Dust and air pollution -Excavation of sand and gravel -Noise pollution -Accidents potential -Clearing of vegetation -Dust/air pollution -Clearing of vegetation -Excavation of sand and gravel -Noise pollution -Air pollution -Interference with other activities -Visual impact -Accumulation of building rubble -Accidents potential Long Term Impacts -Pollution of underground water by effluent -Land requirements Composting of organic Waste -Land requirement -Odour -Air pollution -Possible Visual impact -Ground water pollution -Clinical waste disposal -Pressure on sewerage system Construction of Clinic and Nurses houses 10. Building Control Act. but not limited to. Environmental Assessment will be done with other stakeholders including. Environmental Planning Manual.6. Engineering Department. the Physical Planning Unit. 92 . Leachate monitoring at the existing landfill will continue to be carried out at six months intervals with the assistance of the Department of Sanitation and Waste Management.2 Potential Impacts of Proposed Projects Table 10. Contractors would be required to obtain licences for excavation of sand and gravel and to demonstrate their rehabilitation plans to the planning authorities before they are allowed to extract the materials. Jwaneng Mine and the Department of Sanitation and Waste Management. All these will be appraised and monitored using the relevant legal instruments and policies. Waste Management Act.10. Landscaping and tree planting after construction Dust control measures during construction Proper waste management methods during and after construction phases.

Lack of community environmental cleanliness participation in Strengths Availability and access to health facilities and services. 10. Manpower constraints more especially midwives. Lack of Public Health Specialist and District Health Team 6. Lack of Waste Management Plan 10.4 Development Budget for UDP II Program Project component Construction of the clinic and purchase of furniture and equipment Purchase of clinic vehicle (Ambulance) 300 000 Construction of 10 nurses‟ houses LG 1104 Sub Total Construction of 10 nurses‟ houses Construction of 10 nurses‟ houses GRAND TOTAL 2 000 000 5 930 000 2 000 000 2004/2005 Estimated cost (P) 3 630 000 Financial year 2003/2004 2 000 000 9 930 000 2008/2009 93 . Structural and toilets defects at Ditsweletse clinic.3 Issues and Strengths of the Health Sector Issues 1. Table 10.1 Issues and Strengths of the Health Sector Table 10. 2. Lack of specialisation in different fields of environmental health 5.Proper ventilation of compost heaps to reduce odour impact. The Environmental Health budget is contained in the Ministry of Local Government budget.7. HIV/AIDS – impacts on the manpower and financial resources 3. Human resource development programmes leading to availability of skilled manpower Private sector involvement and partnership Availability of modern landfill and medical waste incinerator Availability of transport collection vehicles including waste 4. Environmental Health Officers and Health Education Officer.2 Development Budget for UDP 2 The budget shown on the table below is for the Clinics Department only.7.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 10.

This is done through questionnaires to clients with regard to how the Council‟s services satisfy their needs and how to improve service delivery. Budget review exercise with the Ministry of Local Government. Feedback from Council committees like the Health and Social and Chief Officers‟ Management Committee to whom health activities are reported on a monthly basis.7. Conducting mini surveys every six months. after sending monthly reports. 94 .10.3 Plan Monitoring Programme Progress will be monitored through: Getting feedback from various sectors of the Ministry of Health.

The different departments under this Ministry in Jwaneng are Labour and Social Security. change if name. National Action Plan for the Youth. The Department of Civil and National Registration deals with registration of vital events and the events are births. In Jwaneng other Labour and Home Affairs departments are still non-existent. promotion of health young people.3 Consultation Priorities The following are issues that were raised during consultations by the Jwaneng community with regard the Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs: Slow issuance of Identity Cards Prevalence of HIV/AIDS among the youth Lack of employment opportunities for the youth Lack of recreational facilities Lack of a National Library 11.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION National Youth Policy The Youth Policy came into effect in 1996 and defines a youth as a person aged between 12 and 29 years. personal empowerment and socio-economic development” The Jwaneng Labour and Home Affairs sector will continue to educate the community about government policies such as the National Youth Policy.1. acquire and disseminate information through efficient services for purposes of education. 11. provision of employment to young people. These are Prison and Rehabilitation Services.CHAPTER ELEVEN 11 LABOUR AND HOME AFFAIRS 11. 11. Monuments and Art Gallery and National Archives and Records Services. societies and national registration. The Department of Culture and Youth promotes and preserves culture and creates an enabling environment for youth and the general public to participate in cultural development in the country. The policy aims at providing appropriate education and training for young people. Civil and National Registration etc. Immigration. 95 . National Library. National Museum. recreation.1 INTRODUCTION 11.2 Strategic Plan for the Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs The strategic goal for the Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs relevant to Jwaneng is “To generate.1 Institutional Framework The Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs provides a wide range of social services through its departments and divisions. department of Sports and Recreation and the Industrial Court. deaths. Culture and Youth.1.1. This will achieve education and personal empowerment in the ministry‟s goal. Civil and National Registration. research. marriages.

The Jwaneng Youth Council purchases recreational equipment for clubs in the township. which have the potential for sustainability are funded. which are held every two years. Births and Deaths Act The Births and Deaths Act administers to register births and Deaths in Botswana. Change of Name Act The Act administers all persons changing from one name to another. solemnizing and domestic problems in marriages before being referred to the District Office. imparts business skills to the youth of Jwaneng and provision of funds for out of school youth thereby creating job opportunities for the youth. Marriage Act The Act administers marriages published and registered in Botswana. CULTURE AND SOCIAL SERVICES 11. The main purpose of the awards is 96 . These are publishing. which implements the provisions of this Act in terms of registration and issuance of identity cards.3. sports and leisure and to development of youth talent.encouraging active participation of young people in recreation. The Civil and National Registration office in Jwaneng provides members of the public with information regarding change of names and assists people in changing their names before being sent to the government gazette for objections if any. The Jwaneng office deals with all matters pertaining to marriages. There is a Civil and National Registration office in Jwaneng.1 Youth and Culture The department‟s major responsibilities include provision of financial assistance to organized youth groups as well as individuals whereby only viable projects and those. In terms of the Act the Civil and National Registration office registers and issues birth and death certificates. the International AIDS Day and youth rallies. The Civil and National Registration office implements the Act by registering all non-profitable organisations as provided for by the Act 11. The department in conjunction with the Botswana National Youth Council sponsors the National Youth Awards. National Registration Act The Act administers to register all Batswana who are 16 years and above to obtain identity cards.3 LABOUR. funds youth musical projects. This is a way of dealing with the high rate of youth unemployment. The department also gets the youth to participate in the commemoration of national activities such as the Month of Youth against AIDS. Societies Act This Act administers to register all non-profitable organisations such as churches and burial societies.

which caters for both in and out of school youth up to the age of 17 years. 97 . 11. The emphasis here is that projects should have been in existence for at least two years. The Jwaneng Mine plays a major role as a private sector in contributing to youth development. This is because offices in towns can easily rent some buildings. These activities include snooker games. Even though the department intends to build district offices during NDP9. But unlike Jwaneng Town Council facilities. it does not give priority to towns.to reward those young people who are involved in profitable and sustainable projects.3. Information and Broadcasting works closely with all government departments because they are all considered news sources. arts and culture. the Mine facilities are accessible to only those who can afford to pay membership fees. The private sector also assists youth groups and organisations with various forms of funding for different projects. needs and opportunities in the township. However. squash. 11. Complementing the efforts of this section are the Debswana Mining Company‟s sports and recreational facilities found elsewhere in the town. darts and football. leadership and personal development. has a fully-fledged youth football development program. through the Galaxy Club.3. It also advises government on public opinion and in the field of public relations generally.2 Botswana National Youth Council (BNYC) The Jwaneng District Youth Council as an organ of the Botswana National Youth Council is engaged in representing young women and men in youth matters. identifying major youth concerns. 11. boxing. it is hoped that this department will be accommodated in the District Administration‟s integrated office block. It is currently operating from a very small office provided by the Department of Culture and Youth.3 Sports and Recreation Most activities under this section take place at the two community centres. community development. which will assist ministries and departments in performing their routine and extension duties. The youth council also identifies projects that can be recommended for funding and support by the private sector and mobilises the youth through Ward Youth Councils in the township. part of the functions of the Department of Information and Broadcasting is to develop and exploit media.4 Information and Broadcasting As stated in the 1969 policy – Information Media Policy Directive. This also applies to the private sector. which include Jwaneng. swimming. The mine. As a media department. The Jwaneng branch of this department covers the whole of the Ngwaketse West constituency. Sport and recreation and exceptional cases.3. Categories for which awards are given are: business enterprise. environmental conservation. The department has leased a building within the town mall. The Jwaneng District Youth Council secretariat is facing dire need of office space.

The reason for covering Mabutsane is that there is no post for an officer to man the Mabutsane Sub-District. Board of Governors Each of the two community junior secondary schools has a Board of Governors working hand in hand with the school administration in the education of children. Births. working hand in hand with their respective schools in the education of children.6 National Library Services Jwaneng remains the only town in Botswana without a public library. Community Based and Voluntary Organizations Ward Development Committees There are seven Ward Development Committees in Jwaneng. These at one point stopped operating but have since been revived. Marriages. which has resulted in planned projects for UDP I not being able to be implemented. 11. 11.3. Deaths. Parents Teachers Association Each of the 4 primary schools has a Parents Teachers Association. create positive change. The community has made it clear that there is a need to have a library in Jwaneng. The main constraint of Ward Development Committees in the township is shortage of plots.11. The department in Jwaneng covers villages surrounding Jwaneng and Mabutsane Sub – District. Its function is to further the pupils‟ interest in education through coordinated parents and teachers‟ efforts and to carry out other duties conducive to the welfare and education of the pupils. Change of Surnames and Societies. Construction of the long planned library has still not taken place despite the project having been carried over from the two successive plans. This is the main institution responsible for the implementation of development programmes in the township.3. Lions Club The Jwaneng Lions Club aims to create and foster the spirit of understanding among people for humanitarian needs to provide voluntary services to the needy through community involvement and international cooperation 98 .3. Its function is also to further the pupils‟ interest in education through coordination with parents.5 Civil and National Registration The Civil and National Registration office in Jwaneng deals with registration of vital events and these are. Junior Chamber The Junior Chamber in Jwaneng endeavours to enhance entrepreneurial skills development among the youth. while National Registration has the sole responsibility of registering and issuing identity cards to all qualifying citizens. The Jwaneng office is constrained by a serious shortage of manpower.7 NGOs. promote leadership development and help in the development of the community through engaging in voluntary community work.

To network with technical colleges to provide youth with survival skills 2.5. societies. profession and civil traditions. change of name and national registration. for example. the goal of providing office and residential accommodation for the staff of the Labour and Home Affairs Sector by constructing an office block and staff houses will have the following environmental impacts: land requirement. building rubble. to inform them about the ministerial programmes To promote leadership. encouraging active and responsible citizenship by cultivating the highest ideals in business. deaths. births. 11.Round Table The Jwaneng Round Table is aimed at developing the fellowship of young men through the medium of their business and professional occupation and community service activities. 11. vegetation clearance. To disseminate HIV/AIDS information to the youth and the public at large To construct an office block and staff houses.5 FRAMEWORK ASSESSMENT FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL 11. indiscriminate extraction of sand and gravel.1 Labour. promoting and further international understanding. practical skills and opportunities for participation by young people within the township 1.5. To conduct capacity building workshops for the youth Continuous education on HIV/AIDS To provide office and residential accommodation for members of staff To create an atmosphere of understanding the importance of registering marriages. However.4 LABOUR. tolerance and trust To recognise. 11. friendship and cooperation and promoting the extension of Round Table movement throughout the world. To encourage the Jwaneng community to register all vital events. mushrooming of borrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel within the planning area and increase in solid waste. 99 . socially and politically.2 Evaluation of sector policies and programmes The policies and programmes discussed in this chapter are not anticipated to have any environmental impacts because they are not construction oriented. promote and support the efforts of young people in the township Youth and economic empowerment Objectives To provide various fora for contact with the Labour and Home Affairs clientele. loss of biodiversity. Culture and Social Services Sector Goals and Objectives Goal To create an atmosphere of understanding.1 Evaluation of environmental key issues with sector goals and objectives The environmental goals and objectives of the Labour and Home Affairs sector are not anticipated to have any environmental impacts. They are only aimed at providing a service to the community in terms of registration of vital events and assisting the youth in empowering them economically. CULTURE AND SOCIAL SERVICE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Table 11.

building rubble. mushrooming of borrow pits as a result of indiscriminate extraction of gravel within the planning area and increase in solid waste. for example. CULTURE AND SOCIAL SERVICE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Table 11.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 11.2 Strategies to achieve labour. indiscriminate extraction of sand and gravel. peer educators and counsellors workshops and to carry out entrepreneurship training Conducting seminars and workshops and participating in career fair Performing drama to HIV/AIDS information disseminate Potential impacts No anticipated impacts No anticipated impacts Action No anticipated impacts No anticipated impacts No anticipated impacts No anticipated impacts No anticipated impacts No anticipated impacts Construction of office block and staff houses Land requirement.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE LABOUR. culture and social services sector goals and objectives Proposed Projects/Strategies Addressing kgotla meeting in all wards at least twice a year Conducting leadership.7.11. vegetation clearance. Preparation of an Environmental Impact Assessment to precede construction 11. loss of biodiversity.1 Issues and Strengths Issues Shortage of manpower for the National and Civil Registration Department Shortage of office accommodation for the youth council Strengths Computerisation of vital events in Jwaneng Decentralisation of some of the duties to Jwaneng Setting up Ward Youth Councils resulting in easy mobilisation of youth 100 .

