~ ..

AYS

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ORIGINAL COMPOSITIONS PLUS WHO CAN I TURN TO TRANSCRIBED ITE-FOR-NOTE FROM HIS RECORDINGS

CONTENTS

FUNNY MAN ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 40

("Further Conversations With Myself"-Verve lp 6·8727)

ONE FOR HELEN . . . . . . . .. 14

("Bill Evans Trio At Montreux Jazz Festival"-

Verve lp 6·8762-this version actually transcribed

from Town Hall concert tapes)

ONLY CHILD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 28 ("Simple Matter Of Conviction"-Verve lp 6-8675)

ORBIT ~: -:'. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 24

("Simple Matter Of Conviction"-Verve lp 6·8675

under title Unless It's You)

TURN OUT THE STARS

("Bill Evans At Town Hall"-Verve lp 6·8683)

WHO CAN I TURN TO

(When Nobody Needs Me) 33

("Bill Evans At Town Hall"-Verve lp 6·8683)

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Immon man, like the digital computer, is a sum of his experiences - what is put in comes out in some way at

lime. The artist is not a common man and, like art, is han the sum of his parts.

in point: William John Evans, b. Aug. 16, 1929; began o studies at 6, violin at 7, flute at 13; graduated South-

I Louisiana College. 1950; joined Herbie Fields band, rrny. 1951-54; various playing jobs in New York City,

· , post-graduate study, Mannes College, 1955; first trio rding, 1956; joined Miles Davis Sextet, J959; formed own

I· late 1959; recipient of several jazz awards, including eat International Jazz Critics Poll and Readers Poll; o NARAS Grammy awards for best jazz album of the Conversations with Myself (1964) and Bill Evans at the lUX Jazz Festival (1968).

w, if you add all that up, you won't get Bill Evans, not if you add the following authoritative statements:

's is the first genius of the piano since Art Tatum." : d Fcat her )

.. the revolution that has come to jazz piano." ~ Lccs)

I one of the most influential musicians in jazz today." orgenstcrn)

nen Bill Evans is in town, one goes not to listen so much worship." (Brian Priestly)

Ips what 15 needed to find all of Bill Evans is some commcntarv on his work:

· I pulse and harmonic movement arc immensely slow ullads ]. the middle register chords scrunchily sensuous,

Icing warrn , the. texture .envcloPing; Yet through and is int rove r t cd q u ic t t hc mclodic lines tloat and soar the treble. insinuate 1I1 the tenor range, and ocnaliv reverberate in the bass. Evan'; abi litv to make

Iline." speak' on the piano is of e.x t raurdina~y subtlety; · 'avs the sensuousness leads not to passivuv but to rrr The dancc-l iit flows into xpri ng-l ik e song;' the in.ist iblv invcm ivc c roxv-rbvt b mx and counter melodies are

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never rebarbative, always supple and in that sense songful. Even when Evans plays quick numbers ... the rhythmic zest provokes song ... " (English composer, critic, and historian Wilfrid Mellers, in his book Music in a New Found Land)

"Evans has brought piano jazz forward to a new plateau of lyrical beauty. He has a touch of phenomenal gentleness, a fine facility with the pedals for dynamic contrast, and most important of all, an ability to voice chords so ingeniously that the placemenjcofjhenotes, the question of which notes are doubled, which struck softly and which heavily, may be far more important than the basic identity of the chord." (Leonard Feather, in his revised The Book of Jazz)

"When he plays, it is like Hemingway telling a story.

