BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.

1 Deployment Planning Guide

BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1

Copyright

© 2008 Business Objects, an SAP company. All rights reserved. Business Objects owns the following U.S. patents, which may cover products that are offered and licensed by Business Objects: 5,295,243; 5,339,390; 5,555,403; 5,590,250; 5,619,632; 5,632,009; 5,857,205; 5,880,742; 5,883,635; 6,085,202; 6,108,698; 6,247,008; 6,289,352; 6,300,957; 6,377,259; 6,490,593; 6,578,027; 6,581,068; 6,628,312; 6,654,761; 6,768,986; 6,772,409; 6,831,668; 6,882,998; 6,892,189; 6,901,555; 7,089,238; 7,107,266; 7,139,766; 7,178,099; 7,181,435; 7,181,440; 7,194,465; 7,222,130; 7,299,419; 7,320,122 and 7,356,779. Business Objects and its logos, BusinessObjects, Business Objects Crystal Vision, Business Process On Demand, BusinessQuery, Cartesis, Crystal Analysis, Crystal Applications, Crystal Decisions, Crystal Enterprise, Crystal Insider, Crystal Reports, Crystal Vision, Desktop Intelligence, Inxight and its logos , LinguistX, Star Tree, Table Lens, ThingFinder, Timewall, Let There Be Light, Metify, NSite, Rapid Marts, RapidMarts, the Spectrum Design, Web Intelligence, Workmail and Xcelsius are trademarks or registered trademarks in the United States and/or other countries of Business Objects and/or affiliated companies. SAP is the trademark or registered trademark of SAP AG in Germany and in several other countries. All other names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective owners. Business Objects products in this release may contain redistributions of software licensed from third-party contributors. Some of these individual components may also be available under alternative licenses. A partial listing of third-party contributors that have requested or permitted acknowledgments, as well as required notices, can be found at: http://www.businessobjects.com/thirdparty 2008-11-06

Third-party Contributors

Contents
Chapter 1 Getting Started 7 About this guide...........................................................................................8 What's new .................................................................................................8 Overview of BusinessObjects Enterprise....................................................9 Deploying for the first time.........................................................................10 Changing your deployment's architecture.................................................11 BusinessObjects Enterprise guides...........................................................12 Chapter 2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture 15

Architecture overview................................................................................16 Enterprise infrastructure.......................................................................18 BusinessObjects Enterprise web services...........................................19 BusinessObjects Enterprise management services.............................20 BusinessObjects Enterprise storage services......................................21 BusinessObjects Enterprise processing services................................22 Server Intelligence ...............................................................................26 Life-Cycle Management (LCM)............................................................26 Clients........................................................................................................27 Browser-based web application clients................................................28 Desktop client applications...................................................................32 Services.....................................................................................................39 Service Categories...............................................................................40 Adaptive Job Server.............................................................................51 Adaptive Processing Server.................................................................52 Central Management Server................................................................53 Connection Server................................................................................55

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.........................................................................................................58 Desktop Intelligence Job Server......................68 Web Application Container Server (WACS).....................................................79 Reporting databases................................................................................................................................................NET SDK................................................................61 List of Values Job Server.........66 Sets Profile Server ....................................................73 Web Services ...........................................................................................68 Web application servers...........................................................................................................78 Databases .........66 Report Application Server.60 Job Servers..65 Publication Job Server............................57 Desktop Intelligence Cache Server ................Contents Crystal Reports Cache Server..................................................................................................................................................................64 Process Analysis Server.............1 Deployment Planning Guide .....................................................62 Multi-Dimensional Analysis Services (MDAS) Server ......................................................................................................................................................................................63 PM Repository Server....................................................58 Desktop Intelligence Processing Server .....................69 Java SDK..................................................64 Predictive Analysis Server ..............................................................................65 Program Job Server............................................................62 PM Metrics Server.................................................................................................................................................................57 Dashboard Server...........................................................................80 4 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3..............................................67 Web Intelligence Processing Server......................................................................................75 Web Application Container Service (WACS)...........................................................................67 Sets Query Server ..................55 Dashboard Analytics Server.................................70 ..............................................................................78 System databases....................................................................59 Event Server..............................................63 PM Rules Server.....................................................................................................................................59 File Repository Servers .

..............................................................83 Information Workflows .........112 Multi-homed environment.....1 Deployment Planning Guide 5 .........................................................................................................................................................105 Web application servers.....................................................................................................................................................................112 Security....................................................................................................................................................111 Failover and load balancing.........................................................................87 Scheduling..............................................................................................................................................119 Deployment scenarios...........................................................................................................88 Viewing.............................................................................Contents Auditing database.......................................................................................................123 Complex deployment overview.............................113 IPv6 networking..........109 Web servers...........................................................................................................122 N-tier scenario overview..........................................82 Security plug-ins.....82 Central Management Server (CMS) security..........................................................................................................................121 Desktop client to server overview.........................93 Chapter 3 Planning Your Deployment 101 Planning your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment.....................86 Authentication..........................................................102 Assessing your organization's environment.....102 Operating systems....................................................................................................................128 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.......................103 Databases in BusinessObjects Enterprise...........................81 Authentication and single sign-on...................................................................83 Authentication and authorization.................125 Chapter 4 Deployment Checklists 127 Deployment Checklist.................118 Designing for high availability................................................117 Performance and scalability......

...............129 Chapter 5 Glossary 133 Appendix A Get More Help 145 Index 149 6 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3...1 Deployment Planning Guide .......................Contents Installation order...............................................

Getting Started 1 .

For server configuration and user management tasks.1 Guide. The website is refreshed with up-to-date content as it becomes available between releases. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide.com/documentation/ What's new For information on new features and changes made since the last release.1 Deployment Planning Guide . this guide provides all the information you need to: • • • • Understand BusinessObjects Enterprise architecture. Go to http://support. This system enables full-text search and other customizable features to make it easy to find the information you need. Plan a secure and fail-safe environment. All product documentation (including error message explanations) is available in all supported languages in an HTML-based documentation library. see the What's New in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. This system enables full-text search and other customizable features to make it easy to find the information you need. You can also access or download the PDF guides from the same website. Whether you are a new or experienced user. For information on installation types and considerations. All product documentation (including error message explanations) is available in all supported languages in an HTML-based documentation library. The website is refreshed with up-to-date 8 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. For specific information related to wdeploy. Learn the new features available for BusinessObjects Enterprise. You can also access or download the PDF guides from the same website. Choose an appropriate configuration.1 Getting Started About this guide About this guide This guide will help you plan a successful deployment of BusinessObjects Enterprise. For information on the deployment of WAR files to web application servers. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment Guide. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment Guide.busi nessobjects.

enabling existing customers to leverage their investments in Business Objects and Crystal technologies. • Support all deployment models and let you fine-tune administration and configuration of the entire system. • Include a variety of major enhancements spread across data access methods. from using Web Intelligence anywhere to improving Crystal Reports interactivity and personalization. BusinessObjects Enterprise provides for web-based administration and configuration of the entire system.com/documentation/. BusinessObjects Enterprise features: • Extend the robust information infrastructure provided by earlier releases and integrate seamlessly with existing product lines. reporting. • Support side-by-side deployments. administration capabilities.Getting Started Overview of BusinessObjects Enterprise 1 content as it becomes available between releases. It also provides an industry-standard. and analysis applications. About this guide This guide provides you with information for planning your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment. Overview of BusinessObjects Enterprise BusinessObjects Enterprise is the business intelligence platform that supports a range of performance management (Dashboard and Analytics). • Bring together features from across the Business Objects product line to meet your evolving reporting needs. and report design options. It explains the key concepts and choices you need to make before you begin your deployment. • Deliver innovation to drive user productivity and self-service reporting. • Deliver more reporting with fewer reports. data integration. Go to http://support. proven architecture and platform-support for semantic layers. You should read this to gain an understanding of how you can install BusinessObjects Enterprise to suit your organization. • Simplify business monitoring with dashboard functionality and improved user experience. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.busi nessobjects. querying.1 Deployment Planning Guide 9 . • Facilitate upgrading from older products to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI. • Deliver the strongest self-service query and analysis solution for SAP customers. and security.

see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Applications Deployment Guide. Who should use this guide? It is recommend to consult this guide if you are: • New to BusinessObjects Enterprise. • Assess your needs and design a deployment architecture that works best for you with Assessing your organization's environment on page 102. • Planning your first deployment. For initial server configuration and user management tasks. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. managing. as is a general understanding of web application server management and scripting technologies. review sections of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide and the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide prior to installation. Familiarity with your operating system and your network environment is beneficial. For specific information related to wdeploy. and maintaining a BusinessObjects Enterprise installation. Deploying for the first time If you are planning or performing your first deployment of BusinessObjects Enterprise. this guide provides sufficient background and conceptual information to clarify administrative tasks and features. This guide is intended as pre-reading material for administrators responsible for configuring. However.1 Getting Started Deploying for the first time For information about installing BusinessObjects Enterprise. and complex • 10 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. • Making significant changes to the architecture of an existing deployment. For information on how to deploy web applications to a web application server. distributed (clustered). to assist all levels of administrative experience. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide.1 Deployment Planning Guide . it is recommended that you perform the following tasks and read the corresponding sections: • Familiarize yourself with the BusinessObjects Enterprise system architecture by reading "Architecture basics". including detailed configuration examples for each of the supported web application servers with simple. • To learn specific requirements and caveats related to the architecture type you have selected for your deployment.

• • • Changing your deployment's architecture If you need to revise your deployment to account for significant changes in how you use the system. multi-homed machines. and secure socket layer (SSL) configuration. trusted authentication. environment protection. see the Managing and configuring servers chapter of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. security plug-ins. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment Guide. To improving performance by assessing your needs. Kerberos. it is recommended that you read the following documentation: • In the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. see theBusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. After you install. evaluating system performance. and working with firewalls.Getting Started Changing your deployment's architecture 1 deployment scenarios. read the Improving Performance chapter for information about assessing and improving the performance of an existing deployment. • If you need to configure server components. proceed with your installation using the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. The guide also includes advanced topics such as configuring clustered environments. session tracking. as well as how to scale or plan for scaling your system. read the Managing and configuring servers chapter of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide for information about configuring your BusinessObjects Enterprise server processes from within the Central Management Console (CMC). third-party authentication (Active Directory or SiteMinder. or LDAP). reverse proxy servers. active trust relationships.1 Deployment Planning Guide 11 . BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. • After determining which areas need improvement. read Assessing your organization's environment on page 102 to see other if a different deployment configuration would improve performance in your area of interest. Once you have formulated your deployment plan. auditing. • To find out about support for Single Sign On (SSO). using NTLM.

BusinessObjects Enterprise guides The following table provides a list of BusinessObjects Enterprise guides and their contents. see the Deploying with wdeploy section of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment Guide.1 Deployment Planning Guide . 12 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1 Getting Started BusinessObjects Enterprise guides • For information about installing server components or deploying to a new web application server platform.

Getting Started BusinessObjects Enterprise guides 1 Guide BusinessObjects Enterprise Planning Guide Description Covers the key concepts you should consider before you begin deploying BusinessObjects Enterprise. Covers topics related to the deployment of web applications to web application servers with BusinessObjects Enterprise.1 Deployment Planning Guide 13 . managing users. determining your organization's needs. and measuring system performance. tips for assessing your existing environment. BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment Guide BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The server administration topics includes server configuration. Leads you through the steps required to run the setup program and complete your installation of BusinessObjects Enterprise. configuring rights and access levels. Provides content for server and content administration. This guide includes an overview of the architecture. There are UNIX and Windows versions of this guide available. configuring firewalls. and preparing for the installation. The content administration topics include working with the CMC. and working with Business Objects applications and objects. managing authentication. There are UNIX and Windows versions of this guide available.

encyclopedia.businessobjects.asp 14 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise Upgrade Guide Information for upgrades from BusinessObjects Enterprise XI to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. working with publications. BusinessObjects Enterprise InfoView User's Guide For a complete list of all of our product documentation please visit: http://support. publishing Desktop Intelligence documents. Provides an overview of InfoView and working with Crystal Reports.1 Deployment Planning Guide . publishing Crystal reports. and Voyager workspaces. such as Classic or Enterprise 5 or 6.1 Getting Started BusinessObjects Enterprise guides Guide BusinessObjects Enterprise Publisher's Guide Description Provides an overview of the publishing process. BusinessObjects 5/6 to XI 3.com/documentation/product_guides/default. and publishing security. objects.1.1. discussions. Web Intelligence. publishing Web Intelligence documents.1 Details content migration from legacy Migration Guide Business Objects software. to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.

BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture 2 .

These services are available to software created by your own organization through several application programming interfaces (APIs). Developers can access the platform using a set of web services and Java and . specialized platform services handle either on-demand data access and report generation. For example. system. edit. Desktop Intelligence. • Web Intelligence.NET APIs to integrate BusinessObjects Enterprise into your organization's systems. increase sales. to tens of thousands of users with multiple tools and interfaces. streamline operations. and interact with reports using specialized tools and applications that include: • Crystal Reports. management. • Desktop Intelligence. and Crystal Reports components. and maintenance of an BusinessObjects Enterprise installation. and is flexible enough to grow from several users with a single tool. and process analysis. You can offload processor intensive scheduling and processing to dedicated servers to improve performance. BI reports can be used internally and externally throughout an organization to make tactical decisions. or deepen customer relationships. BusinessObjects Enterprise includes specialized services including Web Intelligence. reduce costs. The architecture is designed to meet the needs of virtually any BI deployment. and to share dynamically updated documents with users on separate networks. build better products.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview Architecture overview This section outlines the overall platform architecture. and help to form a plan for the deployment. This information will help administrators understand the system essentials. 16 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. and service components that make up the BusinessObjects Enterprise Business Intelligence (BI) platform. BusinessObjects Enterprise is designed for high performance across a broad spectrum of user and deployment scenarios. create. and a set of Dashboard and Analytics services for metrics management.1 Deployment Planning Guide . • Voyager. Business Intelligence is the process of taking raw data stored in databases. predictive analysis. and turning it into useful information in the form of reports that can be used to make business decisions. or report scheduling based on times and events. End users can access.

Dashboard Builder. It is also possible to run duplicate instances of a server process on the same machine. or across several networked machines. • Publishing Wizard.1 Deployment Planning Guide 17 . reliability. although this configuration is recommended only for upgrade or testing purposes.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview 2 • • Dashboard and Analytics. Note: While it is possible to deploy a mixture of Windows and Unix platforms at the tier level (such as a Unix web application server with a Windows CMS). To provide flexibility. • Repository Diagnostic Tool. it is recommended that you do not mix operating systems for server processes (such as a cluster of two CMS systems where one runs Windows and the other runs Unix). or "horizontally scaled" (where server processes are distributed between two or more networked machines) to improve performance. and scalability. IT departments can use data and system management tools that include: • Central Management Console. Server processes can be "vertically scaled" (where one computer runs several. • Universe Designer. server-side processes) to reduce cost. • Central Configuration Manager. the components that make up BusinessObjects Enterprise can be installed on one or many machines. You can even install two BusinessObjects Enterprise deployments simultaneously on the same hardware. • Import Wizard. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. or all.

The Enterprise Infrastructure is a series of services that are designed to communicate via CORBA (Common Object Request Broker Architecture).2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview Enterprise infrastructure The Enterprise Infrastructure provides the basic messaging mechanism needed for BusinessObjects Enterprise components to communicate with one another. which runs over TCP/IP. Some CORBA applications use a name server.1 Deployment Planning Guide . 18 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The name server service is a part of the Central Management Server (CMS). The name server service is a facility of the underlying CORBA architecture that binds the BusinessObjects Enterprise servers together. The name server provides a directory of the servers registered in the BusinessObjects Enterprise environment and helps establish connections between clients and these servers.

the CMS holds the configuration settings and the CMS communicates with all BusinessObjects Enterprise servers. such as its IP address. They include support for report viewing. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. TCP port.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview 2 The Enterprise Infrastructure provides the framework for establishing connections between clients and servers: • • It is the centerpiece of BusinessObjects Enterprise technology. • A server object is a server that participates in serving requests to client objects. The server provides information about itself. The web application server acts as a gateway between the browser and the rest of the components in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Note: When configuring servers using the Central Management Console. Each individual server polls the CMS every 60 seconds to get an updated list of provided services. Web services use the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK to interface with the rest of the BusinessObjects Enterprise services. When a BusinessObjects Enterprise server starts. and a list of services it provides. and logic to understand and direct web requests to the appropriate BusinessObjects Enterprise server. • A client object is a client that makes requests to servers on the Enterprise Infrastructure. Note: In the BusinessObjects Enterprise environment.1 Deployment Planning Guide 19 . BusinessObjects Enterprise web services The web services are server-side components that process requests from client applications and communicate these requests to the appropriate server. and description of the server. A client object can transparently make requests to server objects using the Enterprise Infrastructure. most services act as clients and servers to each other during transactions between the servers. and facilitates communication between servers. it registers itself with the name server in the CMS. BusinessObjects Enterprise web services are hosted on the web application server. to the name server.

and maintain a record of each and every instance and its location. The management services are provided by: • Central Management Service running on the Central Management Server (CMS) The CMS is responsible for authenticating users and groups. user and group administration. or programming language.NET consumers API accessed by rich clients in the user interaction tier. such as Live Office and Crystal Reports. manage auditing information. which includes information about users. • • BusinessObjects Enterprise management services The management services manage the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. BI platform: Exposes advanced platform features such as scheduling. Excel. object model. BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Services provide services in the following areas: • • Session: Authentication and user privilege management. search. The CMS also maintains a separate audit database of information about user actions and manages the BusinessObjects system database. BusinessObjects Enterprise content. PDF. and keeping track of the availability of the other BusinessObjects Enterprise services.1 Deployment Planning Guide . and XML format. and calendars. These services maintain all security information. platform events. It also maintains the BusinessObjects Enterprise system database. security levels. 20 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Web Services consists of software components that can be called remotely using the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). server administration. send requests to the appropriate services.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview Business Objects web services provide a Java and . and services. SOAP is a protocol for exchanging information that is not dependent on a specific platform. groups. Report Engine: Displays Web Intelligence and Crystal Reports in HTML. Query: Builds ad hoc queries based on the Business Objects universe semantic layer.

txt.rpt.rpt and . . .wid. or .1 Deployment Planning Guide 21 . It can store the following files: . or . It allows for extra auditing and tracking of some system information.doc. • Output File Repository Service running on the Output File Repository Server The Output File Repository Service manages all of the report instances generated by the Crystal Reports Job Service and the program instances generated by the Program Job Service.exe.rep.pdf. It can store the following files: .rpt.rtf. . . The storage services are: • Input File Repository Service running on the Input File Repository Server The Input File Repository Service manages all of the report and program objects that have been published to the system. .xls. .rtf. .car.pdf. BusinessObjects Enterprise storage services The storage services are responsible for storing objects and object instances. Event Service running on the Event Server The Event Server manages file-based events.bat.wid files are stored as report documents with saved data. The Audit Database is optional in a regular system deployment.doc. . the Event Server triggers a file-based event. . When the appropriate file appears in the monitored directory. It monitors the directory you specified when setting up a file-based event. • Crystal Reports Cache Service running on the Crystal Reports Cache Server BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. .unv.txt. Note: . . .rep. . .BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview 2 Note: • • • All servers communicate with the CMS when they start up. .wid. It also manages instances generated by the Desktop or Web Intelligence Processing Services. .ppt. .xls.csv. .js. . and the List of Values (LOV) Job Service.

and then save the processed file to the Output File Repository Service as an instance. creating report instances at the request of the Central Management Server (CMS). and generates program instances.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview The Crystal Reports Cache Service maintains a folder of cached report EPF files and determines if a request can be fulfilled with a cached report page. • Desktop Intelligence Cache Service running on the Desktop Intelligence Cache Server The Desktop Intelligence Cache Service handles viewing requests for Desktop Intelligence documents and manages the viewable pages created by the Desktop Intelligence Processing Service. as requested by the CMS. Therefore. it passes the request to the Crystal Reports Processing Service. 22 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise processing services The processing services access the data and generate reports. Viewer choice also plays a role in determining which services and servers are involved in reporting. If the request cannot be fulfilled with a cached report page.epf files each time a page is viewed. • Crystal Reports Job Service running on the Crystal Reports Job Server The Crystal Reports Job Service schedules and processes report objects. Note: Both the Program Job Service and the Crystal Reports Job Service retrieve the document to be run from the Input File Repository Service. run the report or program. The processing services are: • Program Job Service running on the Program Job Server The Program Job Service processes program objects. report pages that have been cached can be shared among users. The benefit of caching is that BusinessObjects Enterprise doesn't have to generate . Which services become involved with reporting is determined by whether the object is being scheduled or viewed on demand.1 Deployment Planning Guide . This is the only tier that interacts directly with the databases that contain report data.

BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. It is invoked when users want to edit and view Desktop or Web Intelligence documents through InfoView.1 Deployment Planning Guide 23 . • Web Intelligence Processing Service running on the Web Intelligence Processing Server The Web Intelligence Processing Service processes Web Intelligence Document requests. but rather the Web Intelligence Job Service hosted by the Adaptive Job Server (AJS). Note: It is not the Adaptive Job Server itself that processes Web Intelligence documents. The AJS can be configured to run with or without the Web Intelligence Job Service. • Connection Service running on the Connection Server The Connection Service is responsible for the database connectivity to access data. It is also used by some EPM services. • Desktop Intelligence Processing Service running on the Desktop Intelligence Processing Server The Desktop Intelligence Processing Service processes viewing requests for Desktop Intelligence documents.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview 2 • Web Intelligence Job Service running on the Adaptive Job Server The Web Intelligence Job Service receives scheduled Web Intelligence document requests from the CMS and forwards them to the Web Intelligence server for processing. • Desktop Intelligence Job Service running on the Desktop Intelligence Job Server The Desktop Intelligence Job Service processes scheduling requests received from the CMS for Desktop Intelligence documents and generates instances of the Desktop Intelligence document. • List of Values (LOV) Job Service running on the LOV Job Server The List of Values Job Service receives scheduling requests from the Business View manager and processes scheduled List of Values objects to populate them with values retrieved from a database. generating Desktop Intelligence documents.

and Desktop Intelligence Processing Server. These libraries allow services to query the database directly without communicating with the Connection Server service. the Web Intelligence Processing Service communicates with the Output File Repository Service to obtain an existing historical instance of a WID. These files are then sent to the Crystal Reports Cache Service. 24 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. including PDF merging and publication extension processing. When viewing an existing instance of a WID. WACS does not support deploying Business Objects or external web applications. Web applications such as the CMC are automatically deployed to WACS. • Web Intelligence Processing Service running on the Web Intelligence Processing Server The Web Intelligence Processing Service is responsible for generating Web Intelligence documents.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview Note: The Connection Service libraries are present on the Web Intelligence Processing Server. After it generates the report. • Publishing Post Processing Service running on the Adaptive Processing Server This service is responsible for any post processing of a publication job. The Web Intelligence Processing Service obtains document creation requests from the web application server and then communicates with the Input File Repository Service in order to obtain a copy of the Web Intelligence Document (WID) file and the universe definition. The Crystal Reports Processing Service retrieves data for the report from the latest instance or directly from a database. • Web Application Container Service (WACS) The Web Application Container Service (WACS) provides a platform for hosting BusinessObjects Enterprise web applications. such as the Central Management Console (CMC). whether manually or by using the wdeploy tool. The viewing processing services are: • Crystal Reports Processing Service running on the Crystal Reports Processing Server The Crystal Reports Processing Service is responsible for generating Crystal Reports pages for viewing.1 Deployment Planning Guide . the Processing Service converts the requested data to one or more EPF files.

BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview

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Report Application Service running on the Report Application Server Report Application Service resolves Dynamic Recipient Lists at design time and Runtime in Publishing, as well as with LiveOffice. The RAS also provides the ad hoc reporting capabilities that allow users to create and modify reports over the Web. As with the Crystal Reports Processing Service, the RAS supports Java viewer SDKs. The Report Application Service also includes an SDK for report creation and modification, providing you with tools for building custom report interaction interfaces.

Multi-Dimensional Analysis Service running on the Multi-Dimensional Analysis Server The Multi-Dimensional Analysis Server (MDAS) is a dedicated server intended to interact with OLAP data sources and to support Voyager. The MDAS needs an appropriate OLAP database client configured for the appropriate OLAP data source. The list of providers is dynamically generated, based on which database drivers are installed on the MDAS. If more than one MDAS exists, the server contacted is selected randomly, so the same drivers should be installed on all servers. Connections to OLAP data sources are defined and managed from the CMC. Entries can include: • Oracle • SAP • Essbase • Microsoft Analysis Services 8.0 (MSAS 2000) • Microsoft Analysis Services 9.0 (MSAS 2005)

Search Service running on the Adaptive Processing Server The Search Service processes search requests and executes the indexing. Your deployment can include multiple Search service, and search requests are actively processed by all available servers. However, only one Search service performs the indexing process.

Client Auditing Proxy Service running on the Adaptive Processing Server The Client Auditing Proxy Service monitors connected Rich Web Intelligence and Rich Desktop Intelligence clients and forwards the information to the auditing server. Rich clients working locally, not

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BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Architecture overview

connected to a repository, are not audited by the Client Auditing Proxy Service. • Publishing Service running on the Adaptive Processing Server The Publishing Service coordinates the publication of an object by communicating with other services to process the publication.

Server Intelligence
Server Intelligence is a component of the Central Management Console (CMC) that simplifies administrative procedures previously carried out by the Central Configuration Manager (CCM), such as the management of CMC server processes. This includes the addition and removal of server processes, server process configuration, and the automatic restart or shutdown of servers that encounter unexpected conditions. Server Intelligence also archives server process information in the CMS database so you can easily restore default server settings, or create redundant instances of server processes with the same settings.
Note:

The CCM is a tool that allows you to configure and manage the Server Intelligence Agent. The Server Intelligence Agent is the component that allows you to manage all servers through the CMC. You can also use the CCM to create and manage nodes in your deployment.

Life-Cycle Management (LCM)
BusinessObjects Enterprise contains new Life-Cycle Management modules that gives you control over your life cycles of system objects. Life-Cycle Management refers to the set of processes involved in managing information related to a product life cycle, from the stage of concept through delivery. It establishes procedures for governing the entire product life cycle, which includes phases such as development, production, testing, and so on. The BI resources that are present in the development repository must be transferred to the testing repository for testing deployment. These phases can occur at the same site or at different geographical locations. The time

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BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients

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required to transfer the resources from one repository to another repository must be minimal, to obtain a high-quality and competitive product. These resources also have dependencies that have to be moved from one repository to another. The dependencies of resources add more complexity to the problem, because these resources have to move along with the dependents. For more information, see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Life-Cycle Manager User's Guide for XI 3.1.

Life-Cycle Manager
BusinessObjects LifeCycle Manager (LCM) is a web-based tool that enables you to move BI resources from one system to another system, without affecting the dependencies of these resources. It also enables you to manage different versions of BI resources, manage dependencies of BI resources, and roll back a promoted resource to restore the destination system to its previous state. The LCM tool is a plug-in for the BusinessObjects Enterprise application. You can promote a BI resource from one system to another system only if the same version of the BusinessObjects Enterprise application is installed on both the source and destination systems.

Clients
Two different types of applications are available: web browser clients, and rich desktop application clients installed on a Microsoft Windows operating system.
Browser-based web applications

This category is made up of light-weight, web browser-based client front-ends that run on all supported operating system platforms. A web application server receives client requests and interfaces with the BusinessObjects Enterprise intelligence and processing tiers to return data to the users' web browsers. This approach allows you to provide business intelligence (BI) access to large groups of users, without the challenges of deploying desktop software products. Communication is conducted over HTTP and can be secured with SSL by enabling HTTPS encryption on the web application server. Examples of this type of application include the InfoView, Web Intelligence, Central Management Console (CMC), and report viewers.

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Standalone mode. The application's dynamic and static resources are separated: static content is deployed to a web server. Desktop Intelligence. wdeploy allows you to deploy WAR files to a web application server in two ways: 1. Note: Although Live Office is a desktop application. and Live Office clients. Web applications are automatically deployed by the setup program when you install BusinessObjects Enterprise. and communicate with your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment through CORBA or encrypted CORBA SSL. The wdeploy tool is designed to speed up and simplify deployment to Java web application severs. 28 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. dynamic content is deployed to a web application server. 2. and run in a web browser. Based on the Apache Ant scripting tool. This approach allows you to offload BI processing from BusinessObjects Enterprise onto individual client computers. Most desktop applications directly access your organization's data through drivers installed on the desktop. Java web applications can also be reconfigured or deployed after the initial installation using the bundled wdeploy command-line tool.1 Deployment Planning Guide . even when sent to recipients outside your organization's secured network. rich-client applications installed on a supported Microsoft Windows operating system. it communicates with BusinessObjects Enterprise web services over HTTP.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients Desktop applications The second category is made up of locally installed. Examples of this type of application include Crystal Reports. Browser-based web application clients Browser-based web application clients reside on a web application server. You can configure BusinessObjects Enterprise so that Microsoft Office documents containing Live Office components dynamically update. Split mode. All web application resources are deployed together on a web application server that serves both dynamic and static content.

Dashboard and Analytics includes the following products: • Dashboard Builder • Performance Manager • Set Analysis • Predictive Analysis BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. These products allow goals to be set around metrics and assigned to owners.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients 2 For more information about wdeploy. they also support group decision-making and analysis via integrated collaboration and workflow capabilities. Dashboard and Analytics Dashboard and Analytics is a suite of products that helps users track and analyze key business metrics via management dashboards.1 Deployment Planning Guide 29 . and alerting. Because the CMC is a web-based application. where and when it's needed. BusinessObjects Mobile BusinessObjects Mobile allows your organization access to information from any wireless device. and set security levels for all of your BusinessObjects Enterprise content. Management and information workers can stay up-to-date and make decisions with access to the latest information. scorecards. you can perform all of these administrative tasks through a web browser on any machine that can connect to the server. All users can log on to the CMC to change their user preference settings. and server management. product. organize. helping to shorten sales cycles. It also allows you to publish. including user. and increasing customer satisfaction. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment Guide. Only members of the Administrators group can change management settings. content. Central Management Console (CMC) The Central Management Console (CMC) is a web-based tool to perform regular administrative tasks. Sales and field service staff can provide the right customer. unless explicitly granted the rights to do so. and work order information.

analytics. and export. • BI content scheduling and publishing.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients • Process Analysis The Dashboard and Analytics repository stores the metrics. and viewing). the application server processes the request. and retrieves the report pages from the BusinessObjects Enterprise framework. schedule. interact with. any type of business intelligence including reports. which processes the report pages and displays them directly in the browser. InfoView allows users to manage: • BI catalog browsing and searching. and strategy maps. • BI content access (creating. used by Dashboard and Analytics users to create dashboards and analytics. scorecards. editing. The web application server then passes the report pages to the client-side viewer. goals. When a user requests a report. Report viewers BusinessObjects Enterprise includes report viewers that support different platforms and different browsers in the client tier.1 Deployment Planning Guide . Report viewers fall into two categories: • Client-side report viewers (Active X viewer. sets and calendar definitions. Each time users refresh a metric. you must purchase a BusinessObjects Enterprise license that includes the use of Dashboard and Analytics as part of its agreement. 30 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. InfoView can access. Java viewer) Client-side report viewers are downloaded and installed in the user's browser. dashboards. and keep track of published reports. and which have different report viewing functionality. BusinessObjects Enterprise InfoView InfoView is a web-based interface that end users access to view. Note: To use Dashboard and Analytics features. the values for the metric refresh are written to the Dashboard and Analytics repository.

Voyager Voyager is an AJAX-based online analytical processing (OLAP) tool for working with multi-dimensional data. combining information from different systems within a single workspace. Therefore.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients 2 • Zero-client report viewers (DHTML viewer) Zero-client report viewers reside on the web application server. When a user requests a report. and present report pages that appear in the user's browser. you must create a connection to data before analysts can begin using Voyager to analyze data. available at the customer support portal: http://support. Users access Voyager from within the BusinessObjects Enterprise InfoView portal.businessobjects. the web application server processes the request. or Oracle Hyperion Essbase. on the internet. The web application server processes the report and creates DHTML pages that the viewer displays in the user's web browser. Users can create new analysis workspaces. SAP BW. and includes features such as time sliders to make the analysis of OLAP data as simple as possible. and then retrieves the report pages from the BusinessObjects Enterprise framework. Voyager requires a connection to a supported OLAP data source. which can be distributed to a large number of users. and view and edit workspaces that have been saved to the BusinessObjects Enterprise repository. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise InfoView User's Guide or the Crystal Reports Developer's Guide.com/documentation/prod uct_guides/default.asp. Voyager is accessed from BusinessObjects InfoView in a web browser. All report viewers help process requests for reports. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. For more information on the specific functionality or platform support provided by each report viewer. Voyager offers a comprehensive range of business and time calculations.1 Deployment Planning Guide 31 . including those outside of your secure network. The Voyager OLAP feature set complements both Crystal Reports (for direct data access to OLAP cubes for production reporting) and Web Intelligence (for ad hoc analytic reporting with universes built on OLAP data sources). such as Microsoft Analysis Services.

Desktop products are installed client applications that run on Microsoft Windows operating systems.1 Deployment Planning Guide . Web Intelligence allows users to create reports. Web Intelligence hides the complexity of underlying data sources. Web Intelligence A web-based tool that provides query. and then utilize this simplified structure as 32 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The objects (such as filters) set row-level security.NET. or to Microsoft Office applications using BusinessObjects Live Office. analyze data.and column-level security.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients Note: The Voyager web application is available only as a Java web application. join tables. They do not communicate with the web application server. and apply report formatting in a drag-and-drop interface. reporting. Business View Manager A Windows-based tool that allows users to build semantic layer objects that simplify underlying database complexity. You can build connections to multiple data sources. and set row. create calculated fields. perform ad hoc queries. You can simplify data access for report designers by insulating them from the raw data structures. Reports can be published to the BusinessObjects Enterprise web portal. They can store resources locally and access your organization's data through locally installed database driver or the Central Management Console (CMC). There is no corresponding Voyager application for . It is a multi-tier system that enables companies to build comprehensive and specific Business View objects that help report designers and end-users access the information they require. alias field names. and analysis functionality for relational data sources in a single web-based product. Desktop client applications Desktop client applications interact with the BusinessObjects Enterprise intelligence or processing servers. Communication between the clients and the servers can be secured with SSL encryption (CORBA SSL).

the CCM shell script (ccm. The CCM allows you to create and configure Server Intelligence Agent (SIA) nodes and start or stop your web application server. it also allows you to configure network parameters. In a Microsoft Windows environment. but the CCM is now used for troubleshooting and node configuration. This designer also allows you to set detailed column and row-level security for various objects in a report.sh) allows you to manage servers from the command-line. The CCM was the primary tool for server management in previous versions of BusinessObjects Enterprise.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients 2 a Business View in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Central Configuration Manager (CCM) The CCM is a server troubleshooting and node configuration tool provided in two forms. This designer provides a wide range of capabilities for creating Data Connections. such as Secure Socket Layer (SSL) encryption. On Windows. the CCM allows you to manage local and remote servers through its graphical user interface (GUI) or from a command line. Crystal Reports Viewer The Crystal Reports Viewer is available as a free download from http://www. Dynamic Data Connections. Data Foundations. Crystal Reports Designer Crystal Reports Designer allows database experts or application developers to create and integrate detailed reports that can be easily shared with others using Crystal Reports Viewer or a web browser. and allows BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Note: Most server management tasks are now handled through the CMC.com/product/catalog/crystalreports. and Business Views. Business Elements. These parameters apply to all servers within a node. The Business View Manager allows you to design relational views of information.1 Deployment Planning Guide 33 . In a Unix environment. not through the CCM. Report designers can then use the Business View as the basis for their reports. rather than accessing the data directly and building their own queries.businessobjects.

Desktop Intelligence A Windows-based integrated query. reporting and analysis tool that allows you to access data using familiar business terms. rather than using technical database query methods. Designers can create reports. or InfoViews. The wizard converts the data source of each report into an object that is usable in BusinessObjects Enterprise. Data Source Migration Wizard The Data Source Migration Wizard allows you to migrate reports that are based on Crystal Reports queries. repository objects. Import Wizard A locally-installed Windows application that guides administrators through the process of importing users. and folders into BusinessObjects Enterprise. as the data used is saved within the report itself. 34 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Reports cannot be refreshed. Users can share and distribute Desktop Intelligence documents by exporting them in different formats. to a BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment. It also allows you to import objects. server groups. where they can be viewed and scheduled. groups. like SQL. You can migrate two types of objects: reports and data sources. events.1 Deployment Planning Guide . The result is that you can use the new features of BusinessObjects Enterprise while keeping the functionality of the reports and data sources from your previous installation. and then resets the data source location of the report to point to the new object. then publish them to InfoView. The complexity of the underlying data storage is abstracted in the semantic data layer known as the Business Objects Universe. and calendars in BusinessObjects Enterprise. dictionaries.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients users to open reports in read-only mode.

you can publish "live" documents to BusinessObjects Enterprise for sharing with your coworkers through a business intelligence portal.1 Deployment Planning Guide 35 . By assigning object rights to individual folders on a given server. allowing for dynamically updated data to be embedded within Microsoft Outlook. Then format your data using familiar Microsoft Office tools. SSL persistence. Check with your network administrator to determine if SSL persistence is appropriate for your organization. 3. For information on configuring web services to work with Live Office. Using Live Office. Use the Publishing Wizard if you have access to the application and you want to add multiple objects or an entire directory of objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Publishing Wizard The Publishing Wizard enables both administrators and end users to publish reports to BusinessObjects Enterprise. you can share your documents with others over the web for collaborative decision-making.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients 2 Live Office BusinessObjects Live Office integrates with the Microsoft Office environment. Or. Source IP and destination port persistence (available only on a Cisco Content Services Switch). Source IP address persistence. you control who can publish reports and where they are published. take it outside the firewall and e-mail it to an off-site partner or coworker. Excel. PowerPoint. Web Intelligence document. Plus. From within Microsoft Office. or use ad hoc data selections. and Word documents. 2. you can use intuitive wizards and toolbars to easily connect to a Crystal report. Note: SSL persistence may cause security and reliability issues on some web browsers. Note: Web services applications are currently only supported with the following load balancer configurations: 1. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Services Administrator Guide.

business users define their own query from a universe. or Inbox folders. Query as a Web Service (QaaWS) Query as a Web Service provides new and easy ways to analyze information through user-driven client solutions for businesses. and then easily and securely publish that query as a standalone web service. Business Intelligence (BI) content is usually bound to a specific user interface of BI tools. Query as a Web Service also enables a range of client-side solutions in tools such as: • Microsoft Office. Using Query as a Web Service. Favorites. • OpenOffice. • Business rules and process management applications. Report Conversion Tool The Report Conversion Tool converts Desktop Intelligence reports to the Web Intelligence format and publishes the converted reports to the CMS. and InfoPath. Query as a Web Service changes this by allowing BI content to be delivered to any user interface that can process web services. • SAP Application Server. Excel. Once an object is added. • Enterprise Services.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients BusinessObjects Enterprise. The tool does not convert all Desktop Intelligence features and reports. For example. Once converted. in the Public. Query as a Web Service provides new client solutions for businesses. it enables Crystal Xcelsius to aggregate multiple disparate data sources into a trusted BI view. It retrieves reports from the CMS. The level of conversion depends 36 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. see the Adding Objects to the Repository chapter of BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's guide. it appears in the folder that you specified in InfoView (or your customized web desktop) and in the Folders management area of the CMC. For more information.1 Deployment Planning Guide . you can publish to the same folder as the original Desktop Intelligence report or to a different folder.

from the same universe in their chosen languages. reimplemented. Repository Diagnostic Tool The Repository Diagnostic Tool (RDT) can scan. for example. A multilingual document contains localized versions of universe metadata and document prompts. and report the repair status and completed actions.1 Deployment Planning Guide 37 . It can also repair the logged inconsistencies. The Report Conversion Tool also lets you audit your converted reports. • Not Converted. The user can set a limit for the number of errors the RDT will find and repair before stopping. The tool assigns one of three statuses to each report: • Fully Converted. Translation Manager BusinessObjects Enterprise provides support for multilingual documents and universes. RDT should be used after the user first completes a hot back-up. The Translation Manager is the tool that defines the multilingual universes and manages translation of universes and their Web Intelligence documents and prompts. Translation Manager: BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. A user can create reports. Or the customer can use the RDT after a restoration and prior to starting their BusinessObjects Enterprise services. and repair inconsistencies that may occur between the Central Management Server (CMS) system database and the File Repository Servers (FRS) filestore.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients 2 on the features in the original report. Other features are modified. To determine synchronization between the file system and database. diagnose. This helps identify reports that cannot be fully converted by the Report Conversion Tool and explains why. RDT scans the CMS system database and identifies inconsistencies. • Partly Converted. Some features prevent the report from being converted. or removed by the tool during conversion.

1 Deployment Planning Guide . enabling the end user to analyze the data without needing to know the details of the underlying database structure. Universe data sources can be multi-dimensional objects (dimensions. It generates external XLIFF format and imports XLIFF files to get translated information. then using a universe creation wizard. used in a standard BusinessObjects universe. Designer is used for the universe generation at the end of the creation process. Universe Builder A universe is a semantic layer of abstraction that exists between BusinessObjects Enterprise and the data in your organization's database. Universe Designer Universe Designer provides a connection wizard that allows you to connect to your database. Lets you translate the metadata through the interface. dimensions. details). Lists the universe or Web Intelligence document structure to be translated. You can create multiple connections with Universe Designer. measures. but only one connection can be defined for each universe. Creates a multilingual document where several languages can be saved. Defines the metadata language parts of the document and the appropriate translation. and details. You can create universes from metadata sources with both Universe Builder and Designer. Once you start Universe Builder.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Clients • • • • • • Translates universe or a Web Intelligence documents for a multilingual audience. This database connection is saved with the universe. Universe Builder allows you to create universes from XML metadata and Oracle Analytic Services. objects. 38 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. you connect to a metadata source. map metadata structures to equivalent classes. Lets you translate the metadata using external translation tools by exporting and importing XLIFF files. Universe Builder is a stand-alone product that provides an independent user interface for universe creation from metadata sources.

It abstracts the complexity of data by using business language rather than data language to access. Universe Designer provides a graphical interface to select and view tables in a database. This semantic layer is the foundation for empowering end users to customize query and analysis. Services BusinessObjects Enterprise uses the terms server and service to refer to the two types of software running on a BusinessObjects Enterprise machine. manipulate. PDF. You can use this interface to manipulate tables. and organize data.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 The objects (such as filters) set row-level security. It enables the integration of dynamically updated data into Microsoft Office. For example. create alias tables. create joins between tables. Web Intelligence users do not see this schema. Xcelsius Xcelsius is a data visualization tool that transforms BI data into engaging presentations and dashboards. on when you want to work with Web Intelligence documents without installing a CMS or application server. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The service runs within the memory space of its server under the process id of the parent container (server). when you want to perform calculations locally rather than on the server. Web Intelligence Rich Client Web Intelligence Rich Client allows you to continue to work with Web Intelligence documents (WID) when you are unable to connect to a CMS. The database tables are represented as table symbols in a schema diagram. create contexts. Web Intelligence Rich Client can also be used when connected to a CMS. A service is a server subsystem that performs a specific function.1 Deployment Planning Guide 39 . the Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service is a subsystem that runs within the Adaptive Job Server. and solve loops in your schema. Xcelsius is comprised of designer and viewing extensions leveraging Business Objects web services. and web documents with Business Objects queries and reports.