Women‟s Affairs and Labour and staff Houses Branch library and staff houses Addressing kgotla meetings in all wards. Immigration. December and March.3 Performance Targets for UDP II Strategies/Objects Addressing kgotla meetings in all wards. Once a year Twice a year during June and August Once a year Performing in every HIV/AIDS activity in the township Not confirmed by the Ministry Construction of office block and staff houses 11. peer educators and counsellors workshops Carry out entrepreneurship training Conducting seminars and workshops for capacity building Participating in career fair Performing information drama to disseminate HIV/AIDS Performance targets Twice a year during October and February Three a year during the months of September. Culture and Youth.4 Plan Monitoring Programme Success in the completion of projects will be determined by a successful implementation of departmental annual plans.7. Civil Registration.00 2 000. To monitor the activities of the Labour and Home Affairs sector. Conducting leadership.3 Development Budget for UDP II Table 11.4 Development Budget for the Labour and Home Affairs Sector Programme HA 104 – MLHA integrated office blocks Project component Integrated office block for National Registration. Recurrent Budget Capacity Building Vote Fund raising activities Carry out entrepreneurship training Conducting 1 day seminars and workshops for capacity building Performing drama HIV/AIDS information to disseminate Estimated cost (P) 11 360 900 HA 502 National Library Services 15 500 000 0.7.00 5 000. there will be compilation of quarterly progress reports to the regional offices in Kanye and the headquarters in Gaborone.00 10 000.7.11.2 Performance Targets for UDP II Table 11.00 11. 101 .

1 Jwaneng Mine Employment Forecast Year 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 No. coordination. health facilities. A significant amount of water is utilised by the ore treatment processes. 12. as a private sector. 12.CHAPTER TWELVE 12 MINERALS. importation. The Debswana Jwaneng Mine remains the largest employer in Jwaneng with a workforce of 2223 as at the year 2002. ENERGY AND WATER 12. energy and water resources sectors.1. Jwaneng mine.6Kv substation 102 . mining and mineral processing. It also administers various mineral investment promotion activities and liases with bilateral and multi-lateral development partners on mineral related matters.1. and skills development. employment opportunities. Energy and Water Affairs (MMEWA) is responsible for the formulation. There is the receiving 132/66/6. Water Utilities Corporation (WUC) and the Botswana Power Corporation (BPC).1.1 Institutional Framework 12. Employment has been forecast as follows within the plan period: Table 12. This Ministry shares implementation of these programmes with other ministries and Parastatals such as the Ministry of Local Government.1. development and implementation of national policies and programmes for the minerals. In 2001 total extraction was 9 million M³ with 17% allocated to the Water Utilities Corporation and the remaining 83% was used by the mine. has a role to contribute to the national economy through the creation of wealth.2 Energy Sector MMEWA is responsible for developing and implementing policies and programs concerning the supply and consumption of energy. the ministry develops and implements the fiscal. Transport and Communications.1 Mineral Sector Under the minerals sector.1 INTRODUCTION The Ministry of Minerals. The Jwaneng Town and Debswana Jwaneng Mine get electricity supplies from the 132 KV over head line running from Thamaga village. legal and policy framework for mineral explorations. social infrastructure (housing. of Employees 2287 2310 2317 2300 2313 The Debswana Jwaneng Mine extracts less than 12 million M³ of water per annum from the Magagarapa Northern Well fields.1. direction. BPC is a statutory body responsible for all matters concerning the generation. transmission and supply of electricity. recreation facilities). Ministry of Works.

which is then responsible for its distribution.in the mine green area. development. and is also responsible for quality monitoring countrywide. Water Conservation is managed by educating the public on water conservation through the media and supplying of leaflets on water conservation tips at all WUC offices and places/occasions like Trade Fairs. i. there is a 33 KV overhead line that supplies the Town ship 33/11 KV substation. 12. which is run by the Debswana Jwaneng Mine at a cost. and 3. This was introduced as a back up supply during power losses on the existing line. especially after reticulation in the three SHHA areas of EU1. Botswana Power Corporation introduced the second 132 KV overhead line feeders to Debswana Jwaneng Mine and the town. MMEWA has primary responsibility for the planning. and from the mine substation. 103 .e. Both the reservoirs and the pipe network are in good working condition. 2. The water is supplied in bulk to the department of water affairs. operates and maintains the water supply systems in 17 major villages. The energy demand in Jwaneng has recently increased slightly. It went down after the completion of a project at the Debswana Jwaneng Mine and after the removal of standpipes in SHHA areas. This substation is supplying about 3000 consumers. There is a weekly connection and submission by residents.1. The Botswana Water Utilities Corporation in Jwaneng gets its supply from a well field at Magagarapa lands. The Corporation also provides water to peri-urban areas and villages near urban centres.3 Water Sector In the water sector. The ministry also acts as a water supply authority. The WUC is a statutory body responsible for all matters concerning the supply of water to urban centres. management and protection of both ground and surface water resources. Water demand is currently low as compared to the year 2001. investigation. It meets all water purification standards including the World Health Organisation standards.1. assessment. Water in Jwaneng is potable and thus safe for drinking. The water is pumped into the Water Utilities Corporation reservoirs from which it is then distributed to customers.

1. Both the boreholes and the water mains between them and WUC reservoirs are operated and maintained by the Debswana Jwaneng Mine.1.12. Energy and Water Affairs Goal To increase economic benefits form mineral exploitation by effective implementation of policies To meet the needs of stakeholders by facilitating consumer choice in use of various forms of energy Objective To develop guidelines for measuring direct and indirect impacts of mining on the economy To facilitate coal distribution by developing infrastructure at local depots.1. the well fields at Magagarapa lands are the property of Debswana Jwaneng Mine. works related infrastructure with minimum impact on the environment Ministry of Works. water. Transport and Communications 12. Treated sewage is used for dust spraying purposes at the haul roads. Wastewater from the mine operations is recycled for use in the Treatment Plant not for drinking purposes (return water from dams). As mentioned above.2 Strategic Plans For Various Ministries Ministry Ministry of Minerals. All Botswana Power Corporation‟s developmental work is done by private pre-qualified electrical contractors who are in turn supervised by nominated electrical consultants. fro example. Ministry of Lands and Housing To facilitate equitable distribution of land through appropriate policies and legislation. b. increase opportunities for stakeholders in use of solar energy and increase in national access to electricity To fill established posts with personnel to enhance efficient service provision and regularly identify community needs and provide appropriate services in line with development needs.4 Consultation priorities a. 12. To put in place. To develop land allocation criteria to ensure equitable distribution of land throughout the country to eligible customers To develop standing operating procedures on environmental impact studies and monitor implementation of the same Ministry of Local Government To improve quality of life of Batswana by providing basic infrastructure and social services.2 Strategic Plans for various ministries Table 12.3 The role of the Private Sector Jwaneng mine is an important stakeholder in water resource identification and water provision. Treated effluent from the oxidation ponds in the town is also utilized by the mine to water its recreation grounds. The problem of low water pressure in some parts of the township Saline water 104 .

The mine policy on Environmental Impact Assessment Act (EIA) requires impact evaluations to be carried out for all activities to assess the need for environmental impact assessment. to provide for the payment of royalties. which will enhance the socio-economic situation of Jwaneng whilst promoting a good standard of living for everyone thereby achieving the vision pillar of a prosperous. The evaluation is a screening stage to determine the need for an EIA.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 12.1 Mineral Sector Mines and Minerals Act The Mines and Minerals Act makes provisions that regulate the law relating to mines and minerals.2 Energy Sector National Energy Master Plan The National Energy Master Plan was formulated to set out appropriate policies. This is in line with the vision pillar of an Educated and Informed Nation. to provide for the granting.2. 12. and for matters incidental to and connected to the foregoing.12. and that waste separation is done at source. Environmental Impact Assessment Act (Draft) This Act makes it a requirement that large-scale developments should have an Environmental Impact Assessment prior to their implementation. facilitation and implementation of advanced systems for regulating the management of controlled waste in order to prevent harm to human. productive and innovative nation Vision 2016 has identified energy as a pre-requisite for successful industrialisation and in this respect.2. animal and plant life as well as to minimise pollution of the environment. The Mine has three landfill sites that are registered in accordance with the requirements of the Act. 12. reusing.5 Alignment to Vision 2016 Prosperous. Waste Management Act The Waste Management Act lays down the framework for the planning. Educated and informed nation The Water Utilities Corporation and the Botswana Power Corporation will meet the above vision pillar by providing information on tariff changes and other issues such as how best to conserve utilities. Operation of the sites is carried out in line with the “Guidelines on the disposal of waste by landfill”. regulatory mechanism and institutions to guide the energy sector in reaching Botswana‟s national economic and social goals. productive and innovative nation. renewal and termination of mineral concessions. the Botswana Power Corporation and the Water Utilities Corporation have developed programmes and projects. The Botswana Power Corporation in Jwaneng operates according to the provisions of this Plan 105 . Jwaneng Mine complies with the Act through Impact evaluation carried out for each project.1. The company has well-managed waste management programmes that cover: recycling.

1 Mining Sector 12.3 MINING.3.12. training on environmental awareness is conducted for all employees and contractors and this is carried out by mine staff on a regular basis.1 Water Consumption The total raw water consumption was 9.1.000 Top soil (BCM) 20. The increase was partly because of increase in consumption due higher production at the Main Treatment Plant and Recrush Plant.000 106 . Also. The Mine residue dumps increase at various rates per annum.m. See table below for topsoil stripping.000 18. The policy is still under preparation. Moreover.800 42.1. The soil in the mining area is currently disturbed by mining operations. 12.7 GWh in 2002. which was an increase from the previous year at 8. National Master Plan for Water and Sanitation.3 Water Sector National Water Master Plan The National Water Master Plan is coordinated by the Department of Water Affairs. an increase of 5. This increase was due to insufficient return water from the slime dams. The plan is currently under review. 12. Pre-stripping of the topsoil prior to dumping has been affected in areas that are not already disturbed.2 % from 2001. Table 12. 12. all waste disposal facilities have been registered under the Waste Management Act and formal licensing granted.m.3.9 million cu. Phase I of the plan is complete with the commissioning of the North South Carrier Water Project.3. Oil seepage is being taken care of because the Debswana Jwaneng Mine has paved areas where oil-using equipment are kept.3 Environmental Management The ISO 14001 based environmental management system is working well. ENERGY AND WATER 12.000 94. This policy is the first in the direction of guiding the master plan and legislation towards achieving the sector objectives.3 Topsoil Stripping During 2003 – 2007 Year 2003 2004 2005 Total waste(M3) 100.1.2 Energy Sources Jwaneng Mine consumes electricity distributed by the Botswana Power Corporation and the mine consumed 200.2.3.000 210. in 2002.4 million cu. This is so as to avoid oil seeping through to contaminate underground water. Waste Water and Sanitation Policy National Waste Water/Sanitation Management Policy. It is a tool which seeks compliance to the environment.