Extraneous phrases are rare. The tale is told with the strictest economy, and when it is over, you are tempted to say, 'Of course, it's so simple. Why didn't I think of that.' He is, in essence, a synccdochist, an artist who implies as much as he plays. And moving all his music, coloring every note, is that deep, rhythmic, almost religious feeling that is the seminal force of jazz." (Don Nelsen, in Down Beat)

And, if I may, a few abstracts from reviews I've written of Evans' work in the last few years:

"In Evans' music, mind and heart become one. His finelace improvisations are webs of finely spun steel- strongly structured but flexible and open to the sun's light. His work, particularly on ballads, slithers through a maze of unexpected twists and turns, revealing a complex mind and staunch heart at play .. He has the knack of turning over-played tunes into quite personal musical excursions that give the impresxion that this is the first time he's ever explored the pieces. He exposes new facets that lend such vitality to the tunes that the listener begins to wonder if these are the same tunes he's heard over and over through the years ... He tenderly unravels the threads that make up the material and then reweaves them into a stunning tapestry of color and movement His voicing of chords (the epitome of clar i ty ) is at the root of his ability to draw so much tonal beautv from his

instrument Evans' fine touch brings a delicate lightness to lush passages that if played with one degree less artistry would be cheap and melodramatic; by measuring and controlling his emotion, Evans turns such passages into art. (He hps an uncanny sense of when to pull up on the rcins.) "

But maybe we're looking in the wrong places for Bill Evans.

He is a man of no mean intellectual ability, an articulate and analytical man, well-read, well-educated. If anyone knows what Bill Evans is all about, it should be Bill Evans. Perhaps if he went all the way back, he might reveal something

"My older brother, Harry, played a big part in influencing me throughout my life," Bill said recently. "He was the first one to take .piano lessons, and it was my mimicking him that led to my playing. I always sort of worshipped him. In sports, I always tried to keep up with him, even though he was two years older and very athletically inclined. The same way with piano. He started playing trumpet (our parents made us take a secondary instrument) in a high school rehearsal band and got interested in playing jazz. One day the piano player got the measles: I went to the rehearsal and read the stock arrangement exactly as written- exactly, and you know what they're like. I think I was about 12. But this was the thing: though I could play masterpieces on the piano and had a good technique and could play them musically, I couldn't play Mv Country 'Tis of Thee without the music. There was no way I could make music. I'd developed a very good reading abi l it y and was very happy in the pleasure I got from playing great piano pieces.

"Anyway, they decided to keep me. Then one night we were playing Tuxedo Function, and for some reason I got inspired and put in a little blues thing. Tuxedo I unct ion is in B-flat, and I put in a little D-flat, D, F thing, bing! in the right hand. It was such a thrill. It sounded right and good, and it wasn't written, and I had done it. The idea of doing something in nusic that somebody hadn't thought of opened a whole new vorld to me."

Evans' interest in jazz stems from that night.

He said that he was fortunate in getting with a group of ilder players shortly after his dance-band debut. The leader )f the older group was Buddy Valentino, but it was bass olayer George Platt whom Evans names as the man who .ielped him most at the early stage of the game.

"He knew chord changes very well," Evans recalled, "and rnderstood harmony and wrote arrangernentsi.and had. tbe )atience of Job, I guess, because he called chord changes to me for a year and a half without ever saying, 'Haven't you learned them yet?' Finally, instead of thinking of them as solated changes, I worked out the system on which traditional theory is based: I just used numbers-I, 5, 6, and so on-and began to understand how the music was put together.

"Also the band was more of a jazz band than the high school band. I had to play solos. On some of the jobs, the people expected to hear jazz, so I just dived in and tried it. [ have recordings from the very beginning that show I was very clear in what I was doing. I've always preferred to play something simple than go all over the keyboard on something

wasn't clear about. Back then, I would stay within the triad." He told of playing four or five nights a week throughout his high school days (and falling from straight A's in his freshman vear to D's in his senior year) and working resort jobs in ~ew Jersey during the summer. In addition to this practical experience. the young musician became deeply immersed n jazz.

'I was buying all the records ... anybody from Coleman :'lawkins to Bud Powell and Dexter Gordon. That was when : first heard Bud, on those Dexter Gordon sides on Savoy. heard Earl Hines very early and, of course, the King Cole

'rio. Nat, I thought, was one of the greatest, and I still do. think he is probably the most under-rated jazz pianist in .e history of jazz.

"I'd play hookey from school and hear all the bands at the aramount in New York or the Adams in Newark. Or we'd '/ to sneak in the clubs on 52nd St. with phony draft cards. st to hear some jazz. I got a lot of experience with insight

. at way.