BusinessObjects Enterprise can be installed on a single machine. For example. 40 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1 Administrator's Guide. The following section describes each service category and the servers it contains. Each service category contains servers that perform similar functions. Business Process BI Service Business Process BI Service is a web service that enables BusinessObjects Enterprise technology to be integrated into custom web applications. you may be able to choose other services to be hosted on the server. A node is a collection of BusinessObjects Enterprise servers running on the same host. Core Services The CMC Servers tab allows you to create new servers by selecting from a list of "Core Services" and choosing a specific service. coordinates the retrieval and processing of the relevant data. or separated over a wide area network (WAN). It receives requests from a web application. Depending on the service you select. spread across different machines on an intranet. Service Categories The Central Management Console (CMC) Server tab groups servers hierarchically by service category. A server runs under a specific operating system account and has its own PID.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services While the term server can refer to a physical machine on which a software system is running. One or more nodes can be on a single host. and returns a processed report to the web application. it is also used to describe an operating system level process (or daemon) hosting one or more services. see the “Server Properties” appendix in the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. the Central Management Server (CMS) and Adaptive Processing Server are servers.1 Deployment Planning Guide . For more information servers and server properties.

Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Business Process BI Service • Web Services SDK and QaaWS Service Central Management Service The Central Management Service receives authentication and report scheduling queries from other BusinessObjects Enterprise servers. which. in turn. or by using the supported database of your choice. The CMC communicates directly with the CMS to view or change configuration settings. Hosted by an Adaptive Processing Server." All the platform services are managed and controlled by the CMS. see Central Management Server on page 53. and system. Hosted by a Central Management Server.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 Hosted by an Adaptive Processing Server. see Adaptive Processing Server on page 52. manages the entire BusinessObjects Enterprise system. see Adaptive Processing Server on page 52. The CMS also manages access to the system file store where the physical documents are managed. For more information on the Central Management Server. Without the CMC.1 Deployment Planning Guide 41 . Additional service that can be hosted with this service: • Single Sign-On Service Client Auditing Proxy Service The Client Auditing Proxy Service monitors connected Rich Web Intelligence and Rich Desktop Intelligence clients and forwards the information to the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Central Management Console Service • Web Services SDK and QaaWS Service Central Management Console Service The Central Management Console (CMC) is an web-based administration portal for the Central Management Server (CMS). The system repository database is maintained using the provided MySQL database. For more information on the Adaptive Processing Server. This is known as the "CMS system database. For more information on the Adaptive Processing Server. you cannot manage a BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment.

not connected to a repository.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services auditing server. a Job Server requests a report from an Input Filestore service when the report has been scheduled to run. 42 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Output can be published to the BusinessObjects Enterprise file system. and publishes the results to the output location specified when the schedule was created. For example. For more information on the Adaptive Processing Server. Hosted by a Job Server. For more information on the Event Server. Hosted by an Event Server. Hosted by an Adaptive Processing Server. No other services run on a server with this service. SMTP or a user's Inbox. Input Filestore Service The Input Filestore Service maintains a list of published report and program objects that can be used in the generation of new reports. see Job Servers on page 61. For more information on the Job Server. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Destination Configuration Service Event Service The Event Service is used to trigger reports to run when a file-based event occurs on a File Repository Server (FRS). Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Publishing Post Processing Service • Publishing Service • Search Service Destination Delivery Scheduling Service The Destination Delivery Scheduling Service is hosted by a Job Server that runs a pre-determined time. Rich clients working locally. The Input Filestore Service provides the report as 'input' into the reporting process. see Adaptive Processing Server on page 52. For example. see Event Server on page 59.1 Deployment Planning Guide . if data file is updated or added to an FRS. FTP. a report can automatically be run on it. are not audited by the Client Auditing Proxy Service.

Hosted by a Job Server. see Job Servers on page 61. No other services run on this server with this service. For more information on the Adaptive Processing Server. reports can be sent to a variety of destinations. see Adaptive Processing Server on page 52. For more information on the Job Server. upon completion. For more information on the File Repository Server.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 Hosted by a File Repository Server. such as an user's inbox. For example. No other services run on this server with this service. such an a directory or user inbox. For example. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Destination Configuration Service Publishing Post Processing Service The Publishing Post Processing Service can perform actions on reports after they have completed running. The Output Filestore Service provides the report as 'output' of the reporting process. see File Repository Servers on page 60 and Input File Repository Servers on page 60. Program Scheduling Service The Program Scheduling Service runs executable objects at a pre-determined time. Hosted by a File Repository Server. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Client Auditing Proxy Service • Publishing Service • Search Service BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. For more information on the File Repository Server. Output Filestore Service The Output Filestore Service maintains collection of completed reports. a Job Server requests a report from an Output Filestore service when the report has run and the report needs to be sent to a specific destination. Hosted by an Adaptive Processing Server. see File Repository Servers on page 60 and Output File Repository Servers on page 61.1 Deployment Planning Guide 43 .

and coordinates with the Publishing Post Processing Service and Destination Job Service to publish reports the desired destination.1 Deployment Planning Guide .2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services Publishing Service The Publishing Service is the central report publishing service. For more information on the Adaptive Processing Server. see Adaptive Processing Server on page 52. see Job Servers on page 61. For more information on the Job Server. Hosted by a Job Server. Hosted by an Adaptive Processing Server. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Client Auditing Proxy Service • Publishing Service • Search Service Replication Service The Replication Service processes replication jobs that mirror reports in different parts of the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Client Auditing Proxy Service • Publishing Post Processing Service • Publishing Service Web Services SDK and QaaWS Service The Web Services SDK and Query as a Web Service (QaaWS) service act as a bridge between custom web applications and the BusinessObjects 44 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Destination Configuration Service • Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service Search Service The Search Service indexes all content in the Central Management Server (CMS) repository. Hosted by an Adaptive Processing Server. This index is then used when a user searches for a term in BusinessObjects Enterprise clients. see Adaptive Processing Server on page 52. For more information on the Adaptive Processing Server.

see Crystal Reports Cache Server on page 55. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. and can be configured to limit the number of concurrent jobs to prevent the service from becoming overloaded. For more information on the Crystal Reports Cache Server. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Business Process BI Service • Central Management Console Service Crystal Reports Services The CMC Servers tab allows you to create new Crystal Reports servers by selecting from a list of "Crystal Reports Services" and choosing a specific service.1 Deployment Planning Guide 45 . Hosted by an Adaptive Processing Server. It can share data between reports to reduce the number of database accesses. Hosted by a Crystal Reports Cache Server. reports cannot query their data sources. Without this service. allowing developers to implement Business Objects functionality in a custom web application. Crystal Reports cannot be run.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 Enterprise system. No other services run on this server with this service. as well as other properties. Crystal Reports Processing Service The Crystal Reports Processing Service accepts and processes Crystal Reports. Crystal Reports Cache Service The Crystal Reports Cache Service limits the number of database accesses generated by Crystal Reports by managing a cache of reports. Administrators can configure how long reports are held in the cache. see Adaptive Processing Server on page 52. you may be able to choose other services to be hosted on the server. the size of the cache. Depending on the service you select. If the Crystal Reports Cache Service is disabled. For more information on the Adaptive Processing Server.

but by default the object has the ability to query the database to return a list of its values when used to build a query. see Report Application Server on page 66. then publishes the results to the output location specified when the schedule was created. Without this service. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Destination Configuration Service Crystal Reports Viewing and Modification Service Hosted by a Report Application Server. see Crystal Reports Processing Server on page 56. 46 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. This list does not physically exist when you create an object.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services Hosted by a Crystal Reports Processing Server. A list of values is a list that contains the distinct data values associated with an object. you will not be able to schedule Crystal Reports to run unattended. When you create a dimension or detail object in Universe Designer. For more information on the Report Application Server. For more information on the Job Server. and all Crystal Reports would have to be run manually from the Crystal Reports client. FTP. SMTP or a user's Inbox. see Job Servers on page 61.1 Deployment Planning Guide . Additional service that can be hosted with this service: • Single Sign-On Service List Of Values Scheduling Service The List of Values Scheduling Service periodically generates a list of options to include in pick-lists. Reports can be published to the BusinessObjects Enterprise file system. Additional service that can be hosted with this service: • Single Sign-On Service Crystal Reports Scheduling Service The Crystal Reports Scheduling Service is hosted by a Job Server that runs Crystal Reports at a pre-determined time. it is automatically assigned an associated List Of Values (LOV). For more information on the Crystal Reports Processing Server. Hosted by a Job Server.

see Connection Server on page 55. see Job Servers on page 61.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 Hosted by a Job Server. reports cannot query their data sources. For more information on the Job Server. Without the Connection Service running. Desktop Intelligence Cache Service The Desktop Intelligence Cache Service limits the number of database accesses generated by Desktop Intelligence reports by managing a cache of reports. Depending on the service you select. you may be able to choose other services to be hosted on the server. Connection Service The Connection Service opens and maintains a database or Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) data source connection. This allows the Connection Service to act as an intermediary between BusinessObjects Enterprise services and a range of supported data formats. If the Desktop Intelligence Cache Service is disabled. No other services run on a server with this service. as well as other properties. Hosted by a CS Container Server. The Connection Server can also be traced so that database activity can be analyzed and later optimized.1 Deployment Planning Guide 47 . For more information on the CS Container Server. the size of the cache. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. through a business view or universe. Administrators can configure how long reports are held in the cache. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Destination Configuration Service Desktop Intelligence Services The CMC Servers tab allows you to create new Desktop Intelligence servers by selecting from a list of "Desktop Intelligence Services" and choosing a specific service. BusinessObjects Enterprise components will not be able to access a data source.

2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services Hosted by a Desktop Intelligence Cache Server. FTP. and publishes the results to the output location specified when the schedule was created. see Desktop Intelligence Cache Server on page 58. It can share data between reports to reduce the number of database accesses. Without this service.1 Deployment Planning Guide . For more information on the Desktop Intelligence Cache Server. you will not be able to schedule Desktop Intelligence reports to run unattended. Desktop Intelligence Processing Service The Desktop Intelligence Processing Service accepts and processes Desktop Intelligence reports. Reports can be published to the BusinessObjects Enterprise file system. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Destination Configuration Service 48 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Desktop Intelligence reports cannot be run. SMTP or a user's Inbox. Hosted by a dpsprocFullClient Server. Without this service. For more information on the Job Server. Additional service that can be hosted with this service: • Single Sign-On Service Desktop Intelligence Scheduling Service The Desktop Intelligence Scheduling Service is hosted by a Job Server that runs Desktop Intelligence reports at a pre-determined time. see Job Servers on page 61. Hosted by a Job Server. and can be configured to limit the number of concurrent jobs to prevent the service from becoming overloaded. and all Desktop Intelligence reports would have to be run manually from the Desktop Intelligence client. No other services run on this server with this service.

It also converts the raw data into XML packages. or Voyager crosstabs and charts. which the requesting client application can render into a variety of formats: Excel spreadsheets.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 Performance Management Services Services in "Performance Managament" services category provide BusinessObjects Enterprise Dashboard and Analytics functionality for data analysis. PDF. The following services are used by Dashboard and Analytics: Service Dashboard Analytics Service Dashboard Service PM Metric Aggregation Service PM Repository Management Service PM Rules Service Predictive Analytic Service Process Analysis Service Sets Profile Service Sets Query Service Hosted by portfolioEngine Server dashboardEngine Server probeEngine Server PM Repository Server probeEngine Server Mining Engine Server spcEngine Server iProfiler Server queryManager Server Voyager Services The CMC Servers tab allows you to create new Multi-Dimensional Analysis server by selecting from a list of "Voyager Services" and choosing a specific service.1 Deployment Planning Guide 49 . BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Multi-Dimensional Analysis Service The Multi-Dimensional Analysis Service is hosted by the Multi-Dimensional Analysis Services Server (MDAS) and is used by the Voyager client to access three-dimensional Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) data.

The resulting Web Intelligence report is the passed back to the originator. The Multi-Dimensional Analysis Service communicates with the Input File Repository Server (FRS). it does coordinate with Input and Output File Servers (to fetch the document on which the report is based) and the Report Engine and Connection Servers (to retrieve data from the Universe.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services Note: OLAP single sign-on (SSO) is only supported for Microsoft Analysis Services and SAP BW. and gets data from the OLAP database server. There are no additions services hosted with this service. Without at least one Web Intelligence Processing service running. Web Intelligence Services The CMC Servers tab allows you to create new Web Intelligence servers by selecting from a list of "Web Intelligence Services" and choosing a specific service. or run reports. which is formatted and displayed by the Voyager client. To read an example workflow of the Multi-Dimensional Analysis Services Server viewing a workspace. 50 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. see Multi-Dimensional Analysis Services (MDAS) Server on page 62. and process the report). Web Intelligence Processing Service The Web Intelligence Processing Service is a subsystem of the Web Intelligence Processing Server that runs Web Intelligence reports submitted to the server by Web Intelligence clients and the Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service. As the Voyager client renders results on the web application server. to retrieve workspaces. Web Intelligence clients would not be able to open. see Viewing a Voyager workspace on page 95. the Multi-Dimensional Analysis Service returns results to the client in XML format. or database. For more information. you may be able to choose other services to be hosted on the server. Although the Web Intelligence Processing Service does not query the database or generate the final report itself. Depending on the service you select. view. and scheduled Web Intelligence reports would fail to run.1 Deployment Planning Guide .

Additional service that can be hosted with this service: • Single Sign-On Service Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service The Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service is hosted by an Adaptive Job Server that runs Web Intelligence reports at a pre-determined time. Without this service. The Web Intelligence Scheduling and Processing Service is hosted by an Adaptive Job Server. and all Web Intelligence reports would have to be run manually from the Web Intelligence client. SMTP or a user's Inbox. For Web Intelligence workflow scenarios. For more information on Adaptive Job Servers. see Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service on page 51. which all run under a single account in the same memory space and under the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The Adaptive Job Server runs as a container for the selected services. and the Destination Configuration Service. Reports can be published to the BusinessObjects Enterprise file system. you will not be able to schedule Web Intelligence reports to run unattended. Additional services that can be hosted with this service: • Destination Configuration Service (allows reports to be sent to different locations). such as the Replication Service.1 Deployment Planning Guide 51 . see the Scheduling and Viewing sections of Information Workflows on page 86. You can schedule Web Intelligence reports with the Central Management Console (CMC). see Web Intelligence Processing Server on page 68.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 For more information on the Web Intelligence Processing Server. • Replication Service Adaptive Job Server The Adaptive Job Server is a specialized job server that hosts BusinessObjects Enterprise services. and publishes the results to the output location specified when the schedule was created. FTP. see Adaptive Job Server on page 51. Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Services. For information about scheduled Web Intelligence reports.

• Replication Service See also: Job Servers on page 61.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services same process id (PID). An Adaptive Job Server can host the following services: • Destination Configuration Service • Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service (runs and publishes Web Intelligence reports at a pre-determined time). • Publishing Service (coordinates the publication of an object by communicating with other services).AdaptiveJobServer Adaptive Processing Server An Adaptive Processing Server is a generic server that hosts services responsible for processing requests from a variety of sources.1 Deployment Planning Guide . • Search Service (processes search requests and executes the indexing). • Publishing Post Processing Service (responsible for any post processing of a publication job. If you stop the Adaptive Job Server. you stop all of the contained job services. including PDF merging and publication extension processing).AdaptiveProcessingServer 52 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Example: The following Adaptive Job Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. An Adaptive Processing Server can host the following services: • Business Process BI Service • Client Auditing Proxy Service (collects auditing information from connected Rich Desktop and Web Intelligence Clients). Example: The following Adaptive Processing Servers are created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.

The system repository database is maintained using the provided MySQL database. and supports inheritance at the user and group level. It also supports aggregation through a flexible. "InfoObjects" are system metadata objects that contain contain index information.1 Deployment Planning Guide 53 . The separation of the object definition (metadata) from the document allows for fast object processing as only the required information is retrieved from the system ?s repository. When a change is made to a user in the entitlement database. • Managing servers The CMS handles load balancing and automated clustering to avoid bottlenecks and maximize hardware efficiency. to perform four main tasks: • Maintaining security The CMS enforces the application of rights at both the folder and object level. and services. The CMS also manages access to the system file store where the physical documents are managed." All the platform services are managed and controlled by the CMS. In some multi-server environments. group-user membership model.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 Central Management Server The Central Management Server (CMS) maintains a database of information about your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. This is known as the "CMS system database. The CMS also runs scheduled report jobs. such as LDAP. • Managing objects The CMS keeps track of the object location and maintains the folder hierarchy. although BusinessObjects Enterprise is designed for integration with multiple concurrent third-party security systems. the change is then propogated to BusinessObjects Enterprise. or by using the supported database of your choice. Siteminder. CMS data includes information about users and groups. The CMS can also maintain an optional auditing database of information about user actions. and the actual documents or objects are stored in a file store. An integrated security system is available for customers who do not currently use an entitlement database. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. content. security levels. or Microsoft Active Directory. BusinessObjects Enterprise may not require a separate third-party load balancing system.

1 Deployment Planning Guide . Usage data is collected from the system interactions recorded in the auditing database. You can switch to a different database later if your deployment needs change. Caution: The CMS database should not be accessed directly. Example: The following Central Management Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. A sample universe and sample auditing reports are also available to provide fast access to information such as the most accessed reports. Restriction: You may access the optional audit database in read-only mode to create custom audit reports. and average user session times. • Single Sign-On Service (allows users to sign on to BusinessObjects Enterprise with credentials from a common authentication system).CentralManagementServer 54 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. peak system use times. On Windows. which documents they interacted with. the Setup program can install and configure its own MySQL database if you do not already have a database server allocated for the deployment. A Central Management Server hosts the following services: • Central Management Service (core CMS service). Note: It is strongly recommended that you back up and audit the CMS system database frequently. System information should only be retrieved using the calls that are provided in the BusinessObjects Enterprise software development kit (SDK). This information allows system administrators to better track and manage their BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services • Managing auditing User actions can be monitored and written to a central audit database. The auditing functionality allows administrators to better understand which users accessed the enterprise system.

Hyperion Essbase). A Connection Server hosts the following service: • Connection Service (provides a database connection to other servers). The Connection Server can be accessed through a Dynamic Link Library (inproc). or by using the Java API. a CORBA server (called through CORBA or HTTP). Example: The following Connection Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. Microsoft Analysis Services. by emulating the missing features if necessary. DB2. and sends the report to the viewer. Microsoft SQL Server.ConnectionServer Crystal Reports Cache Server The Crystal Reports Cache Server intercepts report requests sent from clients to the page server. by emulating the missing features if necessary. The cache server then caches the report page for future use. A Crystal Reports Cache Server hosts the following service: • Crystal Reports Cache Service (creates and maintains a cache of recently-viewed reports). The Connection Server is responsible for handling connection and interaction with the various datasources and providing a common feature set to its clients. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. it passes the request on to the page server. MySQL. If the cache server cannot fulfill the request with a cached report page.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 Connection Server Responsible for handling connection and interaction with the various datasources and providing a common feature set to its clients. which runs the report and returns the results. It supports relational databases (Oracle.1 Deployment Planning Guide 55 . The Connection Server provides database access to the raw source data. Sybase) as well as OLAP (SAP BW.

This helps conserve database traffic and limit the unnecessary use of database licenses. Runs Crystal report queries and returns data to Crystal Reports Cache Server. When retrieving data from the database. instead of the entire report. the report is processed by the Report Application Server. The Cache Server and Processing Server work closely together. reconnects to retrieve additional data.CrystalReportsCacheServer Crystal Reports Processing Server The Crystal Reports Processing Server is responsible for responding to page requests by processing reports and generating encapsulated page format (EPF) pages.1 Deployment Planning Guide . the Processing Server automatically disconnects from the database after it fulfills its initial request and if necessary.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services Example: The following Crystal Reports Cache Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. BusinessObjects Enterprise takes advantage of this behavior by ensuring that the majority of report-viewing requests are made to the Cache Server and Processing Server. the Processing Server responds to page requests made by the Cache Server. However. The EPF pages contain formatting information that defines report layout. A Crystal Reports Processing Server hosts the following services: • Crystal Reports Processing Service • Single Sign-On Service 56 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The Processing Server and Cache Server also interact to ensure cached EPF pages are reused as frequently as possible. and new pages are generated as required. The Processing Server retrieves data for the report from an instance or directly from the database (depending on the user request and the rights he or she has to the report object). This enhances performance and reduces unnecessary network traffic for large reports. The key benefit of EPF is that it supports page-on-demand access so only the requested page is returned. if a user's default viewer is the DHTML viewer. Specifically.