2.3. paraffin and if funds permit.1 Water supply The Water Utilities Corporation in Jwaneng manages and distributes water pumped by the Debswana Mine from its well fields in Magagarapa. Jwaneng experiences different settlement set-ups. Category Domestic CommercialandIndustrial TownCouncil Government Total % 73 14 7 5 MI/month 104 21 10 8 143 12.3.2 Energy Demand and Supply The Botswana Power Corporation is currently able to meet the demand for electricity. 12.3. About 80 % of water in Botswana comes from underground sources while the rest comes from surface water sources.3. These are the people who do not have the means to meet ends and therefore end up utilising alternative energy sources such as gas. 12. solar system. Underground water sources are being depleted at a high rate and there is a high risk of water pollution from industrial development and human activities. The problem is also compounded by increasing demand for water.2 Energy Sector 12.3. wood. is assured because currently there is enough capacity to provide power in the township. people tend to settle in the outskirts of town creating informal settlements.3 Water Protection Water is a valuable and scarce resource in Botswana and the need to protect it from pollution cannot be overemphasised.3.3 Water Sector 12. This is done by installing zonal metres in the pipe network so as to detect any losses through leakages.3. 12.2. There is no irrigation in the township.12. The Corporation distributes underground water for human consumption.5 Agriculture vis a vis Water Agricultural activities in the township are minimal. 12.3.1 Alternative energy sources Like any other township.2 Water Conservation and Management The Water Utilities Corporation is currently carrying out a water losses study in the township. 12.3.3. The Corporation‟s ability to electrify the newly built residential areas in Jwaneng.3.3. the sector does not use water in abundance.3. Where employment is deemed to be available.4 Water Demand The following statistics indicate the average water consumption in the township per month. 107 .3. The need to protect and conserve water together with the introduction of tight control systems are of paramount importance.

emissions and noise. employing wherever practical the principles of reduction.12.6 Water quality Even though water in Jwaneng is saline it is potable and thus safe for drinking.3.3 Water Sector goals and objectives Goal 1 To provide a quality water service to the Jwaneng Township. 108 .3. dust and chemical hazards to secure acceptable working environments. avoidance. 12. Objective To embark on public education about safe use of electricity and align tariffs with market rates To embark on a network and substation reinforcement programme commencing in the 2004/2005 financial year 12.7 Government Buildings The ongoing construction boom and the extensive use of water by the Debswana Jwaneng Mine puts enormous pressure on the water resources that supply the township. 12.3. ENERGY AND WATER SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 12. It meets all water purification standards including the World Health Organisation Standards.3. Contractors engaged by both central government and the Jwaneng Town Council for construction of various facilities pay for the water they use for construction and the mine recycles water for re-use for its activities.4 MINERALS. 12. re-use and recycling.2 Energy Sector Goals and Objectives Goal To distribute and supply electricity in an effective. To carry out an Environment Impact Assessment on all activities that may have significant impact on the environment.1 Mineral Sector Goals and Objective Goal To prevent pollution and reduce environmental impacts of mine activities Objective To manage waste. Objectives To ensure adequate supply and proper treatment of water for human consumption. The Jwaneng Town Council is also exploring possibilities of using recycled wastewater for its parks and gardens.4. safe and affordable manner to enhance the social and economic well being of the Jwaneng Community.4.4.

To embark on a network and substation reinforcement programme commencing in the 2004/2005 financial year Environmental impacts No negative environmental impacts No environmental impacts anticipated No environmental impacts anticipated WATER Objectives 1. To carry out an Environment Impact Assessment on all activities that may have significant impact on the environment. re-use and recycling.4 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Objective MINERAL Objective To manage waste. To embark on public education about safe use of electricity and align tariffs with market rates b. dust and chemical hazards to secure acceptable working environments. avoidance. employing wherever practical the principles of reduction.To regularly ensure that the distribution network is in good condition Goal 2 To reduce water losses Objective To install zonal metres in the pipe network in each environmental unit 12. No environmental impacts anticipated ENERGY Objectives a. 2. To ensure adequate supply and proper treatment of water for human consumption. To install zonal metres in the pipe network in each environmental unit Loss of biodiversity because of digging a small pit to install the metre No environmental impacts anticipated No environmental impacts anticipated 109 .5.5 FRAMEWORK ASSESSMENT FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL 12. To regularly ensure that the distribution network is in good condition 3.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Table 12.

1 Issues and Strengths Issues Health – An alarming high rate of death among the employees between the ages of 20 and 45 due to HIV/AIDS and the number of employees suffering from debilitating diseases.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 12. Prepare schedule of maintenance c. Waste recycling programme – waste is classified and there are bins designated for different kinds of waste ENERGY SECTOR a. 110 . with very long recovery period. Installation of additional transformation capacity at the existing 33/11 kV substation adjacent to the Jwaneng traffic circle WATER SECTOR a.7.5 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes Policy/Programme Mines and Minerals Act Waste Management Act Environmental Impact Assessment Act (Draft) National Water Master Plan National Energy Master Plan Environmental impacts No negative environmental impacts No negative environmental impacts No negative environmental impacts No negative environmental impacts No negative environmental impacts 12. Data base record – waste accounted for every month b. is also on the increase.6 Strategies to Achieve Sector Goals and Objectives Strategies/Projects MINERAL SECTOR a.5. electronic and print media and kgotla meetings b. Issuance of information pamphlets.2 Evaluation of sector policies and programmes Table 12.12. Installation of metres No impacts No mitigation measures No environmental impacts No mitigation measures No environmental impacts No mitigation measures Environmental impacts Action Loss of biodiversity No impacts Loss of biodiversity No mitigation measures 12.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Table 12. Water sampling every week to ensure compliance with Botswana Bureau of Standards requirements b.

7.2 Development Budget The development budget for the Mineral. It is therefore not possible at this planning stage to give financial estimates of projects. based on the performance of the previous year. 111 . Energy and Water sector in Jwaneng is revisited and updated every year.Car accidents 12.

112 . Botswana is served by a modern transport and communications network. Transport and Communications services are provided by various departments and institutions as indicated below: Works Services The Department of Architecture and Building Services (DABS) and the Department of Mechanical and Electrical Services (DEMS) are responsible for the implementation and maintenance of all central government building projects while the Jwaneng Town Council is responsible for constructing and maintaining council buildings. which is capable of supporting economic.In Jwaneng. Meteorological Services The department provides weather data and related information for aviation purposes.CHAPTER THIRTEEN 13 WORKS. Communication Services The Botswana Post provides postal communication to the public and the business community in and around Jwaneng while the Botswana Telecommunications Corporation (BTC) provides telecommunication services. Transport Services The responsibility for public road construction and maintenance is shared by the Roads Department for primary and secondary roads and Jwaneng Town Council for internal and access roads.1 INTRODUCTION 13. Currently.1 Institutional Framework Efficient public works. social and investment policies and programmes of the government . communications and transport services are essential for achieving socio-economic development objectives of the country. Works.1. agriculture and other uses. TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS 13. The Department of Road Transport and Safety promotes road safety education and better training and licensing.

Transport and Communications Ministry of Government Local Goal To provide quality public works and a safe and secure public transport service. Transport and Communication sector in Jwaneng include the following: Slow project implementation. transport permits are issued. Law enforcement and licensing of vehicles is also carried out. 13.1 Strategic Plans for Respective Ministries Ministry Ministry of Works. The construction of an Integrated Office Block and a public library were given as examples of projects which were never implemented during NDP 8/UDP 1.4 The role of the private sector The private sector also plays a major role in the provision of Works.1. and Road Safety Education is done with the aim of reducing road accidents.1.2 Strategic plans for respective ministries Table 13.1. Concerns were raised about slow implementation of approved projects. Major construction works are hived off to the private sector through construction companies. which are the second cause of death in Jwaneng. Poor workmanship by contractors. The community is also educated and informed about road safety measures with a view to reducing road accidents in Jwaneng. The provision of tarred roads and their maintenance in the township ensures that the community is safe and secure.1.5 Consultation Priorities Issues raised by the community under the Works. Educated and informed nation In addition the provision of weather and climate data by the Meteorological Services Department informs the community about weather forecasts.13. There was an outcry that contractors are not adequately supervised and this results in cost overruns and poor workmanship. Transport and Communication services in the township. The improve the quality of life of Batswana by coordinating and providing basic infrastructure and social services To facilitate equitable distribution of land through appropriate policies and legislation Objective To deliver projects within approved budget and formulate guidelines and regulatory instruments to ensure safe transport services To evaluate existing physical infrastructure for its appropriateness and rehabilitate it where necessary and implement 80 % of planned and funded projects To develop land allocation criteria to ensure equitable land distribution throughout the country to eligible customers Ministry of Lands and Housing 13. 113 . with government and council supervising the projects. 13. Mascom and Orange provide telecommunication services to compliment the BTC services.3 Alignment to Vision 2016 Safe and secure nation Road safety is one of the components of building a safe and secure nation where the road worthiness of public transport is checked.

1 Road Traffic Act The Act provides for registration and licensing of vehicles. through the Urban Development Standards. 13. 13. It aims at creating a vibrant and competitive telecommunication industry through a liberalised market. 13.Inadequate capacity of the bus rank. specifies the width of roads and standard sizes of plots for different uses like schools. goods and services are transported in the township and throughout the Southern District. 13. 13.2. This office serves Jwaneng and the surrounding villages. taxis and mini-buses in the township are issued under this Act.2.3. commercial and industrial.1 Meteorological Services In the area of Meteorological Services. The advent of Mascom and Orange with their services in the town has complemented the aim of this policy.2 National Road Safety Policy The policy regulates and monitors road safety and makes it mandatory for the establishment of District Road Safety Committees.2. 13. Regarding Council Roads.2. Therefore. Public education on road safety will continue to be a priority area during the plan period. It provides for the granting of permission for any development of land that is carried out in any planning area. The existing bus rank is said to be inadequate and there is congestion. residential. There is a local office in Jwaneng.2 Roads Road transport remains an important means through which people.2. 13. it is government policy that before plots are allocated. issuance of drivers licenses and regulation of traffic. the department provides weather data and related information for aviation purposes. |The total 114 . The community expressed the need for a bigger bus rank.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION. The Jwaneng Town Council through the Planning Committee administers the provisions of the Act. 13.3 WORKS. agriculture and public weather services in general. Permits for public transport facilities offered by buses. Jwaneng being a planning area operates according to the provisions of this act whereby all developments in the township are assessed accordingly and permission granted for such developments. The Act.5 Town and Country Planning Act This Act provides for the orderly and progressive development of land and to preserve and improve amenities thereof.3 Telecommunications Policy The policy is administered by the Botswana Telecommunications Authority. they should be fully serviced. which implements the provision of this Act.4 Roads Transport Permit Act This Act outlines procedures that need to be followed in the adjudication of transport permit applications. 13.3. all roads in developed environmental units are tarred. TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS.

