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Intellectual Property Notices, Disclaimers, and Terms of Use Applicable to the User Documentation. The legal notices, disclaimers, terms of use, and other information contained herein (the “terms”) apply only to Sourcefire, Inc. appliance discussed in the Documentation (“Documentation”) and your use of it. The terms do not apply to or govern the use of Sourcefire's web site or Sourcefire's appliance discussed in the Documentation. Sourcefire appliances are available for purchase and subject to a separate license containing very different terms of use. Terms Of Use and Copyright and Trademark Notices The copyright in the Documentation is owned by Sourcefire, Inc., and is protected by copyright pursuant to US copyright law, international conventions, and other laws. You may use, print out, save on a retrieval system, and otherwise copy and distribute the documentation solely for non-commercial use, provided that (i) you do not modify the documentation in any way and (ii) you always include Sourcefire's copyright, trademark, and other notices, as well as a link to, or print out of, the full contents of this page and its terms. No part of the documentation may be used in a compilation or otherwise incorporated into another work, or be used to create derivative works, without the express prior written permission of Sourcefire, Inc. Sourcefire, Inc. reserves the right to change the Terms at any time, and your continued use of the Documentation shall be deemed an acceptance of those terms. Sourcefire, the Sourcefire logo, Snort, the Snort logo, 3D Sensor, Intrusion Sensor, Intrusion Agent, Realtime Network Awareness, RNA Sensor, Defense Center, Master Defense Center, Success Pack, and 3D System, are trademarks or registered trademarks of Sourcefire, Inc. All other trademarks are property of their respective owners. © 2004 - 2010 Sourcefire, Inc. All rights reserved. Liability Disclaimers THE DOCUMENTATION AND ANY INFORMATION AVAILABLE FROM IT MAY INCLUDE INACCURACIES OR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. SOURCEFIRE, INC. MAY CHANGE THE DOCUMENTATION FROM THE TIME TO TIME. SOURCEFIRE, INC. MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES ABOUT THE ACCURACY OR SUITABILITY OF THE SOURCEFIRE, INC. WEB SITE, THE DOCUMENTATION, AND/OR ANY APPLIANCE OR INFORMATION. SOURCEFIRE, INC. PROVIDES THE SOURCEFIRE, INC. WEB SITE, THE DOCUMENTATION, AND ANY APPLIANCE OR INFORMATION “AS IS” AND SOURCEFIRE, INC. DISCLAIMS ANY AND ALL EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO WARRANTIES OF TITLE OR THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND/OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. IN NO EVENT SHALL SOURCEFIRE, INC. BE LIABLE FOR ANY DIRECT, INDIRECT, INCIDENTAL, SPECIAL, EXEMPLARY, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES (INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO PROCUREMENT OF SUBSTITUTE GOODS OR SERVICES, LOSS OF DATA, LOSS OF PROFITS, AND/OR BUSINESS INTERRUPTIONS), ARISING OUT OF OR IN ANY WAY RELATED TO THE SOURCEFIRE, INC. WEB SITE, THE DOCUMENTATION, AND/OR ANY SOFTWARE OR INFORMATION, NO MATTER HOW CAUSED AND/OR WHETHER BASED ON CONTRACT, STRICT LIABILITY, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTUOUS ACTIVITY, OR ANY OTHER THEORY OF LIABILITY, EVEN IF SOURCEFIRE, INC. IS ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. BECAUSE SOME STATES/JURISDICTIONS DO NOT ALLOW THE EXCLUSION OR LIMITATION OF LIABILITY FOR CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, THE ABOVE LIMITATIONS MAY NOT APPLY TO YOU. The Documentation may contain “links” to sites on the Internet that are not created by, or under the control of Sourcefire, Inc. Sourcefire, Inc. provides such links solely for your convenience, and assumes no responsibility for the availability or content of such other sites. 2010-Jul-12 13:56

Table of Contents

Chapter 1:

Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System............................. 14
Components of the Sourcefire 3D System......................................................... Real-time Network Awareness (RNA).................................................... Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) ......................................................... Real-time User Awareness (RUA) .......................................................... PEP Traffic Management ....................................................................... Defense Centers.................................................................................... Master Defense Centers ....................................................................... Intrusion Agents..................................................................................... RNA for Red Hat Linux........................................................................... RNA and IPS for Crossbeam Systems................................................... eStreamer .............................................................................................. 15 15 16 17 17 17 19 19 20 20 20

Logging into the Appliance ................................................................................. 21 Logging into the Appliance to Set Up an Account .............................................. 23 Logging Out of the Appliance ............................................................................. 24 Last Successful Login......................................................................................... 25 Specifying Your User Preferences ...................................................................... Changing Your Password ....................................................................... Configuring Event View Settings ........................................................... Setting Your Default Time Zone ............................................................. Specifying Your Home Page................................................................... Specifying Your Default Dashboard........................................................ 25 25 27 34 35 35

Using the Context Menu .................................................................................... 36 Documentation Resources ................................................................................. 37

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Documentation Conventions .............................................................................. 38 Platform Requirements Conventions ..................................................... 38 Access Requirements Conventions ....................................................... 39 IP Address Conventions...................................................................................... 41

Chapter 2:

Performing the Initial Setup .................................................... 43
Setting Up 3D Sensors ....................................................................................... 44 Setting up Defense Centers ............................................................................... 47 Communication Ports ......................................................................................... 50 What’s Next? ...................................................................................................... Administrator User Tasks....................................................................... Maintenance User Tasks........................................................................ Policy & Response Administrator User Tasks ........................................ RNA Event Analyst User Tasks .............................................................. Intrusion Event Analyst User Tasks........................................................ 52 53 54 55 56 57

Chapter 3:

Using Dashboards..................................................................... 59
Understanding Dashboard Widgets.................................................................... 60 Understanding Widget Availability ......................................................... 61 Understanding Widget Preferences ...................................................... 64 Understanding the Predefined Widgets ............................................................. Understanding the Appliance Information Widget................................. Understanding the Appliance Status Widget......................................... Understanding the Compliance Events Widget..................................... Understanding the Current Interface Status Widget ............................. Understanding the Current Sessions Widget ........................................ Understanding the Custom Analysis Widget......................................... Understanding the Disk Usage Widget ................................................. Understanding the Interface Traffic Widget ........................................... Understanding the Intrusion Events Widget.......................................... Understanding the Network Compliance Widget .................................. Understanding the Product Licensing Widget ....................................... Understanding the Product Updates Widget......................................... Understanding the RSS Feed Widget .................................................... Understanding the System Load Widget............................................... Understanding the System Time Widget .............................................. Understanding the White List Events Widget ....................................... Working with Dashboards .................................................................................. Creating a Custom Dashboard............................................................... Viewing Dashboards .............................................................................. Modifying Dashboards........................................................................... Deleting a Dashboard ............................................................................ 65 66 67 67 68 69 69 80 81 81 82 84 85 86 87 87 88 89 89 91 93 97

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Chapter 4:

Using the Defense Center........................................................ 99
Management Concepts .................................................................................... 100 The Benefits of Managing Your Sensors.............................................. 100 What Can Be Managed by a Defense Center? .................................... 101 Understanding Software Sensors ........................................................ 105 Beyond Policies and Events .................................................................. 111 Using Redundant Defense Centers ..................................................... 112 Working in NAT Environments.......................................................................... 112 Working with Sensors ...................................................................................... 113 Understanding the Sensors Page ........................................................ 115 Adding Sensors to the Defense Center ................................................ 117 Deleting Sensors ................................................................................. 121 Resetting Management of a Sensor .................................................... 122 Managing a 3Dx800 Sensor................................................................. 125 Adding Intrusion Agents ...................................................................... 130 Sensor Attributes - Intrusion Agent Page............................................. 130 Managing Sensor Groups ................................................................................. Creating Sensor Groups....................................................................... Editing Sensor Groups ......................................................................... Deleting Sensor Groups....................................................................... Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings .................................................. Viewing a Sensor’s Information Page .................................................. Stopping and Restarting a Managed Sensor ....................................... Managing Communication on a Managed Sensor............................... Setting the Time on a Managed Sensor .............................................. 131 131 132 133 133 135 137 138 139

Managing a Clustered Pair ................................................................................ 140 Establishing a Clustered Pair ............................................................... 142 Separating a Clustered Pair.................................................................. 144 Configuring High Availability ............................................................................. Using High Availability.......................................................................... Guidelines for Implementing High Availability ..................................... Setting Up High Availability .................................................................. Monitoring the High Availability Status ................................................ Disabling High Availability and Unregistering Sensors......................... Pausing Communication between Paired Defense Centers ................ Restarting Communication between Paired Defense Centers ............ 145 145 149 150 152 153 154 154

Chapter 5:

Using the Master Defense Center........................................ 156
Understanding Event Aggregation.................................................................... Aggregating Intrusion Events............................................................... Aggregating Compliance Events.......................................................... Limitations on Event Aggregation........................................................ 157 158 158 159

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Understanding Global Policy Management....................................................... Managing Global Intrusion Policies ...................................................... Using RNA Detection Policies on a Master Defense Center ............... Using Health Policies on a Master Defense Center............................. Using System Policies on a Master Defense Center ........................... Master Defense Center Policy Management Limitations .................... Adding and Deleting Defense Centers ............................................................. Adding a Master Defense Center ........................................................ Adding a Defense Center..................................................................... Deleting a Defense Center .................................................................. Resetting Management of a Defense Center ...................................... Editing Settings for a Managed Defense Center .............................................. Viewing the Defense Center Information Page ................................... Editing the Event Filter Configuration .................................................. Editing or Disabling Remote Management Communications .............. Managing the Health Blacklist ............................................................. Managing High Availability Defense Centers ....................................... Managing Appliance Groups............................................................................. Creating Appliance Groups .................................................................. Editing Appliance Groups..................................................................... Deleting Appliance Groups .................................................................. Editing Master Defense Center System Settings ............................................. Listing Master Defense Center Information ........................................ Viewing a Master Defense Center License ......................................... Configuring Network Settings.............................................................. Shutting Down and Restarting the System.......................................... Configuring Remote Management Networking................................... Setting System Time............................................................................ Blacklisting Health Policies...................................................................

161 161 162 162 162 163 164 165 168 171 171 175 175 176 178 178 178 179 180 180 181 181 182 182 182 182 183 183 184

Using the Appliances Page ............................................................................... 173

Chapter 6:

Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets...................... 185
Understanding Detection Engines .................................................................... 186 Understanding Detection Resources and 3D Sensor Models ............. 189 Understanding Default Detection Engines .......................................... 191 Managing Detection Engines............................................................................ Creating a Detection Engine ................................................................ Editing a Detection Engine .................................................................. Deleting a Detection Engine ................................................................ Using Detection Engine Groups ....................................................................... Creating Detection Engine Groups ...................................................... Editing Detection Engine Groups......................................................... Deleting Detection Engine Groups ...................................................... 193 193 194 197 197 197 198 199

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Using Variables within Detection Engines ........................................................ Assigning Values to System Default Variables in Detection Engines... Creating New Variables for Detection Engines .................................... Deleting and Resetting Variables ......................................................... Configuring Custom Variables in Detection Engines ........................... Using Portscan-Only Detection Engines .............................................. Using Interface Sets ......................................................................................... Understanding Interface Set Configuration Options............................ Creating an Interface Set ..................................................................... Creating an Inline Interface Set ........................................................... Editing an Interface Set ....................................................................... Deleting an Interface Set ..................................................................... Using Interface Set Groups .............................................................................. Creating Interface Set Groups ............................................................. Editing Interface Set Groups................................................................ Deleting Interface Set Groups .............................................................

199 200 202 203 204 205 207 207 213 216 221 223 223 224 224 225

Inline Fail Open Interface Set Commands ........................................................ 225 Removing Bypass Mode on Inline Fail Open Fiber Interfaces ............. 225 Forcing an Inline Fail Open Interface Set into Bypass Mode ............... 226 Using Clustered 3D Sensors............................................................................. Using Detection Engines on Clustered 3D Sensors ............................ Understanding Interface Sets on Clustered 3D Sensors ..................... Managing Information from a Clustered 3D Sensor ............................ 227 228 229 230

Chapter 7:

Working with Event Reports.................................................. 232
Working with Event Reports............................................................................. 234 Working with Report Profiles............................................................................ 234 Generating Reports from Event Views ............................................................. 235 Managing Generated Reports........................................................................... Viewing Generated Reports................................................................. Downloading Generated Reports......................................................... Deleting Generated Reports ................................................................ Moving Reports to a Remote Storage Location................................... Running Remote Reports .................................................................... Understanding Report Profiles.......................................................................... Understanding the Predefined Report Profiles .................................... Modifying a Predefined Report Profile................................................. Creating a Report Profile...................................................................... 237 238 238 239 239 240 241 242 246 246

Working with Report Information ..................................................................... 248 Using Report Types.............................................................................. 250 Defining Report Information ................................................................ 254

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Working with Report Sections .......................................................................... Using Summary Reports...................................................................... Including an Image File ........................................................................ Defining the Report Sections............................................................... Using a Report Profile ....................................................................................... Generating a Report using a Report Profile ......................................... Editing Report Profiles ......................................................................... Deleting Report Profiles.......................................................................

255 255 257 258 260 261 263 263

Working with Report Options ........................................................................... 258

Chapter 8:

Managing Users ...................................................................... 264
Understanding Sourcefire User Authentication ................................................ Understanding Internal Authentication ................................................ Understanding External Authentication ............................................... Understanding User Privileges ............................................................ Managing Authentication Objects .................................................................... Understanding LDAP Authentication ................................................... Creating LDAP Authentication Objects ................................................ LDAP Authentication Object Examples ............................................... Editing LDAP Authentication Objects .................................................. Understanding RADIUS Authentication ............................................... Creating RADIUS Authentication Objects............................................ RADIUS Authentication Object Examples ........................................... Editing RADIUS Authentication Objects .............................................. Deleting Authentication Objects .......................................................... Managing User Accounts ................................................................................. Viewing User Accounts........................................................................ Adding New User Accounts................................................................. Managing Externally Authenticated User Accounts............................. Managing User Password Settings...................................................... Configuring User Roles........................................................................ Modifying User Privileges and Options ............................................... Modifying Restricted Event Analyst Access Properties....................... Modifying User Passwords.................................................................. Deleting User Accounts ....................................................................... User Account Privileges....................................................................... 264 266 266 267 269 269 269 281 286 287 287 295 298 298 299 299 300 302 303 304 306 307 311 312 312

Chapter 9:

Managing System Policies .................................................... 320
Creating a System Policy .................................................................................. 321 Editing a System Policy..................................................................................... 323 Applying a System Policy .................................................................................. 324 Deleting System Policies .................................................................................. 325

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Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy..................................................... Configuring the Access List for Your Appliance ................................... Configuring Audit Log Settings ............................................................ Configuring Authentication Profiles ..................................................... Configuring Dashboard Settings .......................................................... Configuring Database Event Limits ..................................................... Configuring Detection Policy Preferences ........................................... Configuring DNS Cache Properties...................................................... Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address ..................... Configuring Intrusion Policy Preferences ............................................. Specifying a Different Language .......................................................... Adding a Custom Login Banner ........................................................... Configuring RNA Settings .................................................................... Configuring RNA Subnet Detection Settings ....................................... Configuring RUA Settings .................................................................... Synchronizing Time .............................................................................. Mapping Vulnerabilities for Services....................................................

325 325 327 329 331 332 336 337 338 339 340 341 342 349 352 354 358

Chapter 10:

Configuring System Settings ................................................. 360
Viewing and Modifying the Appliance Information ........................................... 362 Understanding Licenses ................................................................................... Understanding Feature Licenses ......................................................... Verifying Your Product License ............................................................ Managing Your Feature Licenses ......................................................... 364 366 368 370

Configuring Network Settings........................................................................... 377 Editing Network Interface Configurations......................................................... 380 Shutting Down and Restarting the System....................................................... 382 Configuring the Communication Channel ......................................................... 383 Setting Up the Management Virtual Network...................................... 384 Editing the Management Virtual Network............................................ 385 Configuring Remote Access to the Defense Center ........................................ 386 Setting the Time Manually ................................................................................ 389 Blacklisting Health Modules.............................................................................. 391 Specifying NetFlow-Enabled Devices ............................................................... 392 Managing Remote Storage............................................................................... Using Local Storage ............................................................................. Using NFS for Remote Storage ........................................................... Using SSH for Remote Storage ........................................................... Using SMB for Remote Storage .......................................................... 393 393 394 395 396

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Chapter 11:

Updating System Software.................................................... 398
Installing Software Updates.............................................................................. Updating a Defense Center or Master Defense Center ...................... Updating Managed Sensors ................................................................ Updating Unmanaged 3D Sensors ...................................................... 400 402 404 406

Uninstalling Software Updates ......................................................................... 409 Updating the Vulnerability Database................................................................. 410

Chapter 12:

Using Backup and Restore .................................................... 413
Creating Backup Files ....................................................................................... 414 Creating Backup Profiles ................................................................................... 418 Performing Sensor Backup with the Defense Center ....................................... 419 Uploading Backups from a Local Host .............................................................. 420 Restoring the Appliance from a Backup File ..................................................... 421

Chapter 13:

Scheduling Tasks .................................................................... 425
Configuring a Recurring Task ............................................................................ 426 Automating Backup Jobs .................................................................................. 428 Automating Software Updates ......................................................................... Automating Software Downloads ........................................................ Automating Software Pushes .............................................................. Automating Software Installs............................................................... Automating Vulnerability Database Updates .................................................... Automating VDB Update Downloads................................................... Automating VDB Update Pushes......................................................... Automating VDB Update Installs ......................................................... 430 431 433 435 437 438 440 442

Automating SEU Imports.................................................................................. 444 Automating Intrusion Policy Applications.......................................................... 446 Automating Reports.......................................................................................... 448 Automating Nessus Scans................................................................................ 450 Preparing Your System to Run a Nessus Scan..................................... 450 Scheduling a Nessus Scan................................................................... 451 Synchronizing Nessus Plugins .......................................................................... 452 Automating Nmap Scans .................................................................................. 454 Preparing Your System for an Nmap Scan ........................................... 454 Scheduling an Nmap Scan ................................................................... 455 Automating Recommended Rule State Generation.......................................... 456

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Viewing Tasks ................................................................................................... 458 Using the Calendar .............................................................................. 459 Using the Task List............................................................................... 460 Editing Scheduled Tasks ................................................................................... 461 Deleting Scheduled Tasks ................................................................................. 461 Deleting a Recurring Task .................................................................... 462 Deleting a One-Time Task.................................................................... 462

Chapter 14:

Monitoring the System ........................................................... 463
Viewing Host Statistics..................................................................................... 464 Monitoring System Status and Disk Space Usage ........................................... 468 Viewing System Process Status ....................................................................... 468 Understanding Running Processes................................................................... 471 Understanding System Daemons ........................................................ 471 Understanding Executables and System Utilities ................................ 473 Viewing IPS Performance Statistics.................................................................. 476 Generating IPS Performance Statistics Graphs ................................... 476 Saving IPS Performance Statistics Graphs .......................................... 478 Viewing RNA Performance Statistics................................................................ 478 Generating RNA Performance Statistics Graphs ................................. 479 Saving RNA Performance Statistics Graphs ........................................ 481

Chapter 15:

Using Health Monitoring ........................................................ 482
Understanding Health Monitoring .................................................................... Understanding Health Policies ............................................................. Understanding Health Modules ........................................................... Understanding Health Monitoring Configuration ................................. Configuring Health Policies ............................................................................... Predefined Health Policies ................................................................... Creating Health Policies ....................................................................... Applying Health Policies....................................................................... Editing Health Policies ......................................................................... Deleting Health Policies ....................................................................... 483 484 485 489 489 490 497 528 530 533

Using the Health Monitor Blacklist ................................................................... 534 Blacklisting Health Policies or Appliances ............................................ 535 Blacklisting a Health Policy Module ..................................................... 537

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Configuring Health Monitor Alerts .................................................................... Preparing to Create a Health Alert ....................................................... Creating Health Monitor Alerts ............................................................ Interpreting Health Monitor Alerts....................................................... Editing Health Monitor Alerts .............................................................. Deleting Health Monitor Alerts ............................................................

539 540 540 542 543 544

Chapter 16:

Reviewing Health Status........................................................ 545
Using the Health Monitor ................................................................................. 545 Interpreting Health Monitor Status ...................................................... 547 Using Appliance Health Monitors ..................................................................... Interpreting Appliance Health Monitor Status ..................................... Viewing Alerts by Status...................................................................... Running All Modules for an Appliance ................................................. Running a Specific Health Module....................................................... Generating Health Module Alert Graphs.............................................. Generating Appliance Troubleshooting Files........................................ Working with Health Events ............................................................................. Understanding Health Event Views ..................................................... Viewing Health Events......................................................................... Understanding the Health Events Table............................................... Searching for Health Events................................................................. 547 549 549 550 551 553 554 555 556 556 561 563

Chapter 17:

Auditing the System................................................................ 566
Managing Audit Records .................................................................................. Viewing Audit Records......................................................................... Suppressing Audit Records.................................................................. Understanding the Audit Log Table...................................................... Searching Audit Records...................................................................... 566 567 570 574 575

Viewing the System Log ................................................................................... 578 Filtering System Log Messages .......................................................... 579 Using Four-Digit Year Formats on the 3D3800 ..................................... 581

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....................................................................................................................................................................... 629 Version 4........................................................... 600 Viewing the Task Queue ...............................................................Table of Contents Appendix A: Importing and Exporting Objects ............................................ Exporting an Intrusion Policy............................................................................................................................................................................ Exporting a Health Policy ............................... 584 584 585 585 586 586 588 588 588 589 590 Importing Objects ......... 598 Viewing the Status of Long-Running Tasks .................. Exporting a System Policy.................. 583 Exporting Objects ........ 600 Managing the Task Queue ......................................................................................... Exporting a Dashboard....................................... 603 Index .......................................................................... Exporting a User-Defined RNA Detector....................................................................................................9............................. Exporting a Custom Workflow.................................................................................................................................... Exporting Multiple Objects ................... Exporting an RNA Detection Policy................................................ 593 Appendix B: Appendix C: Purging the RNA and RUA Databases............................................................1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 13 ....... Exporting a Custom Table ....................... Exporting a PEP Policy .................................................. 602 Glossary ........................................................................

Logging into the Appliance to Set Up an Account on page 23 explains how to set up an association between a external user account and a set of credentials on the appliance. Sourcefire 3D System has the tools you need to: • • • discover the changing assets and vulnerabilities on your network determine the types of attacks against your network and the impact they have to your business processes defend your network in real time The topics that follow introduce you to the Sourcefire 3D System and describe some of the key components that contribute to its value as a part of any security strategy for your network. • • • Version 4. • • • Components of the Sourcefire 3D System on page 15 provides descriptions of each of the components that may be in your Sourcefire 3D System.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 14 . and event viewing preferences. Logging Out of the Appliance on page 24 explains how to log out of the web interface. Specifying Your User Preferences on page 25 explains how to configure the preferences that are tied to a single user account.9.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Chapter 1 Administrator Guide tn The Sourcefire 3D System™ provides you with real-time network intelligence for real-time network defense. Logging into the Appliance on page 21 explains how to access the web interface on your appliance and log in using one of the user accounts. account password. such as the home page. dashboard. time zone. Using the Context Menu on page 36 explains how to display a context-specific menu of shortcuts on certain pages in the web interface.

As RNA passively observes traffic. Components of the Sourcefire 3D System The topics that follow introduce you to the Sourcefire 3D System and describe some of the key components that contribute to its value as a part of any security strategy for your network. using information from detected packets to build a comprehensive map of the devices on the network.9. and traffic profiles to protect your company’s infrastructure by monitoring network traffic for unusual patterns or behavior and automatically responding as needed.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Components of the Sourcefire 3D System Chapter 1 • • • Documentation Resources on page 37 explains where to locate specific information about using the Defense Center. it compiles the following information: • • • the number and types of network devices running on your network the operating systems running on monitored network devices the active services and open ports on monitored network devices Version 4. RNA monitors traffic on your network. You can set up compliance policies. IP Address Conventions on page 41 explains how the Sourcefire 3D System treats IP address ranges specified using Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) notation.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 15 . • • • • • • • • • Real-time Network Awareness (RNA) on page 15 Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) on page 16 Real-time User Awareness (RUA) on page 17 Defense Centers on page 17 Master Defense Centers on page 19 Intrusion Agents on page 19 RNA for Red Hat Linux on page 20 RNA and IPS for Crossbeam Systems on page 20 eStreamer on page 20 Real-time Network Awareness (RNA) Sourcefire Real-time Network Awareness (also called RNA) is one of the components of the Sourcefire 3D System that you can use on your 3D Sensor. You must use a Defense Center to manage a 3D Sensor if it is running RNA. listening to the network segments you specify. Documentation Conventions on page 38 explains typeface conventions used throughout the guide to convey specific types of information visually. compliance white lists.

RNA assigns vulnerabilities to the host based on the operating system vendor and version detected for the host. which is a record of the date. system. RNA builds a host profile for each host it detects. For more information. integrity. system.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Components of the Sourcefire 3D System Chapter 1 • • the vulnerabilities and exploits to which monitored network devices may be susceptible flow data. and contextual information about the source of the attack and its target. you can examine the packets that traverse your network for malicious activity. You can also create custom intrusion rules tuned to your environment. 3D Sensors that are licensed to use IPS include a set of intrusion rules developed by the Sourcefire Vulnerability Research Team (VRT). You can access host profiles by browsing the network map or through one of the workflows Sourcefire provides to aid your analysis. By placing 3D Sensors on key network segments. it generates an intrusion event. containing host details such as detected operating system. and preprocessors to look for the broad range of exploits that attackers have developed. the type of exploit. and RNA detection policies to your sensors. services. if applicable. In a Sourcefire 3D System deployment that includes 3D Sensors with IPS and a Defense Center. and intrusion policies to your sensors. Each 3D Sensor uses rules. and assigned host attributes.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 16 .The Defense Center can also push health. a copy of the packet or packets that triggered the event is also recorded. see What Can Be Managed by a Defense Center? on page 101. 3D Sensors with IPS run preprocessors against detected network traffic to normalize traffic and detect malicious packets. When a 3D Sensor identifies a possible intrusion. Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) The Sourcefire Intrusion Prevention System (also called IPS) is one of the components of the Sourcefire 3D System that you can run on the 3D Sensor. IPS allows you to monitor your network for attacks that might affect the availability. the sensors transmit events and sensor statistics to the Defense Center where you can view the aggregated data and gain a greater understanding of the attacks against your network assets. You can push software Version 4. In addition. and protocols. You can push vulnerability database (VDB) and software updates from the Defense Center as well. 3D Sensors running RNA transmit the network map. time. or confidentiality of hosts on the network.9. and sensor statistics to the Defense Center so you can see a consolidated view of events. as well as the service and protocol used and. event and flow data. which are records of active sessions involving monitored network devices including the frequency and size of the session. decoders. The Defense Center can also push health. For packet-based events. You can choose to enable rules that would detect the attacks you think most likely to occur on your network. the client application and URL involved in the session You can access event views and graphs to analyze this collected data.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 17 . RUA enables you to implement and enforce policies specific to individuals. you must use the Defense Center to manage them. Sourcefire recommends that you use only the Defense Center’s web interface to interact with the sensor and its data. IMPORTANT! The Sourcefire 3D Sensor 3800. PEP allows you to create rules to block. Note that a 3D Sensor running Version 4. The network protocol used by your organization to provide user authentication largely determines the amount of data and efficiency of RUA. If your 3D Sensor is running IPS. See Using Sourcefire RUA in the Analyst Guide for more information about RUA. You can analyze and respond to events from all your sensors consistently by doing the analysis through an interface where you can see all the data collected by the managed sensors. analyze. As a result. PEP traffic management enhances the sensor’s efficiency by allowing you to pre-select traffic to cut through or to drop instead of analyzing. departments. you can configure your 3D Sensor to drop or replace packets that you know to be harmful. For more information. You can apply these policies and rules across the Sourcefire 3D System. If you have software sensors or Intrusion Agents on your network. or other user characteristics. PEP Traffic Management PEP is a technology based on the hardware capabilities of the 3D9900 Sensors.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Components of the Sourcefire 3D System Chapter 1 updates from the Defense Center to sensors as well. Real-time User Awareness (RUA) The Real-time User-Awareness component (also called RUA) allows you to create policies and response rules that are user-based. and 3D Sensor 9800 models (usually referred to a the 3Dc800 sensors) do not have a web interface. 3D Sensor 6800. Note that if you do manage your 3D Sensors with a Defense Center. you can also use a local web interface to create intrusion policies and review the resulting intrusion events. see What Can Be Managed by a Defense Center? on page 101.9. You can also push policies created on the Defense Center and software updates to managed sensors. If you deploy your 3D Sensor inline on your network and create what is called an inline detection engine. or send traffic directly through the 3D9900 with no further inspection. You must manage these models with a Defense Center. Defense Centers The Defense Center provides a centralized management interface and database repository for the Sourcefire 3D System.

the Defense Center correlates threat.9. Impact correlation lets you focus in on attacks most likely to damage high priority hosts. DC500s also have an RNA host limit of 1000. IMPORTANT! You cannot use DC500s in high availability configurations. Version 4.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Components of the Sourcefire 3D System Chapter 1 the IPS component includes its own local web interface. attacks.500 thousand default and 2. You can rack mount a DC1000 and collect data from a large number of 3D Sensors. Key DC1000 database quantities are: • • • Intrusion Events . endpoint.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 18 . you must manage the sensor with a Defense Center.1 million default and 10 million maximum RNA Flows . If you deploy Real-time User-Awareness (RUA). the Defense Center correlates intrusion events from IPS with host vulnerabilities from RNA and assigns impact flags to the intrusion events. If you use your Defense Center to manage 3D Sensors that run RNA and IPS (either on the same sensor or different sensors that monitor the same network segments). You can use either DC1000s or DC3000s in high availability configurations.5 million maximum RNA Flows . and network intelligence with user identity information so that you can identify the source of policy breaches.2 million default and 10 million maximum DC1000 You can use DC1000 Defense Centers in most environments. DC500 You can use the DC500 model of the Defense Center in managed services environments to collect data from up to three 3D Sensors. Key DC500 database limits are: • • • Intrusion Events . The DC500 receives data at an aggregate rate of up to 100 intrusion events or 900 flow events per second.1 million default and 10 million maximum RNA Flow Summaries . or network vulnerabilities. but if you want to use RNA on the sensor. You can configure a DC3000 as a Master Defense Center during the initial setup.1 million default and 10 million maximum RNA Flow Summaries . A DC3000 allows you to use higher database quantities.2 million default and 10 million maximum DC3000 You can use DC3000 Defense Centers in high-demand environments.

1 million default and 100 million maximum RNA Flows .1 million default and 10 million maximum RNA Flow Summaries .1 million default and 10 million maximum RNA Flows . Key Virtual Defense Center database quantities are: • • • Intrusion Events .1 million default and 100 million maximum RNA Flow Summaries .2 million default and 100 million maximum Virtual Defense Center Virtual Defense Centers are hosted on VMware’s ESX/ESXi or Xen virtual machines. You cannot use a Virtual Defense Center in high availability configurations or as a Master Defense Center. Intrusion Agents If you have an existing installation of Snort®. see the Sourcefire 3D System Virtual Defense Center and 3D Sensor Installation Guide. Although you cannot manage policies or rules for an Intrusion Agent from the Defense Center. the Defense Center Version 4.9. you can do analysis and reporting on those events. If the network map on the Defense Center has entries for the target host in a given event. compliance events. In this way.2 million default and 10 million maximum Master Defense Centers The Sourcefire Master Defense Center is a key component in the Sourcefire 3D System. You can use the Master Defense Center to aggregate and analyze intrusion events. and white list events from up to ten Defense Centers within your Sourcefire 3D System deployment. You can manage up to 25 physical and Virtual 3D Sensors with a Virtual Defense Center. For more information. You can then analyze the events detected by Snort alongside your other data. See Using the Master Defense Center on page 156 for more information about managing your Defense Centers with a Master Defense Center.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Components of the Sourcefire 3D System Chapter 1 Key DC3000 database quantities are: • • • Intrusion Events .1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 19 . The Master Defense Center can also aggregate events related to the health of the Defense Centers it is managing. you can view the current status of the Defense Centers across your enterprise from a single web interface. you can install an Intrusion Agent to forward intrusion events to a Defense Center.

IMPORTANT! Because the 3D Sensor Software for X-Series does not have a web interface. you display network host data within one of your network management applications. If. you must use a Defense Center to manage it. but allows you to request specific data from a Defense Center. RNA and IPS data received by a Defense Center from a Crossbeam-based software sensors is treated in a similar way to data received from a 3D Sensor. Separate installation and configuration guides are available for the 3D Sensor Software for X-Series. RNA data received by a Defense Center from the server is treated in a similar way to RNA data received from a 3D Sensor that is running RNA.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 20 . You can continue to manually tune Snort rules and preprocessors with the Intrusion Agent in place. IMPORTANT! You must have a Defense Center in your Sourcefire 3D System deployment to use RNA for Red Hat Linux. IMPORTANT! When using Intrusion Agents registered to Defense Centers configured for high availability and managed by a Master Defense Center. register all Intrusion Agents to the primary Defense Center. RNA and IPS for Crossbeam Systems The Sourcefire 3D System currently supports software-only versions of RNA and IPS for Crossbeam Systems X-Series security switches. eStreamer You can access event data within your own applications through the eStreamer Application Programming Interface (API). you could write a program to retrieve host criticality or vulnerability data from the Defense Center and add that information to your display.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Components of the Sourcefire 3D System Chapter 1 assigns impact flags to the events. See the Sourcefire RNA Software on Red Hat Linux Configuration Guide for more information. eStreamer integration requires custom programming.9. Version 4. RNA for Red Hat Linux The Sourcefire 3D System currently supports a software-only version of the RNA component on your server hardware running Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (RHEL5) or CentOS 5. See the eStreamer Integration Guide for more information. for example.

RNA for Red Hat Linux.9.5. and analysis tasks. If your 3D Sensor is licensed for IPS.0 Microsoft Internet Explorer 8. Intrusion Agents.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Logging into the Appliance Chapter 1 Logging into the Appliance Requires: Any The Defense Center and many 3D Sensor models have a web-based interface that you can use to perform administrative. You must use the Defense Center’s web interface to manage these sensors. If this occurs. and Virtual 3D Sensors) do not have a web interface.0 TIP! Some processes that take a significant amount of time may cause your web browser to display a message that a script has become unresponsive. you are presented with a more complete web interface that you can use to perform additional configuration and event analysis. The initial setup process is described in Setting Up 3D Sensors on page 44. you must log in using the admin user account. make sure you allow the script to continue until it finishes. management. Version 4. Note that 3Dx800 and software sensors (Crossbeam-based software sensors.x Required Enabled Options and Settings JavaScript cookies Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) v3 JavaScript cookies Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) v3 128-bit encryption Active scripting security setting JavaScript cookies Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) v3 128-bit encryption Active scripting security setting Compatibility View Microsoft Internet Explorer 7 .1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 21 . If your 3D Sensor is not licensed for IPS. The current version of the web interface supports the browsers listed in the following table. You can access the web interface by logging into the appliance using a web browser. Browser Requirements Browser Firefox 3. there is a limited web interface that you can use to perform the initial appliance setup and to register the sensor with a Defense Center. If you are the first user to log into the appliance after it is installed.

unless you are viewing a page (such as an unpaused dashboard) that periodically communicates with the web server on the appliance. the features that you can access are controlled by the privileges granted to your user account. If your organization uses SecurID® tokens when logging in. 2. type 1111222222. the user who performed the installation created a single administrative user account and password. IMPORTANT! Because the Defense Center and the 3D Sensor audit user activity based on user accounts. After you create other user accounts as described in Adding New User Accounts on page 300. if your pin is 1111 and the SecurID token is 222222. You must have already generated your SecurID pin before you can log into the Sourcefire 3D System. The first time you log into the appliance. append the token to your SecurID pin and use that as your password to log in. In the Username and Password fields. type your user name and password. For example.5 hours of inactivity.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 22 . Your session automatically logs you out after 3. you and other users should use those accounts to log into the appliance.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Logging into the Appliance Chapter 1 After you log into the appliance. However.9. Version 4. When the appliance was installed. the procedures for logging into and out of the appliance remain the same. The Login page appears. Direct your browser to https://hostname/. where hostname corresponds to the host name of the appliance. append the SecurID token to the end of your SecurID pin and use that as your password when you log in. To log into the appliance: Access: Any 1. you should make sure that users log into the system with the correct account. IMPORTANT! If your company uses SecurID. you should use this account.

append the token to your SecurID pin and use that as your password to log in. the appliance associates those credentials with a set of permissions by creating a local user record. If the default role for external user accounts is set to a specific access role. type 1111222222. The default start page appears. Note that when a shell access user logs into the appliance. If you click a link that requires different privileges from those granted to your account. See Specifying Your Home Page on page 35 for more information.).1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 23 . The menus and menu options that are available to you at the top of the page are based on the privileges for your user account. If your organization uses SecurID tokens when logging in. IMPORTANT! The 3Dx800 sensor models do not have a web interface. Shell users should log in using usernames with all lowercase letters.9. Version 4. externally authenticated users can log into the appliance using their external account credentials without any additional configuration by the system administrator. the following warning message is displayed: You are attempting to view an unauthorized page. the links on the default home page include options that span the range of user account privileges. periods (. If this is the case. the first time you log into the Defense Center or 3D Sensor using your external user credentials. unless they are granted through group or list membership. You can either select a different option from the available menus or click Back in your browser window. If you selected a new home page for your user account. For example. LDAP usernames can include underscores (_). use the Defense Center’s web interface to manage policies and view events. Shell access is controlled entirely through the shell access filter or PAM login attribute set for an LDAP server or the shell access list on a RADIUS server. You (or your system administrator) can then change the permissions to grant the appropriate access to user functionality. Logging into the Appliance to Set Up an Account Requires: Any Some user accounts may be authenticated through an external authentication server. you can log in but cannot access any functionality. and hyphens (-) but otherwise only alphanumeric characters are supported. it does not create a local user account. If an account is externally authenticated and by default receives no access privileges. then that page is displayed instead. Click Login. The permissions for that local user record can then be modified. if your pin is 1111 and the SecurID token is 222222. Instead.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Logging into the Appliance to Set Up an Account Chapter 1 3. However. This activity has been logged.

the default start page appears. type your user name and password.9. the Login page re-appears. contact your system administrator and ask them to modify your account privileges or login as a user with Administrator access and modify the privileges for the account. see Modifying User Privileges and Options on page 306. Click Login. This activity has been logged. where hostname corresponds to the host name of the appliance. then that page is displayed instead. IMPORTANT! If your company uses SecurID. If you continue to have difficulty accessing this device. If you selected a new home page for your user account. with the following error message: Unable to authorize access. However. 2. Logging out ends your web session and ensures that no one can use the appliance with your credentials. append the SecurID token to your SecurID pin and use that as your password when you log in. Direct your browser to https://hostname. the links on the default home page include options that span the range of user account privileges.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 24 . Version 4. 3. The page that appears depends on the default access role for external authentication: • If a default access role is selected in the authentication object or the system policy. See Specifying Your Home Page on page 35 for more information. • If no default access role is selected. You can either select a different option from the available menus or click Back in your browser window. The menus and menu options that are available to you at the top of the page are based on the privileges for your user account.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Logging Out of the Appliance Chapter 1 To create an externally authenticated account on the appliance: Access: Any 1. 4. the following warning message is displayed: You are attempting to view an unauthorized page. The Login page appears. even if you are only stepping away from your web browser for a short period of time. Logging Out of the Appliance Requires: Any Make sure you log out of the appliance. In the Username and Password fields. If you click a link that requires different privileges from those granted to your account. If you do not have access. please contact the system administrator. For more information.

month. Setting Your Default Time Zone on page 34 explains how to set the time zone for your user account and describes how that affects the time stamp on the events that you view. Specifying Your Default Dashboard on page 35 explains how to choose which of the dashboards you want to use as your default dashboard. date and year of your last login the appliance-local time of your last login in 24-hour notation host and domain name last used to access the appliance.5 hours of inactivity. You can change your password at any time. and home page preferences. this is the first page you see upon logging into the appliance. event viewing preferences. To log out of the appliance: Access: Any Click Logout on the toolbar. unless you are viewing a page (such as an unpaused dashboard) that periodically communicates with the web server on the appliance. • • Changing Your Password Requires: Any All user accounts are protected with a password. Configuring Event View Settings on page 27 describes how the event preferences affect what you see as you view events. Version 4. Last Successful Login Requires: Any The first time you visit the appliance home page during a web session.9. time zone settings.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 25 . You can see the following information about that user account last login: • • • day of the week. Specifying Your Home Page on page 35 explains how to use one of the existing pages as your default home page. See the following sections for more information: • • • Changing Your Password on page 25 explains how to change the password for your user account. including passwords. Specifying Your User Preferences Requires: Any Users can specify certain preferences for their user account. you may have to change your password periodically. you can view information about the last login session for the appliance. After setting this value. and depending on the settings for your user account. see Changing an Expired Password on page 26.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Last Successful Login Chapter 1 Note that your session automatically logs you out after 3.

A success message appears on the page when your new password is accepted by the system. 3. To change your password: Access: Any 1. Version 4. 5. Also. Changing an Expired Password Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor Depending on the settings for your user account. type your current password and click Change. passwords must be at least eight alphanumeric characters of mixed case and must include at least one numeric character. click Preferences.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 26 . If your password has exired. you must change your password. In the New Password and Confirm fields. The User Preferences page appears. Passwords cannot be a word that appears in a dictionary or include consecutive repeating characters • Click Skip to change your password later. Click Change Password. Passwords cannot be a word that appears in a dictionary or include consecutive repeating characters. type your new password. Click Change. your password can expire. Note that the password expiration time period is set when your account is created and cannot be changed. 2. In the toolbar. If you have zero warning days left. 4. if password strength-checking is enabled. To respond to the password expiration warning: Access: Any You have two choices: • Click Change Password to change your password now. passwords must be at least eight alphanumeric characters of mixed case and must include at least one numeric character. The Change Password page appears. you cannot change your password through the web interface.9. In the Current Password field.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 Note that if password strength-checking is enabled. the Password Expiration Warning page appears. IMPORTANT! If you are an LDAP or a RADIUS user.

see Event Preferences on page 27.9. see Default Workflows on page 32. click Preferences. 2. For more information. 4. Version 4. Event Preferences Use the Event Preferences section of the Event View Settings page to configure basic characteristics of event views in the Sourcefire 3D System. 6. The Event View Settings page appears. Configure the basic characteristics of event views. Click Save.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 Configuring Event View Settings Requires: Any Use the Event View Settings page to configure characteristics of event views in the Sourcefire 3D System. 5. Configure the default time window or windows. Configure default workflows. The User Preferences page appears. To configure event preferences: Access: Any 1. 3. For more information. Your changes are implemented. Click Event View Settings. In the toolbar. see Default Time Windows on page 29. For more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 27 .

Event Preferences Setting Confirm ‘All’ Actions Description Controls whether the appliance forces you to confirm actions that affect all events in an event view. you can always manually expand the sections in the packet view to view detailed information about a captured packet.expand only the Packet Text subsection • Packet Bytes . By default. allows the appliance to display host names instead of IP addresses in event views. Rows Per Page Controls how many rows of events per page you want to appear in drill-down pages and table views. see Configuring Network Settings on page 377. For more information on the packet view. the appliance displays a collapsed version of the packet view.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 The Event Preferences table describes the settings you can configure.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 28 . • None . see Using the Packet View in the Analyst Guide. Note also that for this setting to take effect. Any IPS or DC/MDC + IPS IPS or DC/MDC Requires Any Version 4. Resolve IP Addresses Whenever possible.9.expand all sections Regardless of the default setting. you must confirm that you want to delete all the events that meet the current constraints (including events not displayed on the current page) before the appliance will delete them from the database. For example. Expand Packet View Allows you to configure how the packet view for intrusion events appears.expand only the Packet Bytes subsection • All .collapse all subsections of the Packet Information section of the packet view • Packet Text . Note that an event view can be slow to display if it contains a large number of IP addresses and you have enabled this option. you must have a DNS server configured in the system settings. if this setting is enabled and you click Delete All on an event view.

links for each of these options To see these links on the packet view. When you log out and then log back in.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 Event Preferences (Continued) Setting Refresh Interval Description Sets the refresh interval for event views. Use the Default Time Windows section of the Event View Settings page to control the default behavior of the time window. sometimes called the time range.a single link that deactivates the standard text rule in only the currently applied intrusion policy. time windows are reset to the Version 4. Note that this interval does not apply to dashboards.a single link that deactivates the standard text rule in all the locally defined custom intrusion policies • Current Policy . in minutes. Note that you cannot deactivate rules in the default policies. your user account must have either Administrator access or both Intrusion Event Analyst and Policy & Response Administrator access. Requires Any Statistics Refresh Interval IPS or DC/MDC Deactivate Rules IPS or DC/MDC + IPS Default Time Windows Requires: Any The time window.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 29 . Entering zero disables the refresh option. • All Policies . you can always manually change the time window for individual event views during your event analysis. imposes a time constraint on the events in any event view. Also keep in mind that time window settings are valid for only the current session. Note that regardless of the default time window setting. Sets the refresh interval for event summary pages such as the Intrusion Event Statistics and RNA Statistics pages.9. Note that this interval does not apply to dashboards. The following graphic shows the Defense Center version of the page. • Ask . Entering zero disables the refresh option. Controls which links appear on the packet view for intrusion events generated by standard text rules.

which displays all the events generated from a specific start time (for example. RUA events. the time window expands and new events are added to the event view sliding. maintenance users. see Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide. client applications. white list events. Note that because not all event views can be constrained by time. RNA events. remediation status events. the time window “slides” so that you see only the events for the range you configured (in this example. flow data. Requires: Any The Audit Log Time Window sets the default time window for the audit log. or white list violations. host attributes. vulnerabilities. RUA users. • Requires: IPS or DC/MDC The Events Time Window sets a single default time window for (depending on the appliance) intrusion events. for the last day) • Version 4. and IPS event analysts can set health monitoring time windows. as time moves forward.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 30 . You can either use Multiple time windows. • • You can only set time windows for event types your user account can access. one day ago) to the present. There are three types of events for which you can set the default time window. services. the SEU import log. If you use a single time window. the settings for the three types of time window disappear and a new Global Time Window setting appears.9. one for each of these types of events. RNA event analysts. compliance events. Administrators and maintenance users can set audit log time windows. and event views for custom tables that can be constrained by time.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 defaults you configured on this page. Requires: DC/MDC The Health Monitoring Time Window sets the default time window for health events. There are three types of time window: • • static. as time moves forward. which displays all the events generated from a specific start time to a specific end time expanding. which displays all the events generated from a specific start time to the present. Administrators. For more information. or you can use a Single time window that applies to all events. time window settings have no effect on event views that display RNA hosts. All user types can set event time windows.

IMPORTANT! The maximum time range for all time windows is from midnight on January 1. the appliance displays all the events generated from a specific start time (for example. 1 hour ago) to the present. the time window “slides” so that you always see events from the last hour. For static time windows (enable the Use End Time check box).9. For expanding time windows (disable the Use End Time check box). The appliance displays all the events generated from a specific start time (for example. Show the Last Static/Expanding This setting allows you to configure either a static or expanding default time window of the length you specify. Time Window Settings Setting Show the Last Sliding Description This setting allows you to configure a sliding default time window of the length you specify. to the present. 1970 (UTC) to 3:14:07 AM on January 19. As you change event views. As you change event views. the time window expands to the present time. the time window stays fixed so that you see only the events that occured during the static time window. 1 hour ago). 2038 (UTC). the appliance displays all the events generated from a specific start time (for example. Version 4.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 The Time Window Settings table explains the kinds of default time windows you can configure. 1 hour ago).1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 31 . to the time when you first viewed the events. As you change event views.

For static time windows (enable the Use End Time check box). you can choose between ten different intrusion event workflows.9. the time window stays fixed so that you see only the events that occured during the static time window. Note that if your analysis continues for over 1 week before you log out. the appliance displays the Events by Priority and Classification workflow. As you change event views. the appliance displays all the events generated from midnight to the time when you first viewed the events. The appliance is configured with a default workflow for each event type. the appliance displays all the events generated from midnight to the present. each of which presents intrusion event data in a different way. based on the time zone setting for your current session. For static time windows (enable the Use End Time check box). the appliance ships with at least one predefined workflow. This means whenever you view intrusion events (including reviewed intrusion events). As you change event views. Version 4. the appliance displays all the events generated from midnight to the time when you first viewed the events. Note that if your analysis continues for over 24 hours before you log out. this time window can be more than 24 hours. The current day begins at midnight. The current week begins at midnight on the previous Sunday. based on the time zone setting for your current session. For each event type. the Events by Priority and Classification workflow is the default for intrusion events. the time window expands to the present time. For expanding time windows (disable the Use End Time check box). Current Week Static/Expanding This setting allows you to configure either a static or expanding default time window for the current week. As you change event views. the time window expands to the present time. this time window can be more than 1 week. For example. As you change event views.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 32 . Default Workflows Requires: Any A workflow is a series of pages displaying data that analysts use to evaluate events. the appliance displays all the events generated from midnight Sunday to the present. depending on the type of analysis you are performing. For expanding time windows (disable the Use End Time check box). For example. the time window stays fixed so that you see only the events that occured during the static time window.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 Time Window Settings (Continued) Setting Current Day Static/Expanding Description This setting allows you to configure either a static or expanding default time window for the current day.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 33 . As another example. Version 4. see Understanding and Using Workflows in the Analyst Guide. change the default workflow for each event type using the Default Workflows sections of the Event View Settings page. but also on your user role. For example.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 You can. on the Defense Center. For general information on workflows. on a 3D Sensor without an IPS license. The following graphic shows the Defense Center version of the Default Workflows section. Keep in mind that the default workflows you are able to configure depend not only on the appliance you are using.9. you can only configure the default workflow for the audit log. intrusion event analysts cannot set default RNA workflows. however.

select the zone (city name) that corresponds with the time zone you want to use. 4. select America. For example.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 Setting Your Default Time Zone Requires: Any You can change the time zone used to display events from the standard UTC time that the appliance uses. The Time Zone Preference page appears. if you want to use a time zone standard to North America. or Canada. it applies only to your user account and is in effect until you make further changes to the time zone. When you configure a time zone. In the toolbar. If you have changed the system clock on the appliance to use a local time zone.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 34 . select the continent or area that contains the time zone you want to use. 3. Click Time Zone Settings. Version 4. For more information about time synchronization between the Defense Center and the sensors. 5. if you want to use Eastern Standard Time. click Preferences. From the box on the left. For example. Click Save.9. From the box on the right. The time zone is set. To change your time zone: Access: Any 1. you would select New York after selecting America in the first time zone box. 2. South America. see Synchronizing Time on page 354. WARNING! The Time Zone function assumes that the default system clock is set to UTC time. The User Preferences page appears. you must change it back to UTC time in order to view accurate local time on the appliance.

4. For general information on dashboards. Restricted Event Analyst full or read-only access. To specify your home page: Access: Any 1. The User Preferences page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 35 . Your home page preference is saved. The default home page is the dashboard (Analysis & Reporting > Event Summary > Dashboards). see Using Dashboards on page 59. Version 4. IMPORTANT! User accounts with Restricted Event Analyst access cannot use the dashboard and therefore cannot specify a default dashboard. In the toolbar.9. In the toolbar. Maintenance access. Specifying Your Default Dashboard Requires: Any You can specify one of the dashboards on the appliance as the default dashboard. 2. user accounts with Policy & Response Administrator access have different options from accounts with Intrusion or RNA Event Analyst full or read-only access. The User Preferences page appears. That is. The Home Page page appears. Click Home Page. click Preferences. click Preferences. 3. If you do not have a default dashboard defined. To specify your default dashboard: Access: Any 1. The options in the drop-down list are based on the access privileges for your user account. The default dashboard appears when you select Analysis & Reporting > Event Summary > Dashboards. Click Save. who use the Welcome page.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Specifying Your User Preferences Chapter 1 Specifying Your Home Page Requires: Any You can specify a page within the web interface as your home page for the appliance. except for user accounts with Restricted Event Analyst access. or Administrator access. Select the page you want to use as your home page from the Opening Screen drop-down list. the Dashboard List page appears.

The Dashboard Settings page appears. As the name implies. and thresholding the rule.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 36 . Select the dashboard you want to use as your default from the Default Dashboard drop-down list. Note that if you try to access the context menu for a web page or location that doesn’t support the Sourcefire-specific menu. hover your pointer over one of the hotspots. A “Right-click for menu” message appears. To access the context menu: Access: Any 1. You can also view the rule documentation and edit the rule. if you access the context menu while viewing an intrusion event that was triggered by an intrusion rule. the normal context menu for your browser appears. The Rule Editor page for intrusion rules contains a hotspot over each intrusion rule. For example. Version 4. when you select Analysis & Reporting > Event Summary > Dashboards. Click Save. the Dashboard List page appears. you have a range of options that includes enabling. suppressing. If you select None. You can access the context menu on the following pages. if you access the menu while viewing an RNA event. certain pages in the web interface support a pop-up context menu that you can use as a shortcut for accessing other features in the Sourcefire 3D System. On one of the hotspot-enabled pages in the web interface.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Using the Context Menu Chapter 1 2. disabling. Click Dashboard Settings. You can then select a dashboard to view. However. Your default dashboard preference is saved. the context menu provides you with the option to view the event in a separate browser window. Using the Context Menu Requires: Any For your convenience. 3. the contents of the menu depend on the context where you access it. • • Event pages (drill-down pages and table views) contain hotspots over each event. 4.9.

Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Documentation Resources Chapter 1 2. but in an easy-to-print format. In this guide you will find information about managing RNA and IPS policies. The Documentation CD also contains copies of the Defense Center Installation Guide and the 3D Sensor Installation Guide. For example. and Policy & Response Administrators. Select one of the options by left-clicking the name of the option. configuring system settings and system policies. scheduling tasks. and 3D Sensors. 3. RNA Event Analysts. including procedural and conceptual information about user management. the following menu appears if you right-click over an intrusion event. managing user accounts. Right-click your pointing device.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 37 . The Analyst Guide contains information for Intrusion Event Analysts. In this guide you will find information about managing Master Defense Centers. A new browser window opens based on the option you selected. You can reach the online help in two ways: • • by clicking the context-sensitive help links on each page by selecting Operations > Help > Online. and intrusion data. which includes information about installing the appliance as well as hardware specifications and safety information. Documentation Resources The Sourcefire 3D System documentation set includes online help and PDF files. You can access the most up-to-date versions of the documentation on the Sourcefire Support web site (https://support. A pop-up context menu appears with options that are appropriate for the hotspot. Defense Centers. The Administrator Guide contains information specifically for administrators and maintenance users. The CD also contains copies of various API guides and supplementary material.com/).9. and IPS and RNA analysis.sourcefire. and using event reports. Version 4. which together include the same content as the online help. analyzing RNA. RUA. The Documentation CD contains a PDF version of the Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide and the Sourcefire 3D System Analyst Guide. The online help includes information about the tasks you can complete on the web interface. system management. and monitoring the health of your appliances.

All platform information is formatted with an orange typeface.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 38 . or DC3000 appliance used as a Defense Center Version 4. Refer to Platform Requirements Conventions on page 38 for the meaning of the Requires statement at the beginning of each section. DC1000. Any DC Any appliance with any combination of licenses A DC500.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Documentation Conventions Chapter 1 Documentation Conventions This documentation includes information about which Sourcefire 3D System components are required for each feature and which user roles have permission to complete each procedure. Platform requirement information for specific aspects of a feature is provided where needed. Platform Requirements Conventions The Requires statement at the beginning of each section in this documentation indicates the combination of appliance platform and licenses you need to use the feature described in the section.9. The following table defines the abbreviations used to indicate each different platform requirement: Platform and Licensing Requirement Abbreviations Requires Acronym 3D Sensor Indicates One of the following Series 1 or Series 2 sensors: • 3D500 • 3D1000 • 3D2000 • 3D2100 • 3D2500 • 3D3500 • 3D4500 • 3D6500 • 3D9900 This acronym on its own indicates that the task in question can be performed on any of these sensors even if an IPS license is not applied on the sensor and the sensor is not managed. Refer to Access Requirements Conventions on page 39 for the meaning of the Access statement at the beginning of each procedure. Virtual Defense Center.

to manage a Defense Center with a Master Defense Center. Access Requirements Conventions The Access statement at the beginning of each procedure in this documentation indicates the access role required to use the feature described in the section. The following table defines the abbreviations used to indicate each different platform requirement: Access Requirement Abbreviations Requires Acronym Admin Any Any Analyst Any except Restricted Indicates User must have the Administrator role User can have any role User can have any analyst role User can have any role except Restricted Analyst or Restricted Analyst (Read Only) Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 39 .Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Documentation Conventions Chapter 1 Platform and Licensing Requirement Abbreviations (Continued) Requires Acronym DC/MDC IPS RNA RUA Indicates A DC3000 appliance used as a Defense Center or a Master Defense Center A 3D Sensor licensed with the IPS technology An RNA license An RUA license An or conjunction indicates that the task or feature is available on either of the indicated platforms. All access information is formatted with a green typeface. A “+” conjunction indicates that the platforms are required in combination. so the Adding a Master Defense Center topic has a Requires statement of MDC + DC. For example. you can change an expired password on a Defense Center or Master Defense Center or on a 3D Sensor.9. you need both a Defense Center and a Master Defense Center. In contrast. so the Changing an Expired Password topic has a Requires statement of DC/MDC or 3D Sensor.

9. For example. a user must have the RNA Event Analyst or RNA Event Analyst (Read Only) role or the Restricted Event Analyst or Restricted Event Analyst (Read Only) role with RNA Hosts Data set to Show All Data or to show a specific search.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System Documentation Conventions Chapter 1 Access Requirement Abbreviations (Continued) Requires Acronym Any Analyst except Restricted Any IPS Indicates User can have any analyst role except Restricted Analyst or Restricted Analyst (Read Only) User must have the Intrusion Event Analyst role or Intrusion Event Analyst (Read Only) role or the Restricted Event Analyst role or Restricted Event Analyst (Read Only) role with rights to that function User must have the Intrusion Event Analyst role or Restricted Event Analyst role with rights to that function User must have the Intrusion Event Analyst (Read Only) role or Restricted Event Analyst (Read Only) role with rights to that function User must have the Maintenance role User must have the Policy & Response Administrator role User must have the RNA Event Analyst or RNA Event Analyst (Read Only) or Restricted Event Analyst or Restricted Event Analyst (Read Only) with rights to that function User must have the RNA Event Analyst role or Restricted Event Analyst role with rights to that function User must have the RNA Event Analyst (Read Only) role or Restricted Event Analyst (Read Only) role with rights to that function IPS IPS-RO Maint P&R Admin Any RNA RNA RNA-RO A “/” conjunction indicates that the task or feature is available to users with one or more of the indicated platforms. The Access setting for the procedure in the Working with the Hosts Network Map topic is Any RNA/Admin. Rule thresholding in the packet view provides an example of required combined access roles. to view the Hosts network map. You must have the Administrator role or have the Policy & Response Administrator role in combination with the Intrusion Event Analyst role or the Restricted Event Analyst role with Intrusion Events Data set to Show All Data or to show a specific search to access the packet view and set thresholding for a rule Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 40 . A “+” conjunction indicates that the platforms are required in combination.

255. without changing your user input. and standard text rules PEP CIDR notation uses a network IP address combined with a bit mask to define the IP addresses in the specified range.536 When you use CIDR notation to specify a range of IP addresses.0. Version 4.0. if you type 10. For example.0.16. but the web interface continues to display 10.0/16 IP Addresses in CIDR Block 10.2.0 Number of IP Addresses 16.216 1.255 172.0.0 10.255.Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System IP Address Conventions Chapter 1 from the packet view.777 .576 65. IP Address Conventions Requires: Any You can use Classless Inter-Domain Routing (CIDR) notation to define IP address ranges in many places in the Sourcefire 3D System.0 255.168.0 192.0.0.255.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 41 .255. the following table lists the private IPv4 address spaces in CIDR notation. As a result.0.048. For example.0.0.168. the Sourcefire 3D System uses only the masked portion of the network IP address you specified.0/8.3/8.240.0/12 192.3/8. the Sourcefire 3D System uses 10.168. including but not limited to the following: • • • • • • • • RNA detection policies custom topologies auto-assigned networks for user-defined host attributes traffic profiles compliance rules and white lists active scan targets intrusion policies.31.255.0.0/8 172.9.1.255 Subnet Mask 255. CIDR Notation Syntax Examples CIDR Block 10.2. the Access setting for the procedure in the Setting Threshold Options within the Packet View topic is IPS + P&R Admin/Admin.16.0.1. variables.0.0.0.255 192.0 255.0 172.

Introduction to the Sourcefire 3D System IP Address Conventions Chapter 1 In other words. although Sourcefire recommends the standard method of using a network IP address on the bit boundary when using CIDR notation.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 42 . the Sourcefire 3D System does not require it.9. Version 4.

see the Sourcefire 3D System Virtual Defense Center and 3D Sensor Installation Guide. Version 4.Performing the Initial Setup Chapter 2 Administrator Guide After installing your Defense Center or 3D Sensor as described in the Installation Guide and logging into the web interface for the first time. Setting up Defense Centers on page 47 explains how to complete the setup process for Defense Centers. Consult your original documentation or contact Sourcefire Support for information about performing the initial setup on those sensor models.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 43 . See the following sections for more information: • • • Setting Up 3D Sensors on page 44 explains how to complete the setup process for Series 2 3D Sensors. What’s Next? on page 52 provides detailed lists of the next tasks to be performed by each type of user. provide a rapid set up feature and a status page. Note that if you purchased your sensor prior to 2008. you are presented with a series of start-up pages.9. To perform the initial setup of a Virtual 3D Sensor. called Series 2 sensors. you may have a Series 1 3D Sensor. Newer models of the 3D Sensor.

After physically installing the 3D Sensor. If the initial setup is interrupted or if a second user logs in while it is underway. Series 2 sensors) provide a simple web form to collect information about your network environment and how you intend to deploy the sensor. and logging into the 3D Sensor’s web interface (as described in the 3D Sensor Installation Guide). the Install page appears so that you can continue the setup process. To complete the initial setup: Access: Admin 1. setting up the IP address for the management interface. enter a new password for the admin user account and for the root password for the shell account.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 44 .9. Under Change Password. in the New Password and Confirm fields. Defense Centers use the setup process in Setting up Defense Centers on page 47. the results can be unpredictable. Use the command line interface on the appliance for subsequent changes to the root password. Sourcefire strongly recommends that your password is at least eight alphanumeric characters of mixed case and includes at least one numeric character. WARNING! Prepare for the initial setup and complete it promptly after you begin. The same password is used for both accounts. These sensors include the following models: • • • • • • • • • 3D500 3D1000 3D2000 3D2100 3D2500 3D3500 3D4500 3D6500 3D9900 You can view illustrations of each model in the 3D Sensor Installation Guide to determine your sensor model. TIP! The initial change to the admin user password changes the root password for the shell account. Avoid using words that appear in a dictionary.Performing the Initial Setup Setting Up 3D Sensors Chapter 2 Setting Up 3D Sensors Requires: 3D Sensor Newer models of the 3D Sensor (that is. Version 4.

You can use the IP address of the Defense Center or. WARNING! If you select Inline with Failopen Mode when the sensor is deployed passively. Note that if you use an NTP server to set the time. If your sensor and Defense Center are separated by a network address translation (NAT) device. the IP address. you can specify the Defense Center as the sensor’s NTP server. resulting in unexpected network behavior. Under Remote Management. indicate whether you want to manage the 3D Sensor with a Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 45 . select Inline with Failopen Mode.Performing the Initial Setup Setting Up 3D Sensors Chapter 2 2. indicate how you want to set the time for the 3D Sensor. You can set the time manually or via network time protocol (NTP) from an NTP server. you may cause your network to be bridged. user-created string that you will also use from within the Defense Center’s web interface when you complete the sensor registration process. You have two options: • • If you deployed the sensor as an inline IPS using paired sensing interfaces.9. IMPORTANT! If both your Defense Center and your sensors are running current software. 3. Version 4. Note that if you are managing the sensor with a Defense Center and the Defense Center itself is set up as an NTP server. netmask. its hostname. 5. Under Detection Mode. Note that if you used the configure-network script before logging into the web interface. if your Defense Center is running current software and your sensors are running earlier software. if you specify a DNS server. this step is unnecessary as the current software will synchronize automatically. defer Defense Center management until after you complete the initial setup. 4. enter the settings that you want to use for the management IP address. specify how you want to deploy the 3D Sensor. you must also specify the primary and secondary DNS servers. Under Network Settings. Refer to Working in NAT Environments on page 112 and Adding Sensors to the Defense Center on page 117 for more information. If you deployed the sensor as a passive IDS on your network. and gateway fields are pre-populated with your settings. select Passive Mode. under Time Settings. The registration key is a single-use. Optionally.

Note that you will be prompted for the license key and an activation key. Under Recurring SEU Imports. indicate whether you want to add a product license to the 3D Sensor.com/. Select the state for adding new rules to intrusion policies as disabled or in the predefined default state. click the link to navigate to https:// keyserver. The activation key was previously emailed to the contact person identified on your support contract. Version 4. check the Enable Recurring SEU Imports check box to configure automatic SEU imports and specify the update frequency. • To use IPS functionality (either by itself or with RNA or RUA functionality). and click Add/Verify. To obtain a product license. For detailed information on adding new rules to custom policies in the default state or in the disabled rule state. If your current host cannot access the Internet. you do not need to add a product license. Skip to step 8. switch to a host that can and navigate to the keyserver web page. To add a product license. enter the license key in the license key field.Performing the Initial Setup Setting Up 3D Sensors Chapter 2 6. You can also instruct the system to reapply intrusion policies after the SEU import completes. refer to Using Recurring SEU Imports in the Analyst Guide. you must add a product license to the 3D Sensor. You will automatically create an RNA detection engine without a policy. You control licensing for RNA or RUA through the Defense Center managing the sensor. Under License Settings. Follow the on-screen instructions to generate an email containing the license file and paste it into the License field. select Update Now. 7. To queue an immediate update from the Sourcefire support site.sourcefire.9. You have two options: • To use only the RNA or RUA functionality without IPS.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 46 .

After physically installing the Defense Center. Under End User License Agreement. WARNING! Prepare for the initial setup and complete it promptly after you begin. the results can be unpredictable. See What’s Next? on page 52 for some suggestions about how to proceed after you complete these initial startup pages. remember to connect the cable to the protected management network. TIP! Applying a default policy to detection engines can take several minutes. TIP! If you used the option to connect through the management port to perform the initial setup. and logging into the Defense Center’s web interface (as described in the Defense Center Installation Guide). If you agree to abide by its provisions.Performing the Initial Setup Setting up Defense Centers Chapter 2 8. You can check the task progress at Operations > Monitoring > Task Status.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 47 . See Using Dashboards on page 59 for more information. If the initial setup is interrupted or if a second user logs in while it is underway. Version 4. A dashboard page appears after you log back in. read the agreement carefully.9. Defense Centers and Master Defense Centers provide a simple web form to collect information about your network environment and how you intend to deploy the appliance. setting up the IP address for the management interface. Setting up Defense Centers Requires: DC/MDC The first time you log in to the web interface. select the check box and click Apply. The 3D Sensor is configured according to your selections. the Install page appears so that you can continue the setup process. The appliance logs you out. You will see no intrusion events until it completes. which indicates the appliance is now operational.

enter a new password for the admin user account and the root password shell account. Under Remote Management. in the New Password and Confirm fields. if you specify a DNS server. 2. Use the command line interface on the appliance for subsequent changes to the root password. under Operational Mode. Sourcefire strongly recommends that your password is at least eight alphanumeric characters of mixed case and includes at least one numeric character.Performing the Initial Setup Setting up Defense Centers Chapter 2 To complete the initial setup: Access: Admin 1. If you select the Master Defense Center mode. For more information on the differences between the features provided by a Master Defense Center and a Defense Center. the Remote Management section becomes unnecessary and is hidden from the form. Version 4. 3. Defense Center capabilities are not a subset of a Master Defense Center. and gateway fields are pre-populated with your settings. Under Change Password. netmask. user-created string that you will also need to use when you register the Defense Center through the Master Defense Center’s web interface. IMPORTANT! If your Defense Center and Master Defense Center are separated by a network address translation (NAT) device. See Working in NAT Environments on page 112 and Adding a Master Defense Center on page 165 for more information. Note that if you used the configure-network script before logging into the web interface. The same password is used for both accounts. Under Network Settings. enter the settings that you want to use for the management IP address. defer remote management until after you complete the initial setup. The registration key is a single-use. and not 3D Sensors.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 48 . 4.9. Avoid using words that appear in a dictionary. You can use the IP address of the Master Defense Center or. see Master Defense Center and Defense Center Functional Comparison on page 159. Skip to step 5. indicate whether you want to manage the Defense Center with a Master Defense Center. the IP address. IMPORTANT! A Master Defense Center can manage only Defense Centers. its hostname. If you are installing a DC3000. TIP! The initial change to the admin user password changes the root password for the shell account. you can set the appliance to operate as a Defense Center or a Master Defense Center.

Note that if you are managing the Defense Center with a Master Defense Center and the Master Defense Center itself is set up as an NTP server. you must also specify the primary and secondary DNS servers. user-created string you used in the Defense Center’s web interface when you configured remote management. The registration key is the single-use. You can use the IP address of the 3D Sensor or. defer remote management until after you complete the initial setup. its hostname. under Sensor Registration.9. Click Add to register each newly listed 3D Sensors with this Defense Center. you should defer remote management until after you complete the initial setup. Use these fields only to register Defense Centers where you have already configured remote management by this Master Defense Center. IMPORTANT! Use this function only if you have previously installed 3D Sensors that are pending registration with this Defense Center. indicate whether you want to apply default policies. Refer to Working in NAT Environments on page 112 and Adding Sensors to the Defense Center on page 117 for more information. You can use the IP address of the Defense Center or. IMPORTANT! If your Defense Center and Master Defense Center are separated by a network address translation (NAT) device. If you are installing a DC3000 and your operational mode is Master Defense Center. user-created string used in the 3D Sensor’s web interface when you configured remote management for the sensor. you can specify the Master Defense Center as the Defense Center’s NTP server.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 49 . indicate how you want to set the time for the Defense Center. if you specify a DNS server. See Working in NAT Environments on page 112 and Adding a Defense Center on page 168 for more information. If your 3D Sensor and Defense Center are separated by a network address translation (NAT) device. Version 4. 7. You can set the time manually or via network time protocol (NTP) from an NTP server. The registration key is the single-use. the Defense Center Registration portion of the form is visible. Master Defense Center and all sensors are running current software. IMPORTANT! If your Defense Center. this step is unnecessary as the current software will synchronize automatically. Note that if you use an NTP server to set the time. Under Time Settings. if you specify a DNS server. its hostname.Performing the Initial Setup Setting up Defense Centers Chapter 2 5. 6. On Defense Centers.