DashboardAnalyticsServer Dashboard Server Server process used by the Dashboard Builder component to create and manage corporate and personal dashboards. A Dashboard Analytics Server hosts the following service: • Dashboard Analytics Service (provides core Dashboard Analytics functionality).1 Deployment Planning Guide 57 . Example: The following Dashboard Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. A Dashboard Server hosts the following service: • Dashboard Service (provides core Dashboard functionality).CrystalReportsProcessingServer Dashboard Analytics Server Server process used by the Dashboard Builder component to create and manage corporate and personal dashboard analytic content. and dashboard management capabilities to help organizations monitor and understand their business activities. Example: The following Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. Dashboard Builder offers metrics. alerts.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 Example: The following Crystal Reports Processing Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.

and generates the instance of the Desktop Intelligence document. and sends the report to the viewer. Example: The following Desktop Intelligence Cache Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.DesktopIntelligenceJobServer 58 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The cache server then caches the report page for future use.1 Deployment Planning Guide .DashboardServer Desktop Intelligence Cache Server The Desktop Intelligence Cache Server intercepts report requests sent from clients to the page server.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services • <HOSTNAME>. A Desktop Intelligence Cache Server hosts the following service: • Desktop Intelligence Cache Service (creates and maintains a cache of viewed reports). it passes the request on to the page server. If the cache server cannot fulfill the request with a cached report page. which runs the report and returns the results.DesktopIntelligenceCacheServer Desktop Intelligence Job Server The Desktop Intelligence Job Server processes scheduling requests received from the CMS for Desktop Intelligence documents. A Desktop Intelligence Job Server hosts the following services: • Destination Configuration Service • Desktop Intelligence Scheduling Service Example: The following Desktop Intelligence Job Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.

1 Deployment Planning Guide 59 . Note: Schedule-based and custom events are managed through the CMS. The CMS can then start any jobs that are dependent upon the event ocurring. Desktop Intelligence Processing Server Runs Crystal report queries and returns data to Crystal Reports Cache Server.DesktopIntelligenceProcessingServer Event Server The Event Server monitors the system for events.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 See also: Job Servers on page 61. • Single Sign-On Service (allows users to sign on to BusinessObjects Enterprise with credentials from a common authentication system). A Desktop Intelligence Processing Server hosts the following services: • Desktop Intelligence Processing Service (processes viewing requests for Desktop Intelligence documents. An Event Server hosts the following service: • Event Service (monitors file-based events) BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. which can act as a trigger for running a report. generating Desktop Intelligence documents). Example: The following Desktop Intelligence Processing Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. When you set up a event trigger within BusinessObjects Enterprise. the Event Server monitors the condition and notifies the CMS that the file-based event has occurred.

Input and Output File Repository Server (FRS) processes run on each BusinessObjects Enterprise server machine. there may be multiple Input and Output FRSes. such as exported reports. or PDFs. the Input and Output FRSes cannot share the same file system directory. the Import Wizard. such as text files. the CMC.1 Deployment Planning Guide .2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services Example: The following Event Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. querying for the size of the entire file repository. Caution: To avoid conflicts between input and output objects. In larger deployments. adding files to the repository. All Input File Repository Servers share the same directory. and imported files in non-native formats. Likewise. all Output File Repository Servers share the same directory. are stored on the Input File Repository Server. and removing files from the repository. Microsoft Word files. The FRSes are responsible for listing files on the server. querying for the size of a file. Note: Objects with associated files. or a Business Objects designer component such as Crystal Reports. or Web Intelligence report panels). Input File Repository Servers The Input FRS stores report and program objects that have been published to the system by administrators or end users (using the Publishing Wizard.EventServer File Repository Servers File repository servers are responsible for the creation of file system objects. A Input File Repository Server hosts the following service: • Input Filestore Service 60 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.

InputFileRepository Output File Repository Servers The Output FRS stores all of the report instances generated by the Report Job Server or the Web Intelligence Processing Server. and the program instances generated by the Program Job Server. When you add a Job server to the BusinessObjects Enterprise system.OutputFileRepository Job Servers A Job Servers is a generic process that processes scheduled actions on objects at the request of the CMS. An Output File Repository Server hosts the following service: • Output Filestore Service The following Output File Repository Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. Tip: If you use the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. you can also publish reports from within your own code. A Job Server can host the following services: • Destination Configuration Service • Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service • Replication Service See also: Adaptive Job Server on page 51. • Send objects or instances to specified destinations. • Process publication objects. you can configure the Job server to: • Process report and document objects.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 The following Input File Repository Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. • Process program objects.1 Deployment Planning Guide 61 .

A list of values is a list that contains the Example: The following List of Values Job Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. which provides the BusinessObjects Voyager client with an extensible framework for accessing multi-dimensional Online Analytical Processing (OLAP) data. Multi-Dimensional Analysis Services (MDAS) Server The Multi-Dimensional Analysis Services (MDAS) Server is a container for the Multi-Dimensional Analysis Service.ListOfValuesJobServer See also: Job Servers on page 61 .WebIntelligenceProcessingServer List of Values Job Server The List of Values Job Server is a specialized container that manages lists of distinct data values associated with an object in the BusinessObjects Enterprise system.ListOfValuesJobServer • <HOSTNAME>.AdaptiveJobServer • <HOSTNAME>.1 Deployment Planning Guide .CrystalReportsJobServer • <HOSTNAME>. 62 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services Example: The following Job Servers are created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.DesktopIntelligenceJobServer • <HOSTNAME>.ProgramJobServer • <HOSTNAME>.DestinationJobServer • <HOSTNAME>.PublicationJobServer • <HOSTNAME>.

PMMetricsServer PM Repository Server Dashboard and Analytics server to read and store performance information from the Dashboard and Analytics repository. run multiple MDAS Servers on several different machines.MultiDimensionalAnalysisServicesServer PM Metrics Server Dashboard and Analytics server to populate metrics created using the Metric Engine. Disabling this server will prevent the Voyager client from accessing OLAP data sources. see Viewing a Voyager workspace on page 95. For more information. To read an example workflow of the Multi-Dimensional Analysis Services Server viewing a workspace. A PM Repository Server hosts the following service: • PM Repository Management Service BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. For more information on the Multi-Dimensional Analysis Service. Example: The following Multi-Dimensional Analysis Services Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. A PM Metrics Server hosts the following service: • PM Metric Aggregation Service Example: The following PM Metrics Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.1 Deployment Planning Guide 63 . see Multi-Dimensional Analysis Services (MDAS) Server on page 62.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 To avoid delays in processing OLAP client requests. consult the Dashboard and Analytics Setup and Administration Guide.

A Predictive Analysis Server hosts the following service: • Predictive Analytic Service 64 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. For more information. For more information.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services Example: The following PM Repository Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. consult the Dashboard and Analytics Setup and Administration Guide. Rules enable you to proactively monitor your business and take appropriate and timely action in response to specific events. and delivering relevant analysis. It helps users make proactive decisions more easily by providing insight in familiar terms through dashboards across the organization. Rules and alerts automate the process of detecting and interpreting change. A PM Rules Server hosts the following service: • PM Rules Service Example: The following PM Rules Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>. consult the Dashboard and Analytics Setup and Administration Guide.1 Deployment Planning Guide .PMRulesServer Predictive Analysis Server Server used for Predictive Analysis (Data Mining) using KXEN engine. which quickly uncovers key business drivers from your data and forecasts future business conditions.PMRepositoryServer PM Rules Server Dashboard and Analytics server to create rules and alerts.

For more information.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 Example: The following Predictive Analysis Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.PredictiveAnalysisServer Process Analysis Server The process analysis server monitors server activity. consult the Dashboard and Analytics Setup and Administration Guide.1 Deployment Planning Guide 65 . A Job Server hosts the following services: • Destination Configuration Service • Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service • Replication Service Example: The following Program Job Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. This helps your organization to automate the tracking of quality variables by using alarm rules and control chart types defined by your quality improvement initiatives.ProcessAnalysisServer Program Job Server A Program Job Server runs exectuable objects at a pre-determined time. A Process Analysis Server hosts the following service: • Process Analysis Service Example: The following Process Analysis Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.

it is included with your BOE package. It can also send objects outside the system. Report Application Server Provides ad-hoc reporting capabilities that allow users to create and modify Crystal reports via the RAS Software Development Kit (SDK). via e-mail. the Publication Job Server retrieves the object from the Input File Repository Server. the Publication Job Server retrieves the instance from the Output File Repository Server.1 Deployment Planning Guide . Publication Job Server The Publication Job Server processes requests that it receives from the CMC or InfoView and sends the requested objects or instances to the specified destination. A Publication Job Server hosts the following services: • Destination Configuration Service • Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service • Replication Service Example: The following Publication Job Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.ProgramJobServer See also: Job Servers on page 61 . such as a user’s inbox. 66 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. This SDK supports the Java viewer SDKs and does not require a specific license. The Publication Job Server can send objects and instances to a destination inside the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. If the request is for an object.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services • <HOSTNAME>. If the request is for a report or program instance.PublicationJobServer See also: Job Servers on page 61 .

A Sets Profile Server hosts the following service: • Sets Profile Service Example: The following Sets Profile Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.SetsProfileServer Sets Query Server Runs Performance Management set queries.SetsQueryServer BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. as well as with LiveOffice.ReportApplicationServer Sets Profile Server Manages Performance Management profile information.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services 2 The RAS is also used to resolve Dynamic Recipient Lists at runtime or during the design phase when working with publications.1 Deployment Planning Guide 67 . Example: The following Report Application Server is not created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program by default: • <HOSTNAME>. A Sets Query Server hosts the following service: • Sets Query Service Example: The following Sets Query Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.

coordinates with other servers to run the report.1 Deployment Planning Guide . run multiple Web Intelligence Processing Servers on different machines. if you opted to install it: 68 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Example: The following Web Application Container Server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program. and returns the result to the originator. see Web Intelligence Processing Service on page 50. Example: The following Web Intelligence Processing server is created by the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program: • <HOSTNAME>.WebIntelligenceProcessingServer Web Application Container Server (WACS) The Web Application Container Server allows the Central Management Console (CMC) to run on installations that do not include a Java web application server. To ensure that server performance is not degraded by a large number of concurrent jobs. A Web Intelligence Processing Server hosts the following services: • Single Sign-On Service • Web Intelligence Processing Service For more information. A Web Application Container Server hosts the following service: • Web Application Container Service. Each Web Intelligence Processing Server can be configured with a maximum number of concurrent jobs (Maximum Jobs Allowed) value. • Central Management Console Service. or those that want to maintain separation between the CMC and web applications on the deployment web application server.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Services Web Intelligence Processing Server A Web Intelligence Processing Server is a specialized Job Server that accepts a Web Intelligence report.

but InfoView and the CMC must be manually deployed: • SAP web application server 7 • WebSphere Community Edition 2. You can use a combination of these options: 1. the BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program will automatically install and delpoy InfoView to IIS.1 Deployment Planning Guide 69 . Web application servers running on Windows.5 by default.1 • Oracle Application Server 10g R3 • Sun Java Application Server 9. and Linux are supported. Linux) The setup program can also automatically deploy InfoView and the CMC to: • Tomcat 5.WebApplicationContainerServer Web application servers A third-party web application server acts as the translation layer between the end user's web browser and BusinessObjects Enterprise Software Development Kit (SDK) interface running on a web application server. and.0 • Jboss 4. A Java web application server (Windows. 2. The CMC is not supported on IIS. you must deploy the BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) . In order to manage your BusinessObjects Enterprise system with the CMC.04 Note: The BusinessObjects Enterprise setup program will install and deploy InfoView and the CMC to Tomcat 5.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Web application servers 2 • <HOSTNAME>. Unix.0 The following web application servers are also supported.5 • WebLogic 9 • WebLogic 10 • WebSphere 6.NET web application server (Windows only) InfoView is supported on Microsoft Information Server (IIS). when detected. Unix.

such as those offered by Web Intelligence or InfoView. WACS simplifies system administration by removing several manual workflows that were previously required for configuring application servers and deploying web applications. whether manually or by using wdeploy. SDKs give you the ability to create web applications that integrate powerful reporting features. then you can use WACS to host the Central Management Console (CMC). Web Application Container Service (WACS) If you plan to use . and by providing a simplified. Web applications such as the CMC are automatically deployed to WACS. The following Java SDKs are included with BusinessObjects Enterprise. • Web services Java SDK. • JavaServer Faces Components (JSF) for BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. • BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK. • Report Application Server (RAS) Java SDK.1 Deployment Planning Guide . • Report Engine Java SDK. 3. consistent administrative interface. 70 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK The BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK allows you to incorporate BusinessObjects Enterprise functionality into your own web applications.NET InfoView. Java SDK The BusinessObjects Enterprise Java 2 Enterprise Edition (J2EE) software development kit (SDK) allows you to create Java web applications that run on the web application server in your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment. • Viewers Java SDK. WACS does not support deploying Business Objects or external web applications.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Web application servers CMC to a Java web application server or install the Web Application Container Service (WACS). and you do not want to use a Java application server to host your CMC.

a user session is created. removing. you can create Java client applications that interact with the RAS server from a web application server. 4. Report Application Server (RAS) Java SDK The Report Application Server (RAS) Java SDK is an API for developing Java web applications with advanced report creation and modification functionality. Many aspects of a BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment can be administered programmatically. Web Intelligence and Desktop Intelligence documents. conditions. Once the user is authenticated. among others. create. Report Engine Java SDK The Report Engine Java SDK includes libraries that you can use to build a web report design tool. The information entity in BusinessObjects Enterprise is the InfoObject. Report operations. With the RAS Java SDK. a variety of different Web Intelligence and Desktop Intelligence documents. such as managing server process and server process groups. Working with repository objects.1 Deployment Planning Guide 71 . such as LDAP or Kerberos. or modify. All operations involve the retrieval and manipulation of InfoObjects from the Central Management Server (CMS). and server auditing. The BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK supports many types of report documents: Crystal reports. The user session maintains state information as the user performs actions and navigates to different pages within the BusinessObjects Enterprise web application.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Web application servers 2 1. charts. Authentication and session management. and Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF). BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 2. Users can modify documents by adding. Users can be authenticated by using the BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication protocol or some other protocol. Applications built with this SDK can view. and filters. Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise. as well as Microsoft Excel. and modifying objects such as tables. 3.

and printing. such as logging on to the system. and fields. JavaServer Faces (JSF) SDK The JavaServer Faces (JSF) SDK consists of JavaServer Faces components and managed Java beans built on top of the BusinessObjects EnterpriseJava SDK. 72 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 2. DHTML report page viewer. prompting. listing managed content. zooming. text. This viewer provides basic thin-client report viewing capabilities to present data and allow drill-down.1 Deployment Planning Guide . and changing a password. The components encapsulate common BusinessObjects Enterprise functionality. Viewers Java SDK The Viewers SDK is an API that lets you incorporate reports in a range of different formats within your web application.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Web application servers Web application users can create or modify Crystal reports by adding. text searching. JSF component functionality can be divided into several main areas of BusinessObjects Enterprise application development. 2. navigating through folders and categories. 1. charts. highlighting. such as logging on or off. or modifying tables. parameters. Two Java viewers are available: 1. Listing and navigating managed content. removing. page navigation. and fields. exporting. This viewer provides the ability to view individual report parts including charts. Viewers are a 'thin-client' technology . Individual users can be associated with their actions. and viewing Crystal reports. Report parts viewer.users of your web application don't need to install any additional software in order to view the reports. Identifying end users in a BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Users can navigate repetitive information using nested lists rendered from a data source.

4. This configuration requires the use of a Microsoft Internet Information Services (IIS) web server. .NET SDK The BusinessObjects Enterprise .NET SDK. The ReportPageViewer component lets you quickly add the ability to view reports on a page.NET Server Components that you can use to simplify the development of custom applications. • Crystal Reports . SDKs give you the ability to create web applications that integrate powerful reporting features. Viewing managed content.NET SDKs are included with BusinessObjects Enterprise. • Web services . • BusinessObjects Enterprise . BusinessObjects Enterprise installations that use the .NET web applications that run on the web application server in your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Web application servers 2 3.NET SDK. • Report Engine .NET SDK. Your application's users can schedule reports to run at custom intervals if you create pages that enable a user to set scheduling options.NET SDK • Report Application Server (RAS) .NET SDK with ASP.NET SDK. and a set of . Web applications that use the SDK run within the web application server and connect to the Report Application Server (RAS) running in the BusinessObjects Enterprise processing tier.NET software development kit (SDK) allows you to create .1 Deployment Planning Guide 73 . Scheduling of managed content. such as those offered by Crystal Reports or InfoView.NET. The following . BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.NET Framework include Primary Interop Assemblies (PIAs) that allow you to use the BusinessObjects Enterprise .

charts. Once the user is authenticated. Authentication and session management. or modify. Web Intelligence and Desktop Intelligence documents. 3. create. Users can be authenticated by using the BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication protocol or some other protocol. such as managing server process and server process groups. 74 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 2. Users can modify documents by adding. a user session is created. removing.1 Deployment Planning Guide . a variety of different Web Intelligence and Desktop Intelligence documents. Working with repository objects. and server auditing. The information entity in BusinessObjects Enterprise is the InfoObject. such as LDAP or Kerberos. 1. among others.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Web application servers BusinessObjects Enterprise . as well as Microsoft Excel. Many aspects of a BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment can be administered programmatically.NET SDK The BusinessObjects Enterprise . Report Engine . and Adobe's Portable Document Format (PDF). and modifying objects such as tables.NET SDK supports many types of report documents: Crystal reports. 4. conditions. All operations involve the retrieval and manipulation of InfoObjects from the Central Management Server (CMS). The user session maintains state information as the user performs actions and navigates to different pages within the BusinessObjects Enterprise web application.NET SDK The Report Engine .NET SDK includes libraries that you can use to build a web report design tool. The BusinessObjects Enterprise .NET SDK allows you to incorporate BusinessObjects Enterprise functionality into your own web applications. Applications built with this SDK can view. and filters. Report operations. Administering BusinessObjects Enterprise.

5.1 Deployment Planning Guide 75 . group.NET web applications with advanced report creation and modification functionality. Embed Crystal Reports Designer in your applications for report creation. Database connections.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Web application servers 2 Report Application Server (RAS) . Report appearance and report objects. and print reports. 3. Printing and Exporting. removing. Web application users can create or modify Crystal reports by adding. With the RAS . Web Services Business Objects Web Services provide a Java API accessed by rich clients in the user interaction tier.NET SDK The Report Application Server (RAS) SDK is a API for developing . such as Live Office and Crystal Reports. and fields. Crystal Reports . Export reports to other formats. Log on to a database server and access data.NET SDK allows you to incorporate BusinessObjects Enterprise functionality into your own web applications. SOAP is a protocol for BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. parameters. Filter. and total report data. and enhance report presentation. including: 1. you can create . 2. Format. sort. Web Services consists of software components that can be called remotely using the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). or modifying tables. charts. work with field and text objects.NET client applications that interact with the RAS server from a web application server. Core functions.NET SDK The Crystal Reports . 4.NET SDK. Report data manipulation.

2. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Services Administrator Guide. and XML format. 3. BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Services includes functionality in the following areas: • Session Authentication and user privilege management. 76 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Check with your network administrator to determine if SSL persistence is appropriate for your organization. or programming language.0 and WSDL. object model. Note: Web Services applications are currently only supported with the following load balancer configurations: 1. • BI platform Exposes advanced platform features such as scheduling. and calendars. PDF. Business Objects web services uses standards such as XML. For information on installing and configuring Web Services. Source IP address persistence. Excel. AXIS 2.1 Deployment Planning Guide . • Query Builds ad-hoc queries based on the Business Objects universe semantic layer. search. Note: SSL persistence may cause security and reliability issues on some web browsers. server administration. • Report Engine Displays Web Intelligence and Crystal Reports in HTML. SSL persistence. The platform follows WS-Interoperability Basic Profile 1.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Web application servers exchanging information that is not dependent on a specific platform. SOAP.0 web services specification. platform events. user and group administration. Source IP and destination port persistence (available only on a Cisco Content Services Switch).

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Query as a Web Service
Business Objects Query as a Web Service is a wizard-based application that allows queries to be made into a web service and integrated with web-ready applications. Queries can be saved to create a catalog of standard queries that application builders can select as required. Business Intelligence (BI) content is usually bound to a specific user interface of BI tools. Query as a Web Service changes this by allowing BI content to be delivered to any user interface that can process web services. Query as a Web Service is designed to work on top of any Microsoft Windows application the same way as other web services. Query as a Web Service is based on the W3C web service specifications SOAP, WSDL, and XML. It has two main components: 1. Server component The server component (included in BusinessObjects Enterprise) stores the Query as a Web Service catalog and hosts the published web services. 2. Client tool This is how business users create and publish their queries as a web service on the server. You can install the client tool on several machines that can access and share the same Query as a Web Service catalog stored on the server. The client tool communicates with the server components via web services. Query as a Web Service allows web queries to be used as part of a range of client-side solutions. • Microsoft Office, Excel, and InfoPath. • SAP Application Server. • OpenOffice. • Business rules and process management applications. • Enterprise Service Bus platforms.

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Web Application Container Service (WACS)
If you plan to use .NET InfoView, and you do not want to use a Java application server to host your CMC, then you can use WACS to host the Central Management Console (CMC). If you plan to use a supported Java application server to deploy BusinessObjects Enterprise web applications, or if you are installing BusinessObjects Enterprise on a UNIX system, you do not need to install and use WACS. Using WACS to host the CMC provides you with a number of advantages: • WACS requires a minimum effort to install, maintain, and configure. • All hosted applications are predeployed on WACS, so that no additional manual steps are required. • WACS is supported by Business Objects. • WACS removes the need for Java application server administration and maintenance skills. • WACS provides an administrative interface that is consistent with other Business Objects servers.

Databases
BusinessObjects Enterprise uses three different of databases: 1. System database An internal database that stores configuration, authentication, user, and other information related to BusinessObjects Enterprise. System databases can be created and used on a wide variety of database platforms. 2. Reporting database Your organization's database, used to create reports, generate statistics, and collect business intelligence. An even wider variety of database platforms are supported for reporting databases than for system databases. 3. Auditing database

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An internal database that stores information on security events such as user login, logout, and object access events. Please review the online BusinessObjects Enterprise supported platforms document for information related to supported database release versions, patch levels, or caveats at the Business Objects customer support site: http://support.businessobjects.com/documentation/supported_platforms.