6 Central Transport Organisation (CTO) The department will continue to enhance private sector participation hiving off some of its services like vehicles maintenance to the private sector. based on the performance of the previous year. 13. As the process of changing the organisational structure of the service is still ongoing. and the town in particular. This means that the Botswana Postal Service holistic approach to service delivery might change thereby changing the projects and strategies.3. There are no CTO services in Jwaneng except a fuel point and all other services are offered by Lobatse CTO branch and the private sector. The postal services have an office in Jwaneng However. with the assistance of the Head Office personnel where necessary and also supervise development works in the township. 13.3. The pillar envisages a situation where the national road network will be safe for people to use thereby creating a safe environment for travelling and investment in Botswana. To update the network and address problems of clogging of storm water drains during rainy seasons council engaged a consultant during UDP I to do a Pavement Management Study for the entire road network within the township. 13.4 Postal Services Postal Services still play a role in maintaining communication links between communities. which is expected to be completed before the end of financial year 2003/2004 13. 115 . This has prompted the organisation‟s Board of Directors to engage in organisational introspection to change the operational complexion. law enforcement.3. The DABS office in Jwaneng will continue to provide operation and maintenance services to central government buildings.5 Department of Architecture and Building Services (DABS) The Department of Architecture and Building Services is responsible for the implementation and maintenance of all central government building projects. in order to achieve effective service delivery. Road Safety Education. which are prevalent in the country in general. The consultant has come up with a 20-year master plan for upgrading roads and storm water drains in the township and it is hoped that the recommendations of the report will be implemented during the plan period. the Botswana Postal Services has performed badly over the past year.3. The department aims to improve road safety within the town and to reduce road accidents. The department therefore aims at providing a safe and secure transport service during the plan period to meet the needs of Botswana and the SADC community. Botswana Post will continue to manage the activities of post offices effectively for the benefit of its customers. better training and licensing and reduction of drunken driving will therefore be priority areas for policy intervention during NDP 9. A report has been submitted to the Council for implementation of its approved recommendations. There are no major projects under the central government Roads Department except the ongoing upgrading of the Jwaneng – Sekoma road.road network under the Jwaneng Town Council is 84 kilometres.3 Transport and Road Safety One of the pillars of vision 2016 is a “Safe and Secure Nation”. Planned activities have been put on hold. The Department of Transport and Road Safety was recently established in the Jwaneng planning area. which are revisited and then updated annually. the Botswana Postal Services will embark on rolling plans.

Objective To deliver projects within approved cost.3 Transport and Road Safety Goal To create a safe environment for travelling by road. BTC will. train examiners and step up road safety education. including per second billing to expand its revenue base. BTC has an office in Jwaneng. operate and maintain the roads and associated infrastructure within the town 13. 13.3.2 Roads Goal To provide a safe and secure road network within the town.4. civic and community and industrial plots in the township. which aims at establishing an effective basic telecommunications infrastructure and position itself as a centre of excellence in communications. 13. Objective To enforce laws. 13. Objectives To develop. Goal To provide quality.4. residential.4 TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS GOALS AND OBJECTIVES. The plan is based on BTC‟s vision. time and acceptable quality levels. safe and secure and environmentally sound infrastructure and services.4. with the assistance of external consultants. coordination and interpretation of climatic and observational data Objective To ensure an effective operational service for provision of basic weather and provide accurate weather and climate data and information on time. which assists the public by installing telephones in commercial.13.1 Meteorological Services Goal To provide policy direction. during the plan period undertake a review of all BTC regulated services and price structures.4 Department of Architectural and Building Services.7 Telecommunications (BTC) The BTC has drawn up a comprehensive plan to turn around its operations. 13. 116 .4.

time and acceptable quality levels. train examiners and step up road safety education. 117 . are going to pose a serious environmental problem when they become obsolete as there are no disposal mechanisms put in place by the service providers.5.2 Assessment of Environmental Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Objective Meteorological Services To ensure an effective operational service for provision of basic weather and provide accurate weather and climate data and information on time. FOR STRATEGIC ENVIROMENTAL 13. No negative impacts anticipated Environmental Impacts Roads To develop.13.5 FRAMEWORK ASSESSMENT.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programms With the increased demand for public transport permits and the resultant increase in vehicle population.5. operate and maintain the roads and associated infrastructure within the town Vegetation clearance Cutting of trees More land required Loss of biodiversity Transport and Road Safety To enforce law. there would be more noise and air pollution from exhaust fumes in the township. Vegetation clearance Cutting of trees More land required Loss of biodiversity 13.1 Assessment of Environmental Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives Table 13. To deliver projects within approved cost. No negative impacts anticipated Department of Architecture and Building Services. Telecommunication equipment like cell phones.

Transport and Communications Sector Program Project Component Improvement (electrification and mechanical works) of DABS Depot. 13. commissioning No negative environmental impacts anticipated No negative environmental impacts anticipated 13.7. train safety No negative environmental impacts anticipated No mitigation measures Department of Architecture and Building Services. The projects in the transport.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE WORKS. WT 104 MWT Facilities Improvement to existing meteorology offices Estimated Cost (P) 154 000 Performance Targets 560 000 Start Date: April 2007 End Date: March 2008 TOTAL 714 000 13. works and communications sector will need to be monitored and reviewed during implementation of UDP2.13. examiners and road education. Replacing obsolete transmission equipment as per schedule and whenever necessary b. TRANSPORT COMMUNICATION GOALS AND OBJECTIVES. Table 13.1 Development Budget Table 13. Calibrating all instruments and equipment for accuracy according to specification. Timely preparation of tender documentation.2 Plan Monitoring and Review.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2. The departments are monitored by the Urban Development Committee through progress reports which are presented quarterly to the 118 . No negative environmental impacts anticipated No mitigation measures Potential Impacts Mitigation Measures AND No negative environmental impacts anticipated No mitigation measures Transport and Road Safety Law enforcement.7.3 Strategies to Achieve Works.4 Development Expenditure for the Works. Transport and Communication Goals and Objectives Projects/Strategies Meteorological Services a.

committee. 119 . also reports to the head office in Gaborone. The Department of Architecture and Building Services.

CHAPTER FOURTEEN 14 LAW.2 Strategic Plans Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs One of the strategic goals of the Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs is to improve customer satisfaction by providing services in an excellent. It enforces the byelaw act.1 Institutional Framework The chapter deals with those institutions involved in enforcing the written laws of Botswana to ensure a stable and peaceful environment conducive to the nation‟s development. effective. The Bye-Law Enforcement is a Section within the Council under the Ministry of Local Government. prevention of crime and apprehensive of offenders against public tranquillity. The Department of Administration of Justice‟s aim is to maintain. Law. Immigration. The Department of Immigration‟s main aim is to protect the society against illegal entrance. sustain and develop and effective judicial system that dispenses justice fairly and partially and expeditiously and to hold human rights. Administration of Justice. Labour and Social Security.1 INTRODUCTION 14. which is empowered to extinguish fires and prevent the outbreak of fires. residents and movement in and out the country of undesirable persons and at the same time facilitate passage of legitimate travellers to and from Botswana.1.1. works compensation administration. The Botswana Police Service aims to eliminate serious and violent crime and illegal possession of firearms as well as distribution and use of addictive drugs. the Botswana Local Police. work permit processing. The officers assist the Town Council in carrying out its lawful functions when called upon to do so and they are also peace officers for the purposes of the written laws of Botswana. The Local Police falls under the Ministry of Local Government under the department of Tribal Administration. apprenticeship training and testing. The duties of the officers are preservation of public peace. provision of labour and factory inspectorate services. Bye-Law Enforcement and the Fire Department. which includes commercial and pounding. democracy and the role of law in accordance with the constitution of Botswana. efficient and friendly manner. The Botswana Police Services falls under the Ministry of Presidential Affairs and Public Administration. Justice and Security services in Jwaneng are provided by eight departments namely. Proactive community policing in combating crime and general lawlessness shall be one of the objectives of the Local Police. The Jwaneng Local Police exists to provide an efficient and effective service to the community. In line with this strategic goal the Jwaneng Immigration Office and the Labour office under the 120 . Customs and Excise. The Labour and Social Security provides Labour Administration Services and this includes mediation of labour disputes. JUSTICE AND SECURITY 14. The Fire Department is a department. Botswana Police. 14.

the Jwaneng Police will endeavour to reduce crime by 10 % annually. This will attain the key result area of Customer Satisfaction.3 The role of the private sector These security companies‟ main objectives are to guard against any criminal offences that may arise on the premises they are attached to and also to report such offences to the police to take action according to the law. In line with this strategic goal. Botswana Police Service One of the strategic goals of the Botswana Police Service is Crime Reduction by providing a quality service to the people of Botswana. which provides for their needs and focuses n the reduction of crime and making communities safer. The Jwaneng Law. The other strategic goal of the Botswana Police is community policing by increasing public confidence in the police and developing a style of policing. plans to carry out public education through addressing kgotla meetings for purposes of educating and informing the community about the dangers and the consequences of employing non-citizens without workers permits. With regards to information provision. the Jwaneng local police will endeavour to educate the Jwaneng community through kgotla meetings and to hold lectures at all schools in the township. which will show among other things. Justice and Security sector. The Jwaneng local police will also introduce community neighbourhood watch in line with objective number 2 above. the labour office. The Jwaneng Police Service will encourage the formation of neighbourhood watch committees by addressing kgotla meetings and promptly responding to reports. the Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs‟ strategic goal is to generate. research. residence permits and naturalisation. in particular. 14. recreation and personal empowerment. crime prevention initiatives and increased visibility and shorter response time. The security companies have no powers of arrest but as 121 . which entails both consultation and partnership with the community. levels of crime in the township. passports. acquire. Department of Tribal Administration The strategic goals of the Department of Tribal Administration are as follows: Goal 1 To reduce crime by adopting community a policing strategy by introducing public education programmes on community policing through kgotla meetings and institutional addresses. In line with the above goal and objectives. introducing community neighbourhood watch in selected communities and intensifying proactive policing strategy by conducting daily visits to the major village wards.1. and disseminate information through efficient services for purposes of education. Goal 2 To improve the quality of policing service through applied research by determining the levels of crime through appropriate data collection methods In line with this objective the Jwaneng local police will submit annual reports to the district head quarters.Ministry of Labour and Home affairs will strive to effectively and efficiently provide service to the Jwaneng community mainly in terms of expeditiously and diligently processing applications for work permits.

stated under the criminal procedure and evidence Act Cap 08:02 Section 31. The Road Traffic section will intensify law enforcement with regard to road traffic accidents. the Law. regulation policies and directives governing local authorities.2 Botswana Local Police Act The Botswana Police Act is a statutory body established under section 3 of the Local Police Act Cap 21:04. which has become the second killer in Jwaneng and the country at large. The Ministry of Local Government may issue standing orders for the general control. failure to declare goods brought into the township. domestic violence. Educated and informed nation The Law.1 Bye-Law Enforcement Section The Jwaneng Town Council Bye-Law Sections main purpose of operation is to provide legal. 14. harbouring illegal immigrants. The Administration of Justice Department will preside over criminal cases brought by the police for implementation of justice to offenders.4 Consultation Priorities Illegal immigrants Incest offences Employment of non-citizens without permits Illegal trading Road traffic offences.2.5 Alignment to Vision 2016 Safe and secure nation In line with Vision 2016 pillar of a Safe and Secure Nation. they may arrest as private persons anyone who commits or attempts to commit an offence in their presence. illegal employment of non citizens. The Fire Services will particularly educate the community on fire safety. 14.1. indecent assault. The Local Police is established under acts no 13 of 1972 to provide appointment and discipline of officers in the service. trade and regulate services in accordance with established legislation.1. Justice and Security sector will sensitise the community on the dangers of not reporting crime and educate them on different types of offences such as defilement. In Jwaneng there is quite a number of security companies namely: Coin Botswana Security Jabs Security Vanguard Security Modia Sengombe Security D. direction and administration of the service. Justice and Security Sector will endeavour to intensify efforts to combat crime and encourage the community to report crime.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 14.K Mabolokane Security 14. 14.2. 122 . illegal hawking and vending.