If you agree to abide by its provisions. You can also instruct the system to reapply intrusion policies after the SEU import completes. select the check box and click Apply. See What’s Next? on page 52 for some suggestions about how to proceed after you complete these initial startup pages. which indicates the appliance is operational. Note that you will be prompted for the license key and an activation key.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 50 . Under License Settings. between Defense Centers and sensors.Performing the Initial Setup Communication Ports Chapter 2 8. Under Recurring SEU Imports. switch to a host that can and navigate to the keyserver web page. The activation key was previously emailed to the contact person identified on your support contract. Under End User License Agreement. Follow the on-screen instructions to generate an email containing the license file and paste it into the License field. TIP! If you used the option to connect through the management port to perform the initial setup.sourcefire. 10. Communication Ports The Sourcefire 3D System requires the use of specific ports to communicate internally and externally. See Using Dashboards on page 59 for more information. For detailed information on adding new rules to custom policies in the default state or in the disabled rule state see Using Recurring SEU Imports in the Analyst Guide. remember to connect the cable to the protected management network. To obtain a product license. 9. click the link to navigate to https:// keyserver.com/. To queue an immediate update from the Sourcefire support site. If your current host cannot access the Internet. Select the state for adding new rules to intrusion policies as disabled or in the predefined default state. A dashboard page appears after you log back in. add a product license and any required feature licenses to the Defense Center. read the agreement carefully. check the Enable Recurring SEU Import check box to configure automatic SEU imports and specify the update frequency.The appliance logs you out. The Defense Center or Master Defense Center is configured according to your selections. select Update Now. and to enable Version 4.9.

636 443 514 1241 1660 1812 and 1813 3306 8301 Description ftp ssh/ssl telnet smtp dns dhcp http snmp ldap https syslog Nessus Nmap FreeRADIUS RUA Agent Intrustion Agent Note that you must open both ports to ensure that FreeRADIUS functions correctly. Open this port for communications between the Defense Center and Intrusion Agents. Open this port for communicatiosn between the Defense Center and RUA Agents. Required Open Ports Ports 20. Notes Version 4.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 51 . Open this port only if you are using a remote syslog server. Open this port when you connect to a remote web server through the RSS widget.Performing the Initial Setup Communication Ports Chapter 2 certain functionality within the network deployment. Refer to the Required Open Ports table for more information on functions and their associated ports. 21 22 23 25 53 67 68 . 80 162 389.

IMPORTANT! Tasks that must be completed on specific hardware or software platforms are indicated by special text: For example. or Requires: RUA. For standalone 3D Sensor deployments (that is. • Administrator User Tasks on page 53 describe the steps that you must complete before Policy & Response Administrator users and analyst users can begin their tasks. Policy & Response Administrator User Tasks on page 55 describe some of the policies and custom rules that Policy & Response Administrator users can create and apply so that analyst users receive useful data for their analyses. • • Version 4. Similarly.9.Performing the Initial Setup What’s Next? Chapter 2 Required Open Ports (Continued) Ports 8302 8305 18183 Description eStreamer Management Virtual Network OPSEC SAM Open this port for communications between the Defense Center and v. 4. your next steps depend on the role assigned to your user account (Administrator user.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 52 . tasks that require a Defense Center are preceded with Requires: DC. Intrusion Event Analyst user.x 3D Sensors. the task is preceded with Requires: IPS. if your Defense Center or 3D Sensor must be licensed for IPS. See Managing Users on page 264 for more information about user roles. RNA. Policy & Response Administrator user. or RUA. which are based on the user account privileges required for the task. Requires: RNA. For deployments that include a Defense Center. a user with Administrator access must perform the first steps. Review the tasks in the following sections. you can perform much of the process on the Defense Center itself. or RNA Event Analyst user) and what appliance you are using. Notes What’s Next? Requires: Any After you complete the initial setup for the Sourcefire 3D System. Maintenance user.8. Maintenance User Tasks on page 54 explain some of the steps in the process that Maintenance users can perform after Administrator users finish their required tasks. deployments that do not include a Defense Center and do not use RNA).

you must create an authentication object for that server as described in Creating LDAP Authentication Objects on page 269. but you cannot use high availability mode directly on the Master Defense Center itself. Requires: DC If you want to authenticate users using an external authentication server. You must complete the steps outlined in Working with Sensors on page 113 on the Defense Center and on the sensors to complete the process. you should set it up now.9. Requires: DC If you are deploying two Defense Centers in high availability mode. TIP! You can use high availabilty mode on Defense Centers which are managed by a Master Defense Center. In most network environments.Performing the Initial Setup What’s Next? Chapter 2 • • RNA Event Analyst User Tasks on page 56 describe the features that RNA Event Analyst users can use to learn about the assets on your network. 3. The first steps for the Administrator user are as follows: Access: Admin 1. If you want to manage your 3D Sensors with a Defense Center but did not enable remote management as part of the initial setup on the sensor.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 53 . Version 4. See Configuring Remote Access to the Defense Center on page 386 for information about setting up management links between your sensors and the Defense Center. Tasks essential to initial setup are listed below. Sourcefire recommends that you use the Defense Center’s web interface rather than the sensor’s web interface to manage the sensor and view the events that it generates. TIP! After you set up management. Intrusion Event Analyst User Tasks on page 57 describe the features that Intrusion Event Analyst users can use to learn about the kinds of attacks that are launched against assets on your network. the sensors you add to the primary Defense Center are automatically added to the secondary Defense Center. 2. set up high availability as explained in Configuring High Availability on page 145. Administrator User Tasks Requires: Any Administrator users have a superset of tasks.

each 3D Sensor has a single detection engine that encompasses all of the available sensing interfaces (or all of the available fast-packetenabled interfaces) on the sensor.Performing the Initial Setup What’s Next? Chapter 2 4. The health monitoring feature includes a range of modules that you can enable or disable based on the needs of your network environment. If you did not already set up a system policy as part of the initial setup. you should configure one that meets the needs of your network and security environment. Maintenance User Tasks. so it is much better to have an account for each user rather than allowing multiple users to access the appliance from one or two accounts. The next section. Maintenance User Tasks Requires: Any After a user with Administrator privileges performs the initial configuration as described in Setting Up 3D Sensors on page 44. Create new user accounts that match the roles you want to assign to your users. 5. and Security Enhancement Updates (SEUs) and apply them to your Defense Center where required. You can also create different policies on your Defense Center and apply them to the managed sensors where it is appropriate. Check for any available software patches. if you want to use external authentication. See Managing Users on page 264 for more information. See Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets on page 185 for more information about examining traffic on multiple network segments with a single sensor. By default. Patches and updates are available on the Sourcefire Support site.9. you must modify the default detection engine. The auditing feature records events based on the user account name. Apply any available software patches or vulnerability database updates to managed sensors where required. describes the steps that a user with Maintenance access can perform. Note that a Maintenance user can also set up health policies. a Maintenance user or an Administrator user can perform the following tasks: Version 4. See Managing System Policies on page 320 for more information. 8. 6. See Importing SEUs and Rule Files in the Analyst Guide and Updating System Software on page 398 for more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 54 . Note that. See Using Health Monitoring on page 482 for more information. vulnerability database updates. you need to enable it in a system policy on the Defense Center and apply that policy to any appliances where users will authenticate to the external server. To take advantage of the multiple detection engine feature. Requires: DC Set up health monitoring policies and apply them to your managed sensors and to the Defense Center itself. 7.

Performing the Initial Setup What’s Next? Chapter 2 To continue the initial setup. 3. See Using Basic Settings in an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide for more information. Version 4. See Configuring Compliance Policies and Rules in the Analyst Guide.9. Set up scheduled tasks for any jobs that you want to perform on a regular basis. Compliance policies can contain rules based on nearly any kind of network activity that your 3D Sensor can detect. See Using Health Monitoring on page 482 for more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 55 . Note that you can also schedule regular backups of your appliance. you can set up and apply health policies on your managed sensors and the Defense Center. Policy & Response Administrator User Tasks. see Configuring Responses for Compliance Policies in the Analyst Guide. Requires: IPS Part of the process for creating an intrusion policy includes enabling the appropriate intrusion rules and fine-tuning the preprocessors and packet decoders to match your network traffic. See Managing Intrusion Rules in the Analyst Guide and Using Advanced Settings in an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide for more in-depth information about configuring intrusion policies. Develop a backup and restore plan. Requires: RNA Set up compliance policies to determine when prohibited activity occurs on your network. Requires: RNA If a compliance policy violation occurs. Requires: DC If a user with Administrator privileges has not configured health monitoring. Policy & Response Administrator users can: Access: P&R Admin/ Admin 1. 4. Requires: IPS Create and apply intrusion policies to the IPS-related detection engines on your 3D Sensor. See Using Backup and Restore on page 413 for details about backing up configurations as well as event data. responses. Policy & Response Administrator User Tasks Requires: Any After a user with Administrator privileges performs the initial configuration as described in Setting Up 3D Sensors on page 44. See Scheduling Tasks on page 425 for more information. including anomalous network traffic patterns. a Policy & Response Administrator user or an Administrator user can perform the following tasks: To continue the initial setup. For more information on . describes the steps that a user with Policy & Response Administrator access can perform. 2. including blocking a suspect host at the firewall or router. 2. 3. Maintenance users can: Access: Maint/Admin 1. you can specify that the Defense Center automatically respond to it in one of several ways. The next section. sending a notification by email or SNMP or simply generating a syslog alert.

The next sections. RNA Event Analyst User Tasks Requires: Any After a user with Administrator privileges performs the initial configuration as described in Setting Up 3D Sensors on page 44. See Configuring External Responses to Intrusion Events in the Analyst Guide for more information.Performing the Initial Setup What’s Next? Chapter 2 5. The policies and rules that you create as a Policy & Response Administrator user determine the kinds of events that are seen by the RNA Event Analyst and Intrusion Event Analyst users on your appliance. 2. You can also use the host profile to set host criticality and to learn about the vulnerabilities reported for the operating system and services running on each host. If your network environment includes an OPSEC-compliant firewall. RNA Event Analyst users can: Access: Any RNA/ Admin 1. or via SNMP) if a specific intrusion rule is triggered. To continue the initial setup. 3. you can also send SAM-based responses to the firewall. Restricted Event Analyst users can perform most of these tasks. you may want to write your own rules to meet the unique needs of your network. See Using Host Profiles in the nAnalyst Guide for more information. Version 4. Intrusion Event Analyst (Read-Only). but their event views are limited to specific IP address ranges. an RNA Event Analyst user or an Administrator user can perform the tasks listed below. See Viewing RNA Event Statistics in the Analyst Guide for more information. or Restricted Event Analyst access can perform. describe the steps that a user with Intrusion Event Analyst. The network map provides you with an overview of your network and is a good tool for locating rogue access points. use the host profile feature to learn more about them. Requires: IPS As you gain more experience with the intrusion rules provided by Sourcefire.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 56 . consider setting up automated notifications (that can be sent to the syslog. which is an expandable tree view of all the hosts and services reported by RNA. RNA Event Analyst (Read Only) users can perform any of these tasks.9. Begin by reviewing the summary statistics. and services that are prohibited by your security policies. which can provide you with a high-level view of the activity and events taking place on your network. unknown hosts. via email. RNA Event Analyst. See Understanding and Writing Intrusion Rules in the Analyst Guide and Rule-Writing Examples and Tips in the Analyst Guide to learn more about using the rule editor to write your own intrusion rules. Requires: RNA Review the information in the network map. See Using the Network Map in the Analyst Guide for more information. RNA Event Analyst (Read-Only). 6. Requires: IPS To ensure that your intrusion event analysts are informed as soon as possible regarding attacks against your most valuable network assets. Similarly. Requires: RNA If you locate unknown hosts on the network map. RNA Event Analyst User Tasks and Intrusion Event Analyst User Tasks.

You can automatically email a report when it is complete. you may want to create your own workflows. See Working with Flow Data and Traffic Profiles in the Analyst Guide for more information. You can use the scheduler to automate reporting. client applications. then determine which might be behaving abnormally. Note that the kinds of RNA events that are logged to the database are determined by the system policy on the managing Defense Center. See Scheduling Tasks on page 425. 5.Performing the Initial Setup What’s Next? Chapter 2 4. You can review information for network hosts. For example. Requires: RNA Use the RNA event workflows to review the activity that has occurred on your network over time. an Intrusion Event Analyst user or an Administrator user can perform the tasks listed below. Requires: RNA Use flow data and traffic profiles to gain a different kind of insight into the activity on your network. Note that flow data is collected by your sensors only if the flow data option is enabled in the RNA detection policy. you can review the information collected by RNA’s traffic monitoring features and identify hightraffic hosts. 7. You can also use the extensive search capability to define and save your own search criteria that you can use as part of your regular analysis.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 57 . or PDF-based event and incident reports. 6. HTML. and host attributes. See Working with Event Reports on page 232 for more information. vulnerabilities. As you grow more experienced with the Sourcefire 3D System. Intrusion Event Analyst User Tasks Requires: Any After a user with Administrator privileges performs the initial configuration as described in Setting Up 3D Sensors on page 44. and act on the events generated by your sensors. See Working with RNA Events in the Analyst Guide for more information. but their event views are limited to specific IP address ranges. Most of these can be performed by Restricted Event Analyst users also. and you can create and save report profiles to use later. Use the report designer to create CSV. Use any of the predefined workflows to view. See Understanding and Using Workflows in the Analyst Guide for more information. Version 4. services. investigate.

Use the report designer to create CSV. intrusion events are correlated with any available RNA data to generate an impact flag. which can provide you with a high-level view of the activity and events taking place on your network. or PDF-based event and incident reports. Note that the events that you see are limited by the options that are enabled in the intrusion policy that is applied to your sensors. See Working with Event Reports on page 232 for more information. You can use an incident to record details about your investigation. See Handling Incidents in the Analyst Guide for more information. 4. You can use the scheduler to automate reporting. and the appliance automatically records the amount of time you have the incident open. 5. HTML. See Working with Intrusion Events in the Analyst Guide for more information. See Using Impact Flags to Evaluate Events in the Analyst Guide for more information. You can also add intrusion event data that you believe might be important to your investigation of the incident. Version 4. Intrusion Event Analyst users can: Access: Any IPS/ Admin 1. Use any of the predefined workflows to view. you may want to create your own workflows. and act on the events generated by your sensors. See Understanding and Using Workflows in the Analyst Guide for more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 58 . You can automatically email a report when it is complete.Performing the Initial Setup What’s Next? Chapter 2 To continue the initial setup. Requires: RNA Note that on the Defense Center. See Viewing Intrusion Event Statistics in the Analyst Guide for more information.9. See Scheduling Tasks on page 425. investigate. Requires: IPS Use the incident handling feature to collect information about your investigation of possible intrusions on your network. 2. 3. Requires: IPS Use the intrusion event views to determine which hosts on your network are the targets of attacks and the types of attacks that are attempted against them. and you can create and save report profiles to use later. Begin by reviewing the summary statistics. As you grow more experienced with the Sourcefire 3D System. Events with high impact are more likely to indicate that an attack is targeted against a vulnerable host on your network.

Each dashboard has one or more tabs.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 59 . current version of the Sourcefire 3D System software running on the appliance. The Sourcefire 3D System is delivered with several predefined widgets. and its remote manager. model. the default dashboard differs depending on whether you are using a Master Defense Center. Each type of appliance is delivered with a default dashboard. as well as information about the status and overall health of the appliances in your deployment. You can change the time range to reflect a period as short as the last hour or as long as the last year. This dashboard provides the casual user with basic event and system status information for your Sourcefire 3D System deployment. Note that because not all widgets are useful for all types of appliances. or 3D Sensor. Version 4. the Appliance Information widget tells you the appliance name. Defense Center.9. self-contained components that provide insight into different aspects of the Sourcefire 3D System. Each dashboard has a time range that constrains its widgets.Using Dashboards Chapter 3 .Administrator Guide Sourcefire 3D System dashboards provide you with at-a-glance views of current system status. including data about the events collected and generated by the Sourcefire 3D System. For example. each of which can display one or more widgets in a three-column layout. Widgets are small. named Default Dashboard.

see Viewing the Flow Summary Page in the Analyst Guide for more information. You can use the predefined dashboards. see Viewing Dashboards on page 91. or create a custom dashboard to suit your needs. For more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 60 . and includes multiple widgets that summarize collected IPS. although you can configure your appliance to display a different default home page. You can share custom dashboards among all users of an appliance. RNA. or you can create a custom dashboard solely for your own use. The Sourcefire 3D System is delivered with several predefined dashboard widgets. including pages that are not dashboard pages. each of which provides insight into a Version 4. and system status data. In addition to the default dashboard. TIP! If you change the home page. You can also set a custom dashboard as your default dashboard. each of which can display one or more widgets in a three-column layout. modify the predefined dashboards. see Understanding Flow Data in the Analyst Guide. see the following sections: • • • Understanding Dashboard Widgets on page 60 Understanding the Predefined Widgets on page 65 Working with Dashboards on page 89 Understanding Dashboard Widgets Requires: Any Each dashboard has one or more tabs. you can access dashboards by selecting Analysis & Reporting > Event Summary > Dashboards. compliance. the Defense Center is delivered with two other predefined dashboards: • The Flow Summary dashboard uses flow data to create tables and charts of the activity on your monitored network. Note that Restricted Event Analysts use the Flow Summary page instead of the Flow Summary Dashboard. • The Detailed Dashboard provides advanced users with detailed information about your Sourcefire 3D System deployment.Using Dashboards Understanding Dashboard Widgets Chapter 3 By default. For more information. the home page for your appliance displays the default dashboard.9. for more information on flow summary data.

For example. see: • • • • Understanding Widget Availability on page 61 Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64 Understanding the Predefined Widgets on page 65 Working with Dashboards on page 89 Understanding Widget Availability Requires: Any The Sourcefire 3D System is delivered with several predefined dashboard widgets. that dashboard may contain unauthorized or invalid widgets. or RNA Event Analyst account privileges. Intrusion Event Analyst. Also note that widgets cannot display data to which an appliance has no access. The dashboard widgets that you can view depend on the type of appliance you are using and on your user role. RNA events. and so on. Although you cannot add an unauthorized or invalid widget to a dashboard. the Appliance Information widget is available on all appliances for all user roles. You can minimize and maximize widgets. For example. add and remove widgets from tabs. as well as rearrange the widgets on a tab. For more information. Currently the only widget in this category displays an RSS feed. In addition. Miscellaneous widgets display neither event data nor operations data. An unauthorized widget is one that you cannot view because you do not have the necessary account privileges. The dashboard widgets that you can view depend on the type of appliance you are using and on your user role: • • An invalid widget is one that you cannot view because you are using the wrong type of appliance. the Master Defense Center cannot access flow data. each dashboard has a set of preferences that determines its behavior. the widget displays an error message. Version 4. Widgets are grouped into three categories: • • • Analysis & Reporting widgets display data about the events collected and generated by the Sourcefire 3D System.Using Dashboards Understanding Dashboard Widgets Chapter 3 different aspect of the Sourcefire 3D System.9. These widgets are disabled and display error messages that indicate the reason why you cannot view them.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 61 . while the Compliance Events widget is available only on the Defense Center for users with Administrator. If you import a dashboard onto a Master Defense Center that contains a Custom Analysis widget configured to display one of those data types. RUA events. if you import a dashboard created either on a different kind of appliance or by a user with different access privileges. Operations widgets display information about the status and overall health of the Sourcefire 3D System.

as well as widgets that display no data. For example. An X indicates that the appliance can display the widget. but on Defense Centers and Master Defense Centers the widget displays only the status of the management interface. the Current Interface Status widget on a 3D Sensor displays the status of its sensing interfaces. keeping in mind that modifying a widget on a shared dashboard modifies it for all users of the appliance. The Sourcefire Appliances and Dashboard Widget Availability table lists the valid widgets for each appliance. For more information.9. the content of a widget can differ depending on the type of appliance you are using. Sourcefire Appliances and Dashboard Widget Availability Widget Appliance Information Appliance Status Compliance Events Current Interface Status Current Sessions Custom Analysis Disk Usage Interface Traffic Intrusion Events Network Compliance Product Licensing Product Updates RSS Feed X X Master Defense Center X X X X X X X X X Defense Center X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X 3D Sensor with IPS (and RNA) X 3D Sensor with RNA (only) X Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 62 .Using Dashboards Understanding Dashboard Widgets Chapter 3 Similarly. see Minimizing and Maximizing Widgets on page 97 and Deleting Widgets on page 97. Note than any content generated in table format can be sorted by clicking on the table column header. You can delete or minimize unauthorized and invalid widgets.

Using Dashboards Understanding Dashboard Widgets Chapter 3 Sourcefire Appliances and Dashboard Widget Availability (Continued) Widget System Load System Time White List Events Master Defense Center X X X Defense Center X X X 3D Sensor with IPS (and RNA) X X 3D Sensor with RNA (only) X X The User Roles and Dashboard Widget Availability table lists the user account privileges required to view each widget.9. IMPORTANT! dashboards. An X indicates the user can view the widget.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 63 . User accounts with Restricted Event Analyst access cannot use User Roles and Dashboard Widget Availability Widget Appliance Information Appliance Status Compliance Events Current Interface Status Current Sessions Custom Analysis Disk Usage Interface Traffic Intrusion Events Network Compliance Product Licensing Administrator X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Maintenance X X P&R Admin X IPS Analyst X X X X RNA Analyst X X X X Version 4.

the following graphic shows the preferences for the Current Interface Status widget. which is a highly customizable widget that allows you to display detailed information on the events collected and generated by the Sourcefire 3D System. You can only configure the update frequency for this widget. the following graphic shows the preferences for the Custom Analysis widget. click the show preferences icon ( ). For example. The preferences section for that widget appears. To modify a widget’s preferences: Access: Any except Restricted 1. Version 4. For example.Using Dashboards Understanding Dashboard Widgets Chapter 3 User Roles and Dashboard Widget Availability (Continued) Widget Product Updates RSS Feed System Load System Time White List Events Administrator X X X X X Maintenance X X X X P&R Admin X X X X X X X X X X X X IPS Analyst RNA Analyst Understanding Widget Preferences Requires: Any Each widget has a set of preferences that determines its behavior.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 64 . Widget preferences can be simple. which displays the current status of the network interfaces for the appliance.9. Widget preferences can also be more complex. On the title bar of the widget whose preferences you want to change.

For detailed information on the widgets delivered with the Sourcefire 3D System. Your changes take effect immediately. see the following sections: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Understanding the Appliance Information Widget on page 66 Understanding the Appliance Status Widget on page 67 Understanding the Compliance Events Widget on page 67 Understanding the Current Interface Status Widget on page 68 Understanding the Current Sessions Widget on page 69 Understanding the Custom Analysis Widget on page 69 Understanding the Disk Usage Widget on page 80 Understanding the Interface Traffic Widget on page 81 Understanding the Intrusion Events Widget on page 81 Understanding the Network Compliance Widget on page 82 Understanding the Product Licensing Widget on page 84 Understanding the Product Updates Widget on page 85 Understanding the RSS Feed Widget on page 86 Understanding the System Load Widget on page 87 Understanding the System Time Widget on page 87 Understanding the White List Events Widget on page 88 IMPORTANT! The dashboard widgets you can view depend on the type of appliance you are using and on your user role. For more information. ) to hide the Understanding the Predefined Widgets Requires: Any The Sourcefire 3D System is delivered with several predefined widgets that. Version 4. For information on the preferences you can specify for individual widgets. when used on dashboards. click the hide preferences icon ( preferences section. On the widget title bar.9. Make changes as needed.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 2. including data about the events collected and generated by the Sourcefire 3D System. 3. see Understanding the Predefined Widgets on page 65. can provide you with at-a-glance views of current system status.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 65 . as well as information about the status and overall health of the appliances in your deployment. see Understanding Widget Availability on page 61.

the name. and model of the appliance the versions of the Sourcefire 3D System software.9. operating system. SEU. Version 4. The widget provides: • • the name. and Sourcefire 3D System software and operating system versions of the peer Defense Center. For more information. the name and status of the communications link with the managing appliance for Defense Centers in a high availability pair. module pack. model. rule pack. the preferences also control how often the widget updates. management interface IP address. Snort. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 66 . as well as how recently the Defense Centers made contact • • You can configure the widget to display more or less information by modifying the widget preferences to display a simple or an advanced view.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 Understanding the Appliance Information Widget Requires: Any The Appliance Information widget provides a snapshot of the appliance. and vulnerability database (VDB) installed on the appliance for managed appliances.

Version 4. The preferences also control how often the widget updates. you must manually apply a health policy or their status appears as Disabled.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 Understanding the Appliance Status Widget Requires: DC/MDC The Appliance Status widget indicates the health of the appliance and of any appliances it is managing. For more information. For more information. You can click a section on the pie chart or one of the numbers on the appliance status table to go to the Health Monitor page and view the compiled health status of the appliance and of any appliances it is managing.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 67 . You can configure the widget to display appliance status as a pie chart or in a table by modifying the widget preferences. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. Understanding the Compliance Events Widget Requires: DC/MDC The Compliance Events widget shows the average events per second by priority.9. over the dashboard time range. see Using the Health Monitor on page 545. Note that because the Defense Center does not automatically apply a health policy to managed sensors.

or click the All graph to view all compliance events. regardless of priority. For more information on compliance events.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 You can configure the widget to display compliance events of different priorities by modifying the widget preferences.9. Note that only 3D Sensors have interface types other than the management interface. including events that do not have a priority. For each interface. 100Mb full duplex. the widget provides: • • • the name of the interface the link state of the interface. as well as to select a linear (incremental) or logarithmic (factor of ten) scale. and unused.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 68 . represented by a green ball (up) or a gray ball (down) the link mode (for example. accessing compliance events via the dashboard changes the events (or global) time window for the appliance. Select Show All to display an additional graph for all compliance events. You can click a graph to view compliance events of a specific priority. For more information. grouped by type: management. Understanding the Current Interface Status Widget Requires: Any The Current Interface Status widget shows the status of the network interfaces for the appliance. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. In either case. Select one or more Priorities check boxes to display separate graphs for events of specific priorities. The preferences also control how often the widget updates. inline. the events are constrained by the dashboard time range. passive. or 10Mb half duplex) of the interface Version 4. see Viewing Compliance Events in the Analyst Guide.

The presets serve as examples and can provide quick access to information about your deployment. Understanding the Current Sessions Widget Requires: Any The Current Sessions widget shows which users are logged into the appliance. On the Current Sessions widget. see Managing User Accounts on page 299 click the host icon ( ) next to any IP address to view the host profile for that computer. that is. copper or fiber the amount of data received (Rx) and transmitted (Tx) by the interface The widget preferences control how often the widget updates. For more information. as well as the aggregation method that configures how the widget groups the data it displays. see Using Host Profiles in the nAnalyst Guide (Defense Center with RNA only) click any IP address or access time to view the audit log constrained by that IP address and by the time that the user associated with that IP address logged on to the web interface. The Custom Analysis widget is delivered with several presets. which are groups of configurations that are predefined by Sourcefire. that is. Understanding the Custom Analysis Widget Requires: Any The Custom Analysis widget is a highly customizable widget that allows you to display detailed information on the events collected and generated by the Sourcefire 3D System.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 69 .9. the IP address of the machine where the session originated. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 • • the type of interface. is marked with a user icon and is rendered in bold type. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. The user that represents you. the user currently viewing the widget. you must select which table and individual field you want to display. You can use these presets or you can create a custom configuration. and the last time each user accessed a page on the appliance (based on the local time for the appliance). For more information. When you configure the widget preferences. you can: • • click any user name to manage user accounts on the User Management page. see Viewing Audit Records on page 567 • The widget preferences control how often the widget updates. Version 4.

On the other hand. either one of the predefined searches delivered with your appliance or a custom search that you created. and so on).9. For example.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 For example. how many unique versions of Linux. aggregating by Unique OS tells you how many unique versions of each operating system are running on the same hosts (for example. constraining the first example (operating systems Version 4. Aggregating this data by Count tells you how many hosts are running each operating system. you can configure the Custom Analysis widget to display which operating systems are running on the hosts in your organization by configuring the widget to display OS data from the RNA Hosts table. Optionally. you can further constrain the widget using a saved search. Mac OS X.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 70 . Microsoft Windows. if you are using Sourcefire RNA as part of your deployment.

For example. You can also configure the widget to display the most frequently occurring events or the least frequently occurring events. Next to each event.9. the widget updates every five minutes. click the icon. The widget updates with a frequency that depends on the dashboard time range.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 aggregated by Count) using the Local Systems search tells you how many hosts within one hop of your 3D Sensors are running each operating system. if you set the dashboard time range to an hour. based on the local time of the appliance. an upwards-pointing icon indicates ascending order. If you want information on events or other collected data over time. you can configure the Custom Analysis widget to display a line graph.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 71 . To change the sort order. A number indicating how many places the event has moved down appears next to the icon. such as one that displays the total number of intrusion events generated in your deployment over Version 4. The direction icon ( ) indicates and controls the sort order of the display. hover your pointer over the Last updated notice in the bottom left corner of the widget. • The widget displays the last time it updated. On the other hand. A downward-pointing icon indicates descending order. The down-arrow icon ( ) indicates that the event has moved down in the standings since the last time the widget updated. the widget updates once a week. To determine when the dashboard will update next. You can change the color of the bars as well as the number of rows that the widget displays. the widget can display one of three icons to indicate any additions or movement from the most recent results: • • The new event icon ( ) signifies that the event is new to the results. The colored bars in the widget background show the relative number of occurrences of each event. if you set the dashboard time range to a year. The up-arrow icon ( ) indicates that the event has moved up in the standings since the last time the widget updated. you should read the bars from right to left. A number indicating how many places the event has moved up appears next to the icon.

A different set of preferences appears depending on whether you configure the widget to show relative occurrences of events (that is. Finally. If the widget continues to stay red over time. you can invoke event views (that is. Version 4.9. you can choose a custom title for the widget. For more information. For graphs over time. To configure a Custom Analysis widget.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 time. a red-shaded Custom Analysis widget indicates that its use is harming system performance. a line graph). or you configure the widget to show a graph over time (that is. you should remove the widget.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 72 . From Custom Analysis widgets. Custom Analysis widgets can place a drain on an appliance’s resources. workflows) that provide detailed information about the events displayed in the widget. IMPORTANT! Depending on how they are configured. show the preferences as described in Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. the Custom Analysis widget has preferences that determines its behavior. see the following sections: • • • Configuring the Custom Analysis Widget on page 72 Viewing Associated Events from the Custom Analysis Widget on page 78 Custom Analysis Widget Limitations on page 79 Configuring the Custom Analysis Widget Requires: Any As with all widgets. you can choose the time zone that the widget uses as well as the color of the line. a bar graph).

The Custom Analysis widget is delivered with several presets. which are groups of configurations that are predefined by Sourcefire. Version 4.. Preset the preset for the widget. For a detailed list of presets.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 73 . as shown in the following graphic. select any value except Time from the Field drop-down list.. the title of the widget.. select Time from the Field drop-down list. see the Custom Analysis Widget Presets table on page 75. Custom Analysis Widget Preferences Use this preference. as shown in the following graphic.. You can use these presets or you can create a custom configuration. The presets serve as examples and can provide quick access to information about your deployment. The following table describes the various preferences you can set in the Custom Analysis widget. the appliance uses the configured event type as the widget title. If you do not specify a title. To configure the widget to show a line graph.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 To configure the widget to show a bar graph.9. Title To control.

the default aggregation criterion is Count. You can display from 10 to 25 result rows. which time zone you want to use to display results. Defense Center predefined dashboard uses Version 4. Table Field To control. in increments of five.9. Show Results whether you want to display the most frequently occurring events (Top) or the least frequently occurring events (Bottom). Aggregate the aggregation method for the widget. select Time. although some presets use predefined searches.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 74 . The following table describes the available presets for the Custom Analysis widget. You do not have to specify a search. It also indicates which. Search the saved search you want to use to further constrain the data that the widget displays... the number of results rows you want to display.. TIP! To display a graph over time.. The aggregation method configures how the widget groups the data it displays. if any.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 Custom Analysis Widget Preferences (Continued) Use this preference. Color the color of the bars in the widget background that show the relative number of occurrences of each result. The time zone appears whenever you select a time-based field. Show Movers Time Zone whether you want to display the icons that indicate additions or movement from the most recent results. For most event types. the specific field of the event type you want to display. the table of events which contains the event data the widget displays.

by classification. Displays the most active hosts on your monitored network. Displays the most active ports on your monitored network. (The predefined dashboards on the Master Defense Center and 3D Sensor do not include Custom Analysis widgets. Displays the most active client applications on your monitored network. based on the number of detected flows. where the packet was not dropped as part of the event. Displays the most active hosts on your monitored network.9. Displays the most frequently occurring types of intrusion events. based on the number of flows where the host initiated the session. Predefined Dashboards Default Dashboard Detailed Dashboard Detailed Dashboard Requires IPS or DC/MDC + IPS All Intrusion Events (Not Dropped) IPS or DC/MDC + IPS Client Applications Detailed Dashboard DC + RNA Dropped Intrusion Events Default Dashboard IPS or DC/MDC + IPS Flows by Initiator IP Flow Summary DC + RNA Flows by Port Flow Summary DC + RNA Flows by Responder IP Flow Summary DC + RNA Flows by Service Flow Summary DC + RNA Version 4. by classification. based on the number of flows where the host was the responder in the session. Displays the most active services on your monitored network. where the packet was dropped. based on the number of detected flows. Displays counts for the most frequently occurring intrusion events. by application type.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 each preset. Custom Analysis Widget Presets Preset All Intrusion Events Description Displays a graph of the total number of intrusion events on your monitored network over the dashboard time range.) .1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 75 .

based on event classification. based on frequency of intrusion events. based on the number of hosts running each operating system within your network. Displays the most active hosts on your monitored network. Displays the most common RNA service vendors. based on the number of intrusion events where the host was the targeted host in the flow that caused the event. Displays a count of intrusion event requiring analysis. Displays the most active hosts on your monitored network. Displays the most common operating system. based on the number of hosts on the network running services made by that vendor. over the dashboard time range.9.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 Custom Analysis Widget Presets (Continued) Preset Flows over Time Description Displays a graph of the total number of flows on your monitored network.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 76 . Displays the most active hours of the day. based on the number of intrusion events where the host was the attacking host in the flow that caused the event. Displays the most frequently occurring types of intrusion events. based on the number of intrusion events occurring on high criticality hosts. Predefined Dashboards Flow Summary Requires DC + RNA Intrusion Events Requiring Analysis Intrusion Events by Hour Intrusion Events to High Criticality Hosts Detailed Dashboard DC/MDC + IPS + RNA IPS or DC/MDC + IPS DC/MDC + IPS + RNA none Detailed Dashboard Operating Systems Detailed Dashboard DC + RNA Services Detailed Dashboard DC + RNA Top Attackers Default Dashboard IPS or DC/MDC + IPS Top Targets Default Dashboard IPS or DC/MDC + IPS Version 4.

based on the number of kilobytes per second of data transmitted by the hosts. based on the number of kilobytes per second of data transmitted by the service. based on the number of kilobytes per second of data transmitted via the port. Displays the most active RUA users on your monitored network. Displays the most active services on your monitored network.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 77 .Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 Custom Analysis Widget Presets (Continued) Preset Traffic by Initiator IP Description Displays the most active hosts on your monitored network. Displays the most active hosts on your monitored network. Predefined Dashboards Detailed Dashboard Flow Summary Requires DC + RNA Traffic by Initiator User Detailed Dashboard DC + RNA + RUA Traffic by Port Flow Summary DC + RNA Traffic by Responder IP Detailed Dashboard Flow Summary DC + RNA Traffic by Service Detailed Dashboard Flow Summary DC + RNA Traffic over Time Detailed Dashboard Flow Summary DC + RNA Version 4.9. Displays a graph of the total kilobytes of data transmitted on your monitored network over the dashboard time range. based on the total number of kilobytes of data received by the hosts where those users are logged in. based on the number of kilobytes per second of data received by the hosts. Displays the most active responder ports on your monitored network.

if you configure multiple time windows on your Defense Center and then access health events from a Custom Analysis widget. based on the number of unique intrusion events per targeted host. the events appear in the default workflow for that event type. constrained by the dashboard time range.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 78 . see Default Time Windows on page 29 and Specifying Time Constraints in Searches in the Analyst Guide. the events appear in the default workflow for that event type. and the health monitoring time window changes to the dashboard time range. and the global time window changes to the dashboard time range. Version 4. Displays the number of unique intrusion event types associated with each impact flag level. As another example. When you invoke an event view from the dashbaord. the events appear in the default health events workflow. This also changes the appropriate time window for the appliance. you can invoke an event view (that is.9. a workflow) that provides detailed information about the events displayed in the widget. For more information on time windows. if you configure a single time window and then access any type of event from the Custom Analysis widget. depending on how many time windows you have configured and on what type of event you are trying to view.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 Custom Analysis Widget Presets (Continued) Preset Unique Intrusion Events by Destination IP Unique Intrusion Events by Impact White List Violations Description Displays the most active targeted hosts. Displays the hosts with the most white list violations. by violation count? Predefined Dashboards none Requires IPS or DC/MDC + IPS none DC/MDC + IPS + RNA DC + RNA Detailed Dashboard Viewing Associated Events from the Custom Analysis Widget Requires: Any Depending on the kind of data that a Custom Analysis widget is configured to display. For example.

9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 79 . bar graphs). constrained by the widget preferences. see the following sections: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Viewing Audit Records on page 567 Viewing Intrusion Events in the Analyst Guide Viewing RNA Network Discovery and Host Input Events in the Analyst Guide Viewing Hosts in the Analyst Guide Viewing Host Attributes in the Analyst Guide Viewing Services in the Analyst Guide Viewing Client Applications in the Analyst Guide Viewing Vulnerabilities in the Analyst Guide Viewing Flow Data in the Analyst Guide Viewing RUA Users in the Analyst Guide Viewing RUA Events in the Analyst Guide Viewing Compliance Events in the Analyst Guide Viewing White List Events in the Analyst Guide Viewing White List Violations in the Analyst Guide Viewing the SEU Import Log in the Analyst Guide Working with Active Scan Results in the Analyst Guide Understanding Custom Tables in the Analyst Guide Custom Analysis Widget Limitations Requires: Any There are some important points to keep in mind when using the Custom Analysis widget. if you are using a dashboard imported from another appliance. For example. remember that not all appliances have access to data of all event types. Similarly. depending on the user’s account privileges. click any event to view associated events constrained by the widget preferences. • For information on working with specific event types. If you are configuring the widget on a shared dashboard. constrained by the widget preferences. click the View All icon in the lower right corner of the widget to view all associated events.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 To view associated events from the Custom Analysis Widget: Access: Any except Restricted You have two options. remember that not all users can view data of all event types. On widgets configured to show flow data over time. as well as by that event. Intrusion Event Analysts cannot view RNA events. depending on how you configured the widget: • On widgets configured to show relative occurrences of events (that is. For Version 4. You can also click the View All icon in the lower right corner of the widget to view all associated events.

This affects your view of the widget as well. The widget preferences also control how often the widget updates. For more information. Version 4. or you can show these plus the /boot partition usage by modifying the widget preferences. If you want to make sure that this does not happen. You enable or disable the Custom Analysis widget from the Dashboard settings in your system policy. however. If you configure the widget on a shared dashboard and constrain its events using a private search. as well as whether it displays the current disk usage or collected disk usage statistics over the dashboard time range. that you (and any other users who share the dashboard) can modify the preferences of the widget to display data that you can see. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 80 . save the dashboard as private. It also shows the capacity of each partition. the widget indicates that you are unauthorized to view the data. Note. save the dashboard as private. see Configuring Dashboard Settings on page 331. the Master Defense Center does not store flow data. the widget resets to not using the search when another user logs in. For more information. You can configure the widget to display just the root (/) and /volume partition usage. Remember that only you can access searches that you have saved as private. If you want to make sure that this does not happen. or even delete the widget.9.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 example. Understanding the Disk Usage Widget Requires: Any The Disk Usage widget indicates the percentage of space used on each partition of the appliance’s hard drive. If your dashboard includes a Custom Analysis widget that displays data that you cannot see.

On 3D Sensors. The widget preferences control how often the widget updates. Note that only 3D Sensors have interfaces other than the management interface. the preferences also control whether the widget displays the traffic rate for unused interfaces (by default. On the 3D Sensor.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 81 . or both. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. the widget only displays the traffic rate for interfaces that belong to an interface set). On the Defense Center and Master Defense Center. you must enable local event storage or the widget will not have any data to display. you can configure the widget to display intrusion events of different impacts by modifying the widget preferences. For more information. the widget can display statistics for dropped intrusion events. Understanding the Intrusion Events Widget Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC + IPS The Intrusion Events widget shows the rate of intrusion events that occurred over the dashboard time range.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 Understanding the Interface Traffic Widget Requires: Any The Interface Traffic widget shows the rate of traffic received (Rx) and transmitted (Tx) on the appliance’s interfaces over the dashboard time range. you cannot configure the widget to display Version 4. this includes statistics on intrusion events of different impacts. On the Defense Center and Master Defense Center. On the 3D Sensor. Note that for managed 3D Sensors. all intrusion events.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 82 . select All to display an additional graph for all intrusion events. you can: • • • Requires: DC/MDC click a graph corresponding to a specific impact to view intrusion events of that impact click the graph corresponding to dropped events to view dropped events click the All graph to view all intrusion events Note that the resulting event view is constrained by the dashboard time range. The following graphic shows the Defense Center version of the widget preferences. the widget displays a pie chart that shows the Version 4. regardless of impact or rule state. see Using Impact Flags to Evaluate Events in the Analyst Guide select Show to choose Events per second or Total events select Vertical Scale to choose Linear (incremental) or Logarithmic (factor of ten) scale • • The preferences also control how often the widget updates. Understanding the Network Compliance Widget Requires: DC The Network Compliance widget summarizes your hosts’ compliance with the compliance white lists you configured (see Using RNA as a Compliance Tool in the Analyst Guide). For more information. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. On either appliance.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 intrusion events by impact. On the Intrusion Events widget. you can: • Requires: DC/MDC select one or more Event Flags check boxes to display separate graphs for events of specific impacts.9. For more information on intrusion events. By default. see Viewing Intrusion Events in the Analyst Guide. In the widget preferences. you can display dropped events. accessing intrusion events via the dashboard changes the events (or global) time window for the appliance.

You can click the pie chart to view the host violation count. Version 4.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 number of hosts that are compliant. non-compliant. the widget considers a host to be non-compliant if it is not compliant with any of the white lists on the Defense Center.9. You can also use the widget preferences to specify which of three different styles you want to use to display network compliance.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 83 . for all compliance white lists that you have created. which lists the hosts that violate at least one white list. The Network Compliance style (the default) displays a pie chart that shows the number of hosts that are compliant. see Viewing White List Violations in the Analyst Guide. by modifying the widget preferences. To bring these hosts into compliance. and that have not been evaluated. You can configure the widget to display network compliance either for all white lists. including white lists that are no longer in active compliance policies. or for a specific white list. Note that if you choose to display network compliance for all white lists. non-compliant. For more information. delete the unused white lists. and that have not been evaluated.

see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. and that have not yet been evaluated. non-compliant.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 The Network Compliance over Time (%) style displays a stacked area graph showing the relative proportion of hosts that are compliant. over the dashboard time range. For example. non-compliant. The top section of the widget displays all of the feature licenses installed on the Defense Center. The Network Compliance over Time style displays a line graph that shows the number of hosts that are compliant. Understanding the Product Licensing Widget Requires: DC The Product Licensing widget shows the feature licenses currently installed on the Defense Center. while the Temporary Licenses section displays only temporary and expired licenses. and that have not yet been evaluated. You can check the Show Not Evaluated box to hide events which have not been evaluated. over the dashboard time range. It also indicates the number of items (such as hosts or users) licensed and the number of remaining licensed items allowed. For more information. if you have two feature licenses for RNA Hosts. one of which is a permanent license and Version 4. including temporary licenses.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 84 . The preferences control how often the widget updates.

Understanding the Product Updates Widget Requires: Any The Product Updates widget provides you with a summary of the software (Sourcefire 3D System software. You can configure the widget to display either the features that are currently licensed. and another that is temporary and allows an additional 750 hosts. the top section of the widget displays an RNA Hosts feature license with 1500 licensed hosts. The preferences also control how often the widget updates. or all the features that you can license. For more information. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. while the Temporary Licenses section displays an RNA Hosts feature license with 750 hosts.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 85 . For more information. the Defense Center version of the widget provides you with similar links so you can update the software on your managed sensors. Expired licenses are marked with a strikethrough. Note that the widget displays Unknown as the latest version of the software unless you have configured a scheduled task to download. the widget uses scheduled tasks to determine the latest version. For more information. For more information. but not yet installed.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 allows 750 hosts. you should read the bars from right to left. Note that you cannot update the VDB on a sensor or a Master Defense Center. or install software updates. You can configure the widget to hide the latest versions by modifying the widget preferences. SEU.9. push. by modifying the widget preferences. The preferences also control how often the widget updates. The widget also provides you with links to pages where you can update the software. Version 4. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. The bars in the widget background show the percentage of each type of license that is being used. see Managing Your Feature Licenses on page 370. see Scheduling Tasks on page 425. You can click any of the license types to go to the License page of the System Settings and add or delete feature licenses. and VDB) currently installed on the appliance as well as information on available updates that you have downloaded. for that software.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 86 . see Scheduling Tasks on page 425 • Understanding the RSS Feed Widget Requires: Any The RSS Feed widget adds an RSS feed to a dashboard. you can also choose how many stories from the feed you want to show in the widget. or you can create a custom connection to any other RSS feed by specifying its URL in the widget preferences. or VDB by clicking either the latest version or the Unknown link in the Latest column. Feeds update every 24 hours (although you can manually update the feed) and the widget displays the last time the feed was updated based on the local time of the appliance. You can also configure the widget to display a preconfigured feed of Sourcefire security news. Keep in mind that the appliance must have access to the Sourcefire web site (for the two preconfigured feeds) or to any custom feed you configure. you can: • manually update an appliance by clicking the current version of the Sourcefire 3D System software. or VDB. When you configure the widget. By default. SEU. see Updating System Software on page 398 and Importing SEUs and Rule Files in the Analyst Guide create a scheduled task to download the latest version of the Sourcefire 3D System software. the widget shows a feed of Sourcefire company news. keep in mind that not all RSS feeds use descriptions. SEU.9.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 On the Product Updates widget. as well as whether you want to show descriptions of the stories along with the headlines. Version 4.

and system load (also called the load average. You can configure the widget to hide the boot time by modifying the widget preferences.9.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 On the RSS Feed widget. The preferences also control how often the widget synchronizes with the appliance’s clock. memory (RAM) usage.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 87 . For more information. uptime. For more information. Version 4. You can configure the widget to show or hide the load average by modifying the widget preferences. Understanding the System Time Widget Requires: Any The System Time widget shows the local system time. both currently and over the dashboard time range. you can: • • • click one of the stories in the feed to view the story click the more link to go to the feed’s web site click the update icon ( ) to manually update the feed Understanding the System Load Widget Requires: Any The System Load widget shows the CPU usage (for each CPU). and boot time for the appliance. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. The preferences also control how often the widget updates. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. measured by the number of processes waiting to execute) on the appliance.

In either case. see Understanding Widget Preferences on page 64. Version 4. You can click a graph to view white list events of a specific priority. or click the All graph to view all white list events.Using Dashboards Understanding the Predefined Widgets Chapter 3 Understanding the White List Events Widget Requires: DC/MDC The White List Events widget shows the average events per second by priority. You can configure the widget to display white list events of different priorities by modifying the widget preferences.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 88 . including events that do not have a priority select Show All to display an additional graph for all white list events. the events are constrained by the dashboard time range. over the dashboard time range. see Viewing White List Events in the Analyst Guide. you can: • • • select one or more Priorities check boxes to display separate graphs for events of specific priorities. accessing white list events via the dashboard changes the events (or global) time window for the Defense Center. For more information. For more information on white list events.9. regardless of priority select Vertical Scale to choose Linear (incremental) or Logarithmic (factor of ten) scale The preferences also control how often the widget updates. In the widget preferences.

Optionally. you can only see your own private dashboards. or on any user-defined dashboard. For each dashboard. see: • • • • • Creating a Custom Dashboard on page 89 Viewing Dashboards on page 91 Modifying Dashboards on page 93 Deleting a Dashboard on page 97 Exporting a Dashboard on page 585 Creating a Custom Dashboard Requires: Any When you create a new dashboard. This makes a copy of the pre-existing dashboard. since the last time the dashboard refreshed. you can create a blank new dashboard by choosing not to base your dashboard on any pre-existing dashboards. including the Sourcefire default dashboard. export. you can make the changes at a local computer. you cannot view or modify private dashboards created by other users. For more information on working with dashboards. You can create. in a network operations center (NOC) where a dashboard is displayed at all times. Version 4. the page indicates which dashboard is the default. Finally. unless you have Admin access. Note that.9. These settings determine how often the dashboard cycles through its tabs and how often the entire dashboard page refreshes. the dashboard in the NOC automatically refreshes at the interval you specify and displays your changes without you having to manually refresh the dashboard in the NOC. You specify the default dashboard in your user preferences. individual widgets update according to their preferences. see Specifying Your Default Dashboard on page 35. view. You must also specify (or disable) the tab change and page refresh intervals. you can choose to base it on any pre-existing dashboard. or that you made to a private dashboard on another computer. Note that you do not need to refresh the entire dashboard to see data updates. for example. modify. you can modify this copy to suit your needs. Then. If you want to make changes to the dashboard. the user who created it) and whether a dashboard is private. the page indicates the owner (that is. and delete dashboards. This can be useful. Refreshing the entire dashboard allows you to see any preference or layout changes that were made to a shared dashboard by another user.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 89 . for more information.Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 Working with Dashboards Requires: Any You manage dashboards on the Dashboard List page (see Viewing Dashboards on page 91).

You can then edit the imported dashboard to suit your needs. all other users of the appliance can view it. If you choose not to save the dashboard as private. To create a new dashboard: Access: Any except Restricted 1. Although the unauthorized widgets still appear on the dashboard. For more information. Type a name and optional description for the dashboard. you can choose to associate the new dashboard with your user account by saving it as a private dashboard. regardless of role. Keep in mind that because not all user roles have access to all dashboard widgets. Select Analysis & Reporting > Event Summary > Dashboards. The New Dashboard page appears. Note that the dashboard widgets you can view depend on the type of appliance you are using and on your user role. they are disabled. In either case. users with fewer permissions viewing a dashboard created by a user with more permissions may not be able to use all of the widgets on the dashboard. you can export a dashboard from another appliance and then import it onto your appliance. select None (the default) to create a blank dashboard. a dashboard created on the Defense Center and imported onto a 3D Sensor or Master Defense Center may display some invalid. save it as private. 3. Optionally. click New Dashboard. for example. 4.9. You should also keep in mind that any user. Use the Copy Dashboard drop-down list to select the dashboard on which you want to base the new dashboard. You can select any predefined or user-defined dashboard. TIP! Instead of creating a new dashboard. Version 4. it appears. If you do not have a default dashboard defined.Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 Finally.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 90 . If you want to make sure that only you can modify a particular dashboard. If you have a default dashboard defined. disabled widgets. the Dashboard List page appears. 2. see Importing and Exporting Objects on page 583. can modify shared dashboards.

Your dashboard is created and appears in the web interface. When you change the time range. Unless you pause the dashboard. this setting will refresh the entire dashboard at the interval you specify. To disable tab cycling. this setting advances your view to the next tab at the interval you specify. For example. 7. To disable the periodic page refresh. Optionally. the home page for your appliance displays the default dashboard. Click Save. enter 0 in the Refresh Page Every field. if you based it on a pre-existing dashboard. Note that this setting is separate from the update interval available on many individual widgets. specify (in minutes) how often the dashboard should change tabs. Unless you pause the dashboard or your dashboard has only one tab. For more information. enter 0 in the Change Tabs Every field. TIP! You can configure your appliance to display a different default home page. Viewing Dashboards Requires: Any By default. specify (in minutes) how often the current dashboard tab should refresh with new data. In the Refresh Page Every field. the dashboard time range has no effect on the Appliance Information widget. the home page shows the Dashboard List page.Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 5. see Specifying Your Home Page on page 35 and Specifying Your Default Dashboard on page 35. If you do not have a default dashboard defined. see Modifying Dashboards on page 93. including pages that are not dashboard pages. widgets will update according to their individual preferences even if you disable the Refresh Page Every setting. To view the details of all available dashboards. You can also change the default dashboard. select the Save As Private check box to associate the dashboard with your user account and to prevent other users from viewing and modifying the dashboard. the widgets that can be constrained by time automatically update to reflect the new time range. This value must be greater than the Change Tabs Every setting. In the Change Tabs Every field.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 91 . For more information. You can now tailor it to suit your needs by adding tabs and widgets (and. click Dashboards from the Dashboard toolbar. by rearranging and deleting widgets). which provides Version 4. where you can choose a dashboard to view. Each dashboard has a time range that constrains its widgets. 8. You can change the time range to reflect a period as short as the last hour (the default) or as long as the last year. Note that not all widgets can be constrained by time. although refreshing the dashboard page resets the update interval on individual widgets. 6.9.

In addition. the Dashboard List page appears. dashboard tabs resume cycling and the dashboard page resumes refreshing according to the settings you specified in the dashboard properties. use the Dashboards menu on the toolbar. Unless the dashboard is paused. regardless of the Cycle Tabs Every setting in the dashboard properties. Dashboard pages stop refreshing. depending on whether you have a default dashboard defined: • • If you have a default dashboard defined. Changing the time range has no effect.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 92 . Unpausing the dashboard causes all the appropriate widgets on the page to update to reflect the current time range. If you do not have a default dashboard defined. The dashboard you selected appears.Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 information the includes the appliance name.5 hours of inactivity. it appears. changing the time range to a long period may not be useful for widgets like the Custom Analysis widget. choose a dashboard time range. this will not happen while you are viewing a dashboard. Dashboard tabs stop cycling. Version 4. unless the dashboard is paused. model. you can unpause the dashboard. Pausing a dashboard has the following effects: • • • • Individual widgets stop updating.9. all appropriate widgets on the page update to reflect the new time range. and current version of the Sourcefire 3D System software. which allows you to examine the data provided by the widgets without the display changing and interrupting your analysis. Click View next to the dashboard you want to view. IMPORTANT! Although your session normally logs you out after 3. To view a different dashboard. To change the dashboard time range: Access: Any except Restricted From the Show the Last drop-down list. To view a dashboard: Access: Any except Restricted Select Analysis & Reporting > Event Summary > Dashboards. depending on how often newer events replace older events. When you are finished with your analysis. You can also pause a dashboard. regardless of any Update Every widget preference. regardless of the Refresh Page Every setting in the dashboard properties. Keep in mind that for enterprise deployments of the Sourcefire 3D System. You have two options.

can modify shared dashboards. To unpause the dashboard: Access: Any except Restricted On the time range control of a paused dashboard. regardless of role. delete. You can also change the basic dashboard properties. Version 4. You can add. You can minimize and maximize widgets. and whether you want to share the dashboard with other users. the tab cycle and page refresh intervals. and whether you want to share the dashboard with other users. ). If you want to make sure that only you can modify a particular dashboard.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 93 . Each tab can display one or more widgets in a three-column layout. which include its name and description. Note that you cannot change the order of dashboard tabs. click the play icon ( The dashboard is unpaused. ).Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 To pause the dashboard: Access: Any except Restricted On the time range control. the tab cycle and page refresh intervals. which include its name and description. click the pause icon ( The dashboard is paused until you unpause it. as well as rearrange the widgets on a tab. see the following sections • • • • • • • • Changing Dashboard Properties on page 93 Adding Tabs on page 94 Deleting Tabs on page 95 Renaming Tabs on page 95 Adding Widgets on page 95 Rearranging Widgets on page 97 Minimizing and Maximizing Widgets on page 97 Deleting Widgets on page 97 Changing Dashboard Properties Requires: Any Use the following procedure to change the basic dashboard properties. make sure to set it as a private dashboard in the dashboard properties. and rename tabs.9. add and remove widgets from tabs. For more information. Modifying Dashboards Requires: Any Each dashboard has one or more tabs. IMPORTANT! Any user.

2. See Creating a Custom Dashboard on page 89 for information on the various configurations you can change. Type a name for the tab and click OK. To the right of the existing tabs.9. View the dashboard where you want to add a tab. Version 4. The Dashboard List page appears. it appears. 2. For more information. 3. Note that you can rename the tab at any time. see Viewing Dashboards on page 91. Click Edit next to the dashboard whose properties you want to change. Make changes as needed and click Save. To add a tab to a dashboard: Access: Any except Restricted 1.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 94 . skip to step 3. You can now add widgets to the new tab. A pop-up window appears.Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 To change a dashboard’s properties: Access: Any except Restricted 1. Adding Tabs Requires: Any Use the following procedure to add a tab to a dashboard. see Renaming Tabs on page 95. If you do not have a default dashboard defined. click the add tab icon ( ). On the toolbar. If you have a default dashboard defined. click Dashboards. The new tab is added. continue with the next step. the Dashboard List page appears. see Adding Widgets on page 95. or simply click OK to accept the default name. The dashboard is changed. The Edit Dashboard page appears. 4. prompting you to name the tab. 3. For more information. Select Analysis & Reporting > Event Summary > Dashboards.

Renaming Tabs Requires: Any Use the following procedure to rename a dashboard tab. If all columns have an equal number of widgets. the appliance automatically adds it to the column with the fewest widgets. For more information. each dashboard must have at least one tab. the new widget is added to the left-most column. When you add a widget to a tab. You cannot delete the last tab from a dashboard. Type a name for the tab and click OK.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 95 . move widgets from tab to tab. click the delete icon ( 3. TIP! After you add widgets. On the tab you want to delete.9. For more information. Confirm that you want to delete the tab. 4. see Rearranging Widgets on page 97. Click the tab you want to rename. you must first decide to which tab you want to add the widget. The tab is deleted. You cannot. Click the tab title. You can add a maximum of 15 widgets to a dashboard tab. For more information. To delete a tab from a dashboard: Access: Any except Restricted 1. To rename a tab: Access: Any except Restricted 1.Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 Deleting Tabs Requires: Any Use the following procedure to delete a dashboard tab and all its widgets. see Viewing Dashboards on page 91. see Viewing Dashboards on page 91. 2. To add a widget to a dashboard: Access: Any except Restricted 1. View the dashboard where you want to rename a tab. View the dashboard where you want to add a widget. View the dashboard where you want to delete a tab. For more information. ). Adding Widgets Requires: Any To add a widget to a dashboard. prompting you to rename the tab. 2. see Viewing Dashboards on page 91. The tab is renamed. Version 4. 3. however. A pop-up window appears. you can move them to any location on the tab.

Operations.Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 2. and Miscellaneous. Click Add Widgets. Select the tab where you want to add the widget. The Add Widgets page appears. Version 4. or you can view all widgets by clicking All Categories. click Done to return to the dashboard. 4. 3. you may want to add multiple RSS Feed widgets. The widget is immediately added to the dashboard. 5. The widgets that you can add depend on the type of appliance you are using and on your user role. The Add Widgets page indicates how many widgets of each type are on the tab. The tab where you added the widgets appears again.9. Optionally. reflecting the changes you made. including the widget you just added. when you are finished adding widgets. Click Add next to the widgets you want to add. They are organized according to function: Analysis & Reporting. You can view the widgets in each category by clicking on the category name. TIP! To add multiple widgets of the same type (for example.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 96 . or multiple Custom Analysis widgets). click Add again.

If you do not have a default dashboard defined. If you have a default dashboard defined. continue with the next step. The widget is deleted from the tab. skip to step 3. Click the close icon ( ) in the title bar of the widget. then drag it to its new location. Note.9. you must define a new default or the appliance will force you to select a dashboard to view every time you attempt to view a dashboard.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 97 . To delete a dashboard: Access: Any except Restricted 1. 2. To minimize a widget: Access: Any except Restricted Access: Any except Restricted Requires: Any Click the minimize icon ( To maximize a widget: Click the maximize icon ( ) in a minimized widget’s title bar. If you delete your default dashboard. however. see Specifying Your Default Dashboard on page 35. Deleting a Dashboard Requires: Any Delete a dashboard if you no longer need to use it. Version 4. the Dashboard List page appears. Confirm that you want to delete the widget. Deleting Widgets Delete a widget if you no longer want to view it on a tab. ) in a widget’s title bar. you must delete it from the existing tab and add it to the new tab. it appears. Minimizing and Maximizing Widgets Requires: Any You can minimize widgets to simplify your view. To delete a widget: Access: Any except Restricted 1.Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 Rearranging Widgets Requires: Any You can change the location of any widget on a tab. To move a widget: Access: Any except Restricted Click the title bar of the widget you want to move. that you cannot move widgets from tab to tab. Select Analysis & Reporting > Event Summary > Dashboards. If you want a widget to appear on a different tab. then maximize them when you want to see them again. For more information.

The Dashboard List page appears.9. 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 98 . The dashboard is deleted. 3. click Dashboards. Confirm that you want to delete the dashboard.Using Dashboards Working with Dashboards Chapter 3 2. Version 4. On the toolbar. Click Delete next to the dashboard you want to delete.

and Crossbeam-based software sensors) do not provide a web interface that you can use to view events or manage policies. you can configure policies for all your sensors from a single location. network discovery information. RNA Software for Red Hat Linux.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 99 . and sensor performance data. You can also push health policies to your managed sensors and monitor their health status from the Defense Center. By using the Defense Center to manage sensors. Intrusion Agents. In addition. analyze. allowing you to monitor the information that your sensors are reporting in relation to one another and to assess the overall activity occurring on your network. 3Dx800 sensors. You must use a Defense Center if your deployment includes any of these products. Version 4. IMPORTANT! Some of the components in the Sourcefire 3D System (such as the Virtual 3D Sensors.Using the Defense Center Chapter 4 Administrator Guide The Sourcefire Defense Center is a key component in the Sourcefire 3D System. and to aggregate. and respond to the threats they detect on your network. you can push various types of software updates to sensors. making it easier to change configurations. The Defense Center aggregates and correlates intrusion events.9. You can use the Defense Center to manage the full range of sensors that are a part of the Sourcefire 3D System.

You can only use a single Defense Center to manage your sensor unless you are using a second Defense Center as a part of a high availability pair. and change the state of managed sensors and how to reset management of a sensor. The sections that follow explain some of the concepts you need to know as you plan your Sourcefire 3D System deployment. delete. This saves you from having Version 4. • • • • • Management Concepts Requires: DC You can use a Defense Center to manage nearly every aspect of a sensor’s behavior. Managing a Clustered Pair on page 140 describes how to create a clustered pair of 3D9900s and how to remove 3D9900s from clusters. Instead of managing each sensor using its own local web interface.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 100 . Configuring High Availability on page 145 describes how to set up two Defense Centers as a high availability pair to help ensure continuity of operations. Managing Sensor Groups on page 131 describes how to create sensor groups as well as how to add and remove sensors from groups. First. • • • • • The Benefits of Managing Your Sensors on page 100 What Can Be Managed by a Defense Center? on page 101 Understanding Software Sensors on page 105 Beyond Policies and Events on page 111 Using Redundant Defense Centers on page 112 The Benefits of Managing Your Sensors Requires: DC There are several benefits to using a Defense Center to manage your sensors. you can use the Defense Center as a central point of management. For example. you can use the Defense Center’s web interface to accomplish nearly any task on any sensor it manages. Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings on page 133 describes the sensor attributes you can edit and explains how to edit them. Working in NAT Environments on page 112 describes the principles of setting up the management of your sensors in Network Address Translation environments.Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 See the following sections for more information about using the Defense Center to manage your sensors: • • Management Concepts on page 100 describes some of the features and limitations involved with managing your sensors with a Defense Center. It also explains how to add.9. Working with Sensors on page 113 describes how to establish and disable connections between sensors and your Defense Center. you can create an intrusion policy on the Defense Center and apply it to all your managed 3D Sensors with IPS.

There is a similar savings when you create and apply RNA appliance and detection policies to managed 3D Sensors with RNA.Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 to replicate the intrusion policy on each sensor. A system policy controls several appliance-level settings such as the login banner and the access control list.9. Because most of the sensors in your deployment are likely to have similar settings in the system policy. when you manage a sensor with a Defense Center. Fourth. you push the external authentication object to the sensor. the Defense Center includes a feature called health monitoring that you can use to check the status of critical functionality across your Sourcefire 3D System deployment. you can create the policy on the Defense Center and push it to the appropriate sensors instead of replicating it locally. you can use your Defense Center to configure external authentication through an Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) or Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) server. External authentication cannot be managed on the sensor. By pushing a system policy with configured authentication objects to your sensor. What Can Be Managed by a Defense Center? Requires: DC You can use your Defense Center as a central management point in a Sourcefire 3D System deployment to manage the following devices: • • Sourcefire 3D Sensors RNA Software for Red Hat Linux Version 4. if your Defense Center manages sensors with IPS and RNA.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 101 . Second. You can view the events from a single web interface instead of having to log into each sensor’s interface to view the events there. You can also apply a health policy to the Defense Center to monitor its health. all the intrusion events and RNA events are automatically sent to the Defense Center. then the Defense Center can correlate the intrusion events it receives with the information about hosts that RNA provides. You can also create and apply system policies to your managed sensors. which can be a laborious task depending on how many of the thousands of intrusion rules you want to enable or disable. The impact flag indicates how likely it is that an intrusion attempt will affect its target. so you must use the Defense Center to manage it. You can also generate reports based on events from multiple sensors. You can take advantage of health monitoring by applying health policies to each of your managed sensors and then reviewing the health data that they send back to the Defense Center. You can use user information from an external server to authenticate users on your Sourcefire 3D System appliances. and those sensors view the same network traffic. Third. The Defense Center can then assign impact flags to each intrusion event. Finally.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 102 .Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 • • 3D Sensor Software for Crossbeam Systems X-Series Intrusion Agents on various platforms IMPORTANT! Sourcefire recommends that you manage no more than three 3D Sensors with the DC500 model Defense Center. as well as intrusion agents and RNA software on approved platforms. Version 4. For details on DC500 database limitations see Database Event Limits on page 333. The following illustration lists what is transmitted between a Sourcefire Defense Center and its managed sensors. you can see a read-only version of the policy on the Defense Center’s web interface. When you manage a sensor (or a software sensor). SSL-encrypted TCP tunnel. If you apply a policy on a sensor before you begin managing it with a Defense Center.9. You can also use a DC500 to manage Sourcefire 3D Sensor software on approved platforms. information is transmitted between the Defense Center and the sensor over a secure. Note that the types of events and policies that are sent between the appliances are based on the sensor type.

Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 Similarly.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 103 . each appliance has its own policies: Version 4.9. First. before you set up sensor management. you can see a read-only version of the running policies on the sensor’s web interface. The following graphics illustrate this process. after you set up communications with a Defense Center and apply policies from the Defense Center to your sensor.

If you want to edit a policy.9.Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 Then. Sourcefire recommends that you use only the Defense Center’s web interface to view events and manage policies for your managed sensors.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 104 . read-only versions of running policies (represented by the dotted lines) are available: The appliance where you originally create a policy is the policy’s “owner” and is identified that way if you view the policy on a different appliance. after communications are set up. For example. The Sample Intrusion Policy that is currently applied to the sensor’s two detection engines was created on the Defense Center (pine.com). you must do it on the appliance where the policy was created. Version 4. TIP! After you set up management with a Defense Center.example. the following graphic shows the Detection Engine page on a 3D Sensor with IPS.

see Managing 3Dx800 Sensors on page 107. For example.for more information. Also note that operations you perform on data on one appliance are not transmitted to other appliances. see Managing 3D Sensor Software with RNA for Crossbeam on page 110 3D Sensor Software with IPS for Crossbeam X-Series . deleting an intrusion event from a sensor does not delete it from the Defense Center. RNA Software for Red Hat Linux .Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 The following user-created data and configurations are retained locally on the sensor and are not shared with the Defense Center: • • • • • • • • • • • user accounts user preferences bookmarks saved searches custom workflows report profiles audit events syslog messages reviewed status for intrusion events (IPS only) contents of the clipboard (IPS only) incidents (IPS only) If you create custom fingerprints on the Defense Center. Similarly.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 105 . Understanding Software Sensors Requires: DC Several of the sensors you can manage with a Defense Center are softwarebased sensors. 3D3800. and 3D9800 sensors . A software-based sensor is a software-only installation of Sourcefire 3D System sensor software.9. they are automatically shared with managed 3D Sensors with RNA. the event remains on the sensor that discovered it. see Managing Intrusion Agents on page 106 3D5800.for more information. if you delete an intrusion event from the Defense Center. see Managing RNA Software for Red Hat Linux on page 109 3D Sensor Software with RNA for Crossbeam X-Series .for more information. The following Sourcefire 3D System sensors are software-based: • • • • Intrusion Agents for various platforms . see Managing 3D Sensor Software with IPS for Crossbeam on page 110 • Version 4.for more information.for more information.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 106 . In addition. The Defense Center cannot apply intrusion policies to the Intrusion Agent.9. Version 4. These events can then be viewed along with data from 3D Sensors with IPS so you can easily analyze all the intrusion information gathered on your network. You must tune your Snort rules and options manually on the computer where the Intrusion Agent resides. IMPORTANT! When using Intrusion Agents registered to Defense Centers configured for high availability and managed by a Master Defense Center. register all Intrusion Agents to the primary Defense Center. certain aspects of functionality are managed through the operating system or other features on the appliance. high availability is not supported on Intrusion Agents. For some software-based sensors. Managing Intrusion Agents Requires: DC The Sourcefire Intrusion Agent transmits events generated by open source Snort sensor installations to the Sourcefire Defense Center. Also. some of the functionality in the Defense Center interface cannot be used with software-based sensors. they can only be managed from a Defense Center.Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 Software-based sensors do not have a user interface on the sensor.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 107 .9.conf files • Process management • Registration of remote manager • Rules tuning Not Supported • Detection engine management • Event storage on sensor • Health policy apply • High availability synchronization • Host Statistics • Interface set management • Intrusion policy apply • Network interface management • Network settings • Performance Statistics • Remote backup and restore • Remote reports • Sensor information management (System Settings) • SEU updates • Software updates • System policy apply • Time settings Managing 3Dx800 Sensors Requires: DC + 3D Sensor Sourcefire 3D Sensor 3800. However. Version 4. Supported Features for Intrusion Agents Supported through Defense Center • Intrusion event collection and management • Licensing • Reports generated on the Defense Center Supported through CLI and . and 3D Sensor 9800 models (usually referred to as the 3Dx800 sensors) provide many of the features found on other 3D Sensors. 3D Sensor 5800.Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 See the Supported Features for Intrusion Agents table for more information. because these models do not have a web interface and because configuration and event data cannot be stored on the sensors.