System databases
Central Management System (CMS) Database
The Central Management System (CMS) server is the only server that accesses the CMS system database. The CMS can also maintain an optional auditing database of information about user actions with the Enterprise system. The data stored inside the CMS system database allows the CMS to perform the following tasks: • Maintaining security The CMS enforces the application of all rights at the global, folder, and object level, and supports inheritance at the user and group level. • Managing objects The CMS keeps track of the object location and maintains the folder hierarchy. InfoObjects are system metadata objects that contain index information. The actual documents/objects are stored in a the FRS. The separation of the object definition (metadata) from the actual document allows the system to retrieve only the required information from the system database, thus providing faster object processing. • Managing servers The CMS handles load balancing to help avoid bottlenecks and maximizes hardware efficiency. You provide the CMS with database connectivity and credentials when you install BusinessObjects Enterprise, so the CMS can create the CMS database using your organization ?s preferred database servers. Before you install

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manipulate. All universe objects and connections are stored and secured in the central repository by the Connection Server.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Databases and connect the CMS to your own database server. Note: • • It is strongly recommended that you backup the CMS database and audit the database frequently. you must create a new. The CMS database cannot be accessed or modified directly. including online analytical processing (OLAP) and common warehousing metamodel (CWM) data sources. The semantic layer allows Web Intelligence to deliver documents. Universe access and row-level security can also be managed at the group or individual user level from within the design environment. Universes are a core component of BusinessObjects Enterprise. Web Intelligence and Crystal Reports use universes to simplify the user creation process required for simple to complex end-user query and analysis. and organize data. by utilizing multiple synchronized data providers. 80 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. You should only make changes to the system database through BusinessObjects Enterprise interfaces such as the CMC that interact with the CMS. This business language is stored as objects in a universe file.1 Deployment Planning Guide . empty database on your database server. Administrators can access the audit database directly to create custom audit reports. • Reporting databases Universes The universe abstracts the data complexity by using business language rather than data language to access. Universe designers need to login to BusinessObjects Enterprise to access the system and create universes.

the auditees correct the time stamps that are recorded in their log files for subsequent audit actions.1 Deployment Planning Guide 81 . The auditees then compare this time to their internal clocks. the CMS communicates with the auditee servers to request copies of records from the auditee ?s local log files.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Databases 2 Views Business Views simplify report creation and interaction by abstracting the complexity of data for report developers. and access control. the CMS controls the overall audit process. and user access control for decentralized management functions. The CMS also controls the synchronization of audit actions that occur on different machines. the CMS periodically broadcasts its system time to the auditees. the BusinessObjects Enterprise server that you monitor is the auditee. Business Views help separate the data connections. If differences exist. Each server writes audit records to a log file local to the server. As the auditor. data access. server metrics. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. At regular intervals. Each auditee provides a time stamp for the audit actions that it records in its log file. When the CMS receives these records it writes data from the log files to the central auditing database. BusinessObjects Enterprise includes a series of dedicated. Auditing database The CMS acts as the system auditor. Business Views are fully supported in BusinessObjects Enterprise. business elements. To ensure that the time stamps of actions on different servers are consistent. Business Views can only be used by Crystal Reports and are designed to simplify the data access and view-time security required for Crystal report creation. Note: • You must configure the auditing database on the CMS before you can begin to audit. pre-configured platform management services for tasks such as password management. Business Views support the combination of multiple data sources in a single view.

the CMS then grants the user a logon token and an active session on the system. In a CMS cluster. its folders. and other objects. the CMS authorizes the request only when it has verified that the user's account or group membership has sufficient privileges. The CMS also responds to authorization requests made by the rest of the system. Third-party security plug-ins. such as SiteMinder or Kerberos. and object rights that define user and group privileges. group memberships. the CMS coordinates the authentication process with its security plug-ins. the cluster assigns the first CMS to start to act as a system auditor. The CMS supports third-party authentication. This section discusses key components of system security. or reuse existing user accounts and groups that are stored in a third-party system (such as LDAP or Windows Active Directory). the CMS allows you to create user accounts and groups within BusinessObjects Enterprise. Note: Because these components are responsible for additional tasks. These components authenticate users and authorize user access for BusinessObjects Enterprise. or Windows AD credentials. and third-party authentication tools. When you set up your system. another CMS from the cluster takes over and begins acting as the auditor.1 Deployment Planning Guide . several are described in more detail in other sections. Central Management Server (CMS) security The CMS handles security information. such as user accounts. 82 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. When a user requests a list of reports in a particular folder. so users can log into BusinessObjects Enterprise with their current LDAP.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Authentication and single sign-on • • The CMS acts as both an auditor and as an auditee when you configure it to audit an action that the CMS controls. Authentication and single sign-on System security is managed by the Central Management Server (CMS). including: • • CMS security. security plug-ins. When users log on. If the machine that is running this CMS fails.

Authentication and authorization Authentication is the process of verifying the identity of a user who attempts to access the system. Authorization is the process of verifying that the user has been granted sufficient rights to perform the requested action upon the specified object. BusinessObjects Enterprise ships with the BusinessObjects Enterprise security plug-in as a default. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. and with LDAP and Windows Active Directory security plug-ins. you need not update or refresh the listing. therefore authentication processes can vary from system to system. Security plug-ins automate account creation and management by allowing you to map user accounts and groups from third-party systems into BusinessObjects Enterprise. BusinessObjects Enterprise is fully customizable. The security plug-ins dynamically maintain third-party user and group listings. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports the following security plug-ins: • • • BusinessObjects Enterprise security plug-in LDAP security plug-in Windows AD and NT security plug-in Note: The third-party Windows NT. or you can create new Enterprise user accounts or groups that correspond to each mapped entry in the external system.1 Deployment Planning Guide 83 . all users who belong to that group can log into BusinessObjects Enterprise. Each security plug-in offers several key benefits. When you make subsequent changes to the third-party group membership. and Windows AD security plug-ins work only once you have mapped groups from the external user database to BusinessObjects Enterprise.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Authentication and single sign-on 2 Security plug-ins Security plug-ins expand and customize the ways in which users are authenticated. You can map third-party user accounts or groups to existing BusinessObjects Enterprise user accounts or groups. LDAP. once you map an LDAP or Windows Active Directory group into BusinessObjects Enterprise. This process is distinct from authorization. So.

BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Authentication and single sign-on BusinessObjects Enterprise supports these methods of authentication: • • • • Enterprise authentication Windows NT authentication Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) authentication Windows AD authentication BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication The system default. eliminating the need to recreate user and group accounts in 84 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. the CMC and InfoView themselves do not support Windows NT authentication. or if you have not already set up a hierarchy of users and groups in a Windows NT server. or a Windows AD server. This allows you to map previously created NT user accounts and groups. Windows NT authentication BusinessObjects Enterprise supports NT authentication with the Windows NT security plug-in. Support for NT authentication means that users or groups created with NT. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports the use of an existing LDAP account directory. • Use the system default Enterprise Authentication if you prefer to create distinct accounts and groups for use with BusinessObjects Enterprise. A very common use for an LDAP directory is to maintain user and group account information. an LDAP directory server. Windows 2000 and Windows 2003 can be used to authenticate with BusinessObjects Enterprise. LDAP authentication Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is a set of protocols used to access information stored in directories. instead of setting up each user and group within BusinessObjects Enterprise. is used in environments that prefer to maintain a distinct set of accounts for use with BusinessObjects Enterprise. which is included by default when the product is installed on Windows. it cannot be disabled. Note: Although a user can configure Windows NT authentication for BusinessObjects Enterprise and custom applications through the CMC. BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication is always enabled.1 Deployment Planning Guide .

and have their membership in a mapped AD group verified before the Crystal Management Server (CMS) grants them an active BusinessObjects Enterprise session. The only methods of authentication that the CMC and InfoView support are Windows AD with Kerberos.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Authentication and single sign-on 2 BusinessObjects Enterprise. For more information. Trusted Authentication provides BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. it also enables BusinessObjects Enterprise to verify all login requests that specify Windows AD Authentication. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator ?s Guide. LDAP. Note: You can specify that BusinessObjects Enterprise use a Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) connection to communicate to the LDAP directory server for additional security. By mapping your LDAP groups to BusinessObjects Enterprise. and Trusted Authentication. Trusted Authentication Users prefer to log into the system once. without needing to provide passwords several times during a session. Directories that support LDAP include: • • • • Sun iPlanet Directory Server Lotus Domino Directory Server IBM Secureway Novell Directory Services (NDS) LDAP authentication is enabled using the Manage Authentication section of the CMC. users are able to log into Enterprise with their LDAP user name and password. the CMC and InfoView themselves do not support Windows AD authentication with NTLM. Note: Although a user can configure Windows NT authentication for BusinessObjects Enterprise and custom applications through the CMC. Users are authenticated against the Windows AD system. Enterprise. Active Directory authentication Windows AD security plug-in enables you to map user accounts and groups from your Windows 2000 Active Directory (AD) system to BusinessObjects Enterprise.1 Deployment Planning Guide 85 .

such as their user name. Applications that have established trust with the Central Management Server can use Trusted Authentication to allow users to log on without providing their passwords. These details are extracted using other methods such as Kerberos and SiteMinder. information flows through the system and the servers communicate with each other. scheduling a report. see BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator ?s Guide. which routes the information to the CMS or the appropriate BusinessObjects Enterprise server. Information Workflows When tasks are performed in BusinessObjects Enterprise. • The authentication type may be Enterprise. depending upon which type(s) you have enabled and set up in the Authentication management area of the Central Management Console (CMC). One of two things can happen during primary authentication: • If single sign-on is not configured. such as logging in.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows a Java single sign-on solution for integrating your BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication solution with third-party authentication solutions. you must configure both the server.1 Deployment Planning Guide . To enable Trusted Authentication. or Windows AD authentication. Windows NT. in the web. Primary authentication Primary authentication occurs when a user first attempts to access the system. LDAP.xml file. and the client. The user's web browser sends the information by HTTP to your web server. the user provides their credentials. For more information. These details are entered by the users on the logon screen. 86 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. through the CMC. or viewing a report. The following section describes some of the process flows as they would happen in the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. password and authentication type. the credentials for the users are silently propagated. If a method of single sign-on is configured.

Upon successful validation. The web application server sends the username. password.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows 2 Authentication Logging on to BusinessObjects Enterprise 1. The Server Intelligence Agent (SIA) starts up and looks in the cache for a list of CMSes (local or remote) to connect to. the SIA either: (1) starts the local CMS and connects to it or (2) connects to a remote CMS. the web application server uses the logon token to validate the user against the CMS. After the SIA has successfully connected. Desktop Intelligence Processing Server. The web application server sends the response back to the user ?s machine where it is rendered in the web client.1 Deployment Planning Guide 87 . 3. The web client sends the login request via the web server to the web application server. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The web application server generates an HTML page to send to the client. 2. it asks the CMS for a list of server service(s) to manage. The system database returns the list of servers and the associated configuration information back to the CMS (for example. 2. According to the information in the cache. The CMS sends a response to the web application server to let it know that the validation was successful. Starting the Server Intelligence Agent 1. The web application server determines that the request is a logon request. and authentication type to the specified CMS for authentication. The CMS finds information on server services and their configuration from the system database. 6. For the rest of this session. Adaptive Job Server. 4. This CMS list is kept up-to-date and refreshed as soon as a new CMS appears. Destination Job Server. the CMS creates a session for the user in its own memory. 5. and Crystal Reports Processing Server). The CMS validates the username and password against the appropriate database (in this case BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication is authenticated against the system database). The web application server generates a logon token for the user session in its memory. 3.

Scheduling Setting a schedule for a Crystal Report to run now 1.exe launches ProcReport.dll completes the following tasks: • Open the report. and Crystal Reports Processing Server) and begins monitoring them. The Input FRS locates the report template and then streams to the Crystal Reports Job Server. 12. ProcReport. The report is created when the Crpe32. 9. Destination Job Server. The CMS sends the job information to the Crystal Reports Job Server. The Crystal Reports Job Server then requests the report template from the Input FRS.1 Deployment Planning Guide . If the user has the appropriate rights to schedule the report. The SIA starts the servers (for example. The Crystal Reports Job Server launches a child process (JobServerChild.exe) to coordinate running the report. 5. the CMS locates an available Crystal Reports Job Server based on the Maximum Jobs Allowed value configured for each Crystal Reports Job Server. When the scheduled time arrives.dll calls Crpe32. 7. 10. The report template is placed in a temporary directory on the Crystal Reports Job Server. The Crystal Reports Job Server determines the location of the Input File Repository Server that houses this report. The web application server passes the request to the CMS. 3. 11. 6.dll and passes it all instances received from the Crystal Reports Job Server. The CMS determines whether or not the user has the appropriate rights to schedule the report. Desktop Intelligence Processing Server. 5. 8. The CMS sends the list of servers and the configuration information to the SIA. JobServerChild. 88 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 4. Adaptive Job Server.dll. The user schedules a report and the request is sent to the web application server. 2.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows 4. The SIA starts the servers according to the associated configuration information. the CMS commits the scheduled object request to the CMS system database.

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• • • •

Connect to the production database. Process the report. Create and save the report instance. Pass the report back to JobServerChild.exe.

13. The Crystal Reports Job Server updates the CMS periodically with the job status. At this time the status shows that the report is processing. 14. JobServerChild.exe uploads the report instance to the Output FRS. 15. The Output FRS notifies the JobServerChild.exe that the report has been saved successfully. 16. JobServerChild.exe notifies the Crystal Reports Job Server that the report creation has completed. 17. The Report Job Server updates the CMS with the job status. The JobServerChild.exe clears itself from memory. 18. The CMS updates the job status in its memory, and then writes the instance information to the BusinessObjects Enterprise System database.

Running a schedule for a Crystal Report to a default location
1. The Central Management Server (CMS) constantly checks the system database to determine if there is any schedule to be run at that time. 2. When the time specified by the schedule arrives, the CMS locates an available Crystal Reports Job Server based on the Maximum Jobs Allowed value configured on each Crystal Reports Job Server. The CMS sends the job information to the Crystal Reports Job Server. The information the CMS sends to the Crystal Reports Job Server is Report ID, Format, Destination, Logon information, parameters, and selection formulas. 3. The Crystal Reports Job Server communicates with the Input File Repository Server (FRS) to obtain a report template as per the requested Report ID. 4. The Crystal Reports Job Server launches the JobChildserver process. 5. The child process (JobChildserver) launches the ProcReport.dll upon receiving the template from the Input File Repository Server via the Enterprise Infrastructure. The ProcReport.dll contains all of the parameters that were passed from the CMS to the Crystal Reports Job Server. 6. The ProcReport.dll launches the Crpe32.dll that processes the report according to all the parameters that were passed.

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7. While still processing, records are retrieved from a database server as defined within a report. 8. The Crystal Reports Job Server updates the CMS periodically with the job status. At this time the status shows that it is processing. 9. Once the report is compiled into the memory of the Crystal Reports Job Server, it needs to be exported to a different format, such as Portable Document Format (PDF). When exporting to PDF, the PDF .dll is used. 10. The report with saved data also needs to be submitted to the default location. Then it will be sent to the Output FRS. 11. Once that process is finished, the Crystal Reports Job Server updates the CMS with the job status. At this time the status is reported as a success. 12. The CMS updates the job status in its memory, and then writes the instance information to the BusinessObjects Enterprise System database.

Setting a schedule for a Crystal Report
1. The web client submits a schedule request in an URL, typically via the web server to the web application server. 2. The web application server interprets the URL request and determines that the request is a schedule request. The web application server sends the schedule time, database login values, parameter values, destination, and format to the specified CMS. 3. The CMS ensures that the user has rights to schedule the object. If the user has sufficient rights, the CMS adds a new record to the system database. The CMS also adds the instance to its list of pending schedules.

Setting a schedule for a Web Intelligence document
1. The user sets a schedule for a document and the request is sent to the web server. The web server passes the document schedule request to the web application server. 2. The web application server passes the document schedule request to the CMS. 3. The CMS determines whether or not the user has the appropriate rights to schedule the document. If the user has the appropriate rights to schedule the document, the user then sets the different scheduling parameters, and the CMS commits the scheduled object request to the

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CMS system database. An instance of the Web Intelligence document is created in the CMS that contains all the relevant scheduling information.

Running a schedule for a Web Intelligence Document
1. The CMS monitors the system database to determine if there is a schedule run at that time. 2. When the scheduled time arrives, the CMS sends the schedule request and all the information about the request to the Adaptive Job Server that houses the Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service. 3. The Adaptive Job Server (Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service) locates an available Web Intelligence Processing Server based on the Maximum Jobs Allowed value configured on each Web Intelligence Processing Server. 4. The Web Intelligence Processing Server determines the location of the Input File Repository Server (FRS) that houses the document and the universe metalayer file on which the document is based. The Web Intelligence Processing Server then requests the document from the Input FRS. The Input FRS locates the Web Intelligence document as well as the universe file on which the document is based and then streams them to the Web Intelligence Processing Server. 5. The Web Intelligence document is placed in a temporary directory on the Web Intelligence Processing Server. The Web Intelligence Processing Server opens the document in memory. The QT.dll generates the SQL from the Universe on which the document is based. The Connection Server (component of the Web Intelligence Process Server) connects to the database. The query data passes through QT.dll back to the Document Engine where the document is processed. A new successful instance is created. 6. The Web Intelligence Processing Server uploads the document instance to the Output FRS. 7. The Web Intelligence Processing Server notifies the Adaptive Job Server (Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service) that document creation is completed. If the document is scheduled to go to a destination (file system, FTP, SMTP, or Inbox), the Adaptive Job Server retrieves the processed document from the Output FRS and delivers it to the specified destination(s). Assume that this is not the case in this example. 8. The Adaptive Job Server (Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Servrice) updates the CMS with the job status.

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The CMS determines if the user has the appropriate rights to schedule the object. The Input File Repository Server returns the program object back to the Program Job Server. The user schedules an object and the request is sent to the web server. At this time the status reported is that the program is processing. 14. The Output File Repository Server notifies the Program Job Server that the object was scheduled successfully by sending an object log file. and then writes the object instance information to the BusinessObjects Enterprise System database. the CMS locates an available Program Job Server based on the Maximum Jobs Allowed value configured on each Program Job Server. 13. Running a schedule for a program 1. 92 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The Program Job Server updates the CMS with the job status. The user schedules an object and the request is sent to the web server. 2. 6. The Program Job Server communicates with the Input File Repository Server and requests the program object. 12. 9.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows 9. When the scheduled time arrives. the CMS commits the scheduled object request to the CMS system database. 2. If the user has the appropriate rights to schedule the object. The web application server passes the request to the CMS. 3. 4.1 Deployment Planning Guide . The Program Job Server launches the scheduled object. 8. The web server passes the object schedule request to the web application server. 7. 11. 15. 5. The CMS sends the job information to the Program Job Server. The Program Job Server updates the CMS periodically with the job status. and then writes the instance information to the BusinessObjects Enterprise system database. The Program Job Server sends a log file to the Output File Repository Server. 10. The web server passes the object schedule request to the web application server. Sending an instance to a destination 1. The CMS updates the job status in its memory. The CMS updates the job status in its memory.

The Input File Repository Server returns the program object back to the Program Job Server. The CMS determines if the user has the appropriate rights to schedule the object. The web client sends a view request in a URL to the web application server. 4.1 Deployment Planning Guide 93 . 7. and then writes the object instance information to the BusinessObjects Enterprise System database. 2. the CMS commits the scheduled object request to the CMS system database. 10. 3. At this time the status reported is that the program is processing. If the user has the appropriate rights to schedule the object. The CMS updates the job status in its memory. 13.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows 2 3. 12. The Output File Repository Server notifies the Program Job Server that the object was scheduled successfully by sending an object log file. 8. 14. The Program Job Server communicates with the Input File Repository Server and requests the program object. 15. The web application server sends a request to the CMS to ensure that the user has rights to view the instance. 6. The Program Job Server updates the CMS periodically with the job status. The CMS checks the system database to verify the user rights. 5. 9. the CMS locates an available Program Job Server based on the Maximum Jobs Allowed value configured on each Program Job Server. The Program Job Server sends a log file to the Output File Repository Server. The web application server passes the request to the CMS. The CMS sends the job information to the Program Job Server. 11. The Program Job Server updates the CMS with the job status. Viewing Viewing an instance when the page exists on the Cache Server 1. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The web application server interprets the request and determines that it is a request to view the first page of the selected report instance. When the scheduled time arrives. The Program Job Server launches the scheduled object.

The web application server checks the CMS to ensure the user has sufficient rights to view the report. The Output FRS sends the requested report instance to the Crystal Reports Page Server. The Crystal Reports Cache Server determines if the requested EPF file exists in the cache directory. 8.EPF file for the requested report page without having to connect to the production database. the Crystal Reports Cache Server returns the page to the web application server. 9. The Crystal Reports Cache Server checks to see if the page already exists. The CMS determines if the user has the appropriate rights to view the report.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows 4. The Crystal Reports Page Server queries the Output FRS for the requested report instance. The CMS sends a response to the web application server to confirm the user has sufficient rights to view the instance. The Crystal Reports Cache Server sends the request to the Crystal Reports Page Server. The requested EPF file is not found in the cache directory. Viewing a page of a report instance when the cache file of the page does not exist 1.1 Deployment Planning Guide . The web application server sends the . 4. 5. 2.epf page to the web client where it is rendered in the ActiveX viewer. The user sends the view request through the web server to the web application server. The Crystal Reports Page Server determines that the report contains data and creates the . 5. 6. 11. The Crystal Reports Page Server opens the report instance and checks the report to determine if it has data. The web application server sends a request to the Crystal Reports Cache Server requesting the first page of the report instance. 12. 7. 10. The web application server recognizes the request as a request to view a report page. The web application server sends a request to the Crystal Reports Cache Server for the requested report page (EPF file). The CMS sends a response to the web application server to confirm the user has sufficient rights to view the report. 94 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 3. If the page does exist. 6.