5 1Trade and Liquor Act The Trade and Liquor Act was established under Act no. discipline. 14. 14. 14. which is a branch within the Botswana Police Service. which discharges the responsibilities of the Act.2.2. 19 of 1967 to control the movement of persons entering and leaving Botswana and to ensure that foreigners do not stay illegally in the country. This shows that number of road accidents has decreased.2.8 Customs and Excise Act The Customs and Excise Act was established under Act no. 22 of 1970 to make provisions for the imposition. The immigration office in Jwaneng implements the provisions of this Act.2. the Act is enforced by the Traffic Section. vending and hawking. To enforce the provisions of this Act the Jwaneng Labour office visits private companies on a regular basis to check non-citizens working without permits and hand them over to the police for prosecution. Illegal mushrooming of vendor shops and selling of liquor is a major concern in Jwaneng. control and administration of the Botswana Police Service. excise and sales duty.There is a local police service in Jwaneng. The act was established for the enrolment.2.2. It also educates the public by addressing kgotla meetings on the dangers and consequences of illegally employing non-citizens.4 Botswana Police Act The Botswana Police was established under statutory instrument No 157 of 1978 as amended by Act No 18 of 1980. 14. In Jwaneng. Jwaneng like the rest of the country is experiencing employment of non-citizens by private companies or individuals without workers permits. levying and collection of customs. 14. The Jwaneng Town Council is empowered by Cap 40:02 section 6 (1) and (2) to regulate the Trade and Liquor Act. fiscal. 14. therefore the law enforcement officers inspects and searches premises for the purpose of enforcing the Trade and Liquor Act. This statutory document guides police operations in and around Jwaneng. 43 of 1972 to provide for the registration and licensing of motor vehicles. 29 of 1986 to consolidate with the enactment relating to trading and liquor licensing and other matters connected therein. creation of offences relating to the use of vehicles and for the regulation of traffic and for matters incidental thereto. for the issuance of driving licences. The total number of accidents in and around Jwaneng declined from 351 in 2001 to 291 in 2002.3 Employment of Non Citizens Act The Employment of Non Citizens Act was established under Act no. and a 123 .7 Immigration Act The Immigration Act was established under Act no.6 Road Traffic Act The Road Traffic Act was established under Act no. 11 of 1981 to regulate the employment and other engagement in occupation for reward or profit of certain persons who are not citizens of Botswana and to provide for matters incidental thereto.

2.3 LAW JUSTICE AND SECURITY 14. The police station comprises of the traffic department. The local police office in Jwaneng is headed by the officer commanding assisted by a District Administration Officer. This is mainly attributed to shortage of accommodation in the township. There is a Magistrate Court in Jwaneng that discharges its responsibility in accordance with the requirements of the Act.3. and matters incidental thereto. security and intelligence service. to make provisions for magistrate courts and for the jurisdiction of persons presiding over such courts and matters incidental thereto or connected therewith. general duties. judges. These sections cover the township and surrounding areas. Refer to Table 14. The department controls the movement of persons entering and leaving Botswana and ensures that foreigners 124 . Table 14.surcharge. Manpower shortages are a problem in the department. The present manpower for the local police is not adequate to cope with the rapid crime rate in the township.2 Police There is a police station in Jwaneng manned by a Station Commander and 102 police officers. The role of these two customary courts is to preside over criminal cases brought by the police and civil matters brought by the Administration Cadre. 14. Private Companies are visited to inspect if imported goods are lawfully cleared. 14. two Station Commanders and 36 supporting staff members.3 Immigration The immigration department in Jwaneng is headed by the Senior Immigration Officer 1. The magistrate presides over both criminal and civil matters. The customs and excise office in Jwaneng sees to it that goods entering and leaving Jwaneng are lawfully cleared according to the Act. The Act was established to guide magistrates. The rate of crime declined from 378 cases in the first quarter of the year 2003 compared to 360 reported cases in the second quarter. 20 of 1974.9 Magistrate Act The Magistrate Act was established under Act no.1 Customary Law and Courts There are two customary courts in Jwaneng namely the Jwaneng customary court and Raphalane customary court.3. prosecutors and presiding officers to maintain. The Customs and Excise Act deals with the import and export of goods. sustain and develop an effective judiciary system. criminal investigation department and the Diamond and Narcotic Squad.3.1 for crime statistics in 2001 and 2002. The two courts are headed by two court presidents and two deputy court presidents. The establishment register shows that there are supposed to be 126 police officers as opposed to the existing 103. 14.1 Reported Cases in Jwaneng 2001 Criminal Cases Civil Cases Total 167 531 698 2002 168 612 780 14. assisted by Senior Immigration Officer II and five supporting staff members.

2 shows the number of people entering and leaving the country through the Jwaneng Airport as recorded by the Jwaneng Immigration office. save property from destruction and to render humanitarian services. The office is manned by an officer in charge and two supporting staff members.3. The office is headed by the Chief Fire Officer with 30 supporting staff members. Table 14. The other constraint is unavailability of office equipment such as photocopying machine.2 People Entering and Leaving the Country in the Years 2001 and 2002 2001 Departures Arrivals 1565 2551 2002 1391 1587 Table 14. All these go through the Debswana Jwaneng Mine Airport only. 14.3 shows other activities carried out by the department during the years 2001 and 2002. A 125 . It has been established under Act no. Table 14.4 Customs And Exercise The department of Customs and Exercise in Jwaneng deals with control of imports and exports in order to protect health security.3.3 Activities Carried out by the Jwaneng Immigration Office During the Years 2001 and 2002. which is under the ministry of Local Government. The department registered 106 imports in the year 2000 and 88 in 2001. ensure that there is cooperation and liaison with similar organisations in other countries for mutual advantage and raise revenue for the government.do not stay illegally in Jwaneng. Table 14. 2001 Passports issued People charged for overstaying Application for residence permits Application residence for permanent 3478 50 285 14 24 2449 2002 3104 56 248 7 13 1110 Application for naturalisation Number of visitors The Department is constrained by a shortage of manpower mainly because the Jwaneng office does not only service the township but also the surrounding villages and the Debswana Jwaneng Mine airport. In exports it registered 19 in the year 2000 and 26 in 2001.5 Fire Services The Fire Department in Jwaneng falls under the Jwaneng Town Council. This has led to inadequate manpower to cope with the increased workload. with the primary duty of prevention and control of fires. It is also involved in processing applications for residence permits. fax machine and computers. which was an increase. there was only one customs and excise office at the airport but due to the introduction of the Value Added Tax (VAT) another office was established within the township. save lives. Initially. promote trade statistics. The Fire Department registered 516 cases of fire outbreaks in 2002 and during the year 2003 the number declined to 119. There are six vacant posts. 14. which is a decline. 6 of 1994. passports and naturalisation.

4. transport remains a problem. The Labour and Social Security has an office Jwaneng.2 Botswana Police Service Table 14. 14. The office is headed by the District Labour officer.3. although it is not possible to be assisted at all times. The office is headed by the District Labour Officer. The department relies on the Central Transport Organisation to assist with pool vehicles.5 Botswana Police Service Sector Goals and Objectives Goal To reduce crime To promote community policing Objectives To reduce crime by 10% annually for the plan period To develop community partnerships through formation of neighbourhood watch committees.6 Magistrate The Magistrate office in Jwaneng is headed by the Senior Magistrate officer with 10 supporting staff members. assisted by two labour officers and seven supporting staff members. A shortage of staff hampers this to run smoothly.4 Immigration Sector Goals and Objectives Goal Reduce illegal immigrants and educate members of the public Objective To sensitise members of the public about illegal immigrants and citizenship act 14. 14. since the office has no transport since the year 2002. Shortage of staff hampers the work to run smoothly. To improve productivity levels through human resources development effective To improve contact and communication with our clientele by quicker response time to reports. Companies are visited at least once a month to conduct labour inspections.shortage of light duty and heavy-duty drivers hampers the work to be done effectively and efficiently.7 Labour and Social Security The Labour and Social Security office in Jwaneng.4. The department ensures that private companies and individuals employ non-citizens who possess workers permits. JUSTICE AND SECURITY GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 14. which covers the Jwaneng Township and surrounding areas. The Department ensures that private sector and individual persons employ non-citizens who possess valid workers permits. To provide quality service To ensure efficient and management of resources 126 .1 Immigration Table 14.3. Even though the manpower is adequate. caters for Jwaneng and surrounding areas. The existing fire engines have no high ground clearance base to go into remote areas to fight grass or bush fires. with two labour officers and 7 support staff.4 LAW. Due to a lack of transport the department is facing a backlog of cases especially civil matters. Companies are visited at least once a month to conduct labour inspections. 14.

14.1 Evaluation of Environmental Key Issues with Sector Goals and Objectives The goals and objectives in the sector are mainly based on increasing public education on security with very minimum impacts on the environment. 127 . regulations policies and directives 14.7 Fire Services Table 14.4.5.6 Customs And Excise Sector Goals And Objectives Goal Public education on Customs and Excise procedures Objective To enhance compliance through public awareness campaigns To make design leaflets on customs procedures at all customs office 14.4.5 FRAMEWORK ASSESSMENT FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL 14.8 Labour and Social Security Sector Goals and Objectives Goal Public education Objective To ensure that foreigners working in Jwaneng have valid workers permits 14.4.4.5 Labour and Social Security Table 14.6 Bye-Law Enforcement Table 14.9 Byelaw Enforcement Sector Goals and Objectives Goal Public education Objective To promote understanding of legalities.7 Botswana Local Police Sector Goals And Objectives Goal To reduce crime Objective To prevent crime and apprehend offenders against public peace To educate members of the public on crime prevention and how to secure their belongings Public education 14.3 Customs And Excise Table 14.4 Botswana Local Police Table 14.10 Fire Services Sector Goals and Objectives Goal Public education and provision of quality service Objective To promote fire safety awareness in Jwaneng 14.4.

6. Through improved training methods 2.Through streamlining administrative procedures 1.Through increased visibility and response time 3.Through implementation of the revised communication strategy 5.2 Evaluation of Sector Policies and Programmes The policies and programmes discussed under Law. Through improvement of crime prevention committees 2. Through promotion of on the job training 3.2 Botswana Police Service Table 14.14. 14.Through improved access to information 4. GOALS AND OBJECTIVES 14.11 Strategies To Achieve Immigration Sector Goals and Objectives Objective To sensitise members of the public about illegal immigrants and citizenship act Strategy/Projects Conduct Kgotla meeting to educate members of the public once in every 3 months. Reduction of accidents involving police vehicles Potential Impacts No environment al impacts anticipated Action No mitigation measures To develop community partnership No environment al impacts anticipated No mitigation measures To improve productivity levels through human resources development No environment al impacts anticipated No mitigation measures To improve contact and communication with our clientele No environment al impacts anticipated No mitigation measures 128 .Through increased crime prevention initiatives 2.Maximization of transport resources 3. Through the adoption of information technologies 2.6 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE LAW JUSTICE AND SECURITY SECTOR. Justice and Security are not anticipated to have any impacts on the environment because they do not entail any physical projects.5. Potential Impacts No potential impacts Action No mitigation measures 14.12 Strategies to Achieve Botswana Police Service Sector Goals and Objectives Objectives To reduce crime by 10% annually for the plan period Strategy 1.1 Immigration Table 14.Through implementation of traffic management strategy 1. Through further development of the community service centre concept 1.6.

regulations policies and directives Strategy 1.16 Strategies to Achieve Bye Law Enforcement Sector Goals and Objectives Objective To promote understanding of legalities.Address company owners on the dangers of employing noncitizens without permits Mitigation Measures No environmental impacts anticipated Action No mitigation measures 14.14 Strategies to Achieve Botswana Local Police Sector Goals and Objectives Objective To prevent crime and apprehend offenders against public peace To educate members of the public on crime prevention and how to secure their belongings Strategy Intensive regularly Intensive regularly patrols patrols No environmental impacts anticipated No mitigation measures Mitigation Measures Action Conducting of lectures to Secondary.6.6.14.13 Strategies To Achieve Customs and Exercise Sector Goals and Objectives Objective To enhance compliance through public awareness campaigns To make design leaflets on customs procedures at all customs office Strategy Public education once in 3 months Mitigation Measures No environmental impacts anticipated Action No mitigation measures Availability of leaflets on customs procedures 14. Conducting of workshop seminars and address of Kgotla meetings regularly Mitigation Measures No environmental impacts anticipated Action No mitigation measures 129 .15 Strategies To Achieve Labour and Social Security Sector Goals and Objectives Objective To ensure that foreigners working in Jwaneng have valid workers permits Strategy 1.Visit to private companies regularly 2.4 Botswana Local Police Table 14.5 Labour and Social Security Table 14.6 Bye-Law Enforcement Table 14.6.6. 14.3 Customs And Exercise Table 14. Use of public address system 2. Primary Schools and members of the public regularly.