See the Supported Features for 3Dx800 Sensors table for more information.9.Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 certain features cannot be used with these sensors.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 108 . Supported Features for 3Dx800 Sensors Supported through Defense Center All 3Dx800 models: • Detection engine management • Health policy apply • High availability synchronization • Host Statistics • Interface set management • Intrusion policy apply (no OPSEC support) • Intrusion event collection and management • Licensing • Performance Statistics (may be underreported because of multiple detection resources) • Process management • Reports generated on the Defense Center • Sensor information management (System Settings) • SEU updates • Software updates • System policy apply • Time settings 3D3800 and 3D5800 only: • Compliance policy apply • RNA and compliance event collection and management • RNA detection policy apply • VDB updates Supported through CLI • Network interface management • Network settings • Registration of remote manager Not Supported • Custom fingerprinting • Event storage on sensor • Remote backup and restore • Remote reports Version 4.

However. not all of the features function in the same manner.Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 Managing RNA Software for Red Hat Linux Requires: DC RNA Software for Red Hat Linux provides many of the features found on 3D Sensors with RNA.9. Supported Features for RNA Software for Red Hat Linux Supported through Defense Center • Compliance policy apply • Detection engine management • High availability synchronization • Host Statistics • Interface set management • Licensing • Performance Statistics • Reports generated on the Defense Center • RNA and compliance event collection and management • RNA detection policy apply • Sensor information management (System Settings) • Software updates • VDB updates Supported through CLI • Network interface management • Network settings • Process management • Registration of remote manager • Time settings Not Supported • Custom fingerprinting • Event storage on sensor • Health policy apply • Remote backup and restore • Remote reports • System policy apply Version 4. See the Supported Features for RNA Software for Red Hat Linux table for more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 109 .

because the Crossbeam sensors do not have a user interface and because configuration and event data cannot be stored on Version 4.9. Supported Features for RNA on Crossbeam Supported through Defense Center Supported through Crossbeam X-Series CLI • Backup and restore • Network interface management • Network settings • Process management • Registration of remote manager • Time settings Not Supported • Compliance policy apply • Detection engine management • High availability synchronization • Host Statistics • Interface set management • Licensing • Performance Statistics • Reports generated on the Defense Center • RNA detection policy apply • RNA and compliance event collection and management • Sensor information management (in System Settings) • Software updates • VDB updates • Custom fingerprinting • Event storage on sensor • Health policy apply • Remote backup and restore • Remote reports • System policy apply Managing 3D Sensor Software with IPS for Crossbeam Requires: DC 3D Sensor Software with IPS for Crossbeam provides many of the features found on 3D Sensors with IPS. See the Supported Features for RNA on Crossbeam table for more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 110 . not all of the features function in the same manner. However. However.Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 Managing 3D Sensor Software with RNA for Crossbeam Requires: DC 3D Sensor Software with RNA for Crossbeam provides many of the features found on 3D Sensors with RNA.

See Performing Sensor Backup with the Defense Center on page 419 for more information. you can use the Defense Center’s web interface to back up those events from the sensor.9. Audit events are stored locally Version 4. Running Remote Reports You can create a report profile on the Defense Center and run it remotely using the data on a managed sensor. Backing Up a Sensor If you are storing event data on your sensor in addition to sending it to the Defense Center. Supported Features for IPS on Crossbeam Supported through Defense Center Supported through Crossbeam X-Series CLI • Backup and restore • Network interface management • Network settings • Process management • Registration of remote manager • Time settings Not Supported • Detection engine management • High availability synchronization • Host Statistics • Interface set management • Intrusion policy apply • Intrusion event collection and management • Licensing • Performance Statistics • Reports generated on the Defense Center • SEU updates • Sensor information management (in System Settings) • Software updates • Custom fingerprinting • Event storage on sensor • Health policy apply • Remote backup and restore • Remote reports • System policy apply Beyond Policies and Events Requires: DC In addition to applying policies to sensors and receiving events from them. certain features cannot be used with this software.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 111 . See the Supported Features for IPS on Crossbeam table for more information.Using the Defense Center Management Concepts Chapter 4 the sensors. This is particularly useful if you want to generate a report for the audit events on a managed sensor. you can also perform other sensor-related tasks on the Defense Center.

company. which can contain new and updated intrusion rules.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 112 . Working in NAT Environments Requires: Any Network address translation (NAT) is a method of transmitting and receiving network traffic through a router that involves reassigning the source or destination IP address as the traffic passes through the router. but you can design a report on the Defense Center. you can use snort when adding either sensor. Typical applications using NAT enable multiple hosts on a private network to use a single public IP address to access the public network. the two required pieces of common information during registration are the registration key and the unique IP address or the fully qualified domain name of the host. If you establish that communication in an environment without NAT. Events are automatically sent to both Defense Centers. When you add an appliance. the two required pieces of common information during registration are the registration key and the unique NAT ID. If you establish that communication in an environment with NAT. select a managed sensor. Policies. when you set up the remote office 3D Sensors connections to the home office. use the Defense Center’s fully qualified domain name maple. and more are shared between the two Defense Centers. Using Redundant Defense Centers Requires: DC You can set up two Defense Centers as a high availability pair. Sourcefire releases updates to the Sourcefire 3D System.Using the Defense Center Working in NAT Environments Chapter 4 and are not sent to the Defense Center. Updating Sensors From time to time. See Working with Event Reports on page 232 for more information. including: • Security Enhancement Updates (SEUs). because the registration key does not have to Version 4. For the registration key. you establish connections between appliances and register the appliances with one another. See Configuring High Availability on page 145 or more information. user accounts.9.com as its host name. In the example diagram. and run the report. If you set up the report so that it is automatically emailed to you. This ensures redundant functionality in case one of the Defense Centers fails. as well as new and updated preprocessors and protocol decoders vulnerability database updates software patches and updates • • You can use the Defense Center to push an update to the sensors it manages and then automatically install the update. you do not even need a user account on the sensor to read the resulting report.

you must use a unique NAT ID when adding the New York 3D Sensor to the Defense Center. SSL-encrypted communication channel between the Defense Center and the sensor. However. Each NAT ID has to be unique among all NAT IDs used to register sensors on the Defense Center.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 be unique. You can create the following policies on your Defense Center and apply them to managed sensors: • • • health policies system policies RUA policies Version 4. you set up a two-way.9. it generates events and sends them to the Defense Center using the same channel.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 113 . Working with Sensors Requires: DC + 3D Sensor When you manage a sensor. The Defense Center uses this channel to send information (in the form of policies) to the sensor about how you want to analyze your network traffic. and then use a different unique NAT ID when adding the Miami 3D Sensor. As the sensor evaluates the traffic.

(Deleting Sensors on page 121 explains how to remove a sensor from the Defense Center. See Configuring Health Policies on page 489 for more information. RNA Software for Red Hat Linux. TIP! The process for setting up communications between the Defense Center and other products such as the Crossbeam-based software sensors. which controls the networks that 3D Sensors with RNA monitor. RNA detection engines require an RNA detection policy. 1. See Viewing Intrusion Event Statistics in the Analyst Guide and Viewing RNA Event Statistics in the Analyst Guide for more information. You can also create and apply system policies. Many sensor management tasks are performed on the Sensors page and are described in Understanding the Sensors Page on page 115. You can create and apply health policies that allow you to monitor the processes and status of your sensors. Create the appropriate policies on the Defense Center and apply them to the sensor or to the appropriate detection engines on the sensor. This is a two-step process. Confirm that you are receiving the events generated by your sensors.9. See What is an RNA Detection Policy? in the Analyst Guide for more information. with procedures that you need to perform on each side of the communications channel. which control certain appliance-level features on your sensors.) 2. Refer to the configuration guides for those products for more information. • • • 3. See Managing System Policies on page 320 for more information. See Managing a 3Dx800 Sensor on page 125 for more information. Begin by setting up a communications channel between the two appliances. and the Intrusion Agents are slightly different. Note that the system policy applied to the Defense Center controls the types of RNA events that are logged to the database.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 114 . Version 4. See Adding Sensors to the Defense Center on page 117 for more information. See Using Intrusion Policies in the Analyst Guide for more information.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 • • RNA detection policies intrusion policies There are several steps to managing a sensor with a Defense Center: The procedure for managing a 3Dx800 sensor differs from the procedure for managing other sensors. • IPS detection engines require an intrusion policy that determines which types of attacks 3D Sensor with IPS detect.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 115 . intrusion agents. Health Policy The next column lists the health policy for the sensor. sensor group. they are designated in the sensor list by a peer icon. Sort-by Drop-Down List Use this drop-down list to sort the Sensors page according to your needs. If you use clustered 3D9900 sensors. You can click the folder icon next to the name of the category to expand and contract the list of sensors. sensor type. if one has been applied. you can see which sensors are paired and if you configured the sensor as a master or a slave. the field for a Virtual Sensor count appears above the sensor list on the Sensors page. You can click the name of the health policy to view a read-only version of the policy. see Managing Sensor Groups on page 131) Model (that is.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 Understanding the Sensors Page Requires: DC + 3D Sensor The Sensors page (Operations > Sensors) provides you with a range of information and options that you can use to manage your sensors (including software-based sensors). Version 4. Virtual Sensor Count When you manage Virtual 3D Sensors from the Defense Center. and software version for each sensor.9. see the Virtual Defense Center and 3D Sensor Installation Guide. You can sort by: • • Group (that is. When you hover over the peer icon. See Editing Health Policies on page 530 for information about modifying an existing health policy. and sensor groups. sensor model. The following sections describe some of the features on the Sensors page. For details about Virtual 3D Sensors. the sensor model) Sensor List The first column lists the hostname.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 116 . the time. See Managing System Policies on page 320 for more information. The system settings include the storage settings for the sensor. See Editing Sensor Groups on page 132 for more information.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 System Policy The next column lists the currently applied system policy. and seconds) since the last contact. If the Defense Center has not received a communication from a sensor within the last two minutes. If a policy has a different icon and its name is in italics. you can click the Edit icon next to the name of a sensor group to modify the list of sensors that belong to the group. As with the health policy. Status Icons The status icons indicate the state of a sensor. If your network is constrained in bandwidth. that indicates the policy was modified after it was applied to the sensor. you can contact technical support to change the default time interval. minutes. The icon and the name of the policy in the bottom row indicate that the version applied to the sensor is up to date. a pop-up window indicates the amount of time (in hours. Edit and Delete Icons Click the Edit icon next to a sensor if you want to change the sensor’s current system settings. it sends a two-byte heartbeat packet to establish contact and ensure that the communications channel is still running. the remote management configuration. and access to the processes for stopping and restarting the sensor or its software. If you hover your cursor over the icon. you can click the name of the system policy to view a read-only version. If you sort your Sensors page by sensor group. Version 4. Note that this is the case for any policy that you create and apply from the Defense Center. The green check mark icon indicates that the sensor and the Defense Center are communicating properly.9. The policy name and the icon for the system policy in the top row highlight a special feature of the Sensors page. The red exclamation point icon indicates that the Defense Center has not received communications from the sensor in the last three minutes. See Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings on page 133 for more information.

Adding Sensors to the Defense Center Requires: DC + 3D Sensor When you manage a sensor. which monitor the health of your managed sensors Note that before you add sensors to a Defense Center. you must make sure that the network settings are configured correctly on the sensor. IMPORTANT! If you registered a Defense Center and 3D Sensor using IPv4 and want to convert them to IPv6. You can also add Intrusion Agents to the Defense Center. As the sensor evaluates the traffic.9. DNS cache settings. See Deleting Sensor Groups on page 133 for more information. If you sort your Sensors page by sensor group. See Deleting Sensors on page 121 for more information. You can create the following policies on your Defense Center and apply them to managed sensors: • • • • system policies. and custom login banners RNA detection policies. For more information. see Adding Intrusion Agents on page 130 and the Sourcefire Intrusion Agent Configuration Guide. you can click the Delete icon next to the name of a sensor group to remove the sensor group from the Defense Center. The Defense Center uses this channel to send information about how you want to analyze your network traffic (in the form of policies) to the sensor. but you can refer to Configuring Network Settings on page 377 for details. it generates events and sends them to the Defense Center using the same channel. you set up a two-way. This is usually completed as part of the installation process. SSL-encrypted communication channel between the Defense Center and the sensor. which control how protocol decoders and preprocessors are configured and which intrusion rules are enabled health policies.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 Click the Delete icon next to a sensor if you no longer want to manage the sensor with the Defense Center. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 117 . you must delete and re-register the sensor. which control appliance-level configurations such as database limits. which control RNA data-gathering behavior and determine which networks are monitored which detection engines intrusion policies.

9.for the hostname or IP address.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 To add a sensor. 2. The Information page appears. Management Host. Version 4. Log into the web interface of the sensor you want to add.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 118 . Management Host and Registration Key used on both appliances Registration Key and Unique NAT ID used on the 3D Sensor with Host.for a unique alphanumeric ID. Registration Key. or on both the Defense Center and the sensor • • TIP! Set up the managed appliance first. Three fields are provided for setting up communications between appliances: • • • Management Host . Registration Key . To add a sensor to a Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. and Unique NAT ID used on the Defense Center. Registration Key. you need: • the sensor’s IP address or hostname (in the connection context “hostname” is the fully qualified domain name or the name that resolves through the local DNS to a valid IP address) the Defense Center’s IP address or hostname to decide if you want to store the events generated by the sensor only on the Defense Center. Valid combinations include: • • • IMPORTANT! The Management Host or Host field (hostname or IP address) must be used on at least one of the appliances. Refer to Working in NAT Environments on page 112 for more information. Unique NAT ID . and Unique NAT ID used on the 3D Sensor with Registration Key and Unique NAT ID used on the Defense Center. You must begin the procedure for setting up the management relationship between a Defense Center and a sensor on the sensor.for registration key. Select Operations > System Settings.

In the Management Host field. In the Registration Key field. type the one-time use registration key that you want to use to set up a communications channel between the sensor and the Defense Center. In that case. The Add Remote Management page appears. TIP! You can leave the Management Host field empty if the management host does not have a routable address. the Pending Registration status appears. Click Remote Management. 5. in the Unique NAT ID field. type the IP address or the host name of the Defense Center that you want to use to manage the sensor.9. 4. Optionally. The Remote Management page appears. 8. Click Add Manager. type a unique alphanumeric ID that you want to use to identify the sensor. use both the Registration Key and the Unique NAT ID fields. Version 4. 6.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 3. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. 7.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 119 . After the sensor confirms communication with the Defense Center. Click Save.

enter the same registration key that you used in step 6. Type the IP address or the hostname of the sensor you want to add in the Host field.9. Click New Sensor. 10. 12. 15. Log into the Defense Center’s web interface using a user account with Admin access. You must store events on the Defense Center. For more information on supported functionality for software-based sensors. 11. see Understanding Software Sensors on page 105. You can store data on both the Defense Center and the sensor by clearing the Store Events and Packets Only on the Defense Center check box. By default. 13. and select Operations > Sensors. Version 4. 14.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 120 . In the Registration Key field. You can prevent packet data from leaving a sensor by enabling the Prohibit Packet Transfer to the Defense Center check box.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 9. If you used a NAT ID in step 7. The Add New Sensor page appears. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. Packet data is often important for forensic analysis. The Sensors page appears. IMPORTANT! Software-based sensors such as the 3D Sensor Software for Crossbeam cannot store data locally. packet data is not retained. IMPORTANT! If you elect to prohibit sending packets and you do not store events on the 3D Sensor. enter the same ID in the Unique NAT ID (optional) field. data is stored only on the Defense Center and not on the sensor.

you should delete the managed sensor from the Defense Center and then re-add it rather than try to delete the non-communicative detection engine. see Managing Sensor Groups on page 131. To add the sensor to a group. Communication between the sensor and the Defense Center is discontinued and the sensor is deleted from the Sensors page. you may need to use the Add Manager feature a second time to add the secondary Defense Center. you can delete it from the Defense Center. To manage the sensor again at a later date. For more information about groups. Deleting a sensor severs all communication between the Defense Center and the sensor.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 16. This interval ensures that the high availability pair re-synchronizes so that both Defense Centers recognize the deletion. TIP! If you can no longer communicate with a detection engine on a managed sensor (for example. it may take more than one synchronization cycle to add the sensor to both Defense Centers. To keep the sensor from trying to reconnect to the Defense Center. 17. IMPORTANT! In some high availability deployments where network address translation is used. select the group from the Add to Group list. you should also delete the manager on the sensor. Click Add.9. IMPORTANT! If you delete a sensor from a Defense Center configured in a high availability pair and intend to re-add it. To delete a sensor from the Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. The Sensors page appears. you must re-add it to the Defense Center. Sourcefire recommends that you wait at least five minutes before re-adding it. Contact technical support for more information. Log into the Defense Center web interface and select Operations > Sensors. 2. It can take up to two minutes for the Defense Center to verify the sensor’s heartbeat and establish communication. The sensor is added to the Defense Center. Version 4. If you do not wait five minutes.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 121 . if the sensor is down or the network interface card is damaged). Deleting Sensors Requires: DC + 3D Sensor If you no longer want to manage a sensor. You can view the sensor’s status on the Sensors page (Operations > Sensors). Click Delete next to the sensor you want to delete.

Resetting Management of a Sensor Requires: DC + 3D Sensor If communications fail between the Defense Center and one of your sensors. If you want to manage a sensor with a different Defense Center. The Sensors page appears.9. Log into the web interface of the Defense Center where you want to reset communications.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 122 . The manager is removed. The procedures for resetting management on the 3Dx800 sensors and on Crossbeam-based software sensors differ from the procedure for other sensors. You must first delete the manager on the sensor and delete the sensor on the Defense Center. If the sensor has a system policy that causes it to receive time from the Defense Center via NTP the sensor reverts to local . log into the web interface of the sensor you want to delete. TIP! To temporarily disable communications between appliances without having to reset management. The Information page appears. 6. The Remote Management page appears. see Resetting Communications on the 3Dx800 on page 128. 5. you can reset management of the sensor.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 3. Click Remote Management. Select Operations > Sensors. Using a user account with Admin access. Click Delete next to the Defense Center where you want to reset management. Version 4. see the Sourcefire 3D Sensor Software for X-Series Installation Guide. For more information on resetting management on a 3Dx800 sensor. you must also reset management before adding the sensor to another Defense Center. Select Operations > System Settings. time management. To reset management: Access: Admin 1. 2. For more information. 4. You can then re-add the manager on the sensor and then add the sensor to a Defense Center. see Managing Communication on a Managed Sensor on page 138. you can disable the manager on the sensor. For more information on resetting management on a Crossbeam-based software sensor.

If your sensor is no longer communicating with the Defense Center. 3. In that case. You must delete the appliance from its manager. you can delete the management on the sensor. type the IP address or the host name of the Defense Center that you want to use to manage the sensor. Communication between the sensor and the Defense Center is discontinued and the sensor is deleted from the Sensors page. The Add Remote Management page appears. Log into the web interface of the sensor where you want to reset communications.example.9. maple. The Remote Management page appears. If you attempt to delete management on the sensor while it is communicating with the Defense Center you will receive an error similar to: Delete failed. 4. You can leave the Management Host field empty if the management host does not have a routable address. Select Operations > System Settings.com. Log into the web interface of the sensor where you want to reset communications and click Add Manager. The manager is removed.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 3. Click Delete next to the sensor you want to delete. Version 4. Click Delete next to the Defense Center where you want to reset management. 2. 3. 2. Click Remote Management. To re-add the sensor to the Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. type the one-time use registration key that you want to use to set up a communications channel between the sensor and the Defense Center. To delete management on the sensor: Access: Admin 1. In the Registration Key field. The Information page appears. In the Management Host field. use both the Registration Key and the Unique NAT ID fields. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 123 .

in the Unique NAT ID field. The Sensors page appears. The Add New Sensor page appears.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 4. After the sensor confirms communication with the Defense Center. Version 4. 11. 6. Click Save.9. the Pending Registration status appears. type a unique ID that you want to use to identify the sensor. You can prevent packet data from leaving a sensor by checking the Prohibit Packet Transfer to the Defense Center check box. You can store data on both the Defense Center and the sensor by clearing the Store Events and Packets Only on the Defense Center check box. and select Operations > Sensors. In the Registration Key field. By default. 10. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. type the same one-time use registration key that you used in step 3. 5. type the same value in the Unique NAT ID field. Packet data is often important for forensic analysis. 7. 8. Click New Sensor. Optionally. If you elect to prohibit sending packets and you do not store events on the 3D Sensor. 9. packet data is not retained. data is stored only on the Defense Center and not on the sensor. Type the IP address or the hostname of the sensor you want to add in the Host field. 12. Log into the Defense Center’s web interface using a user account with Admin access.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 124 . If you used a unique NAT ID in step 4.

select the group from the Add to Group list. Contact technical support for more information. For more information about groups. To manage a 3Dx800 sensor with a Defense Center: Access: Admin 1.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 13.domain [admin] Version 4. Managing a 3Dx800 Sensor Requires: DC + 3D Sensor Because the Sourcefire 3D Sensor 3800.9. The CLI prompt appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 125 . The sensor is added to the Defense Center. and 3D Sensor 9800 (usually called the 3Dx800 sensors) do not have their own web interfaces. Log into the 3D Sensor using the admin account. you must add them to a Defense Center as managed sensors so that you can perform procedures such as: • • • • creating and applying intrusion and RNA detection policies viewing events generating reports uploading and installing software updates The following sections explain how to manage 3Dx800 sensors with a Defense Center: • • • Managing 3Dx800 Sensors with a Defense Center on page 125 Deleting a 3Dx800 Sensor from the Defense Center on page 127 Resetting Communications on the 3Dx800 on page 128 Managing 3Dx800 Sensors with a Defense Center Requires: DC + 3D Sensor Setting up communications between a 3Dx800 sensor and a Defense Center is a two-step process that involves setting up the sensor and then adding the sensor to the Defense Center. 14. 3D Sensor 5800. you may need to use the Add Manager feature a second time to add the secondary Defense Center. This procedure assumes that you have completed the setup steps described in the sensor’s Installation Guide. Click Add. To add the sensor to a group. In some high availability deployments where network address translation is used. see Managing Sensor Groups on page 131. You can view the sensor’s status on the Sensors page (Operations > Sensors). sensor. It can take up to two minutes for the Defense Center to verify the sensor’s heartbeat and establish communication.

8. • If you are deploying your sensor in a network that does use network address translation. enter the following command: [admin:sensor] set management enable NONE reg_key nat_id where NONE is a placeholder for the unresolvable IP address of the Defense Center. a message appears indicating that remote management is enabled. you must change it on the 3Dx800 also: [admin:sensor] set management port port_number where port_number is the same port number you used on the Defense Center. Use the following command to exit the CLI and return to the login prompt: [admin:sensor] exit 7. Using a user account with Admin access. 5.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 126 .Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 2.9. Use the following command to determine whether remote management is already enabled: [admin:sensor] show management If management is already enabled. The IP address and registration key pair must uniquely identify the communications channel between the sensor and the Defense Center. log into the web interface of the Defense Center where you want to add the sensor. Version 4. enter the following command: [admin:sensor] set management enable ip_address reg_key where ip_address is the IP address of the Defense Center and reg_key is a unique single-use alphanumeric registration key. Enter the following at the CLI prompt: [admin] configure sensor 3. and nat_id is a unique alphanumeric string. 6. In either case. The NAT ID together with the registration key must uniquely identify the communications channel between the sensor and the Defense Center. The Sensors page appears. Select Operations > Sensors. 4. Use one of the following commands to enable management on the 3D Sensor: • If you are deploying your sensor in a network that does not use network address translation. See Resetting Communications on the 3Dx800 on page 128 for information about deleting the sensor from the other Defense Center and preparing it for new management. the sensor may be managed by another Defense Center. reg_key is a unique single-use alphanumeric registration key. If you changed the management port on the Defense Center.

In the Registration Key field. select the name of the group from the Add to Group list. 11. To add the sensor to a group. type the same value in the Unique NAT ID field. The 3Dx800 is added to the Defense Center. The Add New Sensor page appears. You can prevent packet data from leaving a sensor by checking the Prohibit Packet Transfer to the Defense Center check box. packet data.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 9. For more information about groups. which is often important for forensic analysis. to manage it with a different Defense Center). Click Add. 14. 10. It can take up to two minutes for the Defense Center to verify the sensor’s heartbeat and establish communication. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 127 .9. If you used a NAT ID in step 4. is not retained anywhere. see Managing Sensor Groups on page 131. type the IP address or the hostname of the sensor you want to add. you must complete a two-step process to disable remote management and then delete it from the Defense Center. type the same one-time use registration key that you used on the sensor. 15. 13. Click New Sensor. 12. If you prohibit sending packets to the Defense Center. Deleting a 3Dx800 Sensor from the Defense Center Requires: DC + 3D Sensor If you want to delete a 3Dx800 sensor from a Defense Center (for example. IMPORTANT! Because 3Dx800 sensors do not have any local storage for events. make sure the Store Events and Packets Only on the Defense Center check box is selected. In the Host field.

you must re-enable remote management and then add the sensor to the Defense Center. you can manually reset communications on the sensor. 3. For more information.domain [admin] 5. Enter the following command to exit the CLI and return to the login prompt: [admin:sensor] exit To add the sensor to either the same or a different Defense Center. 3. Click Delete next to the sensor you want to delete. sensor.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 128 . The sensor is deleted. The sensor is deleted.domain [admin] 2. access the command prompt and use the admin account to log in. To reset communications between the sensor and the Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. The Sensors page appears. see the next section. sensor. The Sensors page appears. access the command prompt and use the admin account to log in.9. Enter the following at the CLI prompt: [admin] configure sensor 2. The CLI prompt appears. On the sensor. Enter the following command to disable remote management: [admin:sensor] set management disable A message appears indicating that remote management is disabled. Resetting Communications on the 3Dx800 Requires: DC + 3D Sensor If communication fails between a 3Dx800 sensor and the Defense Center that manages it. On the sensor. Select Operations > Sensors. Log into the web interface of the Defense Center that manages the sensor. 6. Select Operations > Sensors. 7. 4. The CLI prompt appears. Log into the web interface of the Defense Center where you want to delete the sensor.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 To delete a 3Dx800 sensor from a Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. Click Delete next to the sensor that is no longer communicating with the Defense Center. 4. Version 4. Resetting Communications on the 3Dx800.

Enter the following command to exit the CLI and return to the login prompt: [admin:sensor] exit 9. Enter the following command to disable remote management: [admin:sensor] set management disable Remote management is disabled. Use one of the following commands to enable remote management. • If your sensor is in a network that does use network address translation. Communications are restarted and the sensor is re-added to the Defense Center.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 5. re-add the sensor by clicking New Sensor. In the Host field. reg_key is a unique single-use alphanumeric registration key. and nat_id is a unique alphanumeric string. 11. enter the following command: [admin:sensor] set management enable ip_address reg_key where ip_address is the IP address of the Defense Center and reg_key is a unique single-use alphanumeric registration key. In either case. The IP address and registration key pair must uniquely identify the communications channel between the sensor and the Defense Center. type the IP address or hostname of the sensor and make sure the Store Events and Packets Only on the Defense Center check box is selected. Enter the following at the CLI prompt: [admin] configure sensor 6.9. enter the following command: [admin:sensor] set management enable NONE reg_key nat_id where NONE is a placeholder for the unresolvable IP address of the Defense Center. Click Add.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 129 . Version 4. On the Defense Center’s Sensors page. The NAT ID together with the registration key must uniquely identify the communications channel between the sensor and the Defense Center. • If your sensor is in a network that does not use network address translation. remote management is enabled again. The Sensors page appears. 7. 8. 10.

Click Download Auth Credentials and save them for later use on the Intrusion Agent.Intrusion Agent Page on page 130. type an identifying name for the agent. and reports. Access the Defense Center web interface and select Operations > Sensors. 6. you copy this file to the Intrusion Agent appliance to allow the Intrusion Agent to authenticate with the Defense Center. enter the IP address granted by the NAT device. register all Intrusion Agents to the primary Defense Center. see the Sourcefire Intrusion Agent Configuration Guide. 5. This is the name that the Defense Center uses to identify the Intrusion Agent. displaying a link that allows you to download authentication credentials. IMPORTANT! When using Intrusion Agents registered to Defense Centers configured for high availability and managed by a Master Defense Center. Click New Agent. that is. Sensor Attributes . It will appear on the event summary. The Agent Administration page appears. The Intrusion Agent is added and the page reloads. 3. see Sensor Attributes .1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 130 . Click Add Agent. Version 4. type the Intrusion Agent’s host name (if DNS resolution is enabled on the Defense Center) or IP address. WARNING! If your Intrusion Agent sensor resides behind a NAT device. The Managed Sensors page appears. During configuration. you should the IP address that the Defense Center will “see” when the Intrusion Agent attempts to communicate with it.9. In the Name Of Agent field. In the Hostname or IP Address field.Using the Defense Center Working with Sensors Chapter 4 Adding Intrusion Agents Requires: DC + Intrusion Agent The Add Agent page allows you to add an Intrusion Agent.Intrusion Agent Page Requires: DC + Intrusion Agent The Sensor Attributes page for Intrusion Agents allows you to view basic information about the Intrusion Agent and allows you to download authentication credentials. To add an Intrusion Agent: Access: Admin 1. event view pages. To download authentication credentials. For information on the requirements for the intrusion agent side of the connection. 4. 2.

To download authentication credentials from the Sensor Attributes page: Access: Admin 1. For information about Defense Center groups. Click Download Credential File. See the following sections for more information: • • • Creating Sensor Groups on page 131 explains how to create a sensor group on the Defense Center. Creating Sensor Groups Requires: DC + 3D Sensor Grouping managed sensors allows you to configure multiple sensors with a single system or health policy. 3. To create a sensor group and add sensors to it: Access: Admin 1.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 131 . see Managing Appliance Groups on page 179. Editing Sensor Groups on page 132 explains how to modify the list of sensors in a sensor group. The Managed Sensors page appears. For more information about copying the credentials. Version 4. Deleting Sensor Groups on page 133 explains how to delete a sensor group. select Operations > Sensors. and update multiple sensors with new software updates at the same time. On the Defense Center.9. see the Sourcefire Intrusion Agent Configuration Guide. Click Edit next to the Intrusion Agent. You are prompted to download the credentials to your local computer. The System Settings page for the Intrusion Agent appears. Access the Defense Center web interface and select Operations > Sensors. 2.Using the Defense Center Managing Sensor Groups Chapter 4 Authentication credentials are unique to each Intrusion Agent appliance and Defense Center and cannot be copied from one appliance to another. The Sensors page appears. Managing Sensor Groups Requires: DC + 3D Sensor The Defense Center allows you to group sensors so that you can easily apply policies and install updates on multiple sensors.

In the Group Name field.9. 5. 4. Editing Sensor Groups Requires: DC + 3D Sensor You can change the set of sensors that reside in any sensor group. To edit a sensor group: Access: Admin 1. Click Save. The Sensors page appears. See Applying an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide for details. Version 4. The sensors are added to the group. select Operations > Sensors. Click Save. The group is added. you must apply a new policy to the sensor or sensor group. 6. The Sensor Group Edit page appears. To change the sensor’s policy.Using the Defense Center Managing Sensor Groups Chapter 4 2. type the name of the group you want to create. On the Defense Center. The Create Sensor Group page appears. Select the IP addresses or hostnames of the sensors you want to add from the Available Sensors list and click the arrow to move them into sensor group.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 132 . TIP! You must remove a sensor from its current group before you can add it to a new group. To add sensors to the group. Click Create New Sensor Group. Moving a sensor to a new group does not change its policy to the policy previously applied to the group. 7. return to the Sensors page (Operations > Sensors) and click Edit next to the name of the sensor group. 3.

The Sensor Group Edit page appears. When you Version 4. 3. select it from the Available Sensors list and click the arrow pointing toward the group you are editing. Click Done. Deleting Sensor Groups Requires: DC + 3D Sensor If you delete a group that contains sensors. the sensors are moved to Ungrouped on the Sensors page.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 133 . Select Operations > Sensors. Click Edit next to the sensor group you want to edit. Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings Requires: DC or 3D Sensor Each sensor has a number of system settings. select it from the list in the group you are editing and click the arrow pointing to the Available Sensors list.9. Click Delete next to the group you want to delete. 4. To delete a sensor group: Access: Admin 1. To remove a sensor from a group. On an unmanaged sensor you can use the sensor’s web interface to modify the settings as needed. They are not deleted from the Defense Center. 2. The Sensors page appears.Using the Defense Center Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings Chapter 4 2. • • To add a sensor to the group. Select the sensor you want to move and click the arrow to add or remove it from the group.

For more information.9. Click Edit next to the name of the sensor where you want to edit the system settings. see Editing Network Interface Configurations on page 380. you can: • • view detailed information about the sensor. The Sensors page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 134 . To edit the system settings for a managed sensor: Access: Admin 1. For more information. IMPORTANT! You cannot edit the network settings or add a license file to a sensor through the Defense Center’s web interface. It is possible to select a setting that makes it difficult to access the web interface. see Viewing a Sensor’s Information Page on page 135. For more information. You must perform those tasks on the sensor’s web interface (generally before you begin to manage the sensor with the Defense Center). • reboot or restart the processes on the managed sensor. 3.Using the Defense Center Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings Chapter 4 manage one or more sensors with a Defense Center. 2. WARNING! Do not modify the settings for the management interface unless you have physical access to the appliance. modify the default settings for each network interface on the managed sensor. See Configuring System Settings on page 360 for more information about system settings. Version 4. you can modify their system settings through the Defense Center’s web interface. From the System Settings page. see Stopping and Restarting a Managed Sensor on page 137. The Appliance page appears and includes a list of links on the left side of the page that you can use to navigate between pages. On the Defense Center. select Operations > Sensors.

The model name for the managed sensor. When you view the Information page for a managed Defense Center from the Master Defense Center’s web interface. For more information. manage time settings on the managed sensor. Enable this check box to prevent the managed sensor from sending packet data with the events. Note that is the name of the sensor in the Defense Center web interface. Clear this check box to store event data on both appliances. see Managing Communication on a Managed Sensor on page 138.9. For more information. the fields are slightly different. Product Model Software Version Store Events Only on Defense Center Prohibit Packet Transfer to the Defense Center Operating System Operating System Version VDB Version IPv4 Address Version 4. Enable this check box to store event data on the Defense Center. but not the managed sensor. For more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 135 . blacklist individual health policy modules on the managed sensor. The version of the software currently installed on the managed sensor. The operating system currently running on the managed sensor. The version level of the vulnerability database currently loaded on the managed sensor. see Setting the Time on a Managed Sensor on page 139. Sensor Information Field Name Description The assigned name for the managed sensor.Using the Defense Center Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings Chapter 4 • manage communications between the sensor and the Defense Center. The version of the operating system currently running on the managed sensor. Clear this check box to allow packet data to be stored on the DC with events. • • Viewing a Sensor’s Information Page Requires: DC or 3D Sensor The Information page for a managed sensor includes the fields described in the Sensor Information table. See Editing Settings for a Managed Defense Center on page 175. see Blacklisting a Health Policy Module on page 537. The IPv4 address of the managed sensor. not the hostname.

To edit a managed sensor’s settings: Access: Admin 1. Model Number Current Group The model number for the sensor. If a policy has been updated since it was last applied. • The name of the current health policy is listed under Health. The sensor group that the sensor belongs to. a pop-up message indicates how long it has been (in hours. The Sensors page appears. This number can be important for troubleshooting. the name of the policy appears in italics.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 136 . Version 4. if you applied one from the Defense Center that manages the sensor.9. minutes. If you hover your cursor over the icon. You can click Refresh to update the Status icon and its accompanying pop-up message. See Creating Sensor Groups on page 131 for more information. Select Operations > Sensors. and seconds) since the sensor communicated with the Defense Center. The appliance-level policies currently applied to the managed sensor. • The name of the current system policy is listed under System.Using the Defense Center Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings Chapter 4 Sensor Information (Continued) Field IPv6 Address Current Policies Description The IPv6 address of the managed sensor. if any. Status An icon showing the current status of the managed sensor.

Using the Defense Center Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings Chapter 4 2. Version 4. Change the sensor’s attributes as needed.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 137 . 3. You can edit the following: • • • the sensor’s hostname where events generated by the sensor are stored the group in which the sensor resides WARNING! Sensor host names must be made up of a combination of alphanumeric characters and should not be made up of numeric characters only. Stopping and Restarting a Managed Sensor Requires: DC For 3D Sensors. See the Sensor Information table on page 135 for a description of each field. you can reboot or restart the processes on a managed sensor using the Defense Center’s web interface. Click Save. You must use the command line interface (CLI) to manage processes on Crossbeam-based software sensors. RNA Software for Red Hat Linux. and Intrusion Agents. Click Edit next to the name of the sensor whose system settings you want to edit. The Information page for that sensor appears. 4.9. The updated sensor attributes are saved.

the process shuts down the operating system on the appliance. Select Operations > Sensors. click Run Command next to Restart Appliance Console. click Run Command next to Reboot Appliance. The Sensors page appears. 3. click Run Command next to Restart Detection Engines. you can manage communications between a managed sensor and the Defense Center managing it using the Defense Center’s web interface. The Information page for that sensor appears. To disable communications between the Defense Center and the sensor: Access: Admin 1. click Run Command next to Shutdown Appliance. Select Operations > Sensors.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 138 . The Sensors page appears. but does not physically shut off power. Managing Communication on a Managed Sensor Requires: DC + 3D Sensor For most 3D Sensors.9. Crossbeam-based software sensors. To shut off power. 2.Using the Defense Center Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings Chapter 4 To shut down or restart a managed sensor: Access: Admin 1. Version 4. Specify what command you want to perform: • • • • If you want to shut down the sensor. and Intrusion Agents. The Process page appears for your managed sensor. If you want to restart the Snort and RNA processes. Click Edit next to the name of the sensor that you want to restart. If you want to restart the software processes on the sensor. Click Process in the list to the left of the page. 4. WARNING! If you shut down the appliance. You must use the command line interface (CLI) to manage communication on 3Dx800 sensors. RNA Software for Red Hat Linux. If you want to reboot the sensor. you must press the power button on the appliance.

Using the Defense Center Editing a Managed Sensor’s System Settings Chapter 4 2. TIP! To enable communications between the two appliances again. You must use the command line interface (CLI) to manage time settings on Crossbeam-based software sensors and RNA Software for Red Hat Linux. then you cannot change the time manually. Communications between the two appliances are interrupted. 4. For 3D Sensors. you can manage time settings on a managed sensor using the Defense Center’s web interface. For information about editing the remote management communications from a sensor see Configuring Remote Access to the Defense Center on page 386. You cannot manage time settings on Intrusion Agents. Select Operations > Sensors. The Sensors page appears. Version 4. Click Edit next to the name of the sensor that you want to manage. Click Edit next to the name of the sensor where you want to set the time.9. The Remote Management page appears. The Information page for that sensor appears. which is the recommended setting for a managed sensor and its Defense Center. Click Remote Management in the list to the left of the page. click Enable. Setting the Time on a Managed Sensor Requires: DC or 3D Sensor If your managed sensor is receiving its time from an NTP server. Click Disable next to the name of the sensor. However. 3. To set the time for a managed sensor: Access: Admin 1.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 139 . 2. then you can change it as part of the system settings. See the NTP Status table on page 390 for a description of the values you are likely to see for a sensor that is synchronized with an NTP server. if the system policy applied to the managed sensor allows you to set the time manually. The Information page for that sensor appears.

you combine the 3D9900 sensors resources into a single.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 140 . Managing a Clustered Pair Requires: DC + 3D9900 You can increase the amount of traffic inspected on a network segment by connecting two fiber-based 3D9900 sensors in a clustered pair. this time zone option changes the time setting your user account uses on the Defense Center web interface. When you establish a clustered pair configuration. The Time page appears showing the current time. Version 4. After you do the cabling. 4. 6.9. shared configuration. after the time zone setting is saved. In other words. select the following: • • • • • year month day hour minute 5. From the Set Time drop-down lists. Select your time zone and click Save and. use a Defense Center to establish the clustered pair relationship between the two sensors and manage their joint resources. 7. Click Time in the list to the left of the page. click Close to close the pop-up window.Using the Defense Center Managing a Clustered Pair Chapter 4 3. The time is updated. When you connect the two 3D9900 sensors you determine which is the master. A pop-up window appears. This setting does not affect the time zone setting on the managed sensor. Click Apply. Changing the time zone with this option is equivalent to changing the time zone using the Time Zone Settings option in the user preferences. You connect the master to the network segment you wish to analyze. If you want to change the time zone. click the time zone link located next to the date and time.

see the Cluster Interconnect table.9. For information on the detection engines. and data from a clustered pair. shared detection configuration. and local management is blocked on the shared portion of the clustered pair.Using the Defense Center Managing a Clustered Pair Chapter 4 After you establish the relationship between the two sensors. The following diagram shows interfaces on the master and slave sensors.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 141 . see: • • • Using Detection Engines on Clustered 3D Sensors on page 228 Understanding Interface Sets on Clustered 3D Sensors on page 229 Managing Information from a Clustered 3D Sensor on page 230 The Defense Center manages the clustered pair. For information about the connections between the master and slave 3D9900 sensors. they act like two separate sensors with a single. interface set. Cluster Interconnect Master Interface ethb2 RX ethb2 TX Slave Interface ethb0 TX ethb0 RX Version 4.

Before you begin. the detection engines and interface set are combined on the two sensors. You determine the master/slave designation by the way you cable the pair.6 or later loaded on your 3D9900 and Defense Center cable the units properly prior to designating the master/slave relationship Connect the master’s ethb0 and ethb1 pair to the network.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 142 . you must: • • • decide which unit will be the master have SEU 2. you must edit and reapply your detection policy after you establish clustering. IMPORTANT! If you apply an RNA detection policy to the RNA detection engines on two different 3D9900 sensors and then establish clustering with those two sensors. you cannot change which sensor is the master or slave unless you break and reestablish the relationship using the Defense Center. Connect the master’s ethb2 and ethb3 pair to the slave’s ethb0 and ethb1 pair as shown in the Cluster Interconnect table. IMPORTANT! You cannot connect the slave’s ethb2 and ethb3 pair when you establish the clustered pairing. see the Sourcefire 3D Sensor Installation Guide. For more information. see: • • Establishing a Clustered Pair on page 142 Separating a Clustered Pair on page 144 Establishing a Clustered Pair Requires: DC + 3D9900 You can group two fiber-based 3D9900 sensors in a clustered pair to increase throughput.8.9. For more information about cabling. Version 4. After you establish the relationship.Using the Defense Center Managing a Clustered Pair Chapter 4 Cluster Interconnect Master Interface ethb3 RX ethb3 TX Slave Interface ethb1 TX ethb1 RX You connect the master to the network and the slave to the master. After you establish the master/slave relationship.

In the Clustering field.com.com. They are managed from the Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 143 . 3. 2.Using the Defense Center Managing a Clustered Pair Chapter 4 There is one detection engine and interface set shared over the paired 3D9900 sensors. For example. the following message is displayed. you cannot perform the next series of steps.9. under status. if the other member of your pair is birch. To establish 3D9900 clustered pairing: Access: Admin 1. If you attempt to manage the combined detection engines and interface set on the paired 3D9900 sensors.example. The System Settings page appears and there is a Clustering field at the bottom. The Click Edit next to the 3D9900 sensor that you cabled for master operation. Clustering is established and a confirmation message appears. Select Operations > Sensors on your Defense Center. The Sensor page appears. instead of the 3D9900 sensors. TIP! If you edit a 3D9900 that is not cabled as the master. Version 4. select the sensor you want to form a cluster with.example. select Clustered with birch.

Note the Master/Slave pairing and click OK to confirm the Master/Slave that you want to separate the clustered pair. 3. Click Save. the sensing traffic is interrupted. Separating a Clustered Pair Requires: DC + 3D9900 If you no longer need to use the two 3D9900 sensors as a clustered pair. 6. Click Edit next to the 3D9900 sensor that you designated as the maser sensor when you connected the pair’s cables. To separate a 3D9900 clustered pair: Access: Admin 1. The System Settings page appears with the Clustering field at the bottom. 2. detection engines) from the slave.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 144 . Select Break Cluster in the Clustering field. it removes detection configurations (interface sets. If the system determines that the cabling is correct. you can use the Defense Center to break the cluster.Using the Defense Center Managing a Clustered Pair Chapter 4 4. the field reads: Status Clustered and Role Slave • 3D9900 clustering is established.9. The 3D9900 sensors separate and the confirmation message disappears. verify that the Clustering field changes to indicate the correct state. Review the confirmation message and confirm the correct the Master/Slave pairing. Version 4. Use the managing Defense Center to establish the cluster’s detection configurations for the interface set and detection engines. The Sensor page appears. • On the master. IMPORTANT! While system verifies the cabling configuration. 5. 5. where sensor_name is the name of the sensor you designated as the slave in step 3 and Role Master. For example: 4. Click OK to confirm the Master/Slave pairing. the field reads: Status Clustered sensor_name. After clustering is established. Select Operations > Sensors on your Defense Center. On the slave. Review the confirmation message.

• • • • • • • Using High Availability on page 145 list the items that are and are not duplicated when you implement high availability.9.Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 Configuring High Availability Requires: DC To ensure the continuity of operations. Version 4. Sourcefire strongly recommends that both Defense Centers in an HA pair be the same model. the high availability feature allows you to designate redundant Defense Centers to manage 3D Sensors. Disabling High Availability and Unregistering Sensors on page 153 explains how to permanently remove the link between linked Defense Centers. The DC500 model of the Defense Center and the Virtual Defense Center do not support high availability. Pausing Communication between Paired Defense Centers on page 154 explains how to pause communications between linked Defense Centers. Setting Up High Availability on page 150 explains how to specify primary and secondary Defense Centers. RNA events. Using High Availability Requires: DC The DC1000 and DC3000 models of the Defense Center support high availability configurations. That is. Monitoring the High Availability Status on page 152 explains how to check the status of your linked Defense Centers. Guidelines for Implementing High Availability on page 149 outlines some guidelines you must follow if you want to implement high availability. and compliance events without interruption using the second Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 145 . do not attempt to set up high availability between a Defense Center 1000 and a Defense Center 3000. WARNING! Sourcefire recommends that you change configurations only on the primary Defense Center and that you keep your secondary Defense Center as a backup. RUA events. Restarting Communication between Paired Defense Centers on page 154 explains how to restart communications between linked Defense Centers. Event data streams from managed sensors to both Defense Centers and certain configuration elements are maintained on both Defense Centers. See the following sections for more information about setting up high availability. you can monitor your network for intrusion events. If one Defense Center fails.

Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 For more information on: • • • • sensor attributes and user information shared in a high availability pair.9. if you have any user accounts with the same name on both Defense Centers. see Understanding High Availability on page 148 Sensor Configurations and User Information Requires: DC Defense Centers in a high availability pair (also called an HA pair) share the following sensor attributes and user information: • user account attributes and authentication configurations WARNING! Before you establish a high availability. see Sensor Configurations and User Information on page 146 health and system policies shared in a high availability pair. where events generated by the sensor are stored. such as the sensor’s host name. and the group in which the sensor resides intrusion. • • RNA detection policies RNA custom service detectors Version 4. RNA. see Health and System Policies on page 147 feature license operation in a high availability pair. Also. • • • • • • • • • • custom dashboards authentication objects for Sourcefire 3D System user accounts custom workflows custom tables sensor attributes. and RUA detection engines intrusion policies and their associated rule states local rules custom intrusion rule classifications variable values and user-defined variables IMPORTANT! If your deployment includes intrusion agents and you are also using a Master Defense Center to manage your linked Defense Centers. you must make sure that the admin account uses the same password on both Defense Centers. because both Defense Centers must have an admin account. make sure you remove duplicate user accounts from one of the Defense Centers. make sure you register all intrusion agents to the primary Defense Center. see Feature Licenses on page 148 details of high availability pair operation.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 146 .

services. When you restore your primary Defense Center after a failure. and the deactivation or modification of vulnerabilities compliance policies and their associated rules compliance white lists • • To avoid launching duplicate responses and remediations when compliance policies are violated.9. Although system policies are shared by Defense Centers in a high availability pair. Defense Centers do not share the associations between the policies and their responses and remediations. Allow enough time to ensure that 3D Sensor information about health policies. is synchronized on a newly activated Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 147 . if you created associations between rules or white lists and their responses and remediations on the secondary Defense Center. For 3D Sensors. However. apply the policy after it synchronizes. make sure you remove the associations so responses and remediations will only be generated by the primary Defense Center. you can synchronize time with multiple alternative NTP servers.You must upload and install any custom remediation modules and configure remediation instances on your secondary Defense Center before remediations are available to associate with compliance policies. see Creating Compliance Policies in the Analyst Guide and Configuring Remediations in the Analyst Guide. and networks from the network map. Version 4. see Synchronizing Time on page 354. you can point to one Defense Center as your first NTP server and the other Defense Center as your second NTP server. If you want identical system policies on both Defense Centers. For more information. Health and System Policies Requires: DC Health and system policies for Defense Centers and 3D Sensors are shared in high availability pairs. including notes and host criticality. For more information. they are not automatically applied. If the primary Defense Center fails. TIP! If you employ an HA paired Defense Center as a NTP server. the deletion of hosts. the NTP function does not automatically switch.Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 • • • • activated custom fingerprints host attributes traffic profiles RNA user feedback. modules. blacklists. you should quickly associate your compliance policies with the appropriate responses and remediations on the secondary Defense Center to maintain continuity of operations.

if you want to use NetFlow data to supplement the data gathered by your 3D Sensors with RNA. If one Defense Center does not have a NetFlow license. For more information. and any change you make to one Defense Center should be applied on the other Defense Center within ten minutes. you can make policy or other changes to either Defense Center.9. both Defense Centers must have RUA licenses if you want to manage 3D Sensors with RUA with the high availability pair.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 148 .Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 Defense Centers in an HA pair share the following system and health policy information: • • • • • • system policies system policy configurations (what policy is applied where) health policies health monitoring configurations (what policy is applied where) which appliances are blacklisted from health monitoring which appliances have individual health monitoring policies blacklisted Feature Licenses Requires: DC Defense Centers in an HA pair do not share RNA. so changes appear within two five-minute Version 4. RUA. see Configuring an RUA Agent on an Active Directory Server in the Analyst Guide. IMPORTANT! An RUA Agent can only connect to one Defense Center at a time. but the cycles themselves could be out of sync by as much as five minutes. TIP! Both Defense Centers in a high-availability pair must have NetFlow licenses for at least the number of NetFlow-enabled devices you are using. While NetFlow data and devices are shared. you must make sure that your RUA Agents can communicate with the secondary Defense Center. if the primary Defense Center fails. In an high-availability environment. (Each Defense Center has a five-minute synchronization cycle. the two Defense Centers must have enough NetFlow licenses to merge the list of devices on each. ” Defense Centers periodically update each other on changes to their configurations. it will not receive data from your NetFlow-enabled devices. • While RUA LDAP authentication objects are shared. Understanding High Availability Requires: DC Although Defense Centers in high availability mode are named “primary” and “secondary. and NetFlow licenses: • • Both Defense Centers must have RNA host licenses if you want to manage 3D Sensors with RNA with the high availability pair.

regardless of the designations of the Defense Center as primary and secondary. • You must designate one Defense Center as the primary Defense Center and one as the secondary. both Defense Centers can be configured with policies. you must follow these guidelines. Because the sensor has a policy applied to it that the secondary Defense Center does not recognize. You cannot configure a recurring task schedule on the inactive Defense Center. • By default. To make sure the secondary Defense Center is in its original state. For more information. the sensor could contact the secondary Defense Center before the Defense Centers contact each other. rules. see Guidelines for Implementing High Availability on page 149. Both Defense Centers must be running the same software version.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 149 . • • • Version 4. and so on before you set up high availability. the Defense Centers use port 8305/tcp for communications. if you create a policy on your primary Defense Center and apply it to a sensor that is also managed by your secondary Defense Center. you have not created or modified any policies. TIP! To avoid confusion. Guidelines for Implementing High Availability Requires: DC To take advantage of high availability. Regardless of their designations as primary and secondary. use the Restore CD to remove changed settings. the secondary Defense Center displays a new policy with the name “unknown” until the Defense Centers synchronize. if you make conflicting policy or other changes to both Defense Centers within the same window between Defense Centers syncs. nor do they have to be in the same geographic location. nor created any new rules. during this ten-minute window. the last change you make takes precedence. Note that this also deletes event and configuration data from the Defense Center.9. For example. The Defense Center software version must be the same or newer than the software version of managed 3D Sensors. You can change the port as described in Configuring the Communication Channel on page 383.Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 cycles. Defense Centers configured as a high availability pair do not need to be on the same trusted management network. Both Defense Centers must be running the same SEU version. Also. nor have you previously managed any sensors with it. policies may appear incorrectly on the other Defense Center. That is. managed sensors.) However. You must recreate the recurring task schedule on a newly activated Defense Center when it changes from inactive to active. start with the secondary Defense Center in its original state.

In addition. If you use a Master Defense Center to manage a high-availability pair of Defense Centers.9. • Setting Up High Availability Requires: DC To use high availability. add the primary Defense Center and the secondary Defense Center is automatically added. 2. The two Defense Centers do not need to be on the same network segment. For information about adding a Defense Center to a Master Defense Center. Log into the Defense Center that you want to designate as the secondary Defense Center. but each of the Defense Centers must be able to communicate with the other and with the sensors they share. Select Operations > Configuration > High Availability. the primary Defense Center must be able to contact the secondary Defense Center at the IP address on the secondary Defense Center’s own management interface. then set up high availability as detailed in Setting Up High Availability on page 150. use this sequence to establish communications between the three of them: First. Before you configure high availability. For information about editing the remote management communications between the two appliances. That is.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 150 . set up remote management between each Defense Center and the Master Defense Center as detailed in Adding and Deleting Defense Centers on page 164. and vice versa. For details on setting time. see Adding a Master Defense Center on page 165.Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 • • All RNA software sensors managed by Defense Centers in high availability mode must be the same software version. WARNING! Sourcefire recommends that you change configurations only on the primary Defense Center and that you use your secondary Defense Center as a backup. see Synchronizing Time on page 354. TIP! To add an existing high availability pair of Defense Centers to a Master Defense Center. see Editing the Management Virtual Network on page 385. make sure you synchronize time settings between the Defense Centers you want to link. The High Availability page appears. you must designate one Defense Center as the primary and another Defense Center of the same model as the secondary. Version 4. To set up high availability for two Defense Centers: Access: Admin 1. either each Defense Center must be able to contact the sensors it manages or the sensors must be able to contact the Defense Center.

Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 3. in the Unique NAT ID field. use both the Registration Key and the Unique NAT ID fields. The Secondary Defense Center Setup page appears. The Primary Defense Center Setup page appears. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. showing the current state of the secondary Defense Center. 5. In that case. log into the Defense Center that you want to designate as the primary. 10.9. Click the secondary Defense Center option. Select Operations > Configuration > High Availability. Click Register. Type the hostname or IP address of the secondary Defense Center in the Secondary DC Host text box. Click the primary Defense Center option. You can leave the Primary DC Host field empty if the management host does not have a routable address. Optionally. Type the hostname or IP address of the primary Defense Center in the Primary DC Host text box. A success message appears. 8. and the Peer Manager page appears. 11. Using an account with Admin access. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. 7. type a unique alphanumeric registration ID that you want to use to identify the primary Defense Center. Type a one-time-use registration key in the Registration Key text box 6. 4. Version 4. See Working in NAT Environments on page 112 for more information. 9. The High Availability page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 151 .

A success message appears. Type the same one-time-use registration key in the Registration Key text box you used in step 5. 13. including: • • • • • IP address product model operating system operation system version time the Defense Centers last synchronized To check high availability status: Access: Admin 1. Click Register.Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 12. showing the current state of the primary Defense Center. The High Availability page appears. 14. 2. type the same registration ID that you used in step 6 in the Unique NAT ID text box. You can view the High Availability page to check the status of the link between the two Defense Centers. Version 4. it may take up to 10 minutes before all the rules and policies appear on both Defense Centers. you can use one of them to view status information about the other. Select Operations > Configuration > High Availability. You can also monitor the Task Status to see when the process completes.9. Monitoring the High Availability Status Requires: DC Once you have identified your primary and secondary Defense Centers. Depending upon the number of policies and custom standard text rules they have. and the Peer Manager page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 152 . If you used a unique NAT ID on the secondary Defense Center. See Monitoring the High Availability Status on page 152. Log into one of the Defense Centers that you linked using high availability.

you must first disable the high availability link between them. if you want to synchronize the policy immediately. it is automatically shared with the other Defense Center within 5 minutes. see Editing the Management Virtual Network on page 385.9. This interval ensures that the high availability pair re-synchronizes first. enabled or disabled. it may take more than one synchronization cycle to add the sensor to both Defense Centers. Version 4. Under High Availability Status. Sourcefire recommends that you wait at least five minutes before adding the sensor back. of the communications link the state. Click Peer Manager in the toolbar. 5. If you do not wait five minutes. The two Defense Centers automatically synchronize within ten minutes (five minutes for each Defense Center) after any action that affects a shared feature.Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 3. You can view the following information: • • • the IP address of the other Defense Center in the HA pair the status. Disabling High Availability and Unregistering Sensors Requires: DC If you want to remove one of the Defense Centers from a high availability pair. registered or unregistered.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 153 . However. if you create a new policy on one Defense Center. of the HA pair For information about editing the remote management communications between the two appliances. IMPORTANT! If you delete a sensor from a Defense Center configured in a high availability pair and intend to re-add it. you can view the following information about the other Defense Center in the high availability pair: • • • • • the IP address the model name the software version the operating system the length of time since the last contact between the two Defense Centers 4. click Synchronize. The Peer Manager page appears. For example.

Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 154 . To stop managing the sensors altogether. To disable the communications channel for a high availability pair: Access: Admin 1. select Unregister sensors on both peers. high availability is disabled and any managed sensors are deleted from the Defense Centers according to your selection. You can enable high availability with a different Defense Center as described in Setting Up High Availability on page 150. 2.9. select Unregister sensors on the other peer. For information about editing the remote management communications between the two appliances. Pausing Communication between Paired Defense Centers Requires: DC If you want to temporarily disable high availability. you can disable the communications channel between the Defense Centers. see Editing the Management Virtual Network on page 385. 4. Click Peer Manager. you can enable the communications channel between the Defense Centers to restart high availability. Select Operations > Configuration > High Availability. Click Disable HA. 2. Log into one of the Defense Centers in the HA pair. The High Availability page appears. 3. Click Disable to disable the communications channel between the two Defense Centers. After you answer the prompt Do you really want to Disable High Availability? by selecting OK. The Peer Manager page appears. Select one of the following options from the Handle Registered Sensors dropdown list: • • • To control all the managed sensors with the Defense Center where you are accessing this page.Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 To disable a high availability pair: Access: Admin 1. select Unregister sensors on this peer. Restarting Communication between Paired Defense Centers Requires: DC If you temporarily disabled high availability. To control all the managed sensors with the other Defense Center.

9. Version 4. see Editing the Management Virtual Network on page 385. Click Enable to disable the communications channel between the two Defense Centers.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 155 . The Peer Manager page appears. For information about editing the remote management communications between the two appliances.Using the Defense Center Configuring High Availability Chapter 4 To enable the communications channel for a high availability pair: Access: Admin 1. Click Peer Manager. 2.

and white list events from up to ten Defense Centers within your Sourcefire 3D System deployment. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 156 .Using the Master Defense Center Chapter 5 Administrator Guide The Sourcefire Master Defense Center is a key component in the Sourcefire 3D System. compliance events. You can use the Master Defense Center to aggregate and analyze intrusion events.9.

although most deployments will use the same configuration across the enterprise. You can also choose whether to include the packet data collected with the intrusion events. IMPORTANT! The Product Compatibility section of the release notes for each version describes which versions of the Defense Center you can manage with a Master Defense Center. When you apply intrusion policies from a Master Defense Center. See the following sections for more information: • • • Aggregating Intrusion Events on page 158 Aggregating Compliance Events on page 158 Limitations on Event Aggregation on page 159 Version 4. it updates the managing Defense Center’s SEU. • Understanding Event Aggregation on page 157 explains which types of events you can send from your Master Defense Centers to your Master Defense Center. Understanding Global Policy Management on page 161 explains which policies you can send from your Master Defense Center to 3D Sensors and Defense Centers. Adding and Deleting Defense Centers on page 164 explains how to configure a Defense Center to communicate with a Master Defense Center. • • • • Understanding Event Aggregation Requires: MDC A Master Defense Center can aggregate intrusion events and compliance events (including white list events) from up to ten Defense Centers. You can configure a Defense Center to send intrusion events based on their flag. The Master Defense Center can also aggregate events related to the health of managed Defense Centers. Editing Settings for a Managed Defense Center on page 175 explains how to change some of the settings for a Defense Center from the Master Defense Center’s web interface. You can set up a different configuration for each Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 157 . Managing Appliance Groups on page 179 explains how to use appliance groups to aid in managing 3D Sensors and Defense Centers. If it finds an older SEU. the Sourcefire 3D System checks the SEU on the managing Defense Center. The following sections explain more about using a Master Defense Center in your Sourcefire 3D System deployment. The settings on the Filter Configuration page determine which events are forwarded from the Defense Center to the Master Defense Center.Using the Master Defense Center Understanding Event Aggregation Chapter 5 You can use the Master Defense Center to build and dispatch global detection and intrusion policies.9. you can view the current status of the Defense Centers across your enterprise from a web interface. In this way.

however. flow data. For example.Intrusion events are not forwarded to the Master Defense Center. any packets captured for the event are not sent. For example. are forwarded to the Master Defense Center. you can greatly reduce the number of events sent from a Defense Center by excluding events with the blue or gray impact flags. • You can use the Flags section of the Filter Configuration page to forward only the intrusion events that are important to your analysis. If your 3D Sensors are deployed inline and you are using intrusion rules set to Drop and Generate Events. you can choose one of the following options: • • Do Not Send . then intrusion events are limited to gray impact flags to indicate unknown impact. and intrusion rules are all able to generate intrusion events. Events Only . If you do not deploy 3D Sensors with RNA on your network. RNA events. you may also want to send intrusion events with the black inline result flag. The conditions that can trigger a compliance rule include intrusion events. Events and Packet Data . When you use the Filter Configuration page to specify which events are forwarded to the Master Defense Center. the red impact flag.The intrusion events specified in the Flags section are forwarded to the Master Defense Center. preprocessors. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 158 . IMPORTANT! You must deploy both RNA and IPS on your network to generate intrusion events with meaningful impact flags.Using the Master Defense Center Understanding Event Aggregation Chapter 5 Aggregating Intrusion Events Requires: MDC An intrusion event is generated by IPS when it analyzes network traffic and finds one or more packets that violate the currently applied intrusion policy. Packet decoders. that is.The intrusion events specified in the Flags section. you may want to limit the intrusion events on the Master Defense Center to only those with the greatest impact. along with any related packets. Aggregating Compliance Events Requires: MDC A compliance event is generated by a Defense Center when the conditions for a compliance rule in an active compliance policy are met.9. You can also use flag settings to reduce the number of intrusion events that are sent to the Master Defense Center in deployments where large numbers of intrusion events are being generated from your 3D Sensors. and anomalous network traffic.

audit log.9. Master Defense Center and Defense Center Functional Comparison Function License provisions Master Defense Center provides product license Defense Center provides product license.Using the Master Defense Center Understanding Event Aggregation Chapter 5 When you use the Filter Configuration page to specify which events are forwarded to the Master Defense Center. compliance events. network interfaces. and RUA events. scan results. The Master Defense Center and Defense Center Functional Comparison table compares and contrasts Defense Center and Master Defense Center functional areas. vulnerabilities. you can choose to send or not send compliance events. SEU import log. and NetFlow. audit log. there are certain limitations that you should take into consideration when you design your Master Defense Center deployment. Analysis and reporting search Version 4. 3D Sensor configuration allows you to configure detection engines allows you to search for intrusion events. remediation status. client applications. host attributes. health events. hosts. users. RNA and RUA feature licenses allows you to configure detection engines. services. health events. See the following sections for more information: • • Adding a Defense Center on page 168 Editing the Event Filter Configuration on page 176 Limitations on Event Aggregation Requires: MDC The Master Defense Center is a powerful tool for analyzing the potential malicious activity across your enterprise’s network. white list events. interface sets. RNA events. However.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 159 . white list violations. SEU import log. allows you search for intrusion events. white list events. compliance events. flow data.

because you can forward compliance events and white list events from your managed Defense Centers to your Master Defense Center.9.Using the Master Defense Center Understanding Event Aggregation Chapter 5 Master Defense Center and Defense Center Functional Comparison (Continued) Function Network scans Global policies Master Defense Center does not provide for Nessus and Nmap scans. Event Rate The event rate limit for the Master Defense Center is the same rate limit on Defense Centers. This means that if your Defense Centers are accepting events from their 3D Sensors up to the rate limit. In addition. and not sending the packet data. To take advantage of this. allows you to build intrusion policies and to distribute them through connected Defense Centers to their managed 3D Sensors throughout the enterprise allows for collection of events from up to ten Defense Centers Defense Center provides Nessus and Nmap scans and results. Intrusion Agents Intrusion events generated by intrusion agents are not forwarded to the Master Defense Center. you can gain insight into RNA-detected activity across your enterprise. For example. on your Defense Centers you need to build compliance rules and policies that are triggered by the RNA events that interest you and forward the resulting compliance events to the Master Defense Center. However. You can also limit the amount of data transferred between a Defense Center and its Master Defense Center by sending only intrusion event data. in cases where the intrusion event rate is high. the Master Defense Center does not build a network map or host data for the hosts on your network.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 160 . policies are normally downloaded only to their managed 3D Sensors Event consolidation events are collected only from managed 3D Sensors Data Generated by RNA The Master Defense Center cannot aggregate RNA events or flow data generated by RNA and forwarded to a Defense Center. Version 4. you must adjust the event filter on the Master Defense Center so that only the most important events are forwarded from the Defense Centers. you might want to adjust the filter to send only intrusion events with red impact flags.

Applying an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide explains how to apply a new or updated intrusion policy to the appropriate IPS detection engines. apply edit. system. however if a newer SEU resides on the Master Defense Center than on a Defense Center in the path. delete and export RNA on a Master Defense Center. which networks and NetFlow-enabled devices are monitored by NetFlow. and so on. Which networks and ports are monitored by the RNA policy If NetFlow is used to generate host information. Global intrusion policies are beneficial in rapid response scenarios and during enterprise-wide intrusion policy updates. For information on import and export functions. RNA compares the data it collects and analyzes with its vulnerability database to determine the potential vulnerabilities on the detected host.9. Editing an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide explains how to modify existing intrusion policies. Existing RNA policies are available for viewing so that you can determine: • • • • RNA policy name and description Detection policy settings such as update interval.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 161 . For information on creating and applying as well as deleting RNA policies. Managing Variables in the Analyst Guide explains how to create and manage variables that you can use within intrusion policies. and health policies. then the downstream SEU is updated. see What is an RNA Detection Policy? in the Analyst Guide. Master Defense Center generated policies are not accessible on an intermediate Defense Center.Using the Master Defense Center Understanding Global Policy Management Chapter 5 Understanding Global Policy Management Requires: MDC You can use the Master Defense Center to generate global intrusion policies and coordinate them with potential vulnerabilities detected by RNA policies. see Importing and Exporting Objects on page 583. The Master Defense Center sends the policy through a Defense Center to a 3D Sensor’s detection engine. if banners and HTTP URLs are captured. You can also import and export compliance policies and rules. if client application are being detected. You can build. custom service decoders. Defining IP Addresses and Ports for Your Network in the Analyst Guide provides the syntax used to specify IP addresses and port numbers within the variables and rules in your policy. This ensures that a global intrusion policies utilize the latest SEU. • Version 4. Managing Global Intrusion Policies Requires: MDC Refer to the following sections for information about managing intrusion policies: • • • • Creating an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide explains how to create an intrusion policy. as well as intrusion.

Note that SEUs can also contain new and updated decoders and preprocessors. Importing SEUs and Rule Files in the Analyst Guide explains how to download and import Security Enhancement Updates (SEUs) that contain new intrusion rules. Using System Policies on a Master Defense Center Requires: MDC System policies allow you to manage the following functions on your Defense Centers or Master Defense Center: • • access configuration authentication profiles (Defense Center only) Version 4. and for brief descriptions of those modules that are used. edit.9. export. and apply RNA detection policies from a Master Defense Center.Using the Master Defense Center Understanding Global Policy Management Chapter 5 • Managing Intrusion Rules in the Analyst Guide explains how to enable and disable intrusion rules within an intrusion policy. delete. • Using RNA Detection Policies on a Master Defense Center Requires: MDC You can create. Refer to the following. and apply default health policies to the Master Defense Center and to connected Defense Centers. For information about health policies see the following: • • • • • • • Understanding Health Monitoring on page 483 Configuring Health Policies on page 489 Using the Health Monitor Blacklist on page 534 Configuring Health Monitor Alerts on page 539 Using the Health Monitor on page 545 Using Appliance Health Monitors on page 547 Working with Health Events on page 555 See Health Policies on page 164 to distinguish the health policy modules that are useful on a Master Defense Center or Defense Center from those that are not. delete.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 162 . for information on the following RNA detection policy functions: • • • • Creating RNA Detection Policies in the Analyst Guide Applying an RNA Detection Policy in the Analyst Guide Editing an RNA Detection Policy in the Analyst Guide Deleting an RNA Detection Policy in the Analyst Guide Using Health Policies on a Master Defense Center Requires: MDC You can edit. This section also explains how to configure rules in inline intrusion policies so that they drop malicious packets.

RNA Detection Policies RNA analysis and reporting functions such as using the network map. and apply intrusion detection and prevention policies from a Master Defense Center. delete. The Sourcefire 3D System bases intrusion policies on SEUs residing on the appliance where the policy is built. RUA detection. After you acknowledge the message by clicking its check box. RNA detection. the Sourcefire 3D System checks for any older SEUs on Defense Center(s) managing those detection engines. the Apply button activates.Using the Master Defense Center Understanding Global Policy Management Chapter 5 • • • • • • • database limits DNS cache settings the mail relay host and a notification address for database prune messages language selection (English or Japanese) login banner the kinds and amount of RNA data stored in the database (Defense Center only) time synchronization settings See Managing System Policies on page 320 for information about system policy usage. and listing client applications and vulnerabilities are performed on Defense Centers and not on Master Defense Centers. Therefore. When you apply an intrusion policy to a 3D Sensor’s detection engines from a Master Defense Center. if your Version 4. they are updated. Master Defense Center Policy Management Limitations Requires: MDC There are several types of policies including detection and prevention. You can apply one or more custom intrusion policies filtered to monitor VLAN or subnetwork traffic on the network monitored by the detection engine where you apply the policy. listing RNA hosts and events.9. export. You cannot apply a non-filtered policy from a Defense Center then add filters to it from a managing Master Defense Center. and health policies. edit. you must apply a non-filtered policy to the detection engine from the same Defense Center or Master Defense Center. TIP! Before applying a filtered policy. Detection and Prevention Policies You can create. a warning message with a check box appears. The Defense Center and Master Defense Center do not handle these policies in the same manner. If it finds SEUs older than those on the Master Defense Center. However.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 163 .