4. so a new page does not have to be rendered for each new request. The Input FRS retrieves the appropriate Information Analyzer workspace (. The Crystal Reports Cache Server writes the EPF file to the cache directory.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows 2 13. The web client communicates with the web application server using DHTML AJAX technology (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML). The Crystal Reports Cache Server sends the requested page to the web application server.1 Deployment Planning Guide 95 . The web server sends the requested page to the report viewer.amw) from the underlying directory (via OS) and then streams that workspace back to the MDAS. The CMS retrieves the user's credentials from the system database. 16. 14. Viewing a Voyager workspace 1. The MDAS Server opens the workspace. The web application server translates the request and sends it to the platform (CMS) to determine whether a user is entitled to view or create a new workspace. The web client sends a request via the web server to the web application server to view a new workspace. 15. workspace. 2. The Crystal Reports Page Server sends the EPF file to the Crystal Reports Cache Server. and sends it to the OLAP Database Server. it also sends a list of one or more available MDAS Servers via CORBA. The AJAX technology allows for partial page updates. 6. formulates a query. If the user is allowed to view or create a workspace. 17. 3. The MDAS server needs to communicate with the Input FRS to retrieve the appropriate workspace document that has information about the underlying OLAP Database and an initial OLAP query saved with it. 5. The web application server forwards the file to the web server. the CMS confirms this to the web application server. The translation of the web client query into the appropriate OLAP query BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. or refresh an existing. 7. The web application server picks an MDAS Server from the list of available choices and sends a CORBA request to the MDAS Server to find the appropriate OLAP server(s) to create a new. The MDAS Server has to have an appropriate OLAP database client configured for the OLAP data source. At the same time.

This is a zero-client solution that does not need to download any Java or ActiveX components. The MDAS Server. 5. database login. 7. 4. the Crystal Reports Cache Server sends a request for the Crystal Reports Processing Server to generate the page. print. 96 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 8. The web client sends the view on demand request in an URL typically via the web server to the web application server. The CMS checks the system database to verify the user rights.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows needs to occur. Unless the report meets the requirements for On Demand report sharing (within a set time of another On Demand request. The MDAS Server sends XML packages of prerendered result back to the web application server. 9. On Demand Viewing a report on demand 1. based on the request to either create. The web application server renders the workspace and sends the formatted page or portion of the page to the web client via the web server. The web application server interprets the requested page and the values sent in the URL request and determines that it is a request to view the first page of the selected report object. 6. view. 3. The Crystal Reports Processing Server requests the report object from the Input File Repository Server.1 Deployment Planning Guide . The CMS sends a response to the web application server to confirm the user has sufficient rights to view the object. prerenders the result to enable the Java WAS to finish the rendering more quickly. parameters). The web application server sends a request to the Crystal Reports Cache Server requesting the first page of the report object. or export. The Input File Repository Server streams a copy of the object to the Crystal Reports Processing Server. The Crystal Reports Cache Server checks to see if the page already exists. 2. The Crystal Reports Processing Server opens the report in its memory and checks to see if the report contains data. The web application server sends a request to the CMS to ensure that the user has rights to view the object. The web client displays the updated or newly requested page. The OLAP Database Server sends the query result back to the MDAS Server.

epf page to the web application server. 8.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows 2 8. The Web Intelligence Processing Server requests the document from the Input File Repository Server as well as the universe file on which the requested document is built. The Web Intelligence Report Engine uses QT component (inproc) and ConnectionServer (inproc). The Input File Repository Server streams a copy of the document to the Web Intelligence Processing Server. but the size of this . 10. 2. the Crystal Reports Processing Server must connect to the database to query for data. The web application server determines that the request is for a Web Intelligence document.epf page in its cache directory in anticipation of new viewing requests. 6. 4. There is only one . The web application server sends a request to the Web Intelligence Processing Server. The web server sends the . including row. A web browser sends the view request to the web application server via the web server. 9. 5. requesting the document. The Crystal Reports Processing Server sends the . Assuming that there is no data in the report object. 11. The universe file contains metalayer information.etf page can be substantial.epf page to the Crystal Reports Cache Server. The Web Intelligence Report Engine opens the document in memory. The .etf page may also be generated and sent to the Crystal Reports Cache Server in this step. The Crystal Reports Cache Server sends the .epf page to the user ?s machine where it is rendered in the viewer in the web client. 7. Note: An . The Crystal Reports Cache Server stores a copy of the .epf page to the web server. The CMS sends a response to the web application server to confirm the user has sufficient rights to view the document. Viewing a Web Intelligence document on demand 1. and sends a request to the CMS to ensure the user has the appropriate rights to view the document. as well as the universe file on which the requested document is built. The QT component BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1 Deployment Planning Guide 97 . 3. The web application server sends the .etf page per report.etf page (left pane group tree navigation of the report) is generated when the first page of report is generated and when the report is grouped.and column-level security.

Viewing a Desktop Intelligence document on demand using the web view format 1. The ConnectionServer uses the SQL to get the data from the database to the Report Engine where the document is processed. The Desktop Intelligence Processing Server requests the document and the universe on which the document is based from the Input FRS. 9. 3. The query data is passed back to the report engine where the document is processed. The Web Intelligence Processing Server sends the viewable document page that was requested to the web application server. The Input FRS streams a copy of the document and the universe to the Desktop Intelligence Processing Server. The web application server sends a request to the CMS to ensure that the user has rights to view the document. The CMS sends a response to the web application server to confirm the user has sufficient rights to view the document. The web server sends the request to the web application server. 4. The web application server forwards this viewable page to the web server. The Desktop Intelligence Cache Server checks whether the page is already cached. the Desktop Intelligence Cache Server returns that viewable page back to the web application server. The web client sends the view Desktop Intelligence document request in an URL to the web server. The Desktop Intelligence Processing Server generates the SQL from the universe that the report is based on. 8. The web application server interprets the requested page and the values sent in the URL request and determines it is a request to view a Desktop Intelligence document. 98 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 9. 5. 2.1 Deployment Planning Guide . The Connection Server library (part of the Desktop Intelligence Processing Server) connects to the database to run the query. where it is rendered in a web browser. 6.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows generates/validates/regenerates the SQL and connects to the database to run the query. The CMS checks the system database to verify the user rights. If it is. The web application server sends a request to the Desktop Intelligence Cache Server requesting the document. 7. The Desktop Intelligence report engine opens the document and the universe in its memory. The web server sends the viewable page to the user ?s machine. the Desktop Intelligence Cache Server asks the Desktop Intelligence Processing Server to generate the requested viewable page of the Desktop Intelligence document. If not.

8. The Crystal Reports Processing Server opens the report in its memory and checks to see if the report contains data. the Crystal Reports Cache Server sends a request for the Crystal Reports Processing Server to generate the page. The Desktop Intelligence Cache server then passes the viewable page (obtained from the Desktop Intelligence Processing Server) back to the web application server. The Desktop Intelligence Cache server stores that viewable page locally (HTML pages) in anticipation of future requests to view that already created page. The web server sends the HTML page (viewable page of the document) to the user's machine where it is rendered in the web browser. database login. The web application server sends a request to the Crystal Reports Cache Server requesting the first page of the report object. Viewing a report on demand when the default view format is set to Web Java 1. The web application server sends a request to the CMS to ensure that the user has rights to view the object. 2. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 12.1 Deployment Planning Guide 99 . The web application server interprets the requested page and the values sent in the URL request and determines that it is a request to view the first page of the selected report object. The Crystal Reports Processing Server requests the report object from the Input File Repository Server. 7. 6.BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows 2 10. 11. the Crystal Reports Processing Server must connect to the database to query for data. The Desktop Intelligence Processing Server sends the requested viewable page (HTML pages) of the document to the Desktop Intelligence Cache server. 13. 4. The CMS checks the system database to verify the user rights. The web application server does not need to convert that viewable page to HTML because it is already in HTML format and passes the page to the web server. 3. The Input File Repository Server streams a copy of the object to the Crystal Reports Processing Server. parameters). 5. The web client sends the view on demand request via the web server to the web application server. Assuming that there is no data in the report object. The CMS sends a response to the web application server to confirm the user has sufficient rights to view the object. Unless the report meets the requirements for On Demand report sharing (within a set time of another On Demand request. The Crystal Reports Cache Server checks to see if the page already exists.

11. The Crystal Reports Processing Server sends the .epf page to the web server.2 BusinessObjects Enterprise Architecture Information Workflows 9.etf page (left-pane group tree navigation of the report) is generated when the first page of the report is generated and when the report is grouped. The Crystal Reports Cache Server stores a copy of the .epf page to the user ?s machine where it is rendered in the viewer in the web client.epf page to the Crystal Reports Cache Server.etf page can be substantial.1 Deployment Planning Guide .epf page in its cache directory in anticipation of new viewing requests. The . The Crystal Reports Cache Server sends the . An .epf page to the web application server. 100 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. There is only one . 10. but the size of this . The web server sends the . The web application server sends the .etf page may also be generated and sent to the Crystal Reports Cache Server in this step.etf page per report.

Planning Your Deployment 3 .

Assessing your organization's environment The resources and conventions used in your existing network environment affect how you deploy BusinessObjects Enterprise. Choose an initial deployment architecture. Different deployment options are available to you. Planning your deployment involves the following steps: 1. you can keep troubleshooting to a minimum. Review the key concepts you need to consider for your deployment.com/documentation/supported_plat forms. and high availability. database. 2. performance and scalability. and application server considerations. By evaluating your needs before you deploy your BusinessObjects Enterprise system. Refer to the BusinessObjects Enterprise supported platform document at: http://support. 3. database servers and authentication method you plan to use. in addition to security. Which deployment architecture will serve your needs within the limits of your resources? For suggestions and common configurations. but it is important to note that each deployment is unique. depending on the operating systems.businessobjects. The flexibility of the BusinessObjects Enterprise service-based architecture allows you to tailor the deployment to serve your organization's requirements as precisely as possible. web application servers. with resources provided for areas that you may need to investigate further. see Deployment scenarios on page 121.1 Deployment Planning Guide . The section includes examples and suggestions for deployment. See Assessing your organization's environment on page 102.3 Planning Your Deployment Planning your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment Planning your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment This section provides guidelines for assessing your organization's needs. Other conventions used in your current environment 102 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. This section serves as a checklist of criteria to help you plan your deployment. including operating system. and suggestions for deployment scenarios.

However. refer to User permissions for installing BusinessObjects Enterprise in the Windows version of BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide. Operating systems BusinessObjects Enterprise runs on Microsoft Windows and Unix (including Linux) operating systems. installing BusinessObjects Enterprise on UNIX operating systems does not require root access.businessobjects. Use the ping command to verify network connectivity and DNS name resolution. Note: Review the online BusinessObjects Enterprise supported platforms document for information related to supported operating system release versions. you must verify connectivity between all machines and verify that DNS names can be correctly resolved.1. such as security. or caveats: http://support. An Administrator account must be used to install BusinessObjects Enterprise on Windows operating systems. and one version for UNIX. For a complete list of system privileges required. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. For information on IPv6 networking. There is one version of the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation guide for Windows.com/documentation/sup ported_platforms.Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment 3 may also affect how you deploy BusinessObjects Enterprise. Note: Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is supported in BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. performance monitoring. patch levels.1 Deployment Planning Guide 103 . see IPv6 networking on page 117. Network configuration Because BusinessObjects Enterprise is deployed in a networked environment. This section provides a high-level overview for assessing your environment prior to deployment. and design for high availability. or UNIX permissions in the UNIX version of BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide.

although you may require root access to work with your chosen database. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports both 32. a period. To run the setup program correctly. or a slash. or web application systems. Note: In Solaris. and HP-UX. if one of them is not available on your system. or a slash.3 Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment Deployment on Windows Ensure your hosts do not use any of the following characters in their name: an underscore. You must have Administrator rights to install BusinessObjects Enterprise on a Windows platform. It is recommended that you obtain any required files from your UNIX vendor when possible.1 Deployment Planning Guide . However. download and install a version appropriate to your UNIX system. Deployment on UNIX Ensure your hosts use none of the following characters in their name: an underscore. You do not require root privileges in order to install BusinessObjects Enterprise. BusinessObjects Enterprise must have the appropriate operating system account privileges. a period. AIX. ensure that the PATH environment variable of the account being used to install or run BusinessObjects Enterprise does not include GNU or third-party replacements for core system command-line 104 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. web.and 64-bit Windows operating systems. the following commands and utilities must be installed on your UNIX system and available on the PATH for the account being used to install BusinessObjects Enterprise: /bin/sh uname awk tar stty pwd expr chown id ulimit read hostname grep dirname which touch sed tail gzip These commands and utilities should be available on all UNIX distributions. To open ports and run daemon processes or services.

UTF-8 for German UTF-8). BusinessObjects Enterprise supports both 32.com/documenta tion/supported_platforms. the GNU coreutils package.g. See the online BusinessObjects Enterprise supported platforms document for more information about locales: http://support.1 Deployment Planning Guide 105 . • Solaris 10 Containers. Note: BusinessObjects Enterprise documentation uses the terms "tablespace" and "database" interchangeably. Databases in BusinessObjects Enterprise In BusinessObjects Enterprise. Your operating system locale must be set to a UTF-8 encoding variant.UTF-8 (for other languages. Databases allow tables to be grouped together into collections of logically related tables called tablespaces.and 64-bit UNIX operating systems. and can cause problems with the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation or server scripts. • AIX LPAR. Deployment in a virtualized environment BusinessObjects Enterprise can also be installed in the following supported virtualized environments: • VMware. or an individually downloaded and compiled version of a tool). BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Tables are grouped into tablespaces within a database system in the same way that files are grouped into a directory within a file system.businessobjects. such as de_DE. such as en_US.Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment 3 tools (e. While the GNU versions of these tools offer enhanced functionality. use the appropriate localized UTF-8 encoding. a database can be defined as a data repository that organizes a collection of information into structures called tables for rapid search and information retrieval. their output can differ significantly from the native UNIX tools.

• Oracle Database.3 Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment The following database systems.1 Deployment Planning Guide . Ensure that any third-party database servers and clients are set up to use Unicode character encoding (UTF-8). Note: • • If you use your own database system. 106 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. are supported for the Central Mangement System (CMS) database: • IBM DB/2. manufacturing. or as tablespaces distributed across several database systems. BusinessObjects Enterprise uses several other databases to store internal system information. first it must be configured and confirmed as operational. • Sybase Adaptive Server Enterprise (ASE).com/documentation/supported_platforms. as the BusinessObjects Enterprise installer will attempt to verify the database connection. see the Products Availability Report (PAR): http://support. • Microsoft SQL Server. the BusinessObjects Enterprise installer can create and configure a MySQL database system as part of the installation process. you could create reports directly from your organization's existing sales. In addition to your data source. BusinessObjects Enterprise connects directly to the database that you specify as a data source. The following table details the different database or tablespace repositories used by BusinessObjects Enterprise. They can be configured as several tablespaces within a single database system. For a full list of database systems supported for each component of BusinessObjects Enterprise. or scientific database. You are free to use any supported database system with BusinessObjects Enterprise. Consult your database documentation to determine how to enable Unicode support. For example. If you do not have a database system ready. • MySQL.businessobjects.

Yes sObjects Enterprise user. Rather than assign administrative privileges to the account used by BusinessObjects Enterprise. group. security. such as the number of report generation or login events. objects in this database will be initalized by the BusinessObjects Enterprise installer. Auditing Performance Manager (repository for Dashboard and Analytics) BusinessObjects Enterprise scripts require database user privileges that permit the creation and deletion of database objects. Auditing can be enabled and configured during the installation process. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment 3 Repository Description Required during installation? No Reporting Your organization's data repository containing the data to be analyzed with BusinessObjects Enterprise. CMS Main repository that stores Busines. but can be configured after the initial installation is complete. Activity tracking repository that allows No administrators to view system usage information. If you do not have a CMS database from a previous installation. Dashboard and Analytics is only enabled when purchased as part of your license agreement. indexes.1 Deployment Planning Guide 107 . and temporary data. Dashboard and Analytics tracks sys. this table summarizes the privileges required for each supported database system. including tables. content. A Dashboard and Analytics repository is not set up by the installer. and service information.No tem performance and matches it to set goals defined by an administrator.

as found in the configuration file SYBASE_HOME /locales/locales. Default database owner (DBO) account permissions. User with the following privileges enabled: • create session • create table • create procedure Alternatively. Page size must be set to 8 KB.1 Deployment Planning Guide . Default database owner (DBO) account permissions. NLS_LANG must be set to a valid UTF-8 setting. Database IBM DB/2 Additional settings required • • • Set DB2CODEPAGE=1208. and Create schemas implicitly enabled. Databases may require specific configuration to function best with BusinessObjects Enterprise. LC_ALL must be set to a valid locale. MySQL Microsoft SQL Server Sybase ASE Default database owner (DBO) account permissions. Create tables . a user with the CONNECT and RESOURCE roles enabled. The following table provides a list of additional configuration settings.dat. and the Admin Option setting disabled for both roles.3 Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment Database IBM DB/2 Oracle Database Account or role privileges required User with Connect to database . Oracle • Sybase • 108 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Enable user temporary table spaces.

or use a supported third-party web application server and Java Development Kit (JDK). Review the online BusinessObjects Enterprise supported platforms document for information related to supported web application server and JDK release versions. can use a connection server running on Windows to provide a database connection to a Microsoft SQL Server database server.1 Deployment Planning Guide 109 . it must be installed and configured before BusinessObjects Enterprise.NET web application server to process the server-side scripts that make up web applications. In heterogenous environments. as the installer will attempt to verify the location of your web application server. allowing UNIX-based deployments to access Windows-based databases without the need to install ODBC drivers on UNIX systems. the Connection Server can be used to access databases running on platforms other than the operating system used by the Central Management Server (CMS) . Web application servers BusinessObjects Enterprise requires a Java or . patch levels. A number of connection servers can be used by a BusinessObjects Enterprise system at the same time. or caveats: http://support. If you use a third-party server. a UNIX-based CMS. You can install the Tomcat application server during the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation. with a Web Intelligence server and Web Intelligence rich clients. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.com/docu mentation/supported_platforms. For example. and can deploy your web applications directly.businessobjects. where there is a mixture of UNIX and Windows systems. use the Internet Information Services (IIS) server that comes with Windows operating systems.Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment 3 Connection Server in heterogenous environments The BusinessObjects Enterprise Connection Server provides access to databases for the Web Intelligence server and Web Intelligence rich clients.

Supported split combinations for BusinessObjects Enterprise: • Apache HTTP Server 2. 110 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1. The application's dynamic and static resources are separated: static content is deployed to a web server. Note: The BusinessObjects Enterprise installer will not deploy web applications for the following web application servers: • JBoss 4.1 Deployment Planning Guide .0. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment Guide. All web application resources are deployed together on a web application server that serves both dynamic and static content.2 For more information on the wdeploy command. Split mode.0. • IBM WebSphere Community Edition 2.2 MP2 or 10. or on the command-line with the wdeploy tool included with BusinessObjects Enterprise. There are two different ways to deploy web applications using the wdeploy tool: 1.NET web application servers The BusinessObjects Enterprise installation program can deploy to active IIS 6 or 7 web sites on the local Windows Server system during install. • Apache HTTP Server 2. • Sun Java Application Server 8.2 and Tomcat 5.2 and WebLogic 9. Java web application servers The BusinessObjects Enterprise installation program can deploy to supported Java web application servers running on the local system during installation.2 These web application servers must have web applications deployed manually through the web application server administrative console.5.04. dynamic content is deployed to a web application server. • IBM HTTP Server 6.07.1 and WebSphere 6.3 Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment . • SAP Application Server 7. • iPlanet and Sun Java Application Server 8. 2. Standalone mode.