The following are performance targets and resource requirements for the Fire Services Department under Jwaneng Town Council: Table 14.7 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 14. Fire prevention and inspection services 3. Scrutinize building plans 4. Fire Safety education campaigns 2. Inspection and testing of fire Performance Targets 1. Familiarise staff by visiting high risk premises for effective operation in the event of fire 5.6.7.1 Development Budget for UDP II For central government departments.17 Strategies to Achieve Fire Services Sector Goals and Objectives Objective To promote fire safety awareness in Jwaneng Strategy 1. resource proposals are estimated and sent to respective headquarters for further assessment and consideration but it is not a guarantee that the funds will be provided as such it is not possible at this planning stage to give estimated figures. Plan with other relevant departments for effective operation Mitigation Measures No environmental impacts anticipated No mitigation measures 14.7 Fire Services Table 14. Monthly 130 .Objective Strategy 3.Every six months Resource Requirements P15 000 every financial year 2. In conjunction with the police. conduct day and night patrols within the Township Mitigation Measures Action 14.mounting safety education campaigns through lectures 2. Inspect and test fire hydrants on a 6 monthly basis 6.18 Performance Targets And Resource Requirements for UDP II Objective To promote fire safety awareness in Jwaneng Activity 1.Provide fire prevention and protection inspection services 3.

As for the Council Fire Services Department.7. Training in handling of first aid fire fighting equipment Performance Targets 3. quarterly reports will be made to the Urban Development Committee and monthly reports to the Chief Officers Management Team.Objective Activity hydrants 4. Justice and Security Sector.Every six months 14. 131 .Yearly 5.2 Plan Monitoring Programme Reports are compiled and submitted to regional offices and head offices on quarterly and annually to monitor the performance of respective department under the Law.Fire demonstrations 5.Every six months Resource Requirements 4.

These will guide the projects and overall performance of the Ministry.1 INTRODUCTION 15. Mine Hospital and primary schools. Tribal Administration. Standard. 132 . Industry. Wildlife and Tourism. The Botswana Power Corporation. there are three (3) Local Authorities represented. these are District and Urban Councils. Local Police. Water Utilities Corporation. The Private Sector represented by three (3) Financial banks. Ministry of Education (Junior Secondary Schools) and the Ministry of Local Government (Town Council. Ministry of Trade. Other organisations represented in the town are financial banks. Debswana Mining Company. Botswana Power Corporation. A Strategic Plan of the Ministry of Local Government exists and is directed by its Vision. Postal Services. Ministry of Labour and Home Affairs (Immigration. There are four different types of Local Authorities. except the Land board. Integrated Field Services (IFS). and Botswana Housing Corporation. Water Utilities Corporation. will continue construction of housing units.CHAPTER FIFTEEN 15 LOCAL GOVERNMENT 15. The contribution of each organisation is summarized below The Botswana Housing Corporation.2 Role of the Private Sector The private and parastatal sectors available in Jwaneng are. Botswana Telecomms Corporation. 15. Water Utilities Corporation. and the First National Bank. This will include servicing EU8 and 9. Land boards and District Administration. The following Ministries are represented in Jwaneng and they are as follows: Ministry of Presidential Affairs (Police). except District Administration is vested in the Directorate of Local Government Service Management. Administration of Justice. Botswana Telecomms Corporation. Barclays. utilities corporations. Parastatals: Botswana Telecommunications Corporation. will continue to provide services as per their separate mandate. District Administration). in accordance with the needs as perceived by the town/residents. Botswana Power Corporation. Mission and Values. with the purpose of rent or sale: The Botswana Housing Corporation and others can participate in servicing land to address the problem of delayed provision of ready land. Debswana Hospital and Primary School. Tribal Administration and the Town Council. Tribal Administration. The Ministry of Local Government is responsible for the efficient operation of the Local Authorities. The responsibility for the Management of Local Authorities Personnel.1. the Botswana Housing Corporation.1. In Jwaneng.1 Institutional Framework The Ministry of Local Government is represented by the District Administration. Labour and Youth).

3 The Consultation Process During the consultations. It is necessary that the Southern District Council. service and demarcate plots in the surrounding villages to meet the demand for land. As Jwaneng operates a 24-hour clinic. and the goal is to reduce new infections. in anticipation of availability of jobs. They are therefore forced to construct make shift structures which are indiscriminately placed. environmental conservation.4 Consultation Priorities HIV/AIDS Both. It becomes necessary for both districts to develop strategies by which to address the matter. especially those that are outside the Jwaneng Town Council boundaries. The financial institutions will provide service as per their mandate. Unemployment Lack of employment opportunities in and around the Southern District tends to pull people towards Jwaneng. as the number of patients increases. It is necessary for the Southern District to develop strategies by which to provide a service that would be convenient to the people. This can be done by upgrading health posts to clinics.1.1. The Debswana Mining Company will provide infrastructure and other services for the benefit of its employees. communities were able to come up with projects that they want to be implemented during UDP2. as it has been discovered that residents or occupiers of the affected areas are reluctant to participate. Disaster Management There is a need for both Jwaneng and the Southern District to develop coping strategies. with a maternity wing. Squatters As people move to Jwaneng in anticipation of jobs. which would address. 133 . Jwaneng Town Council and Ngwaketse Land Board. veld fires. Jwaneng and the Southern District have a high HIV/AIDS prevalence. they find themselves without proper housing. for example. 15. and indirectly. for the benefit of Jwaneng residents in general. and by staffing them with nurses who hold requisite qualifications. Primary Health care The two Jwaneng Town Council clinics are accessible to residents and to people from the surrounding villages. Vision 2016. The consultations were in line with emerging challenges that have been highlighted during NDP 8 mid term review such as HIV/AIDS. The strategy would help to curb squatting. The influx has a negative bearing on availability of drugs. economic diversification and employment creation.The private sector needs to participate in servicing land for commercial and industrial purposes so as to attract business to Jwaneng. 15. it tends to be attractive to those from the nearby villages.

1. with the resultant high operation and maintenance costs of the pipes. at a subsidized rate. Waste generated by Jwaneng and by the Southern District needs to be managed in an efficient matter so as to reduce fast wear and tear of the incinerators. Social Welfare Both districts enjoy benefits of national social welfare safety nets. Saline water Water is supplied from Magagarapa well fields in Kweneng District.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION The Local Authorities (LA) operates under the following policies: 134 . Through the clinics. Concerns have been raised regarding the water quality. These will be addressed as follows: An Educated and Informed Nation Jwaneng Town Council is vested with the responsibility of providing Primary Education facilities and all that goes with it – such as buildings. These lime deposits block household water reticulation pipes. An Open and Democratic Nation The Kgotla not only ensures sharing and spreading of information. as there are a lot of lime deposits in the water. However.Waste Management There is a need to develop and implement strategies by which to reduce contamination of earth and underground water sources. thereby embracing the fact that Batswana have input in development programmes and policies formulation. furniture. thus ensuring attendance and improved educational levels. Other packages are availed for the home-based care programme. therefore ensuring availability of treatment to all. and to prolong the lifespan of the Landfill. These will be provided for over the plan period. Just and Caring Nation Jwaneng Town Council is vested with the responsibility of providing safety nets for that in need by providing monthly food packages. for purposes of educating the nation. 15. clothes and school uniforms for the destitute and the orphaned. Council provides medication and treatment. A Compassionate. beneficiaries tend to criss-cross borders in favour of one Council over the other. Council also ensures that children of school going age do not drop out due to poverty at the home level. books and equipment. and to also meet the requirements of the Revised National Education Policy of 30:1 pupil/teacher ratio.5 Alignment to Vision 2016 The NDP 9 theme of “Towards Realization of Vision 2016: a sustainable and diversified development through competitiveness in the Global Market” has been taken into cognisance by the Urban Development Plan II which aims at addressing it in its various programmes and projects. The welfare programme provides the necessary support. it also allows all to participate in the discussions. 15.

Penal Code and Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act There is aneed to review conviction and fines procedures referred to District Officers by customary courts to give the former ample review time and to ascertain that the correct fines have been imposed. iii)Education Policy Under this policy the Ministry of Education has transferred the responsibility for the provision of Primary Education to Local Government. This is implemented through the Planning Committee‟s monthly meetings. the District Commissioner/District Officer has legal powers to perform various judicial functions as stipulated in the Laws of Botswana. which in turn delegated to Local Authorities.2.15. Jwaneng was declared a town under this act. 15.2. The policy holds Jwaneng Council responsible for the provision of all primary education requirements such as: Schools and books Teachers Housing General welfare of both teachers and pupils 135 . Premarital and post marital counselling will continue to be given by the District Officer if couples so desire.2. Marriage Act Marriage officers continue to solemnize marriages after satisfying that there are no legal impediments to the proposed marriages. ii)Town and Country Planning Act This is an act to make provision for the orderly and progressive development of land in both Urban and Rural areas and to preserve and improve amenities thereof. harmony and to dispense justice.2 Tribal Administration Customary Court Act The Customary Court Act CAP 04:05 was enacted for the smooth running of customary courts in enforcing specified laws. where applications for use of land are considered.3 Town Council i)Township Act This is an act empowering the minister to declare by statutory instrument to make an order that any place in Botswana be a township except those places in the Tribal Territories and the freehold farms. There are 2 customary courts (Jwaneng and Raphalane Customary Courts) whose mandate is to implement the Act to ensure promotion of peace. 15.1 District Administration Magistrate Courts Act According to this Act. for the grant of permission to develop land and for the powers of control over land. However they are not given any induction to enable them to diligently perform such duties.

at government rate. With the recent amendment of the Jwaneng Mine Precious Stones Act. and for matters connected therewith. vii)Byelaws These are regulatory sub-laws formulated and implemented by the Councils/Local Authorities as empowered by CAP 40:02 Section 6 (1) and (2). General welfare of both parents and children v)Children’s Act This is an act to make provision for the care and custody of children.The Jwaneng Town Council implements this policy through the Education Committee which sits every 2 months. for the appointment of Commissioner of Child Welfare: for the establishment of children and juvenile courts and certain institutions for the reception of children. to monitor progress of the Recurrent and Capital Budgets. The Social workers provide reports. viii)Day Care Centre Policy Jwaneng Town Council encourages individuals and groups to construct and run day care centres as a service to working parents. The Byelaws are made to mainly enforce implementation of the following: Trade and Liquor Act Hawking and Vending Health Act Waste Management These are mainly to maintain good health and governance. The Trade and Liquor licensing Committee sits every month to implement the above. 136 . as and when required by the Magistrates vi)Trade and Liquor Act This is an act to consolidate with amendments the enactments relating to trading and liquor licensing and other matters connected therewith. and any other matters pertaining to primary education. Monthly meetings of the Trade and Licensing Committee are held to process applications for trading licences. the Jwaneng Town Council is now under this policy responsible for the welfare of the aforementioned class of people by providing: Monthly food rations and clothing Education and welfare of children Medical treatment. iv)Destitution Policy This is a government policy shouldering Local Authorities with the responsibility of catering for the poor and marginalized within their communities.

examples are. sanitation services. first aid kit and an office away from the classrooms. In addition. and access roads. 15. These responsibilities cover related items such as. the section attends to diverse social cases brought by the community daily. primary health care and primary roads. commercial and industrial establishments for disposal at the landfill. with participants drawn from the community of Jwaneng. Byelaws with appropriate fines are currently being formulated to ensure compliance.2 Community Development The department mobilises the community to engage in self-help work. destitution and the gradual disintegration of the extended family. Annually the section holds Social Welfare workshops. as well as vulnerable groups and individuals are cushioned against the effects of drought.3. Education and Health. The number of such cases has been fluctuating over the years as indicated by the table below: 15.3 Home Economics This section deals with skills training in home management. Some of the functions are complemented by Central Government departments/Ministries and parastatals.1. Their statutory responsibilities include provision of primary education. social and community development as well as administering Self Help Housing Agency (SHHA). 15.74. Out of the seven (7) Ward Development Committees. A licence is then issued by council after combined inspection by the Social and Community Development. which they shared for development purposes.3. Responsibilities have been extended to cover related items such as the issuing of business licences.1 Urban Councils The main responsibilities of Council are: Provision of basic primary education. playing equipment. junior toilets.1 Social Welfare Social welfare activities are designed to ensure that families.1. During UDP1 the community did not undertake any project due to lack of plots. 15. Urban Councils have delegated functions stipulated by law. primary health care.3.3 LOCAL GOVERNMENT 15. Fire and Environmental Health Departments. Water.1.3. ix)Waste Management Act The Jwaneng town Council implements this Act by collecting and disposing of waste from household. furniture. and administration of SHHA. municipal abattoirs and market stalls. In Jwaneng there are seven (7) Ward Development Committees and one Consultative committee (umbrella). 137 . environmental health. handicraft and imparting knowledge to families and members of the community.The requirement of this policy is that the structure within which a Day Care Centre is operated should have a sickbay. four managed to raise a total of P5 531.