Currently. For a listing of the health policy modules that apply to Master Defense Centers. For a listing of the health policy modules that apply to Defense Centers. RUA functions are available only on properly licensed Defense Centers. you set up a two-way.Default Health Policy table on page 493. Default 3D Sensor. Master Defense Centers apply health policies only to Master Defense Centers and Defense Centers. Default IPS (3Dx800 only). see the Enabled MDC Health Modules . you can view host profiles from event views by clicking the host profile icon ( ) next to an IP address. The Defense Center uses this channel to send events to the Master Defense Center. Health Policies The Master Defense Center monitors its health and the health of connected Defense Centers. it evaluates which events.9. System Policies System policies are applied only to Master Defense Centers and Defense Centers from a Master Defense Center. As the Defense Center receives events from its sensors. see the Enabled Defense Center Health Modules . Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Requires: MDC + DC When you manage a Defense Center with your Master Defense Center. For details about editing appropriate health policies.Using the Master Defense Center Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Chapter 5 deployment includes RNA.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 164 . Policies that are not applicable are implicitly disabled when there is an attempt to apply them to a Defense Center or an Master Defense Center. and Default RNA Health Policies are not used on the Master Defense Center.Default Health Policy table on page 494. Default IPS. RUA Detection Policies There are currently no Real-Time User Awareness functions on a Master Defense Center. see Editing Health Policies on page 530. • • • Adding a Defense Center on page 168 Deleting a Defense Center on page 171 Resetting Management of a Defense Center on page 171 Version 4. based on filter configuration. it should send to the Master Defense Center using the same channel. SSL -encrypted communication channel between the appliances. only the generic Default Health Policy is available for editing and application to appliances.

See Working in NAT Environments on page 112 for more information. add the primary Defense Center and the secondary Defense Center is automatically added. The Information page appears.for a unique alphanumeric ID. Registration Key . Log into the web interface of the Defense Center you want to add. At a Defense Center. 2.Using the Master Defense Center Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Chapter 5 Adding a Master Defense Center Requires: MDC + DC You can add a Master Defense Center connection to your Defense Center. Version 4. This is usually completed as part of the installation process. Registration Key. you need to determine which events on the Defense Center you want to forward to the Master Defense Center. TIP! To add an existing high availability pair of Defense Centers to a Master Defense Center. add the Defense Center.registration key Unique NAT ID (optional) . Valid combinations include: • • • Management Host or Host and Registration Key used on both appliances Registration Key and Unique NAT ID used on the Defense Center with Host.9. TIP! Set up the managed appliance first. To add a Master Defense Center to a Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. Registration Key. Select Operations > System Settings. To add a Master Defense Center.for the hostname or IP address. and Unique NAT ID used on the Master Defense Center Management Host. you must make sure that the network settings are configured correctly on both appliances. however before you do. but you can see Configuring Network Settings on page 377 for details. Three fields are provided for setting up communications between appliances: • • • Management Host or Host.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 165 . and Unique NAT ID used on the Defense Center with Registration Key and Unique NAT ID used on the Master Defense Center IMPORTANT! The Management Host or Host field (hostname or IP address) must be used on at least one of the appliance. add the remote management then at the managing Master Defense Center.

In the Registration Key field. type the one-time use registration key that you want to use to set up a communications channel between the Master Defense Center and the Defense Center. Click Remote Management. use both the Registration Key and the Unique NAT ID fields 6. 7.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 166 . 8. Optionally. Click Save. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. in the Unique NAT ID field. 9. Click Add Manager. After the Defense Center confirms communication with the Master Defense Center.Using the Master Defense Center Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Chapter 5 3. the Pending Registration status appears. The Remote Management page appears. The Add Remote Management page appears.9. type a unique alphanumeric NAT ID that you want to use to identify the Defense Center. In that case. type the IP address or the host name of the Master Defense Center that you want to use to manage the Defense Center. You can leave the Management Host field empty if the management host does not have a routable address. In the Management Host field. Version 4. Log into the Master Defense Center’s web interface using a user account with Admin access. 4. The Defense Centers page appears. 5. and select Operations > Appliances.

You can leave the Host field empty if the host does not have a routable address.9. use both the Registration Key and the Unique NAT ID fields 12. you can send events or events and packet data.Using the Master Defense Center Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Chapter 5 10. In that case. IMPORTANT! You must select at least one type of flag if you want to send intrusion events. See Editing the Event Filter Configuration on page 176 for more information. If you chose to send compliance events to the Master Defense Center. 11. 14. The New Defense Center page appears. Type the IP address or the hostname of the Defense Center you want to add in the Host field. Note that if you select intrusion events. If you used an unique NAT ID in step 6. Click New Defense Center. type the same value in the Unique NAT ID (optional) field. In the Registration Key field. Version 4. identify the types of events you want to forward from the Defense Center to the Master Defense Center. Under Filter Configuration. You can also filter which intrusion events are forwarded based on their impact flag.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 167 . WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. 13. white list events are also sent. type the same one-time use registration key that you used in step 6.

and Unique NAT ID used on the Master Defense Center Management Host. you must delete and re-register the Defense Center. Version 4.9. For more information see Configuring Network Settings on page 377. The Defense Center is added to the Master Defense Center.for a unique alphanumeric ID. Registration Key. 16. Valid combinations include: • • • Management Host or Host and Registration Key used on both appliances Registration Key and Unique NAT ID used on the Defense Center with Host. After communications between the two appliances are established.for the hostname or IP address. This is usually completed as part of the installation process. See Working in NAT Environments on page 112 for more information. IMPORTANT! If you registered a Master Defense Center and Defense Center using IPv4 and want to convert them to IPv6. It can take up to two minutes for the Defense Center to establish communication with the Master Defense Center. Registration Key . Three fields are provided for setting up communications between appliances: • • • Management Host or Host. and Unique NAT ID used on the Defense Center with Registration Key and Unique NAT ID used on the Master Defense Center IMPORTANT! The Management Host or Host field (hostname or IP address) must be used on at least one of the appliance. then at the managing Master Defense Center add the Defense Center. TIP! Set up the managed appliance first. add the remote management.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 168 . you must make sure that the network settings are configured correctly on both appliances.one-time use registration key Unique NAT ID (optional) . At a Defense Center.Using the Master Defense Center Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Chapter 5 15. Click Add. continue with the procedure in Adding a Defense Center. Adding a Defense Center Requires: MDC + DC Before you add a Defense Center to a Master Defense Center. You can view the status on the Defense Centers page (Operations > Appliances). Registration Key.

log into the web interface of the Defense Center you want to add. The Information page appears. Optionally. In the Registration Key field.9. in the Unique NAT ID field. Click Add Manager. 3. 8. you need to predetermine which events on the Defense Center you want to forward to the Master Defense Center. In the Management Host field. TIP! You can leave the Management Host field empty if the management host does not have a routable address. In that case. 4. Select Operations > System Settings. After the Defense Center confirms communication with the Master Defense Center. Version 4. type the IP address or the host name of the Master Defense Center that you want to use to manage the Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 169 . Using a user account with Admin access. the Pending Registration status appears. type the one-time use registration key that you want to use to set up a communications channel between the Master Defense Center and the Defense Center. 6. 2. use both the Registration Key and the Unique NAT ID fields. type a unique alphanumeric NAT ID that you want to use to identify the Defense Center. 5. The Add Remote Management page appears. To add a Defense Center to a Master Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. Click Save.Using the Master Defense Center Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Chapter 5 To add a Defense Center. 7. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. The Remote Management page appears. Click Remote Management.

Click New Defense Center.Using the Master Defense Center Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Chapter 5 9. 10. See Editing the Event Filter Configuration on page 176 for more information. and select Operations > Appliances. Version 4. you can send events or events and packet data. The New Defense Center page appears. 13. 11. Note that if you select intrusion events. white list events are also sent. If you chose to send compliance events to the Master Defense Center. You can also filter which intrusion events are forwarded based on their impact flag. In the Registration Key field.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 170 . IMPORTANT! You must select at least one type of flag if you want to send intrusion events. 12. The Defense Centers page appears. type the same value in the Unique NAT ID (optional) field. identify the types of events you want to forward from the Defense Center to the Master Defense Center. 14. Under Filter Configuration. type the same one-time use registration key that you used in step 6. Log into the Master Defense Center’s web interface using a user account with Admin access. Type the IP address or the hostname of the Defense Center you want to add in the Host field.9. If you used a NAT ID in step 7. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses.

You can view the status on the Defense Centers page (Operations > Appliances). Click Delete next to the Master Defense Center that was managing the Defense Center. Select Operations > System Settings. you should also delete the manager on the Defense Center. and select Operations > Appliances. Click Add. Communication between the Master Defense Center and the Defense Center is discontinued and the Defense Center is deleted from the Defense Centers page. To manage the Defense Center again at a later date. Deleting a Defense Center severs all communication between the Defense Center and the Master Defense Center. 4. The manager is removed.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 171 . Version 4. Log into the Master Defense Center web interface. The Defense Center is added to the Master Defense Center.Using the Master Defense Center Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Chapter 5 15. It can take up to two minutes for the Defense Center to establish communication with the Master Defense Center. 6. To keep the Defense Center from trying to reconnect to the Master Defense Center. The Remote Management page appears. You can then re-add the Master Defense Center on the Defense Center and then add the Defense Center to a Master Defense Center. The Defense Centers page appears. 2. Resetting Management of a Defense Center Requires: MDC + DC If communications fail between the Master Defense Center and one of your Defense Centers. To delete a Defense Center from the Master Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. Click Delete next to the Defense Center you want to delete. you can delete it from the Master Defense Center. If you want to manage a Defense Center with a different Master Defense Center.9. Deleting a Defense Center Requires: MDC + DC If you no longer want to manage a Defense Center. you must also reset management before adding the Defense Center to the another Master Defense Center. The Information page appears. 5. you must first delete the manager on the Defense Center and delete the Defense Center on the Master Defense Center. To do this. 3. Log into the web interface of the Defense Center you want to delete. you must re-add it to the Master Defense Center. you can reset management of the Defense Center. Click Remote Management.

3. The Defense Centers page appears. 2. 3. Click Delete next to the Master Defense Center where you want to reset management. Log into the web interface of the Defense Center where you want to reset communications. Select Operations > System Settings. Log into the web interface of the Master Defense Center where you want to reset communications.Using the Master Defense Center Adding and Deleting Defense Centers Chapter 5 To reset management from a Master Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. The Remote Management page appears. 2. use both the Registration Key and the Unique NAT ID fields Version 4. Click Delete next to the Defense Center you want to delete. type the IP address or the host name of the Master Defense Center that you want to use to manage the Defense Center. TIP! You can leave the Management Host field empty if the management host does not have a routable address. Communication between the Defense Center and the Master Defense Center is discontinued and the Defense Center is deleted from the Defense Centers page. In that case. To re-add the Defense Center to the Master Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. The manager is removed.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 172 . Click Remote Management. Log into the web interface of the Defense Center where you want to reset communications and click Add Manager. To delete management on the Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. Select Operations > Appliances. The Remote Management page appears. The Information page appears. 2. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. 4.9. In the Management Host field.

6.Using the Master Defense Center Using the Appliances Page Chapter 5 3. 10. For more information about Defense Center groups. the Pending Registration status appears.9. type the same one-time use registration key that you used in step 3. 7. 9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 173 . 4. 8. It can take up to two minutes for the Master Defense Center to verify communication with the Defense Center. type the one-time use registration key that you want to use to set up a communications channel between the Defense Center and the Master Defense Center. See Working in NAT Environments on page 112 for more information. type the same value in the Unique NAT ID (optional) field. Click New Defense Center. The Add New Defense Center page appears. Optionally. Version 4. Click Save. You can view the Defense Center’s status on the Defense Centers page (Operations > Appliances). type a unique alphanumeric NAT ID that you want to use to identify the Defense Center. After the Defense Center confirms communication with the Master Defense Center. see Managing Appliance Groups on page 179. 11. Log into the Master Defense Center’s web interface and select Operations > Appliances. 5. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. in the Unique NAT ID field. Using the Appliances Page Requires: MDC + DC The Appliances page (Operations > Appliances) provides you with a range of information and options that you can use to manage your Defense Centers. The Defense Centers page appears. In the Registration Key field. The following sections describe the features on the Appliances page. To add the Defense Center to a group. 12. In the Registration Key field. If you used an alphanumeric NAT ID in step 4. Type the IP address or the hostname of the Defense Center you want to add in the Host field. select the group from the Add to Group list. The Defense Center is added to the Master Defense Center. Click Add.

Click the Delete icon next to a Defense Center if you no longer want to manage the Defense Center with the Master Defense Center. you can contact technical support to change the default time interval. it sends a two-byte heartbeat packet to establish contact and ensure that the communications channel is still running. If the Master Defense Center has not received a communication from a Defense Center within the last two minutes. See Editing Settings for a Managed Defense Center on page 175 for more information. The system settings include the filter configuration for the Defense Center. a pop-up window indicates the amount of time (in hours. Model. The red exclamation point icon indicates that the Master Defense Center has not received communications from the Defense Center in the last three minutes. An HA pair is listed as a group named with the name of the active Defense Center. which sorts by appliance model number. the Defense Center 1000 and the Defense Center 3000. See Deleting a Defense Center on page 171 for more information. that is.9.Using the Master Defense Center Using the Appliances Page Chapter 5 Sort-by Drop-Down List Use this drop-down list to sort the Appliances page according to your needs. Status Icons The status icons indicate the state of a Defense Center. 3D Sensor 2100. the health blacklist settings. If your network is constrained in bandwidth. The green check mark icon indicates that the Master Defense Center and the Defense Center are communicating properly. You can sort by: • Group. and seconds) since the last contact. and the high availability settings. minutes. If you hover your cursor over the icon. the remote management configuration. which sorts by Appliance group (see Managing Appliance Groups on page 179) TIP! High availability Defense Center pairs are automatically listed as an appliance group. and so on.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 174 . which sorts by the Defense Center then the 3D Sensor connected to it. Version 4. • • Manager. Edit and Delete Icons Click the Edit icon next to a sensor if you want to change the Defense Center’s current system settings.

9. not the hostname. The operating system currently running on the managed Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 175 . The version of the operating system currently running on the managed Defense Center. The Information page for a managed Defense Center includes the fields described in the Defense Center Information table. you can use the Master Defense Center web interface to view and edit the configuration of the Defense Center. select Appliances from the Operations menu. Defense Center Information Field Name Description The assigned name for the Defense Center.Using the Master Defense Center Editing Settings for a Managed Defense Center Chapter 5 Editing Settings for a Managed Defense Center Requires: MDC + DC After you configure management of a Defense Center by a Master Defense Center. Note that this is the name of the Defense Center in the Master Defense Center web interface. The version of the software currently installed on the managed Defense Center. The model name for the managed Defense Center. See the following sections for more information. The Vulnerability Database version on the managed Defense Center. Product Model Software Version Operating System Operating System Version VDB Version IP Address Version 4. • • • • • Viewing the Defense Center Information Page on page 175 Editing the Event Filter Configuration on page 176 Editing or Disabling Remote Management Communications on page 178 Managing the Health Blacklist on page 178 Managing High Availability Defense Centers on page 178 Viewing the Defense Center Information Page Requires: MDC + DC To access the system settings information page for a managed Defense Center. The IP address of the managed Defense Center. then click Edit next to the Defense Center.

See the Impact Flags table in the Analyst Guide for an explanation of what each impact Version 4. and seconds) since the Defense Center communicated with the Master Defense Center. Model Number Current Group The model number for the Defense Center. You can click Refresh to update the Status icon and its accompanying pop-up message. Your options are to send intrusion events. The updated Defense Center attributes are saved. You can edit the following: • • the name of the Defense Center the group in which the Defense Center resides WARNING! The name must be made up of a combination of alphanumeric characters and should not be made up of numeric characters only. and compliance events. minutes. if any. Editing the Event Filter Configuration Requires: MDC The settings on the Filter Configuration page control which events are sent from the Defense Center to the Master Defense Center that manages it. To edit a managed Defense Center’s settings: Access: Admin 1.9.Using the Master Defense Center Editing Settings for a Managed Defense Center Chapter 5 Defense Center Information (Continued) Field Status Description An icon showing the current status of the managed Defense Center. intrusion events and related packet data.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 176 . If you want to send intrusion events (with or without packet data). Click Save. The group that the Defense Center belongs to. Change the Defense Center’s attributes as needed. a pop-up message indicates how long it has been (in hours. you can also specify which intrusion events are sent based on their impact flag. If you hover your cursor over the icon. 2. This number can be important for troubleshooting.

2. Note that you must deploy both RNA and IPS as part of your Sourcefire 3D System deployment to generate meaningful impact flags. click Edit. select Operations > Appliances. use the drop-down list to indicate whether you want to forward intrusion events to the Master Defense Center. The Appliances page appears.9. then you must select at least one impact flag option. 3. and Events and Packet Data. The options are Do Not Send.Using the Master Defense Center Editing Settings for a Managed Defense Center Chapter 5 flag means. On the Master Defense Center’s web interface. then packet data is not forwarded to the Master Defense Center. The Flags options are: • • • • • • • All Black (or Drop) Red (or Vulnerable) Orange (or Potentially Vulnerable) Yellow (or Currently Not Vulnerable) Blue (or Unknown Target) Gray (or Unknown) TIP! If you select All. The Filter Configuration page appears. If you indicated that you want to send intrusion events. Version 4. In the Intrusion Events area. If you want to send intrusion events to the Master Defense Center. Next to the Defense Center whose filter configuration you want to change. Events Only. then you must specify which events you want to send based on their impact flag. then all the options are immediately selected. 4. To modify the event filter configuration: Access: Admin 1. TIP! If you set up the 3D Sensor so it does not send packet data to the intermediate Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 177 .

0/24 to indicate that the Management Virtual Network is disabled on a Master Defense Center.9. you can temporarily disable communications between the Defense Center and its Master Defense Center. Click Save. click Enable. See the following sections for more information: • • Using Redundant Defense Centers on page 112 Setting Up High Availability on page 150 Version 4. You may want to do this to prevent events from the module from changing the status for the appliance to warning or critical. pause and restart Defense Center High Availability from a Defense Center.Using the Master Defense Center Editing Settings for a Managed Defense Center Chapter 5 5.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 178 . disable. For information on using the blacklisting function. To enable communications between the two appliances again. For example. monitor. Editing or Disabling Remote Management Communications Requires: MDC + DC You can manage communications between a managed Defense Center and its Master Defense Center using the Master Defense Center’s web interface. see Using the Health Monitor Blacklist on page 534. if a Defense Center is no longer responding.0. In the Compliance Events area. You cannot edit the Management Virtual Network field of a Master Defense Center. 6. Communications between the two appliances are interrupted. Your settings are saved and the Defense Center begins forwarding the events you specified to the Master Defense Center that manages it. see Editing the Management Virtual Network on page 385.0. IMPORTANT! Master Defense Centers do not currently use a Management Virtual Network. use the drop-down list to indicate whether you want to forward compliance events to the Master Defense Center. The options are Do Not Send and Send. For more information about editing the Management Virtual Network. To disable communications between the Defense Center and the Master Defense Center: Access: Admin Click Disable next to the name of the Defense Center. Managing the Health Blacklist Requires: MDC + DC You can blacklist individual health policy modules on Defense Centers. Managing High Availability Defense Centers Requires: MDC + DC You can configure. The field is filled with 0.

Managing Appliance Groups Requires: MDC The Master Defense Center allows you to group appliances so that you can easily search for events based on whether they were forwarded by one of a specific group of appliances.9. The redundant Defense Center is activated. The high availability page appears with the paired Defense Centers. The System Settings page for that Defense Center appears. 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 179 . Select Operations > Appliances. Click High Availability. Click Activate to activate the redundant Defense Center. TIP! A light bulb icon shows which of the high availability paired Defense Centers is currently active. The Appliances page appears.Using the Master Defense Center Managing Appliance Groups Chapter 5 • • • • Monitoring the High Availability Status on page 152 Disabling High Availability and Unregistering Sensors on page 153 Pausing Communication between Paired Defense Centers on page 154 Restarting Communication between Paired Defense Centers on page 154 If High Availability is configured. TIP! High availability Defense Center pairs are automatically listed as an appliance group. Version 4. TIP! When using Intrusion Agents registered to Defense Centers configured for high availability and managed by a Master Defense Center. 3. To activate a redundant Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. register all Intrusion Agents to the primary Defense Center. An HA pair is listed as a group with the name of the active Defense Center. you can activate Defense Center High Availability from a Master Defense Center. 2. Click Edit next to the appropriate Defense Center.

On the Master Defense Center. 7. The appliances are added to the group and the Appliances page appears again. To create an appliance group and add appliances to it: Access: Admin 1. The Appliance Group Edit page appears. TIP! You must remove an appliance from its current group before you can add it to a new group. The Appliances page appears. In the Group Name field. 3. Editing Appliance Groups on page 180 explains how to modify the list of Defense Centers in a Defense Center group. type the name of the group you want to create. Editing Appliance Groups Requires: MDC You can change the set of appliances that reside in any appliance group. 6. Click Save. Select the IP addresses or hostnames of the appliances you want to add from the Available Appliances list and click the arrow to move them into the group. Moving an appliance to a new group does not change any of its policies or configurations. 5. To add appliances to the group. The Create Appliance Group page appears. The group is added.9. Creating Appliance Groups Requires: MDC Grouping managed appliances allows you to use the group name as a search criterion when you search for specific compliance or intrusion events. Click Save. Deleting Appliance Groups on page 181 explains how to delete a Defense Center group. Click Create New Appliance Group. select Operations > Appliances.Using the Master Defense Center Managing Appliance Groups Chapter 5 See the following sections for more information: • • • Creating Appliance Groups on page 180 explains how to create a Defense Center group on the Master Defense Center. Version 4. return to the Appliances page (Operations > Appliances) and click Edit next to the name of the group.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 180 . 4. 2.

The Appliances page appears. On the Master Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 181 . The appliances group is removed from the Master Defense Center. • • To add an appliance to the group. Select the appliance you want to move and click the arrow to add or remove it from the group. Select Operations > Appliances. select it from the list in the group you are editing and click the arrow pointing to the Available Appliances list. 2. See the following sections for information on each of the listed system settings: IMPORTANT! NetFlow-enabled devices cannot currently be added to a Master Defense Center. select it from the Available Appliances list and click the arrow pointing toward the group you are editing. • • • • Listing Master Defense Center Information on page 182 Viewing a Master Defense Center License on page 182 Configuring Network Settings on page 377 Shutting Down and Restarting the System on page 182 Version 4. To remove an appliance from a group. 3. the appliances are moved to Ungrouped on the Appliances page.9. 2. To delete an appliance group: Access: Admin 1. Click Delete next to the group you want to delete.Using the Master Defense Center Editing Master Defense Center System Settings Chapter 5 To edit an appliance group: Access: Admin 1. The Appliance Group Edit page appears. Editing Master Defense Center System Settings Requires: MDC With a few exceptions. 4. Click Edit next to the Appliance group you want to edit. select Operations > Appliances. Click Save. They are not deleted from the Master Defense Center. the Master Defense Center system settings are the same as those of a Defense Center. Deleting Appliance Groups Requires: MDC If you delete a group that contains appliances. The Appliances page appears.

Select Operations > System Settings. Click Save. see Configuring Network Settings on page 377. You can: • • • shut down the appliance reboot the appliance restart the appliance Version 4. Click License.9. The Information page appears. see Defense Center Information on page 175.Using the Master Defense Center Editing Master Defense Center System Settings Chapter 5 • • Setting System Time on page 183 Blacklisting Health Policies on page 184 Listing Master Defense Center Information Requires: MDC For details on information listed under the Master Defense Center system settings. a Master Defense Center cannot manage the licenses of Defense Centers or 3D Sensors. For information on configuring the Master Defense Center network settings. Change the name of the Master Defense Center attributes as needed.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 182 . The License page appears. 2. To view information about the Master Defense Center license: Access: Admin 1. Configuring Network Settings Requires: MDC The network settings are identical to those of the Defense Center. 2. To edit a Master Defense Center’s settings: Access: Admin 1. WARNING! The name must be made up of a combination of alphanumeric characters and should not be made up of numeric characters only. The updated Master Defense Center attributes are saved. Viewing a Master Defense Center License Requires: MDC Unlike a Defense Center. Shutting Down and Restarting the System Requires: MDC You have several options for controlling the processes on your Master Defense Center.

On the Time Synchronization page you can choose to serve time from the Master Defense Center by selecting Enabled in the Serve Time via NTP field. Setting System Time Requires: MDC The system time is set and synchronized in accordance with the system policy.Using the Master Defense Center Editing Master Defense Center System Settings Chapter 5 To shut down or restart your appliance: Access: Admin 1. their real IP network is used to serve time. click Run Command next to Shutdown Master Defense Center. The Appliance Process page appears. Select Operations > System Settings. If you want to reboot the system. 3. You cannot edit the Management Virtual Network field if the Defense Center is in the Master Defense Center operational mode.0. TIP! Because Master Defense Centers do not currently use Management Virtual Networks. Specify the command you want to perform: • • • If you want to shut down the Master Defense Center. Configuring Remote Management Networking Requires: MDC A Master Defense Center’s Management Virtual Network is disabled. click Run Command next to Restart Master Defense Center Console. IMPORTANT! Master Defense Centers do not currently use a Management Virtual Network. Note that restarting the Defense Center may cause deleted hosts to reappear. Version 4. click Run Command next to Reboot Master Defense Center. 2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 183 .9.0. Click Process.0/24 to disable the Management Virtual Network. The Information page appears. The field is filled with the address range 0. If you want to restart the Defense Center.

you should configure your DHCP server to set the same NTP server. see Synchronizing Time on page 354. type the IP address of the NTP server or. if DNS is enabled. To receive time through NTP from a different server. The Master Defense Center supports the following health policy modules: • • • • • • • • Appliance Heartbeat CPU Usage Data Correlator Process Defense Center Status Disk Usage eStreamer Process Event Stream Status Memory Usage For more information on blacklisting a health policy. Blacklisting Health Policies Requires: MDC You can blacklist health policy modules when required. type the fully qualified host and domain name. select Via NTP Server from and. To avoid this situation.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 184 . in the text box. see Blacklisting a Health Policy Module on page 537. For more information about setting system time. select Manually in the System Settings. Version 4. WARNING! If the appliance is rebooted and your DHCP server sets an NTP server record different than the one you specify here. the DHCP-provided NTP server will be used instead.9.Using the Master Defense Center Editing Master Defense Center System Settings Chapter 5 To specify how the Master Defense Center clock is set: Access: Admin You have two options: • • To set the time manually.

You can think of a detection engine as a collection of one or more sensing interfaces (called an interface set) on a 3D Sensor plus a portion of the sensor’s computing resources (called a detection resource). you can combine the data from those sensors with RUA or RNA on a Defense Center. However. See the Detection Resources by Model table on page 190 for more information. In addition.9. and the third for RUA.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 185 . you cannot use RUA or RNA on 3D9800 sensors. Version 4. 3D Sensors support three types of detection engines: • • • IPS RNA RUA TIP! You cannot use the RUA feature on Crossbeam-based software sensors. the Sourcefire 3D System provides a feature called the detection engine. one for RNA.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Chapter 6 Administrator Guide To give you increased flexibility in your deployment choices. Most 3D Sensor models have at least three detection resources available and can support at least three detection engines: one for IPS. The number of detection engines per sensor is limited by the number of detection resources that are available.

policy. This section also describes how default detection engines are configured. Using Clustered 3D Sensors on page 227 explains how to use detection engines and interface sets in a clustered 3D9900 sensor pairing. The figure below shows the Defense Center version of the page. edit. Using Interface Set Groups on page 223 describes how to create and use interface sets groups. The Available Detection Engines page appears. including some of the limitations based on the sensor model. • • • • • • • Understanding Detection Engines Requires: DC or 3D Sensor A detection engine is the mechanism on a 3D Sensor that is responsible for analyzing the traffic on the network segment where the sensor is connected. Managing Detection Engines on page 193 explains how to create. You can sort the available detection engines by group. Using Interface Sets on page 207 describes how to create interface sets and how to use them with detection engines. sensor.9.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Understanding Detection Engines Chapter 6 The following sections describe the detection engines and interface set features and how you can use them in your Sourcefire 3D System deployment: • Understanding Detection Engines on page 186 explains detection engines in more detail. and delete detection engines. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 186 . Inline Fail Open Interface Set Commands on page 225 explains how to force an interface set in and out of bypass mode when using an inline fiber fail open interface set. To list the available detection engines: Access: Admin Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines. or interface set type. detection engine type. Using Variables within Detection Engines on page 199 explains how to use detection engine-specific variable values to tailor your detection capabilities to more closely match your infrastructure. Using Detection Engine Groups on page 197 explains how to create and use detection engine groups.

but the interface options available to you depend on the type of sensor and the capabilities of its sensing interfaces. and Interface Set Depending on which components are licensed on the sensor. 3D Sensors can support three types of detection engines: IPS. Note that you can use any two of the non-fail-open interfaces on the sensor’s network interface cards as part of an inline interface set. see Understanding Detection Resources and 3D Sensor Models on page 189 PEP Policy Only 3D9900 sensors provide the PEP feature. RNA. where pairs are pre-determined). A detection engine has two main components: • • an interface set.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 187 . Interface Set Types Type Passive Inline Description Use a passive interface set if you deployed the sensor out of band from the flow of network traffic. Resources. see Using PEP to Manage Traffic in the Analyst Guide. (The exception is on 3D9900s. which is a portion of the sensor’s computing resources For information about detection engines and detection resources. The three interface types are described in the Interface Set Types table. Note that you must use paired fail-open interfaces on the sensor’s network interface cards for an inline with fail open interface set.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Understanding Detection Engines Chapter 6 Detection Engine Type. although a sensing interface can belong to only one interface set at a time. and RUA. Use an inline with fail open interface set if you deployed the sensor inline on your network and the sensing interfaces do support automatic fail-open capabilities. The Sourcefire 3D System supports three types of interface sets. For more information on the PEP feature.9. which can include one or more sensing interfaces a detection resource. Set Type An interface set refers to a grouping of one or more sensing interfaces on a sensor. Inline with Fail Open Version 4. Use an inline interface set if you deployed the sensor inline on your network and the sensing interfaces do not support automatic fail-open capabilities.

If you are monitoring the same inline interface set with both IPS and RNA or RUA. or configure the interface set in tap mode. the RNA detection engine monitoring that interface set will not see any traffic. • You can click the name of an IPS policy to see details about the running policy. if you plan to use RNA to monitor either an inline or inline with fail open interface set. Otherwise. and the IPS detection engine fails for any reason.9. then the icon has an exclamation point and the name is italicized. the RNA or RUA detection engine monitoring that interface set will not see any traffic until the IPS detection engine restarts. Policy 3D Sensors have different capabilities and limitations depending on whether you licensed IPS.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Understanding Detection Engines Chapter 6 You can use RNA or RUA to monitor the traffic that passes through any of the three types of interface sets. IMPORTANT! On a 3D3800 or 3D5800 sensor. Neither RNA nor RUA are supported on the 3D9800 sensor. as well as apply an intrusion policy to that detection engine.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 188 . You can determine what the name and state of IPS and RNA policies from the following information in the policy column: • If you change an IPS and RNA policy and have not applied it to the detection engine since the change. TIP! After you upgrade your sensor to version 4. See Using Interface Sets on page 207 for more information about creating and editing interface sets. Version 4. RUA. For more information see Viewing an Intrusion Policy Report in the Analyst Guide.9 you have the advantage of the following listed features. or RNA. you must either configure an IPS detection engine that uses that interface set.

Different sensor models have different Version 4. which takes approximately 30 seconds. See Understanding Default Detection Engines for more information. click Reapply All. If you want to remove the currently applied IPS policy from the detection engine. If you want to reapply all policies for the detection engine. The delete icon only appears next to the base policy when there are no network or VLAN filters applied. click Edit or Delete next to its sensor name. if you plan to use the 3D3500 sensor in inline mode. click Variables. click the delete icon ( ) next to the filter name. See Using Variables within Detection Engines on page 199 for more information. use one detection resource per application per core on your appliance. then OK to confirm. reset. edit. click the delete icon ( ) next to the intrusion policy name. you could assign two detection resources to your detection engine to allow processing of more events per second. • • For more information see Understanding Detection Resources and 3D Sensor Models on page 189 When you configure a new sensor. For example. IMPORTANT! Initially. the Available Detection Engines page does not indicate that the filtered or base intrusion policy is deleted. which allows you to use more computing resources when network traffic is high. add. If you want to remove the currently applied filter from the IPS policy.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 189 . • Sensor The sensor column provides the name of the sensor where the policy is applied. or delete variables associated with a detection engine’s IPS or RNA policy. See Editing a Detection Engine on page 194 and Deleting a Detection Engine on page 197 for more information. Select Monitor > Task Status to track the progress of the deletion process. Understanding Detection Resources and 3D Sensor Models Requires: DC or 3D Sensor 3D Sensors with IPS can use multiple detection resources per detection engine.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Understanding Detection Engines Chapter 6 • If there is a network or VLAN filter applied to the IPS policy. you can click More or the down icon ( ) and view the type (Net for network or VLAN for virtual LAN) filter.9. If you hover above the name you can view the network or VLAN range of the filter. If you want to list. As a best practice. It also provides the following capabilities: • If you want to edit or delete a detection engine. it has a predefined detection engine that you can choose to modify to meet your needs.

It also indicates the maximum number of detection resources you can assign a single detection engine. • • Detection Resources by Model Model 3D500 3D1000 3D2000 3D2100 3D2500 3D3000 3D3500 3D3800 3D4500 3D5800 3D6500 3D9800 3D9900 Optimal per Sensor 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 4 6 8 12 7 Maximum per Sensor 2 2 2 3 4 4 6 2 8 6 12 12 12 Combination Restrictions Maximum of one IPS and either one RNA or one RUA Maximum of two.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 190 . 3D Sensors can run combinations of IPS. • The Optimal column indicates the per-sensor total number of detection resources you should use if you want to maximize the performance of the sensor.9. The Combination Restrictions column indicates the permitted combinations of detection resources that you can allocate to detection engines on the same sensor. The Maximum column indicates the total number of detection resources available on the sensor. RNA and RUA. can be any type No restrictions No restrictions No restrictions No restrictions No restrictions No restrictions No restrictions No restrictions No restrictions No restrictions Version 4. can be any type Maximum of two.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Understanding Detection Engines Chapter 6 numbers of detection resources available as shown in the Detection Resources by Model table.

the maximum number of detection engines that you can create is equal to the number of available detection resources. Crossbeam-based Software Sensor Considerations Depending upon the capabilities of your X-Series and the products you are licensed to use.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 191 . current Crossbeam System hardware and software support. Refer to the Sourcefire 3D Sensor Software for X-Series Installation Guide for information on deployment scenarios.9. After initial installation can modify interface sets and detection engines. Consider how your network is configured and how you want to deploy the Sourcefire 3D System within it. you can reduce latency by distributing your network traffic across all available interfaces on the sensor. The number of detection resource depends on the Crossbeam System hardware. Version 4. then distribute the detection engines and detection resources across all operative interfaces on the sensor. As with other 3D Sensors. Understanding Default Detection Engines Requires: DC or 3D Sensor When you install a new 3D Sensor. you have several deployment options for 3D Sensor Software.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Understanding Detection Engines Chapter 6 Detection Resources by Model (Continued) Model Virtual 3D Sensor Crossbeambased software sensors Optimal per Sensor 3 Maximum per Sensor 3 Combination Restrictions No restrictions Refer to Crossbeam-based Software Sensor Considerations on page 191 General Recommendations with Two or More Detection Resources For improved 3D Sensor performance on sensors with optimal detection resources of two or greater. and detection resources available on Crossbeam System hardware. you can use initial interface sets and default detection engines to quickly begin evaluating network traffic.

the default that builds paired fail-open interface sets on all 3D Sensor interfaces. and you have deployed it in a high-bandwidth environment where the traffic load is likely to reach the design limits of the appliance.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 192 . usually near the management interface. the detection engine may not provide optimum performance. on some of the older models. Version 4. If you modify the default detection engine to include it. that is automatically included in the default detection engine. note that the default detection engine does not include the second on-board interface. Choose from these initial interface sets based on how you deployed the sensor. Select Passive Mode if the sensing interfaces are not cabled inline. With this configuration. typically you pair adjacent interfaces. Passive that builds a single passive interface set for all 3D Sensor interfaces. IMPORTANT! For the 3D3000 on the IBM xSeries 346 appliance. Default Detection Engines Default detection engines are configured with the optimal (rather than maximum) number of detection resources as described in the Detection Resources by Model table on page 190. the second on-board interface cannot support the same high-performance standards as the interfaces on the network interface cards. you can connect any of the non-management interfaces to your network and apply the appropriate policy to the detection engine and begin analyzing your network. If your appliance has one of these extra interfaces. However.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Understanding Detection Engines Chapter 6 Initial Interface Sets The initial interface sets for 3D Sensors are: • • Inline with Fail-Open. Sourcefire recommends that you remove the second on-board interface from the detection engine for improved performance.9. less the management interface. If you want to change either the number of detection resources or the interfaces assigned to the default detection engine. Depending on the 3D Sensor. see Editing a Detection Engine on page 194. Select Inline with Fail-Open Mode if you cabled the sensing interfaces inline on your network as an IPS. less the management interface. a 3D2000 Sensor uses eth1 and eth2 as one inline fail-open interface set and it uses eth3 and eth4 as another inline fail-open interface set. Second On-Board Interface Some Sourcefire sensors have a second on-board interface. for example.

and spaces. You can use alphanumeric characters. The figure below shows the Defense Center version of the page. The Create Detection Engine page appears. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines. You can use interface sets that include multiple inline interface pairs.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Managing Detection Engines Chapter 6 Managing Detection Engines Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor See Understanding Detection Engines on page 186 and Using Interface Sets on page 207 for more information about the capabilities of detection engines and the interface sets they depend on. and delete detection engines. when they are available on your 3D Sensor. punctuation. Click Create Detection Engine. enter a name and description for the new detection engine. 3. 2.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 193 . The Detection Engines page appears. The following sections explain how to create. Version 4. In the Name and Description fields. • • • Creating a Detection Engine on page 193 Editing a Detection Engine on page 194 Deleting a Detection Engine on page 197 Creating a Detection Engine Requires: DC or 3D Sensor You can create a detection engine if you have an available interface set and at least one available detection resource. To create a detection engine: Access: Admin 1. edit.

Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Managing Detection Engines Chapter 6 4. Optionally. Select the type of detection engine that you want to create from the Type drop-down list. you can select Inspect Traffic During Policy Apply. Optionally. Select the number of detection resources for this detection engine. the detection engine does not restart and interrupt traffic inspection when the policy is applied. IPS. a software bridge is automatically set up to transport packets when the sensor restarts. 3D1000. Select the interface set that you want to assign to this detection engine. 8. editing an interface set or detection engine can cause the detection engines on the sensor to restart. See Using Interface Sets on page 207 for information about creating and modifying interface sets. IMPORTANT! On the 3D500. The second detection resource is available only if you want to create a second detection engine for RNA or RUA. if this option is employed. Editing a Detection Engine Requires: DC or 3D Sensor In some circumstances. See Using Detection Engine Groups on page 197 for information on creating and modifying detection engine groups. no packets are lost. Click Save. or 3D3800. RNA. 9. See the Detection Resources by Model table on page 190 for more information. if you are creating an IPS detection engine and if you are using a 3D Sensor other than a 3D500. 5. or RUA. Although some packets are transmitted without inspection during this time. IMPORTANT! For most 3D Sensors with inline interface sets. you can only use one of the two detection resources for IPS. The detection engine is created. which can cause a short pause in processing.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 194 . 6. add the detection engine to an existing detection engine group. However. 7. TIP! This option may degrade performance when you apply a policy and may result in longer policy-apply periods. The following sections describe some of the cases where a detection engines is affected by changes to the detection engines and interface sets: Version 4.9.

If you delete a detection engine or interface set. which interface set is used. or the detection engine type. or the setting for tap mode or transparent mode for an interface set. that detection engine is restarted. all detection engines on the sensor are restarted. • • • • If you create a detection engine. A restart occurs only when you assign a detection engine to the interface set. If you change an interface set’s transparent mode setting. If you create an interface set.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Managing Detection Engines Chapter 6 3Dx800 Sensors • If you change the number of network interfaces. nothing is restarted. all the detection engines on the sensor are restarted because the total number of allocated resources has changed. • • • Version 4. If you create an interface set. Contact Sourcefire Support for information about how to clear those hardware alarms. nothing is restarted. all the detection engines on the sensor are restarted. nothing is restarted. If you change the detection engine type for a detection engine. the interface set type.9. only that detection engine is started (although other CPUs may be restarted to rebalance the processing load). IMPORTANT! If you have an 3Dx800 health policy applied to a 3D9800 sensor when you change the number of detection resources. it will generate hardware alarms.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 195 . If you change the name or description of an interface set or detection engine. If you change the number of detection resources. all the detection engines on the sensor are restarted. If you delete a detection engine or interface set. all detection engines on the sensor are restarted. all the detection engines using that interface set are restarted. • Other Sensors • • • • • • If you change which network interfaces are used by an interface set. all detection engines assigned to that interface set are restarted. If you change a detection engine’s interface set. or interface set type. nothing is restarted. If you change the number of detection resources allocated to a detection engine. only that detection engine is restarted (although other CPUs may be restarted to rebalance the processing load). all detection engines on the sensor are restarted. When you create a detection engine. If you change the name or description of an interface set or detection engine.

3D1000. you must delete the detection engine and create a new one. You cannot modify the detection engine type. description. Your changes are saved. The Edit Detection Engine page appears. group.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Managing Detection Engines Chapter 6 Make sure you plan these actions for times when they will have the least impact on your deployment. you may want to remove any affected VAPs from the load-balanced list until the associated detection engines restart. TIP! The Inspect Traffic During Policy Apply option is not available on 3D500. If you need to change the detection engine type. For more information. Version 4. Click Save. or 3D3800 sensors.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 196 . then reinstate the VAPs. You can modify the name.9. To edit an existing detection engine: Access: Admin 1. 2. and number of detection resources for the detection engine. Click Edit next to the detection engine you want to modify. The Detection Engines page appears. 3. see the Sourcefire 3D Sensor Software for X-Series Installation Guide. In the case of an IPS detection engine you can also select if traffic is inspected while a policy is being applied. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines. TIP! On your 3D Sensor Software for Crossbeam Systems X-Series.

Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines. confirm that you want to delete the detection engine. see Modifying a Rule in the Analyst Guide. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines.9. To delete a detection engine: Access: Admin 1. you should first delete (or modify) the constraint in all rules in which it is used. See the following sections for more information: • • • Creating Detection Engine Groups on page 197 Editing Detection Engine Groups on page 198 Deleting Detection Engine Groups on page 199 Creating Detection Engine Groups Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor Access: Admin The following procedure explains how to create a detection engine group. Click Delete next to the detection engine you want to delete. 2. Also. you should not delete a detection engine that is used as a constraint in one or more compliance rules. Using Detection Engine Groups Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor You can use detection engine groups to combine similar detection engines.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 197 . WARNING! Do not delete a detection engine that is in use. To create a detection engine group: 1. For information on modifying compliance rules.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Detection Engine Groups Chapter 6 Deleting a Detection Engine Requires: DC or 3D Sensor Use the following procedure to delete a detection engine. a record of the detection engine is retained so that events generated by that detection engine are viewable. Version 4. The detection engine is deleted. These groups make it easier to apply policies to detection engines that have similar purposes. 3. The Detection Engines page appears. The Detection Engines page appears. At the prompt. however.

3. 2. 3. adding the detection engine to the group and clicking Update. The Detection Engine Group Edit page appears. Select available detections engines and to move them to the detection engine group with the arrow buttons. 4. You can add detection engines to this group by clicking Edit next to a detection engine name and. See Creating Detection Engine Groups on page 197. on the Edit Detection Engine page. Click Create Detection Engine Group.9. You must create a detection engine group before you can edit it. Click Edit for the detection engine group. The Create Detection Engine Group page appears. The Detection Engine page appears again. Click Save. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines. 4. You can also move detection engines out of the detection engine group. The Detection Engines page appears. To edit a detection engine group: Access: Admin 1. Type a name for the detection engine group in the Group Name field. Editing Detection Engine Groups Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor The following procedure explains how to edit a detection engine group. The Available Detection Engines page appears. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 198 . Click Save to add the selected detection engines to the detection engine group.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Detection Engine Groups Chapter 6 2.

30. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines. 2. You can define HOME_NET in your system default variable to encompass your internal address range (for example.0/24 In the detection engine named DE_ACCT: HOME_NET = 10.0/24) and another monitors a different class (for example. Click Delete next to the name of the detection engine group. For example. The detection engine group is deleted. if you have created your detection engines so that one detection engine monitors one class of hosts (in this example. However.0/16 In the detection engine named DE_DMZ: HOME_NET = 10. IPS can use the value of the detection engine-specific variable in rules you enable in your policy to monitor network traffic and generate events.0/16). which are specific to the policy in which they are created. In the system default variable used in the intrusion policy: HOME_NET = 10. For information on policy-specific variables. Using Variables within Detection Engines Requires: IPS or DC/MDC + IPS A system default variable sets a variable value on your Sourcefire 3D Sensor or Defense Center that IPS uses by default unless it is overridden by a policy-specific or detection engine-specific value for the same variable.10. the intrusion rules in an intrusion policy take advantage of certain system default variables such as HOME_NET and EXTERNAL_NET to look for exploits that originate outside your network and are targeted against hosts within your network.10. When you apply an intrusion policy to that detection engine.10. you can use the system default Version 4. The Detection Engines page appears. 10.10. You can associate a system default variable with a specific detection engine and give the resulting detection engine-specific variable an explicit value for that detection engine. you can use detection engine-specific variable values to tailor your detection capabilities to more closely match your infrastructure.90. To delete a detection engine group: Access: Admin 1. hosts in your network’s DMZ in the range 10.0.30.90. which includes a mixed address space.10.0. any detection engines in the group are automatically ungrouped. hosts in your accounting department in the address range 10.10.0/24 If you later create another detection engine that monitors the rest of your network.9. see Creating New Policy-Specific Variables in the Analyst Guide.0/24).Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Variables within Detection Engines Chapter 6 Deleting Detection Engine Groups Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor When you delete a detection engine group.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 199 . they are not deleted.

Optionally. or on the detection engine Variable List page for the detection engine.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 200 . the definition reverts to the definition in the intrusion policy the next time you apply the policy. You can also create new variables for use only within the context of the detection engine. For more information.9. You can create detection engine-specific variables and set detection engine-specific values for system default variables within an intrusion policy or from the detection engine Variable List page. Variables use the same syntax and must follow the same guidelines regardless of whether you create or define them from within intrusion policies or from the detection engine Variable List page. see the following sections: • • • • • Assigning Values to System Default Variables in Detection Engines on page 200 Creating New Variables for Detection Engines on page 202 Deleting and Resetting Variables on page 203 Configuring Custom Variables in Detection Engines on page 204 Using Portscan-Only Detection Engines on page 205 Assigning Values to System Default Variables in Detection Engines Requires: IPS or DC/MDC + IPS You can assign detection engine-specific values to system default variables. IMPORTANT! You cannot use variables with RNA detection engines. See Creating New Variables in the Analyst Guide and Modifying Variables in the Analyst Guide for more information. For configuration details related to setting detection engine-specific variables within an intrusion policy. You can view the explicit detection engine-specific value you configured in the list of variables for the detection engine within each policy. a detection engine-specific variable value takes precedence over a policy-specific or system default value for the same variable. When they exist. which means that the value specified in the policy will be used when you apply the policy. Version 4. and on the Variable list page for all other detection engines where it is listed with the value set to Policy Defined. You can view the corresponding new system default variable in the list of system default variables within each policy. If you disable a variable defined on the Variable List page by resetting the variable. see Creating New Variables in the Analyst Guide. you can modify the variable in the intrusion policies and detection engines where it is added automatically to give it a specific definition. For an explanation see Using Variables within Detection Engines on page 199. Configuration details in this section relate to the detection engine Variable List page. Creating a detection engine-specific variable from the detection engine Variable List page also creates a corresponding system default variable with the value set to any.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Variables within Detection Engines Chapter 6 variable value rather than creating another detection engine-specific value for HOME_NET.

Click Edit next to the variable you want to define. 3. The value for each of the variables defaults to the value within the intrusion policy that is applied to the detection engine. See Creating New Variables in the Analyst Guide for information about variable syntax. The Variable List page appears again and shows the new value for the variable. Enter a value for the variable and click Save.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 201 . 2. The Detection Engines page appears. The variable takes effect the next time you apply an intrusion policy to the detection engine. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines. The Variable Binding page appears. Click Variables next to the detection engine where you want to define a variable value. as described in Applying an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide. The Variable List page appears.9. Version 4.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Variables within Detection Engines Chapter 6 To assign a detection engine-specific value to a system default variable: Access: Admin 1. 4.

The Detection Engines page appears. • • • See Defining IP Addresses in Variables and Rules in the Analyst Guide for more information if you are defining a IP address-based variable. 3. From the Variable Type drop-down list. 4. For an explanation see Using Variables within Detection Engines on page 199. In the Variable Name field.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Variables within Detection Engines Chapter 6 Creating New Variables for Detection Engines Requires: IPS or DC/MDC + IPS When you create an intrusion policy. enter a name for the variable.9. See Defining Ports in Variables and Rules in the Analyst Guide for more information if you are defining a port-based variable. The Variable List page appears. 2. Click Variables next to the detection engine where you want to define a variable value. The Variable page appears. Click Add Variable. you can associate detection engine-specific variable definitions with the policy.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 202 . Version 4. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines. . select IP Port. or Custom. To create a new variable for a detection engine: Access: Admin 1. 5. See Understanding Custom Variables in the Analyst Guide if you are defining a special-purpose custom variable with one of the reserved variable names described in the Custom Variables table in the Analyst Guide.

Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Detection Engines. You cannot delete predefined system variables within an intrusion policy. Deleting and Resetting Variables Requires: IPS or DC/MDC + IPS You can reset the value of a variable on the Variable List page and the variable reverts to the value defined in the intrusion policy the next time you apply the intrusion policy to the detection engine. In the Value field. IMPORTANT! Each new detection engine variable adds a system variable with a value of any that is accessible in all your intrusion policies. The variable is created and is accessible to all policies as a system default variable. In any intrusion policy that you apply to a different detection engine and do not explicitly set a policy-defined or detection engine-specific variable to override the value of the system variable. The Detection Engines page appears. as described in Applying an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide. The variable takes effect the next time you apply an intrusion policy to the detection engine. Version 4. but only if they are not used in any active or inactive rule within the system. To delete or reset variables on a detection engine: Access: Admin 1. It is listed in the variable list for the detection engine in all intrusion policies with the explicitly set value. the value any will be used. enter a value for the variable and click Save. Creating the new detection engine variable also lists the description Policy Defined for all other IPS detection engines on the Variable List page. The Variable List page appears again and shows the new variable and its value. and listed for all other detection engines on the Variable List page with a value of Policy Defined. You can delete predefined system variables on the detection engine Variable List page.9.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Variables within Detection Engines Chapter 6 6.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 203 . See Creating New Variables in the Analyst Guide for information about the syntax for variables. meaning that the value specified in the policy will be used when you apply the policy. You can also delete variables that you created within the context of the detection engine.

click Delete next to the name of the variable. The variable is deleted from the detection engine the next time you apply an intrusion policy to the detection engine. Click Variables next to the detection engine where you want to delete or reset a variable value.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 204 . You then define the variable value with a set of instructions appropriate to the function the variable provides. You create a detection engine-specific custom variable by setting an explicit value for a reserved predefined system variable. Version 4. • To delete a locally created variable. You can set an explicit detection engine value for the predefined SNORT_BPF custom system variable. You can add a new USER_CONF detection engine variable using the reserved name USER_CONF . see Understanding Custom Variables in the Analyst Guide. or by creating a variable using a specific reserved name. click Reset next to the name of the variable.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Variables within Detection Engines Chapter 6 2. The Variable List page appears. The variable is reset and Policy Defined appears in the Value column.9. For more information. 3. You have two options: • To disable the variable value defined in the IPS detection engine and revert to the variable value defined in the policy. Configuring Custom Variables in Detection Engines Requires: IPS or DC/MDC + IPS Custom variables allow you to configure special IPS features that you cannot otherwise configure via the web interface.

Multiple detection engines will use this interface set. Internal logic on the sensor ensures that packets belonging to the same session are directed to the same resource for analysis. In this way. 1. Using Portscan-Only Detection Engines Requires: IPS or DC/MDC + IPS If you configure a sensor to use multiple detection resources within a single IPS detection engine. To overcome this issue. a portion of the traffic that the 3D Sensor sees is directed to each detection resource for processing. 2. Depending on the traffic mix on your network. One downside to using multiple detection resources is that no single resource sees all the traffic on a network segment. Create an IPS portscan-only detection engine and assign one detection resource to it. which is a requirement for the portscan preprocessor. the sensor can process more packets with greater efficiency. The following steps outline the process you can use to configure your sensor to detect portscans in addition to other exploits against your network assets. inline. you may need to adjust the number of resources in the multi-resource detection engine.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Variables within Detection Engines Chapter 6 To configure the SNORT_BPF custom variable for a detection engine: Access: P&R Admin/Admin To set an explicit detection engine-specific value for SNORT_BPF using the existing system default variable. Version 4. 3. create an interface set that includes the network interfaces you want to use on the sensor. Remember that the portscan-only detection engine can use only one detection resource. you can create a portscan-only intrusion policy and apply it to a portscan-only detection engine on the sensor. Using the Defense Center’s web interface.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 205 . Create another IPS detection engine that uses up to the remaining number of detection resources and the interface set that you created in step 1. Make sure you use the interface set that you created in step 1. see Assigning Values to System Default Variables in Detection Engines on page 200. IMPORTANT! A portscan-only intrusion policy is able to process up to three times more traffic than a more complex intrusion policy because it uses fewer CPU resources. Sourcefire recommends that you monitor the performance of your sensor to make sure that the portscan-only detection engine is able to keep up with the multi-resource detection engine. Engines on page 202.9. To configure the USER_CONF custom variable for a detection engine: Access: P&R Admin/Admin To create USER_CONF as a new detection engine-specific variable using the reserved name USER_CONF see Creating New Variables for Detection . or inline with fail open depending on how your sensor is deployed. The interface set can be passive. However.

Enable IP Defragmentation (under Transport/Network Layer Preprocessors) and make sure it is configured for your environment (using the Hosts option) See Enabling and Disabling Advanced IPS Features in the Analyst Guide for more information. the SMTP Configuration preprocessor (under Application Layer Preprocessors). Note that all rules are disabled on the Rules page. Version 4. you must enable rules on the Rules page with generator ID (GID) 122 for enabled portscan types for the portscan detector to generate portscan events. You do not need to set up variables for this policy. make sure you disable portscan detection in this policy.9. Make sure you match the type of intrusion policy to the type of interface set that you created in step 1. Enable Portscan Detection and configure it for your network environment. items listed under Performance Statistics. the HTTP Configuration preprocessor. See Detecting Portscans in the Analyst Guide for more information. See Enabling and Disabling Advanced IPS Features in the Analyst Guide for more information. and Applying an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide for more information): • Select the No Rules Active Base Policy and make sure the Protection Mode is Passive. Ensure that OPSEC Configuration (under External Responses) is disabled. Create and apply an intrusion policy for the multi-resource detection engine. Ensure that the DCE/RPC Configuration preprocessor. 6. See Selecting the Base Policy in the Analyst Guide for more information. You should not change the default settings for Checksum Verification or Packet Decoding (under Transport/Network Layer Preprocessors). The policy should inherit or be set to the following settings in the layer in your intrusion policy where you enable portscan detection (See Creating an Intrusion Policy in the Analyst Guide. Review the resulting intrusion events to ensure that you are receiving the events you expect. Working with Layers. and Back Orifice Detection (under Specific Threat Detection) are disabled. or Rule Processing Configuration. • • • • • • IMPORTANT! Note that when portscan detection is enabled. Also. Make sure portscan rules are enabled for the types of portscans you configure.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 206 .Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Variables within Detection Engines Chapter 6 4. See the Portscan Detection SIDs (GID:122) table in the Analyst Guide for more information. Create and apply an intrusion policy to the portscan-only detection engine. 5.

or PEP policy. Some installations require that the link state be propagated and most sensor interfaces provide that option. you can set up any of your 3D Sensor interfaces in passive. Only 3D9900 sensors provide a fail-safe option that works with inline interface sets. You can also set interfaces on most sensors in transparent inline mode. sensor.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 Using Interface Sets Requires: DC or 3D Sensor An interface set is a collection of one or more sensing interfaces on your appliance. or inline with fail-open mode. inline. 3D Sensors deployed in networks that are highly sensitive to latency can use the automatic application bypass option. Only 3D9900 sensors provide the PEP feature.9. • With the exception of the Virtual 3D Sensor. For more information on the PEP feature. You can sort the available interface sets by group. • • • • • • • Version 4. On selected sensors you can set interfaces to tap mode. set type. See the following sections for more information about interface sets: • • • • • • • Understanding Interface Set Configuration Options on page 207 Creating an Interface Set on page 213 Creating an Inline Interface Set on page 216 Editing an Interface Set on page 221 Deleting an Interface Set on page 223 Inline Fail Open Interface Set Commands on page 225 Using Clustered 3D Sensors on page 227 Understanding Interface Set Configuration Options Requires: DC or 3D Sensor There are a number of configuration variables to consider when you configure interface sets. The Virtual 3D Sensor supports only passive mode operation. Sensors with Gigabit Ethernet interfaces can employ jumbo frames.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 207 . To list the available interface sets: Access: Admin Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets. see Using PEP to Manage Traffic in the Analyst Guide.

Supported Features by 3D Sensor Model 3D Sensor Model Virtual 3D Sensor 3D500 3D1000 3D2000 3D2100 3D2500 3D3000 3D3500 3D3800 3D4500 3D5800 3D6500 3D9800 3D9900 Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Transparent Inline Mode Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Link State Propagation Mode Tap Mode Jumbo Frames Automatic Application Bypass Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Enable Fail-safe PEP See the following sections for more information: • • • • • • • Types of Interface Sets on page 209 Transparent Inline Mode on page 209 Tap Mode on page 210 Link State Propagation Mode on page 211 Jumbo Frames on page 212 Automatic Application Bypass on page 212 Enabling Fail-Safe on page 213 Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 208 .Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 See the following table for a list of 3D Sensors and each of their applicable interfaces features.9.

an inline with fail open interface set on a 3D3800 or 3D5800 sensor can include up to four interface pairs. except on the 3D9800 sensor. the Transparent Inline Mode option is enabled by default. The interfaces do not have to be on the same network cards. one for an IPS and the other for RNA. IMPORTANT! If you include an on-board sensing interface (instead of. Note that interface pairs on the same fiber-based NIM will act as fail open interfaces even if you assign them to an inline interface set. but you should avoid using an on-board interface. and an inline interface set on a 3D9800 sensor can include up to the total number of interface pairs on the sensor. This allows the sensor to act as a “bump in the wire” and means that the sensor forwards all the network traffic it sees regardless of its source and destination. You can set up multiple detection engines to use a single interface set. Transparent Inline Mode Transparent inline mode is a feature for inline interface sets and is not available for Passive interface sets. an inline interface set can include any two interfaces. However. you can choose one of three types: • Passive A passive interface set can encompass any number of the available sensing interfaces on a sensor. if the power fails or the Snort process halts. If you choose the Inline or Inline with Fail Open option. an inline interface set on a 3D3800 or 3D5800 sensor can include up to four interface pairs. interfaces on the network cards). Version 4. an inline with fail open interface set must include exactly one interface pair.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 209 . then apply different policies to the detection engines.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 Types of Interface Sets When you create an interface set. • Inline with Fail Open For most sensors. • Inline For most sensors. which only supports a single IPS detection engine. and an inline with fail open interface set on a 3D9800 sensor can include up to the total number of interface pairs on the sensor. For example. That is. It is not available on the 3D500 and available but not a default configuration on the Virtual 3D Sensor. network traffic continues to flow through the sensor as it would for an inline with fail open interface set.9. or in addition to. except for the 3D500 and the Virtual 3D Sensor. you could create a single passive interface set and create two detection engines. However. the appliance’s performance could be degraded.

a sensor acts as a bridge.9. and forwards packets accordingly. 3Dx800 sensors run in transparent inline mode. consider the following diagram. a copy of each packet is sent to the sensor and the network traffic flow is undisturbed.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 If you disable this option. Tap Mode Tap mode is available for the 3D3800. rules that you set to Drop and rules that use the replace keyword do not affect the packet stream. rules of these types do generate intrusion events when they are triggered. 3D5800. it does not allow the traffic to pass through the interface to the side of the network with Host C. but instead of the packet flow passing through the sensor. Over time. Version 4. then if the sensor sees network traffic from Host A to Host B.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 210 . when the sensor sees traffic from Host A to Host B. the sensor is deployed inline. If your sensor is deployed inline (or more precisely. For example. If the sensor is inline and you are not using transparent inline mode. With tap mode. 3D9900. Because you are working with copies of packets rather than the packets themselves. However. The Sourcefire 3D System checks the 3D9800 firmware version and displays the optional tap mode check box in the Create Interface Set page when appropriate. Keep in mind that if you create an inline interface set but do not use transparent inline mode. and on later versions of 3D9800 3D Sensor when you create an inline or inline with fail open interface set. the sensor learns which hosts are on which side of the inline interface. TIP! 3D9800 sensors with earlier versions of firmware do not support tap mode. you must be especially careful not to create loops in your network infrastructure. if your sensor includes a detection engine with an inline interface set) and the Transparent Inline Mode option is selected. and you cannot disable it. Only traffic between Host A and Host C or between Host B to Host C is allowed to pass. it allows the traffic to pass through the interface even though Host A and Host B are on the same side of the sensor.

In other words. Link state propagation is available for both copper and fiber fail-open NIMs. the second interface automatically comes back up. you can modify your intrusion policy and add the drop rules that best protect your network without impacting its efficiency. or configure the interface set in tap mode. if the link state of one interface changes. IMPORTANT! Crossbeam-based software sensors and 3D9800 sensors do not support link state propagation. Neither RNA nor RUA are supported on the 3D9800 sensor. you must either configure an IPS detection engine that uses that interface set. For example. and the IPS detection engine fails for any reason. If you are monitoring the same inline interface set with both IPS and RNA or RUA. the RNA or RUA detection engine monitoring that interface set will not see any traffic until the IPS detection engine restarts. as well as apply an intrusion policy to that detection engine.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 There are benefits to using tap mode with sensors that are deployed inline. IMPORTANT! Fiber interface sets configured as inline fail-open. When the downed interface comes back up. you can set up the cabling between the sensor and the network as if the sensor were inline and analyze the kinds of intrusion events the sensor generates. the link state of the other interface is changed automatically to match it. When you are ready to deploy the sensor inline. Version 4. Link State Propagation Mode Link state propagation mode is a feature for interface sets in the inline fail-open mode so both pairs of an inline pair track state. It is not available for passive interface sets. Link state propagation mode automatically brings down the second interface in the interface pair when one of the interfaces in an inline interface set goes down. see Removing Bypass Mode on Inline Fail Open Fiber Interfaces on page 225. Otherwise. the RNA detection engine monitoring that interface set will not see any traffic. you can disable tap mode and begin dropping suspicious traffic without having to reconfigure the cabling between the sensor and the network. other than those on 3D9900s must be in hardware bypass mode for link state propagation to function correctly. For more information about fiber interface sets and hardware bypass. IMPORTANT! On a 3D3800 or 3D5800 sensor.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 211 .9. if you plan to use RNA to monitor either an inline or inline with fail open interface set. It is also available on 3D9900s in both the inline and inline fail-open mode. too. Based on the results.

Jumbo Frames Jumbo frames are Ethernet frames with a frame size greater than the standard 1518 bytes. a core file is automatically generated for potential troubleshooting by Sourcefire Support. RNA. If the application bypass triggers repeatedly. The valid range is from 250 ms to 60.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 Link state propagation is especially useful in resilient network environments where routers are configured to reroute traffic automatically around network devices that are in a failure state. WARNING! If a detection engine is bypassed. Version 4. The automatic application bypass option is off by default. Most gigabit Ethernet network interface cards support jumbo frames to increase efficiency. see the Supported Features by 3D Sensor Model table on page 208. see Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on page 502.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 212 . it is most valuable in inline deployments. The feature functions with both passive and inline interface sets. Automatic Application Bypass The automatic application bypass feature allows you to balance packet processing delays with your network’s tolerance for packet latency. If your 3D Sensor and interface supports jumbo frames. Automatic application bypass limits the time allowed to process packets through an IPS. 3D Sensors generate a health monitoring alert. Typical maximum sized jumbo frames are 9018 bytes. Note also that frames larger than the configured maximum frame size are silently dropped by the sensor. For more information on the health monitoring alert. You can apply automatic application bypass on an interface set basis. you do not need to set it in the Create Interface Set page.9. set the maximum frame size for the interface using the Create Interface Set page. The default setting is 750 milliseconds (ms). 3D Sensor that support jumbo frames include: • • • 3D6500 3D9800 (9018-byte jumbo frames are always accepted) 3D9900 Note that since the 3D9800 is set to always accept the maximum size frame. You can change the bypass threshold if the option is selected.000 ms. If a detection engine is bypassed. or RUA detection engine and allows packets to bypass the detection engine if the time is exceeded. however. To see a list of which 3D Sensors you can use Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on. excessive numbers of core files can result in disk usage health alerts.

3. 3D9900 sensors monitor internal traffic buffers and bypass detection engines if those buffers are full. The Enable Fail-Safe option is only available on inline interface configurations. The Interface Sets page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 213 . Select the type of interface you want to create. Click Create Interface Set. Inline. or Inline with Fail Open. For more information. Version 4. For information about their use. 2. IMPORTANT! The procedure for creating an inline interface set for 3Dx800 sensors is slightly different. Creating an Inline Interface Set. traffic is allowed to bypass detection and continue through the sensor. Creating an Interface Set Requires: DC or 3D Sensor An interface set is a collection of one or more sensing interfaces on your appliance.9. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets. The Create Interface Set page appears. 4. Type a name and description for the new interface set in the Name and Description fields. You can use alphanumeric characters and spaces. see Using Interface Sets on page 207. When you enable the Enable Fail-Safe option. from the Interface Set Type drop-down list. To create an interface set: Access: Admin 1. Passive.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 Enabling Fail-Safe The Create Interface Set page includes an additional option for 3D9900 sensors: the Enable Fail-Safe option. see the next section. TIP! Some sensors do not support every interface set type.

You can. Optionally. clear the Transparent Inline Mode check box to disable transparent mode. The default setting is 750 ms and the valid range is from 250 ms to 60. you can select the Enable Fail-safe check box to enable traffic pass-though during application bypass. If you selected either the Inline or Inline with Fail Open option and you are not configuring a Crossbeam-based software sensor.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 5.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 214 . Optionally. 7. This option is especially useful if the routers on your network are able to re-route traffic around a network device that is down.9. select Link State Propagation Mode. then optionally.000 ms. however. 9. you can select a Bypass Threshold in milliseconds (ms). Automatic Application Bypass is most useful in inline applications. 8. Optionally. set jumbo frame options on the Crossbeam CLI. Optionally. See Using Interface Set Groups on page 223 for more information. and if you are configuring an inline interface set on a 3D9900. When the option selected. IMPORTANT! Link state propagation and automatic application bypass are not supported on Sourcefire 3D Sensor Software for X-Series platforms. if you selected the Inline or Inline with Fail Open option. select an existing interface set group or select Create New Group to create a new interface set group. Version 4. 6. select Automatic Application Bypass if your network is sensitive to latency.

You can also select the ungrouped sensors. and if you are configuring an interface set on a 3D6500 or 3D9900 type a maximum frame size for your IP traffic in the Maximum Frame Size field. Defense Center Only Select the sensor group containing the sensors where you want to create the interface set. Version 4. You can set any jumbo frame size between 1518 and 9018 bytes. inclusive. On the Defense Center only. Optionally. 12.9. 11. The following shows a 3D9900 interface set. A list of network interfaces on the sensor appears.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 10. a list of sensor groups appears. including a list of ungrouped sensors. Defense Center Only Select one of the sensors from the list.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 215 . A list of sensors appears.

Click Save.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 13. eth2. make sure you reapply intrusion policies to the IPS detection engines on the affected sensor. Creating an Inline Interface Set Requires: DC or 3D Sensor You can add multiple interface pairs to an inline interface set on 3D Sensors and Crossbeam-based software sensors. Select the interfaces that you want to add from the Available Interfaces list and click the arrow button to add the interface to the Selected Interfaces list. see the Installation Guide for your sensor or sensor software. For example. your sensor may not provide optimum performance. the names that appear in the Available Interfaces list correspond to the slot number and interface location. The interface set is created. you can include all of the available interfaces in a passive interface set. TIP! After you create an interface set. Inline with fail open interface sets must contain one pair of interfaces from the same fail-open network card.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 216 . For 3D Sensor Software for Crossbeam Systems X-Series. but inline interface sets must contain exactly two interfaces (except on 3Dx800 sensors). Using one interface set that includes all available inline interface pairs. IMPORTANT! If you select an on-board interface rather than an interface on a network card. • • For more information. and so on). s0.e0 corresponds to the leftmost interface on the network interface module (NIM) in I/O Slot 0 on the back of your appliance. log into the console and disconnect the network cable from the interface. This is the default behavior during 3D Sensor installations. For example. 14. Different types of interface sets have different requirements. Determining which interface name corresponds with a physical interface on your sensor depends on the model: • For most 3D Sensors. you can apply a single policy and rapidly complete your initial Version 4. the names that appear in the Available Interfaces list correspond to the device names you assigned to the circuits you created on the X-Series.9. You can use the Shift and Ctrl keys to select multiple interfaces at once. Remember to reconnect the network cable when you are finished. A message appears on the console indicating the name of the interface (eth1. For 3Dx800 sensors.