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"Now, in retrospect, I think it was a good thing I didn't have a great apt itude for mimicry. though it made it very difficult for me at the time because I had to work very hard to take things apart. I had to build mv whole musical style. I'd abstract musical principles from people I dug, and' I'd take their feeling or technique to applv to things the way that I'd built them. But because I had to build them so meticulously, I think, worked out better in the end, because it gave me a complete understanding of everything I was

doing." 1

Evans has been paying learning dues ever since he hit that minor third on Tuxedo function. He tells of learning to accompany when he was with Herbie Fields, of studying music of all kinds when he was younger, of sitting in with other musicians around the country, of learning to be flexible so he could play with any kind of rhythm section, of doubling between the Fifth Army Band at Ft. Sheridan (in which he played flute and piccolo) and jazz clubs in nearby Chicago (the doubling almost killed him, which teaches one a lot about one's self). He undoubtedly still brings something home each night that he wants to ponder and analyze and perhaps add to his playing arsenal.

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Where does it end) Where does he want to go)

"L'd just like to go forward," he answered. "Forward by replacing what I'm doing with something better. And that's the hang-up, you see. The hang-up also is that whatever you try to learn, you learn very fast at first and then the learning gets slower and you're up against an almost impenetrable wall, and the next sixteenth of an inch takes an enormous effort. I'd like to be changing every night, have something absolutely new every night.

"I don't feel I'm cramped by a style; I'm cramped by rn; own limitations. I'm free to do anything I want with my trio, but I believe in quality - I try to play something that: good, that's a complete product. I might jump out into, new area, a free area, but this doesn't last long, because 1 have to have something that offers a wider scope crnot ionallj to express myself in.

"I really believe in the language of the popular idiom, the song, and this has come out of not just our culture but all 01 history, especially the traditional jazz idiom. It's the experi ence of millions of people and of conditions which are im· possible to take into consideration. But I'd rather deal with some thing ·as_.real as that than anything that is merely arbitrary, such as playing without chords, bar lines or form.

"Now, if I could take the feelings and experience I have from this traditional idiom and somehow extend it to another area of expression - whether it's 'free' or not - to continuously progress with it, that I would like to do. I want everything to have roots - and not only that, but that it express something that has esthetic value. I don't want to' express just my feelings - all my feelings aren't interesting to everybody. My everyday frustrations are not all interesting, and I don't want to hear about anybody else's. I want to put in music something that will enrich somebody. I'm the first one, of course, to be enriched when I discover it, and that's the reason for doing it really.

"My creed for art in general is that it should enrich the soul; it should teach spiritually by showing a person a portion of himself that he would not discover otherwise. It's easy to rediscover part of yourself, but through art you can be shown part of yourself you never knew existed. That's the real mission of art. The artist has to find something within himself that's universal and which he can put into terms that are communicable to other people. The magic of it is that art z-an communicate this to a per'son without his realizing it.

"Enrichment, that's the function of music."

Despite Evans' analysis, despite the explanatory attempts of crit ic s. despite the piecing together of data, you will not find Bill Evans on pieces of paper. You will find-Bill Evans in his music. Catch him - if you can.

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-Don DeMicheal

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rranscribed from BILL EVANS AT TOWN HALL - Verve 6-8683

TURN OUT THE STARS

Ad lib - Rubato

BO E7

Music by BILL EVANS

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1~ Copyright S~.. _ M_~;" U.s.;r~ . Y.

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. · Note: This version was transcribed from tapes of Bill Evans' Town Hall Concert, February 21,1966, For purposes of comparison,

rested that the advanced piano student listen to the version recorded on BILL EVANS TRIO AT MONTREUX JAZZ FESTIVALVerve 6-8762 to hear the way the tune developed.

THo© Copyright 1968 and 1969 LUDLOW MUSIC, INC., New York, N. Y. I"sem4lio...u Copyright Sectlrea Made in U.s.~.