Tribal Administration activities are decentralised and they include preservation of culture and administration of customary law. Local Authorities and other agencies are coordinated by the Urban Development Committee. 15. with the aim of controlling spillage To sort. Tribal Administration. their deputies and administrative staff. by end of 2004/05 To construct market stalls by 2004/05 with the aim of spreading out the service To clean the environment by providing skips in the first 4 years of the plan To annually remove vegetation along the road reserve. the Urban Council. and/or recycle waste by end of 2004/05 138 .3. Parastatals and other development agencies. The number of participants has been unstable during UDP1.4 LOCAL GOVERNMENT GOALS AND OBJECTIVES Goal To improve the quality of life of the public through the provision of basic physical and social infrastructure.1. which addresses Local Development issues affecting the town.15. and by provision of other services Objectives To construct a primary school in order to accommodate children from EU 6. presiding over both criminal and civil cases as well as settling disputes. so as to provide a resting place for long distance trucks To upgrade 4 kilometres of sewerage system by end of 2005/06. The District Officer chairs it and it is made up of Central Government Departments.3. 15.4 Economic Empowerment and Poverty Alleviation Programme The section enrols thirty-five (35) participants annually. at various strategic places.3. 8 by the financial year 2007/08. This will be done through intensive mobilization of the community by the department. 15. compost.2 Tribal Administration The department has traditional development duties. 7.3 District Administration Development activities undertaken by Central Government. During UDP 2 efforts will be made to encourage regular attendance. which is chaired by the District Officer. It is expected that during this plan period the Precious Stone and Semi Precious Stones Protection Act will be amended to give way to the Social Welfare Section of Jwaneng Town Council to adequately make service provision to destitutes. (See chapter on Education) To construct a clinic in EU 7 by end of 2003/04 To construct a bus rank by end of 2004/05 To construct public toilets. The Urban Development Committee is an advisory body. and clean up the storm water drains To construct a truck inn by the end of 2006/07. It is composed of the Court Presidents.

They will attend meetings and/or workshops. Objectives (on quarterly basis) To hold Urban Development Committee meetings so as to monitor plan of action. To involve community based organizations in programmes and issues that need their participation. To encourage establishment and participation of ward development committees by use of workshops. open-door policy. of the Plan Management Committee. kgotla. and to solicit feedback on performance of government and/or Council. by holding quarterly DMSAC meetings. (by use of departmental reports). open days. biannually. which meets quarterly.Goal To efficiently coordinate Local Government activities and programmes. in general about departmental performance by use of local media. to Full Council. To manage and discuss plan of action and other issues. by use of the high level consultative forum. in line with Vision 2016: An informed and educated nation. to share information. Goal To drive and monitor implementation of HIV/AIDS programmes. suggestion box. by which to educate members of the community. 139 . Objectives To hold 2 kgotla meetings. To provide feedback. To hold quarterly meeting. to ensure achievement of Vision 2016 –to reduce the prevalence of HIV/AIDS. To educate members of the public about any new or improved government policy. Goal To provide an enabling environment for enhanced participation in development. plan preparation meetings. bi-annually. and to organizational structures. To hold. Objectives To encourage a multi-sectoral approach and response to the epidemic. To solicit views from residents. programmes and Acts. To annually commemorate World AIDS Day. To encourage Peer educators to give feedback to DMSAC. on programme implementation. To establish and support the functions of AIDS-in-the-work place committees.

5 STRATEGIES TO ACHIEVE LOCAL GOVERNMENT SECTOR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES The Local Government ministry‟s goals and objectives will be achieved through: public education on Government policies. ensuring effective monitoring of project through quarterly reports presented to UDC and ensuring strict adherence to byelaws through punitive measures to those that do not obey them.Local Authority Fleet Development Financial Year Programme Project Component Ambulance (Fire department) Station Wagon (District Administration) 7 Ton Truck (Supplies) SUB TOTAL 7 Ton Truck (Education) Toyota Double Cab (Tribal) Car (Personnel) Light Duty Vehicle Administration Car (Tribal) Venture (Pool – Council) SUB TOTAL Dyna (Buildings) 7 Ton Truck (District Administration) SUB TOTAL Light Duty Vehicle Administration) 4 x 4 Toyota Hilux (Tribal) SUB TOTAL GRAND TOTal (District Estimated Cost (P) 200 000 300 000 300 000 800 000 350 000 150 000 80 000 80 000 80 000 200 000 940 000 200 000 300 000 500 000 90 000 150 000 240 000 2 480 000 2003/2004 2005/2006 LG 104 (District 2006/2007 2007/2008 Table 15.1 Resource Requirements for LG104 .6 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP 2 Table 15. 15.15. implementation of all proposed projects and provision of efficient services.2 Resource Requirements for LG 901 – Customary Courts Financial Year 2003/2004 2004/2005 LG 901 Programme Project Component Customary court and Staff Houses Customary court and staff houses – completion GRAND TOTAL Estimated (P) 3 611 000 3 611 000 7 222 000 Cost 140 . promoting the spirit of peaceful co-existence among township residents who come from different groups but all reside in the town area.

etc. Vegetation control. offices. sweeping of storm water drainage. Vegetation control. cleaning road reserves.Recreational Facilities Financial Year 2003/2004 Programme LG 1103 Project Component Final/detailed design of the Amusement Park and supervision Amusement Park Phase I construction (site development. mini golf) SUB TOTAL 2005/2006 2006/2007 2008/2009 Landscaping parks Phase II of the Amusement Park (expansion) Landscaping parks GRAND TOTAL Estimated Cost (P) 250 000 2 500 000 2 750 000 150 000 3 000 000 220 000 6 120 000 Table 15. cleaning road reserves. sweeping of storm water drainage. cleaning road reserves. etc. etc. sweeping of storm water drainage. Vegetation control. amphitheatre/open air market. sweeping of storm water drainage. conference room. cleaning road reserves. sweeping of storm water drainage. cleaning road reserves.Rural Administration Centres and Offices Financial Year 2006/2007 Programme LG 1105 Project Component Construction of SHHA offices at EU 8 GRAND TOTAL Estimated Cost (P) 1 700 000 1 700 000 Table 15. GRAND TOTAL 81 000 Estimated Cost (P) 81 000 2004/2005 81 000 2005/2006 81 000 2007/2008 81 000 2008/2009 81 000 486 000 141 . LG 1107 2006/2007 Vegetation control.4 Resource Requirements for LG 1105 . Vegetation control.Table 15. etc. sweeping of storm water drainage.3 Resource Requirements for LG 1103 . cleaning road reserves.5 Resource Requirements for LG 1107 – Labour Intensive Public Works Financial Year 2003/2004 Programme Project Component Vegetation control. etc. etc.

purchase pumps and accessories including a project vehicle.7 Resource Requirements For LG 1112 .8 Resource Requirements for LG 1114 – Urban Sewerage Financial Year 2003/2004 Programme Project Component Purchase of Refuse Skips (20) Purchase of a Landfill Compactor LG 1114 Upgrade 4km of trunk sewers.6 Resource Requirements for LG 1109 – Community Projects Financial year 2003/2004 Programme Project component Training and Logistics Residential House – Seole Ward SUB TOTAL 2004/2005 2005/2006 Residential House – Molopo Ward Residential House – Mogale Ward Training and Logistics SUB TOTAL 2006/2007 2007/2008 LG 1109 Residential Ward House – Kgalagadi Estimated (p) 10 000 40 000 50 000 40 000 40 000 10 000 50 000 40 000 40 000 10 000 50 000 40 000 26 000 cost Residential House – Ngami Ward Training and Logistics SUB TOTAL 2008/2009 Residential House – Raphalane Ward Horticulture – Macro Project Industrial SUB TOTAL GRAND TOTAL 66 000 296 000 Table 15. accommodation etc) GRAND TOTAL Estimated (P) 200 000 1 400 000 168 000 1 568 000 168 000 1 314 000 3 250 000 Cost Table 15. Estimated Cost (P) 300 000 1 900 000 4 000 000 142 . Costs include design and supervision fees.Municipal Services Financial Year 2003/2004 2004/2005 LG 1112 2005/2006 2006/2007 Programme Project Component Consultancy on feasibility study for the bus rank Construction of bus rank 6 Market stalls SUB TOTAL 6 Market stalls Truck inn (with ablution facilities.Table 15. install chlorinator at sewer ponds.

1 Plan Monitoring Programme The Jwaneng Town Council monitors plan performance by use of Heads of Departments monthly meetings.6. The three Local Authorities. and by use of council and its committees. at which they report on a quarterly basis on the plan implementation. screening machine & shredding plant Purchase of a Self Loading Tipper Truck Purchase of Refuse Compactor Truck Construction of Public Toilets (1 x 1 block of 6 toilets) Estimated Cost (P) 6 200 000 4 650 000 2004/2005 400 000 500 000 1 000 000 300 000 Purchase of Refuse Skips (20) 4 000 000 Expansion of existing sewer ponds SUB TOTAL 2005/2006 Upgrading of the road to the ponds Upgrading of trunk sewers Purchase of Refuse Skips (20) Construction of Public Toilets (1 x 1 block of 6 toilets) Purchase of Refuse Compactor Truck SUB TOTAL 2006/2007 2007/2008 2008/2009 Construction of sewer offices and workshop at the ponds Rationalization of 20 pumping stations Pilot Agricultural project GRAND TOTAL 10 850 000 1 000 000 700 000 300 000 1 000 000 500 000 3 500 000 500 000 1 000 000 600 000 22 650 000 15. including plan performance. Government Departments and the Private Sector are members of the Urban Development Committee.Financial Year Programme Project Component SUB TOTAL Composting of organic waste and sorting machinery turning machine. The Tribal and District Administration convene meetings every 3 months to discuss issues of mutual concern. Annual plans containing project proposals for both Council and Central 143 .

Government Departments are also presented to Full Council at the beginning of each financial year as a monitoring mechanism. 144 .

government departments. epidemics and floods do occur. it is mostly veld fires that occur annually in areas surrounding the township. just and caring nation.1. The committee will coordinate efforts of various stakeholders. the National Disaster Management Office (NDMO) under the Office of the President is responsible for leading and coordinating disaster planning. community based organisations. the responsibility for disaster management lies with the District Disaster Preparedness Committee headed by the District Officer and Town Clerk under the Ministry of Local Government. even leads to loss of life. the Disaster Preparedness Committee will be revived during UDP2. On an irregular basis. preparedness. which is more relevant in any relief interventions undertaken by the District Disaster Preparedness Committee in a disaster situation.CHAPTER SIXTEEN 16 CONTINGENCY PLANNING 16. nongovernmental organisations and the private sector. all stakeholders in disaster management including the private sector and non-governmental organisation will participate. mitigation and recovery in Botswana. At national level. By nature. Disasters of this nature can seriously disrupt the process of development hence their recognition by government and the need for a more coordinated management of drought and other forms of disaster. The role of the private sector in disaster management in terms of relief interventions and contribution to food security cannot be over emphasised. the government of Botswana has undertaken to among other things. which has become a cyclical phenomenon in the country.1 Disaster Relief Sector Priorities In its long-term vision for the country. which can immediately be used by districts in times of disaster. 16. ii. Time is of essence in any disaster situation and such a fund will speed up the Disaster Preparedness Committee‟s response time and assist in speeding up recovery efforts. Organise and administer emergency relief interventions Produce a disaster plan for the town and surrounding areas and Coordinate its implementation Advocate for the establishment of a Disaster Fund by government. build a compassionate.2 The role of the Private Sector Once the Disaster Preparedness Committee is revived. road accidents and to a small extent mine accidents. In Jwaneng the most common type of disaster is fire outbreaks. It is this pillar.1 INTRODUCTION Botswana is prone to various types of disasters. Responses to these disasters should be as far as possible be planned in advance and be ready for implementation in the event that the need arises. At the local level. principally drought. that is. other types of disasters like veld fire. 145 . any form of disaster disrupts the normal way of life of society as it is sudden and causes damage to property. infrastructure and sometimes. 16.1. To improve the town‟s disaster planning preparedness and mitigation. The Committee‟s main responsibility will be among others to: i. In the context of Jwaneng. iii.