You can also use multiple interface pairs when your network employs asynchronous routing. the sensor might not correctly analyze your network traffic because a detection engine might see only half of the traffic. If you include only one interface pair in an interface set.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 3D Sensor deployment. Your network may be set up to route traffic between a host on your network and external hosts through different interface pairs depending on whether the traffic is inbound or outbound. as shown in the following graphic. in many cases you can improve performance by modifying the interface set to include only the inline interface pairs your network requires. Later. you can refine policies for specific connected network segments and their requirements. Version 4. TIP! Although the default interface set on 3D Sensors includes all the available inline interface pairs.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 217 .9.

the RNA or RUA detection engine monitoring that interface set will not see any traffic until the IPS detection engine restarts. Version 4. Select the type of inline interface you want to create. Type a name and description for the new interface set in the Name and Description fields. To create an inline interface set: Access: Admin 1. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets. Although some packets are transmitted without inspection during this time. 2. You can use alphanumeric characters and spaces. Neither RNA nor RUA are supported on the 3D9800 sensor. If you are monitoring the same inline interface set with both IPS and RNA or RUA. or configure the interface set in tap mode. Otherwise. no packets are lost. IMPORTANT! On a 3D3800 or 3D5800 sensor. A list of sensor groups appears. 5. choose Inline from the Interface Set Type drop-down list.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 For most 3D Sensors with inline interface sets. 3. and the IPS detection engine fails for any reason. See Using Interface Set Groups on page 223 for more information. Optionally. if you plan to use RNA to monitor either an inline or inline with fail open interface set. a software bridge is automatically set up to transport packets when the sensor restarts. 4.9. you must either configure an IPS detection engine that uses that interface set. from the Interface Set Type drop-down list. select an existing interface set group or select Create New Group to create a new interface set group. The Create Interface Set page appears. Click Create Interface Set. For Crossbeam-based software sensors. as well as apply an intrusion policy to that detection engine. including a list of ungrouped sensors.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 218 . choose either Inline or Inline with Fail Open. • • For an 3Dx800 sensor. the RNA detection engine monitoring that interface set will not see any traffic. The Interface Sets page appears.

you can select a Bypass Threshold in milliseconds (ms). On the Defense Center only. The following shows a 3D9900 interface set. Version 4. you can select the Enable Fail-safe check box to enable traffic pass-though during application bypass.9.000 ms. You can set any jumbo frame size between 1518 and 9018 bytes. however. Select one of the sensors from the list. Optionally.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 219 . Optionally. If you are creating an inline with fail open interface set. and if you are configuring an interface set on a 3D9900. Optionally. including a list of ungrouped sensors. inclusive. a list of sensor groups appears. IMPORTANT! Link state propagation and automatic application bypass are not supported on Sourcefire 3D Sensor Software for X-Series platforms. set jumbo frame options on the Crossbeam CLI.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 6. a list of network interfaces on the sensor appears. 8. select Automatic Application Bypass if your network is sensitive to latency. When the option selected. a list of paired network interfaces on the sensor’s fail-open cards appears. 7. 9. and if you are configuring an interface set on a 3D6500 or 3D9900 type a maximum frame size for your IP traffic in the Maximum Frame Size field. The default setting is 750 ms and the valid range is from 250 ms to 60. If you are creating an inline interface set. You can.

For 3D Sensor Software for Crossbeam Systems X-Series. the names that appear in the Available Interfaces list correspond to the slot number and interface location.e0 corresponds to the leftmost interface on the network interface module (NIM) in I/O Slot 0 on the back of your appliance. select two interfaces that you want to designate as an inline pair from the Available Interfaces list and click the arrow button to add the interface to the Selected Interfaces list.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 10. Note that 3D Sensor Software for Crossbeam Systems X-Series does not support inline with fail open interface sets. For example. but each pair must reside on a single fail-open network card. the paired interface names that appear in the Available Interfaces list correspond to the device names you assigned to the transparent bridge-mode bridge circuits you created on the X-Series.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 220 . If you are creating an inline with fail open interface set. • Use the Shift and Ctrl keys to select multiple interfaces or interface pairs at once. You can configure inline interface sets on 3D3800 and 3D5800 sensors to contain up to four pairs of interfaces. Determining which interface name corresponds with a physical interface on your sensor depends on the model: • For 3Dx800 sensors. • If you are creating an inline interface set. 11. Add the interfaces to your interface set. select the Enable Tap Mode check box to use tap mode. Optionally. s0. The Sourcefire 3D System checks the 3D9800 firmware version and displays the optional tap mode check box in the Create Interface Set page when appropriate.9. select at least one interface pair from the Available Interfaces list and click the arrow button to add the interface to the Selected Interfaces list. for a 3DX800 or 3DX900 sensor. Repeat to add additional interface pairs. On the 3D9800 sensor. see the Installation Guide for your sensor or sensor software. inline and inline with fail open interface sets can include up to the total number of interface pairs on the sensor. • For more information. Version 4. Inline with fail open interface sets on 3D3800 and 3D5800 sensors can also contain up to four pairs of interfaces. TIP! 3D9800 sensors with earlier versions of firmware do not support tap mode.

for a 3D3800 or 3D5800 sensor. Click Save.9. 13. The following sections describe some of the cases where a detection engine is affected by changes to the detection engines and interface sets: Version 4. no packets are lost. which can cause a short pause in processing.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 221 . select Link State Propagation Mode. TIP! After you create an interface set. IMPORTANT! Note that link state propagation is not available for Crossbeambased software sensors or 3D9800 sensors. This option is especially useful if the routers on your network are able to re-route traffic around a network device that is down. Although some packets are transmitted without inspection during this time. a software bridge is automatically set up to transport packets when the sensor restarts. The interface set is created. Editing an Interface Set Requires: DC or 3D Sensor In some circumstances. editing an interface set or detection engine can cause the detection engines on the sensor to restart. Optionally. TIP! The link lights on fiber fail-open NIMs remain lighted even when the link state is down on 3D3800 or 3D5800 sensors with link state propagation enabled.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 12. make sure you reapply intrusion policies to the IPS detection engines on the affected sensor. IMPORTANT! For most 3D Sensors with inline interface sets.

all detection engines on the sensor are restarted. all detection engines assigned to that interface set are restarted. If you change a detection engine’s interface set. If you create a detection engine. If you delete a detection engine or interface set. that detection engine is restarted. The Sourcefire 3D System checks the 3D9800 firmware version and displays the optional tap mode check box in the Create Interface Set page when appropriate. only that detection engine is started (although other CPUs may be restarted to rebalance the processing load). If you change the number of detection resources allocated to a detection engine. all the detection engines on the sensor are restarted because the total number of allocated resources has changed. or transparent mode for an interface set. only that detection engine is restarted (although other CPUs may be restarted to rebalance the processing load).Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Sets Chapter 6 3Dx800 Sensors • If you change the number of network interfaces. the interface set type. all the detection engines on the sensor are restarted. nothing is restarted. all detection engines assigned to that interface set are restarted. If you delete a detection engine or interface set. which interface set is used. If you change the detection engine type for a detection engine. or the detection engine type. • If you change the number of detection resources. If you change which network interfaces are used by the interface set. all the detection engines on the sensor are restarted. • • • • • Other Sensors • • • • • • • Version 4. all the detection engines using that interface set are restarted. nothing is restarted.9. all detection engines on the sensor are restarted. TIP! 3D9800 sensors with earlier versions of firmware do not support tap mode. If you change an interface set’s transparent mode setting or interface set type. If you create an interface set. all detection engines on the sensor are restarted. If you change an interface set’s tap mode setting. If you change the name or description of an interface set or detection engine.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 222 . When you create a detection engine.

see Understanding PEP Traffic Management in the Analyst Guide. You must delete the detection engine before you can delete the interface set. The Interface Sets page appears. 2. For more information on PEP policies. These groups make it easier to apply PEP policies to interface sets that have similar purposes. The Create Interface Set page appears. at the prompt. Make sure you plan these actions for times when they will have the least impact on your deployment. 3. Click Edit next to the interface set that you want to modify. Make any changes to the interface set and click Update. The Interface Sets page appears. Your changes are saved. To delete an interface set: Access: Admin 1. make sure you reapply your intrusion policy on the affected sensor. and. The interface set is deleted. To edit an interface set: Access: Admin 1. A restart occurs only when you assign a detection engine to the interface set. nothing is restarted.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Set Groups Chapter 6 • • If you create an interface set. Deleting an Interface Set Requires: DC You cannot delete an interface set that is being used by a detection engine.9. See the following sections for more information: • • Creating Interface Set Groups on page 224 Deleting Interface Set Groups on page 225 Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 223 . Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets. 2. confirm that you want to delete the interface set. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets. Click Delete next to the interface set that you want to delete. TIP! After you edit an interface set used by an IPS detection engine. If you change the name or description of an interface set or detection engine. nothing is restarted. Using Interface Set Groups Requires: DC You can use interface set groups to combine similar interface sets.

adding available interfaces to the group and clicking Save. 3. The Available Interface Sets page appears. The Create Interface Set Group page appears. Type a name for the interface set group in the Group Name field.9. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets. The Interface Set page appears again. To create a interface set group: Access: Admin 1. Click Create Interface Set Group or click Create Interface Set then click Create New Group in the Group field. To edit an interface set group: Access: Admin 1.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Interface Set Groups Chapter 6 Creating Interface Set Groups Requires: DC The following procedure explains how to create an interface set group. 2. See Creating Interface Set Groups on page 224.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 224 . on the Interface Group Edit page. The Interface Group Edit page appears. 2. Editing Interface Set Groups Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor The following procedure explains how to edit an interface set group. You can add interface sets to an interface set group by clicking Edit next to a interface set group name and. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets. Click Edit for the interface set group. Version 4. Click Save. You must create an interface set group before you can edit it.

When the links restore. The Interface Sets page appears. The Available Interface Sets page appears. Inline Fail Open Interface Set Commands Requires: 3D Sensor When you use fiber inline fail open interfaces sets and the interface set goes into bypass.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 225 . Version 4. You can force a copper or fiber inline fail open interface in or out of bypass. any interface sets in the group are automatically ungrouped. You can use a command line tool to force the interface set out of bypass mode. most fiber inline fail open interface sets do not return from bypass automatically. 2. It is not necessary to use this tool on inline with fail open copper interface pairs or to use this tool with 3D9900 sensors. Select available interface sets and to move them to the interface set group with the arrow buttons. TIP! This tool works on most 3D Sensors with inline with fail open fiber interface pairs. Click Save to add the selected interfaces to the interface set group. See Removing Bypass Mode on Inline Fail Open Fiber Interfaces. The interface set group is deleted. Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets. you can force the interface out of bypass mode. To delete a interface set group: Access: Admin 1. Deleting Interface Set Groups Requires: DC When you delete an interface set group. Click Delete next to the name of the interface set group. all network traffic passes through the interface pair without being analyzed.9. See Forcing an Inline Fail Open Interface Set into Bypass Mode on page 226. they are not deleted. 4.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Inline Fail Open Interface Set Commands Chapter 6 3. You can also move interface sets out of the interface set group. Removing Bypass Mode on Inline Fail Open Fiber Interfaces Requires: 3D Sensor When link state propagation is enabled on a sensor with an inline fail open interface set and the sensor goes into bypass mode. IMPORTANT! Make sure you contact Technical Support if you are having issues with the fail open interfaces on your sensor.

When the interfaces switch out of bypass mode.9. you can use a command line tool to force the interface set into bypass mode. a state where all network traffic passes through the interface pair without being analyzed. Log in as root onto the sensor and. To force an inline fail open interface set into bypass mode: Access: Admin 1. The Create Interface Set page appears. You cannot use it with non-fail open inline interface sets. enter the correct password. Under Available Interface Sets. TIP! Note that this tool works only with inline with fail open interface pairs. 3. On the appliance’s web interface. a message in syslog indicates the 3D Sensor is analyzing traffic. You can determine this information on the Interface Sets page. The Selected Interfaces column displays the names of the interfaces in the interface set.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 226 . To force an inline fail open interface set into bypass mode. it goes into bypass mode. 2. Enter the following at the command line: 3.sh 2. at the prompt. you must know which two interfaces are included in the interface set. select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Inline Fail Open Interface Set Commands Chapter 6 To force a fiber inline fail open interface set out of bypass mode: Access: Admin 1. /var/sf/bin/unbypass_cards. Version 4. For example: Fiber pair has been reset by un_bypass Forcing an Inline Fail Open Interface Set into Bypass Mode Requires: 3D Sensor When the sensor with an inline fail open interface set fails. click Edit next to the inline with fail open interface set you are investigating. The Interface Sets page appears. Open a terminal window on your 3D Sensor and enter the command su and the root password to switch to the root user. IMPORTANT! Make sure you contact Technical Support if you are having issues with the fail open interfaces on your sensor. or if the interface card does not fail open on its own. If you are troubleshooting an interface set.

see Managing a Clustered Pair on page 140. For information on establishing and separating clustered pairs. if the interfaces in the interface set are eth2 and eth3.pl open eth2:eth3 The following message appears: NOTE: You must already have a failopen interface set and detection engine configured on the pair you are forcing open or closed for this utility to work. When you establish a clustered pair configuration. Version 4. Using Clustered 3D Sensors Requires: DC + 3D9900 You can increase the amount of traffic inspected on a network segment by connecting two fiber-based 3D9900 sensors in a clustered pair. you can identify them on the Sensor list page. Enter the following at the command line: failopen_pair. If you did not specify the correct interfaces.. To return an inline fail open interface set to normal mode: Access: Admin 1. enter the following: failopen_pair. After the cluster is established.9. enter the following: failopen_pair. Then.. if you specified the correct interfaces.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Clustered 3D Sensors Chapter 6 4. enter the correct password.pl close eth2:eth3 The following message appears: Mode changed for interfaces eth2:eth3 The interfaces return to normal mode and the traffic flowing through the detection engines on the interface set is analyzed as you would expect. Select Operation > Sensors and note that clustered sensors have a peer icon.pl open eth#:eth# For example.pl close eth#:eth# For example. if the interfaces in the interface set are eth2 and eth3. the following message appears: No failopen interface set configured for interfaces eth2:eth3. 2. at the prompt. you combine the 3D9900 sensors resources into a single.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 227 . the following message appears: Mode changed for interfaces eth2:eth3 The interfaces switch to bypass mode and the traffic is no longer analyzed. Enter the following at the command line: failopen_pair. Log in as root onto the sensor and. shared configuration.

example.com. For more information. When you create a detection for a clustered pair. see: • • • Using Detection Engines on Clustered 3D Sensors on page 228 Understanding Interface Sets on Clustered 3D Sensors on page 229 Managing Information from a Clustered 3D Sensor on page 230 Using Detection Engines on Clustered 3D Sensors Requires: DC + 3D9900 For information about using detection engines with clustered 3D9900s. see: • • • Managing Clustered 3D Sensor Detection Engines Requires: DC + 3D9900 Use the managing Defense Center to create.example. where Z inline DE is the name of the detection engine.com is the name of the slave in the pair of 3D9900 sensors. see: • • • Managing Clustered 3D Sensor Detection Engines on page 228 Using Clustered 3D Sensor Detection Engines in Policies on page 229 Managing Information from a Clustered 3D Sensor on page 230 Creating a Detection Engine on page 193 Editing a Detection Engine on page 194 Deleting a Detection Engine on page 197 For information about how to manage detection engines. In a clustered pair.9.com is the name of the master in the pair.example. both sensors are listed in the interface set. the slave’s ethb0 and ethb1 connect to the master and the its ethb2 and ethb3 are not connected. and list the detection engines of paired 3D Sensors. By combining two 3D9900 sensors as a clustered pair. When you combine two 3D9900 sensors as a clustered pair. Because the detection engines and interface sets are combined. The format is DetectionEngineName (MasterSensorName. a clustered 3D Sensors detection engine could be: Z inline DE (birch. when you hover over the peer icon. and which sensor it is paired with. you can combine their detection engines.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 228 . and fir.example. the Defense Center displays the single interface set of the master sensor. fir. For example. SlaveSensorName). you can only manage them from a Defense Center and not from one of the clustered sensors. You use the combined detection engines as a single entity except when viewing information from the clustered pair. birch. Both 3D9900 sensors are listed as a part of the detection engine formed by the clustered 3D Sensors. Version 4.com). the Edit page is replaced with an informational page. You cannot manage detection engines on the local GUI of a paired 3D Sensor.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Clustered 3D Sensors Chapter 6 You can see if the sensor is a master or slave. edit.

and fir. Understanding Interface Sets on Clustered 3D Sensors Requires: DC + 3D9900 After you set up the clustered pair. Using Clustered 3D Sensor Detection Engines in Policies Requires: DC + 3D9900 Use the managing Defense Center to manage policies and responses of paired 3D Sensors. a clustered 3D Sensors detection engine could be: Z inline DE (birch. The master’s ethb2 and ethb3 pair connect to the slave’s ethb0 and ethb1 pair. SlaveSensorName) when you use them in: • • • • IPS policies PEP policies RNA detection policies compliance rules For example.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Clustered 3D Sensors Chapter 6 When you create or edit a detection engine formed by the clustered 3D Sensors.example. where Z inline DE is the name of the detection engine. IMPORTANT! You cannot use the Policy & Response menu on the local GUI of a paired 3D Sensor.example. birch. Clustered 3D Sensors detection engines present their names in the form DetectionEngineName (MasterSensorName.com is the name of the master in the pair. the detection resources are listed as from both sensors.com.com is the name of the slave in the pair of 3D9900 sensors. a master/slave relationship is established between the two 3D9900 sensors.com). The slave’s ethb2 and ethb3 pair are not functional and must not be connected when you establish the clustered pairing. fir.example.example.9. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 229 . those pages are replaced with an informational page. The master’s ethb0 and ethb1 pair are used for sensing connections.

For information about using interface sets in the detection engines of clustered 3D9900s. Analysis & Reporting tools display the information from each half of the detection engine independently. Do not attempt to change the interface settings while a clustered sensor is paired.example. where Z inline DE is the detection engine.com.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 230 . add data from both sensor of the detection engine to measure the total.com is the master sensor. Managing Information from a Clustered 3D Sensor Requires: DC + 3D9900 Clustered sensors report information from each of the sensors.Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Clustered 3D Sensors Chapter 6 To view the clustered pair interface sets: Access: Admin Select Operations > Configuration > Detection Engines > Interface Sets.com and from Z inline DE / fir.9. The Interface Sets page appears. and fir. in the form DetectionEngineName/MasterSensorName and DetectionEngineName/SlaveSensorName.example. fir. When you examine information from the clustered pair.example.example. it is listed as from both Z inline DE / birch.com. see Using Detection Engines on Clustered 3D Sensors on page 228. birch. IMPORTANT! If you collect statistics from clustered 3D9900s. A Select Detection Engines list from the Intrusion Event Statistics page is show below.com). These reports include: • • • intrusion event statistics intrusion events event graphs Version 4.com is the slave sensors. For example.example. the clustered 3D Sensors detection engine could be: Z inline DE (birch.example. A clustered pair interface set displays both the master and the slave in the Sensor column.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 231 .Using Detection Engines and Interface Sets Using Clustered 3D Sensors Chapter 6 • • • • dashboards RNA statistics network map searches IMPORTANT! If you use eStreamer to stream event data from a clustered pair of 3D9900s to an external client application. collect the data from both 3D9900s and ensure that you configure each 3D9900 identically.9. The eStreamer settings are not automatically synchronized over the pair. Version 4.

the Intrusion Events report appears under the IPS report category and requires the IPS component on a 3D Sensor. the RNA Events report appears under the RNA report category on the Report Designer page.9. Event reports include the data that you see on the event view pages for each type of event presented in a report format. and you must configure the RNA component for that sensor to collect RNA events.Working with Event Reports Chapter 7 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide The Sourcefire 3D System provides a flexible reporting system that you can use to generate a variety of event reports.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 232 . You must have an RNA host license on the Defense Center managing your 3D Sensor. Similarly. For example. You can run the report on the 3D Sensor or on the Defense Center that manages the sensor. Report Types Report Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality Intrusion Events with Source Criticality Intrusion Events SEU Import Log Host Attributes Report Category IPS or RNA IPS or RNA IPS IPS RNA Requires DC + RNA + IPS DC + RNA + IPS DC + IPS DC + IPS DC + RNA Version 4. The Report Types table describes the reports you can create and the components required for producing them.

Version 4.9. see Understanding Report Profiles on page 241. or use it as a template for an event report profile which can be customized by modifying field settings as appropriate and saving the report with the new values. see Editing Report Profiles on page 263. For more information on how to create and save report profiles. You can create a new report profile through the use of the Report Designer.Working with Event Reports Chapter 7 Report Types (Continued) Report RNA Hosts Scan Results RNA Client Applications RNA Events RNA Services Vulnerabilities Hosts with Services Flow Data RUA Events Users White List Violations Compliance Events White List Events Remediation Status Health Events Audit Log Events Report Category RNA RNA RNA RNA RNA RNA RNA RNA RUA RUA Compliance Compliance Compliance Compliance Health Monitoring Audit Log Requires DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RUA DC + RUA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC Any You can use a predefined report profile to generate your report.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 233 . For information on modifying a predefined or existing report profile.

For more information on how to manage your reports. see Generating Reports from Event Views on page 235. download. For more information on how to configure a Defense Center to store reports in a remote location using SSH. NFS. see Managing Remote Storage on page 393. You can also specify which detection engine to use when generating the report. see Editing Report Profiles on page 263.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 234 . see Creating a Report Profile on page 246. For information on how to generate a report for the data that appears in an event view. For more information on how to how to generate reports on managed sensors and view the results on the Defense Center. Version 4. For information on how to generate a report from a report profile view. For information on how to modify a report profile. You can run reports remotely from the Defense Center using the data on the sensors for the report. or SMB. Working with Report Profiles Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can use a predefined report profile to generate your report. see Managing Generated Reports on page 237.Working with Event Reports Working with Event Reports Chapter 7 See the following sections for more information: • • • • • • • • Working with Event Reports on page 234 Working with Report Profiles on page 234 Managing Generated Reports on page 237 Understanding Report Profiles on page 241 Working with Report Information on page 248 Working with Report Sections on page 255 Working with Report Options on page 258 Using a Report Profile on page 260 Working with Event Reports Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can generate reports manually or automatically on any subset of events in an event view. see Using a Report Profile on page 260. if you use a Defense Center to manage your sensors. You can view.9. as well as move reports to a remote storage location. For more information on how to create and save report profiles. You can create a new report profile through the use of the Report Designer. or delete previously generated reports. You can use a predefined report profile as a template for an event report which can be customized by modifying field settings as appropriate and saving the report with the new values. see Running Remote Reports on page 240. You can store reports locally or remotely.

You can do this several ways: • Use an event search to define the type of events you want to view. see Searching for Events in the Analyst Guide. For details on using the event search. Generating Reports from Event Views Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can generate reports on any subset of events in an event view. see Working with Report Options on page 258. To generate a report for a specific set of events: Access: Any Analyst/ Admin 1.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 235 . Version 4. Drill down through a workflow until you have the proper events in your event view. For more information. • TIP! In addition to generating reports in an event view. For more information on each of the summary reports.9. For information on how to incorporate these options into your reports. see Understanding and Using Workflows in the Analyst Guide. as described in this section. or as comma-separated . you can also create a report profile and then either use it to generate a report or save it to use later. Populate an event view with the events you want to include in the report. You can also specify how you want the report formatted: PDF HTML. see Understanding Report Profiles on page 241. see Using Summary Reports on page 255. and a short description of the report. . For details on using workflows and constraining events within a workflow.Working with Event Reports Generating Reports from Event Views Chapter 7 You can include a summary report for intrusion events and RNA events by selecting the appropriate radio button in your report profile. You can generate reports in PDF HTML or comma-separated value (CSV) formats. and include custom options such as a corporate logo or footers. values (CSV).

Working with Event Reports Generating Reports from Event Views Chapter 7 2. 5.9. HTML. The Report Designer page appears. Note that you may select more than one format. Click Generate Report. TIP! If you need to go back to the drill-down page where you opened the Report Designer.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 236 . The following graphic shows the Defense Center version of the page. click Return to Calling Page at the bottom of the Report Designer page. Change any of the parameters as necessary to meet your needs. For details on the parameters for a report. 4. The settings on the page reflect the parameters that you selected for the search or through the drill-down pages. Version 4. or CSV. 3. see Creating a Report Profile on page 246. Click Report Designer in the toolbar. Select the check boxes next to the output options you want in the report: PDF .

Each report is listed with the report name as defined in the report profile plus the date and time the report was generated. for local. click Reports in the toolbar. NFS.pdf for PDF reports . then click the report name on the Reporting page that appears. it has already been generated. Note that only Series 2 Defense Centers support remote storage of reports. You can enable or disable remote storage using the Enable Remote Storage for Reports check box. click Remote Storage on the toolbar. For more information. and SMB storage.csv for comma-separated value reports . If you disable remote storage. or whether the generation failed (for example. due to lack of disk space). You can view. To view the report. and whether it is stored locally or remotely. The report profile is saved and the report generates in the output formats you selected. or delete reports. In addition.9. To configure remote storage. The report appears. who generated it. you can move reports to a remote storage location. for scheduled tasks).zip for HTML reports (HTML reports are zipped along with the necessary graphics) Finally. The default location for report storage is listed at the top of the page. If you are using a Series 2 Defense Center.Working with Event Reports Managing Generated Reports Chapter 7 6. the Defense Center hides reports not stored in the new location. 7. Click OK to confirm that you want to save the current parameters as a report profile. Version 4. Managing Generated Reports Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Manage previously generated reports on the Reporting page. which indicates whether it has yet to be generated (for example. the Defense Center hides any previously generated remotely stored reports. download. if you change the remote storage location. the appliance lists the status of each of the reports.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 237 . the appliance provides the disk usage of the storage device. Each report has one of the following file extensions appended to the report name: • • • . see Managing Remote Storage on page 393.

On the toolbar. then click View. other users can only view reports that they generated themselves. Click the name of the report. The Reporting page appears.Working with Event Reports Managing Generated Reports Chapter 7 For information on managing reports. Select Analysis & Reporting > Report Profiles. 2. To view a generated report: Access: Any Analyst/ Admin 1. Downloading Generated Reports. To download generated reports: 1. In either case. see the next section. You can view one report at a time. the report opens. You have two options: • • Enable the check box next to the report you want to view.9. The Report Profiles page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 238 . The Report Profiles page appears. For more information. Select Analysis & Reporting > Report Profiles. click Reports. 3. Note that users with Admin access can view all reports generated on the appliance. click Reports. On the toolbar. Downloading Generated Reports Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Access: Any Analyst/ Admin Use the following procedure to download generated reports. The Reporting page appears. Version 4. TIP! You can also save reports locally. see the following topics: • • • • • Viewing Generated Reports on page 238 Downloading Generated Reports on page 238 Deleting Generated Reports on page 239 Moving Reports to a Remote Storage Location on page 239 Running Remote Reports on page 240 Viewing Generated Reports Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Use the following procedure to view generated reports. 2.

Note that after you move a report to a remote location. you can move locally stored reports to a remote storage location. The Reporting page appears. Select Analysis & Reporting > Report Profiles. Enable the check boxes next to the reports you want to download. Version 4. 3.zip file. Moving Reports to a Remote Storage Location Requires: DC/MDC On Series 2 Defense Centers. a second check box appears that you can enable to delete all reports on all pages. click Reports. If you have multiple pages of reports. On the toolbar. The Report Profiles page appears. For information on configuring a remote storage location and enabling remote storage of reports.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 239 . To delete generated reports: 1. 2. Select Analysis & Reporting > Report Profiles. 2. see Managing Remote Storage on page 393. TIP! Enable the check box at the top left of the page to download all reports on the page.9. If you have multiple pages of reports. To move generated reports: Access: Any Analyst/ Admin 1. The reports are downloaded in a single . Enable the check boxes next to the reports you want to delete. On the toolbar. The Report Profiles page appears. then click Download. you cannot move it back. The reports are deleted. Deleting Generated Reports Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Access: Any Analyst/ Admin Use the following procedure to delete generated reports. 4. 4. TIP! Enable the check box at the top left of the page to delete all reports on the page. Confirm that you want to delete the reports. a second check box appears that you can enable to download all reports on all pages. Follow your browser’s prompts to download the reports. The Reporting page appears. then click Delete. click Reports.Working with Event Reports Managing Generated Reports Chapter 7 3.

Click OK. Confirm that you want to move the reports. the logo or image file must exist on both the Defense Center and the managed sensor where you run the report. then the remote report will be empty. Running Remote Reports Requires: DC + 3D Sensor If you use a Defense Center to manage your sensors. a second check box appears that you can enable to move all reports on all pages. if you use your Defense Center to manage a 3D Sensor with IPS. Select Analysis & Reporting > Report Profiles.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 240 . 4. From the drop-down list at the bottom of the page. A prompt appears asking you to confirm that you want to run the report remotely. you can run the report on the data that is resident on the sensor. Enable the check boxes next to the reports you want to move. • • To run a remote report: Access: Any Analyst/ Admin 1. 5.9. Version 4. The Report Designer page appears.Working with Event Reports Managing Generated Reports Chapter 7 3. then click Move. you have the option of running reports remotely from the Defense Center using the data on the sensors. There are several limitations that you need to keep in mind: • • If you do not store data on the sensor. The report is run on the sensor that you selected. The Report Profiles page appears. and you store IPS data on the sensor in addition to sending it automatically to the Defense Center. 3. 2. Click Create Report Profile. If you have multiple pages of reports. TIP! Enable the check box at the top left of the page to move all reports on the page. For example. Create the report that you want to run on the managed sensor. select the sensor where you want to run the report and click Run Remote Report. 4. You cannot run incident reports remotely on managed 3D Sensors with IPS. The reports are moved. You cannot run remote reports on 3Dx800 or Crossbeam-based software sensors. See Generating Reports from Event Views on page 235 for details. If your report uses a logo or image file.

Working with Event Reports Understanding Report Profiles Chapter 7 6. For more information. click Reports.9. When you run the report. In the toolbar. you will have other options to define.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 241 . Depending upon your choices. adds a custom footer. see Working with Report Information on page 248. and provides an option to email the report. and then selecting the report category and type. make sure you select the name of the sensor and click Run Report Remotely. For more information. or the inclusion of an image file. see Working with Report Sections on page 255. inserts a logo. such as detection engine. Additionally. The Reporting page appears. Report Information defines the basic nature of the report profile by first giving the report profile a name. Report Sections identifies which sections to include in the report. See the following sections for more information: • • • • Understanding the Predefined Report Profiles on page 242 Modifying a Predefined Report Profile on page 246 Creating a Report Profile on page 246 Working with Report Information on page 248 Version 4. such as a drill down of events. For more information. You can then manually run these reports or schedule them to run automatically (for information about scheduling tasks. comma-separated (CSV format). Understanding Report Profiles Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Report profiles provide the structure for the generated report. and workflow. Whether you use a predefined report profile or create your own. table view of events. see Scheduling Tasks on page 425).is prepended to the name of the report. Report Options specifies the outputs of the report format (PDF HTML. see Working with Report Options on page 258. listing the report you just generated on the managed sensor. a new report profile can be created through the use of the Report Designer. You can use a predefined report profile to either generate your report. Note that remote. You can view or download the remote report as you would with any other locally generated report. and Report Options. search query. or . Note that not all options are available for all categories or types. TIP! You can also use report profiles as the basis for remote reports by creating a profile as described in Creating a Report Profile on page 246. or use as a template for a new report profile by modifying field settings as appropriate and saving the report with the new values. all report profiles contain the same three configurable areas: Report Information. Reports Sections. 7.

9.Working with Event Reports Understanding Report Profiles Chapter 7 • • • • • Working with Report Sections on page 255 Working with Report Options on page 258 Using a Report Profile on page 260 Generating a Report using a Report Profile on page 261 Deleting Report Profiles on page 263 Understanding the Predefined Report Profiles Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC A predefined report profile provides you with predefined setting for event reports. you can use a predefined report profile as a template for an event report. Version 4. As with custom report profiles that you create (see Creating a Report Profile on page 246). save the report with the new values. and run the report manually or automatically. You can modify field settings as appropriate.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 242 .

Working with Event Reports Understanding Report Profiles Chapter 7 Predefined reports are provided by the Sourcefire system: Blocked Events. Version 4. High Priority Events. you must save the report profile with a new name to preserve your new settings. The Report Options area is not included in these charts. and Host Audit. Note that if you modify the default settings. The following tables provide the default settings for each of the predefined report profiles.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 243 . you have created a new report profile. The following graphic shows the Blocked Events report profile on the Defense Center version of the page.9.

9. Default Settings for the Blocked Events Report Profile Field Report Category Report Type Detection Engine Search Query Workflow Setting IPS Intrusion Events All Blocked Events Impact and Priority (on the Defense Center) Destination Port (on the 3D Sensor) Time Add Summary Report Impact Based Event Summary (on the Defense Center) Drill Down of Source and Destination IPS (on the Defense Center) Drill Down of Destination Port (on the 3D Sensor) Drill Down of Events (on the 3D Sensor) Table View of Events Packets (limit 50 pages) Last day.Working with Event Reports Understanding Report Profiles Chapter 7 The Blocked Events report profile provides information on blocked intrusion events for all detection engines for the past twenty-four hours.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 244 . This report profile is available on the Defense Center or on a 3D Sensor with IPS. sliding time window Quick Enabled Enabled Enabled Enabled Disabled Disabled The High Priority Events report profile provides information on intrusion events as well as the host criticality of hosts involved in the intrusion events for the past Version 4.

9. sliding time window Quick Enabled Enabled Enabled Disabled The Host Audit report profile provides operating system details for the past week on systems less than two network hops away from 3D Sensors with RNA. This report profile is available only on a Defense Center that manages 3D Sensors with RNA and IPS. Default Settings for the Host Audit Report Profile Field Report Category Report Type Detection Engine Search Query Setting RNA RNA Hosts All Local Systems Version 4.Working with Event Reports Understanding Report Profiles Chapter 7 twenty-four hours. Default Settings for the High Priority Events Report Profile Field Report Category Report Type Detection Engine Search Query Workflow Time Add Summary Report Impact to Criticality Summary Source Destination Drill Down Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality Packets (limit 50 pages) Setting IPS Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality All High Priority Events Events by Impact.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 245 . and Host Criticality Last day. This report profile is available only on the Defense Center that manages 3D Sensors with RNA. Priority.

save the report profile. see Editing Report Profiles on page 263. Working with Report Sections on page 255 explains how to specify which the sections to be included in the report. Not all options are available for all reports. configure the options in each of three report areas (Report Information. For more information on how to modify a predefined report profile. create the report profile in the system. but not all options are available for all reports. Creating a Report Profile Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can create the report profile by defining category and type. and then specifying which detection engines to search. and which workflows to examine. and workflows to apply. Working with Report Information on page 248 explains how to set the type of report and how to specify which detection engines. such as a drill down of events. selecting the Intrusion Events report type gives you the option to select which detection engines to search. and. and Report Options). the criteria for the search.9. For example. Note that all reports contain the option for a summary report and an image file.Working with Event Reports Understanding Report Profiles Chapter 7 Default Settings for the Host Audit Report Profile (Continued) Field Workflow Time Add Summary Report Summary of OS Names Summary of OS Versions OS Details with IP NetBIOS. Report Sections. Criticality Table View of Events Packets (limit 50 pages) Setting Operating System Summary Last week. or an image file. . Version 4. selecting the Intrusion Events with Source Criticality report type does not provide that option. queries. table view of events. finally. second. sliding time window summary Enabled Enabled Enabled Disabled Disabled Modifying a Predefined Report Profile Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can use a predefined report profile as a template to create a new report profile by modifying the field settings as appropriate. You perform three steps to create the a report profile: first. and saving the report with the new values.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 246 . in the IPS report category.

The Report Designer page appears. 3. To create a report profile: Access: Any Analyst/ Admin 1. adds a custom . Version 4. The following graphic shows the Defense Center version of the page.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 247 . The Report Profiles page appears.9. and how to use the option which emails the report. Select Analysis & Reporting > Report Profiles. footer or logo.Working with Event Reports Understanding Report Profiles Chapter 7 Working with Report Options on page 258 section explains how to set the output of the report (PDF HTML or comma-separated value (CSV) format). Continue with Defining Report Information on page 254. TIP! You can also reach the Report Designer page from any event view by clicking Report Designer on the toolbar. Click Create Report Profile. 2.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 248 .Working with Event Reports Working with Report Information Chapter 7 Working with Report Information Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You define the basic nature of the report profile by first giving the report profile a name. periods.9. Depending upon your choices. dashes. you will have other options to define. The following graphic is an example of the Report Information section. parentheses. Note that not all options are available for all categories or types. such as detection engine. The Report Name can be any name using 1-80 alphanumeric characters. Version 4. and then selecting the report category and type. search query. and spaces. and workflow.

Compliance Health Monitoring Audit Log Version 4. For example. RNA hosts. are using a Defense Center with an RNA host license and you want to report on white list violations. For example. or various services. want to report on audit log events. are using a Defense Center and you want to report on the health of your sensors.Working with Event Reports Working with Report Information Chapter 7 The Report Category defines which system feature is examined in the report. RUA are using a Defense Center with an RUA host license and you want to search one or more detection engines to examine the RUA Events and users. hosts with services. compliance events. vulnerabilities. you can create a report which searches selected detection engines for RUA events.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 249 . For more information on RNA Report Type options. RNA events. or the SEU import log. or scan results. However IPS and RNA report types options are extensive and provide detailed options for defining your report profile. RNA are using a Defense Center with an RNA host license and you want to report on host attributes. Use this option to select a workflow on one or more detection engines to search for blocked events. For example. IPS If you. see IPS Category Report Types on page 251. or exploits that target client/server issues. RNA client applications. high impact or high priority events. Use this option to search hosts for blocked or high priority events. See Using Report Types on page 250 for more information. public or private addresses only.. Options vary depending upon Report Type. have an IPS license and you want to report on intrusion events with or without source or destination criticality. The Report Type is a subset of the Report Category and provides a greater level of detail to the report. RNA services. you can create a report which searches for IP-specific high impact intrusion events on a specified detection engine. and generate a report which can include sections with a Table View of Events and Users. see RNA Category Report Types on page 252. Select from the Report Categories table . report types are limited and self-explanatory. intrusion events with source criticality. remediation status. Report Categories Select. or white list events. you can create a report which searches a selected detection engine for RNA compliance events.. common concerns. For information on IPS Report Type options. such as the Compliance or Audit Log report categories.9..For example.. In many cases. you can create a report which searches selected detection engines for RNA client applications.

Options vary depending upon Report Type. The Time option allows you to define the period of time for which the report is generated. have limited report types and are self-explanatory. See the following sections for more information: • • IPS Category Report Types on page 251 RNA Category Report Types on page 252 Version 4. or sliding time frame. Options vary depending upon which options you selected for Report Type. See the following sections for more information: • • Using Report Types on page 250 Defining Report Information on page 254 Using Report Types Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC The Report Type is a subset of the Report Category and provides a greater level of detail to the report. and can include a list of exploits (such as Sasser Worm Search or non-standard service attempts) or areas of concern such as IRC Events or Kerberos Client/Server issues. such as the Compliance or Audit Log report categories. Options for the report type vary depending upon which Report Category is selected. Click in the current time field to open a pop-up window from which you can select a static. This option is available when searching for events. and health monitoring. white list. the report types available to the IPS and RNA report categories are extensive and provide detailed options for defining your report profile. The Workflow allows you to select which workflow to examine. The Search Query identifies the search criteria for the report.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 250 . see Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide. and can include such options as Network Services by Count or Host Violations. and IP-Specific or Impact and Priority. Some report categories.9. RNA. For more information. expanding. or compliance events.Working with Event Reports Working with Report Information Chapter 7 The Detection Engine allows you to select which detection engines are to be searched for the report. host attributes. Detection Engine. and Search Query. or when searching the network for RNA hosts. However. client applications. such a intrusion.

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IPS Category Report Types
You can choose from the following IPS Category Report Types
:

IPS Category Report Types Select... Intrusion Events To... search one or more detection engines using user-specified search queries and workflows to generate a report which can include sections with a drill down of the destination port and events, a table view of events, and the packets. Search queries include: Blocked Events, Bootstrap Client/Server, Common Concerns, DNS Service, DirectX Service, FTP Service, Finger Service, High Impact Events, High Priority Events, IRC Events, Impact1/Not Dropped Events, Kerberos Client/Server, LDAP Services, Mail Services, Oracle Service, Private Addresses Only, Public Addresses Only, RPC Services, and Reserved Port TCP Scan. Workflows include: Destination Port, Event-Specific, Events by Priority and Classification, Events to Destinations, IP-Specific, Impact and Priority, Impact and Source, Impact to Destination, Source Port, and Source and Destination. Intrusion Events with Source Criticality search using the Blocked Events or High Priority events search queries to generate a report on the Intrusion Events with Source Criticality default workflow which can include sections on Intrusion Events with Source Criticality, and the packets. search using the Blocked Events or High Priority Events search queries on your choice of three workflows: Events by Impact, Priority, and Host Criticality, which can include sections on Impact to Criticality Summary, Source Destination Drill Down, Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality, and the packets. Events with Destination, Impact, and Host Criticality, which can include sections on Current Events Monitor, Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality, and the packets. Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality default workflow, which can include sections on Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality, and the packets. SEU Import Log generate a report on the SEU Detail View workflow.

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RNA Category Report Types
You can choose from the following RNA Category Report Types: RNA Category Report Types Select... Host Attributes To... search one or more detection engines to examine the Attributes workflow, and generate a report which can include sections with a table view of host attributes and the packets. search one or more detection engines to examine the Client Application Summaries or RNA Client Applications workflows, and generate a report which can include sections with a table view of client applications and the packets. examine the Vulnerabilities workflow and generate a report which can include sections with a table view of vulnerabilities, vulnerabilities on the network, and the packets. search using the Blocked Events or High Priority events search queries on the Intrusion Events with Source Criticality default workflow, and generate a report which can include sections on Intrusion Events with Source Criticality, and the packets. examine the Hosts with Services Default Workflow or the Service and Host Details, and generate a report which can include sections on Hosts with Services and the hosts. search one or more detection engines to examine the operating system summary or RNA hosts for local, remote, unidentified, or unknown systems, and generate a report which can include sections with a Summary of Operating System Names, Summary of Operating System Versions, Operating System Details with IP NetBIOS Criticality, Table View of Hosts, and Hosts. , generate a report on the Scan Results workflow. search one or more detection engines using the NetSky.S Worm Search, New Events, Sasser Worm Search, Subseven Trojan Search, Timeout Events, and Update Events, and generate a report which can include sections with a Table View of Events, and Hosts.

RNA Client Applications

Vulnerabilities

Intrusion Events with Source Criticality

Host with Services

RNA Hosts

Scan Results RNA Events

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RNA Category Report Types (Continued) Select... RNA Services To... search one or more detection engines for non-standard service events (such as non-standard HTML, non-standard mail, non-standard SSH) in Network Services by Count, Network Services by Hit, and RNA Services workflows, and to generate a report which can include sections with Active Services, Service Application Activity, Service Version Audit, Service by Host, and Hosts. search using the Blocked Events, Events to High Criticality Hosts, or High Priority Events search queries, and generate a report on your choice of three workflows: Events by Impact, Priority, and Host Criticality, which can include sections on Impact to Criticality Summary, Source Destination Drill Down, Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality, and the packets. Events with Destination, Impact, and Host Criticality, which can include sections on Current Events Monitor, Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality, and the packets. Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality default workflow, which can include sections on Intrusion Events with Destination Criticality, and the packets. Flow Data search one or more detection engines using user-specified search queries and workflows, and generate a report which can include sections with the Top Ten workflows, Table View of Flow Summary Data, Table View of Flow Data drill down of the destination port and events, a table view of events, and the packets. Search queries include: Possible Database Access, Standard HTTP Standard , Mail, Standard SSL, and Unauthorized SMTP . Workflows include: Flow Summaries, Flows by Detection Engine, Flows by Initiator, Flows by Port, Flows by Responder, Flows by Service, Flows Over Time, RNA Flows, Traffic by Detection Engine, Traffic by Initiator, Traffic by Port, Traffic by Responder, Traffic by Service, Traffic Over Time, Unique Initiators by Responder, and Unique Responders by Initiator.

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Defining Report Information
Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Access: Any Analyst/ Admin After you have determined which options you need for your report, use the following procedure to define the report information options. To define the Report Information: 1. From the Report Category drop-down list, select the report category for which you want to create a report.

You can choose from: • • • • • • IPS (with an IPS license) RNA (on a Defense Center with an RNA host license) RUA (on a Defense Center with an RUA host license) Compliance (on a Defense Center with an RNA host license) Health Monitoring (on a Defense Center) Audit Log

2. From the Report Type drop-down list, select the type of report you want to create. 3. Optionally, if the report type you selected includes the Detection Engine option, select a specific Detection Engine on which to report. 4. Requires: DC Optionally, if you are reporting on health events, select a specific sensor or sensor group from the Sensor drop-down list. 5. From the Search Query drop-down list, either use the Use Current Query option (which retains any query parameters you specified on the search page or event page) or select one of the existing search queries. Note that if you did not previously specify a search query, the Use Current Query option places no constraints on the events. 6. From the Workflows list, select the workflow you want to use to build the report. For information on workflows, see Understanding and Using Workflows in the Analyst Guide.

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7.

Specify the time range for the report. Depending on your default time window, the time range matches either the time window for the event view you are using to building the report profile, or the global time window. You can change time range by clicking it and using the Date/Time pop-up window to select a new time range. For more information, see Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide.

8. Continue with Defining the Report Sections on page 258. IMPORTANT! For report profiles that you plan to use multiple times, such as in scheduled tasks, Sourcefire strongly recommends that you use a sliding time range. If you create a report profile with a static time range, the appliance will generate a report using the same time range (and therefore the same events) every time you use the report profile.

Working with Report Sections
Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC The Report Sections area is populated based on the workflow you selected. Select the check box for each report section you want to include in the report. Reports can include up to 10,000 records for each report section you select. See the following sections for more information: • • • Using Summary Reports on page 255 Including an Image File on page 257 Defining the Report Sections on page 258

Using Summary Reports
Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Depending on the components you are licensed to use in your Sourcefire 3D System deployment, you can include summary reports for intrusion events and RNA events. You can append these summary reports to the beginning of any report by selecting the appropriate radio button in the report profile. Intrusion event reports require the IPS component. If your deployment includes IPS, you can include either a Quick Summary or a Detail Summary report in your report profile definition.

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The Comparison of Quick Summary and Detail Summary Reports table shows which information is included in the reports
.

Comparison of Quick Summary and Detail Summary Reports Report Information Pie chart showing the percentage of events in each event type (which maps to the rule category for the rule that generated the event) List of the 10 most active and 10 least active events Graph showing the number of events over time Pie charts showing the percentage of events by protocol (for example, TCP , UDP or ICMP) and event classification (which maps to the value for the , classtype keyword in the rule that generated the event) Tables listing the 50 most active and least active events Tables listing the 50 most active source and destination ports Tables listing the 25 most active source and destination hosts and host combinations. Tables listing the 25 most active source and destination hosts as well as the 25 most active source and host combinations Tables listing the most active events for each of the 25 most active destination hosts Tables listing the most active events for the 25 most active source and destination host combinations Quick Summary X X X X Detail Summary X X X X

X X X

X X X X X X

IMPORTANT! On the Defense Center, the report includes summary information for all the managed 3D Sensors with IPS that you include in the report. RNA-related event reports require the RNA component. If your deployment includes 3D Sensors with RNA and a Defense Center that manages the sensors,

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you can add the RNA Summary to RNA event, host, client application, service, and flow data reports. The RNA Summary includes: • RNA event statistics including total number of events, events in the last day and hour, total services, total hosts, total routers, total bridges, and host limit usage a list of events divided by event type with counts for the last hour and total number within the report range pie charts showing the percentage of events by protocol (for example, TCP , UDP or ICMP), service, and operating system ,

• •

Including an Image File
Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can add an image to your report which will be displayed after the summary report and before the drill down or table views. This can be useful for providing information best displayed in a visual, non-graphical format, or simply as a break between sections. You can use JPEG, PNG, and TIFF files as image files, but only JPEG and PNG graphics are supported in most browsers.

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Defining the Report Sections
Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Access: Any Analyst/ Admin After you have determined which options you need for your report, use the following procedure to define the report section options. To define the Report Sections: 1. If a summary is available for the report type you selected, specify whether you want to include it as part of your report.

To include a summary with intrusion event-based reports, select quick or detailed. For a full description of the information provided in Quick and Detailed summaries, see Using Summary Reports on page 255. On a Defense Center with an RNA host license, to include a summary with an RNA-based report, select summary. For a full description of the information provided in the RNA summary, see Using Summary Reports on page 255. To exclude the summary, select none, which is the default.

2. If you want to include an image in the report, type the path to the image in the Include Image File text box, or navigate to a JPEG, PNG, or TIFF file. 3. Select the check boxes next to the sections of the workflow you want to include in the report. The options in this section depend on the workflow you selected in step 6. 4. Continue with Working with Report Options on page 258. TIP! Note that if you select a table view of events, the report is limited to 10,000 records as noted in step 6, regardless of the number of events.

Working with Report Options
Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Report Options define the look of the report, and provide the option to email the report You can generate a report in PDF HTML or comma-separated value (CSV) format. , You can also generate the same report in multiple formats. Note that graphics are not available in the CSV format.

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You can include a logo on your report. In PDF formats, the logo is included on every page. In HTML formats, the logo is included at the top of the report. You can add a description which will be included on the front page summary of the report. Access: Any Analyst/ Admin To define the report options: 1. Select the check boxes next to one or more output options for your report: PDF HTML, or CSV. ,

2. Optionally, for PDF and HTML reports, select a logo from the list of image files that were previously added to the system. See Including an Image File on page 257 for information about how to make more logos available to the report designer. 3. Optionally, for PDF and HTML reports, type a description in the Description field. You can use alphanumeric characters and spaces. The description appears in the report header. 4. Optionally, for PDF reports, type the text you want to include as the footer in the Custom Footer field. You can use 1 - 80 alphanumeric characters and spaces. 5. Optionally, you can specify that reports are automatically emailed after they are generated. To email a report, type one or more email addresses in a comma-separated list in the Email to field. IMPORTANT! You must make sure that the mail host is identified: Click Not available. You must set up your mail relay host. The System Policy page appears. Click Edit in the row for the system policy you want to modify. Click Email Notification. Type the name of your mail server in the Mail Relay Host field and click Save. Click Apply in the row for the system policy you changed and apply it to the appliance. The report is emailed from host_name@domain_name, where host_name is the host name of the appliance and domain_name is the name of the domain where you deployed the appliance.

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6. You have the following options: • To save the report profile, click Save Report Profile. When prompted, follow the instructions for your browser to save the report profile. The report profile is saved with the name you specified in the Report Name field. • To generate the report and save the report profile, click Generate Report. When prompted, follow the instructions for your browser to generate the report and save the report profile. • To see a PDF preview of your report, click Preview Report. When prompted, follow the instructions for your browser to display a PDF version of the report in the browser window. • On a Defense Center, to generate the report remotely, select the sensor where you want to run the report and click Run Remote Report. When prompted, follow the instructions for your browser to generate the report and save the report profile. IMPORTANT! The PDF HTML, and CSV selections for Output Options apply to , generated reports, not to report previews. When you click Preview Report, you see a PDF version of the report.

Using a Report Profile
Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can use report profiles to generate reports that contain the information that is important to you and your evaluation of the events generated for your network. You can use an predefined or existing report profile as a template for a new report profile. For information on editing a report profile, see Editing Report Profiles on page 263. If you want to generate a report for a specific set of events or a specific time period, populate the event view with the events you want to see in your report before opening the report designer. For details on using the event view, see the following sections: • • • • • • Viewing RNA Network Discovery and Host Input Events in the Analyst Guide Viewing Hosts in the Analyst Guide Viewing Services in the Analyst Guide Viewing Client Applications in the Analyst Guide Working with Flow Data and Traffic Profiles in the Analyst Guide Working with Intrusion Events in the Analyst Guide

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See the following sections for more information: • • • Generating a Report using a Report Profile on page 261 Editing Report Profiles on page 263 Deleting Report Profiles on page 263

Generating a Report using a Report Profile
Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Access: Any Analyst/ Admin You can use report profiles to generate reports that contain the information that is important to you and your evaluation of the events generated for your network. To generate a report using a report profile: 1. Select Analysis & Reporting > Report Profiles. The Report Profiles page appears.

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2. Click the name of the report profile you want to use. The Report Designer page loads the parameters defined for that selected report.

3. If necessary, click the time range to change it to include the events you want in your report. For more information, see Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide. 4. Click Generate Report. The system generates the report. 5. Click Reports in the toolbar to display the Reporting page. The Reporting page appears, listing the report that you generated as well as any other previously generated reports. For information on managing generated reports, see Managing Generated Reports on page 237.

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1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 263 . 2. The Report Profiles page appears. Select Analysis & Reporting > Report Profiles. modifying the field settings as appropriate. Use the following procedure to edit a report profile. Click Delete next to the profile that you want to delete. Access: Any Analyst/ Admin To edit a report profile: 1. Click Edit next to the profile that you want to delete. 3. 2. Click Save Report Profile. Version 4. The Report Designer page appears and contains the current settings for the report profile. The report profile is saved with the name you specified in the Report Name field. When prompted. Select Analysis & Reporting > Report Profiles. Deleting Report Profiles Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC Access: Any Analyst/ Admin Use the following procedure to delete a report profile. remember to change the name of the report profile in the Report Name field. You can also edit a report profile to make changes to the resulting report. The Report Profiles page appears. The report profile is deleted. See the following sections for information: • • • Working with Report Information on page 248 Working with Report Sections on page 255 Working with Report Options on page 258 IMPORTANT! If you are creating a new report profile from a predefined or existing report profile. follow the instructions for your browser to save the report profile.Working with Event Reports Using a Report Profile Chapter 7 Editing Report Profiles Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can create a new report profile by using a predefined or existing report profile as a template for a new report profile. 4. To delete a report profile: 1. Make changes to the report areas as needed. and saving the report with the new values.9.

If the account uses external authentication. For more information. the appliance looks for a match for the user name and password in the local list of users. it queries an external server. see the following sections: • • • Understanding Sourcefire User Authentication on page 264 Managing Authentication Objects on page 269 Managing User Accounts on page 299 Understanding Sourcefire User Authentication Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor When a user logs into the web interface. such as a Lightweight Directory Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 264 . the process checks the local database to see if the user exists there and.Managing Users Chapter 8 Administrator Guide If your user account has Administrator access. if the user is not found locally. There are two kinds of authentication: internal and external. This process is called authentication. you can manage the user accounts that can access the web interface on your Defense Center or 3D Sensor. If the user’s account uses internal authentication. you can also set up user authentication via an external authentication server.9. On the Defense Center. rather than through the internal database. the authentication process checks the local database for this list.

Users with external authentication receive the permissions either for the group or access list they belong to. for a list of users. or based on the default user access role you set in the server authentication object or in a system policy on the managing Defense Center. For users with either internal or external authentication.9. unless you change the user permissions manually.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 265 . Version 4. you can control user permissions.Managing Users Understanding Sourcefire User Authentication Chapter 8 Access Protocol (LDAP) directory server or a Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) authentication server.

Internal authentication occurs when the username and password are verified against records in the internal Sourcefire 3D System database. in the order the servers are listed in the system policy. Version 4.Note that you can only use one form of external authentication for an appliance. If you want to use external authentication. see the following sections: • • • Understanding Internal Authentication on page 266 Understanding External Authentication on page 266 Understanding User Privileges on page 267 Understanding Internal Authentication Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor By default. and the user logs in using the password stored for that user on the external server. Once an internally authenticated user converts to an externally authenticated user. you cannot revert to internal authentication for that user. IMPORTANT! Note that an internally authenticated user is converted to external authentication if you enable external authentication.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 266 . the Sourcefire 3D System uses internal authentication to check user credentials when a user logs in. Understanding External Authentication Requires: DC External authentication occurs when the Defense Center or managed sensor retrieves user credentials from an external repository. LDAP authentication and RADIUS authentication are types of external authentication. The authentication object contains your settings for connecting to and retrieving user data from that server. Because you manually create each internally authenticated user. You can then enable that object in a system policy on the managing Defense Center and apply the policy to an appliance to enable authentication. When any externally authenticated user logs in. you set the access settings when you create the user and you do not need to set default settings. you must configure an authentication object for each external authentication server where you want to request user information. such as an LDAP directory server or RADIUS authentication server.9.Managing Users Understanding Sourcefire User Authentication Chapter 8 For more information. the user credentials are managed in the internal database. the web interface checks each authentication server to see if that user is listed. the same username exists for the user on the external server. If you do not enable external authentication when you create a user.

but might never require access to administrative functions for the Sourcefire 3D System itself. the access rights for users are based on their membership in LDAP groups. the user has only the rights granted by default. Intrusion Agents. For more information on specific types of external authentication. If you apply a local system policy (created on the sensor) to the sensor itself. you set the access rights when you create them. If you do not modify the user’s rights. the authentication objects are exported with the policy. The only configuration of external authentication on the sensor occurs when you select the type of authentication for a new user.Managing Users Understanding Sourcefire User Authentication Chapter 8 When you create a user. see the following sections: • • Understanding LDAP Authentication on page 269 Understanding RADIUS Authentication on page 287 Understanding User Privileges The Sourcefire 3D System lets you allocate user privileges based on the user’s role. You can grant Intrusion Event Analyst and RNA Event Analyst access privileges for analysts and reserve the Administrator role for the network administrator managing the Sourcefire 3D System. but you cannot control the authentication object from the sensor’s web interface. you set a default access role for all users who are externally authenticated. For example. disable it in the system policy on the managing Defense Center and re-apply the policy to the sensor. you can add or remove access rights for that user on the User Management page. or Crossbeambased software sensors. external authentication is also disabled. you can specify whether that user is internally or externally authenticated. IMPORTANT! Sourcefire does not support external authentication for RNA Software for Red Hat Linux. If you configured management of access rights through LDAP groups. Because you create internally authenticated users manually. After an externally authenticated user logs in for the first time. TIP! You can use the Import/Export feature to export system policies. an analyst typically needs access to event data to analyze the security of monitored networks. When you export a policy with external authentication enabled. 3Dx800 sensors. If you want to disable external authentication on a managed 3D Sensor. In the system policy on the Defense Center. They receive the Version 4.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 267 . You can then import the policy and object on another Defense Center. You can push a system policy to a managed 3D Sensor to enable external authentication on that sensor. Do not import policies with authentication objects onto 3D Sensors.

If you configure default access in the authentication object. Note that on the Defense Center you cannot select Restricted Event Analyst as the default user role in the system policy. client applications. • • • • • Version 4. Users with the Administrator role also have Intrusion Event Analyst. configure system policies and system settings. Similarly. analyze. compliance events. except that they cannot delete events. and RUA events. RNA Event Analyst. they receive the default user access rights configured in the authentication object for the LDAP server. Intrusion Event Analysts (Read Only) have all the same rights as Intrusion Event Analysts. the user receives the role that has the highest level of access. the user receives that role. those settings override the default access setting in the system policy. They can also create incidents. manage user accounts. hosts. If the user does not belong to any lists and you have configured a default access role in the authentication object. listed in order of precedence. review. If they do not belong to any groups and you have configured group access. If you configure group access. If a user is on the lists for two mutually incompatible roles. and delete intrusion events and compliance and RUA events. unless one or more of those roles are mutually incompatible. Intrusion Event Analysts can view. but you can modify a user’s settings via the User Management page to grant this level of access. analyze. services. but cannot be assigned the Intrusion Event Analyst or RNA Event Analyst roles. The Sourcefire 3D System supports the following user roles. but users are limited to subsets of that data. if you assign a user to specific user role lists in a RADIUS authentication object. Policy & Response (P&R) Administrator.9. RNA Event Analysts can view. and delete network change events.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 268 . RNA Event Analysts (Read Only) have all the same rights as RNA Event Analysts. host attributes. Restricted Event Analysts have the combined privileges of Intrusion Event Analysts and RNA Event Analysts. and Maintenance access rights. generate reports.Managing Users Understanding Sourcefire User Authentication Chapter 8 default access rights for the group that they belong to that has the highest level of access. except that they cannot delete events. Restricted analysts can also be assigned the Policy & Response Administrator or Maintenance User roles. depending on the features you have licensed: • Administrators can set up the appliance’s network configuration. vulnerabilities. the user receives all assigned roles. and view (but not delete or modify) health events. those settings override the default access setting in the system policy. RNA analysts can also generate reports and view (but not delete or modify) health events.

directory on your network that organizes objects. such as user credentials. manage. you can change them in one place. you can configure shell access authentication. Note that maintenance administrators do not have access to the functions in the Policy & Response menu and can only access the dashboard from the Analysis & Reporting menu. Creating LDAP Authentication Objects Requires: DC You can create LDAP authentication objects to provide user authentication services for an appliance. containing connection settings and authentication filter settings for those servers. performance data. and responses. and system logs) and maintenance functions (including task scheduling and backing up the system). host statistics.9. When you create an authentication object. allows you to set up a . See the following sections for details on these tasks: • • • • • • • • Understanding LDAP Authentication on page 269 Creating LDAP Authentication Objects on page 269 LDAP Authentication Object Examples on page 281 Editing LDAP Authentication Objects on page 286 Creating RADIUS Authentication Objects on page 287 RADIUS Authentication Object Examples on page 295 Editing RADIUS Authentication Objects on page 298 Deleting Authentication Objects on page 298 Understanding LDAP Authentication LDAP or the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol. You also select the directory context and search criteria you want to use to retrieve user data from the server. rather than having to change them on the local appliances as well as on any other application that uses them. as well as compliance rules. If you ever need to change a user's credentials. and responses. you define settings that let you connect to an authentication server. You can create. policies.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 269 . Version 4. and delete authentication objects on the Defense Center. Multiple applications can then access those credentials and the information used to describe them. in a centralized location. Managing Authentication Objects Requires: DC Authentication objects are server profiles for external authentication servers.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 • • Policy & Response Administrators can manage intrusion rules. Maintenance Administrators can access monitoring functions (including health monitoring. Optionally. policies.

For more information. see Configuring Access Settings by Group on page 275. 7. Identify the authentication server where you want to retrieve user data for external authentication. the port uses the default of 636. Version 4. 3. The Create Authentication Object page appears. The Login Authentication page appears. configure LDAP groups to use as the basis for default access role assignments.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 Note that to create an authentication object. see Configuring Attribute Mapping on page 274. If you select SSL encryption. Identifying the LDAP Authentication Server Requires: DC When you create an authentication object. specify the appropriate attributes for your server. For none or TLS. the port uses the default value of 389. you first specify the primary and backup server and server port where you want the local appliance (3D Sensor or Defense Center) to connect for authentication. Select Operations > Configuration > Login Authentication. To create an authentication object: Access: Admin 1. 6. Test your configuration by entering the name and password for a user who can successfully authenticate. Specify a user name template to format the usernames that users enter on login. For more information. see Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 and Applying a System Policy on page 324. see Identifying the LDAP Authentication Server on page 270. 5. If you are using a Microsoft Active Directory server or if your LDAP server uses a UI access attribute or a shell access attribute other than uid.9. see Testing User Authentication on page 280. configure authentication settings for shell access. Click Create Authentication Object. For more information. For more information. Optionally. Remember that you have to apply a system policy with the object enabled to an appliance before the authentication changes take place on that appliance. Configure authentication settings to build a search request that retrieves the users you want to authenticate.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 270 . For more information. 4. see Configuring LDAP Authentication Settings on page 271. Note that if you change the encryption method after specifying the port. 8. Your changes are saved. For more information. 2. Optionally. you need TCP/IP access from your local appliance to the authentication server where you want to connect. the port resets to the default value. see Configuring Administrative Shell Access on page 278. For more information.

however. Type the IP address or host name for the primary server where you want to obtain authentication data in the Primary Server Host Name/IP Address field. 2.9. Continue with Configuring LDAP Authentication Settings. modify the port used by the primary authentication server in the Backup Server Port field. In addition. for example. IMPORTANT! If you are using a certificate to connect via TLS or SSL. modify the port used by the primary authentication server in the Primary Server Port field. the host name in the certificate must match the host name used in this field. IPv6 addresses are not supported.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 To identify an LDAP authentication server: Access: Admin 1. 7. If. Configuring LDAP Authentication Settings Requires: DC If you specify a backup authentication server. Type a name and description for the authentication server in the Name and Description fields. the failover to the backup server does not occur. you can set a timeout for the connection attempt to the primary server. If the number of seconds indicated in the Timeout field (or the timeout on the directory server) elapses without a response from the primary authentication server. the primary server has LDAP disabled. If LDAP is running on the port of the primary LDAP server and for some reason refuses to service the request (due to misconfiguration or other issues). 6. Optionally. 3. Optionally. Select LDAP from the Authentication Method drop-down list. the appliance then queries the backup server. 5.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 271 . type the IP address or host name for the backup server where you want to obtain authentication data in the Backup Server Host Name/IP Address field. 4. Version 4. the appliance would query the backup server. Optionally.

dc=com when using Microsoft Active Directory Server.250 as the server and computer1. you can use the LDAP naming standards and filter and attribute syntax defined in the RFCs listed in the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (v3): Technical Specification. or directory tree. you need to select the encryption method for the connection.10. The base filter focuses your search by only retrieving objects in the base DN that have the attribute value set in the filter. dc=example. that the local appliance should search by providing a base distinguished name. you must supply user credentials for a user with appropriate rights to the authentication objects you want to retrieve. and hyphens (-) but otherwise only alphanumeric characters are supported. the local appliance queries using the base filter to test it and indicates whether or not the filter appears to be correct.example. To allow the local appliance to access the user objects. see Testing User Authentication on page 280. Note that if you are using a certificate to authenticate when connecting via TLS or SSL. the name of the LDAP server in the certificate must match the name that you use to connect. the local appliance checks the uid attribute value for each object in the directory tree indicated by the base DN you set. For the authentication method specific parameters. you can use the address specification syntax documented in the Internet RFC 822 (Standard for the Format of ARPA Internet Text Messages) specification when referencing a user name that contains a domain. Typically.dc=com. You can choose no encryption. or Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) encryption.ou=security. LDAP usernames can include underscores (_). For example. the Security organization of the Example company might have a base DN of ou=security. the base DN will have a basic structure indicating the company domain and operational unit.dc=example. if you enter 10. To test your base filter more specifically by entering a test username and password.example.example. Remember that the distinguished name for the user you specify must be unique to the directory information tree for the directory server.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 To allow an appliance to connect to the LDAP server.10.com causes the connection to succeed. You can specify the namespace. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 272 . When you save the authentication object.com rather than the equivalent user distinguished name of cn=JoeSmith. filter (cn=F*). you might type JoeSmith@security. For example. For example.com in the certificate. it needs a starting point for that search. If one of the objects has a matching username and password. Transport Layer Security (TLS). Enclose the base filter in parentheses. If your LDAP Server uses a Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) login attribute of uid. Examples of syntax are provided throughout this procedure. Changing the name of the server in the authentication profile to computer1. to refer to a user object. or base DN. periods (. Note that when you set up an authentication object to connect to a Microsoft Active Directory Server. For example.). You can also add a base filter that sets a specific value for a specific attribute.9. RFC 3377 . the connection fails. the user login request is authenticated. When the local appliance searches the LDAP directory server to retrieve user information on the authentication server. to filter for only users with a common name starting with F use the .

Type the base distinguished name for the LDAP directory you want to access in the Base DN field. the port uses the default of 636. Select one of the following encryption modes: • • • To connect using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL). IMPORTANT! Note that if you change the encryption method after specifying a port. type ou=security.example. by mapping the string conversion character (%s) to the value of the shell access attribute for the user.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 273 . Version 4. For example. The user name template is the format for the distinguished name used for authentication. you reset the port to the default value for that method.9. Optionally. 3. to set a user name template for the Security organization of the Example company. select TLS. If you select SSL encryption. 2. To connect without encryption. A message appears. To connect using Transport Layer Security (TLS). Type the number of seconds that should elapse before rolling over to the backup connection in the Timeout field. the name is substituted for the string conversion character and the resulting distinguished name is used to search for the user credentials. indicating a successful certificate upload. To configure the authentication method for a server: Access: Admin 1.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 Selecting a user name template lets you indicate how user names entered on login should be formatted. select None.com. For example. 4. click Browse to browse to the location of a valid TLS or SSL certificate or type the path to the certificate in the SSL Certificate Upload Path field. When a user enters a user name into the login page. the port uses the default value of 389.dc=com. For none or TLS. if you selected TLS or SSL encryption and you want to use a certificate to authenticate.dc=example. you would enter %s@security. select SSL. to authenticate names in the Security organization at the Example company.

into the User Name Template field. If the shell access attribute for a server is something other than uid. Type the distinguished name and password for the user whose credentials should be used to validate access to the LDAP directory in the User Name and Password fields. Configuring Attribute Mapping Requires: DC If your LDAP Server uses a default UI access attribute of uid. type (physicalDeliveryOfficeName=NewYork). To set a filter that retrieves only specific objects within the namespace you specified as the Base DN. For example. in the Base Filter field. Type the user distinguished name. to authenticate all users who work in the Security organization of our example company by connecting to an OpenLDAP server where the shell access attribute is uid. when a user logs in. Valid user names are unique. 6. 8. If you want to filter on uid.dc=com in the User Name Template field. If your LDAP server uses uid. 9. if the value of the attribute is a valid user name for either the Sourcefire 3D System web interface or for shell access. you could type %s@security.9. However. you can map a different attribute for the local appliance to search. Re-type the password in the Confirm Password field. Version 4.ou=security. with the string conversion character (%s) in place of the shell access attribute value. 7. the local appliance (3D Sensor or Defense Center) checks the value of the uid attribute for each user record on the LDAP Server to see if it matches the user name. Setting a UI access attribute tells the local appliance to match the value of that attribute rather than the value of the uid attribute. The Pluggable Authentication Module (PAM) login attribute of your LDAP Server acts as a shell access attribute. and the attribute value you want to use as a filter. you would type uid=%s. and do not begin with a numeral. For example.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 5.dc=com. You can use any attribute.ou=security. you do not need to specify a UI access attribute.com. For a Microsoft Active Directory server. type the attribute type. the local appliance checks the user name entered on login against the attribute value of uid. have no spaces and no periods in them. you would type uid=NetworkAdmin.dc=example. to retrieve only users in the New York office. if you are connecting to an OpenLDAP Server where user objects have a uid attribute and the object for the administrator in the Security division at our example company has a uid value of NetworkAdmin. Continue with Configuring Attribute Mapping. For example. enclosed in parentheses.dc=example. you must explicitly set the Shell Access Attribute to match the attribute value. if the user objects in a directory tree have a physicalDeliveryOfficeName attribute and users in the New York office have an attribute value of NewYork for that attribute. a comparison operator.example.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 274 .

you can search the userPrincipalName attribute by typing userPrincipalName in the UI Access Attribute field. you can configure a default access setting for those users detected by LDAP that do not belong to any specified groups. For the next step. When a user logs in. Version 4. Configuring Access Settings by Group Requires: DC If you prefer to base default access settings on a user’s membership in an LDAP group. Static LDAP groups are groups where membership is determined by group object attributes that point to specific users.9. 2. When you do so. For example. type the attribute type in the UI Access Attribute field. continue with Configuring Access Settings by Group. For example. sAMAccountName shell access attribute to retrieve shell access users by typing sAMAccountName in the Shell Access Attribute field. on a Microsoft Active Directory Server. continue with Configuring Administrative Shell Access on page 278. you may want to use the UI Access Attribute to retrieve users. use the 3. you can specify distinguished names for existing groups on your LDAP server for each of the access roles used by your Sourcefire 3D System. on a Microsoft Active Directory Server. You can reference static LDAP groups or dynamic LDAP groups. the Sourcefire 3D System dynamically checks the LDAP directory and assigns default access rights according to the user’s current group membership. type the attribute type you want to filter on in the Shell Access Attribute field. you have two choices: • • If you want to configure user default roles based on LDAP group membership.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 To configure attribute mapping for a server: Access: Admin 1. If you are not using LDAP groups for authentication. Group access settings for a role only affect users who are members of the group. Any group you reference must exist on the LDAP server. Instead. and dynamic LDAP groups are groups where membership is determined by creating an LDAP search that retrieves group users based on user object attributes. because there may not be a uid attribute on Active Directory Server user objects. To retrieve users for shell access. To retrieve users based on an attribute instead of the Base DN and Base Filter.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 275 .