All Rights Reserved Including Public Performance For Profit

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~;: ~ ~ ~: ~ ~== ~ == == == ~h l- I-
· .
· - f\ I ~ .. • ~~"f:.~
/
I
, @) --..
< ~~~ ~ ~ l~l: .- .. ~ I~l 1:--- -=
l.i~ I:;- != ~ ~
· I

I

I

*

I

*Bass solo and drum solo omitted.

I

L.__3__J

f\ 1 I 2
. 1
~~ .
.
~r I .
~J. r -i' r I
, ---. b._'-"'n I-t.n.
· . L • I..~
T. - t--~ 6..
1
.
.
1 I

31

I I I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I

f\ 1
'J ~. I
I~ . :
1 i'"
1 ~ --u:::::::: L-. ~ ro °
1~"9 .
, ,9- -t---.- ~: _-# r~o
° .iI.
l · 0 l- I. °
h I
0 .
0
l 1 111
.JL
I [;l( >'L I
~ 0 !
~ 0
°
q:: ~ 0
:: "1- " ....
I 0 ~:: :: -t J---J
0 ~.
f\ I I I ~ I
~
I 0 ° ~I 1
~ "~
.
~ l' ! T'V-! ~
j V'I
0 . .0. -' ~o ,~
0 -"#'---(7- 1 c~ ~
0
-" f\ I 1 1 "I
171 I I I r.'\
I~
4!J ".
~ 0 .§. Ill!' _,.
~"- .. o b- ro"- .. '" -I
I · t;;.
"_ 0
._0
9 ~ f\ r.'\
, 4! ~ =~~- .. _.
( -. ~ . =j:."ir.:-ii ~-.t~-;
~ · rr.
I
9
0 I t

rranscribed from SIMPLE MA ITER OF CONVICTION - Verve 6-8675 under ririe Unless It's You

ORBIT

I

I

t.

Music by BILL EVANS

Gm9

E+7

Am9

D9

Gmaj7

G+7 3

em7

F+7

Ii I r--. --,
.
@) ~ "I-P': .. Iq1f~'1 T~~ ~ ,:;;D ~f 1 I ~
< v~
------ ~ tt..-b r-3l---, I~b~b
I .
.
~ ~ ....._-- I ------ - r I ~ I

I

Bbmaj7 Bb+7

Ebm9 Ab +7

Db maj? Db+7

F#m6

D+7

Ii I I I _l .1. j
. ·
·
·
,.u rJ F-' V e.. ., ~ V-'-P-:= V ~ f!P' T
I: ,... I..J IoIJ L I C -J ..It:> .~

I ~ Gm7 Bb7

Ebmaj7 F#+7

Bm7 Eb+7 Ab rn?

B+7

fI I r'l 1 _j I\-
J~
Ie.. e.. c.. " . " c.. +1'- ~
I: I': l... ~ ~ _b bp. ~~ _j
, .
~ flo- I I

Emaj7 G+7 °r7 E"'+-7 Am9 C+7 Fmaj9 A 7
I_ i. I ~
;1
vc.; " ~ .,- .,- - .,-
I!I u. be: bQ ..LeL ~ (]ia_ I~
\'
~ ., c.. I

C#m7

F+7

Bbm7

Ab rnaj? Dbmaj7

Gbmaj7

C+7

I . " . .i - r--3'--'1
'~ ·
· ·
· ·
· ·
I ., .,
I· b •• ~~ ~. •• fr i 1
I ,"'-I r I I I

~ © Copyright 1967 and 1969 LUDLOW MUSIC, INC, New Yorio, N, v, InleNJ4Iio1JiJJ Copyright Secured MlUie in U.s.A,

All Rights Reserved Including Public Performance For Profit

I

Fm9

E~maj7

A~maj7

D~maj7

G7

Cm6

I

25 I

1\ I I .--31---, *
·
I . ·
· I-Pi:
@) •• c. · .... ~ r
I.
~
~ . I I bJ 1. . e-
I · . .
· . .
.
•• --- 1 ffi 1.1 3