extreme weather and road accidents. 16. 146 . the private sector and non-governmental organizations. The scope of the strategy is as follows: Providing economic access to food for household by attainment of a broadbased income security.1.1. 16. destitution and assistance to needy students. Coordinated efforts in handling all forms of disaster in the district will be spearheaded by the Disaster Committee.2 National Food Security Strategy The National Food Strategy lays down the framework within which the national and household food and economic security processes and activities are to be carried out. there will be joint responsibility reflecting the partnership of Government.1. Experience has shown that outbreaks of veld fires are a common form of disaster in the district.2. and household in the availability and access to nutritionally safe and adequate food. Efficient and cost effective disaster management will be based on the mobilization of existing government structures and resources in collaboration with communities. home based care. In the event of a disaster the committee has agreed that the operation centre will be the Civic Centre where all logistics and resource requirements will be mobilised. Educational campaigns – call Kgotla meeting and organise workshops to sensitise people on how to prevent and fight veld fires. the District Disaster Management Committee will be responsible for disaster management and relief interventions.2. Within the scope of this strategy.2 NATIONAL POLICIES AND LEGISLATION 16. These programmes include orphan care. Integrated and coordinated disaster management is based on partnerships and cooperation amongst all government sectors. the Jwaneng Town Council will continue to implement programmes designed for certain vulnerable groups in order to get maximum intended benefits from the programmes. Disaster management is the responsibility of every citizen and institution in the country. though they may be others like foods. the District Preparedness committee will coordinate disaster management as outline at 16.1. Regarding food security.3 CONTINGENCY PLANS As outlined at 16.1 National Disaster Management Plan The National Policy on Disaster Management provides the framework for the National Disaster Management Plan. private sector.16. The two policies raise issues of coordinated disaster management and household food security. Within the context of Jwaneng. Assurance of household food security is availability through national food imports and production. The Agricultural Resources Board under the Ministry of Agriculture will continue in conjunction with the Disaster Committee to undertake the following: i. The Department of Crop Production and Forestry will continue to encourage production of vegetables in back yards and institutional gardens for domestic consumption to increase household food security.

existing government structures and resources in collaboration with communities. extinguishers and hand sprayers. In the event of any disaster. which may lead to sol erosion Loss of biodiversity Noise and dust pollution from fire engines 16. which has the overall responsibility of monitoring relief measures with financial assistance from the National Disaster Management office. iv. the most common type of disaster is fire outbreaks and these are handled by the Council Fire Department. The private sector and nongovernmental organizations will also be mobilized by the Disaster Committee to actively participate in disaster preparedness and management activities. 16. There is also a centralized disaster fund established by government. In Jwaneng. Provide the necessary fire fighting equipment like fire engines.5 RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS FOR UDP2 Resources for contingency planning are sourced from within individual departmental budgets.4 FRAMEWORK ASSESSMENT FOR STRATEGIC ENVIRONMENTAL The use of fire engines. extinguishers and provision of storm water drainage will have the following environmental impacts: Loss of vegetation.ii. iii. Fire management training – conduct in-house training of Council and central government employees in handling of fire fighting equipment. Non Governmental Organisations and private sector will be mobilized. 147 . Provision of storm water drainage in town especially in prone areas. Relief interventions are coordinated by the District Disaster Preparedness Committee at the local level.

CHAPTER SEVENTEEN
17 PLAN MONITORING AND EVALUATION
17.1 INTRODUCTION
Structural arrangements in the form of functional institutions responsible for the formulation and implementation of the UDP2 are already in place. The overall responsibility for all aspects of the UDP lies with the Urban Development Committee (UDC). The principal functions of the UDC are: To serve as a planning body for the town To coordinate the work of various central and local government agencies To prepare and oversee the implementation of the UDP The Plan Management Committee, a Sub Committee of the UDC, will be responsible for the general management of the plan. This sub committee has not been in existence in Jwaneng and efforts will be made during UDP 2 plan period to establish this sub committee, which is a core group decision oriented with the primary responsibility of managing the plan.

17.2 ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING ACTIVITIES
There will be need to identify environmentally sensitive areas and reduce activities that will be harmful to the environment during the plan period in an effort to protect and preserve the environment. Upgrading of low-income areas, which started in 1999 has addressed the problem of the use of pit latrines, which has potential for polluting underground water resources. The proposed servicing of EU 8 and 9 will make provision for sewer lines, which will eliminate the use of pit latrines. The ongoing study on establishment of a borrow pit for pit sand excavation will also address the problem of indiscriminate digging of pit sand in town.

17.3 FINANCIAL AND PERSONNEL CONSTRAINTS
The world economic slow down has had a negative impact on Botswana‟ economy. As we enter a period of budgetary constraints, there is a need to reprioritise our expenditure programme (recurrent and development) and even prioritise among projects within priority sectors. This means scaling down our project proposals to be in line with what the ceiling can accommodate for UDP 2 plan period. The implications for the implementation of the plan would be that: i. Development expenditure at district level will decline from relatively high levels of funding which characterized the first years of UDP1 /NDP8. Ministerial Planners, responding to signals from MFDP may increase restrictions on projects already underway or request districts to scale them down.

ii.

Projects implemented by local authorities have changed significantly in terms of scope and nature. This increase in projects far exceeds the increase in the local authorities‟ 148

establishment, especially in the professional and technical fields. This problem is compounded by the high rate of resignations of professionals and technicians and this has a negative impact on plan implementation. It does not appear like the situation will improve during UDP2 unless government introduces measures aimed at attracting and retaining officers in the local authorities.

17.4 PROPOSED PLAN MONITORING ACTIVITIES DURING UDP2
The Urban Development Plan already has an implementation schedule in that all planned projects have been phased according to financial years. Annual Plans will also be prepared every year in March showing projects that will be implemented during the coming year. The plans will also indicate expected commencement and completion dates. This will facilitate follow up and user departments will liase with the implementing agency or department to address any implementation bottlenecks that may arise. Monitoring will further be improved through regular progress reporting to the Urban Development Committee, the Plan Management Committee and Jwaneng Town Council meetings.

149

APPENDIX A: URBAN DEVELOPMENT PLANNING MATRIX
The Urban – Ministry Matrix is comprised of spreadsheets designed to show the details of UDP II/NDP IX financial allocations of each project, from each ministry to each town. It is a detailed breakdown of the NDP IX financial allocations by town, disaggregated both by components of specific projects, and where possible into the six annual phases of the plan period. The matrix data contained in the spreadsheets is at two levels: Ministry allocations per town for all relevant projects Urban allocations within particular projects by component and annual phasing, where applicable, over the six-year plan period. The purposes of these matrices is to enable the town and ministry planners and project managers to negotiate at a more detailed and specific level about the allocation of funds for the different projects in each Urban Development Plan. The matrices also provide an effective reference document for all projects and components during the implementation and monitoring stages of the plan period. All users of the plan can therefore quickly and easily see the agreed amount of project funding for al the agreed amount of project funding for all projects at the start of the plan period. It has not been possible to get a full set of data on the dis-aggregation of some central government projects by component and phased over the six-year plan period. This data was only available for projects implemented by the town itself under the Ministry of Local Government and sporadically for a few ministries. The matrices in this plan are directly linked to the national matrices; therefore every effort has been made to ensure that the data in the urban matrices is accurate based on the inputs from the ministries and towns.

150

P139157000 BUDGET ALLOCATIONS IN P'000 PROJECT TITLE LG 104 Fleet Development LG 901 Customary Courts LG 1102 Facilities Primary Education 2003/04 800 3611 5650 2750 5930 2000 1700 81 50 200 18000 37072 81 40 1568 12000 27900 81 50 168 6912 10351 9385 1801 81 40 1314 18340 26537 81 50 81 66 3611 8600 2050 150 2750 3000 1430 5830 220 2000 2004/05 2005/06 940 2006/07 500 2007/08 240 2008/09 UDP TEC 2480 7222 26310 6120 9930 1700 486 296 3250 55252 113046 II NDP TEC 307000 201800 1444800 41300 274800 416100 69800 61900 247000 621000 3685500 9 LG 1103 Recreation Facilities LG 1104 Primary Health Facilities LG 1105 Centres Rural Administration LG 1107 Labour Intensive Public Works LG 1109 Community Projects LG 1112 Municipal Services LG 1113 Urban Land Servicing TOTAL MINSTRY OF AGRICULTURE Total estimated cost for Jwaneng Projects .P3247668.00 151 .MINISTRY OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT TOTAL ESTIMATED COST .

Development of extension services (office block) TOTAL 2003/04 3247668 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 UDP TEC 3247668 3247668 II NDP 9 TEC'000 96921 96921 152 .BUDGET ALLOCATION PROJECT TITLE AG 315 .

P694 580 BUDGET ALLOCATION PROJECT TITLE TI 104 MTI INFRASTRUCTURAL SERVICES (Offices and staff houses) TOTAL 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 694580 2007/08 2008/09 UDP TEC 694580 II NDP 9 TEC'000 180085 694580 180085 MINISTRY OF WORKS. TRANSPORT AND COMMUNICATIONS Total estimated cost for Jwaneng . INDUSTRY AND WILDLIFE Total estimated cost for Jwaneng .NATIONAL LIBRARY SERVICES TOTAL 15500000 26860900 248826 528656 MINISTRY OF TRADE.P26860900.00 BUDGET ALLOCATION PROJECT TITLE HA 104 (Office block) MLHA FACILITIES 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 UDP TEC II NDP 9 TEC' 000 279830 11360900 HA 502 .MINISTRY OF LABOUR AND HOME AFFAIRS Total extimated cost for Jwaneng .P154 000 153 .

P14000 BUDGET ALLOCATION PROJECT TITLE FD 104 MFDP (Revenue Offices) FACILITIES 2003/04 2004/05 7200 6800 IN P '000 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 UDP TEC 7200 6800 II NDP 9 TEC'000 235900 231100 FD 607 CUSTOMS AND IMIGRATION FACILITIES (staff houses) TOTAL 14000 467000 154 .BUDGET ALLOCATION PROJECT TITLE WT 104 MWT FACILITIES (Upgrading DABS Depot) TOTAL 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 UDP TEC 154000 154000 II NDP 9 TEC'000 162678 162678 MINISTRY OF FINANCE AND DEVELOPMENT PLANNING IN P'000 Total estimated cost for Jwaneng .

SHHA DEVELOPMENT LH 1003 .P21832525 BUDGET ALLOCATIONS PROJECT TITLE ED 110 COLLEGES OF EDUCATION (Upgrading of Jwaneng Technical College) ED 401 .MINISTRY OF EDUCATION Total estimated cost for Jwaneng .GOVT OFFICE BLOCKS TOTAL MINISTRY OF ENVIRONMENT. WILDLIFE & TOURISM 2003/04 1920000 50000000 2004/05 1920000 2005/06 1920000 2006/07 1920000 2007/08 1920000 2008/09 1920000 UDP TEC II NDP 9 TEC'000 338000 1208545 1546545 11520000 50000000 61520000 BUDGET ALLOCATIONS 155 .OUT OF SCHOOL EDUCATION ED 800 SECONDARY SCHOOLS TOTAL 3000000 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 UDP TEC II NDP 9 TEC'000 730000 14500000 3000000 4332525 21832525 81000 1100000 1911000 MINISTRY OF LANDS AND HOUSING P61520000 BUDGET ALLOCATIONS PROJECT TITLE LH 201 .

PROJECT TITLE 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 UDP TEC 560000 II NDP TEC P'000 169800 9 EWT 401 DEVELOPMENT OF METEOROLOGICAL (Improvement of existing offices) EWT URBAN SEWERAGE TOTAL 502 6200 10850 3500 500 560000 1000 600 22650 347799 582650 517599 156 .

157 .

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->