Version 4. If a user’s group membership is not established in those recursions. however. When you modify the access rights for an externally authenticated user.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 276 . If a new user does not belong to any specified groups.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 The access rights granted when a user logs into the Sourcefire 3D System depends on the LDAP configuration: • If no group access settings are configured for your LDAP server. the user receives the access role for the group with the highest access as a minimum access role. new users belonging to specified groups inherit the minimum access setting for the groups where they are members. the default access role defined in the Group Controlled Access Roles section is granted to the user. You can. If a user belongs to more than one configured group. • • • You cannot remove the minimum access rights for users assigned an access role because of LDAP group membership through the Sourcefire 3D System user management page.Locally Modified. the LDAP query is used exactly as it is configured on the LDAP server. the Authentication Method column on the User Management page provides a status of External .9. the user is assigned the default minimum access role specified in the Group Controlled Access Roles section of the authentication object. IMPORTANT! If you use a dynamic group. the Sourcefire 3D System authenticates the user against the LDAP server and then grants user rights based on the default minimum access role set in the system policy. assign additional rights. when a new user logs in. For this reason. the Sourcefire 3D System limits the number of recursions of a search to four to prevent search syntax errors from causing infinite loops. If you configure any group settings.

Version 4. to authenticate names in the Security organization at the Example company. type cn=ipsanalystgroup.ou=groups. dc=example. type cn=itgroup. rule and policy configuration.ou=groups.dc=example.ou=groups. Type the distinguished name for the LDAP group containing users who should at minimum have access to monitoring and maintenance features in the Maintenance Group DN field. to authenticate names in the Intrusion Event Analyst group at the Example company. and all maintenance features in the Administrator Group DN field.dc=com. to authenticate names in the information technology organization at the Example company. 2. dc=example.9. For example. system management. dc=com.dc=com. 4.dc=example. dc=com. For example. type cn=securitygroup. For example. Type the distinguished name for the LDAP group containing users who should at minimum have access to rules and policy configuration in the Policy & Response Administrator Group DN field.ou=groups.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 To base access defaults on LDAP group membership: Access: Admin 1. Type the distinguished name for the LDAP group containing users who should at minimum have access to IPS analysis features in the Intrusion Event Analyst Group DN field. For example. type cn=itgroup.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 277 . 3. Type the distinguished name for the LDAP group containing users who should at minimum have access to analysis and reporting features. to authenticate names in the information technology organization at the Example company.

3Dx800 sensors. 7. see Adding New User Accounts on page 300. Type the distinguished name for the LDAP group containing users who should at minimum have access to RNA analysis features in the RNA Event Analyst Group DN (Read Only) field. Select the default minimum access role for users that do not belong to any of the specified groups from the Default User Role list. type member. IMPORTANT! Sourcefire does not support external authentication for RNA Software for Red Hat Linux. For example. For more information on user access roles. see Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329. or Crossbeam-based software sensors.9. 6. Optionally. if the memberURL attribute contains the LDAP search that retrieves members for the dynamic group you specified for default Admin access. For example. Continue with Configuring Administrative Shell Access on page 278. TIP! Press the Ctrl key while clicking role names to select multiple roles in the list. type the LDAP attribute that contains the LDAP search string used to determine membership in a dynamic group in the Group Member URL Attribute field. Version 4. Specify a search filter that will retrieve entries for users you want to grant shell access. Note that you can only configure shell access for the first authentication object in your system policy. For more information on managing authentication object order. Type the distinguished name for the LDAP group containing users who should at minimum have access to RNA analysis features in the RNA Event Analyst Group DN field. if the member attribute is used to indicate membership in the static group you reference for default Policy & Response Administrator access. 10. 11. Type the distinguished name for the LDAP group containing users who should at minimum have access to IPS analysis features in the Intrusion Event Analyst Group DN (Read Only) field.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 278 . 8. type memberURL. 9. Configuring Administrative Shell Access Requires: DC You can also use the LDAP directory server to authenticate accounts for shell access on your local appliance (3D Sensor or Defense Center). Type the LDAP attribute that designates membership in a static group in the Group Member Attribute field. Intrusion Agents.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 5.

in the Shell Access Filter field. Note that a home directory for each shell user is created on login.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 With the exception of the root account. and when an LDAP shell access user account is disabled (by disabling the LDAP connection). and the filter you set here determines which set of users on the LDAP server can log into the shell. using the same home directory. The Same as Base Filter check box allows you to search more efficiently if all users qualified in the base DN are also qualified for shell access privileges. If the user then is re-enabled. To configure shell account authentication: Access: Admin 1. type the attribute type. and the attribute value you want to use as a filter. Shell users are not configured as local users on the appliance. Addition and deletion of shell access users occurs only on the LDAP server. shell access is controlled entirely though the shell access attribute you set. you can set a base filter of (manager=shell). Version 4. For example. but the user shell is set to /bin/false in /etc/password to disable the shell. Make sure that you restrict the list of users with shell access appropriately. even after they log in. enclosed in parentheses. a warning displays when you save the authentication object to confirm that you meant to leave the filter blank. the LDAP query to retrieve users combines the base filter with the shell access filter. the same query would be run twice. To set a filter to retrieve administrative user entries based on attribute value. which is unnecessarily time-consuming. the directory remains. if all network administrators have a manager attribute which has an attribute value of shell. or select Same as Base Filter to use the same filter you specified when configuring authentication settings.9. Continue with Testing User Authentication.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 279 . 2. IMPORTANT! If you choose not to specify a shell access filter. a comparison operator. WARNING! All shell users have sudoers privileges. Shell users should log in using usernames with all lowercase letters. You can use the Same as Base Filter option to run the query only once for both purposes. the shell is reset. Normally. If the shell access filter was the same as the base filter.

3. If you are connecting to a Microsoft Active Directory Server and supplied a shell access attribute in place of uid in Configuring Attribute Mapping on page 274. To enable LDAP authentication using the object on an appliance. You can also specify a fully-qualified distinguished name for the user. use the value for that attribute as the user name.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 Testing User Authentication Requires: DC After you configure LDAP server and authentication settings. the test fails even if the server configuration is correct. To view details of test output. Click Test. type the uid value or shell access attribute value and password for the user whose credentials should be used to validate access to the LDAP directory. If that succeeds supply a user name and password to test with the specific user. to test to see you can retrieve the JSmith user credentials at our example company. If the test succeeds. Test the server configuration without the additional test parameters first. see Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 and Applying a System Policy on page 324. Version 4. with the new object listed.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 280 . either indicating success of the test or detailing what settings are missing or need to be corrected. TIP! If you mistype the name or password of the test user. The Login Authentication page appears. In the User Name and Password fields. 2. For the user name. you must apply a system policy with that object enabled to the appliance. you can specify user credentials for a user who should be able to authenticate to test those settings. For more information. you can enter the value for the uid attribute for the user you want to test with. A message appears. 4. For example. click Save. type JSmith. Note that testing the connection to servers with more than 1000 users only returns 1000 users because of UI page size limitations. To test user authentication: Access: Admin 1. select Show Details.9.

with a backup server that has an IP address of 10. see the following sections: • • • OpenLDAP Example on page 281 Microsoft Active Directory Server Example on page 282 Sun Directory Server Example on page 284 OpenLDAP Example Requires: DC The following figures illustrate parts of a sample LDAP login authentication object for an OpenLDAP directory server with an IP address of 10. Version 4.DC=example.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 LDAP Authentication Object Examples Requires: DC For sample configurations showing how different configuration options might be used for connections to specific directory server types. Note that the connection uses port 389 for access and that connections to the server time out after 30 seconds of disuse.5.10.10.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 281 .DC=com for the security organization in This example shows a connection using a base distinguished name of the information technology domain of the Example company.DC=it.3.9.4.3. This example illustrates important aspects of LDAP configuration. • OU=security.

with a backup server that has an IP address of 10. no UI access attribute is specified. Microsoft Active Directory Server Example Requires: DC The following figure illustrates a sample LDAP login authentication object for a Microsoft Active Directory Server with an IP address of 10.11. Aspects of this example illustrate important differences in this LDAP configuration from the configuration discussed in the OpenLDAP Example on page 281.9. the CN attribute is set as the shell access attribute.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 282 . Like the OpenLDAP server.3. followed by the base distinguished name for the server directory. allowing only those users who have a common name attribute value of jsmith to log into the appliance using a shell account. the connection uses port 389 for access and connections to the server time out after 30 seconds of disuse (or the timeout period set on the LDAP server). Note that all objects in the directory are checked because no base filter is set. • • • To support shell access. A shell access filter has been applied to this configuration.11. the user name template for the connection uses CN=%s.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 • Because this is an OpenLDAP server that uses CN as a part of each user’s name. The Sourcefire 3D System checks the uid attribute of each object in the directory indicated by the distinguished name against the username for each user who logs into the system.4. Because the user names to be retrieved are contained in the default uid attribute.5. Version 4.3. to indicate the template used to format user names retrieved from the server.

• • In addition.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 283 . Again. However. the user name template for the connection uses address specification syntax documented in RFC 822 rather than the typical LDAP naming syntax. the Sourcefire 3D System checks attributes for all objects in the directory indicated by the base distinguished name.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 • Like the OpenLDAP server. this example shows a connection using a base distinguished name of OU=security.9.DC=it. because no base filter is applied to this server. it uses the userPrincipalName attribute to store user names rather than the uid attribute.DC=example. Note that the configuration includes a UI Access Attribute of userPrincipalName. a Shell Access Attribute of sAMAccountName causes each sAMAccountName attribute to be checked for all objects in the directory for matches when a user logs into a shell account on the appliance. the Sourcefire 3D System checks the userPrincipalName attribute for each object for matching user names when a user attempts to log into the Sourcefire 3D System. because this server is a Microsoft Active Directory server. Version 4. As a result.DC=com for the security organization in the information technology domain of the Example company. • Because this is a Microsoft Active Directory Server.

DC=com.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 284 .Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 • This example also has group settings in place.12.9.4.12. Sun Directory Server Example Requires: DC The following figure illustrates a sample LDAP login authentication object for a Sun Directory Server with an IP address of 10. The maintenance role is automatically assigned to all members of the group with a member group attribute and the base domain name of CN=maintenance. Version 4. with a backup server that has an IP address of 10. a shell access filter has been specified for this server.DC=it. However.DC=example. allowing only those users who have a common name attribute value of jsmith to log into the appliance using a shell account.5. • As in the OpenLDAP server. as noted above.3.3. a shell access attribute value of sAMAccountName must be set for shell access to work on a Microsoft Active Directory server.

Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 Settings in the example illustrate important differences in this LDAP configuration from the configuration discussed in Microsoft Active Directory Server Example on page 282: • Because the Encryption for the connection is set to SSL.9. • To allow shell access on the server. The filter restricts the users retrieved from the server to those with a common name ending in smith.DC=example.DC=com for the security organization in the information technology domain of the Example company. The Sourcefire 3D System checks the uid attribute of each object in the directory indicated by the distinguished name against the user name for each user who logs into the system. allowing all users with a common name ending in smith to log in using a shell account as well. Because user names can be retrieved from the uid attribute on this server.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 285 . Version 4. • This example shows a connection using a base distinguished name of OU=security. the Server Port is set to 636. • • The user name template shown uses the uid attribute value as the user name. no UI access attribute is specified. However. Note that all objects in the directory are checked because no base filter is set. A certificate has been uploaded to allow the SSL connection. the uid attribute is named as the Shell Access Attribute and the Same as Base Filter option for the shell access filter is set. Using Same as Base Filter allows a more efficient search query if and only if all users qualified in the base DN are also qualified for shell access privileges.DC=it. note that this server does have a base filter of (cn=*smith).

the settings in place at the time the policy was applied stay in effect until you re-apply the policy. To edit an authentication object: Access: Admin 1. The Login Authentication page appears. Version 4. If the object is in use in a system policy. 3. Modify the object settings as needed. 2.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 Editing LDAP Authentication Objects Requires: DC You can edit an existing authentication object. The Create Authentication Object page appears. see the following topics: • • • • • Creating LDAP Authentication Objects on page 269 Configuring LDAP Authentication Settings on page 271 Configuring Attribute Mapping on page 274 Configuring Administrative Shell Access on page 278 Testing User Authentication on page 280 IMPORTANT! If you previously uploaded a certificate and want to replace it. For more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 286 . Click Edit next to the object you want to edit. Select Operations > Configuration > Login Authentication. upload the new certificate and re-apply the system policy to your appliances to copy over the new certificate.9.

Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 4. You also grant user roles to specific and default users. those users can log into a Sourcefire 3D System appliance using their pin plus the SecurID token without any additional configuration on the appliance. Optionally. or failing that. the user receives the roles specified for that user in the authentication object. you define settings that let you connect to an authentication server. You can modify a user’s roles. Click Save. Remember that you have to apply a system policy with the object enabled to an appliance before the authentication changes take place on that appliance. users authenticated against that server append the SecurID token to the end of their SecurID pin and use that as their password when they log into a Sourcefire appliance. Understanding RADIUS Authentication Requires: DC The Remote Authentication Dial In User Service (RADIUS) is an authentication protocol used to authenticate. When a user authenticated on a RADIUS server logs in for the first time. or if the user is not listed for any of the user roles. the system policy. The Login Authentication page appears. For more information. If your RADIUS server returns custom attributes for any users you plan to authenticate. you need TCP/IP access from your local appliance to the authentication server where you want to connect.9. You can create an authentication object for any RADIUS server that conforms to RFC 2865. 2. see Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 and Applying a System Policy on page 324. you can also configure shell access authentication. Your changes are saved and the Login Authentication page re-appears. authorize. Version 4. Select Operations > Configuration > Login Authentication. unless the settings are granted through the user lists in the authentication object.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 287 . Click Create Authentication Object. if needed. Creating RADIUS Authentication Objects Requires: DC When you create a RADIUS authentication object. and account for user access to network resources. Note that to create an authentication object. The Sourcefire 3D System implementation of RADIUS supports the use of SecurID® tokens. the default access role you selected in the authentication object. To create an authentication object: Access: Admin 1. As long as SecurID is configured correctly to authenticate users outside the Sourcefire 3D System. When you configure authentication by a server using SecurID. you need to define those custom attributes. The Create Authentication Object page appears.

If the profiles for any of the users to authenticate return custom RADIUS attributes. see Defining Custom RADIUS Attributes on page 293. the appliance would query the backup server. see Configuring RADIUS User Roles on page 290. If you specify a backup authentication server. you can set a timeout for the connection attempt to the primary server. 4. see Configuring Administrative Shell Access on page 292. Optionally. For more information. Configuring RADIUS Connection Settings Requires: DC When you create a RADIUS authentication object. see Configuring RADIUS Connection Settings on page 288. see Testing User Authentication on page 294. For more information. Set the default user role. After the appliance re-queries the primary authentication server the number of times indicated by the Retries field and the number of seconds indicated in the Timeout field again elapses without a response from the primary authentication server. For more information.9. the primary server has RADIUS disabled. For more information. configure administrative shell access.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 3. you need to open both ports 1812 and 1813 on your firewall and on the FreeRADIUS server. the appliance then rolls over to the backup server. If RADIUS is running on the port of the primary RADIUS server and for some reason refuses to service the request (due to Version 4. 6. specify the users or user attribute values for users that you want to receive specific Sourcefire 3D System access roles. For more information. the appliance then re-queries the primary server. 5. If the number of seconds indicated in the Timeout field (or the timeout on the directory server) elapses without a response from the primary authentication server. IMPORTANT! For FreeRADIUS to function correctly. for example. Optionally. see Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 and Applying a System Policy on page 324. Your changes are saved. Identify the primary and backup authentication servers where you want to retrieve user data for external authentication and set timeout and retry values. you first specify the primary and backup server and server port where you want the local appliance (3D Sensor or Defense Center) to connect for authentication. 7. Remember that you have to apply a system policy with the object enabled to an appliance before the authentication changes take place on that appliance. define those attributes. If. For more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 288 . Test your configuration by entering the name and password for a user who should successfully authenticate.

9. 7. 4. 5. Version 4. IMPORTANT! IPv6 addresses are not supported. Type the secret key for the primary RADIUS authentication server in the RADIUS Secret Key field.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 misconfiguration or other issues). the failover to the backup server does not occur. Select RADIUS from the Authentication Method drop-down list.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 289 . Optionally. 2. Type the IP address or host name for the primary RADIUS server where you want to obtain authentication data in the Primary Server Host Name/IP Address field. 8. Type the secret key for the backup RADIUS authentication server in the RADIUS Secret Key field. 6. Type the number of seconds that should elapse before retrying the connection in the Timeout field. modify the port used by the primary RADIUS authentication server in the Primary Server Port field. Type the IP address or host name for the backup RADIUS authentication server where you want to obtain authentication data in the Backup Server Host Name/IP Address field. Type a name and description for the authentication server in the Name and Description fields. modify the port used by the backup RADIUS authentication server in the Backup Server Port field. To identify a RADIUS authentication server: Access: Admin 1. 3. however. Optionally.

that user receives all assigned access roles. For more information on the user roles supported by the Sourcefire 3D System. Version 4. you must not only move the user from one list to another in the RADIUS Specific Parameters section or change the user’s attribute on the RADIUS server. You can. the Sourcefire 3D System authenticates the user against the RADIUS server and then grants user rights based on the default access role (or roles) set in the system policy. For example. If a new user is not specified on any lists and default access roles are selected in the Default User Role list of the authentication object. you can also configure a default access setting for those users detected by RADIUS that are not specified for a particular role. Type the number of times the primary server connection should be tried before rolling over to the backup connection in the Retries field. assign additional rights. If you add a user to the list for one or more specific role. and you must remove the assigned user right on the user management page. see Defining Custom RADIUS Attributes on page 293. When a user logs in. You can assign a default user role (or roles) to be assigned to any users that are authenticated externally but not listed for a specific role. rather than usernames. Note that you need to define any custom attributes before you use them to set user role membership. however. Continue with Configuring RADIUS User Roles. • • You can also use attribute-value pairs. the user is assigned those access roles. 11. the Sourcefire 3D System checks the RADIUS server and grants access rights depending on the RADIUS configuration: • If specific access settings are not configured for a user and a default access role is not selected. see Configuring User Roles on page 304. Configuring RADIUS User Roles Requires: DC You can specify the access roles for existing users on your RADIUS server by listing the user names for each of the access roles used by your Sourcefire 3D System. to identify users who should receive a particular user role. You can select multiple roles on the Default User Role list.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 290 . you must reapply the system policy. You cannot remove the minimum access rights for users assigned an access role because of RADIUS user list membership through the Sourcefire 3D System user management page. For more information.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 10. if you know all users who should be RNA Analysts have the value Analyst for their User-Category attribute. when a new user logs in. When you do so. WARNING! If you want to change the minimum access setting for a user. you can type User-Category=Analyst in the RNA Analyst List field to grant that role to those users.

4. and all maintenance features in the Administrator List field. who should at minimum receive access to IPS analysis features in the Intrusion Event Analyst (Read Only) List field.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 291 . jdoe in the Administrator List field. Type the name of each user or each identifying attribute-value pair. Type the name of each user or each identifying attribute-value pair. who should at minimum receive access to analysis and reporting features. separated by commas. 5. separated by commas. who should at minimum receive access to monitoring and maintenance features in the Maintenance List field. Type the name of each user or each identifying attribute-value pair.who should at minimum receive access to rules and policy configuration in the Policy & Response Administrator List field. rule and policy configuration.9. Version 4. to grant the Maintenance role to all users with a in the Maintenance List field. system management. Type the name of each user or each identifying attribute-value pair. type jsmith. separated by commas. who should at minimum receive access to IPS analysis features in the Intrusion Event Analyst List field. to grant the Administrator role to the users jsmith and jdoe. 3.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 To base access on user lists: Access: Admin 1. Type the name of each user or each identifying attribute-value pair. separated by commas. 2. separated by commas. For example. User-Category value of Maintenance. type User-Category=Maintenance For example.

Type the name of each user or each identifying attribute-value pair. Select the default minimum access role for users that do not belong to any of the specified groups from the Default User Role list.Managing Users Managing Authentication Objects Chapter 8 6. Continue with Configuring Administrative Shell Access. With the exception of the root account. Note that a home directory for each shell user is created on login. For more information on managing authentication object order. Shell users are configured as local users on the appliance when the system policy is applied. but the user shell is set to /bin/false in / etc/password to disable the shell. and when an RADIUS shell access user account is disabled (by disabling the RADIUS connection). TIP! Press the Ctrl key while clicking role names to select multiple roles in the list. Configuring Administrative Shell Access Requires: DC You can also use the RADIUS server to authenticate accounts for shell access on your local appliance (3D Sensor or Defense Center). the shell is reset. using the same home directory. see Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329. Shell users should log in using usernames with all lowercase letters. who should at minimum receive access to RNA analysis features in the RNA Event Analyst (Read Only) List field. separated by commas. If the user then is re-enabled. the directory remains. 7.9. separated by commas. see Configuring User Roles on page 304. For more information on user access roles. Note that you can only configure shell access for the first authentication object in your system policy. Specify user names for users you want to grant shell access. WARNING! All shell users have sudoers privileges.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 292 . Version 4. 9. the shell access list you set on the RADIUS authentication object entirely controls shell access on the appliance. 8. Make sure that you restrict the list of users with shell access appropriately. Type the name of each user or each identifying attribute-value pair. who should at minimum receive access to RNA analysis features in the RNA Event Analyst List field.

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To configure shell account authentication: Access: Admin 1. Type the usernames, separated by commas, in the Administrator Shell Access User List field. IMPORTANT! If you choose not to specify a shell access filter, a warning displays when you save the authentication object to confirm that you meant to leave the filter blank. 2. Continue with Defining Custom RADIUS Attributes on page 293.

Defining Custom RADIUS Attributes
Requires: DC
dictionary file in /etc/radiusclient/ and you plan to use those attributes to

If your RADIUS server returns values for attributes not included in the

set user roles for users with those attributes, you need to define those attributes in the login authentication object. You can locate the attributes returned for a user by looking at the user’s profile on your RADIUS server. When you define an attribute, you provide the name of the attribute, which consists of alphanumeric characters. Note that words in an attribute name should be separated by dashes rather than spaces. You also provide the attribute ID, which should be an integer and should not conflict with any existing attribute IDs in the etc/radiusclient/dictionary file. You also specify the type of attribute: string, IP address, integer, or date. As an example, if a RADIUS server is used on a network with a Cisco router, you might want to use the Ascend-Assign-IP-Pool attribute to grant a specific role to all users logging in from a specific IP address pool. Ascend-Assign-IP-Pool is an integer attribute that defines the address pool where the user is allowed to log in, with the integer indicating the number of the assigned IP address pool. To declare that custom attribute, you create a custom attribute with an attribute name of Ascend-IP-Pool-Definition, an attribute ID of 218, and an attribute type of integer. You could then type Ascend-Assign-IP-Pool=2 in the Intrusion Event Analyst (Read Only) field to grant read-only intrusion event analyst rights to all users with an Ascend-IP-Pool-Definition attribute value of 2. When you create a RADIUS authentication object, a new dictionary file for that object is created on the Sourcefire 3D System appliance in the /var/sf/ userauth directory. Any custom attributes you add to the authentication object are added to the dictionary file.

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To define a custom attribute: Access: Admin 1. Click the arrow to expand the Define Custom RADIUS Attributes section. The attribute fields appear.

2. Type an attribute name consisting of alphanumeric characters and dashes, with no spaces, in the Attribute Name field. 3. Type the attribute ID, in integer form, in the Attribute ID field. 4. Select the type of attribute from the Attribute Type drop-down list. 5. Click Add to add the custom attribute to the authentication object. TIP! You can remove a custom attribute from an authentication object by clicking Delete next to the attribute. 6. Continue with Testing User Authentication on page 294.

Testing User Authentication
Requires: DC After you configure RADIUS connection, user role, and custom attribute settings, you can specify user credentials for a user who should be able to authenticate to test those settings. For the user name, you can enter the user name for the user you want to test with. Note that testing the connection to servers with more than 1000 users only returns 1000 users because of UI page size limitations. TIP! If you mistype the name or password of the test user, the test fails even if the server configuration is correct. To verify that the server configuration is correct, click Test without entering user information in the Additional Test Parameters first. If that succeeds supply a user name and password to test with the specific user.

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To test user authentication: Access: Admin 1. In the User Name and Password fields, type the user name and password for the user whose credentials should be used to validate access to the RADIUS server. For example, to test to see you can retrieve the jsmith user credentials at our example company, type jsmith.

2. Select Show Details and click Test. A message appears, either indicating success of the test or detailing what settings are missing or need to be corrected. 3. If the test succeeds, click Save. The Login Authentication page appears, with the new object listed. To enable RADIUS authentication using the object on an appliance, you must apply a system policy with that object enabled to the appliance. For more information, see Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 and Applying a System Policy on page 324.

RADIUS Authentication Object Examples
Requires: DC This section provides examples of RADIUS server authentication objects to show how Sourcefire 3D System RADIUS authentication features can be used. See the following sections for more information: • • Authenticating a User using RADIUS on page 295 Authenticating a User with Custom Attributes on page 296

Authenticating a User using RADIUS
Requires: DC The following figure illustrates a sample RADIUS login authentication object for a server running freeRadius with an IP address of 10.10.10.98. Note that the connection uses port 1812 for access and that connections to the server time out after 30 seconds of disuse and will retry three times before attempting to connect to a backup authentication server.

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This example illustrates important aspects of RADIUS user role configuration: • Users ewharton and gsands are granted administrative access to Sourcefire 3D System appliances where this authentication object is enabled. The user jaustin is granted Intrusion Event Analyst access to Sourcefire 3D System appliances where this authentication object is enabled. The user cbronte is granted RNA Event Analyst access to Sourcefire 3D System appliances where this authentication object is enabled. The user ewharton can log into the appliance using a shell account.

• • •

The following graphic depicts the role configuration for the example:

Authenticating a User with Custom Attributes
Requires: DC You can use an attribute-value pair to identify users who should receive a particular user role. If the attribute you use is a custom attribute, you must define the custom attribute.

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The following figure illustrates the role configuration and custom attribute definition in a sample RADIUS login authentication object for the same freeRadius server as in the previous example. In this example, however, the MS-RAS-Version custom attribute is returned for one or more of the users because a Microsoft remote access server is in use. Note the MS-RAS-Version custom attribute is a string. In this example, all users logging in to RADIUS through a Microsoft v. 5.00 remote access server should receive the Intrusion Event Analyst (Read Only role), so you type the attribute-value pair of MS-RAS-Version=MSRASV5.00 in the Intrusion Event Analyst (Read Only) field.

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Editing RADIUS Authentication Objects
Requires: DC You can edit an existing authentication object. If the object is in use in a system policy, the settings in place at the time the policy was applied stay in effect until you re-apply the policy. To edit an authentication object: Access: Admin 1. Select Operations > Configuration > Login Authentication. The Login Authentication page appears. 2. Click Edit next to the object you want to edit. The Create Authentication Object page appears. 3. Modify the object settings as needed. For more information, see the following topics: • • • • • Creating RADIUS Authentication Objects on page 287 Configuring RADIUS Connection Settings on page 288 Configuring RADIUS User Roles on page 290 Configuring Administrative Shell Access on page 292 Testing User Authentication on page 294

4. Click Save. Your changes are saved and the Login Authentication page re-appears. Remember that you have to apply a system policy with the object enabled to an appliance before the authentication changes take place on that appliance. For more information, see Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 and Applying a System Policy on page 324.

Deleting Authentication Objects
Requires: DC You can delete an authentication object if it is not currently enabled in a system policy. To delete an authentication object: Access: Admin 1. Select Operations > Configuration > Login Authentication. The Login Authentication page appears. 2. Click Delete next to the object you want to delete. The object is deleted and the Login Authentication page appears.

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Managing User Accounts
If you have Admin access, you can use the web interface to view and manage user accounts on a Defense Center or a 3D Sensor, including adding, modifying, and deleting accounts. User accounts without Admin access are restricted from accessing management features. The navigation menu differs in appearance for each type of user. See the following sections for more information about managing user accounts: • Viewing User Accounts on page 299 explains how to access the User Management page, where you can add, activate, deactivate, edit, and delete user accounts. Adding New User Accounts on page 300 describes the different options you can use when you add a new user account. Managing Externally Authenticated User Accounts on page 302 explains how externally authenticated users are added and what aspects of the user configuration you can manage within the Sourcefire 3D System. Modifying User Privileges and Options on page 306 explains how to access and modify an existing user account. Modifying Restricted Event Analyst Access Properties on page 307 explains how to restrict the data available to a user account with restricted data access. Deleting User Accounts on page 312 explains how to delete user accounts. User Account Privileges on page 312 contains tables that list the menus and options each type of user account can access.

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Viewing User Accounts
Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor From the User Management page, you can view, edit, and delete existing accounts. You can determine the type of authentication for a user from the Authentication Method column. The Password Lifetime column indicates the days remaining on each user’s password. The Action column allows you to set users active or inactive. Note that for externally authenticated users, if the authentication object for the server is disabled, the Authentication Method column displays External (Disabled). To access the User Management page: Access: Admin Select Operations > User Management. The User Management page appears, showing each user, with options to activate, deactivate, edit, or delete the user account.

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See the following sections for information about the actions you can perform on the User Management page: • • • • • Adding New User Accounts on page 300 Modifying User Privileges and Options on page 306 Modifying Restricted Event Analyst Access Properties on page 307 Modifying User Passwords on page 311 Deleting User Accounts on page 312

Adding New User Accounts
Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor When you set up a new user account, you can control which parts of the system the account can access. To add a new user: Access: Admin 1. Select Operations > User Management. The User Management page appears.

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2. Click Create User. The Create User page appears.

3. In the User Name field, type a name for the new user. New user names must contain alphanumeric or hyphen characters with no spaces, and must be no more than 32 characters. 4. Requires: DC/MDC If you want this user to authenticate to an external directory server on login, select Use External Authentication Method. IMPORTANT! If you select this option, the password management options below disappear. Configure access settings and click Add User to complete configuration of the externally authenticated user. You must also create an authentication object for the external authentication server you want to use for authentication on your Defense Center, and apply a system policy with authentication enabled to your appliance before users can log in using credentials from an external server. For more information, see Managing Authentication Objects on page 269 and Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329.

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5. In the Password field, type a password (up to 32 alphanumeric characters). If you enable password strength checking, the password must be at least eight alphanumeric characters of mixed case and must include at least one numeric character. It cannot be a word that appears in a dictionary or include consecutive repeating characters. 6. In the Confirm Password field, type the password again. 7. Configure the remaining password user account options. For more information, see the User Account Password Options table on page 304. 8. Select user roles to grant to the user. For more information, see the User Roles table on page 305. 9. Optionally, for users with event analyst roles, click Restrict Deletion Rights - User Cannot Delete Bookmarks, Searches, Reports, Report Profiles, Custom Workflows or Custom Tables Created by Other Users to restrict the user to deletion of reports, report profiles, searches, bookmarks, custom tables, and custom workflows created by the user. 10. Click Add User. A message appears, indicating that the user was added. The username appears on the User Management page. IMPORTANT! Click Deactivate next to the name of an internally authenticated user on the User Management page to disable that user login without deleting it. To reactivate a user, click Activate next to the username.

Managing Externally Authenticated User Accounts
Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor When an externally authenticated user logs into an appliance that has external authentication enabled, the appliance grants the user the default access role you set by specifying group membership in the authentication object. If you did not configure access group settings, the appliance grants the default user role you set in the system policy. However, if you add users locally before they log into the appliance, the user privileges you configure on the User Management page override the default settings. An internally authenticated user is converted to external authentication when all of the following conditions exist: • • • You enable LDAP or RADIUS authentication. The same username exists for the user on the LDAP or RADIUS server. The user logs in using the password stored for that user on the LDAP or RADIUS server.

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Once an internally authenticated user converts to an externally authenticated user, you cannot revert to internal authentication for that user. For more information on selecting a default user role, see Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 and Understanding User Privileges on page 267. Note that you can only enable external authentication in a system policy on a Defense Center. You must use the Defense Center to apply the policy to managed sensors if you want to use external authentication on them. For more information on associating an external user with a set of permissions on your appliance, see Logging into the Appliance to Set Up an Account on page 23. For more information on modifying user access, see Modifying User Privileges and Options on page 306. Note that you cannot manage passwords for externally authenticated users or deactivate externally authenticated users through the Sourcefire 3D System interface. For externally authenticated users, you cannot remove the minimum access rights through the Sourcefire 3D System user management page for users assigned an access role because of LDAP group or RADIUS list membership or attribute values. On the Edit User page for an externally authenticated user, rights granted because of settings on an external authentication server are marked with a status of Externally Modified. You can, however, assign additional rights. When you modify the access rights for an externally authenticated user, the Authentication Method column on the User Management page provides a status of External - Locally Modified.

Managing User Password Settings
You can also control how and when the password for each user account is changed, as well as when user accounts are disabled. The User Account

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Password Options table describes some of the options you can use to regulate passwords and account access. IMPORTANT! After you enable Use External Authentication Method, password options no longer appear. Use the external authentication server to manage password settings. User Account Password Options Option Use External Authentication Method Description Select this option if you want this user's credentials to be externally authenticated. IMPORTANT! If you select this option for the user and the external authentication server is unavailable, that user can log into the web interface but cannot access any functionality. Enter an integer, without spaces, that determines the maximum number of times each user can try to log in after a failed login attempt before the account is locked. The default setting is five tries; use 0 to allow an unlimited number of failed logins. Enter the number of days after which the user’s password will expire. The default setting is 0, which indicates that the password never expires. Enter the number of warning days users have to change their password before their password actually expires. The default setting is 0 days. WARNING! The number of warning days must be less than the number of days before the password expires Force Password Reset on Login Check Password Strength Select this option to force the user to change his password the first time the user logs in. Select this option to require strong passwords. A strong password must be at least eight alphanumeric characters of mixed case and must include at least one numeric character. It cannot be a word that appears in a dictionary or include consecutive repeating characters.

Maximum Number of Failed Logins

Days Until Password Expiration Days Until Expiration Warning

Configuring User Roles
The User Roles table contains a synopsis of each access type. For a full list of the menus available to each access type, see User Account Privileges on page 312.

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client applications. Administrator users see the main toolbar as well as all the menu options. network maps. host profiles. services. WARNING! If you want to change the minimum access setting for a user. you must not only move the user from one list to another in the authentication object or change the user's attribute value or group membership on the external authentication server. host profiles. and you must remove the assigned user right on the user management page. including event views. Provides read-only access to analysis features.9. You can.User Cannot Delete Items Created by Other Users to restrict the user’s deletion rights. and reports. Maintenance users see the main toolbar and maintenancerelated options on the Operations top-level menu. RNA Event Analyst (Read Only) Access Version 4. You cannot remove minimum access rights through the Sourcefire 3D System user management page for users assigned an access role because of LDAP group or RADIUS list membership or attribute values . Note that you should limit use of the Administrator role for security reasons. Maintenance User Access RNA Event Analyst Access Provides access to monitoring and maintenance features. services. rule and policy configuration. searches. Select Restrict Deletion Rights . and all maintenance features. assign additional rights. incidents. vulnerabilities. RNA Event Analysts see the main toolbar and RNA analysis-related options on the Analysis & Reporting and Operations menus. Note that you can restrict an event analyst user’s deletion rights to only allow deletion of report profiles. you must reapply the system policy. vulnerabilities. however. client applications. In addition. system management. RNA Event Analysts see the main toolbar and analysisrelated options on the Analysis & Reporting and Operations menus. and reports. Provides access to RNA analysis features. User Roles User Role Administrator Access Privileges Provides access to analysis and reporting features.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Note that you cannot change the authentication type for a user after you create the user account. bookmarks. including event views. network maps. custom tables. and custom workflows created by that user. externally authenticated users cannot authenticate unless the external authentication server is available.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 305 .

incidents. Version 4. however. You can. Provides read-only access to IPS analysis features. Policy & Response Administrators have access to the main toolbar and rule and policy-related options on the Policy & Response and Operations menus. you must configure access rights for all accounts. you cannot remove the minimum access rights through the Sourcefire 3D System user management page for users assigned an access role because of LDAP group or RADIUS list membership or attribute values. incidents. See Modifying Restricted Event Analyst Access Properties on page 307 for more information. Intrusion Event Analysts see the main toolbar and IPS analysis-related options on the Analysis & Reporting and Operations menus. Note that password management options do not apply to users who authenticate to an external directory server. Intrusion Event Analysts see the main toolbar and IPS analysis-related options on the Analysis & Reporting and Operations menus. or passwords at any time. account options.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 User Roles (Continued) User Role Intrusion Event Analyst Access Intrusion Event Analyst (Read Only) Access Restricted Event Analyst Access Privileges Provides access to IPS analysis features. you must supply a new password for the user. You can restrict access by allowing access to only for those events that match specified search criteria or you can turn off access for an entire category of events. you can modify access privileges. assign additional rights. For externally authenticated users.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 306 . and reports. Provides access to the same features as Intrusion Event Analyst or RNA Event Analyst access. Policy & Response Administrator Access Modifying User Privileges and Options Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor After adding user accounts to the system. Note that if you change the authentication for a user from externally authenticated to internally authenticated. Restricted event analyst users see only the main toolbar and analysis-related options on the Analysis & Reporting and Operations menus.Locally Modified. Provides access to rules and policy configuration. including intrusion event views. When you modify the access rights for an externally authenticated user. However. the Authentication Method column on the User Management page provides a status of External . including those that are externally authenticated.9. and reports. including intrusion event views. You manage those settings on the external server.

Version 4. See Managing User Password Settings on page 303 for information on changing password settings for internally authenticated users. See Adding New User Accounts on page 300 for information about adding new user accounts.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 307 .Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 To modify user account privileges: Access: Admin 1. You can specify this information only after the user is added. The User Management page appears. 2. Modify the account or accounts as needed: • See Managing Externally Authenticated User Accounts on page 302 for a description of how users can be authenticated through external servers.9. select or clear the Only delete items created by user option to manage the user’s ability to delete of items not created by that user. for users with event analyst roles. The Edit User page appears. • • • Modifying Restricted Event Analyst Access Properties Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor User accounts with Restricted Event Analyst access use saved searches to specify which events a user can view. Select Operations > User Management. 3. Optionally. See Configuring User Roles on page 304 for more information on configuring roles to grant access for Sourcefire 3D System functions. Click Edit next to the user you want to modify.

. The Restricted Event Analyst Settings table shows the correlation between platform and access requirements for the restricted event analyst... view the network map When these platforms are present.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 308 . DC + RNA Set this data set or data sets to Show All or to a specific search One or more of the following: • Host Attributes Data • RNA Client Applications Data • RNA Hosts Data • RNA Services Data • Vulnerabilities Data view network discovery events view hosts view host attributes view services view vulnerabilities view client applications view flow data view compliance events view white list events view white list violations view users or user events view intrusion events use the clipboard DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RNA DC + RUA IPS IPS RNA Events Data RNA Hosts Data Host Attributes Data RNA Services Data Vulnerabilities Data RNA Client Applications Data Flow Data Compliance Events Data White List Events Data White List Violations Data Users Data Intrusion Events Data N/A ..9.included in the base set of rights for the restricted analyst role Version 4. Restricted Event Analyst Settings To allow the restricted event analyst to.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Restricted event analyst users have access to only a few sections of the web interface.

. restricted event analyst users could delete the searches and enhance their access privileges.9.. Select Operations > User Management. 2. Searches must be private. IPS IPS DC/MDC or 3D Sensor Set this data set or data sets to Show All or to a specific search All data sets for which the user will generate reports All data sets for which the user will create incident reports N/A .1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 309 .included in the base set of rights for the restricted analyst role DC/MDC or 3D Sensor All data sets for which the user will create custom workflows DC/MDC or 3D Sensor Platforms required to view custom table All data sets for which the user will need to create or access bookmarks All data sets for the applicable custom tables If you want to ensure that a user only sees data for a specific subnet. Version 4. Click Edit next to the user to whom you want to grant restricted event analyst rights. If they are saved as public. create multiple private saved searches. See Searching for Events in the Analyst Guide for more information.. IMPORTANT! You must have saved private searches available before you can add restricted event analyst values to a user account. on the Defense Center. The User Management page appears. time zone. custom tables create and manage bookmarks view events from a custom table When these platforms are present. and then apply each saved search to the account as described in the following procedure. generate (but not view) reports create (but not modify) incident reports change user-specific preferences such as the account password. one for each of the event types. To restrict event analyst access to events: Access: Admin 1. and event view settings create custom workflows and.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Restricted Event Analyst Settings (Continued) To allow the restricted event analyst to..

Intrusion Event Analyst. IMPORTANT! You cannot select Restricted Event Analyst if Administrator. RNA Event Analyst. select Restricted Event Analyst. or RNA Event Analyst (Read Only) access is enabled. The Defense Center version of the page is shown below. 5. If the user you want to modify does not already have the Restricted Event Analyst option enabled. For each row. To grant access to events that match a specific saved search. To deny access to all events in a category. Intrusion Event Analyst (Read Only). you have three choices: • • • To grant access to all events for a category. IMPORTANT! If you created any custom tables on the Defense Center. they appear on this page.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 3. 4. select Hide Data. select the search that you want to use to restrict the user account. select Show All Data. Click Save to save your changes and return to the User Management page. The Restrictions section of the page appears.9. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 310 .

Next to the user name. 2.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Modifying User Passwords Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor You can modify user passwords from the User Management page for internally authenticated users. TIP! If you want to force a user to change the password on the next log-in.9. In the Password field. Version 4. click Reset Password next to the user account on the User Management page.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 311 . The User Management page appears. type the new password (up to 32 alphanumeric characters). To change a user’s password: Access: Admin 1. Note that you must manage externally authenticated user passwords on the LDAP or RADIUS server. The Edit User page appears. click Edit. 3. Select Operations > User Management.

• • • • Analysis & Reporting Menu on page 313 Policy & Response Menu on page 316 Operations Menu on page 317 Toolbar Options on page 319 Version 4. the password must have at least eight alphanumeric characters of mixed case. see Managing User Password Settings on page 303. The password is changed and any other changes saved. see Configuring User Roles on page 304. 2. Select Operations > User Management.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 312 . In the Confirm Password field. The account is deleted. re-type the new password. 6.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 4. with at least one number. For more information on the access notations used in the tables that follow and throughout this documentation. see Access Requirements Conventions on page 39. Next to the user whose account you want delete. Make any other changes you want to make to the user configuration: • • For more information on password options. For more information on user roles. It cannot be a word that appears in a dictionary or contain consecutive repeating characters. Deleting User Accounts Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor You can delete user accounts from the system at any time. click Delete. 5. Click Save. IMPORTANT! If password strength checking is enabled for the user account. User Account Privileges Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor The following sections provide a list of the menus and toolbar options in Sourcefire 3D System and the user account privileges required to access them.9. with the exception of the admin account. which cannot be deleted. The User Management page appears. To delete a user account: Access: Admin 1.

Analysis & Reporting Menu Menu Admin Maint RNA/ RNA-RO Event Analyst X IPS/ IPS-RO Event Analyst X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Restricted Event Analyst P&R Admin Event Summary Intrusion Event Statistics Event Graphs Dashboards RNA Statistics Flow Summary IPS Events Reviewed Events Clipboard Incidents RNA Network Map | Hosts Network Map | Network Devices Network Map | Services Network Map | Vulnerabilities Network Map | Host Attributes X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Version 4.9.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Analysis & Reporting Menu Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC The Analysis & Reporting Menu table lists the user account privileges required to access each option on the Analysis & Reporting menu.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 313 . Users with only Rules or Maintenance access cannot see the Analysis & Reporting menu at all. An X indicates that the user can access the option.

Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Analysis & Reporting Menu (Continued) Menu Admin Maint RNA/ RNA-RO Event Analyst X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X IPS/ IPS-RO Event Analyst Restricted Event Analyst P&R Admin RNA Events Hosts Host Attributes Services Client Applications Flow Data Vulnerabilities RUA Users RUA Events Compliance Compliance Events White List Events White List Violations Custom Tables Searches Audit Log Client Applications Compliance Events Flow Data Health Events X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 314 .9.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 315 .9.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Analysis & Reporting Menu (Continued) Menu Admin Maint RNA/ RNA-RO Event Analyst X X X X IPS/ IPS-RO Event Analyst Restricted Event Analyst P&R Admin Host Attributes Hosts Intrusion Events Remediation Status RNA Events RUA Events Scan Results Services SEU Import Log Users Vulnerabilities White List Events White List Violations Custom Workflows Bookmarks Report Profiles X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Version 4.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 316 . An X indicates that the user can access the option.9. RNA Event Analyst. or Maintenance access can not see the Policy & Response menu at all.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Policy & Response Menu Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC The Policy & Response Menu table lists the user account privileges required to access each option on the Policy & Response menu. Users with Intrusion Event Analyst. Event Analyst P&R Admin IPS Intrusion Policy SEU Rule Editor Email OPSEC RNA Detection Policy Host Attributes RNA Detectors Custom Fingerprinting Custom Product Mappings User 3rd Party Mappings Network Map | Custom Topology Compliance Policy Management Rule Management X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Version 4. Policy & Response Menu Menu Admin Maint RNA/ RNA-RO Event Analyst IPS/ IPS-RO Event Analyst Res.

An X indicates that the user can access the option. Event Analyst P&R Admin White List Traffic Profiles Responses Alerts Impact Flag Alerts RNA Event Alerts Remediations Groups X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Operations Menu Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor The Operations Menu table lists the user account privileges required to access each option on the Operations menu. All users can access at least some options on the Operations menu.9. Event Analyst P&R Admin Configuration RNA/RUA Event Purge Detection Engines High Availability eStreamer Login Authentication X X X X X X X Version 4.Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Policy & Response Menu (Continued) Menu Admin Maint RNA/ RNA-RO Event Analyst IPS/ IPS-RO Event Analyst Res. Operations Menu Menu Admin Maint RNA/ RNA-RO Event Analyst IPS/ IPS-RO Event Analyst Res.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 317 .

Event Analyst P&R Admin RUA Sensors User Management System Settings System Policy Update Monitoring Statistics Performance | IPS Performance | RNA Audit Task Status Syslog Health Tools Scheduling Backup/Restore Import/Export Whois Scan Results Scanners X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Version 4.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 318 .Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Operations Menu (Continued) Menu Admin Maint RNA/ RNA-RO Event Analyst IPS/ IPS-RO Event Analyst Res.

Toolbar Options Menu Admin Maint RNA/ RNA-RO Event Analyst X X X X X X X X X X X X IPS/ IPS-RO Event Analyst X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Res.9. Event Analyst X X X X X P&R Admin Help About Online Email Support Support Site X X X X X X X X X X X X X X X Toolbar Options Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor The Toolbar Options table lists the user account privileges required to access each option on the toolbar and its sub-menus. All users can access at least some of the options on the toolbar. Event Analyst P&R Admin Health Preferences Preferences | Home Page Preferences | Event View Settings Preferences | Change Password Preferences | Time Zone Settings Help Logout X X X X X X X X X X X Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 319 .Managing Users Managing User Accounts Chapter 8 Operations Menu (Continued) Menu Admin Maint RNA/ RNA-RO Event Analyst X X X X X IPS/ IPS-RO Event Analyst X X X X X Res. An X indicates that the user can access the option.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 320 .Managing System Policies Chapter 9 Administrator Guide A system policy allows you to manage the following on your Defense Center or 3D Sensor: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • access control lists audit log settings authentication profiles dashboard settings database event limits detection policy preferences DNS cache properties the mail relay host and notification address tracking intrusion policy changes specifying a different language custom login banners RNA settings. For example. your organization’s security policies may require that Version 4.9. including multiple fingerprint and subnet detection settings RUA settings synchronizing time serving time from the Defense Center mapping vulnerabilities for services You can use a system policy to control the aspects of your Defense Center that are likely to be similar for other Sourcefire 3D System appliances in your deployment.

or if you want to test different database limits. For more information. See Configuring System Settings on page 360 for more information. Contrast a system policy. you can create several system policies and switch between them rather than editing a single policy. which controls aspects of an appliance that are likely to be similar across a deployment. you configure the various aspects of the policy. you can set the login banner once in a system policy on a Defense Center and then apply the policy to all the sensors that it manages. With system policies. with system settings. you assign it a name and a description. Instead of creating a new policy. You can also benefit from having multiple policies on a 3D Sensor.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 321 . each of which is described in its own section. if you have different mail relay hosts that you use under different circumstances. see Importing and Exporting Objects on page 583. See the following sections for more information: • • • • Creating a System Policy on page 321 Editing a System Policy on page 323 Applying a System Policy on page 324 Deleting System Policies on page 325 Creating a System Policy Requires: Any When you create a system policy. you can export a system policy from another appliance and then import it onto your appliance. IMPORTANT! You cannot apply system policies to Crossbeam-based software sensors or Intrusion Agents. which are likely to be specific to a single appliance. You can then edit the imported policy to suit your needs before you apply it. Next. For example.9.Managing System Policies Creating a System Policy Chapter 9 your appliances have a “No Unauthorized Use” message when a user logs in. Version 4.

Click Create Policy.Managing System Policies Creating a System Policy Chapter 9 To create a system policy: Access: Admin 1. The System Policy page appears. The Policy Name column includes its description. The Applied To column indicates the number of appliances where the policy is applied and a count of out-of-date appliances where the previously applied policy has changed and should be reapplied. Your system policy is saved and the Access List page appears. From the drop-down list. see one of the following sections: • • • • • • • • • • • • Configuring the Access List for Your Appliance on page 325 Configuring Audit Log Settings on page 327 Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 Configuring Dashboard Settings on page 331 Configuring Database Event Limits on page 332 Configuring Detection Policy Preferences on page 336 Configuring DNS Cache Properties on page 337 Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 Configuring Intrusion Policy Preferences on page 339 Specifying a Different Language on page 340 Adding a Custom Login Banner on page 341 Configuring RNA Settings on page 342 Version 4. select an existing policy to use as a template for your new system policy. 5. Click Save. For information about configuring each aspect of the system policy.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 322 . 3. Select Operations > System Policy. 2. Type a name and description (up to 40 alphanumeric characters and spaces each) for your new policy. 4. The Create page appears.

Managing System Policies Editing a System Policy Chapter 9 • • • • • Configuring RNA Subnet Detection Settings on page 349 Configuring RUA Settings on page 352 Synchronizing Time on page 354 Serving Time from the Defense Center on page 357 Mapping Vulnerabilities for Services on page 358 Editing a System Policy Requires: Any You can edit a system policy that is currently in use. appears. see one of the following sections: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Configuring the Access List for Your Appliance on page 325 Configuring Audit Log Settings on page 327 Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 Configuring Dashboard Settings on page 331 Configuring Database Event Limits on page 332 Configuring Detection Policy Preferences on page 336 Configuring DNS Cache Properties on page 337 Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 Configuring Intrusion Policy Preferences on page 339 Specifying a Different Language on page 340 Adding a Custom Login Banner on page 341 Configuring RNA Settings on page 342 Configuring RNA Subnet Detection Settings on page 349 Configuring RUA Settings on page 352 Synchronizing Time on page 354 Version 4. but remember to re-apply the policy as explained in Applying a System Policy on page 324. To edit an existing system policy: Access: Admin 1. Click Edit next to the system policy that you want to edit. including a list of the existing system policies. You can change the policy name and description. With the Policy Name and Policy Description fields at the top. The System Policy page appears. Access List.9. 2. For information about configuring each aspect of the system policy. the first section of the system policy. Select Operations > System Policy.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 323 .

TIP! You can sort the sensors by sensor group. If a policy has been updated since it was applied. the Defense Center itself. make sure you apply the updated policy when you are finished. You can also select an entire group. On the Defense Center. the system policy is applied. and. type of sensor. where you want to apply the system policy. The System Policy page appears. To apply a system policy: Access: Admin 1. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 324 . model. select the sensors. 4. if required. 2. including a list of the existing system policies. On the 3D Sensor. 3. or previously applied policy. the Apply page appears. Select Operations > System Policy. Click Apply next to the system policy that you want to apply. On the Defense Center. IMPORTANT! You cannot apply system policies to Crossbeam-based software sensors or Intrusion Agents. Click Apply. your settings do not take effect until you apply it.9. A message appears indicating that the task is added to the task queue.Managing System Policies Applying a System Policy Chapter 9 • • Serving Time from the Defense Center on page 357 Mapping Vulnerabilities for Services on page 358 IMPORTANT! If you are editing the current system policy. the name of the policy appears in italics. Applying a System Policy Requires: Any After you create or edit a system policy. See Applying a System Policy on page 324.

To delete a system policy: Access: Admin 1. including a list of the existing system policies. see one of the following sections: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Configuring the Access List for Your Appliance on page 325 Configuring Audit Log Settings on page 327 Configuring Authentication Profiles on page 329 Configuring Dashboard Settings on page 331 Configuring Database Event Limits on page 332 Configuring Detection Policy Preferences on page 336 Configuring DNS Cache Properties on page 337 Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 Configuring Intrusion Policy Preferences on page 339 Specifying a Different Language on page 340 Adding a Custom Login Banner on page 341 Configuring RNA Settings on page 342 Configuring RNA Subnet Detection Settings on page 349 Configuring RUA Settings on page 352 Synchronizing Time on page 354 Serving Time from the Defense Center on page 357 Mapping Vulnerabilities for Services on page 358 Configuring the Access List for Your Appliance Requires: Any The Access List page allows you to control which computers can access your appliance on specific ports. Click Delete next to the system policy that you want to delete. By default. The policy is deleted.Managing System Policies Deleting System Policies Chapter 9 Deleting System Policies Requires: Any You can delete a system policy even if it is in use. For information about configuring each aspect of the system policy. Default system policies cannot be deleted. Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Requires: Any You can change various parts of your system policy. it is used until a new policy is applied.9. 2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 325 . The System Policy page appears. port 443 (Hypertext Transfer Protocol Version 4. If the policy is still in use. Select Operations > System Policy.

click Create Policy. the access list does not take effect until you apply the system policy. consider adding access to the appliance for specific IP addresses and then deleting the default any option. WARNING! If you delete access for the IP address that you are currently using to connect to the appliance interface (and if there is no entry for “IP=any port=443”). Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321.9. the Access List page appears. and click Save. In either case. To configure the access list as part of a new system policy. The setting is removed. click Edit next to the system policy.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 Secure. 2. To configure the access list: Access: Admin 1. To delete one of the current settings. You have two options: • • To modify the access list in an existing system policy. or SSH). Select Operations > System Policy. Version 4. To operate the appliance in a more secure environment. WARNING! By default. which is used to access the command line. are enabled for any IP address. In either case. 3. click Delete. You can specify the access list either by creating a new system policy or by editing an existing policy.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 326 . which is used to access the web interface and port 22 (Secure Shell. or HTTPS). you will lose access to the system when you apply the policy. access to the appliance is not restricted. The System Policy page appears. The access list is part of the system policy.

The name of the sending host is part of the sent information and you can further identify the audit log stream with a facility.1/24) For information on using CIDR in the Sourcefire 3D System.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 4.168. The system policy is updated. IMPORTANT! You must ensure that the external host is functional and accessible from the appliance sending the audit log. 7. Configuring Audit Log Settings Requires: Any You can configure the system policy so that the appliance streams an audit log to an external host. 5. The Add IP Address page appears. or both to specify which ports you want to enable for these IP addresses.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 327 . Select SSH. In the IP Address field. to designate any IP address 6.168. The appliance does not send the audit log until you apply the system policy.1. • any. 192. reflecting the changes you made. TIP! You can click Add to add access for additional IP addresses or click Delete to remove access from other IP addresses. Click Save Policy and Exit.1. Version 4. see IP Address Conventions on page 41. then click Add. The Access List page appears again. click Add. use the following syntax depending on the IP addresses you want to add: • • an exact IP address (for example. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy.101) an IP address range using CIDR notation (for example. and an optional tag. HTTPS. To add access for one or more IP addresses. 192. a severity.

The default for Severity is INFO. 3. 4. The default setting is Disabled. However. The default port (514) is used. the appliance may the send audit log to the host. click Create Policy. Otherwise. For example: Mar 01 14:45:24 localhost [TAG] Dev-DC3000: admin@10. Click Save Policy and Exit. Label the audit data that you are sending with a facility and severity. click Edit next to the system policy. Select Operations > System Policy. [Action] where the local date. time. You have two options: • • To modify the audit log settings in an existing system policy.1.2. Version 4. Operations > Monitoring. Click Audit Log Settings.1.9. WARNING! The computer you configure to receive an audit log must be set up to accept remote messages. 6. 5.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 To configure the audit log settings: Access: Admin 1. and the sending device name precedes the audit log message. and hostname precede the bracketed optional tag. the Access List page appears. and click Save. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. 2. Optionally. you can select any of the standard syslog facility and severity settings. 7. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy to the Defense Center and its managed sensors. The following is an example of the output structure: Date Time Host [Tag] Sender: [User_Name]@[User_IP]. After you apply a policy with this feature enabled and your destination host is configured to accept the audit log. but it will not be accepted. The default for Facility is USER. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. [Subsystem]. Select Enabled next to Send Audit Log to Syslog. The System Policy Page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 328 . insert a reference tag in the TAG field. To configure the audit log settings as part of a new system policy. the syslog messages are sent. Page View 8. In either case. The system policy is updated. Designate the destination host for the audit information by using the IP address or the fully qualified name of the host in the Host field.

Once you apply the policy to a Version 4. For more information on available user roles. see Modifying User Privileges and Options on page 306. see Understanding User Privileges on page 267. you would probably want to leave the default role unselected. You can select multiple roles. the appliance verifies the user credentials by comparing them to a user account stored in the Defense Center or managed sensor’s local database. For more information on modifying a user account. users can log in but cannot access any functionality. that if authentication fails on the available external authentication servers. You can enable authentication in a system policy on your Defense Center and then push that policy to managed sensors. However. When you apply a policy with authentication enabled to an appliance. if a user has internal authentication enabled and the user credentials are not found in the internal database. see Logging into the Appliance to Set Up an Account on page 23. when a user logs into a Sourcefire 3D System Defense Center or managed sensor. See Configuring Attribute Mapping on page 274 for more information. if your authentication profile retrieves records for other personnel in addition to the security group. In addition. When you enable authentication. Note. their account is listed on the User Management page. if you set up an authentication profile that retrieves only users in the Network Security group in your company. Note that when you create an LDAP authentication object on your Defense Center. then later modify the policy to use different default user roles and re-apply.9. However. For example. any user accounts created before the modification retain the first user role until you modify or delete and recreate them. where you can edit the account settings to grant additional permissions.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 329 . If no access role is selected. the appliance verifies the user credentials against users on an LDAP or RADIUS server. if you create an authentication object referencing an external authentication server. If you configure the system policy to use one user role and apply the policy. all passwords across all servers work. as long as those roles can be combined. After a user attempts to log in. you can set the default user role for any user whose account is externally authenticated. however. If a user has the same username on multiple systems. you can apply the system policy to let users logging into the Defense Center or managed sensor authenticate to that server rather than using the local database.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 Configuring Authentication Profiles Requires: DC/MDC Normally. the appliance then checks the external server for a set of matching credentials. the appliance does not revert to checking the local database. you may set the default user role to include both the Intrusion Event Analyst role and the RNA Event Analyst so users can access collected event data without any additional user configuration on your part. you can set a filter search attribute to specify the set of users who can successfully authenticate against the LDAP server. The Authentication Profiles page only displays in the system policy on a Defense Center. For a complete procedure for logging in initially as an externally authenticated user.

If an external user attempts to log in. 2. an external user account is created in the local database with the default privileges for the external authentication object. click Create Policy.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 sensor. If the username and password match results from an external server. To make changes to the authentication profile settings. the Access List page appears. the appliance checks the username and password against the external database. the user logs in successfully. the appliance checks the user against each external authentication server in the authentication order shown in the system policy. In either case. The System Policy page appears. the appliance first checks if that user is in the local user database. so you cannot manage them on the sensor itself. however. you can either disable it in a system policy on the Defense Center and push that to the sensor or apply a local system policy (which cannot contain authentication profile settings) on the sensor. If a match is found. If the login fails. If the user is a new external user. the appliance then checks the username and password against the local database. select Operations > System Policy.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 330 . and external authentication is enabled. To configure the authentication profile settings as part of a new system policy. the appliance changes the user to an external user with the default privileges for that authentication object. You have two options: • • To modify the authentication profile settings in an existing system policy. Note that you can only enable external authentication on Defense Centers and 3D Sensors. eligible externally authenticated users can log into the sensor. If a match is found. However. and click Save. click Edit next to the system policy. On the Defense Center. External users cannot authenticate against the user list in the local database.9. the system policy on the sensor does not display authentication profile settings. Enabling external authentication by applying a system policy is not supported on the following sensor types: • • • • 3Dx800 sensors Crossbeam-based software sensors Intrusion Agents RNA Software for Red Hat Linux If a user with internal authentication attempts to log in. If the user exists. To enable authentication of users on external servers: Access: Admin 1. If the login fails. the user logs in successfully. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. Version 4. To disable authentication on a managed sensor. you have to modify the policy on the Defense Center and then push it to the sensor again. the user login attempt is rejected.

Click Authentication Profiles. select Enabled from the Shell Authentication drop-down list. Click Save Policy and Exit. 9.9. 7. From the Status drop-down list. Configuring Dashboard Settings Requires: Any You can configure the system policy so that Custom Analysis widgets are enabled on the dashboard. only the analyst role is applied. click Enable next to the object.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 3. From the Default User Role drop-down list. The system policy is updated. TIP! Press Ctrl before selecting roles to select multiple default user roles. 8. Note that although you can select both an event analyst role and the corresponding read-only event analyst role. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. Dashboards provide you with at-a-glance views of current Version 4. select a user role to define the default permissions you want to grant to users authenticated externally. 5. The Authentication Profiles page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 331 . Remember that shell access users can only authenticate against the server whose authentication object is highest in the profile order. use the up and down arrows to change the order in which authentication servers are accessed when an authentication request occurs. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy to the Defense Center and its managed sensors. To enable use of an authentication object. 4. 6. Optionally. If you want to use the external server to authenticate shell access accounts as well. select Enabled. IMPORTANT! You must enable at least one authentication object to enable external authentication.

Click Dashboard. clear the check box to prohibit users from using those widgets. for some databases. 2. You have two options: • • To modify the dashboard settings in an existing system policy. the Access List page appears. Select the Enable Custom Analysis Widgets check box to allow users to add Custom Analysis widgets to dashboards. See Understanding the Custom Analysis Widget on page 69 for more information on how to use custom widgets. The Custom Analysis widget allows you to create a visual representation of events based on a flexible. In most cases. In either case. To configure the dashboard settings as part of a new system policy. one day’s history). Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. The Dashboard Settings page appears. click Create Policy. However. Select Operations > System Policy. Version 4.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 system status through the use of widgets: small. Click Save Policy and Exit. 3. To improve performance.9. To enable Custom Analysis widgets: Access: Admin 1. See Deleting System Policies on page 325for more information. click Edit next to the system policy. Custom Analysis widget use is enabled 5. the minimum number of records you can store in any database is one record (or. and click Save. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. The System Policy page appears. By default. user-configurable query of the events in your appliance's database. you can choose not to store any events.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 332 . in the case of the compliance violation history database. self-contained components that provide insight into different aspects of the Sourcefire 3D System. Configuring Database Event Limits Requires: Any You can use the Database page to specify the maximum number of events you want to store on an appliance. you should try to tailor the database event limit to the number of events you regularly work with. 4. The system policy is updated.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 333 . and health events..9. The Database Event Limits on page 333 below describes the maximum number of records you can store in the databases on your appliance.. or DC1000 100 million events on the DC3000 10 million events on the DC500. Database Event Limits The.. 2.5 million events on the DC500 10 million events on the Virtual Defense Center or the DC1000 100 million events on the DC3000 2 million events RNA network discovery events on a Defense Center RNA flows on a Defense Center 10 million events 10 million events on the DC500. flow summaries. Virtual Defense Center. intrusion events on a Defense Center or on a Master Defense Center (which is always a DC3000) intrusion events on a 3D Sensor And can store up to.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 These databases include those that store RNA and RUA events.. IMPORTANT! You cannot apply system policies to Crossbeam-based software sensors or Intrusion Agents. as well as flow events. or DC1000 100 million events on the DC3000 1 million events RNA Flow Summary Database Compliance & White List Event Database Health Event Database RNA flow summaries (aggregated RNA flows) on a Defense Center compliance events and white list events on a Defense Center or Master Defense Center health events on a Defense Center or Master Defense Center 1 million events Version 4. database limits that do not apply to a particular appliance are silently ignored. if you specify 100 million intrusion events and apply that policy to a 3D Sensor). In addition. any health alert limits you set in the policy have no effect on the sensors. Intrusion Event Database (Defense Center or Master Defense Center) Intrusion Event Database (3D Sensor) RNA Event Database RNA Flow Database Is the database that stores. Virtual Defense Center. For example. Note that if you apply a system policy to an appliance that does not support the maximum limit you specify (for example. if you use the Defense Center to apply the same system policy to itself and the 3D Sensors it manages. the maximum limit for the appliance is silently enforced...

.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 334 .. unified files are deleted from the system. click Create Policy. audit records remediation status events on a Defense Center the white list violation history of the hosts on your network.. To configure the maximum number of records in the database: Access: Admin 1.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 Database Event Limits (Continued) The.. on a Defense Center RUA events on a Defense Center RUA storage of user logins on a Defense Center SEU import log records And can store up to. In either case. The System Policy page appears. click Edit next to the system policy. the oldest events and packet files are pruned until the database is back within limits. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. see Purging the RNA and RUA Databases on page 598. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for information about generating automated email notifications when events are automatically pruned.000 records 10 million events a 30-day history of violations 10 million events 10 million user login records 1 million records Note that if the number of events in the intrusion event database exceeds the maximum.9. the Access List page appears.. and click Save. In addition. Version 4. 100. To configure the database settings as part of a new system policy. 2. For information on manually pruning the RNA and RUA databases. Select Operations > System Policy. Audit Event Database Remediation Status Event Database White List Violation History Database RUA Event Database RUA History Database SEU Import Log Database Is the database that stores. beginning with the oldest files. if the /volume disk partition reaches 85% of its capacity. You have two options: • • To modify the database settings in an existing system policy..

For information on how many records each database can maintain. Click Database.9.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 3. see Database Event Limits on page 333.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 335 . For each of the databases. 4. The Database page appears. The following graphic shows the Database page on a DC1000 Defense Center. enter the number of records you want to store. Version 4.

select No from the drop-down list. Click Save Policy and Exit. Do you want to confirm your action when you apply RNA detection policies and intrusion policies? • • If yes. The System Policy page appears. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. Select Operations > System Policy. 2. Configuring Detection Policy Preferences Requires: Any The Detection Policy Preferences page allows you to configure whether you must confirm your action when you apply RNA detection policies and intrusion policies. select Yes from the drop-down list. You have two options: • • To modify the detection policy preferences in an existing system policy.9. The Detection Policy Preferences page appears. 3. 4. In either case. click Edit next to the system policy. and click Save.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 336 . If you enable this setting. click Create Policy. whenever you apply an RNA detection policy or an intrusion policy to one or more detection engines.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 5. Version 4. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. the appliance prompts you to confirm that you want to apply the policy. If no. the Access List page appears. Click Detection Policy Preferences. The appliance also warns you if the detection engine has a different policy applied to it than the one you are attempting to apply. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. 5. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. The system policy is updated. Click Save Policy and Exit. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. To configure detection policy preferences: Access: Admin 1. To configure the detection policy preferences as part of a new system policy. The system policy is updated.

the Access List page appears. In either case. Configuring DNS caching allows you to identify IP addresses you previously resolved without performing additional lookups. 5. and then click Save. see Configuring Network Settings on page 377. To configure IP address resolution on a per-user-account basis. Click DNS Cache. The default setting is 300 minutes (five hours). 2. enable Resolve IP Addresses. Version 4. you can configure the appliance to resolve IP addresses automatically on the event view pages. 4. click Edit next to the system policy. 3. users must also select Event View Settings from the User Preferences menu. and click Save. IMPORTANT! DNS resolution caching is a system-wide setting that allows the caching of previously resolved DNS lookups. Next to DNS Resolution Caching. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. see Configuring Event View Settings on page 27. This can reduce the amount of traffic on your network and speed the display of event pages when IP address resolution is enabled. For information about configuring DNS servers. As an administrator. The DNS Cache page appears. click Create Policy. To configure the DNS cache settings as part of a new system policy.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 Configuring DNS Cache Properties Requires: Any If you have a DNS server configured on the Network page.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 337 . you can also configure basic properties for DNS caching performed by the appliance. The System Policy page appears. You have two options: • • To modify the DNS cache settings in an existing system policy. In the DNS Cache Timeout field. select Enabled to enable caching or Disabled to disable it.9. For information about configuring event preferences. enter the number of minutes a DNS entry remains cached in memory before it is removed for inactivity. To configure the DNS cache properties: Access: Admin 1. Select Operations > System Policy.

Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. Select Operations > System Policy. In either case. You have two options: • • To modify the email settings in an existing system policy. Click Save Policy and Exit. To configure a mail relay host: Access: Admin 1. Version 4. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. The System Policy page appears. 2.requires RNA) use email for intrusion event alerting (Defense Center only . Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address Requires: Any If you plan to: • • • • • email event-based reports email status reports for scheduled tasks use email for RNA event. and click Save. IP address resolution is not enabled on a per-user basis unless it is configured on the Events page accessed from the User Preferences menu. the Access List page appears. The system policy is updated. To configure the email settings as part of a new system policy. click Edit next to the system policy.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 6.requires IPS) use email for health event alerting (Defense Center only) you must configure a mail host. click Create Policy. WARNING! Although DNS caching is enabled for the appliance. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 338 . impact flag. In addition. you can configure an email address that will receive notifications when intrusion events and audit logs are pruned from the database. and compliance event alerting (Defense Center only .

3. 2. 5. in the Data Pruning Notification Address field. In either case.9. 4.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 3. Optionally. the Access List page appears. Configuring Intrusion Policy Preferences Requires: Any You can allow or require comments to be added to the audit log when an intrusion policy changes. click Create Policy. enter the email address you want to receive notifications when intrusion events and audit logs are pruned from the appliance’s database. Click Intrusion Policy Preferences. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. and click Save. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. IMPORTANT! The mail host you enter must allow access from the appliance. Click Email Notification. To configure intrusion policy change tracking: Access: Admin 1. Select Operations > System Policy. To configure the intrusion policy preferences as part of a new system policy. You can also track all changes to intrusion policies in the audit log. click Edit next to the system policy. The Intrusion Policy Preferences page appears. The Configure Email Notification page appears. 6. The System Policy page appears. In the Mail Relay Host field. Click Save Policy and Exit. type the hostname or IP address of the mail server you want to use.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 339 . You have two options: • • To modify the intrusion policy preferences in an existing system policy. The system policy is updated. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. Version 4.