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

fI 1 .........r'"'1 ~ ot_ .. (~~ .. ~ :_-t---
I
@) • L-3-' - I -
(
/ . n\. IF- 1_1!7 .1!7 ~n hn "
I ·
·
1\ I ~ ~ --
I j""ooooIlI
@)
( ll~-P- ~ J J
~. br1*:' . .-._
· 1\ I ~ ~ I ,.-3, 3.- ~ ·1 b. L I it. ~_
@) 3 --- ~ 'J1 --.T ~ ~
<
- -_ -. &p_ il~ (~Je-
~ ~ I£- fL' .p.io" II.
·
·
- f\ I ~ • fl 1"'"'"'1 I ~.- ~ ~
@) '~ 3'"' ... .,
~ jp_ h~~ qi
en hn rP l_"fr 119-
·
· 1'\ ~I r--3 --, - .~ .~
.-
I@) ., --=:: ~ -
< ~
~n ~_p. -e- -e- -e- n----n
·
· *Bass solo omitted.

I

26

,J~ I ~ .-3-, ~ r-3j' _;-3' r+,
- 3 ,.__
I ., ~ .. " .. -# " l::J..-J _....
bn -e- ~n - .,P-
I:
III - ,.__ ~3-'
I
I ,.. 3
I,n L
I

I I II r--.1 --, 3 3 ~ .L- ~ -
_I.e ,...-,
, I ~ - rl'-# -:r- '"
-P- ~
.. --~- £T
• I I

3

3

I

27 I

1\ I - ~ L ---~. -

I
@) ., ~ .. -J V 3- 'V
liT bn ~: ~~ fl-
·
· I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

_I

11! ~ A 0;-3,. 3 _3
I
@) 3- -. ., OT'"'~ ..
<
17 iT r: 12 ~- -
I ·
·
1'1 I . ~ -fL1*-. ,.-- 3 -, .---3, J *
. .
@) ~~ ~ ':" . . ~ 3 "-j-J .,
<
:"n bQ -fr
·
· Lli
. .
@) ~ ~~ CL .. ~Y~1 " ... • ~It ~r; rr~ " 0- 1~!7-
--....:::::l ~'
I . ~ _ . ~. " -. ~. I h"
~ ·
·
~ ------~ r ..__... v 1\ ! I I I I_
@) 0 "r ~'F V'" -1 ~ ~ r ., ~--.::: ~ " Co
- ~- I~ -<, I f7 ~ .> ---_
·
·
-41! -fi . I I

1'\ I rr. (~bf t!)
,
i!~ "~ 'v 'C; ~ c; ., ~ IIv ~o
II ( ~)..., ..., "- k L r.-.
·
·
\
I ~ ~c.. -6 -
"0 *1 chorus of melody omitted.

Music by BILL EVANS

Bb majs

I
I
I
I Ad lib. F9 transcribed from SIMPLE MATTER OF CONVICTION - Verve 6-8675

ONLY CHILD

Bbmaj7

Bb dirn

F(b9)

F9

F+7

I

Cm9

Cdim7

EmIl

Dm7

Gm7

Fm9

A7

f'I L
I~ .
.
I ~ 411 f: , ~~ -t ~ l' C,.I. ., !~rer "r
I: , I I I I kJ 1

I "D I r qe r

r

I

Dbmaj7

Fmaj7

F6

Gm7

C9

Em7

A7

D

Fdim7 D~7

Ebm9

Ab Bbm7

I

I

"fRO © Copyright 1966 and 1969 LUDLOW MUSIC, INC.. New York. N. Y. inJernaJlOnaJ Copyright Secured Made in U.S.A.

All Rights Reserved Including Public Performance For Profit

Gb maj?