For more information on reverse proxy configuration. In a de-paired configuration. Also recommended to have one gigabyte of RAM. the web server will serve static and cached content to offset a portion of the requests sent to the web application server. see the BusinessObjects Enterprisewde ploy user's guide or the Post Installation Web Application Deployment chapter of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment guide BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. IBM WebSphere Web servers Although web application servers come with built-in web server functionality. It is recommended that you have at least 2 gigabytes of free space on the partition used to hold /tmp or the userdefined temporary directory specified by your TMPDIR environment variable.1 Deployment Planning Guide 111 . Web application tools must be configured manually using the bundled wdeploy utility to split the static and dynamic content so that each can be separately deployed to the web and web application servers. For more information on wdeploy. Web Application Server BEA WebLogic Considerations Minimum 2 gigabytes of free space on install partition used to hold /tmp or the user-defined temporary directory. The BusinessObjects Enterprise installer will not automatically deploy the InfoView or Central Management Console (CMC) web applications to a de-paired environment. A web server may also support a reverse proxy configuration to improve site security.Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment 3 When deploying to a BEA WebLogic and IBM WebSphere web application server. please see Reverse proxy on page 116. with a minimum of 2 gigabyte of free disk space on the install partition. BusinessObjects Enterprise also supports the separation of web and web application servers into a de-paired configuration. Also recommended to have one gigabyte of RAM. the following points must be considered.

so users will not notice if a cluster node fails.1 Deployment Planning Guide . For example. and does support session fail-over. The server tier can be configured to accept 112 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. The F5 BIG-IP family of load balancers. The following persistence types are currently supported: • Source IP address persistence. an environment may have web application servers and database servers on separate subnets. The following hardware load balancers are currently supported: • • • Cisco Content Services Switches (CSS). Failover and load balancing BusinessObjects Enterprise supports the clustering of your web application server. • Cookie persistence Insert mode (ArrowPoint Cookie). However. Note: Web services applications are currently not supported with cookie persistence and fail-over. Cisco Content Switching Modules (CSM). please see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment Guide. in which a server has two or more network addresses. The Central Management Console (CMC) application does not support session fail-over. Hardware or software load balancers can be used as the entry-point for the web application servers to ensure that the processing is evenly distributed among servers. This allows servers to be configured to receive requests from one network and transmit requests to another. Multi-homed environment BusinessObjects Enterprise supports multi-homed environments. InfoView is fault-tolerant.3 Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment Note: For more information about configuring split web and web application servers.

single sign-on. Multihomed environments use multiple physical or logical network cards.0.g.g. 10. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. see the Security concepts section of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. reverse proxies. object rights. 192.0). see the Configuring third-party authentication section of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. Security Your organization's security policies affect how you deploy BusinessObjects Enterprise on your network. Authentication Authentication verifies the identity of a user who attempts to access the system.Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment 3 requests from the web application servers on one subnet (e. For information about how to configure primary authentication or single sign-on. and if you plan to use a reverse proxy. and transmit database requests to database servers on another (e.50. The current release supports these methods of authentication: • BusinessObjects Enterprise authentication • LDAP authentication • Windows AD authentication • Trusted Authentication To use any of the third-party methods of authentication or Trusted Authentication.0). For detailed instructions. the BusinessObjects Enterprise architecture supports features such as: SSL encryption. Do you plan to use the system's built-in authentication. Assess how authentication is handled by your existing environment before deciding how to manage security within BusinessObjects Enterprise. resource access security.0. or do you need it to work with existing LDAP or Windows Active Directory (AD) authentication? You also need to decide how your firewalls are configured. To protect against unauthorized access.1 Deployment Planning Guide 113 . you will need to configure them before you use them with BusinessObjects Enterprise.168. and LDAP or Windows AD authentication.

Internal network communication Almost all internal communication between networked BusinessObjects Enterprise servers is conducted through dynamically chosen port numbers. If your BusinessObjects Enterprise system is distributed across more than one network (such as multiple CMS servers running in different geographic locations. as the standard port numbers are used if your deployment features any SMTP. Your firewall must also allow outbound connections on any port 114 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. no configuration is required to facilitate internal communication. The name server port is 6400 by default. The CMS responds by returning the value of its request port. you must allow incoming traffic through your firewall on port 6400 TCP to allow clients to contact the CMS. or Microsoft Directory services.1 Deployment Planning Guide . rexec. The request port is selected dynamically by default. External network communication For both distributed and locally contained networked deployments. and NetBIOS. and incoming traffic to allow clients to contact any other services that you want to be accessible. Unless you change the default port numbers for your CMS and InfoView web applications. unless you specify otherwise during the BusinessObjects Enterprise installation process. There are a few exceptions to this rule. This may simplify integration with any network security systems through which your BusinessObjects Enterprise system components must communicate. If all of your BusinessObjects Enterprise system components are contained locally within the same network.3 Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment Firewalls The Central Management Server (CMS) uses two ports: the request port and the name server port. or individual servers running on different subnets). with unrestricted communication between each of the server machines. Standard ports for database and web application servers are also used. a firewall or other security system may separate the internal BusinessObjects Enterprise system components from any external web browser or feature-rich clients. rsh. FTP. you can configure the system to use static port numbers. BusinessObjects Enterprise servers initially contact the CMS on its name server port.

Network traffic is then sent to the firewall. Note: Static port numbers must be unique when using NATas firewalls forward traffic based upon the port number used. If your firewall uses packet filtering you must configure it so that traffic from your BusinessObjects Enterprise system components is allowed to pass through the firewall.1 Deployment Planning Guide 115 . The firewall accepts traffic from the CMS and passes it through to a database server running on a different subnet. see the Working with firewalls section of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. as the firewall provides the network translation between each of the two subnets. For detailed information on any of these topics. This service allows or blocks traffic across a firewall based upon the original or destination network address. the database server sees the firewall as a CMS server. a CMS server is configured to send database requests to a firewall that resides between two different subnets. the traffic will merge and go to only one server will be able to communicate with the other side of the firewall. For example. the CMS considers the firewall to be a database server. Network Address Translation (NAT) Firewalls often provide Network Address Translation (NAT) between systems on either side of the firewall. Neither the CMS nor the database server is aware of the firewall's existence. Effectively. Effectively.Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment 3 to allow the CMS and InfoView to reply to external clients on a dynamically chosen port. which is configured to forward it to the appropriate machine on the other side. If two different servers on one side of a firewall attempt to use the same port number. Packet filtering Your firewall may also provide packet filtering. The CMS server configuration page allows you to enter the firewall's IP address or hostname in place of the corresponding system on the other side of the firewall.

HTTPS support You can secure the HTTP communication between your BusinessObjects Enterprise web application server and the web browser clients it serves by using secure socket layer (SSL) encryption for HTTP. modifying the HTTP headers so the clients cannot detect that their request was not processed by the reverse proxy. 116 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. This arrangement is commonly referred to as HTTPS. Restriction: A reverse proxy used with BusinessObjects Enterprise must have the ability to modify the value of the path attribute in Set-Cookie headers.3 Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment Reverse proxy Reverse proxies hide internal web application servers from clients on an external network. They receive and forward resource requests from external client to servers on an internal network.1 Deployment Planning Guide . including detailed steps for individual web application servers. To generate the encryption keys and enable HTTPS encryption. If you have a de-paired web and web application server. see the Modifying Default Security Behavior section of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. please consult the documentation supplied by your web application server vendor. The configuration of a reverse proxy server is a post-installation task that involves configuring a web server to forward client requests to the BusinessObjects Enterprise web application server. As HTTPS communication is handled by the web application server and the client web browser. it is transparent to BusinessObjects Enterprise system components and must therefore be configured post-install on your chosen web application server platform. Special configuration is required to enable the root cookie path on the web application server for BusinessObjects Enterprise web components to work with ISA 2006. They then return any responses from the internal network back to the originating clients. For more information about reverse proxies and BusinessObjects Enterprise. you can configure them to operate in a reverse proxy arrangement.

and ensure that all DNS names resolve to IPv6 addresses. • Between back-end servers. See the Managing and configuring servers section of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. or ping6 <FULL_DNS_NAME> on Unix.Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment 3 CORBA SSL support Non-HTTP network communication between your BusinessObjects Enterprise system components uses the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) communication standard. or mixed hosts (with both IPv6 and IPv4 stacks enabled). If you're planning to deploy to an IPv6 network environment. IPv6 networking Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is supported in BusinessObjects Enterprise. • Between your web application and back-end servers. A host with both IPv4 and IPv6 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Choosing a host type BusinessObjects Enterprise can run on IPv6-only hosts (with only an IPv6 stack enabled). read HTTPS support on page 116. Note: To verify IPv6 network connectivity and DNS name resolution use the command ping -6 <FULL_DNS_NAME> on Windows machines. You can enable CORBA SSL encryption by configuring each component of your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment in turn. verify IPv6-based network connectivity between all machines in the deployment. post-installation. IPv4-only hosts (only an IPv4 stack enabled). ensure that the all machines have an IPv6 stack enabled. non-HTTP network traffic in your deployment can be secured: • Between rich clients and back-end servers.1 Deployment Planning Guide 117 . As CORBA supports SSL encrpytion. Note: To learn more about how to secure HTTP traffic between your web application server and web clients.

To run non-IPv6-compliant products in an IPv6 BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment. For example. BusinessObjects Enterprise server and client components should run in mixed IPv6/IPv4 mode. 118 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. • Performance and scalability Before deciding how to deploy your system. For more information consult the documentation from the third-party software vendor. use a mixed IPv6/IPv4 host. or any other factor that could cause your BusinessObjects Enterprise system requirements to change. A host using only IPv6 can only accept and send IPv6 traffic. the volume of business data. if you are expecting an increase in the number of concurrent users accessing your system.1 Deployment Planning Guide . report complexity. This could be an increase in the number of concurrent users. If you are going to transition an existing BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment to an IPv6-only environment. You should determine which network protocol and the host type best fits your needs before deploying BusinessObjects Enterprise. By monitoring and regularly re-evaluating your system's performance. consider whether the demand on the system may change after it has been installed. schedule tuning or configuration changes before potential issues become performance problems. Until your system is completely transitioned to supporting IPv6-only traffic. you must ensure that they are also IPv6-compliant. Anticipate these changes before you deploy to save you time and money by making architectural choices that will support a scalable solution. such as a database or LDAP server. you may consider deploying a small three-node cluster that can be expanded to five-nodes when demand increases.3 Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment enabled can accept and send both IPv4 and IPv6 traffic. consider the following recommendations: • Your third-party software must be fully IPv6-compliant. Connecting to third party software products If you plan to use third-party software products in a BusinessObjects Enterprise IPv6 deployment.

When designing a system for high availability. Designing for high availability High availability refers to a system that is almost always operational. consider how much down-time is acceptable for the system. separated by a reverse proxy and firewall. It is good practice to keep the backup system at a different geographic location. This arrangement improves the performance of your web applications by off-loading static content from the web application server onto the web server. a fault-tolerant system allows for continuous processing of system requests with no loss of service. see the Improving performance section of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's guide. Split web and web application servers You may choose to split your web and web application server into two servers. you should provision duplicate BusinessObjects Enterprise services. consider a combination of failover processing. as well as shielding your web application servers behind several network layers for improved security. • Frequent data backups BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. server or server process redundancy.Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment 3 For general information about assessing BusinessObjects Enterprise performance. a backup system is still available and becomes the production system. the duplicate Web Intelligence Job Server process immediately takes its place.1 Deployment Planning Guide 119 . • Server redundancy A disaster recovery plan can minimize the effects of a disaster on an organization so you can maintain or quickly resume important system functions. If the primary system goes down. and frequent back-ups: • Failover processing If a BusinessObjects Enterprise service fails. The BusinessObjects Enterprise disaster recovery plan involves implementing redundant servers that mirror the primary system. For example. To minimize time down. if a Web Intelligence Job Server process fails. To achieve this level of availability.

3

Planning Your Deployment Assessing your organization's environment

Regular and frequent backups provide an easy, cost-effective, and reliable method of protecting your valuable data. During a catastrophic system failure, the entire system can be quickly restored to the last backup point without the need to recreate a lot of data.
Note:

When you back up your primary system, you need to back up: the Central Management Server system database; the content of the Input and Output File Repository Servers; the user ID and password for the Administrator account; the application code from the Web Application Server; and the registry settings (if manual changes were made). You may not have the resources to implement a high degree of availability, but you can use best practices to provide the best possible availability for your system. These include vertical scaling (adding redundant server processes to a system in case the primary server process fails) and maintaining a regular back-up schedule.

Designing a multiple-server system for high availability
In a multiple-server environment, duplicate server processes can be installed onto additional machines. This is referred to as horizontal scaling because the duplicate server processes are spread across several machines, as opposed to the vertical scaling with duplicate server processes installed on just one machine. You can also cluster servers together so that transactions are processed more quickly, and, in the event of a failure, an unaffected machine can continue to process requests with minimal impact on the system's overall ability to process requests. Two common examples of fault tolerance in a multiple-server environment are: • CMS clustering With CMS clustering, a set of two or more server machines function as a single Central Management Server. In the event of a network, power, hardware, or software failure on one server, the workload of the failed CMS is picked up by another within the same cluster.

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Planning Your Deployment Deployment scenarios

3

For more information about CMS clustering, see Managing and configuring servers in the BusinessObjects Enterprise Server Administrator's Guide. • Active and passive File Repository Servers (FRS) Your deployment can have multiple Input and Output FRSes. The first File Repository Server pair to register with the CMS cluster becomes the active FRS pair and the other FRS services are considered passive. Although all File Repository Server services run simultaneously, only the active FRS pair handles requests. If an active FRS fails, a passive FRS that is registered with the CMS cluster is changed to active status. When the previously active FRS becomes operational again, it is registered as a passive FRS with the CMS.

Deployment scenarios
After you determine the needs of your users and the resources required for the deployment, you can develop an initial deployment plan for BusinessObjects Enterprise. This section describes sample scenarios for administrators planning an installation of BusinessObjects Enterprise. To see detailed information for any of these scenarios, review the Deployment Scenarios chapter of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Web Application Deployment Guide. The optimal configuration for your deployment will depend on many factors: hardware configuration, database software, reporting requirements, operating system, clock speed, hyperthreading, disk speed, application server configuration, load frequency, and many more. Every deployment is unique, and these examples are provided only as guidelines. For information about assessing your system's unique needs and fine-tuning performance, see the Improving Performance section of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's guide. It is also recommended that you contact your Business Objects sales representative and request information about the BusinessObjects Enterprise Sizing Guide. A Business Objects Services consultant can assess your reporting environment and assist in determining the configuration to best integrate with your current environment.

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3

Planning Your Deployment Deployment scenarios

As a baseline, this section assumes that you have not yet distributed the BusinessObjects Enterprise server processes across multiple machines; however, this section does assume familiarity with the BusinessObjects Enterprise architecture, installation, and server configuration. For preliminary installation information, see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Installation Guide.
Tip:

If you are deploying multi-processor machines, you may also want to run one or more BusinessObjects Enterprise server processes in multiple instances on that machine. For details, see Managing and deleting servers in the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide.

Desktop client to server overview
This scenario illustrates a simple client to server scenario which involves a desktop client application - Desktop Intelligence - connecting to the BusinessObjects Enterprise back-end server behind a firewall.
System layers

• • •

Data Tier: one machine with existing database server Server Tier: one machine for hosting the framework servers and another for all other BusinessObjects servers Client Tier: one machine for installing and running Desktop Intelligence

Configuration details

• • •

A firewall exists between client and server tiers Only the ports required for the communication between the desktop client and the server tier are open on the firewall BusinessObjects servers are distributed over two machines.

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System layers • Data Tier: One machine used to host the database server.1 Deployment Planning Guide 123 . N-tier scenario overview This section describes how to setup a scenario in which a web browser accesses BusinessObjects Enterprise system through web applications.Planning Your Deployment Deployment scenarios 3 Installation platform for BusinessObjects Enterprise Database for Central Management Server (CMS) Web application server Firewall Windows Server 2003 SP2 Enterprise Edition Microsoft SQL Server 2005 Not relevant Linux iptables Desktop client to server diagram The following diagram illustrates the system overview for the scenario once it is implemented. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.

1 Deployment Planning Guide . 124 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. processing and performance management (PMC) servers.3 Planning Your Deployment Deployment scenarios • • • Server Tier: Three machines hosting the framework. Configuration details Installation platform for BusinessObjects Enterprise Database for Central Management Server (CMS) Web application server Firewall Windows Server 2003 SP2 Enterprise Edition Oracle 10g R2 Oracle 10g R3 Linux iptables Basic n-tier diagram The following diagram illustrates the system overview for the scenario once it is implemented. Web Tier: One machine in hosting the web application server. Client Tier: One machine running the Live Office application.

1 Deployment Planning Guide 125 . Client Tier: a browser used to log into Central Management Console (CMC). The server tier comprises clustered Central Management (CMS) and File Repository servers. Web Tier: two web application servers installed on separate machines running as a cluster with fail. The web tier contains a load balancer and clustered web applications clustered on two separate machines.over support through load balancer.Planning Your Deployment Deployment scenarios 3 Complex deployment overview The following scenario illustrates an end to end scenario which combines split web and server tiers. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Server Tier: all BusinessObjects Enterprise servers installed on two machine running as a cluster. System layers • • • • Data Tier: contains databases used by the CMS and File Repository servers. Configuration details Installation platform for BusinessObjects Enterprise Database for Central Management Server (CMS) Web application server Load balancer Firewall Windows Server 2003 SP2 Enterprise Edition Microsoft SQL Server 2005 WebLogic 10 Cisco CSS 11500 series load balancer Linux iptables running on Red Hat Linux with two network interface cards (NIC) Complex deployment diagram The following diagram illustrates the system overview for the scenario once it is implemented.. and multiple instances of the remaining servers clustered on two separate machines.

1 Deployment Planning Guide .3 Planning Your Deployment Deployment scenarios 126 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.

Deployment Checklists 4 .

This section provides a checklist of the major tasks to be completed for the planning phase of your BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment.Y__/N__ nessObjects Enterprise architecture.Assessing your orga. Performance and scalability on page 118 Y__/N__ 128 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. nization's environment on page 102 Understand the components and how they communicate with each other. read the pertinent sections of the BusinessObjects Enterprise Administrator's Guide. Identify potential performance problems. and/or reverse proxy. Security on page 113 Y__/N__ secure sockets layer. on page 103 Choose the database servers will you be ac.1 Deployment Planning Guide . Checklist item Reference Complete? (Y/N) Understand the tiers that make up the Busi.Databases in Busicessing. Understand the workflows (how information travels through the architecture).Operating systems ploying the system on. Y__/N__ Web application servers on page 109 If you are using third-party authentication.4 Deployment Checklists Deployment Checklist Deployment Checklist This section provides a checklist for the steps you need to perform when planning a deployment of BusinessObjects Enterprise. nessObjects Enterprise on page 105 Choose a web application server. firewalls. Architecture overview on page 16 Information Workflows on page 86 Y__/N__ Y__/N__ Y__/N__ Y__/N__ Identify the operating system you will be de.

BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Designing for high availability on page 119 Choose an architecture that meets all of these Deployment scenar. ios on page 121 Review the installation order for BusinessOb. The actual order will vary depending on whether your system included pre-existing systems that are to be incorporated into the new BusinessObjects Enterprise deployment.Y__/N__ needs. page 129 Installation order The following table lists the recommended order that BusinessObjects Enterprise system components should be installed.Deployment Checklists Installation order 4 Checklist item Reference Complete? (Y/N) Y__/N__ Choose whether or not to design for high availability and failover support.Installation order on Y__/N__ jects Enterprise.1 Deployment Planning Guide 129 .

130 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. A second database will be required to enable auditing. To protect your database behind a firewall. at least one database server must be available for the CMS to use.Install your BusinessObjects Enterprise terprise server or server or cluster using the BusinessObjects cluster Enterprise installer.Install the appropriate database drivers on terprise database your BusinessObjects Enterprise server sysdrivers tems and ensure that the database servers can be accessed through the firewall. to act as source material against which to run reports. Ensure that access through the firewall is working in both directions. In addition. Server firewall To protect your BusinessObjects Enterprise server or cluster behind a firewall. 2. 5. Ensure that access through the firewall is working in both directions. 3.1 Deployment Planning Guide . Database firewall 3. (b) Web application files When your web application server is verified to be working. (a) BusinessObjects En. BusinessObjects En. BusinessObjects Enterprise requires a connection to your organization's own database. Component Database server Description To use your own database server to store BusinessObjects Enterprise data. install the web application server or cluster and verify network connectivity between it and the BusinessObjects Enterprise server.4 Deployment Checklists Installation order Order 1. To use your own web application server instead of the version of Tomcat installed by the installer. (b) 4. You will need to enter connection information for all databases during the install. (a) Web application server or cluster 5. install the firewall after the databases are configured and verified to be working. rather than the version of MySQL installed by the installer. deploy the BusinessObjects Enterprise web application files. install the firewall after the servers are configured and verified to be working.

Ensure that access through the firewall is working in both directions. configure the load balancer after the web servers or cluster are verified to be working.1 Deployment Planning Guide 131 . Component Web application server firewall Description To protect your web application server or cluster behind a firewall. Web server firewall 9. To protect your web server behind a firewall. To protect your entire deployment behind a firewall. Web server or cluster 8. When using a reverse proxy server. configure your web server or cluster and ensure connectivity to the web application server. configure the reverse proxy to once access through the web or web application server firewall has been verified. install the firewall after the servers are configured and verified to be working. install the firewall after the entire system is configured and verified to be working. Ensure that access through the firewall is working in both directions. To use split web and web application servers so that server static content can be off-loaded from the web application servers. When using a load balancer. Reverse proxy 10.Deployment Checklists Installation order 4 Order 6. Ensure that access through the firewall is working in both directions. External firewall BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 7. install the firewall after the servers are configured and verified to be working.

4 Deployment Checklists Installation order 132 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1 Deployment Planning Guide .

Glossary 5 .

the user can log on using either a third-party user name and password or an Enterprise user name and password. Automated Process Scheduler See Central Management Console 134 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Thus. Note: In developer documentation. Note that third-party user accounts and groups must be mapped to BusinessObjects Enterprise before you can use the latter three types of authentication. Using the predefined access levels whenever possible can greatly reduce the complexity of your object security model. By assigning an alias to the user. access levels are referred to as "roles". alias A placeholder that allows administrators to link a user's multiple BusinessObjects Enterprise accounts. an alias enables a user to log on via more than one authentication type. a BusinessObjects Universe is provided for administrators to create their own custom reports and analysis. Auditing A BusinessObjects Enterprise component that enables administrators to monitor. Windows AD. authorization The process of verifying that the user has been granted sufficient rights to perform the requested action upon the specified object. and optimize their BI system.1 Deployment Planning Guide . A set of pre-defined reports are available. Windows NT and LDAP authentication. Authentication types include Enterprise.5 Glossary access levels A predefined group of rights which allow you to set common security levels quickly. advanced right A tool which allows administrators more granular control when setting rights in the CMC. Application foundation See Dashboard and Analytics. authentication The process of verifying the identity of a user who attempts to access the system. In addition. analyze. This is useful when a user has a third-party account that is mapped to Enterprise and an Enterprise account.

query and analysis. Cache server A server responsible for handling all report viewing requests. base right A right that applies to all objects in the system. or if administrators want to provide users with sets of regular scheduling dates to choose from. Calendars are particularly useful when users want to run a recurring job on an irregular schedule. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. and are only visible to the users who created them. There are two types of categories: corporate and personal. personal categories are created by individual users. to reports. BusinessObjects Enterprise A business intelligence (BI) platform that powers the management and secure deployment of specialized end-user tools for reporting. For example. you can grant users the right to schedule a report. with data that has been refreshed from the database within the interval that you have specified as the default. and are visible only to groups and users who have the rights to view them. category An alternative to folders as a way of organizing objects. and to other BusinessObjects Enterprise objects. but you cannot grant users the right to schedule another user (because users cannot be scheduled). Corporate categories are created and administrated by administrators with the appropriate rights. the Cache Server returns that cached report page. they can use a calendar to run the job on a predefined set of dates. When users schedule objects. BusinessObjects See Desktop Intelligence. calendar A customized list of run dates for scheduled jobs. and open services-oriented architecture.1 Deployment Planning Guide 135 . If the Cache Server finds a cached page that displays exactly the required data. and performance management (Dashboard and Analytics) on a scalable. The Cache Server checks whether or not it can fulfill the request with a cached report page.Glossary 5 available right BusinessObjects Enterprise administrators setting rights in the CMC will be presented with rights options depending on the object they are setting rights on. the "View objects" right is a base right: it applies equally well to folders. For example.