Select Disabled. To configure the language settings as part of a new system policy. Optional. a Description of Changes text box appears when you commit your intrusion policy changes. Optionally. 3. 5. if you want to track changes to intrusion policies.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 4. or Required from the Comments on policy change drop-down list. You have two options: • • To modify the language settings in an existing system policy. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321.9. Click Language. Click Save Policy and Exit.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 340 . To select a different language for the user interface: Access: Admin 1. the Access List page appears. and click Save. If you select Optional or Required. Version 4. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. WARNING! The language you select here is used for the web interface for every user who logs into the appliance. In either case. Select Operations > System Policy. select Write changes in Intrusion Policy to audit log. 2. click Create Policy. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. click Edit next to the system policy. The system policy is updated. Select the language you want to use. The Language page appears. 6. The System Policy page appears. Specifying a Different Language Requires: Any You can use the Language page to specify a different language for the web interface. 4.

In the Custom Login Banner field.9. In either case. enter the login banner that you want to use with this system policy. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. 3. and click Save. 2. Click Login Banner. the Access List page appears. You can specify the login banner either by creating a new system policy or by editing an existing policy. You have two options: • • To modify the login banner in an existing system policy. The system policy is updated. Version 4. The System Policy page appears. In either case.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 5. To configure the login banner as part of a new system policy. click Edit next to the system policy.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 341 . Banners can contain any printable characters except the less-than symbol (<) and the greaterthan symbol (>). Click Save Policy and Exit. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. The Login Banner page appears. Adding a Custom Login Banner Requires: Any You can create a custom login banner that appears when users log into the appliance using SSH and on the login page of the web interface. the login banner is not used until you apply the system policy. Custom login banners are part of the system policy. 4. Select Operations > System Policy. click Create Policy. To add a custom banner: Access: Admin 1. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information.

The system policy is updated. before RNA drops a service from the network map due to inactivity. IMPORTANT! To avoid premature timeout of hosts. Version 4. see the following sections: • • • • Understanding RNA Data Storage Settings on page 342 Understanding Vulnerability Impact Assessment Settings on page 345 Understanding Multiple Fingerprint Settings on page 345 Configuring Settings for RNA on page 347 Understanding RNA Data Storage Settings Requires: DC/ MDC + RNA RNA data storage settings. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. see Creating RNA Detection Policies in the Analyst Guide. and therefore determine the data that other parts of the Sourcefire 3D System can use. make sure that the host timeout value is longer than the update interval in the RNA detection policy. whether operating system and service identity conflicts are automatically resolved. and the priority of active sources of identity data. For more information. see Creating RNA Detection Policies in the Analyst Guide. in minutes. as described in the following table.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 342 .Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 5. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. Configuring RNA Settings Requires: DC/ MDC + RNA You can configure several aspects of RNA behavior through the system policy. Service Timeout The amount of time that passes. before RNA drops a host from the network map due to inactivity.9. For more information. RNA Data Storage Settings Field Host Timeout Description The amount of time that passes. Click Save Policy and Exit. whether identity conflict events are logged. The default setting is 10080 minutes (7 days). These settings also control how long data is retained in the network map. The default setting is 10080 minutes (7 days). including how RNA stores data. make sure that the service timeout value is longer than the update interval in the RNA detection policy. control the kinds of RNA data stored in the database. For more information. IMPORTANT! To avoid premature timeout of services. what RNA and host input events are logged. in minutes. which vulnerability types to use for impact assessment.

which prevents your 3D Sensors from transmitting individual flows to the Defense Center and therefore prevents you from taking advantage of any feature that requires data from individual flows. and reports use external to indicate the hosts outside your monitored network. This can reduce the space required to store flow data and can also speed up the rendering of flow data graphs. The Defense Center will combine flow summaries involving a host on your monitored network and one or more external hosts if the flows use the same port. Note that you can also use the RNA detection policy to force your 3D Sensors to combine flow summaries involving external hosts before they transmit the data to the Defense Center. IMPORTANT! Make sure that the client application timeout value is longer than the update interval in the RNA detection policy. protocol. in minutes. which can reduce the number of events sent to the Defense Center. keep in mind that setting this option in the RNA detection policy requires that you set your flow data mode to Summary. if you enable this option and you attempt to drill down to the table view of flow data (that is. The default setting is 10080 minutes(7 days). see Creating RNA Detection Policies in the Analyst Guide. instead of an individual IP address. Select this check box if you want you want to combine flow summaries involving external hosts. Version 4. For more information. service. Event views. before RNA drops a client application from the network map due to inactivity. This option is especially valuable if you want to prevent spoofed hosts from taking the place of valid hosts in the network map. access data on individual flows) for a flow summary that involves an external responder.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 343 . graphs. Enabling this option treats flow summary data from IP addresses that are not in your list of monitored networks (as defined by your RNA detection policy) as coming from a single host. However. see Combining Flow Summaries from External Responders in the Analyst Guide as well as Configuring RNA Detection Policy Settings in the Analyst Guide.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 RNA Data Storage Settings (Continued) Field Client Application Timeout Description The amount of time that passes. and if they were detected by the same detection engine (for flows detected by 3D Sensor) or were exported by the same NetFlow-enabled device and were processed by the same detection engine. Drop New Hosts When Host Limit Reached Combine Flows for Out-Of-Network Responders Select this check box if you want new hosts rather than old hosts dropped when the Defense Center reaches its host limit and the network map is full. the table view contains no information. For more information.9. However.

each detection engine generates a flow event when RNA detects that a connection is terminated between a monitored host on one of the networks and a monitored host on the other network. Version 4. if you use one policy to monitor both networks. each of which is monitoring a separate network segment using separate detection engines.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 RNA Data Storage Settings (Continued) Field Drop Duplicate RNA Flow Events Description Select this check box if you want the Defense Center to drop duplicate flow events generated by 3D Sensors with RNA. Drop Duplicate NetFlow Events Select this check box if you want the Defense Center to drop duplicate flow events that are based on NetFlow data. On the other hand. and can also use excessive bandwidth. not following best practices can degrade performance as the Defense Center attempts to resolve the conflicts.9. For more information. best practices are to avoid creating duplicate NetFlow events. Just as with RNA flow events. Note that best practices are to use only one detection policy and to not overlap network segment coverage. Duplicate flow events can be created if you use two RNA detection policies. In that scenario. Duplicate NetFlow events can be created. for example. only the reporting detection engine for the flow initiator generates a flow event. Duplicate flow events can also be created if you overlap network segment coverage with your RNA detection engines in your RNA detection policy. if two NetFlow-enabled devices export information about the same session.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 344 . see Drop Duplicate RNA Flow Events.

as described in the following table. see Using Impact Flags to Evaluate Events in the Analyst Guide. Version 4. select this option to use the Nessus vulnerability mappings. intrusion events will never be marked with the red impact flag. For more information.9. For more information. Host Input Event Logging Understanding Multiple Fingerprint Settings Requires: DC + RNA RNA matches fingerprints for operating systems and services against patterns in traffic to determine what operating system and which services are running on a particular host. See Understanding RNA Network Discovery Event Types in the Analyst Guide for information about each event type Expand this section and use the check boxes to specify the types of RNA host input events that you want to log in the database. See Understanding RNA Host Input Event Types in the Analyst Guide for information about each event type. • Select the Third Party Vulnerability Mappings check box if you want to use third-party vulnerability references to perform impact flag correlation. Vulnerability Impact Assessment Settings Field Vulnerabilities to use for Impact Assessment Requires: IPS Description Select the check boxes in this section to configure how the Sourcefire 3D System performs impact flag correlation with intrusion events. if you scan using Nessus. For example.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 345 . RNA Event Logging Expand this section and use the check boxes to specify the types of RNA network discovery events that you want to log in the database. Note that if you clear all the check boxes. see Understanding Nessus Scans in the Analyst Guide or the Sourcefire 3D System Host Input API Guide.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 Understanding Vulnerability Impact Assessment Settings Requires: DC/ MDC + RNA The RNA vulnerability impact assessment settings. • Select the Use RNA Vulnerability Mappings check box if you want to use RNA vulnerability information to perform impact flag correlation. see Mapping Third-Party Vulnerabilities in the Analyst Guide. the intrusion event will be marked with the red (Vulnerable) impact flag. To provide the most reliable operating system and service identity information. if IPS generates an intrusion event and the Sourcefire 3D System is able to use any of the methods you specified to determine that the host involved in the event is vulnerable to the attack or exploit. • Select the Use Third Party Scanner Vulnerability Mappings check box if you are using an integrated scan capability or the AddScanResult host input API function and you want to use vulnerability lookups from the scanner to perform impact flag correlation. For more information. RNA collates fingerprint information from several sources. You can select any or all of the check boxes in this section. control which vulnerability types to use for impact assessment.

9. RNA retains one identity for each source. but does allow integration of imported application or scan results. By default. however. you can set your system to always automatically resolve the conflict by keeping the passive identity or to always resolve it by keeping the active identity. identity data added by a scanner or application overrides identity data detected by RNA.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 346 .Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 RNA uses all passive data to derive operating system identities and assign a confidence value. Note. identity conflicts are not automatically resolved and you must resolve them through the host profile or by rescanning the host or re-adding new identity data to override the RNA identity. or change the priority or timeout settings for existing sources. but only data from the highest priority application or scanner source is used as the current identity. that user input data overrides scanner and application data regardless of priority. Note that adding a scanner to this page does not add the full integration capabilities that exist for the Nmap and Nessus scanners. see Enhancing Your Network Map in the Analyst Guide. as indicated in the Multiple Fingerprint Settings table. For more information on current identities and how RNA selects the current identity. However. You can add new active sources through this page. remember to make sure that you map vulnerabilities from the source to the RNA vulnerabilities in the network Version 4. An identity conflict occurs when RNA detects an identity that conflicts with an existing identity that came from the active scanner or application sources listed on the Multiple Fingerprinting page or from a user. If you import data from a third-party application or scanner. You can use the Multiple Fingerprinting page to rank scanner and application fingerprint sources by priority. By default. unless there is an identity conflict.

• To indicate the duration of time that should elapse between the addition of an identity to the network map by this source and the deletion of that identity. from the Type drop-down list. The System Policy page appears. For more information. see Mapping Third-Party Vulnerabilities in the Analyst Guide. Version 4. select Scanner or Application. Type a name for the source. Select Operations > System Policy. • To promote a source and cause the operating system and service identities to be used in favor of sources below it in the list. click the up arrow next to the source name. Configuring Settings for RNA Requires: DC + RNA Use the following procedure to configure RNA settings in the system policy. click Add in the Multiple Fingerprints page of the system policy. • To demote a source and cause the operating system and service identities to be used only if there are no identities provided by sources above it in the list. To specify RNA settings: Access: Admin 1. Multiple Fingerprint Settings Option Generate Identity Conflict Event Automatically Resolve Conflicts Description Enable this option to generate an event when an identity conflict occurs on a host in the network map. select Hours.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 347 . click the down arrow next to the source name. Days.9. select Active from the Automatically Resolve Conflicts drop-down list. • To use the RNA fingerprint when an identity conflict occurs. You have the following options: • To force manual conflict resolution of identity conflicts. • To use the current identity from the highest priority active source when an identity conflict occurs.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 map. or Weeks from the Timeout drop-down list and type the appropriate duration. select Passive from the Automatically Resolve Conflicts drop-down list. Scanner/ Application List You have several options: • To add a new source. • To change the type of source. select Disabled from the Automatically Resolve Conflicts drop-down list.

Click RNA Settings. Specify the RNA data storage settings that you want for your Defense Center. click Create Policy. click Edit next to the system policy. 4. Version 4. See the RNA Data Storage Settings table on page 342 for more information.9. 3. In either case. and click Save. the Access List page appears. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 348 .Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 2. You have two options: • • To modify the RNA settings in an existing system policy. The RNA Settings page appears. To configure the RNA settings as part of a new system policy.

Optionally. you can use the system policy to configure RNA to automatically generate subnet recommendations for your currently applied RNA detection policies on a daily basis. Click Save Policy and Exit. This is because RNA only gathers secondary information Version 4. Unfortunately. 7. you may not always be kept abreast of network configuration changes. it may be able to refine any subnet recommendations it has made for your RNA detection policies. as a time-saving and performance-maximizing measure. specify the RNA network discovery events that you want to log by clicking the arrow next to RNA Event Logging. Choosing which subnets to monitor with which detection engines is an iterative process that you should revisit from time to time. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. Alternately. especially if your network configuration has been altered through routing or host changes. Optionally. If you do not configure the Defense Center to automatically apply subnet recommendations. See the RNA Host Input Event Types table in the Analyst Guide for more information. Optionally. Subnet detection allows RNA to make recommendations about which are the best detection engines to analyze the traffic on the various network segments in your organization. Configuring RNA Subnet Detection Settings Requires: DC + RNA Optimally. 6. A network administrator may modify a network configuration through routing or host changes without informing you.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 5. Optionally.9. configure multiple fingerprint settings to manage operating system and service source priorities and identity conflict resolution settings. you can configure the Defense Center to automatically update those policies and apply the updated policies to your RNA detection engines. you must revisit the detection policy after you apply it for the first time so that you can manually evaluate and apply any subnet recommendations. your RNA detection policy specifies that each RNA detection engine is configured as the reporting detection engine for the hosts that are closest to it from a network hop standpoint. The system policy is updated.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 349 . specify the RNA host input events that you want to log by clicking the arrow next to Host Input Event Logging. All the event types are enabled by default. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. As RNA continuously monitors your network traffic. All the event types are enabled by default. 8. which can make it challenging to stay on top of proper RNA policy configurations. See the Multiple Fingerprint Settings table on page 347 for more information. See the RNA Network Discovery Event Types table in the Analyst Guide for more information.

and so on. or.9. you must explicitly assign an RNA detection engine to monitor that subnet. flow data. Note that you can configure the Defense Center to notify you of subnet recommendations via email so that you can make the changes manually.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 (hops and MAC address data) about hosts in subnets that are set to autodetect. to notify you of any changes made. including operating system and service identity data. The following diagram illustrates the automated subnet detection process.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 350 . To get detailed information about the hosts in a subnet. if you configured the Defense Center to automatically apply recommendations. Version 4.

For more information. To configure RNA subnet detection settings: Access: Admin 1. click Create Policy. click Edit next to the system policy. Optionally. The System Policy page appears. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. enter the email address where you want to receive notifications of new subnet recommendations.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 For more information on subnet detection. 3. 2. TIP! To receive email notifications. 4. The RNA Subnet Detection Settings page appears. select the time when you want RNA to automatically generate daily subnet recommendations for all applied RNA detection policies. the Access List page appears. in the Mail Notifications To field. see Introduction to Sourcefire RNA in the Analyst Guide.9. You have two options: • • To modify the RNA subnet detection settings in an existing system policy. RNA only automatically generates recommendations for RNA deployments running on Version 4. you must configure a valid mail relay host. Select Operations > System Policy. and click Save. 5. From the Generate Recommendations Daily At drop-down list. If your RNA deployment includes even one legacy (pre-Version 4. see Manually Generating Subnet Recommendations in the Analyst Guide.9) 3D Sensor. you must manually generate and apply recommendations for your RNA detection policies. To configure the RNA subnet detection settings as part of a new system policy. In either case. To disable daily generation of subnet recommendations. IMPORTANT! For performance reasons.9 and later 3D Sensors. select Disabled. Click RNA Subnet Detection Settings. see Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 351 . Version 4.

the Defense Center does not record them unless there is already a user with a matching email address in the database. RUA stops adding new users to the Defense Center database. This is because these logins are not associated with any of the user metadata that RUA obtains from an LDAP server. RUA can add users to the database using the following types of detected protocols: • • • • • • LDAP AIM POP3 IMAP Oracle SIP (VoIP) Note that although RUA detects SMTP logins. Version 4. Note that this option has no effect unless you enable daily recommendations. 7. Enable the Automatically Apply Daily Recommendations check box to automatically update and apply your RNA detection policies after RNA generates subnet recommendations. Configuring RUA Settings Requires: DC + RUA You can use the RUA settings in the system policy to filter which types of network activity cause RUA to add users to the database. POP3. and other guests.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 352 . Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy.9. AIM. For example. obtaining usernames through protocols such as AIM. and IMAP can introduce usernames not relevant to your organization due to network access from contractors. The system policy is updated. an RUA user is added to the Defense Center user database. visitors. Restricting RUA helps minimize username clutter and preserve RUA licenses. Click Save Policy and Exit. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. After you reach your licensed limit. and SIP logins always create duplicate user records. Sourcefire RUA (see Using Sourcefire RUA in the Analyst Guide) is an optional component of the Sourcefire 3D System that allows you to correlate network activity with user identity information. In addition.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 6. RUA users are not added to the database based on SMTP logins. Oracle. When RUA detects a user login for a user who is not already in the database. The RUA feature license on the Defense Center (see Licensing RUA in the Analyst Guide) specifies the number of users you can monitor with RUA.

The System Policy page appears. The RUA Detection Settings page appears. 2. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. Click Save Policy and Exit. see How Do I Choose an RUA Implementation? in the Analyst Guide. Select Operations > System Policy. Therefore. filtering non-LDAP logins has no effect. click Create Policy. unless your RUA implementation includes 3D Sensors with RUA. In either case. IMPORTANT! Sourcefire RUA Agents installed on Microsoft Active Directory LDAP servers collect only LDAP user login information. all login types cause RUA to add users to the database. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. Click RUA Settings. 4.9. click Edit next to the system policy. By default. and click Save. Select the check boxes that correspond to the types of logins that will create RUA users. To configure the RUA settings as part of a new system policy. To filter RUA users based on network activity type: Access: Admin 1. For more information on RUA Agents and 3D Sensors with RUA.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 nor are they associated with any of the information contained in the other types of login that your 3D Sensors detect. the Access List page appears. 3. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 353 . The system policy is updated. 5. You have two options: • • To modify the RUA settings in an existing system policy.

such as command line interfaces or the operating system interface. You can choose to synchronize the time: • • manually using one or more NTP servers (one of which can be a Defense Center) Time settings are part of the system policy. You can specify the time settings either by creating a new system policy or by editing an existing policy. You manage time settings on an Intrusion Agent through the operating system. The System Policy page appears. The procedure for synchronizing time differs slightly depending on whether you are using the web interface on a Defense Center or a 3D Sensor. Connections to NTP servers do not use configured proxy settings. You must use native applications. Each procedure is explained separately below. but are stored on the appliance itself using UTC time. see the Sourcefire 3D Sensor Software for X-Series Installation Guide. Do not synchronize your 3D Sensors (virtual or physical) to a Virtual Defense Center. If you specify a remote NTP server. the time setting is not used until you apply the system policy. if enabled). In either case. your appliance must have network access to it. to manage time settings for software sensors: • For more information on configuring settings for Crossbeam Systems Switches. Select Operations > System Policy.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 Synchronizing Time Requires: Any You can manage time synchronization on the appliance using the Time Synchronization page. To synchronize time on the Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. Sourcefire recommends that you synchronize your virtual appliances to a physical NTP server. Version 4. see Serving Time from the Defense Center on page 357. To use the Defense Center as an NTP server.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 354 . Note that time settings are displayed on most pages on the appliance in local time using the time zone you set on the Time Zone page (America/New York by default).9. the current time appears in UTC at the top of the Time Synchronization page (local time is displayed in the Manual clock setting option. For more information on configuring settings for RNA Software for Red Hat Linux. • • You can synchronize the appliance’s time with an external time server. In addition. see the Sourcefire RNA Software for Red Hat Linux Configuration Guide.

If you want to serve time from the Defense Center to your managed sensors. Click Time Synchronization. See Setting the Time Manually on page 389 for information about setting the time after you apply the system policy. click Create Policy. if DNS is enabled. Version 4. and click Save. click Edit next to the system policy. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. in the Serve time via NTP drop-down list. 5. The Time Synchronization page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 355 . type a comma-separated list of IP addresses for the NTP servers you want to use or. in the text box. the Access List page appears. 4. select Manually in the System Settings. • WARNING! If the appliance is rebooted and your DHCP server sets an NTP server record different than the one you specify here. the DHCP-provided NTP server will be used instead. In either case. select Via NTP Server from and. To receive time through NTP from a different server. Note that if you set this option to Enabled and then apply the system policy to a sensor rather than a Defense Center. You have two options for specifying how the time is synchronized on the appliance: • To set the time manually. Only Defense Centers can act as NTP servers.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 2. this value is ignored. You have two options: • • To modify the time settings in an existing system policy. 3.9. type the fully qualified host and domain names. select Enabled. To avoid this situation. To configure the time settings as part of a new system policy. you should configure your DHCP server to set the same NTP server.

To synchronize time on a 3D Sensor: Access: Admin 1. the Access List page appears. 3. click Edit next to the system policy.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 6. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. and click Save. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. 2. In either case. Click Save Policy and Exit. The Time Synchronization page appears.9. Click Time Synchronization. IMPORTANT! It may take a few minutes for the appliance to synchronize with the configured NTP servers. 4. You have two options for specifying how time is synchronized on the 3D Sensor: Version 4. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. Select Operations > System Policy. To configure the time settings as part of a new system policy. click Create Policy. The System Policy page appears. The system policy is updated.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 356 . You have two options: • • To modify the time settings in an existing system policy.

if you are synchronizing the 3D Sensor to a Defense Center that is configured as an NTP server. before configuring the Defense Center to serve time using NTP If you need to . Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy. change the time manually and click Save. if DNS is enabled. The System Policy page appears. On the Defense Center. select Manually in the System Settings. This is because the Defense Center must first synchronize with its configured NTP server before it can serve time to the 3D Sensor. select Via NTP Server from and. TIP! You cannot set the time manually after configuring the Defense Center to serve time using NTP If you need to manually change the time. change the time manually after configuring the Defense Center as an NTP server. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. Serving Time from the Defense Center Requires: DC/MDC You can configure the Defense Center as a time server using NTP and then use it to synchronize time between the Defense Center and managed 3D Sensors. you should do so . The system policy is updated.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 • To set the time manually. IMPORTANT! If you configure the Defense Center to serve time using NTP and . Version 4. the NTP service on managed sensors will still attempt to synchronize time with the Defense Center. In addition. disable the Via NTP option and click Save. it may take some time for the time to synchronize.9. type a comma-separated list of IP addresses of the NTP servers or. select Operations > System Policy. • 5. and the Defense Center itself is configured to use an NTP server. IMPORTANT! It may take a few minutes for the 3D Sensor to synchronize with the configured NTP servers. in the text box. Click Save Policy and Exit. type the fully qualified host and domain names. To receive time through NTP from different servers. and then enable Via NTP and click Save. You must disable NTP from the managed sensors’ web interfaces to stop the synchronization attempts. See Setting the Time Manually on page 389 for information about setting the time after you apply the system policy. To configure the Defense Center as an NTP server: Access: Admin 1. then later disable it.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 357 .

click Create Policy. In either case. 4. and click Save. 5. many services do not include vendor and version information. Click Save Policy and Exit. Note that although RNA detectors collect service information and add it to host profiles.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 358 .Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 2. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information. If you enable the SMTP service on the Vulnerability Mapping page of a system policy. For the services listed in the system policy. The Time Synchronization page appears. select Via NTP from Defense Center. For example. a host receives SMTP traffic that does not have a vendor or version in the header. You have two options: • • To modify the NTP server settings in an existing system policy. In the Set My Clock option for the sensors. From the Serve Time via NTP drop-down list. click Edit next to the system policy. when the service has a service ID in the RNA database and the packet header for the traffic includes a vendor and version. However. the Access List page appears. To configure the NTP server settings as part of a new system policy. then apply that policy to the Defense Center managing the sensor that detects the traffic. IMPORTANT! It may take a few minutes for the Defense Center to synchronize with its managed sensors. Mapping Vulnerabilities for Services Requires: DC/MDC RNA automatically maps vulnerabilities to a host for any service traffic received or sent by the host. the service information will not be used for vulnerability mapping because you cannot specify a vendor or version for a custom service and cannot select the service for vulnerability mapping in the system policy. Version 4.9. The system policy is updated. all vulnerabilities associated with SMTP applications are added to the host profile for the host. 6. you can configure whether RNA associates vulnerabilities with service traffic for vendor and versionless services. Click Time Synchronization. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy to the Defense Center and its managed sensors. select Enabled. 3. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321.

The Vulnerability Mapping page appears. The system policy is updated. You have two options: • To prevent vulnerabilities for a service from being mapped to hosts that receive service traffic without vendor or version information. click Create Policy. select the check box for that service. See Applying a System Policy on page 324 for more information.Managing System Policies Configuring the Parts of Your System Policy Chapter 9 To configure vulnerability mapping for services: Access: Admin 1. click Edit next to the system policy. Click Vulnerability Mapping. clear the check box for that service. • TIP! You can select or clear all check boxes at once using the check box next to Enable. You have two options: • • To modify active fingerprint source settings in an existing system policy. Provide a name and description for the system policy as described in Creating a System Policy on page 321. and click Save. To cause vulnerabilities for a service to be mapped to hosts that receive service traffic without vendor or version information. 4. The System Policy page appears. To configure active fingerprint source settings as part of a new system policy.9. the Access List page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 359 . Version 4. Your changes do not take effect until you apply the system policy to the Defense Center and its managed sensors. In either case. Click Save Policy and Exit. 2. Select Operations > System Policy. 3. 5.

Configuring System Settings Chapter 10 Administrator Guide The system settings include a series of linked pages that you can use to view and modify settings on your appliance. with a system policy. which controls aspects of an appliance that are likely to be similar across a deployment.9. which are likely to be specific to a single appliance. See Managing System Policies on page 320 for more information. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 360 . Contrast the system settings.

See Setting the Time Manually on page 389 for more information. Provides options that you can use to: • shut down the appliance • reboot the appliance • restart the Sourcefire 3D System-related processes See Shutting Down and Restarting the System on page 382 for more information. See Viewing and Modifying the Appliance Information on page 362 for more information. If the time synchronization settings in the current system policy for the appliance is set to Manual. Allows you to view and modify the settings for the network interfaces on your appliance.9. License Network Network Interface Process Version 4. You can also change the appliance name. System Settings Options Option Information Description Allows you to view current information about the appliance. and proxy settings of the appliance that were initially set up as part of the installation. See Understanding Licenses on page 364 for more information. then you can use this page to change the time. Enables you to change options such as the IP address. Time Displays the current time. See Configuring the Communication Channel on page 383 for more information. See Editing Network Interface Configurations on page 380 for more information. See Configuring Network Settings on page 377 for more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 361 . enables you to specify values for the internal network and management port that the Defense Center uses to communicate with its managed sensors and high availability peer. enables you to establish communications with a Defense Center from the sensor.Configuring System Settings Chapter 10 The System Settings Options table describes the options you can configure in the system settings. hostname. Remote Management On the 3D Sensor. On the Defense Center. Provides you with options for managing your current licenses and for adding additional feature licenses on the platforms that support them. See Configuring Remote Access to the Defense Center on page 386 for more information.

and the current appliance-level policies. On Series 2 DC1000 and DC3000 Defense Centers. See Specifying NetFlow-Enabled Devices on page 392 for more information. Version 4. Viewing and Modifying the Appliance Information Requires: Any The Information page provides you with information about the Defense Center or 3D Sensor.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 362 . See Managing Remote Storage on page 393 for more information. NetFlow Devices Remote Storage To configure the system settings: Access: Admin Select Operations > System Settings. IMPORTANT! You cannot view sensor information for Intrusion Agents. On the Defense Center. the operating system and version.9. with a list on the left side of the page that you can use to access other system settings. allows you to temporarily disable health monitoring for a 3D Sensor to prevent the Defense Center from generating unnecessary health events.Configuring System Settings Viewing and Modifying the Appliance Information Chapter 10 System Settings Options (Continued) Option Health Blacklist Description On the Defense Center. The information includes view-only information such as the product name and model number. The Series 2 DC1000 or DC3000 Defense Center version of this the page is shown below. allows you to specify the NetFlow-enabled devices you want to use to collect flow data. allows you to configure remote storage for backups and reports. The Information page appears. See Blacklisting Health Modules on page 391 for more information. The page also provides you with an option to change the name of the appliance.

9. The version of the software currently installed. The IP address of the appliance. Appliance Information Field Name Description A name you assign to the appliance. If a policy has been updated since it was last applied. Clear this check box to allow packet data to be stored on the DC with events.Configuring System Settings Viewing and Modifying the Appliance Information Chapter 10 The Appliance Information table describes each field. Enable this check box to prevent the managed sensor from sending packet data with the events. The appliance-level policies currently applied to the appliance. The operating system currently running on the appliance. This number can be important for troubleshooting. Although you can use the hostname as the name of the appliance. but not the managed sensor. The model name for the appliance.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 363 . Clear this check box to store event data on both appliances. Note that this name is only used within the context of the Sourcefire 3D System. the name of the policy appears in italics. Enable this check box to store event data on the Defense Center. entering a different name in this field does not change the hostname. Product Model Software Version Store Events Only on Defense Center Prohibit Packet Transfer to the Defense Center Operating System Operating System Version IP Address Current Policies Model Number Version 4. The version of the operating system currently running on the appliance. The model number for the appliance.

2. For Defense Centers. The Information page appears. the Sourcefire 3D System requires that you enable IPS by applying a product license file to each appliance as part of the installation process. 3. click Save. type a new name in the Name field. Version 4. Understanding Licenses Requires: Any You can license a variety of products and features to create your optimal deployment. Select Operations > System Settings. WARNING! The name must be alphanumeric characters and should not be composed of numeric characters only. the 3D Sensor version of the page is shown below.9. The Defense Center version of the page is shown below. To save your changes. For comparison. To change the appliance name. You can also add feature licenses such as RNA host licenses and Intrusion Agent licenses.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 To modify the appliance information: Access: Admin 1. The page refreshes and your changes are saved.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 364 .

Version 4. To understand why and when to use these licenses.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 365 ... Product License to. For information on how to add a feature license. TIP! You can view your licenses by using the Product Licensing widget in the dashboard. For information on IPS. Sourcefire Licenses You apply a. and so on. Virtual License a Defense Center at any time use virtual machines. see Adding Feature Licenses on page 370. see Sourcefire Virtual Defense Center and 3D Sensor Installation Guide. See Understanding the Product Licensing Widget on page 84 for more information. see Introduction to Sourcefire IPS in Sourcefire 3D System Analyst Guide Feature License a Defense Center at any time use additional features such as RNA.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 See the following for more information: • • • Understanding Feature Licenses on page 366 Verifying Your Product License on page 368 Managing Your Feature Licenses on page 370 You can use a variety of appliances and optional features in your deployment.9. see Sourcefire 3D Sensor Installation Guide.. see the Sourcefire Licenses table on page 365. For information on adding a product license. RUA. see Understanding Feature Licenses on page 366. and Sourcefire Defense Center Installation Guide. For information on how the various features function. For information on how to use virtual appliances. use IPS on that appliance... a 3D Sensor or a Defense Center during installation so that you can.

NetFlow is available not only on Cisco networking devices. The NetFlow cache stores a record of every flow (a sequence of packets that represents a connection between a source and destination host) that passes through the devices. Standardized through the RFC process. the Sourcefire 3D System uses RNA detection engines on 3D Sensors to analyze NetFlow data. Feature Licenses If you want to.. or network vulnerabilities transmit events generated by open source Snort installations to the Defense Center IPS for use with Crossbeam Systems X-Series you need a license for. and OpenBSD devices. and use NetFlow data to monitor those networks. You must use a Defense Center to configure NetFlow data collection and to view the collected data. FreeBSD. attacks.9. capture and export data about the traffic that passes through NetFlow-enabled devices monitor hosts on your network (including hosts discovered by NetFlow-enabled devices) to observe your network traffic to analyze a complete. up-to-the-minute profile of your network correlate threat. and network intelligence with user identity information identify the source of policy breaches.. NetFlow NetFlow is an embedded instrumentation within Cisco IOS Software that characterizes network operation. Intrusion Agents.. RUA Users. NetFlow-enabled devices are widely used to capture and export data about the traffic that passes through those devices. IPS Software Sensors. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 366 . Although you can use NetFlow-enabled devices exclusively to monitor your network. For more information. RUA Users and either RNA Hosts or the product license (or both).Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 Understanding Feature Licenses The Feature Licenses table describes how to determine which features to license for your deployment.. endpoint. and your deployment must include at least one 3D Sensor with RNA that can communicate with your NetFlow-enabled devices. see Introduction to NetFlow in the Sourcefire 3D System Analyst Guide. but can also be embedded in Juniper. RNA Hosts. You can deploy NetFlow-enabled devices on networks that your sensors cannot monitor. NetFlows.

as well as mitigate risk. or network vulnerabilities. the Defense Center assigns impact flags to the events. behavioral profiling. you can install an Intrusion Agent to forward intrusion events to a Defense Center. attacks. All RUA deployments require a Defense Center that has an RUA feature license installed. You can continue to manually tune Snort rules and preprocessors with the Intrusion Agent in place. and events directly to individual users. Intrusion Agent If you have an existing installation of Snort®. For more information. also called RUA. endpoint. Version 4. If the network map on the Defense Center has entries for the target host in a given event. For more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 367 . RUA can help you to identify the source of policy breaches. By default. You can then analyze the events detected by Snort alongside your other data. allows your organization to correlate threat. and built-in alerting and remediation. you must manage 3D Sensors with RNA with a Defense Center. block users or user activity. see Sourcefire 3D System Intrusion Agent Configuration Guide. For more information. and take action to protect others from disruption. LDAP server to augment the Defense Center’s database of user identity information with available metadata. 3D Sensors with RNA passively observe your organization’s network traffic and analyze it to provide you with a complete. These capabilities also significantly improve audit controls and enhance regulatory compliance. that Defense Center must have an RNA host license installed and the 3D Sensor must have a product license installed.9. up-tothe-minute profile of your network. If your organization uses LDAP you can use the user information on your . to enable RNA functionality. traffic. In addition. RNA is installed on most 3D Sensors. (The 3D9800 does not support RNA. and network intelligence with user identity information. see Introduction to Sourcefire RNA in the Sourcefire 3D System Analyst Guide. However. to control how network intelligence is gathered and to view the resulting information. see Using Sourcefire RUA in the Sourcefire 3D System Analyst Guide. RUA Host Sourcefire Real-time User Awareness.) Sourcefire also makes key components of RNA available in installation packages for Red Hat Linux servers and Crossbeam Systems security switches. By linking network behavior. Although you cannot manage policies or rules for an Intrusion Agent from the Defense Center.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 RNA Host Sourcefire RNA allows your organization to confidently monitor and protect your network using a combination of forensic analysis. you can do analysis and reporting on those events.

see Managing Your Feature Licenses on page 370. The License page appears.9. 2. see Sourcefire Crossbeam Installation Guide XOS. For information on adding. The Information page appears. In most cases. Verifying Your Product License Requires: Any During installation. you do not need to re-install the license. viewing. For more information. and deleting feature licenses. the user who sets up the appliance adds the software license as part of the process.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 368 .Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 IPS Software Sensor An IPS Software Sensor allows you to use 3D Sensor Software for X-Series on a Crossbeam® Next Generation Security Platform to gather network intelligence and intrusion information. To verify the product license file: Access: Admin 1. Select Operations > System Settings. Click License. Version 4.

which will be sent to you in an email. 5.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 3. and click Submit License. Version 4. Click Verify License. a message appears under the License field. If the license file is correct.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 369 .com/. For more information about feature licenses. you must switch to a host that can access it. Click Get License. Continue with step 5 to obtain a license and install it. paste it into the License field (as shown in Step 3). The Licensing Center web site appears. If the license file is invalid. 6. IMPORTANT! If you purchased a feature license. 4. click Edit. Under Product Licenses.sourcefire. IMPORTANT! If your web browser cannot access the Internet. Do not proceed to step 5. see Managing Your Feature Licenses on page 370. Copy the license file from the email. • • If the license file is valid. The Manage License page appears. 7. the license is added to the appliance. Follow the on-screen instructions for an appliance license to obtain your license file. and the features for the appliance are available in the web interface. click Add New License and add it using the Add Feature License page. you will receive an error message. Copy the license key at the bottom of the page and browse to https://keyserver.9.

which specify the number of NetFlow-enabled devices you can use to gather flow data RNA host licenses. you must add them to the Defense Center from the web interface.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 Managing Your Feature Licenses Requires: DC The Defense Center uses feature licenses to allow for additional features. Version 4. See the following sections for more information: • • • Adding Feature Licenses on page 370 Viewing Feature Licenses on page 372 Configuring Network Settings on page 377 Adding Feature Licenses Requires: DC If you need to obtain a feature license for a feature you purchased.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 370 . If you do not have the serial number. which allow you to use 3D Sensor Software with IPS on Crossbeam Systems security switches When you purchase license packs for any licensable feature.sourcefire. you can find it by logging into the Sourcefire Support Site (https://support. you should have the 12-digit feature license serial number provided by Sourcefire when you purchased the licensable feature. which allow you to use the RUA feature Intrusion Agent licenses. which allow you use virtual sensors in your deployment IPS licenses for Crossbeam.9. If one Defense Center does not have a NetFlow license. it will not receive data from your NetFlow-enabled devices. IMPORTANT! Both Defense Centers in a high-availability pair must have NetFlow licenses for at least the number of NetFlow-enabled devices you are using.com/). which allow you to use intrusion agents 3D Virtual Sensors. Before beginning. which specify the number of hosts that you can monitor with RNA RUA licenses. The serial number appears in the Sourcefire Software & Licenses section. you can request it from the web interface. Feature licenses include: • • • • • • NetFlow licenses. clicking Account. then clicking Products & Contracts.

Select Operations > System Settings. Click Add New License. Version 4. The License page appears.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 To add a license: Access: Admin 1. The Information page appears. Click License.9. The Add Feature License page appears. 2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 371 . 3.

exporters. TIP! Your Defense Center can have multiple feature licenses (for example. or users allowed by the sum of your feature or host licenses. and provides a link that allows you to view or edit the license. the license is added to the appliance. they appear itemized below the product license. model code. which will be sent to you in an email. Version 4. The first license that appears shows the Defense Center’s product license which shows the license status. TIP! You can also view licenses by using the Product Licensing widget on the dashboard. RUA. IMPORTANT! If your web browser cannot access the Internet.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 372 . Viewing Feature Licenses Requires: DC The licenses page displays the product and feature licenses that you have added to the Defense Center. Follow the on-screen instructions for a feature license to obtain your license file. virtual appliances. one or more licenses for RNA Hosts in addition to one or more licenses for Intrusion Agents. If you have feature or host licenses installed.9.sourcefire. copy the license file from the email. and the licensed feature is available. Copy the license key at the bottom of the page and browse to https://keyserver. and shows the total number of hosts.com/. paste it into the License field. see Verifying Your Product License on page 368. 6. If the license file is correct. you must switch to a host that can access it. and click Submit License. A summary of your licenses appears below the itemized list.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 4. node (MAC address). Click Get License. For more information about viewing and modifying product licenses. connections. Note that there is only one product license. 5. and expiration date. You can repeat this process for each feature license you need to add. The Licensing Center web site appears. After you receive an email with the feature license file. See Understanding the Product Licensing Widget on page 84 for more information. and so on).

invalid. Indicates if the license is valid. invalid. The RNA Host License Columns table describes each column that appears in an RNA host license. Displays the feature serial number. Displays the appliance model number. Lists the number of NetFlow-enabled devices that the license allows you to use. Displays the feature serial number. or if a temporary license has expired. or if a temporary license has expired. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 373 . Displays the appliance’s MAC address.9. Indicates if the license is valid. RNA Host License Columns Column Feature ID Serial Number Status Number of Hosts Model Node Description Displays the ID number that corresponds with the feature being licensed. Lists the number of monitored hosts added by the license. Displays the date and time that the feature license expires. Displays the appliance model number. Displays the appliance’s MAC address. Allows you to delete the feature license by clicking Delete. NetFlow License Columns Column Feature ID Serial Number Status Model Allowed NetFlow Exporters Node Expires Action Description Displays the ID number that corresponds with the feature being licensed.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 The NetFlow License Columns table describes each column that appears in a NetFlow license.

Displays the feature serial number. Displays the date and time that the feature license expires. Displays the appliance model number. invalid. Displays the feature serial number. RUA License Columns Column Feature ID Serial Number Status Model Number of Users Node Expires Action Description Displays the ID number that corresponds with the feature being licensed. Intrusion Agent License Columns Column Feature ID Serial Number Description Displays the ID number that corresponds with the feature being licensed.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 374 . Version 4. Lists the number of monitored users added by the license. The Intrusion Agent License Columns table describes each column that appears in an intrusion agent license. Allows you to delete the host license by clicking Delete. Displays the appliance’s MAC address. or if a temporary license has expired. Allows you to delete the feature license by clicking Delete. Indicates if the license is valid.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 RNA Host License Columns (Continued) Column Expires Action Description Displays the date and time that the feature license expires. The RUA License Columns table describes each column that appears in an RUA host license.

Virtual 3D Sensor License Columns Column Feature ID Serial Number Status Model Allowed Virtual Sensors Node Throughput Limit Description Displays the ID number that corresponds with the feature being licensed. or if a temporary license has expired. Maximum throughput is limited by other factors such as number of Virtual Machines on your VMware server. 45.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 375 . invalid. or if a temporary license has expired. Displays the appliance model number. Lists the maximum number of software agent connections allowed by the license. Version 4. Displays the date and time that the feature license expires. 100. Displays the appliance’s MAC address. and other physical hardware constraints.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 Intrusion Agent License Columns (Continued) Column Status Model Swagent Max Connections Node Expires Action Description Indicates if the license is valid. Lists the maximum number of Virtual 3D Sensors allowed by the license. or 250MB). IMPORTANT! These speeds are not a guaranteed throughput for the Virtual 3D Sensor you license. Indicates if the license is valid. Displays the appliance’s MAC address. its connections. invalid. Displays the feature serial number. The Virtual 3D Sensor License Columns table describes each column that appears in an intrusion agent license. Allows you to delete the feature license by clicking Delete.9. Displays the maximum capacity licensed for processing by the Virtual 3D Sensor (20. Displays the appliance model number.

Indicates if the license is valid. To view or delete your feature licenses: Access: Admin 1. Displays the appliance model number.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 376 . Displays the feature serial number. The IPS Software License Columns table describes each column that appears in an IPS Software license. Displays the date and time that the feature license expires. invalid.Configuring System Settings Understanding Licenses Chapter 10 Virtual 3D Sensor License Columns (Continued) Column Expires Action Description Displays the date and time that the feature license expires. Version 4. The Information page appears. IPS Software License Columns Column Feature ID Serial Number Status Model Node Expires Action Description Displays the ID number that corresponds with the feature being licensed. Allows you to delete the feature license by clicking Delete. Displays the appliance’s MAC address. or if a temporary license has expired. Allows you to delete the feature license by clicking Delete.9. Select Operations > System Settings.

such as command line interfaces. Configuring Network Settings Requires: Any With some exceptions. see the Intrusion Agent Configuration Guide. showing the product license and any feature licenses you have added. For more information on configuring settings for Intrusion Agents. or both IPv4 and IPv6 network settings in System Settings. Click License. you must manually configure all network properties. see the 3D Sensor Installation Guide.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 377 . see the Virtual Defense Center and 3D Sensor Installation Guide. see the Sourcefire 3D Sensor Software for X-Series Installation Guide. For more information on configuring settings for RNA Software for Red Hat Linux.9.Configuring System Settings Configuring Network Settings Chapter 10 2. Disabled (IPv4 or IPv6) Manual (IPv4 and IPv6) DHCP (IPv4 and IPv6) Router assigned (IPv6 only) • • • • You have the following configuration options: • • • • If you specify manual. You must use native applications. IPv6. The License page appears. or the operating system interface. click Delete in the Action column. For the feature that you want to delete. 3. If you specify DHCP the appliance automatically retrieves its network settings from a . The exceptions include software sensors or 3Dx800 sensors. to manage network settings for software sensors or 3Dx800 sensors: • For more information on configuring settings for Crossbeam-based software sensors. third-party user interfaces. For more information on configuring settings for Virtual 3D Sensors. see the Sourcefire RNA Software for Red Hat Linux Configuration Guide. For more information on configuring settings for 3Dx800 appliances. your Sourcefire 3D System provides a dual stack implementation so that you can choose IPv4. Version 4.

the management interface is connected to an internal. Manual Network Configuration Settings Setting Management Interface Address and either IPv4 Netmask or IPv6 Prefix Length Description The IP address for the management interface. protected network. Domain Primary DNS Server Secondary DNS Server Tertiary DNS Server The fully-qualified domain name where the appliance resides The IP address of the DNS server for the network where the appliance resides A secondary DNS server’s IP address A tertiary DNS server’s IP address If the appliance is not directly connected to the Internet. Default Network Gateway Hostname The IP address of the gateway device for your network The DNS-resolvable name for the appliance IMPORTANT! If you change the hostname. To configure network settings: Access: Admin 1.9. By default.0. This is the network through which Defense Centers and sensors communicate. Select Operations > System Settings. you must set the address and netmask in dotted decimal form (for example: a netmask of 255. • For IPv6. you can configure a proxy server to be used when downloading updates and SEUs. the appliance is configured to directly connect to the Internet. Version 4.Configuring System Settings Configuring Network Settings Chapter 10 local DHCP server. you specify Router assigned. in the case of IPv6. If. you must set the address in colon-separated hexadecimal form and the number of bits in the prefix (for example: a prefix length of 112).0). The Information page appears.255. the appliance retrieves its network settings from a local router. the new name is not reflected in the syslog until after you reboot the appliance. • For IPv4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 378 . In most installations.

Select DHCP to allow DHCP server network setting resolution. Specify which IP version (v4.9. Select Router assigned (an IPv6-only configuration) to allow router assigned network setting resolution. Click Network. if your network uses only IPv6. 3. Select Manual to manually specify network settings. If you selected Manual. See the Manual Network Configuration Settings table on page 378 for a full description of each field you can configure. in the IPv4 section select Disabled).1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 379 .Configuring System Settings Configuring Network Settings Chapter 10 2. v6. Version 4. specify the network settings. and domain servers) if you use manual or router assigned configurations. You can change the Shared Settings (hostname. or both) you want to use by selecting the Configuration from the IPv4 and IPv6 settings: • • • • Select Disabled to use only the alternative IP version (for example. The Network page appears. 4. domain.

The System Settings page appears.Configuring System Settings Editing Network Interface Configurations Chapter 10 5. you can identify a proxy server to be used when downloading updates and rules. Version 4. appliances are configured to connect directly to the Internet. select Operations > Sensor. If you change the link mode for a sensing interface. 6. If your appliance is not directly connected to the Internet. Click Save. You must configure 3Dx800 interfaces on the 3Dx800 CLI. To configure network interfaces from a Defense Center. By default. Any changes you make to the Auto Negotiate value are ignored for Gigabit interfaces. then click Edit next to the 3D Sensor.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 380 . You have two choices: • • To configure network interfaces from a 3D Sensor.9. It is possible to select a setting that makes it difficult to access the web interface. select Manual proxy configuration and enter the IP address or fully qualified domain name of your proxy server in the HTTP Proxy field and the port in the Port field. you have two options: • • If you have a direct connection from the appliance to the Internet. select Operations > System Settings. The network settings are changed. To configure a proxy server. If your network uses a proxy. WARNING! Do not modify the settings for the management interface unless you have physical access to the appliance. the sensor drops traffic while the network interface card renegotiates its network connection. select Direct connection. To edit a network interface: Access: Admin 1. Editing Network Interface Configurations Requires: DC or 3D Sensor You can use the Network Interface page to modify the default settings for each network interface on your appliance.

The current settings for the interface appear: These setting include: • • • • • interface name sensor name interface type.9. 3. Click Network Interface. either Sensing or Management interface description whether the interface is configured to auto-negotiate speed and duplex settings Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 381 . Click Edit next to the interface that you want to modify. The Network Interface page appears.Configuring System Settings Editing Network Interface Configurations Chapter 10 2. listing the current settings for each interface on your appliance.

However. and the link mode as needed. To shut off power to the appliance. for an appliance without a power button. database. and http server processes on the appliance (this is typically used during troubleshooting) restart the RNA and Snort processes (Snort runs on the 3D Sensor only if you are licensed to use IPS) IMPORTANT! If you shut down the appliance. keep the following in mind: • In the Auto Negotiate field. unplug it. If you need to specify a link mode. MDIX (medium dependent interface crossover). the process shuts down the operating system on the appliance. N/A indicates that there is no link for the interface • You can modify the interface name and description. you must press the power button on the appliance.9. MDI/MDIX settings. including the bandwidth and duplex setting (Full or Half). or Auto mode (Series 2 3D Sensors only). Click Save. Normally. Any changes you make to the Auto Negotiate value are ignored for Gigabit interfaces. Version 4. Shutting Down and Restarting the System Requires: Any You have several options for controlling the processes on your appliance. or. You can: • • • • shut down the appliance reboot the appliance restart communications. when you set a specific link mode. You cannot change the Auto Negotiate setting for 10Gb interfaces. You must configure 3Dx800 interfaces on the 3Dx800 CLI. making it impossible for the endpoints to attain link unless you manually set the required MDI/MDIX mode. • Series 2 3D Sensors only If you disable auto negotiation and specify a link mode. The Network Interface page appears again. select Off only if you require a specific link mode setting. 4. However. which automatically handles switching between MDI and MDIX to attain link.Configuring System Settings Shutting Down and Restarting the System Chapter 10 • whether the interface is configured for MDI (medium dependent interface). automatic MDI/MDIX handling is disabled. N/A in this column indicates that the interface does not support MDI/MDIX the current link mode. select it in the Link Mode field. MDI/MDIX is set to Auto. but does not physically shut off power. you must also set the MDI/MDIX field to the required MDI or MDIX mode.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 382 .

to its Defense Center peer. To restart the Snort and RNA processes. click Run Command next to Shutdown Defense Center. Click Process.8 and earlier Defense Centers and sensors use a range of internal network IP addresses called the management virtual network to transmit thirdparty communications such as NTP to managed sensors and. in high availability deployments. click Run Command next to Reboot Defense Center.9. To reboot the system. its managed sensors. Specify the command you want to perform: For DC/MDC • • • To shut down the Defense Center.Configuring System Settings Configuring the Communication Channel Chapter 10 To shut down or restart your appliance: Access: Admin 1. The Appliance Process page appears.0. click Run Command next to Restart Appliance Console. Select Operations > System Settings.16. click Run Command next to Restart Defense Center Console. Note that this logs you out of the Defense Center.0/ 16. 3.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 383 . and if high availability is enabled. click Run Command next to Reboot Appliance. click Run Command next to Shutdown Appliance. The communication on port 8305 is bi-directional. To reboot the system. To restart the Defense Center. its high availability peer is 8305/tcp. 2. The Defense Center version of the page is shown below. Enhancements in the current software eliminate the need for the management virtual network provided both the Defense Center and the sensors it manages are Version 4. Note that restarting the Defense Center may cause deleted hosts to reappear in the network map. For 3D Sensor • • • • Configuring the Communication Channel Requires: DC + 3D Sensor Version 4. The Information page appears. To restart the 3D Sensor. The default port for communications between the Defense Center. click Run Command next to Restart Detection Engines. The default address range is 172. Note that this logs you out of the 3D Sensor. To shut down the 3D Sensor.

The field is filled with 0. but make sure you do not to enter a range that overlaps other local networks. or the operating system interface. but you can change it later. However. you can specify different values.0. IMPORTANT! The management virtual network is required only when the Defense Center must communicate with sensors running an older version. For more information on configuring settings for 3Dx800 sensors. and Intrusion Agents. see the Sourcefire 3D Sensor Software for X-Series Installation Guide. You must use native applications. If both the Defense Center and all sensors have been upgraded to the current version. third-party user interfaces. For more information on configuring settings for Crossbeam-based software sensor. see the Sourcefire RNA Software for Red Hat Linux Configuration Guide. including your management network. you will need to use a management virtual network and ensure that it does not conflict with other communications on your network. You can not edit the Management Virtual Network field of a Master Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 384 . see the Sourcefire 3D Sensor Installation Guide. 3Dx800 sensors. the management virtual network is unnecessary. For more information on configuring settings for RNA Software for Red Hat Linux.0. to manage the communication channel sensor settings for Crossbeam-based software sensors. The user interface prevents you from entering the address range for the management network. such as command line interfaces. Doing so may break communications between hosts on the local network. This is usually configured as part of the installation process. Version 4.0/24 to indicate that the Management Virtual Network is disabled on a Master Defense Center. see the Intrusion Agent Configuration Guide. WARNING! The IP address range you specify for the Management Virtual Network must not conflict with any other local network. For more information.Configuring System Settings Configuring the Communication Channel Chapter 10 both using the current software. IMPORTANT! Master Defense Centers do not currently use a Management Virtual Network. if your Defense Center is running the current version of the software and the sensors it manages are running an older version of the software. refer to: • • Setting Up the Management Virtual Network on page 384 Editing the Management Virtual Network on page 385 Setting Up the Management Virtual Network Requires: DC + 3D Sensor If the IP address range or the port conflicts with other communications on your network. For more information on configuring settings for Intrusion Agents.9.

enter the IP address range that you want to use. Typically.0. The field is filled with 0. this function is used only under the direction of Sourcefire Support. The new values are saved. 3. Click Remote Management. The Information page appears.0/24 to indicate that the Management Virtual Network is disabled on a Master Defense Center. it should not be edited. 5.9. which provided enough addresses for 127 appliances. Master Defense Centers do not currently use a Management Virtual Network. TIP! The subnet mask is fixed at /16 (sixteen bits). 2. WARNING! Changing the management port on the Defense Center requires that you also manually change the management port on every managed sensor. WARNING! If the Management Virtual Network is functioning properly. In the Management Port field. Click Save to save your changes for both the IP address range and the port number.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 385 .0. Editing the Management Virtual Network Requires: DC + 3D Sensor You can change the host IP or host name of the connected appliance. Past versions of Sourcefire 3D Systems used a default /24 (twenty-four bit) CIDR address space. enter the port number that you want to use. 4. In the Management Virtual Network field. a feature that is especially useful after network reconfigurations or appliance updates. You can not edit the Management Virtual Network field of a Master Defense Center. The Remote Management page appears. Select Operations > System Settings. The current Version 4.Configuring System Settings Configuring the Communication Channel Chapter 10 To configure the communications channel: Access: Admin 1. You can also regenerate the Virtual IP address.

5. See Working in NAT Environments on page 112 for more information.registration key Unique NAT ID . Click Edit next to the host whose Management Virtual Network you want to change. The Edit Remote Management page appears. which provides for a much greater number of appliances. Optionally. The Remote Management page appears. click Save. 3. After appropriate management virtual network edits are made. To edit the remote management virtual network: Access: Admin 1.Configuring System Settings Configuring Remote Access to the Defense Center Chapter 10 version uses a default /16 (sixteen bit) CIDR address space. 4. The Information page appears.9.a unique alphanumeric ID for use when registering sensors in NAT environments. Edit the name or host ID in the Name or Host fields as required. Configuring Remote Access to the Defense Center Requires: DC + 3D Sensor You must begin the procedure for setting up the management relationship between a Defense Center and a sensor on the sensor.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 386 .the hostname of IP address. click Regenerate VIP to regenerate the IP address used by the virtual network. Version 4. Three fields are provided for setting up communications between appliances: • • • Management Host . Select Operations > System Settings. Registration Key . Click Remote Management. 6. TIP! The regenerate VIP option is useful after you reconfigure your network or change the Sourcefire 3D System to take advantage of a larger address space. 2.

3. see Setting Up the Management Virtual Network on page 384. Management Host.9. 2.Configuring System Settings Configuring Remote Access to the Defense Center Chapter 10 Valid combinations include: • • • Management Host and Registration Key used on both appliances Registration Key and Unique NAT ID used on the 3D Sensor with Host. 4. Click Add Manager. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. type the IP address or the hostname of the Defense Center that you want to use to manage the sensor. If you must change the Management Port.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 387 . the Remote Management page displays the Unique NAT ID in the Host field. select Operations > System Settings. To set up sensor management from the sensor: Access: Admin 1. but without a hostname or IP address. The Information page appears. Click Remote Management. and Unique NAT ID used on the 3D Sensor with Registration Key and Unique NAT ID used on the Defense Center. Registration Key. Registration Key. and Unique NAT ID used on the Defense Center. Sourcefire strongly recommends that you read Using the Defense Center on page 99 before you add sensors to the Defense Center. WARNING! Leave the Management Port field at the top of the Remote Management page in the default setting in nearly all cases. The Remote Management page appears. Version 4. On the sensor’s web interface. The Add Remote Management page appears. The Management Host or Host field (hostname or IP address) must be used on at least one of the appliances. In the Management Host field. TIP! If you register a sensor to a Defense Center using a Registration Key and Unique NAT ID.

11. The Sensors page appears. Click New Sensor. 8. type a unique alphanumeric NAT ID that you want to use to identify the sensor. type the same value in the Unique NAT ID field. type the same one-time use registration key that you used in step 5. 9. 5. In the Registration Key field. in the Unique NAT ID field.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 388 . Type the IP address or the hostname of the sensor you want to add in the Host field. The Add New Sensor page appears.Configuring System Settings Configuring Remote Access to the Defense Center Chapter 10 Note that you can leave the Management Host field empty if the management host does not have a routable address. 7. 6. the Pending Registration status appears. In that case. 10. Click Save. 12. use both the Registration Key and the Unique NAT ID fields. After the sensor confirms communication with the Defense Center. Optionally. Access the Defense Center web interface and select Operations > Sensors. Version 4. WARNING! Make sure you use hostnames rather than IP addresses if your network uses DHCP to assign IP addresses. type the one-time use registration key that you want to use to set up a communications channel between the sensor and the Defense Center. In the Registration Key field. If you used a unique ID in step 6.9.

Configuring System Settings Setting the Time Manually Chapter 10 13. You can store IPS data on both the Defense Center and the sensor by clearing the Store Events and Packets Only on the Defense Center check box. 14. For more information about groups. IMPORTANT! If you elect to prohibit sending packets and you do not store events on the 3D Sensor. 16. 15. To add the sensor to a group. By default.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 389 . Note that RNA data is never stored on the sensor. IMPORTANT! In some high availability deployments where network address translation is used. Packet data is often important for forensic analysis. IPS data is stored only on the Defense Center and not on the sensor. Contact Sourcefire Support for more information. You can prevent packet data from leaving a sensor by checking the Prohibit Packet Transfer to the Defense Center check box. Click Add. select the group from the Add to Group list. The sensor is added to the Defense Center. Setting the Time Manually Requires: Any If the Time Synchronization setting in the currently applied system policy is set to Manual. you may need to use the Add Manager feature to add the secondary Defense Center. Version 4. IMPORTANT! 3Dx800 sensors and Crossbeam-based software sensors cannot store IPS data locally. then you can manually set the time for the appliance using the Time page in the system settings. see Managing Sensor Groups on page 131. You must store events on the Defense Center. It can take up to two minutes for the Defense Center to verify the sensor’s heartbeat and establish communication. packet data is not retained.9.

and positive values indicate that it is ahead. Select Operations > System Settings. • Unknown indicates that the status of the NTP server is unknown. To manually configure the time: Access: Admin 1. • Available indicates that the NTP server is available for use but time is not yet synchronized. Negative values indicate that the appliance is behind the NTP server. The number of seconds that have elapsed since the time was last synchronized with the NTP server. time manually. Instead. For example. The status of the NTP server time synchronization.9. • Not Available indicates that the NTP server is in your configuration but the NTP daemon is unable to use it. The NTP daemon automatically adjusts the synchronization times based on a number of conditions.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 390 . if you see larger update times such as 300 seconds. Last Update See Synchronizing Time on page 354 for more information about the time settings in the system policy. • Pending indicates that the NTP server is new or the NTP daemon was recently restarted.Configuring System Settings Setting the Time Manually Chapter 10 If the appliance is synchronizing its time based on NTP you cannot change the . its value should change to Being Used. Over time. or Not Available. Offset The number of milliseconds of difference between the time on the appliance and the configured NTP server. Available. the NTP Status section on the Time page provides the following information: NTP Status Column NTP Server Status Description The IP address and name of the configured NTP server. The following states may appear: • Being Used indicates that the appliance is synchronized with the NTP server. Version 4. that indicates that the time is relatively stable and the NTP daemon has determined that it does not need to use a lower update increment. The Information page appears.

For example. if an appliance is temporarily disconnected from the management network. If you need to disable the results of a group of appliances’ health monitoring. 5. Click Apply. You may want to do this to prevent events from the module from changing the status for the appliance to warning or critical. you can blacklist the policy. click Close to close the pop-up window. 3. Once the blacklist settings take effect. From list boxes that appear. the appliances report a disabled status in the Health Monitor Summary.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 391 . see Blacklisting a Health Policy Module on page 537 Version 4. The Time page appears. Blacklisting Health Modules Requires: DC/MDC If you want to disable health events for all appliances with a particular health policy. For information on blacklisting individual or groups of appliances see Blacklisting Health Policies or Appliances on page 535.Configuring System Settings Blacklisting Health Modules Chapter 10 2. If you want to change the time zone. For information on blacklisting an individual policy modules. after the time zone setting is saved. A pop-up window appears. see Setting Your Default Time Zone on page 34. Click Time. Select your time zone and click Save and. 6. select the following: • • • • • year month day hour minute 4. you can blacklist the Appliance Heartbeat module during that maintenance window. you can blacklist the group of appliances. click the time zone link located next to the date and time.9. The time is updated. You can also blacklist individual health policy modules on appliances. For more information about using the time zone page.

TIP! To remove a NetFlow-enabled device. One of the prerequisites for using NetFlow data is to use the system settings to specify the NetFlow-enabled devices you are going to use to collect the data. To add additional NetFlow-enabled devices. 5. Click Add Device to add a NetFlow-enabled device. In the IP Address field. Keep in mind that if you remove a NetFlow-enabled device from the system policy.Configuring System Settings Specifying NetFlow-Enabled Devices Chapter 10 Specifying NetFlow-Enabled Devices Requires: DC + RNA If you have enabled the NetFlow feature on your NetFlow-enabled devices). Select Operations > System Settings. The NetFlow Devices page appears. To add NetFlow-enabled devices for flow data collection: Access: Admin 1. Version 4. you should also remove it from your RNA detection policy. 2. 6. see Editing an RNA Detection Policy in the Analyst Guide. For more information. The list of NetFlow-enabled devices is saved. Click Save. 4.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 392 . repeat steps 3 and 4. For more information on using NetFlow data with the Sourcefire 3D System. You must configure these NetFlow-enabled devices to export NetFlow version 5 data. see Introduction to NetFlow in the Analyst Guide. you can use the flow data that these devices collect to supplement the flow data collected by 3D Sensors with RNA by specifying the devices and the networks they monitor in your RNA detection policy. click Delete next to the device you want to remove. Click NetFlow Devices. The Information page appears. enter the IP address of the NetFlow-enabled device you want to use to collect flow data. 3. including information on additional prerequisites.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 393 . To use NFS for backup and report storage. or Server Message Block (SMB)/Common Internet File System (CIFS) for backup and report remote storage.Configuring System Settings Managing Remote Storage Chapter 10 Managing Remote Storage Requires: Series 2 DC On Series 2 Defense Centers you can use local or remote storage for backups and reports. To store backups and reports locally: Access: Admin 1. You can use Network File System (NFS). 3Dx800 sensors. TIP! After configuring and selecting remote storage. see Using Backup and Restore on page 413. Secure Shell (SSH). Select one of the backup and report storage options: • • • • To disable external remote storage and use the local Defense Center for backup and report storage. Keep in mind that only Series 2 Defense Centers and not Master Defense Centers provide backup and report remote storage. but you can choose to send either to a remote system and store the other on the local Defense Center. or Intrusion Agents. The Information page appears. Select Operations > System Settings. You must ensure that your external remote storage system is functional and accessible from the Defense Center. see Using SMB for Remote Storage on page 396. RNA Software for Red Hat Linux. IMPORTANT! You cannot use remote backup and restore to manage data on Crossbeam-based software sensors. Using Local Storage Requires: Series 2 DC You can store backups and reports on the local Defense Center. To use SSH for backup and report storage. see Using Local Storage on page 393. You cannot send backups to one remote system and reports to a another. see Using SSH for Remote Storage on page 395. To use SMB for backup and report storage. see Using NFS for Remote Storage on page 394. you can switch back to local storage only if you have not increased the RNA flow database limit. Version 4. For information on backup and restore.9.

Version 4. The Remote Storage Device page appears. Using NFS for Remote Storage Requires: Series 2 DC You can select Network File System (NFS) protocol to store your reports and backups. The page refreshes to display the NFS storage configuration options. The Information page appears. select NFS. At Storage Type. 4. Select Operations > System Settings.9. 3. The Remote Storage Device page appears. Click Save. At Storage Type. Enter the path to your storage area in the Directory field. Your storage location choice is saved. 3.Configuring System Settings Managing Remote Storage Chapter 10 2. Click Remote Storage Device. To store backups and reports using NFS: Access: Admin 1. Click Remote Storage Device. 2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 394 . 4. Add the connection information: • • Enter the IP or hostname of the storage system in the Host field. select Local (No Remote Storage). TIP! You do not use the Test button with local storage.

Click Remote Storage Device. At Storage Type. Click Save. Select Enable Remote Storage for Reports to store reports on the designated host. Optionally.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 395 . To store backups and reports using SSH: Access: Admin 1. Select Enable Remote Storage for Backups to store backups on the designated host. 3. The page refreshes to display the SSH storage configuration options. select Use Advanced Options. 8.Configuring System Settings Managing Remote Storage Chapter 10 5. 6. Using SSH for Remote Storage Requires: Series 2 DC You can select Secure Shell (SSH) protocol to store your reports and backups. Under System Usage. The Information page appears. The test ensures that the Defense Center can access the designated host and directory. Your remote storage configuration is saved. Select Operations > System Settings. If there are any required command line options. select SSH. click Test. Version 4.9. The Remote Storage Device page appears. 2. A Command Line Options field appears where you can enter the commands. select either or both of the following: • • 7.

copy the content of the SSH Public Key field and place it in your authorized_keys file. Version 4. select Use Advanced Options.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 396 . 5. 6. 8. Under System Usage. Select Enable Remote Storage for Backups to store backups on the designated host.9. Select Operations > System Settings. Select Enable Remote Storage for Reports to store reports on the designated host. Click Remote Storage Device. Enter the storage system’s user name in the Username field and the password for that user in the Password field. If there are any required command line options. A Command Line Options field appears where you can enter the commands. Your remote storage configuration is saved. click Test. To use SSH keys. Click Save. The Remote Storage Device page appears. Optionally. Enter the path to your storage area in the Directory field. Using SMB for Remote Storage Requires: Series 2 DC You can select Server Message Block (SMB) protocol to store your reports and backups. The Information page appears. select either or both of the following: • • 7.Configuring System Settings Managing Remote Storage Chapter 10 4. The test ensures that the Defense Center can access the designated host and directory. To store backups and reports using SMB: Access: Admin 1. 2. Add the connection information: • • • • Enter the IP or hostname of the storage system in the Host field.

The page refreshes to display the SMB storage configuration options. If there are any required command line options. Under System Usage. Add the connection information: • • • • Enter the IP or hostname of the storage system in the Host field. The test ensures that the Defense Center can access the designated host and directory. Version 4. click Test. Click Save. Your remote storage configuration is saved. 4. Enter the share of your storage area in the Share field. select Use Advanced Options. 5. Optionally. Select Enable Remote Storage for Backups to store backups on the designated host. 6. enter the domain name for the remote storage system in the Domain field.Configuring System Settings Managing Remote Storage Chapter 10 3.9. Optionally. select either or both of the following: • • 7. Select Enable Remote Storage for Reports to store reports on the designated host.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 397 . At Storage Type. Enter the user name for the storage system in the Username field and the password for that user in the Password field. select SMB. 8. A Command Line Options field appears where you can enter the commands.

for example. for example. Version 4.9. client applications. and services that RNA detects.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 398 . see the Intrusion Agent Configuration Guide. 4. Feature updates are more comprehensive than patches and generally include new features (and usually change the third digit in the version number. 4. Sourcefire electronically distributes several different types of updates: • • Patches include a limited range of fixes (and usually change the fourth digit in the version number.0.Updating System Software Chapter 11 Administrator Guide Use the Update feature to update the Sourcefire 3D System. Vulnerability database (VDB) updates affect the vulnerabilities reported by RNA as well as the operating systems. Major and minor version releases include new features and functionality and may entail large-scale changes to the product (and usually change the first or second digit in version number.0).9.1). see Importing SEUs and Rule Files in the Analyst Guide. for example.1). • • IMPORTANT! You cannot use the Update feature to update the SEU or Intrusion Agents. For information on updating your SEU.9 or 5. 4. For information on Intrusion Agents.

If your deployment includes a Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 399 . new features and functionality. known and resolved issues. See the following sections for more information: • • • Installing Software Updates on page 400 Uninstalling Software Updates on page 409 Updating the Vulnerability Database on page 410 Version 4. and specific installation and uninstallation instructions. you must read the release notes that accompany the update. TIP! For patches. Before you update Sourcefire software. Uploaded VDB updates also appear on the page. you may need to uninstall the previous version and install the new version. you can take advantage of the automated update feature. nor is it supported for appliances that do not have local web interfaces. When you upload updates to your appliance. warnings. WARNING! This chapter contains general information on updating the Sourcefire 3D System. including software sensors. they appear on the page.The following graphic shows the Defense Center version of the page. and the date and time it was generated. It also indicates whether a reboot is required as part of the update. for major updates to software sensors.9. and product compatibility. you can use it to install updates on its managed 3D Sensors. the version number. as do uninstaller updates. They also contain information on any prerequisites. see Scheduling Tasks on page 425. Uninstalling from the web interface is not supported for major version upgrades. feature updates. The list of updates shows the type of each update.Updating System Software Chapter 11 You can obtain updates from the Sourcefire Support and then manually install them using the Patch Update Management page. which are created when you install a patch to a Sourcefire appliance. You can uninstall patches to the Sourcefire software using an appliance’s local web interface. and VDB updates. The release notes describe supported platforms. However.