Ab9

I

29 I

Abm9 Db7

Fll

F+

f\ I I
I .
@) ~ ~ r "~ Il· ~ f ~r ~~ II. -¥ ~
< l_24 I
/ ~
· .
I ·
I I I r r f\ I
/
I .
. "; ...
,~ ~#i5 f .~' ... • I~#~ bI POl ~I :p-
I I I I I I
·
·
1+P r ~ ~u_ -r r
F~6

r uj s

F+7

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

r

Ab maj? Ab9

G+7

Cmaj7

AmI I Ab9

C7

f\ I I I I
.
I@) ~ t f ~-r- qVy • I ~ p 19- 19- ,,_
<
U I Ib~ I L I I
·
·
I r r r r r I I I ~r f\ I a tempo __..., - I (---3-, I
/
..
.
14!J ~ -:J.---'" • - ... :-' :s- f I~
~ J -- ~~ - •... ~-
I ~ ,. I.
·
·
\ GO
r r c. f\ I I I ~ 1 .-3. ~
.
I
4!J 1 F-" f'" ~ I
U J I rifT g .~ ~ .. ;: t .f-
t-
o
0 f\ I _ r----3__'1 I
. 0
0 Ivr~-1-
@) -
bis: t:l; ,bSI=-n-; ~I~; ~ i J ~ 1lJ:.d
·
0 I r

(\1 ~ I
·
~@) ·
·
·
I - -.,. -.,. l' T
~ ~~~~ kI~ .-. t-n Ip,q~~ I":~
• ~ I. ..-- ....... ~ 11.1'1 ~ P-
I :
I

f' hn - h,., ;;:-3---'
- ..
, v
#q~~~ .iI~; #£ r-n jJ. .. _~. ~ i1ae- I.~~ ~~
.... I-Af e-
I :
I

I

i

I (\ I - -----J. h I I ... I I. I
, \;~ .
.
3 I ,~:=4lj. ~
I.:Z;;~ ~a I. ; ,j
I. b-
I

~ I -,,--J. J r 1 T l \
, · .
.
· .
lI' I 1.~d1 Iwrr-u .,
;=::- ... C'fT b~ I.~ ,~
j ~
{I: •
'I 1 I t

Ih (2nd time rit.) 2nd time Fine
I ... :i 3 .-.1"" r-.1-' f"31 ,3-,
. .
.
~ I '1 I~ I, r,· .. .._ ~ .. • -. I ~
-J J. .P- ~j
_--
I:
I I ~ I I

I

3

3

3

I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I

f\ I '-3-, ,....., r- .':1-. ~ • h. ---...._
/ .
\ -~ --y 1 I' ~ S-I
I
j ~ q~ 1$ .~~ Iw~ $: I~ $
·
\ f\ I ~ ,.1l". .fL • I. • .fL :r: F tt ~ . L
I
\ @) - 3
< f: C~ ~j ]I~ ~b.s ~q.,
..
·
· f\ I .PI. --- I - I I I I I'- ~~ _ "'"
L@) 3 -
< q~ ~ ~I- ,b l-
I ih~.' tj'
·
· w::::I -... I 3_ I ~ a,.. ~
/\ I
\ @) - - .

~ J j IJ I~
) ~ J: r~
· .
· I f\ I ~ ~-~~ . .. ~ ~ 3
\@J ., - -r 'l ~.
I. .b...&: 1-0:: .. ~: V :0.
l · .
· .
.. I I

I. I r+:
~I l .,
.
~ '-' -
~ 1
@) :g: ~ .. Io:g:
L.~ g
~.
T'
7-v 3-,

I

1, ... ~. ~ ~~~ !'- ~ ~-
I --
tr
lL --- -3
@J .- t--- Pj: ---
IL: k I~ ~G~ .J:: b~ - . r:-
.

7'
\ I

~. . .. f:.
'I ' ~~ .. - - .
[1 ..... - - -
".
I@J 3 I b of- 12.-=
'L ~t_ .:S~ L~: -t

L
, ~ f:.~~ .. 1,. -
.. - --
~I
il: r ......
3 - .. -~., -.
ph..c: r--i9- I.~
I: bt p~ I. 111-: ~--: '''~ ~
. .
. .
7' r
['" I

I

D. S. al FineJS

I I

I

33

I

transcribed from BILL EVANS AT TOWN HALL - Verve 6-8683

from the David Merrick-Bernard De lfont production "THE ROAR OF THE GREASEPAINT-The Smell Of The Crowd"

Piano Arrangement by Bill Evans

WHO CAN I TURN TO (When Nobody Needs Me)

By LESLIE BRICUSSE and ANTHONY NEWLEY

1,

3

Ebmaj7

I I

Ad lib.