Dashboard and Analytics 136 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. design layouts. In a UNIX environment. and redistribute personalized report views in BusinessObjects Enterprise. The CMS maintains security and manages objects and servers.5 Glossary Central Configuration Manager (CCM) A server administration tool provided in two forms. users can also search within Discussions Notes and Encyclopedia information. and servers. It also refines the search results by grouping them into categories of similar object types.1 Deployment Planning Guide . The data stored by the CMS includes information about users and groups. and server management. the CCM allows you to manage local and remote servers through its Graphical User Interface (GUI) or from a command line. Crystal Management Server See Central Management Server. save. and perform data analysis using a zero client interface. Crystal Reports Explorer An application which allows users to create and modify reports. With this enhanced search capability. Central Management Server (CMS) A server responsible for maintaining a database of information about your BusinessObjects Enterprise system which other components of the system can access as required. BusinessObjects Enterprise content. Central Management Console (CMC) A web-based administrative tool for managing a BusinessObjects Enterprise system. This functionality reduces IT reporting backlog by enabling users to create. It provides a single interface for user. security levels. see the BusinessObjects Enterprise Deployment and Configuration Guide. Content Search An optimized search tool that enables users to search within the content of objects managed by BusinessObjects Enterprise. In a Windows environment.For more information on the CCM. content. the CCM shell script (ccm.sh) allows you to manage servers from a command line. connection See universe connection. and ranking them in order of their relevance to the search term.

x.x/ 6.This product was previously known as BusinessObjects in release 5.e. email. Destinations include user inboxes. and FTP. The Destination Job Server does not run the actual report or program objects. Desktop Intelligence A web-enabled integrated query. BusinessObjects Enterprise users who have the appropriate rights can view the notes or add their own comments to a discussion thread.Glossary 5 A suite of products which help users track and analyze key business metrics via management dashboards. scorecards. they don't require knowledge of technical database terms like those used in SQL. destination A place where scheduled objects are sent. hyperlinks. they also support group decision-making and analysis via integrated collaboration and workflow capabilities.1 Deployment Planning Guide 137 . discussions A feature which enables users to create notes for reports. to an email address). These products allow goals to be set around metrics and assigned to owners. and analysis solution that allows users to access data in their corporate databases directly from their desktops. programs. because users work with it in the business terms that are familiar to them. and other objects in InfoView. which is a series of related notes in a hierarchical format. and alerting. Desktop Intelligence makes it easy to access this data. to a user's inbox) or outside the system (i. reporting. Dashboard and Analytics includes the following products: • Dashboard Builder • • • Set Analysis Predictive Analysis Process Analysis Designer A tool used to build universes. It handles only objects and instances that already exist in the Input or Output File Repository Servers.e. Destination Job Server A server which can send objects and instances to destinations inside the BusinessObjects Enterprise system (i. Users can create a discussion BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.

File Repository Server (FRS) BusinessObjects Enterprise implementations typically include one Input and one Output File Repository Server. the Event Server triggers your file-based event: that is. and/or a schedule event. for redundancy. The CMS then starts any jobs that are dependent upon your file-based event. The result is displayed on the Rights page in the CMC.5 Glossary thread or add notes to a discussion thread for any object to which they have access. once you create an event. All users are members of the Everyone group. You can schedule an object with a file event. Event-based scheduling provides you with additional control over scheduling objects: you can set up events so that reports are proccessed only after a specified event occurs. effective rights A calculation performed by the CMS that takes into account the effect of the rights set on an object. Accessible from your BI portal. Encyclopedia A user panel inside BusinessObjects Enterprise for creating business intelligence (BI) reference guides. When you set up a file-based event within BusinessObjects Enterprise. Everyone A group created by default in BusinessObjects Enterprise. event A preset trigger for scheduling and processing objects.) The Input File Repository Server manages all of the report objects that have been published to the system by 138 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. That is. Event Server A server which manages file-based events. the Event Server monitors the directory that you specified. the Event Server notifies the CMS that the file-based event has occurred. you can select it as a dependency when you schedule an object . Working with events consists of two steps: creating an event and scheduling an object with events. a custom event. (In larger deployments. there may be multiple Input and Output File Repository Servers. When the appropriate file appears in the monitored directory. Encyclopedia helps users locate and interpret your corporate information for more confident and accurate decision making. The scheduled job is then processed only when the event occurs.1 Deployment Planning Guide .

inbox A destination for a scheduled report. Information Analyzer See Voyager. and keep track of published reports. subfolders. and files in BusinessObjects Enterprise. group A collection of users who share the same account privileges. In BusinessObjects Enterprise. individual users. or program is processed. or a component such as Crystal Reports).1 Deployment Planning Guide 139 . the Import Wizard. and custom-created by administrators according to organizational needs. focused. Groups are created by default (as in the case of the Administrators and Everyone groups). InfoView consolidates the presentation of a company's BI information and allows it to be accessed in a way that is secure. and then schedule those objects to generate instances on a recurring basis. the CMC. Groups enable you to make changes to user rights in one place (the group) instead of modifying each user account individually. Each instance contains data that is current at the time the report. schedule. The File Repository Servers are responsible for listing files on the server. you publish objects to the system. adding files to the repository. query. When scheduling a report.Glossary 5 administrators or end users (using the Publishing Wizard. you can specify that you want the system to store the report instances in the inbox of one or more users. and removing files from the repository. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. InfoView A web-based interface that end users access to view. You can also send existing report objects or instances to a user's inbox by using the "Send to" feature. instance A copy or "version" of an object that contains data that has been retrieved from one or more databases. and personalized to users inside and outside an organization. The Output File Repository Server manages all of the report instances generated by the LDAP authentication(s). inheritance The method by which rights set on groups or folders are passed to subgroups. querying for the size of a file. querying for the size of the entire file repository.

such as Excel. Object packages can be composed of any combination of report and program objects that are published to the BusinessObjects Enterprise system. PowerPoint. Job Server Any server which processes scheduled actions on objects at the request of the CMS. rich text format files. Microsoft Excel files. Word. Acrobat. text files. Also see Voyager. and allows you to schedule the contents simultaneously. Lists of values are used to implement dynamic prompts and cascading lists of values within Crystal Reports. and Hyperlink objects.5 Glossary Java viewer A client-side viewer which is downloaded and installed in the user's browser. List of Values object An object that contains the values of specific fields in a Business View. Microsoft PowerPoint files. Text. cannot be added to object packages. (Third-party objects. Rich Text. see the OLAP Intelligence User's Guide. Microsoft Word files.) OLAP Intelligence A tool for creating reports based on multidimensional data. List-of-value objects do not appear in CMC or InfoView. see the Business Views Administrator's Guide. object package A type of object which functions as a folder for other objects. Job servers can be configured to process either report objects or program objects when you add the servers to BusinessObjects Enterprise. hyperlinks. object A generic term for items represented in the Repository. List of Values Job Server A server which processes scheduled list-of-value objects. BusinessObjects Enterprise supports many types of objects including reports. Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Page Server 140 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. and object packages.1 Deployment Planning Guide . For more information. programs. For more information. Web Intelligence documents.

The EPF pages contain formatting information that defines the layout of the report. Program Job Server A server which processes scheduled program objects. users can schedule a publication (based on a Desktop Intelligence document) once. To run a program. program object An executable.Glossary 5 A server which responds to on-demand page requests from the Cache Server to generate Encapsulated Page Format (EPF) pages. as requested by the CMS. The data for the report is saved with the report or retrieved on demand from the database. The Page Server then returns the EPF pages to the Cache Server. With profiles. the Program Job Server first retrieves the files from storage on the Input File Repository Server. and deliver many different personalized versions of the document to your users (known as single-pass report bursting in earlier versions of BusinessObjects). through InfoView. publishing BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. and then runs the program. Performance management See Dashboard and Analytics.1 Deployment Planning Guide 141 . Therefore the outcome of running a program depends on the particular program object run. By definition. or Java program that users can schedule to run regularly or based on an event. program objects are custom applications. Additionally. Publishing includes the ability for users or administrators to subscribe to and receive publications on a pre-defined timetable. making BusinessObjects Enterprise a self-managing environment. profile A tool for personalizing the content that users see when Desktop Intelligence documents are published. Program object features allow administrators to automate a wide range of administrative tasks. or specific sections of documents. Publishing A feature that allows users to schedule and distribute Desktop Intelligence documents. Documents are then distributed to users either via the web or email. thus integrating BusinessObjects Enterprise into a broader workflow. script. administrators can use program objects to trigger external processes.

as requested by the CMS. It also allows you to specify a number of options on each object that you publish. They can perform data analysis and create reports using the objects in a universe. Although this application runs only on Windows. Report Application Server (RAS) A server which provides users with report design capability over the Web. and it provides ad hoc reporting capabilities that allow users to create and modify reports over the Web. each right provides a user or group with permission to perform a particular action. and other features in BusinessObjects Enterprise. the Report Job Server obtains the report object from the Input FRS and communicates with the database to retrieve the current data. It process reports that BusinessObjects Enterprise users view with the Advanced DHTML viewer. without seeing. Once it has generated the report instance. right The base unit for controlling user access to files. or having to know anything about. applications. Publishing Wizard An application which allows you to publish objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise quickly. users. Report Job Server A server which processes scheduled reports. When granted. Web Intelligence. 142 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. scheduling The process through which a user determines when an object will run on the system. you can use it to publish reports to BusinessObjects Enterprise servers that are running on Windows or on UNIX. To generate a report instance.1 Deployment Planning Guide . and generates report instances. it stores the instance on the Output FRS. role See access level. universe An abstraction of a data source that presents data to users in non-technical terms. the underlying data structures in the database. servers.5 Glossary The process of adding objects to BusinessObjects Enterprise and making them available to authorized users. Desktop Intelligence. and Crystal Reports users can connect to a universe and run queries against a database.

connects those objects to OLAP data sources. For complete information. Web Intelligence A web-based query and analysis tool that enables users to track. which will generate the instance of the Web Intelligence document. The Web Component Adapter (WCA) runs within the application server and provides all services that are not directly supported by the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. understand. universe connection A named set of parameters that defines how a BusinessObjects application accesses data in a database.Glossary 5 Universes are created using the Designer. and manage corporate data using a simple browser as their interface. Web Component Adapter (WCA) A server which communicates directly with the application server that hosts the BusinessObjects Enterprise SDK. You must select or create a connection when you create a universe. see the Web Intelligence User's Guide. and then defines queries to explore the data. while maintaining tight security over data access. Voyager A web-based OLAP analysis tool that users access through InfoView. Web Intelligence Job Server A server which processes scheduling requests it receives from the CMS for Web Intelligence documents. For complete information. The web server passes requests to the application server. A user creates a workspace. For more information see the Business Objects Voyager User's Guide. Web Intelligence Report Server BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Web Intelligence provides business users an easy-to-use interface for building and analyzing reports on corporate data over secured intranets and extranets.1 Deployment Planning Guide 143 . You must have a connection to access data. For more information. populates it with crosstab and chart objects. It forwards these requests to the Web Intelligence Report Server. A connection links Web Intelligence to your middleware. see the Designer's Guide. which then forwards the requests to the WCA. see the Designer's Guide. Voyager workspaces display OLAP data in crosstabs and charts.

which it stores on the Output File Repository Server (FRS). 144 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. Depending on the user's access rights and the refresh options of the document. the Web Intelligence Report Server will use cached information.1 Deployment Planning Guide .5 Glossary A server used to create. and analyze Web Intelligence documents. It processes scheduled Web Intelligence documents and generates new instances of the document. or it will refresh the data in the document and then cache the new information. edit. view.

Get More Help A .

It also has links to a wide range of technical information including knowledgebase articles.com/developer/library/ Online customer support The Business Objects Customer Support web site contains information about Customer Support programs and services. in connectivities.com/ and click Business Objects at the top of the page.sap. Find more information on the Business Objects Education web site: http://www.businessobjects. The library is updated regularly with new content as it becomes available. To access the online documentation library.1 Deployment Planning Guide . and download PDF versions. For more information. Additional developer resources https://boc.com/services/training 146 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. and support forums. contact your local sales office.com/services/consulting/ Looking for training options? From traditional classroom learning to targeted e-learning seminars.A Get More Help Online documentation library Business Objects offers a full documentation set covering all products and their deployment. Expertise is available in relational and multidimensional databases.businessobjects. or contact us at: http://www.sdn. http://www. visit http://help. do full-text searches. The online documentation library has the most up-to-date version of the Business Objects product documentation. read guides on line. and more. database design tools.businessobjects.com/support/ Looking for the best deployment solution for your company? Business Objects consultants can accompany you from the initial analysis stage to the delivery of your deployment project. customized embedding technology.sap. downloads. You can browse the library contents. we can offer a training package to suit your learning needs and preferred learning style.

com Note: If your issue concerns a Business Objects product and not the documentation.com/support/.1 Deployment Planning Guide 147 .businessobjects. and we will do our best to ensure that your suggestion is included in the next release of our documentation: documentation@businessobjects. please contact our Customer Support experts.Get More Help A Send us your feedback Do you have a suggestion on how we can improve our documentation? Is there something you particularly like or have found useful? Drop us a line. Business Objects product information For information about the full range of Business Objects products. For information about Customer Support visit: http://www. visit: http://www.com. BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.businessobjects.

1 Deployment Planning Guide .A Get More Help 148 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.

NET SDK 74 . 113 authorization 83 B basic web tier scenario configuration details 123 diagram 123 overview 123 system layers 123 Business Process BI Service 40 Business View Manager 32 BusinessObjects Enterprise architecture diagram 18 documentation 12 BusinessObjects Enterprise .NET SDK 75 Report Application Server (RAS) .NET SDK 74 BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK 70 BusinessObjects Mobile 29 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. desktop 32 Business View Manager 32 Central Configuration Manager (CCM) 33 Crystal Reports Designer 33 Crystal Reports Viewer 33 Data Source Migration Wizard 34 Desktop Intelligence 34 Import Wizard 34 Live Office 35 Publishing Wizard 35 Query as a Web Service 36 Report Conversion Tool 36 Repository Diagnostic Tool 37 A Adaptive Processing Server 52 architecture 16 architecture diagram 18 auditing database 81 authentication 82.NET BusinessObjects Enterprise . 83.Index . browser-based 28 BusinessObjects Mobile 29 Central Management Console (CMC) 29 Dashboard and Analytics 29 InfoView 30 Report viewers 30 Server Intelligence 26 Voyager 31 Web Intelligence 32 clients.NET SDK 74 Crystal Reports .NET web application servers 73 C Central Configuration Manager (CCM) 33 Central Management Console (CMC) 29 Central Management Console Service 41 Central Management Server (CMS) security 82 Central Management Service 41 Central Management System (CMS) database 79 client 27 Client Auditing Proxy Service 41 clients.1 Deployment Planning Guide 149 .NET SDK 75 Report Engine .

architecture 18 disaster recovery 119 E Event Service 42 F fault tolerance 119 firewalls 114 H high availability 119 HTTPS encryption 116 I Import Wizard 34 InfoView 30 Input Filestore Service 42 IPv6 117 150 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.NET SDK 75 Crystal Reports Cache Service 45 Crystal Reports Designer 33 Crystal Reports Processing Service 45 Crystal Reports Scheduling Service 46 Crystal Reports Viewer 33 Crystal Reports Viewing and Modification Service 46 D Dashboard and Analytics 29 Data Source Migration Wizard 34 databases 78 auditing 81 Central Management System (CMS) 79 universe 80 views 81 deployment checklist 128 clustering 120 database 105 documentation 12 encryption 116.Index clients. 117 firewalls 114 high availability 119 inital 10 installation order 129 load balancers 112 multi-homed 112 overview 9 planning 102 deployment (continued) reverse proxy 116 scalability 118 security 113 split tier 119 updating 11 web application servers 109 web servers 111 deployment scenario complex 125 diagram 125 deployment scenarios desktop client to server 122 Desktop Intelligence 34 Desktop Intelligence Cache Service 47 Desktop Intelligence Processing Service 48 Desktop Intelligence Scheduling Service 48 Destination Delivery Scheduling Service 42 diagram. desktop (continued) Translation Manager 37 Universe Builder 38 Universe Designer 38 Web Intelligence Rich Client 39 Xcelsius 39 clustering 120 connection server 109 Connection Service 47 CORBA SSL encryption 117 Crystal Reports .1 Deployment Planning Guide .

1 Deployment Planning Guide 151 .NET SDK 74 Report Engine Java SDK 71 Report Viewers 30 Repository Diagnostic Tool 37 reverse proxy 116 L Life Cycle Management (LCM) 26 Life-Cycle Management (LCM) Life-Cycle Manager 27 List of Values Scheduling Service 46 Live Office 35 M management services 20 Multi-Dimensional Analysis Server 62 Multi-Dimensional Analysis Service 49 S scenarios 121 SDK web services 75 Search Service 44 security 82 Central Management Server (CMS) 82 plug-ins 83 Server Intelligence 26 servers Adaptive Job Server 51 Adaptive Processing Server 52 Central Management Server 53 Connection Server 55 contrast with services 39 Crystal Reports Cache Server 55 Crystal Reports Processing Server 56 Dashboard Analytics Server 57 N network IPv6 117 nodes 39 O Output Filestore Service 43 P plug-ins security 83 processing services 22 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3. 77 Query as a Web Service (QaaWS) Service 44 R Replication Service 44 Report Application Server (RAS) .Index J Java BusinessObjects Enterprise Java SDK 70 JavaServer Faces (JSF) SDK 72 Report Application Server (RAS) Java SDK 71 Report Engine Java SDK 71 Viewers Java SDK 72 Java web application servers 70 JavaServer Faces (JSF) SDK 72 Program Scheduling Service 43 Publishing Post Processing Service 43 Publishing Service 44 Publishing Wizard 35 Q Query as a Web Service 36.NET SDK 75 Report Application Server (RAS) Java SDK 71 Report Conversion Tool 36 Report Engine .

1 Deployment Planning Guide .Index servers (continued) Dashboard Server 57 Desktop Intelligence Cache Server 58 Desktop Intelligence Job Server 58 Desktop Intelligence Processing Server 59 Event Server 59 File Repository Servers 60 Input File Repository Servers 60 Job Servers 61 List of Values (LOV) Job Server 62 Multi-Dimensional Analysis Server 62 nodes 39 Output File Repository Servers 61 PM Metrics Server 63 PM Repository Server 63 PM Rules Server 64 Predictive Analysis Server 64 Process Analysis Server 65 Program Job Server 65 Publication Job Server 66 Report Application Server 66 Sets Profile Server 67 Sets Query Server 67 Web Application Container Server 68 Web Intelligence Server 68 services Business Process BI Service 40 categories 40 Central Management Console Service 41 Central Management Service 41 Client Auditing Proxy Service 41 Connection Service 47 contrast with servers 39 Core Services 40 Crystal Reports 45 Crystal Reports Cache Service 45 Crystal Reports Processing Service 45 Crystal Reports Scheduling Service 46 Crystal Reports Viewing and Modification Service 46 Desktop Intelligence 47 Desktop Intelligence Cache Service 47 services (continued) Desktop Intelligence Processing Service 48 Desktop Intelligence Scheduling Service 48 Destination Delivery Scheduling Service 42 Event Service 42 Input Filestore Service 42 List of Values Scheduling Service 46 management 20 Multi-Dimensional Analysis Service 49 Output Filestore Service 43 Performance Management 49 processing 22 Program Scheduling Service 43 Publishing Post Processing Service 43 Publishing Service 44 Query as a Web Service (QaaWS) Service 44 Replication Service 44 Search Service 44 storage 21 Voyager 49 Web Intelligence 50 Web Intelligence Processing Service 50 Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service 51 web services 19 Web Services SDK 44 single sign-on 82 split tiers 119 storage services 21 T Translation Manager 37 U universe 80 Universe Builder 38 Universe Designer 38 UNIX deployment 103 152 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.

Index V Viewers Java SDK 72 views 81 Voyager 31 W wdeploy 28 Web Application Container Service (WACS) 78 web application servers 69 .1 Deployment Planning Guide 153 .NET 73 Java 70 Web Intelligence 32 Web Intelligence Processing Service 50 Web Intelligence Rich Client 39 Web Intelligence Scheduling and Publishing Service 51 Web Intelligence Server 68 web services 19. 75 Query as a Web Service 77 Web Services SDK 44 what's new 8 Windows deployment operating systems 103 workflows 86 X Xcelsius 39 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.

Index 154 BusinessObjects Enterprise XI 3.1 Deployment Planning Guide .

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