1'\ I .-3-, 3 :- ~ .-::::::::---...
- ..-....... ·
·
I ·
·
U :t.~.-¥ .. l...,..J I I =::
< .. "f'" 1'- f. f:.
- "f'"
~ .
.
- 1 I I - I I

Fm

Fm9

Bb

,

I I

(

)

)

1\ I '--"'0
@) ~ --- __ _- .. .. ~
1'-~ .. ...---... "f'"f:.f.f:."f'" ~ • ,
-
·
·
3 ~ 3 -....01 I

Moderately ad lib., but with a feeling of 2

Eb+ Cm Fm+ Bb7 Eb C7 Fm7 Gmll Bbm7

Dbmaj7

I I

1\ I I ~ I r-, I 4 ,
)~ ~ .. , .. r ., ~i • II~ v~ ______ #,
I J J J
I I 1 I I ,
·
· -" .~-
, I I iT
I r r

I I

Ab maj?

Gm9

Cm7

I I

" I I ~ I 1--- T r-,I ,
,
.
} 4~ . r ~r
e J ~ '"'" - T i
i cd bo-- -0
· F 7

F 9

Ab 7

I I

I

m 1m m m
f\ I I ~ I I ~ _j_ ] I I
It; ., ~ ~
'I Vi r:
i ~ J J----__d ~4 ad
. I -
. .
. . .
[J' ~ .. c..' I I

© Copyright 1964 Concord Music Ltd., London, England

"fRO MUSICAL COMEDY PRODUCTIONS, INC., New York, controls all fights for the U.S.A. and Canada ImernationaJ Copyright Secured Made in U.S.~.

All Rights Reserved Including Public Performance For Profit

I

I

-----

Ebmaj7

.

.

F#m

.1 .•

Eb maj?

Fm7

Abmaj7

Ab9 Fm9 E7

Cm7

F7

f' J 1 ., j I - ., I I l 1 j I I I 1
·
I ~ I I ,J I "r r r
I· bJ· ---- J bj ~ j ., ., J.
·
·
--- .,~ G. f+G. I

F#¢7

Eb - I J Fm7 Bb7 Eb9 ~
1 ~ ., ! 11 •• -_- ~ --..
.
I a tempo'f ... I ,,-- I "-r'
.--:= ~. 1".' J. b) -J
I: ,J.'~ ~i:: H- .J.f: ~ ~
c F s: ~
.
-
II IWIfI"" I

I

-------------------------_.

35

I I I I I I I I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I

f\ I r-3---, "'-3~
· .
· ·
·
· ·
@) I I I.. 1 I - , - f1• r r
~ 3- r
~ ~o il2o: ;-0
·
· f\ I ~ j_ I J ~ 1 I I"
I 'I
@; I "'!- ~- , . "r
f ~f b.-: t-Q bb~ -I- r- 3----,
1= L • ~ ~ JipL _k_- t:-L, L..-E-
·
· r-3----,

f\ I -.--... · . .-.. ...---.. - --- I ~ I
· · .
. · · . .
. · · .
@; r I v>: I r , r ' '"-"
~:-} ~: ~ ~~~~d~ ~~. ##~ ~~ .. ~~f:; 8t:: ~
,-I :- ~ :
· ·
· 1\ I ~ ........
( .
-
~ @) .
I I - r , - r-
, 1= ~ l -~" ....... ~- _kf: L..~
• 1= ~ ~
·
·
" f\ I ..-- ~ ~ ..A. ..A.
.
·
· r r I 10'
~ r "p-r , ._.. I I
::J: ~r
---- -f'- 1*- • -. Lbe: L ~J:
I :t:---# ~. k ....... h.
· . ·
· I r: *
f\ I e./ I r l --- ..
.
. ·
. ·
~ I r I " I ) ~ J...J '. ....
~a: ~#~!~ bL..~t t"--_. .~~ b ~ t-;9-
1=: f: LF ~
· ·
· *Bass solo omitted.

• fI I * ~fL~. ...",----- ~~~
~
~ 'f I I ........
~~t~ r---- •• f~ ~~ ~,. rf9-
s::;a ••
~ :---= ...... 5' flII.-: ~: ... ~a:
· · . .
· · .
I I

11'1 I ~,_ r». 1'-~~ • I
·
I~ - - - ---
f: t: I ~ :c: :c: r,. II- ~
II- r,.~
I: I

I

I f\ I ~ ~ .. ~
f I """" r- ~
\ :±/~ .~ ~ I t ~ ,;_
._
I ·
· ! rass solo omitted.

I

I

\ }

i

e:~~~. _. t ~ .i!"-
1\ I - ..
-@j 3- ....... L3__J
~l I: ,~II=. l..1 (" t-.I ~'-4~ t 1,-1 1 f l f c4~.f_

·
·
\
L- __J 3

37 I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I I

" I ~ r= ~ ~ ~ !'-.:f!:- ~ !'- .. ~ " • - . -.I •
1 @) 3 - -
f f f c4' A 'f J
·
·
, " I _. ~ .. - __
tU _.. -.. J ~ r
:f t ~~ b' ~-!- lit.. .~,.-f:: 1 I
.
·
· I

L-3--'

I

Illf'I I ~ ~~L~ ~ ~ . ~ I.
Ir -# 3 3 3 -
f ~.--= ....... ~f
~I : .. l"- f I ,kl~ 11" T ~: ,

- I

I I

I

39 I

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I

I.

.. ~ ---- ~ :~
( o ~ ~#- •
::r-=+- .-.. ~ -
_II, -
- L I 1 J 1."..01 I L J I I I • ~ ......_
) ~
~l
< r=: 3--' ,~:f: ,d_
J ~ '= bl: l:_
~
I ~:-T A· '~.i'-'" - . _ ..
·-.r7 . ..;.'
- - ~ ~ .-.-t'-_ ..-.. • ..A. ~ .l. - ...
11.1 --
I ~ I - ~
r t I -
~ , r r
~ ~t; !..f- t--,., ~~; .-:. :-- .. ,~ ~ r--~
,kH: t: ~ ~ -'"
----.: t-: . .
I~: . . . .
.
I ad lib.

I

FUNNY MAN

I

Music by BILL EVANS

Slow 4

I I

I Gm7

f%G

Ebmaj7 q7
Fm7-6 (Bm7 Bbm'l A+l1) Ab maj? ~7b5 G7b9
p=------ 1r?: -s;: t Gr r F I r d r I r E ~
]
I I F7b9 Eb+7 Db+7 Gb rnaj?
I¥b Cm7 Bbm7 Abm7 Bmaj7
F j V E ~ I r· j } I F F j V E r I e I
:J
I
Fm7 B7 Bb 7 +5 Ebmaj7 BO Cm7 EO
I~b& 4 3
j J ---i ~ J. } I F J d #J II f 0 J.: ±~
• ~
@)
I
Fm7 c7b9 Fm7 F#o Gm7 Cm7 B+7 Em7 D9

Grnaj? Cmaj7( #4) Fm7 C+7 Fm7 Bb+7 Eb6 (EO Fm7 Bb+7)
r I I d"'C It ~r I r? 1----.., II
§v I§~J Q Gr r· V E1 I

(Also as a bright 2 beat)

, b Eb BO Cm7 EO

~~ I/~ ~ ~ JQJ bid bid:

Fm7

!! J

I

c7b9 Fm7 Bb7

j I J j tJ b)>- En

Ilete .

etc.

I I

THO © Copyright 1967 LUDLOW MUSIC, INC., New York, N. Y.

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