To update your Sourcefire 3D System appliances: Access: Admin 1. and product compatibility. You must install the latest SEU (see Importing SEUs and Rule Files in the Analyst Guide) on your appliances before you begin the update. the release notes describe supported platforms. 4. Install the latest SEU on your appliances. the policies and network settings on the appliance remain intact. The release notes for the update indicate the required version. you may need to uninstall the previous version and install the new version. 2. Note that for major updates to software sensors (Crossbeam-based software sensors and RNA for Red Hat Linux). see Automating Software Updates on page 430. Make sure the computers or appliances where you installed software sensors are running the correct versions of their operating systems. For patches and feature updates. Version 4. they also contain information on any prerequisites. as described in the release notes. Make sure that any Crossbeam Systems or Red Hat Linux platforms you are using to host Sourcefire software sensors are running the correct version of the operating system. see the release notes for more information. you can take advantage of the automated update feature. You can obtain the SEU from the Sourcefire Support Site. TIP! This section explains how to plan for and perform manual software updates on your Sourcefire appliances. new features and functionality. known and resolved issues. Available on the Sourcefire Support Site. If you are running an earlier version. Updating an appliance does not modify its configuration. warnings. 3. you can obtain updates from the Sourcefire Support Site. and specific installation and uninstallation instructions. Make sure your appliances (including software sensors) are running the correct version of the Sourcefire 3D System. Read the release notes for the update.9.Updating System Software Installing Software Updates Chapter 11 Installing Software Updates Requires: Any Sourcefire periodically issues updates to the Sourcefire 3D System software.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 400 .

see Updating a Defense Center or Master Defense Center on page 402. First.Updating System Software Installing Software Updates Chapter 11 5. do not update paired Defense Center at the same time. the other Defense Center in the pair becomes the primary. then update the second Defense Center. 8. After you update any Master Defense Centers in your deployment. including Crossbeam-based software sensors. see the release notes for more information. paired Defense Centers do not receive software updates as part of the regular synchronization process. Update your managed 3D Sensors. Update your unmanaged 3D Sensors. For more information on the backup and restore feature. see Updating a Defense Center or Master Defense Center on page 402. complete the update procedure for one of the Defense Centers. See Updating Unmanaged 3D Sensors on page 406. In addition. Delete any backups that reside on the appliance. 10.9. then back up current event and configuration data to an external location. and 3Dx800 sensors. Update your Master Defense Centers. Version 4. including the types of backups that are supported for your appliance. for major updates to software sensors. Event data is not backed up as part of the update process. 9. Note that when you begin to update one Defense Center in a high availability pair. RNA for Red Hat Linux. Always update Master Defense Centers first. After you update the Master Defense Centers and Defense Centers in your deployment. you can update your managed sensors (including software sensors). Make sure you have enough free disk space and allow enough time for the update. the update requires additional disk space on the Defense Center. the paired Defense Centers stop sharing configuration information. When you update a managed sensor. 7. then back up current event and configuration data to an external location. Sourcefire strongly recommends that you delete or move any backup files that reside on your appliance. 6. However. Update your Defense Centers. you may need to uninstall the previous version and install the new version. if it is not already. Note that you must use the Defense Center to update sensors that do not have a web interface. see Using Backup and Restore on page 413. The release notes for the update indicate space and time requirements. see Updating Managed Sensors on page 404.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 401 . To ensure continuity of operations. you can update the Defense Centers they manage. Sourcefire strongly recommends that you use your Defense Centers to update the sensors they manage.

if it is not already. the other Defense Center in the pair becomes the primary. In addition. paired Defense Centers do not receive software updates as part of the regular synchronization process.9. Read the release notes for the update and complete any required pre-update tasks. To ensure continuity of operations. First. making sure you have enough free disk space to perform the update. backing up event and configuration data. You update the Defense Center in one of two ways. and so on. from the appliance.Updating System Software Installing Software Updates Chapter 11 Updating a Defense Center or Master Defense Center Requires: DC/MDC Use the procedure in this section to update your Defense Centers and Master Defense Centers. do not update paired Defense Center at the same time. the paired Defense Centers stop sharing configuration information. Choose this option if your Defense Center does not have access to the internet or if you are performing a major update. complete the update procedure for one of the Defense Centers. To update the Defense Center or Master Defense Center: Access: Admin 1. then update the second Defense Center. updating the Defense Center removes any existing updates and patches. you must update them before you update the Defense Centers that they manage. If your deployment includes Master Defense Centers. IMPORTANT! For major updates. You can manually download the update from the Sourcefire Support Site and then upload it to the Defense Center. Version 4. • Note that when you begin to update one Defense Center in a high availability pair.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 402 . as well as their uninstall scripts. Pre-update tasks can include making sure that the Defense Center is running the correct version of the Sourcefire software. making sure you have set aside adequate time to perform the update. depending on the type of update and whether your Defense Center has access to the internet: • You can use the Defense Center to obtain the update directly from the Support Site. Choose this option if your Defense Center has access to the internet and you are not performing a major update. This option is not supported for major updates.

depending on the type of update and whether your Defense Center has access to the internet. 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 403 . you must manually delete them from the task queue after the update completes. Make sure that the appliances in your deployment are successfully communicating and that there are no issues being reported by the health monitor. The task queue automatically refreshes every 10 seconds. Select Operations > Update to display the Patch Update Management page. For major releases. or if your Defense Center does not have access to the Internet. You have two options. If you transfer an update file by email. it may become corrupted. The Patch Update Management page appears. Select Operations > Monitoring > Task Status to view the task queue and make sure that there are no jobs in process. its version number. The update is uploaded to the Defense Center. The Install Update page appears. The Patch Update Management page shows the type of update you just uploaded. then click Download Updates to check for the latest updates on the Support Site. The page also indicates whether a reboot is required as part of the update. • IMPORTANT! Download the update directly from the Support Site. select Operations > Update to display the Patch Update Management page. either manually or by clicking Update on the Patch Update Management page. 3.Updating System Software Installing Software Updates Chapter 11 2. • For all except major releases. Upload the update to the Defense Center. first manually download the update from the Sourcefire Support Site. 6. and if your Defense Center has access to the Internet. Version 4. Browse to the update and click Upload. Select Operations > Update. Tasks that are running when the update begins are stopped and cannot be resumed. then click Upload Update. and the date and time it was generated. Click Install next to the update you uploaded. You must wait until any long-running tasks are complete before you begin the update.9. 5.

Verify that all managed sensors are successfully communicating with the Defense Center. log in again to view the task queue.9. If prompted. 10. 9. Clear your browser cache and force a reload of the browser. 12. Updating Managed Sensors Requires: DC + 3D Sensor After you update your Defense Centers. Instead. If this occurs. continue to refrain from using the web interface until the update has completed. 11. Re-apply intrusion policies to the IPS detection engines on your managed 3D Sensors. applying an intrusion policy causes IPS detection engines to restart. Note that you can update Version 4. If the update is still running. This is expected behavior. Updating Managed Sensors. install the software. if the task queue indicates that the update has failed or if a manual refresh of the task queue shows no progress). download the update from the Support Site and upload it to the managing Defense Center. Before the update completes. Select Operations > Help > About and confirm that the software version is listed correctly. Continue with the next section.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 404 . confirm that you want to install the update and reboot the Defense Center. This can cause a short pause in processing and. First. You can monitor the update's progress in the task queue (Operations > Monitoring > Task Status). see Updating the Vulnerability Database on page 410. 13. see Creating a Detection Engine on page 193). Update the VDB on your Defense Centers and the 3D Sensors with RNA that they manage. the user interface may exhibit unexpected behavior. If you encounter issues with the update (for example. do not restart the update. Unless you enabled the Inspect Traffic During Policy Apply option when you created your IPS detection engines (this option is supported on many sensor models. to update the Sourcefire software on the sensors that the Defense Center manages.Updating System Software Installing Software Updates Chapter 11 7. the web interface may become unavailable. 14. log into the Defense Center. The update process begins. may cause a few packets to pass through the sensor uninspected. 8. After the update finishes. if necessary. push the update to the sensors from the Defense Center. Otherwise. Updating managed sensors is a multi-step process. WARNING! Do not use the web interface to perform any other tasks until the update has completed and (if necessary) the Defense Center reboots. contact Support. or the Defense Center may log you out. select the Defense Center and click Install. Under Selected Update. Finally. for most detection engines with inline interface sets. Sourcefire strongly recommends that you use them to update the sensors they manage. Next.

Read the release notes for the update and complete any required pre-update tasks. including Crossbeam-based software sensors. The page also indicates whether a reboot is required as part of the update. If you transfer an update file by email. but only if they use the same update. The update is uploaded to the Defense Center. 6. select Operations > Update. However.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 405 . 5. Download the update from the Sourcefire Support Site. 3. RNA for Red Hat Linux. 7. you may need to uninstall the previous version and install the new version. On the managing Defense Center. see Updating a Defense Center or Master Defense Center on page 402. it may become corrupted. and so on.Updating System Software Installing Software Updates Chapter 11 multiple 3D Sensors at once. and date and time it was generated. For information on updating the 3D Sensors in your deployment. Version 4. see the release notes. making sure software sensors are running the correct version of their operating systems. 2. see the release notes for more information. and 3Dx800 sensors. Different 3D Sensor models use different updates. IMPORTANT! Download the update directly from the Support Site. Click Push next to the update. its version number. To update managed 3D Sensors: Access: Admin 1. For information on the updates you can download. The Patch Update Management page shows the type of update you just uploaded. backing up event and configuration data. for major updates to software sensors. you have set aside adequate time to perform the update. Pre-update tasks can include updating your managing Defense Center. Update the Sourcefire software on the sensors’ managing Defense Center. making sure you have enough free disk space to perform the update. Make sure that the appliances in your deployment are successfully communicating and that there are no issues being reported by the health monitor. IMPORTANT! You must use the Defense Center to update sensors that do not have a web interface. then click Upload. see the release notes. The Push Update page appears. making sure that the 3D Sensors are running the correct version of the Sourcefire software. The Patch Update Management page appears. Click Upload Update to browse to the update you downloaded. 4.9.

You can monitor the progress of the push in the task queue (Operations > Monitoring > Task Status). Updating Unmanaged 3D Sensors Requires: 3D Sensor Use the procedure in this section to update unmanaged 3D Sensors only. You can monitor the update's progress in the Defense Center’s task queue (Operations > Monitoring > Task Status). WARNING! If you encounter issues with the update (for example. and the sensors do not have fail-open network cards. if the task queue indicates that the update has failed or if a manual refresh of the task queue shows no progress). do not restart the update. select the sensors you want to update. If your sensors have fail-open network cards. Click Install next to the update you are installing. contact Support. Select the sensors where you pushed the update and click Install. see Updating Managed Sensors on page 404. When the push is complete. see Creating a Detection Engine on page 193). Select Operations > Sensors and confirm that the sensors you updated have the correct version listed. The Install Update page appears. Verify that the sensors you updated are successfully communicating with the Defense Center. some traffic may pass through the sensors uninspected while they reboot. Depending on the size of the file. your 3D Sensors use IPS detection engines with inline interface sets.Updating System Software Installing Software Updates Chapter 11 8. Unless you enabled the Inspect Traffic During Policy Apply option when you created your IPS detection engines (this option is supported on many sensor models. Version 4. Under Selected Update. traffic is interrupted while the sensors reboot. for most detection engines with inline interface sets. 11. 10. If the update requires a reboot. confirm that you want to install the update and reboot the 3D Sensors. For more information. If prompted. may cause a few packets to pass through the sensor uninspected. 13. 9. continue with the next step.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 406 . This can cause a short pause in processing and. 12. Sourcefire strongly recommends that you update managed 3D Sensors using their managing Defense Centers.9. The update process begins. applying an intrusion policy causes IPS detection engines to restart. Instead. then click Push. it may take some time to push the update to all sensors. Re-apply intrusion policies to the IPS detection engines on your managed 3D Sensors.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 407 .Updating System Software Installing Software Updates Chapter 11 You update the 3D Sensor in one of two ways. backing up event and configuration data. The page also indicates whether a reboot is required as part of the update. Choose this option if your 3D Sensor has access to the internet and you are not performing a major update. and the date and time it was generated. either manually or by clicking Update on the Patch Update Management page. • For all except major releases. • IMPORTANT! Download the update directly from the Support Site. This option is not supported for major updates. If you transfer an update file by email. 2. The update is uploaded to the 3D Sensor. from the sensor. • IMPORTANT! For major updates. making sure you have enough free disk space to perform the update. first manually download the update from the Sourcefire Support Site. then click Upload Update. and if your 3D Sensor has access to the Internet. depending on the type of update and whether your 3D Sensor has access to the internet: • You can use the 3D Sensor to obtain the update directly from the Support Site. You can manually download the update from the Sourcefire Support Site and then upload it to the 3D Sensor. making sure you have set aside adequate time to perform the update.9. Read the release notes for the update and complete any required pre-update tasks. Browse to the update and click Upload. its version number. updating the 3D Sensor removes any existing updates and patches. then click Download Updates to check for the latest updates on the Support Site. Choose this option if your 3D Sensor does not have access to the internet or if you are performing a major update. Pre-update tasks can include making sure that the 3D Sensor is running the correct version of the Sourcefire software. it may become corrupted. select Operations > Update to display the Patch Update Management page. depending on the type of update and whether your 3D Sensor has access to the internet. Version 4. For major releases. and so on. You have two options. Select Operations > Update to display the Patch Update Management page. or if your 3D Sensor does not have access to the Internet. To update an unmanaged 3D Sensor: Access: Admin 1. Upload the update to the 3D Sensor. The Patch Update Management page shows the type of update you just uploaded. as well as their uninstall scripts.

and the sensor does not have a fail-open network card. Select Operations > Monitoring > Task Status to view the task queue and make sure that there are no jobs in process. The Patch Update Management page appears. This can cause a short pause in processing and. If the sensor has a fail-open network card. may cause a few packets to pass through the sensor uninspected. The update process begins. contact Support. After the update finishes. WARNING! Do not use the web interface to perform any other tasks until the update has completed and (if necessary) the 3D Sensor reboots. Unless you enabled the Inspect Traffic During Policy Apply option when you created your IPS detection engines (this option is supported on many sensor models. log in again to view the task queue. Select Operations > Help > About and confirm that the software version is listed correctly. Otherwise. some traffic may pass through the sensor uninspected while it reboots. 4. 5. or the 3D Sensor may log you out. If this occurs. Clear your browser cache and force a reload of the browser. Version 4. Before the update completes. you must manually delete them from the task queue after the update completes. your 3D Sensor uses IPS detection engines with inline interface sets. do not restart the update. You must wait until any long-running tasks are complete before you begin the update. This is expected behavior. If the update requires a reboot. 9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 408 . If you encounter issues with the update (for example. 7.Updating System Software Installing Software Updates Chapter 11 3. applying an intrusion policy causes IPS detection engines to restart. the user interface may exhibit unexpected behavior. for most detection engines with inline interface sets. The task queue automatically refreshes every 10 seconds. if the task queue indicates that the update has failed or if a manual refresh of the task queue shows no progress). Tasks that are running when the update begins are stopped and cannot be resumed. traffic is interrupted while the sensor reboots. Instead. Select Operations > Update. If the update is still running. confirm that you want to install the update and reboot the 3D Sensor. 6. If prompted. continue to refrain from using the web interface until the update has completed. Re-apply intrusion policies to your IPS detection engines. see Creating a Detection Engine on page 193). You can monitor the update's progress in the task queue (Operations > Monitoring > Task Status). log into the 3D Sensor. 8. if necessary. the web interface may become unavailable. Click Install next to the update you just uploaded.9.

see the release notes.2 patch might result in an appliance running Version 4. When you uninstall a patch. Uninstalling the Version 4. For information on the resulting Sourcefire software version when you uninstall an update.1 update.0. even though you never installed the Version 4.0. The Patch Update Management page appears. For example.9. For information on uninstalling patches from appliances that do not have local web interfaces (Crossbeam-based software sensors. you cannot use the Defense Center to uninstall patches from managed sensors. the resulting Sourcefire software version depends on the update path for your appliance. Version 4. IMPORTANT! Uninstalling from the web interface is not supported for major version upgrades.0.9. contact Support.0.9. Select Operations > Update.2. see the release notes. and 3Dx800 sensors). and finally your Master Defense Centers. In addition.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 409 .0 to Version 4.1. as described by the procedure in this section. That is. To uninstall a patch using the local web interface: Access: Admin 1. You must use the local web interface to uninstall patches.9. consider a scenario where you updated an appliance directly from Version 4. then your Defense Centers. first uninstall the patch from your managed 3D Sensors.9. the update process creates an uninstaller update that allows you to uninstall the patch from that appliances’s web interface.Updating System Software Uninstalling Software Updates Chapter 11 Uninstalling Software Updates Requires: Any When you install a patch to a Sourcefire appliance. RNA for Red Hat Linux. you must uninstall a patch from the appliances in your deployment in the reverse order of how you installed it. If you upgraded to a new version of the appliance and need to revert to an older version.

the web interface may become unavailable. If this occurs. You can monitor its progress in the task queue (Operations > Monitoring > Task Status). Click Install next to the uninstaller for the update you want to remove. the Install Update page appears. • • On the Defense Center. 5. do not restart the uninstall. RNA correlates the operating system and services detected on each host with the vulnerability database to help you determine whether a particular host increases your risk of network compromise.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 410 . as well as fingerprints for RNA-detection operating systems. there is no intervening page. contact Support. Otherwise. Verify that the appliance where you uninstalled the patch is successfully communicating with its managed sensors (for the Defense Center) or its managing Defense Center (for 3D Sensors). The uninstall process begins. If the sensor has a fail-open network card. traffic is interrupted while the sensor reboots. In either case. 4. WARNING! Do not use the web interface to perform any other tasks until the uninstall has completed and (if necessary) the appliance reboots. if necessary. Version 4. some traffic may pass through the sensor uninspected while it reboots. Select Operations > Help > About and confirm that the software version is listed correctly.9. and services. or the appliance may log you out. 6. Updating the Vulnerability Database Requires: DC + RNA The Sourcefire Vulnerability Database (VDB) is a database of known vulnerabilities to which hosts may be susceptible. Clear your browser cache and force a reload of the browser. If the uninstall is still running. Before the uninstall completes. and the sensor does not have a fail-open network card. the sensor uses IPS detection engines with inline interface sets. for example. 3. This is expected behavior. If the uninstall for a 3D Sensor requires a reboot. if the task queue indicates that the uninstall has failed or if a manual refresh of the task queue shows no progress. On the 3D Sensor.Updating System Software Updating the Vulnerability Database Chapter 11 2. log in again and view the task queue. the user interface may exhibit unexpected behavior. log into the appliance. select the Defense Center and click Install. Under Selected Update. The Sourcefire Vulnerability Research Team (VRT) issues periodic updates to the VDB. confirm that you want to uninstall the update and reboot the appliance. If you encounter issues with the uninstall. After the uninstall finishes. client applications. continue to refrain from using the web interface until the uninstall has completed. if prompted. Instead.

either manually or by clicking Update. 3. use your Defense Centers to push and install the VDB on all managed 3D Sensors with RNA. Click Push next to the VDB update. manually download the update from the Sourcefire Support Site. You can take advantage of the automated update feature to schedule VDB updates. Upload the update to the Defense Center. The Patch Update Management page appears. If your Defense Center does not have access to the Internet. As a rule of thumb. The VDB update is saved on the Defense Center and appears in the Updates section. To update the vulnerability database: Access: Admin 1. divide the number of hosts on your network by 1000 to determine the approximate number of minutes to perform the update. Because you cannot view RNA data on Master Defense Centers or on unmanaged 3D Sensors. 2. Read the VDB Update Advisory Text for the update. Version 4. including software sensors. 4. it may become corrupted. Select Operations > Update. If you transfer an update file by email. you do not need to update the VDB on these appliances. The time it takes to update vulnerability mappings depends on the number of hosts in your network map. IMPORTANT! Download the update directly from the Support Site. • • If your Defense Center has access to the Internet.Updating System Software Updating the Vulnerability Database Chapter 11 You should install the same version of the VDB on all the appliances in your deployment. click Download Updates to check for the latest updates on the Support site. as well as product compatibility information.9. You may want to schedule the update during low system usage times to minimize the impact of any system downtime. The VDB Update Advisory Text includes information about the changes to the VDB made in the update. The Push Update page appears. Browse to the update and click Upload. TIP! This section explains how to plan for and perform manual VDB updates on your Sourcefire 3D System appliances. To ensure you install the same VDB version.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 411 . see Automating Vulnerability Database Updates on page 437. then click Upload Update.

confirm that the VDB build number matches the update you installed. You can monitor the update's progress in the task queue (Operations > Monitoring > Task Status). Depending on the number of hosts in your network map. 7. 8. Instead. Depending on the size of the file. To check the VDB build number on your managed sensors.Updating System Software Updating the Vulnerability Database Chapter 11 5.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 412 . Click Install next to the VDB update. When the push is complete. do not restart the update. The Install Update page appears. After the update finishes. select Operations > Help > About. Under Selected Update. 6. You can monitor the progress of the push in the Defense Center’s task queue (Operations > Monitoring > Task Status). Select the Defense Center. the update may take some time. if the task queue indicates that the update has failed or if a manual refresh of the task queue shows no progress. then click Edit next to each sensor you updated. then click Install. then click Push. If you encounter issues with the update. it may take some time to push the VDB update to all sensors. • • To check the VDB build number on the Defense Center. for example. Version 4. The update process begins. WARNING! Do not use the web interface to perform tasks related to mapped vulnerabilities until the update has completed. contact Support.9. select the managed 3D Sensors you want to update. select Operations > Sensors on the Defense Center. continue with the next step. as well as the sensors where you pushed the VDB update.

You can restore a backup onto a replacement appliance if the two appliances are the same model and are running the same version of the Sourcefire 3D System software. if applicable for the range of appliances in your deployment: • • • the entire intrusion event database the entire RNA event database additional files that reside on the appliance WARNING! If you applied any SEU updates. You need to apply the latest SEU update after you restore. WARNING! Do not use the backup and restore process to copy the configuration files between sensors. system configuration files are saved in the backup file. You can also choose to back up the following. By default.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 413 .Using Backup and Restore Chapter 12 Administrator Guide Backup and restoration is an essential part of any system maintenance plan.9. Sourcefire 3D System provides a mechanism for archiving data so that the Defense Center or 3D Sensor can be restored in case of disaster. The configuration files include information that uniquely identifies a sensor and cannot be shared. While each organization’s backup plan is highly individualized. Version 4. those updates are not backed up.

See Creating Backup Profiles on page 418 for information about creating backup profiles that you can use later as templates for creating backups. copy it via SCP to a remote host. you can use remote storage as detailed in Managing Remote Storage on page 393.9. see Managing Remote Storage on page 393. See Restoring the Appliance from a Backup File on page 421 for information about how to restore a backup file to the appliance. Creating Backup Files Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC To view and use existing system backups go to the System Backup Management page. • • • • • See Creating Backup Files on page 414 for information about backing up files from the appliance. See Uploading Backups from a Local Host on page 420 for information about uploading backup files from a local host.Using Backup and Restore Creating Backup Files Chapter 12 You can save backup files to the appliance or to your local computer. if needed. See the following sections for more information. Version 4. As an alternative or if your backup file is larger than 4GB. You should periodically save a backup file that contains all of the configuration files required to restore the appliance. When your backup task is collecting RNA events. You may also want to back up the system when testing configuration changes so that you can revert to the saved configuration. On Series 2 Defense Centers. See Performing Sensor Backup with the Defense Center on page 419 for information about backing up managed sensors with the Defense Center. You can choose to save the backup file on the appliance or on your local computer. in addition to event and packet data. Uploading a backup from your local computer does not work on backup files larger than 4GB since web browsers do not support uploading files that large. the backup file can be saved to a remote location. Additionally. if you are using a Series 2 Defense Center. data correlation is temporarily suspended.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 414 .

9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 415 . Version 4.Using Backup and Restore Creating Backup Files Chapter 12 The Defense Center and Master Defense Center version of the page is shown below.

select the files that you want to include from the Unified File List. select Backup Configuration. the 3D Sensor version of the page is shown below. Requires: IPS To archive individual intrusion event data files. punctuation. In the Name field.Using Backup and Restore Creating Backup Files Chapter 12 For comparison. Version 4. Requires: IPS or DC/MDC To archive the configuration. type a name for the backup file. select Backup Events. 4.9. The Backup page appears. 2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 416 . and spaces. To create a backup file: Access: Maint/Admin 1. 6. 3. Requires: IPS or DC/MDC To archive the entire event database. The System Backup Management page appears. 5. Click Sensor Backup on a 3D Sensor toolbar or Defense Center Backup on a Defense Center toolbar. You can use alphanumeric characters. Select Operations > Tools > Backup/Restore.

to use secure copy (scp) to copy the backup archive to a different machine. Often. You must make sure that your mail relay host is configured as described in Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 417 . Requires: IPS Ensure that the value of the compressed backup file in the Selected Sum field is less than the value in the Available Space field. Optionally.Using Backup and Restore Creating Backup Files Chapter 12 7. 9. Version 4. 8. If you want to include an additional file in the backup. TIP! The compressed value that appears in the Selected Sum field is a conservative estimate of the size of the compressed file. select the Copy when complete check box and then type the following information in the accompanying text boxes: • • • • the hostname or IP address of the machine where you want to copy the backup the path to the directory where you want to copy the backup the user name that you want to use to log into the remote machine the password for that user name TIP! Sourcefire recommends that you periodically save backups to a remote location so that the appliance can be restored in case of system failure. Optionally. to be notified when the backup is complete. 10. type the full path and file name in the Additional Files field and click the plus sign (+).9. select the Email when complete check box and type your email address in the accompanying text box. the file will be smaller. TIP! You can repeat this step to add additional files.

see Restoring the Appliance from a Backup File on page 421. Click Create Profile. see Managing Remote Storage on page 393. See Creating Backup Profiles on page 418 for more information.9. When the backup process is complete. Select Operations > Tools > Backup/Restore. On Series 2 Defense Centers. TIP! You can click Edit to modify an existing profile or click Delete to delete a profile from the list. The Backup Profiles page appears with a list of existing backup profiles. you can view the file on the Restoration Database page. For information about restoring a backup file. Click Backup Profiles on the toolbar. 3. • To save this configuration as a backup profile that you can use later. you can direct the backup file to a remote location.Using Backup and Restore Creating Backup Profiles Chapter 12 11. click Save As New. To create a backup profile: Access: Maint/Admin 1. You can later select one of these profiles when you are backing up the files on your appliance. Version 4. 2. TIP! When you create a backup file as described in Creating Backup Files on page 414. The backup file is saved in the /var/sf/backup directory. The System Backup Management page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 418 . a backup profile is automatically created. You have the following options: • To save the backup file to the appliance. The System Backup page appears. You can modify or delete the backup profile by selecting Operations > Tools > Backup & Restore and then clicking Backup Profiles. Creating Backup Profiles Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can use the Backup Profiles page to create backup profiles that contain the settings that you want to use for different types of backups. click Start Backup.

3. Type a name for the backup profile. In the Sensors field. You cannot use remote backup and restore to manage data on Crossbeam-based software sensors. The Remote Backup page appears. 4.9. To include event data in addition to configuration data. or Intrusion Agents. Select Operations > Tools > Backup/Restore. 6. Performing Sensor Backup with the Defense Center Requires: DC You can use the Defense Center to back up data on managed 3D Sensors. RNA Software for Red Hat Linux.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 419 . punctuation. To back up a managed sensor: Access: Maint/Admin 1. 3Dx800 sensors. Click Sensor Backup on the toolbar. select the managed sensors that you want to back up. The default name for the backup file uses the name of the managed 3D Sensor.Using Backup and Restore Performing Sensor Backup with the Defense Center Chapter 12 4. they change to underscores. Note that the unified files are binary file that the Sourcefire 3D System uses to log event data. Click Save As New to save the backup profile. 2. Configure the backup profile according to your needs. Version 4. The Backup Profiles page appears and includes your new profile in the list. 5. and spaces. You can use alphanumeric characters. See Creating Backup Files on page 414 for more information about the options on this page. select the Include All Unified Files check box. TIP! If you use a backup file name containing spaces or punctuation characters. The System Backup Management page appears.

TIP! It can take several minutes to complete the backup. The System Backup Management page appears. Version 4. you can view the backup file on the Restoration Database page. Click Browse. 6. the backup file can be saved to and retrieved from a remote location. The Upload Backup page appears. Click Start Backup. A success messages appears and the backup task is set up. To upload a backup from your local host: Access: Maint/Admin 1. To save the backup file on the Defense Center. TIP! Uploading a backup larger than 4GB from your local host does not work because web browsers do not support uploading files that large.9. select the Retrieve to DC check box.Using Backup and Restore Uploading Backups from a Local Host Chapter 12 5. click Upload Backup. you can upload it to a Defense Center. and navigate to the backup file. After you select the file to upload. On Series 2 Defense Centers. leave this check box unselected. Check the task status for progress. TIP! To save each sensor’s backup file on the sensor itself. As an alternative. Select Operations > Tools > Backup/Restore. Uploading Backups from a Local Host Requires: DC If you download a backup file to your local host using the download function described in the Backup Management table on page 421. Click Upload Backup. 3. see Managing Remote Storage on page 393. copy the backup via SCP to a remote host and retrieve it from there. When the backup is complete.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 420 . 2.

The backup file is uploaded and appears in the backup list. The Backup Management table describes each column and icon on the System Backup Management page. Restoring the Appliance from a Backup File Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can restore the appliance from backup files using the System Backup Management page. Click Backup Management on the toolbar to return to the System Backup Management page. If you use remote storage. type. Click with the backup file selected to view a list of the files included in the compressed backup file.Using Backup and Restore Restoring the Appliance from a Backup File Chapter 12 4. On Series 2 Defense Centers. Note that you can only restore a backup to an identical appliance type and version. Backup Management Column System Information Date Created File Name Location Size (MB) Events? View Restore Description The originating appliance name.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 421 . The date and time that the backup file was created The full name of the backup file The location of the backup file The size of the backup file. and version. in megabytes “Yes” indicates the backup includes event data. Click with the backup file selected to restore it on the appliance. After you complete the restoration process. backup system. and backup directory are listed at the top of the page. the protocol. backup files are saved to /var/sf/backup which is listed with the amount of disk space used in the /var partition at the top of the System Backup Management page. If you use local storage. you must apply the latest SEU. select Enable Remote Storage for Backups to enable or disable remote storage at the top of the System Backup Management page. Version 4. refresh the System Backup Management page to reveal detailed file system information. TIP! After the Defense Center verifies the file integrity.9.

Version 4. click to send the backup to the designated remote backup location. To restore the appliance from a backup file: Access: Admin 1.Using Backup and Restore Restoring the Appliance from a Backup File Chapter 12 Backup Management (Continued) Column Download Delete Move Description Click with the backup file selected to save it to your local computer. Click with the backup file selected to delete it. The System Backup Management page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 422 . A Series 2 Defense Center version of the page is shown. Select Operations > Tools > Backup/Restore.9. On a Series 2 Defense Center when you have a previouslycreated local backup selected.

5. select either or both: • • Replace Configuration Data Restore Event Data Then click Restore to begin the restoration. The Defense Center version of the page is truncated to show a sample of the files that are backed up. select the file and click View. Select the backup file that you want to restore and click Restore.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 423 . and its file size and date. click Backup Management to return to the System Backup Management page. 4. To view the contents of a backup file. On the toolbar. Version 4. on the 3D Sensor. The Restore Screen page appears. The manifest appears listing the name of each file.Using Backup and Restore Restoring the Appliance from a Backup File Chapter 12 2. all event data. Requires: DC/MDC To restore files. its owner and permissions. WARNING! This procedure will overwrite all configuration files and. 3.9.

9. 8. Reboot the appliance. Version 4. and system policies to the restored system. Requires: IPS If you want to restore intrusion event data. TIP! To cancel the restoration. health. RNA detection. Re-apply any intrusion. select the files that you want to include from the Unified File List box.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 424 . Apply the latest SEU to re-apply SEU rule and software updates.Using Backup and Restore Restoring the Appliance from a Backup File Chapter 12 6. click Cancel. Click Restore to begin the restoration. The appliance is restored using the backup file you specified. 9. 7.

IMPORTANT! Some tasks (such as those involving automated software and SEU updates and those that require pushing updates or intrusion policies to managed sensors) can place a significant load on networks with low bandwidths.9.Scheduling Tasks Chapter 13 Administrator Guide You can schedule many different types of administrative tasks to run at scheduled times. including: • • • • • • • • • • • running backups Requires: IPS applying intrusion policies generating reports Requires: DC + RNA running Nessus scans Requires: DC + RNA synchronizing Nessus plugins Requires: DC + RNA running Nmap scans Requires: DC + RNA + IPS using RNA rule recommendations Requires: IPS importing Security Enhancement Updates (SEUs) downloading and installing software updates Requires: DC + RNA downloading and installing vulnerability database updates Requires: DC pushing downloaded updates to managed sensors You can schedule tasks to run once or on a recurring schedule. Version 4. You should always schedule tasks like these to run during periods of low network use.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 425 .

and installation of software updates. Synchronizing Nessus Plugins on page 452 provides procedures for synchronizing your sensor with the Nessus server. push. Deleting Scheduled Tasks on page 461 describes how to delete one-time tasks and all instances of recurring tasks. You must recreate the recurring task schedule on a newly activated Defense Center when it changes from inactive to active.Scheduling Tasks Configuring a Recurring Task Chapter 13 See the following sections for more information: • • • • Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 explains how to set up a scheduled task so that it runs at regular intervals. Automating Reports on page 448 provides procedures for scheduling reports. Editing Scheduled Tasks on page 461 describes how to edit an existing task. Automating SEU Imports on page 444 provides procedures for scheduling rule updates. and installation of software updates. IMPORTANT! You cannot configure a recurring task schedule on the inactive Defense Center in a high availability pair of Defense Centers. Automating Software Updates on page 430 provides procedures for scheduling the download. Version 4. Automating Nessus Scans on page 450 provides procedures for scheduling Nessus scans. Automating Backup Jobs on page 428 provides procedures for scheduling backup jobs. • • • • • • • • • • Configuring a Recurring Task Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You set the frequency for a recurring task using the same process for all types of tasks. Automating Intrusion Policy Applications on page 446 provides procedures for scheduling intrusion policy applications.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 426 .9. Viewing Tasks on page 458 describes how to view and manage tasks after they are scheduled. push. Automating Nmap Scans on page 454 provides procedures for scheduling Nessus scans. Automating Vulnerability Database Updates on page 437 provides procedures for scheduling the download. Automating Recommended Rule State Generation on page 456 provides procedures for scheduling automatic update of intrusion rule state recommendations based on RNA data.

For example. The Add Task page appears. specify how often you want the task to recur. That is. 7. the Defense Center or 3D Sensor with IPS automatically adjusts its local time display for daylight saving time (DST). You can use the drop-down list to select the month. it will run at 3am during DST.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 427 . weeks. In the Start On field. and year. You can specify a number of hours. 2. select the type of task that you want to schedule. specify the date when you want to start your recurring task. Each of the types of tasks you can schedule is explained in its own section. The page reloads with the recurring task options. For the Schedule task to run option. select Recurring. Further. type 2 and select Day(s) to run the task every two days. 5. Click Add Task. 6. In the Repeat Every field. which is determined by using the time zone you specify in your system settings. where appropriate. To configure a recurring task: Access: Maint/Admin 1.9. However. days. TIP! You can either type a number or use the arrow buttons to specify the interval. it will run at 1am during standard time. Similarly. recurring tasks that span the transition dates from DST to standard time and back do not adjust for the transition. day. if you create a task scheduled for 2am during DST. 4. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. if you create a task scheduled for 2am during standard time. Version 4. 3. From the Job Type list. In the Run At field. The Scheduling page appears. specify the time when you want to start your recurring task.Scheduling Tasks Configuring a Recurring Task Chapter 13 Note that the time displayed on most pages on the web interface is the local time. or months.

See the following sections for more information: • • • • • • • • • • Automating Backup Jobs on page 428 Automating Software Updates on page 430 Automating Vulnerability Database Updates on page 437 Automating SEU Imports on page 444 Automating Intrusion Policy Applications on page 446 Automating Reports on page 448 Automating Nessus Scans on page 450 Synchronizing Nessus Plugins on page 452 Automating Nmap Scans on page 454 Automating Recommended Rule State Generation on page 456 Automating Backup Jobs Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can use the scheduler to automate system backups of a Defense Center or a 3D Sensor with IPS. a Repeat On field appears. The Scheduling page appears. If you selected Week(s) in the Repeat Every field. If you selected Month(s) in the Repeat Every field. 2.9.Scheduling Tasks Automating Backup Jobs Chapter 13 8. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. Use the drop-down list to select the day of the month when you want to run the task. see Creating Backup Profiles on page 418. To automate backup tasks: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Version 4. Select the check boxes next to the days of the week when you want to run the task. The remaining options on the Add Task page are determined by the task you are creating. For information on backup profiles.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 428 . a Repeat On field appears. Click Add Task. The Add Task page appears. TIP! You must design a backup profile before you can configure it as a scheduled task. 9.

spaces. From the Backup Profile list. For more information on creating new backup profiles. so you should try to keep it relatively short. Optionally. 5. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. in the Comment field. Version 4. Once or Recurring. In the Job Name field. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. • For one-time tasks. see Creating Backup Profiles on page 418. The page reloads to show the backup options. select the appropriate backup profile. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. or periods.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 429 . 6. select Backup. spaces. • For recurring tasks. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. Specify how you want to schedule the backup.Scheduling Tasks Automating Backup Jobs Chapter 13 3. 4. From the Job Type list. 7. or dashes.

If you use your Defense Center to automate software updates for managed 3D Sensors. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. Automating Software Updates The tasks you schedule to automate download. in the Email Status To: field. you must schedule two tasks: 1. For example. Similarly. it queries the Sourcefire support site for the latest updates. push. When automating direct software updates for an appliance. if you want to automate software updates on your managed sensors. However. Push the update to managed sensors. if the scheduled installation task repeats daily. You should schedule the push and install tasks to happen in succession.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 430 . So. and installation of software updates vary depending on whether you are updating an appliance directly or are using a Defense Center to perform the updates. the appliance automatically downloads the latest update when the installation task runs. For example. you can schedule automatic software installation and. if you want to update your 3D Sensor directly and it is connected to the internet. as long as it has access to the Internet. if you want to update the software for your Defense Center.9. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. Optionally. Tasks should be scheduled at least 30 minutes apart. for example. Always allow enough time between tasks for the process to complete. then install it on the sensor. the installation task will not succeed. Click Save. as long as the appliance has access to the Internet. Install the update on managed sensors. you can schedule Install Latest Update to download and install the latest Defense Center update. you can just schedule the Install Latest Update task. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages.Scheduling Tasks Automating Software Updates Chapter 13 8. Note that when the Defense Center runs either the Push Latest Update or the Install Latest Update task. you must always push the update to the sensor first. Note that the tasks for pushing the update to managed sensors (on the Defense Center) and installing the update (on any appliance) automatically check the Version 4. 9. The backup task is created. 2. if you schedule a task to install an update and the update has not finished copying from the Defense Center to the sensor. it will install the pushed update when it runs the next day.

1). To automate software updates: Access: Maint/Admin 1. If you want to have more control over this process. you can use the Once option to download and install updates during off-peak hours after you learn that an update has been released. push. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. if you manually download an update to an appliance that cannot access the Support site.8 or 4. This behavior also has implications for appliances that cannot access the Support site at all. The Add Task page appears. Specifically. TIP! The automated update process allows you to download and install software patches and feature releases (generally when the last two digits in the four-digit version number change. such as 4.8. Click Add Task.8. you cannot schedule either pushes to managed sensors (on the Defense Center) or installs (on any appliance). the task does not complete. Version 4. The Scheduling page appears. On the Defense Center. and install the upgrade files.1 or 4. Instead you must manually push or install the updates as described in Updating System Software on page 398. If your appliance cannot access the Support site. you can also automate vulnerability database (VDB) updates.2. See the following sections for more information: • • • Automating Software Downloads on page 431 Automating Software Pushes on page 433 Automating Software Installs on page 435 Automating Software Downloads Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can create a scheduled task that automatically downloads the latest software updates from Sourcefire. You can use this task to schedule download of updates you plan to push or install manually.Scheduling Tasks Automating Software Updates Chapter 13 Support site to ensure that you have the latest version of the update. 2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 431 . you must manually upload.9). For larger.9. more comprehensive updates (such as 4.

From the Job Type list. • • Select Software to download the most recent software patch. 6. Once or Recurring. select Download Latest Update. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. Requires: DC Select Vulnerability Database to download the most recent vulnerability database update. IMPORTANT! If your appliance is not directly connected to the Internet. specify which updates you want to download.sourcefire. In the Update Items section. In the Job Name field. Version 4. Specify how you want to schedule the task. you should set up a proxy as described in Configuring Network Settings on page 377 to allow it to download updates from the Sourcefire Support site (https://support. • For recurring tasks. 4. 5.com/). See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. • For one-time tasks. or dashes.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 432 .Scheduling Tasks Automating Software Updates Chapter 13 3. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time.9. The Add Task page reloads to show the update options. The Defense Center version of the page is shown below. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. Both options are selected by default. spaces.

make sure you allow enough time between the push task and a scheduled install task for the updates to be copied to the sensor. The task is created.Scheduling Tasks Automating Software Updates Chapter 13 7. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. The Scheduling page appears. When you create the task to push software updates to managed sensors. 2. Click Save. 8. you cannot schedule pushes to managed sensors. Instead you must manually push the update as described in Updating System Software on page 398. in the Comment field. 9. information about the push process status is reported on the Tasks page. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. you must push the software to the managed sensors before installing. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. Version 4. so you should try to keep it relatively short. Automating Software Pushes Requires: DC/MDC If you are installing software or vulnerability database updates on managed 3D Sensors. To push software updates to managed sensors: Access: Maint/Admin 1. See Viewing the Status of Long-Running Tasks on page 600 for more information. When you push software updates to managed sensors.9. or periods. Optionally. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. Note that if you manually download an update to an appliance that cannot access the Support site. Optionally. in the Email Status To: field. The Add Task page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 433 . Click Add Task. spaces.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 434 . • • Select Software to push the software update. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. in the Comment field. Requires: DC + RNA Select Vulnerability Database to push the VDB update. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. or periods. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. select the sensor that you want to receive updates. From the Job Type list. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. spaces. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. In the Update Items section. spaces. Once or Recurring. or dashes. 8.Scheduling Tasks Automating Software Updates Chapter 13 3. 4. Both options are selected by default. • For one-time tasks. In the Job Name field. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. Optionally.9. specify which updates you want to push to your managed sensors. Specify how you want to schedule the task. 5. The page reloads to show the options for pushing updates. select Push Latest Update. 6. so you should try to keep it relatively short. Version 4. 7. • For recurring tasks. From the Sensor list.

type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. The task is added. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. To schedule a software installation task: Access: Maint/Admin 1. The Scheduling page appears. Note that if you manually download an update to an appliance that cannot access the Support site. Click Add Task.Scheduling Tasks Automating Software Updates Chapter 13 9. See Automating Software Pushes on page 433 for information about pushing updates to managed sensors. 2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 435 . Instead you must manually install the update as described in Updating System Software on page 398. See Viewing the Status of Long-Running Tasks on page 600 for more information. 10. You can check the status of a running task on the Task Status page. WARNING! Depending on the update being installed. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. the appliance may reboot after the software is installed. make sure you allow enough time between the task that pushes the update to the sensor and the task that installs the update.9. The Add Task page appears. Click Save. Version 4. Automating Software Installs Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC If you are using a Defense Center to create a task to install a software update on a managed sensor. in the Email Status To: field. you cannot schedule installation of that update. Optionally.

Version 4.9. 6. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. from the Sensor list. In the Job Name field. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 436 . TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. Optionally. • For one-time tasks. The page reloads to show the options for installing updates. in the Comment field. spaces. Select the sensor where you want to install the update. select Install Latest Update. select Software to install the software update. 8. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. • For recurring tasks. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. Select the name of the Defense Center to install the update there. If you are using a Defense Center. so you should try to keep it relatively short. 4. Specify how you want to schedule the task.Scheduling Tasks Automating Software Updates Chapter 13 3. Once or Recurring. 5. From the Job Type list. The Defense Center version of the page is shown below. In the Update Items section. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. or periods. spaces. or dashes. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. you have the following options: • • 7.

See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. See Viewing the Status of Long-Running Tasks on page 600 for more information. if you schedule a task to install an update and the update has not fully Version 4. 3. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. This ensures that your Defense Center is correctly setting the impact flag on the intrusion events generated by the traffic on your network. Always allow enough time between tasks for the process to complete. Optionally. Install the VDB update on the Defense Center and on those managed sensors. When automating VDB updates for managed sensors with RNA. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. you must automate two separate steps: 1. VDB updates also include new vulnerabilities discovered by the Sourcefire Vulnerability Research Team (VRT). For example. you must schedule three tasks in this order: 1. When automating VDB updates for your Defense Center. make sure that you download and install VDB updates and SEUs on a regular basis. thereby ensuring that RNA is using the most up-to-date information to evaluate the hosts on your network. 2. Download the VDB update on your Defense Center. The scheduled software installation task is added. Automating Vulnerability Database Updates Sourcefire uses vulnerability database (VDB) updates to distribute new operating system fingerprints as we expand the list of operating systems that RNA recognizes.Scheduling Tasks Automating Vulnerability Database Updates Chapter 13 9. in the Email Status To: field. Installing the VDB update. 2. Click Save. Downloading the VDB update.9. You can check the status of a running task on the Task Status page. 10. TIP! If your Sourcefire 3D System deployment includes IPS and RNA monitoring the same network segments. Push the VDB update to your managed 3D Sensors that are using the RNA component.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 437 . You can use the scheduling feature to download and install the latest VDB updates.

Scheduling Tasks Automating Vulnerability Database Updates Chapter 13 downloaded. You must download the VDB on the Defense Center and push it to the sensor. Version 4. if the scheduled installation task repeats daily. 2. If you want to have more control over this process. Note that if you manually download an update to an appliance that cannot access the Support site.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 438 . you cannot schedule either pushes to managed sensors (on the Defense Center) or installs (on any appliance). it will install the downloaded VDB update when it runs the next day. IMPORTANT! You cannot download the VDB using a scheduled task on a sensor. Click Add Task. See the following sections for more information: • • • Automating VDB Update Downloads on page 438 Automating VDB Update Pushes on page 440 Automating VDB Update Installs on page 442 Automating VDB Update Downloads Requires: DC/MDC + RNA You can create a scheduled task that automatically downloads the latest vulnerability database updates from Sourcefire. The Scheduling page appears. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. the installation task will not succeed. The Add Task page appears. Instead you must manually push or install the updates as described in Updating System Software on page 398. To automate VDB updates: Access: Maint/Admin 1.9. you can use the Once option to download and install VDB updates during off-peak hours after you learn that an update has been released. However.

com/). 6. spaces. Once or Recurring.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 439 . See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. 4. Version 4.Scheduling Tasks Automating Vulnerability Database Updates Chapter 13 3. Optionally. make sure Vulnerability Database is selected. or dashes. 5.9. so you should try to keep it relatively short.sourcefire. or periods. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. IMPORTANT! If your appliance is not directly connected to the Internet. you should set up a proxy as described in Configuring Network Settings on page 377 to allow it to download updates from the Sourcefire Support site (https://support. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. 7. In the Job Name field. In the Update Items section. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. The Add Task page reloads to show the update options. Both the Software and Vulnerability Database options are selected by default. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. Specify how you want to schedule the task. • For one-time tasks. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. in the Comment field. • For recurring tasks. From the Job Type list. spaces. select Download Latest Update.

you must push the update to the managed sensors before installing. you cannot schedule pushes to managed sensors. Optionally. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. The Scheduling page appears. Click Add Task. 9. The Add Task page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 440 . When you push VDB updates to managed sensors. in the Email Status To: field. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. Note that if you manually download an update to an appliance that cannot access the Support site. To push VDB updates to managed 3D Sensors with RNA: Access: Maint/Admin 1. WARNING! You must download vulnerability database updates before you can push them to managed sensors. Version 4. information about the process status is reported on the Tasks page.Scheduling Tasks Automating Vulnerability Database Updates Chapter 13 8. Instead you must manually push the update as described in Updating System Software on page 398. The task is created. See Viewing the Status of Long-Running Tasks on page 600 for more information. 2. Automating VDB Update Pushes Requires: DC/MDC + 3D Sensor + RNA If you are installing vulnerability database updates on managed 3D Sensors with RNA. Click Save.9. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling.

Specify how you want to schedule the task. • For recurring tasks. 5. 6. 7. In the Update Items section.9. 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 441 . From the Sensor list. so you should try to keep it relatively short. select the sensor that you want to receive updates. Optionally. Once or Recurring. • For one-time tasks. or dashes. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. The page reloads to show the options for pushing updates. select Push Latest Update. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. in the Comment field. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. spaces. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance.Scheduling Tasks Automating Vulnerability Database Updates Chapter 13 3. Version 4. make sure Vulnerability Database is selected. Both the Software and Vulnerability Database options are selected by default. In the Job Name field. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. 8. or periods. spaces. From the Job Type list. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters.

you must allow enough time between the task that pushes the update to the sensor and the task that installs the update.9. The Add Task page appears. Note that if you manually download an update to an appliance that cannot access the Support site. See Automating VDB Update Pushes on page 440 for information about pushing updates to managed sensors. If you are creating a task to install a VDB update on a managed sensor. Version 4. Optionally. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. Instead you must manually install the updates as described in Updating System Software on page 398. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 442 . 10. The task is added. Automating VDB Update Installs Requires: DC/MDC + RNA After you have downloaded a VDB update. Click Add Task. in the Email Status To: field. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages.Scheduling Tasks Automating Vulnerability Database Updates Chapter 13 9. You should allow enough time for a scheduled VDB update to download when you set up a scheduled task to install it. you can schedule the installation process. See Viewing the Status of Long-Running Tasks on page 600 for more information. you cannot schedule installation of that update. 2. The Scheduling page appears. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. You can check the status of a running task on the Task Status page. Click Save. To schedule a software installation task: Access: Maint/Admin 1.

Once or Recurring. From the Job Type list. In the Job Name field. so you should try to keep it relatively short. 5. select the name of the Defense Center from the drop-down list. 4. The page reloads to show the options for installing updates. • For one-time tasks.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 443 . or dashes. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. select Vulnerability Database to install the VDB update. Specify how you want to schedule the task. select Install Latest Update. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. in the Comment field. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. you have the following options: • • 7. From the Sensor list. If you want to install the update on a managed sensor. spaces.Scheduling Tasks Automating Vulnerability Database Updates Chapter 13 3. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. 8. In the Update Items section. or periods. select the name of the sensor from the drop-down list. • For recurring tasks. spaces. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. Version 4. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. 6. If you want to install the update on the Defense Center. Optionally.9.

and policy re-apply. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. Note. If you enable Update when a new SEU is installed for the base policy of an existing policy and the SEU contains changes to the default rule states for existing rules in that base policy. Import the SEU. any new rules or features provided by the SEU that are enabled in the policy you apply to the sensor are also enabled on the sensor by that policy. Note that you can only re-apply policies applied from the appliance where the scheduled task is configured. 10. Note that on the Defense Center. The Import SEU task allows you to schedule the following subtasks separately or to combine them into one scheduled task: 1. See Viewing the Status of Long-Running Tasks on page 600 for more information. rule state update. the Sourcefire Vulnerability Research Team (VRT) releases Security Enhancement Updates (SEUs). Once one subtask completes. Click Save. you also allow the Version 4. the SEU does not override your change. in the Email Status To: field. Optionally.9. the next configured subtask begins. An SEU contains new and updated standard text rules and shared object rules and may contain updated versions of Snort® and features such as preprocessors and decoders. install. If you allow SEUs to update your base policy. however. Re-apply your intrusion policy so that the new SEU takes effect. those changes are also imported. The selected subtasks present in the Import SEU task occur in the following order: download. You can automatically download and install SEUs. 2. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. Automating SEU Imports Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC + IPS As new vulnerabilities are identified. Applying an intrusion policy from a Defense Center to a managed sensor after you import an SEU does not apply the SEU to the sensor. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 444 .Scheduling Tasks Automating SEU Imports Chapter 13 9. that if you changed a rule state. 3. Download the latest SEU. You can check the status of a running task on the Task Status page. you also must re-apply your intrusion policies on your managed 3D Sensors with IPS. However. The scheduled VDB installation task is added. VRT sometimes uses an SEU to change the default state of one or more rules in a default policy.

Version 4. however. so make sure you schedule downloads during periods of low network use. For more information on the recurring SEU import feature and a comparison of the two methods of setting up recurring imports. The Add Task page appears. the SEU will not override your change. that if you have changed the rule state. Click Add Task. IMPORTANT! SEUs may contain new binaries. 3.9. The page reloads to show the options for importing SEUs. see Importing SEUs and Rule Files in the Analyst Guide. To schedule an Import SEU task: Access: Maint/Admin 1. select Import SEU.Scheduling Tasks Automating SEU Imports Chapter 13 SEU to change the default state of a rule in your policy when the default state changes in the default policy you used to create your policy (or in the default policy it is based on). Note that you must be using Snort 2. 2. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling.8. you can also use the recurring SEU import feature on the Import SEU page. From the Job Type list. Make sure your process for downloading and importing SEUs complies with your security policies. SEUs can be quite large. In addition to configuring SEU imports on the Scheduling page. The Scheduling page appears. Note.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 445 . In addition.2 or higher to import recurring SEUs on the Import SEU page.

or periods. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. In the Job Name field.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 446 . you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. 6. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. so you should try to keep it relatively short. Once or Recurring. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. To re-apply intrusion policies after installing an SEU. select Reapply intrusion policies after the SEU import completes. Specify how you want to schedule the task. in the Comment field. This feature is useful if you need to use different policies during different times of the day. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. The task is created. • For recurring tasks. 10. spaces. in the Email Status To: field. Optionally. • For one-time tasks.9. 11. select Download the latest SEU from the support site. 5. select Install the latest downloaded SEU. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters.Scheduling Tasks Automating Intrusion Policy Applications Chapter 13 4. 7. 8. Automating Intrusion Policy Applications Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC + IPS You can automatically apply intrusion policies at scheduled intervals. or dashes. 9. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. To use this task to download the latest SEU. Optionally. To use this task to install the latest downloaded SEU. Click Save. Version 4. spaces. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time.

6. In the Job Name field. spaces. or dashes. In the Policy Name field. 7.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 447 . See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. 5. From the Job Type list.9. • For one-time tasks. The Add Task page appears. select the detection engine where you want to apply the policy. select the intrusion policy you want to apply from the drop-down list or select Policy Default to apply the policy to each detection engine targeted in the policy. Specify how you want to schedule the task. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. select Apply Policy. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. The Scheduling page appears. 2. In the Detection Engine field. Click Add Task. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task.Scheduling Tasks Automating Intrusion Policy Applications Chapter 13 To automate intrusion policy application: Access: Maint/Admin 1. 3. • For recurring tasks. 4. Once or Recurring. The page reloads to show the options for applying an intrusion policy. Version 4.

Click Save. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. See Creating a Report Profile on page 246 for more information about using the report designer to create a report profile. 2. 9. Click Add Task. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. However. in the Comment field. Automating Reports Requires: IPS or DC/ MDC You can automate reports so that they run at regular intervals.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 448 .Scheduling Tasks Automating Reports Chapter 13 8. 10. Version 4. The Scheduling page appears. The task is created. spaces. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. You can check the status of a running task on the Task Status page. you must design a profile for your report before you can configure it as a scheduled task. See Viewing the Status of Long-Running Tasks on page 600 for more information. or periods. in the Email Status To: field. To automate a report: Access: Maint/Admin 1. The Add Task page appears. Optionally. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. Optionally.9. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. so you should try to keep it relatively short. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters.

type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. in the Comment field. You cannot run remote reports on Crossbeam-based software Requires: DC If you want to run the report on a managed sensor. Once or Recurring. Version 4. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. 8. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. spaces. or periods. In the Report Profile field. From the Job Type list. 7. IMPORTANT! sensors. or dashes. spaces. • For recurring tasks. Optionally. so you should try to keep it relatively short. select Reports. 4.Scheduling Tasks Automating Reports Chapter 13 3. in the Remote Run field. select the name of the sensor from the drop-down list. 5. select the report profile that you want to use from the drop-down list. • For one-time tasks. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 449 . TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance.9. In the Job Name field. Specify how you want to schedule the task. 6. The page reloads to show the options for setting up a report to run automatically. The Defense Center version of the page is displayed below. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time.

Preparing Your System to Run a Nessus Scan If you have not used the Nessus scanning capability before.9. see Nessus Scan Remediations in the Analyst Guide.Scheduling Tasks Automating Nessus Scans Chapter 13 9. in the Email Status To: field. 1. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. see Configuring a Local Nessus Server on page 641. You need to select this name when prompted for the Nessus Remediation name when setting up the scheduled scan. You can also schedule scans to test for recurrent vulnerabilities to attacks that have happened in the past. see Creating a Nessus Scan Instance on page 643. Click Save. Version 4. you need to complete several Nessus configuration steps prior to defining a scheduled scan. If you do not have an existing external Nessus server. The task is created. For more information. For more information on setting up a Nessus server connection profile.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 450 . For more information on starting the server and configuring and activating a Nessus user. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. IMPORTANT! Make note of the name of the scan instance you create. Automated scans allow you to test periodically to make sure that operating system updates or other changes do not introduce vulnerabilities on your enterprise-critical systems. Automating Nessus Scans You can schedule regular Nessus scans of targets on your network. set up the Nessus server on your Defense Center. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. Optionally. Create a scan instance to define the Nessus server to be used by your scan. 10. 2. See the following sections for more information: • • Preparing Your System to Run a Nessus Scan on page 450 Scheduling a Nessus Scan on page 451 Note that a Policy & Response Administrator can also use a Nessus scan as a remediation.

Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. 3. The page reloads to show the options for automating Nessus scans. Create a scan target to define the target hosts and host ports to scan. Create a remediation definition to define what plugins and Nessus scan settings should be used when the scheduled scan runs. Click Add Task. see Creating a Nessus Remediation on page 646. 2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 451 . 4. select Nessus Scan. To schedule Nessus scanning: Access: Maint/Admin 1.Scheduling Tasks Automating Nessus Scans Chapter 13 3. Version 4. Scheduling a Nessus Scan Requires: DC + RNA You can automate Nessus scanning using a specific scan remediation by scheduling the scan. From the Job Type list. The Scheduling page appears.9. Continue with Scheduling a Nessus Scan. see Creating a Nessus Scan Target on page 645. The Add Task page appears. For more information on setting up a scan target. 5. For more information on setting up a remediation definition.

or periods. The task is created.9. 8. In the Nessus Remediation field. Optionally. 9. select the scan target that defines the target hosts you want to scan. Once or Recurring. 5. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 452 . Click Save. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. Optionally. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. so you should try to keep it relatively short. In the Job Name field. or dashes. In the Nessus Target field. • For recurring tasks. in the Comment field. in the Email Status To: field. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters.Scheduling Tasks Synchronizing Nessus Plugins Chapter 13 4. select the Nessus remediation for the Nessus server where you want to run the scan. spaces. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. Specify how you want to schedule the task. • For one-time tasks. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. spaces. 6. You may want to schedule your plugin synchronization to occur shortly before your scheduled Nessus scans to make sure that you scan with the latest list of plugins. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. 7. Version 4. 10. Synchronizing Nessus Plugins Requires: DC + RNA You can automate synchronization with the Nessus server to obtain an up-to-date list of plugins before you scan. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent.

2.9. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. From the Job Type list. Once or Recurring. 3. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. or dashes. The Scheduling page appears. The Add Task page appears. The page reloads to show the Nessus plugin synchronization options. 4. The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. Specify how you want to schedule the task. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details. or periods. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. In the Job Name field. 7. Optionally. spaces. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. spaces. Click Add Task.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 453 . so you should try to keep it relatively short. 5. In the Nessus Instance field.Scheduling Tasks Synchronizing Nessus Plugins Chapter 13 To schedule Nessus plugin synchronization: Access: Maint/Admin 1. • For recurring tasks. select Synchronize Nessus Plugins. select the instances with the Nessus plugins that you want to synchronize. in the Comment field. • For one-time tasks. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. Version 4. 6.

You can also schedule scans to automatically test for unidentified services on hosts in your network. in the Email Status To: field. Click Save. Create a scan target to define the target hosts and host ports to scan. 9. Automated scans allow you to refresh operating system and service information previously supplied by an Nmap scan. see Nmap Scan Remediations in the Analyst Guide. you must complete several Nmap configuration steps prior to defining a scheduled scan. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. 1. Preparing Your System for an Nmap Scan If you have not used the Nmap scanning capability before. 2. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. You need to select this name when prompted for the Nmap Configuration name when setting up the scheduled scan.Scheduling Tasks Automating Nmap Scans Chapter 13 8. For example. The task is created. Automating Nmap Scans You can schedule regular Nmap scans of targets on your network. Create a scan instance to define the Nmap server to be used by your scan. see Creating an Nmap Scan Instance in the Analyst Guide. which resolves the conflict. See the following sections for more information: • • Preparing Your System for an Nmap Scan Scheduling an Nmap Scan Note that a Policy & Response Administrator can also use an Nmap scan as a remediation. Running the scan obtains updated operating system information for the host.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 454 . when an operating system conflict occurs on a host. that conflict can trigger an Nmap scan. IMPORTANT! Make note of the name of the scan instance you create. For more information on setting up a scan target. Optionally. see Creating an Nmap Scan Target in the Analyst Guide. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. For more information.9. Version 4. For more information on setting up a Nmap server connection profile. you need to rescan periodically to keep that data up to date. Because RNA cannot update Nmap-supplied data.

RNA no longer updates the information replaced by Nmap for the host.9. Scheduling an Nmap Scan Requires: DC + RNA You can schedule a scan of a host or hosts on your network using the Nmap utility. select Nmap Scan. Version 4. 4. see Creating an Nmap Remediation in the Analyst Guide. Create a remediation definition to define what plugins and Nmap scan settings should be used when the scheduled scan runs. The Add Task page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 455 . Nmap-supplied service and operating system data remains static until you run another Nmap scan. From the Job Type list. To schedule Nmap scanning: Access: Maint/Admin 1. If you plan to scan a host using Nmap. any Nmap scan results are discarded and RNA resumes monitoring of all operating system and service data for the host. For more information on setting up a remediation definition. Click Add Task. The page reloads to show the options for automating Nmap scans. Continue with Scheduling an Nmap Scan. The Scheduling page appears. you may want to set up regularly scheduled scans to keep Nmap-supplied operating system and services up to date. 2. Once Nmap replaces a host’s operating system or services detected by RNA with the results from an Nmap scan. If the host is deleted from the network map and re-added. 3.Scheduling Tasks Automating Nmap Scans Chapter 13 3. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling.

spaces. The task is created. 7. or periods. 9. 8. Automating Recommended Rule State Generation Requires: DC + RNA + IPS IMPORTANT! If the system automatically generates scheduled recommendations for an intrusion policy with unsaved changes. 10. Optionally. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. so you should try to keep it relatively short. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. Optionally. In the Nmap Target field. • For recurring tasks. in the Comment field. In the Nmap Remediation field. spaces. select the Nmap remediation to use when running the scan. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host. you must discard your changes in that policy and commit the policy if you want the policy to reflect the automatically generated recommendations. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. In the Job Name field. Version 4. • For one-time tasks. or dashes.9. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. in the Email Status To: field. 5. Click Save. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. 6. Specify how you want to schedule the task. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. Once or Recurring. See Committing Intrusion Policy Changes in the Analyst Guide for more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 456 .Scheduling Tasks Automating Recommended Rule State Generation Chapter 13 4. select the scan target that defines the target hosts you want to scan. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details.

depending on the configuration of your policy. From the Job Type list.9.Scheduling Tasks Automating Recommended Rule State Generation Chapter 13 You can automatically generate rule state recommendations based on RNA data for your network using the most recently saved configuration settings in your custom intrusion policy. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. it also modifies the states of intrusion rules based on the criteria described in Managing RNA Rule State Recommendations in the Analyst Guide. select RNA Recommended Rules. where you can configure RNA Recommended Rules in a policy. The Add Task page appears. Optionally. Modified rule states take effect the next time you apply your intrusion policy.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 457 . Version 4. 3. Optionally. 2. The Scheduling page appears. See Using RNA Recommendations in the Analyst Guide for more information. The page reloads to show the options for generating RNA-recommended rule states. 4. See Managing RNA Rule State Recommendations in the Analyst Guide for more information. When the task runs. click the policies link in the Job Type field to display the Detection & Prevention page. Click Add Task. To generate recommendations: Access: Maint/Admin 1. the system automatically generates recommended rule states.

Optionally. IMPORTANT! You must have a valid email relay server configured to send status messages. in the Email Status To: field. spaces. • For one-time tasks. You have the following options: • • In the Policies field. 8. use the drop-down lists to specify the start date and time. The View Options section of the page allows you to view scheduled tasks using a calendar and a list of scheduled tasks. 6. In the Job Name field. Specify how you want to schedule the task. Viewing Tasks After adding scheduled tasks. you can view them and evaluate their status. select one or more policies. Use the Shift and Ctrl keys to select multiple policies. 9. you have several options for setting the interval between instances of the task. Once or Recurring. spaces. type a name using up to 255 alphanumeric characters. Next to Policies. 10. or dashes. TIP! The Current Time field indicates the current time on the appliance. See Configuring a Recurring Task on page 426 for details.9. See Configuring a Mail Relay Host and Notification Address on page 338 for more information about configuring a relay host.Scheduling Tasks Viewing Tasks Chapter 13 5. Version 4. select one or more policies where you want to generate recommendations. TIP! The comment field appears in the View Tasks section of the page. 7. Click Save. Click the All Policies check box to select all policies. Optionally. in the Comment field. type the email address (or multiple email addresses separated by commas) where you want status messages sent. so you should try to keep it relatively short. • For recurring tasks. type a comment using up to 255 alphanumeric characters.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 458 . or periods. The task is created.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 459 . Version 4. To view scheduled tasks using the calendar: Access: Maint/Admin 1. You can perform the following tasks using the calendar view: • • Click << to move back one year. Click < to move back one month. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling.9.Scheduling Tasks Viewing Tasks Chapter 13 See the following sections for more information: • • Using the Calendar on page 459 Using the Task List on page 460 Using the Calendar Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor The Calendar view option allows you to view which scheduled tasks occur on which day. The Scheduling page appears. 2.

) Task List Columns Column Name Type Start Time Frequency Comment Status Description Displays the name of the scheduled task. Click >> to move forward one year.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 460 . Deletes the scheduled task. Click Today to return to the current month and year. (See Using the Calendar on page 459 for more information. Creator Delete Displays the name of the user that created the scheduled task. Version 4. • A check mark icon indicates that the task ran successfully. Click a specific task on a date to view the task in a task list table below the calendar. Displays the type of scheduled task. The task list appears at below the calendar when you open the calendar.Scheduling Tasks Viewing Tasks Chapter 13 • • • • • • Click > to move forward one month.9. Click a date to view all scheduled tasks for the specific date in a task list table below the calendar. IMPORTANT! For more information about using the task list. Describes the current status for a scheduled task. Displays the scheduled start date and time. In addition. you can access it by selecting a date or task from the calendar. Using the Task List Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor The Task List shows a list of tasks along with their status. Click Add Task to schedule a new task. Displays the comment that accompanies the scheduled task. see Using the Task List on page 460. • A red ! indicates that the task failed. • A question mark icon indicates that the task is in an unknown state. Displays how often the task is run.

all instances of the task are deleted. after the task completes successfully. you can change it to a recurring task. If you delete an instance of a recurring task. only that task is deleted. once or recurring. 4.Scheduling Tasks Editing Scheduled Tasks Chapter 13 Editing Scheduled Tasks Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor You can edit a scheduled task that you previously created. See the following sections for more information: • • • • • • • • • • Automating Backup Jobs on page 428 Automating Software Updates on page 430 Automating Vulnerability Database Updates on page 437 Automating SEU Imports on page 444 Automating Intrusion Policy Applications on page 446 Automating Reports on page 448 Automating Nessus Scans on page 450 Synchronizing Nessus Plugins on page 452 Automating Nmap Scans on page 454 Automating Recommended Rule State Generation on page 456 5. Later. Click Save to save your edits. The Scheduling page appears. Click either the task that you want to edit or the day on which the task appears. The Edit Task page appears showing the details of the task you selected. The Task Details table containing the selected task or tasks appears.9. To edit an existing scheduled task: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Edit the task to meet your needs. 3.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 461 . Version 4. You can delete a specific one-time task that has not yet run or you can delete every instance of a recurring task. Locate the task you want to edit in the table and click Edit. If you delete a task that is scheduled to run once. including the start time. The remaining options are determined by the task you are editing. You cannot change the type of job. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. Your change are saved and the Scheduling page appears again. 2. and how often the task runs. the job name. Deleting Scheduled Tasks There are two types of deletions you can perform from the Schedule View page. This feature is especially useful if you want to test a scheduled task once to make sure that the parameters are correct.

see Deleting a One-Time Task on page 462. On the calendar. Version 4. To delete a recurring task: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Deleting a Recurring Task Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor When you delete one instance of a recurring task. Locate an instance of the recurring task you want to delete in the table and click Delete. A table containing the selected task or tasks appears. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling. you automatically delete all instances of that task. if it has already run. Select Operations > Tools > Scheduling.Scheduling Tasks Deleting Scheduled Tasks Chapter 13 The following sections describe how to delete tasks: • • To delete all instances of a task. The instance of the task you selected is deleted. To delete a single task or. delete a task record: Access: Maint/Admin 1. 3. Deleting a One-Time Task Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor You can delete a one-time scheduled task or delete the record of a previously-run scheduled task using the task list. The Scheduling page appears. 3. Click the task that you want to delete or the day on which the task appears. All instances of the recurring task are deleted. The Scheduling page appears. To delete a single instance of a task. 2. select an instance of the recurring task you want to delete.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 462 . 2.9. Locate the task you want to delete in the table and click Delete. The page reloads to display a table of tasks below the calendar. see Deleting a Recurring Task on page 462.

on the Host Statistics page you can monitor basic host statistics. For more information. all on a single page. The following sections provide more information about the monitoring features that the system provides: • Viewing Host Statistics on page 464 describes how to view host information such as: • • • • • • system uptime disk and memory usage RNA process statistics Data Correlator statistics system processes intrusion event information On the Defense Center.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 463 . Version 4. You can also monitor both summary and detailed information on all processes that are currently running on the Defense Center or 3D Sensor. see Understanding Health Monitoring on page 483. intrusion event information. you can also use the health monitor to monitor disk usage and alert on low disk space conditions.Monitoring the System Chapter 14 Administrator Guide The Sourcefire 3D System provides many useful monitoring features to assist you in the daily administration of your system.9. For example. and statistics for the Data Correlator and RNA processes for the current day.

The percentage of system memory that is being used. see the RNA Process Statistics table on page 466 for details intrusion event information (requires IPS). Version 4.Monitoring the System Viewing Host Statistics Chapter 14 • • • • Monitoring System Status and Disk Space Usage on page 468 describes how to view basic event and disk partition information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 464 . The average number of processes in the CPU queue for the past 1 minute. • Viewing Host Statistics Requires: Any The Statistics page lists the current status of following: • • • • general host statistics. The number of days (if applicable).9. Understanding Running Processes on page 471 describes the basic system processes that run on the appliance. see the Data Correlator Process Statistics table on page 465 for details RNA process statistics (Defense Center only . Viewing System Process Status on page 468 describes how to view basic process status. see the Host Statistics table on page 464 for details Data Correlator statistics (Defense Center only . Viewing RNA Performance Statistics on page 478 describes how to view RNA performance statistics and how to generate graphs based on these statistics. 5 minutes.requires RNA). Host Statistics Category Time Uptime Memory Usage Load Average Description The current time on the system. and 15 minutes. and minutes since the system was last started. hours. Viewing IPS Performance Statistics on page 476 describes how to view IPS performance statistics and how to generate graphs based on these statistics. see the Intrusion Event Information table on page 467 for details The Host Statistics table describes the host statistics listed on the Statistics page.requires RNA).

in kilobytes Average amount of memory used by the Data Correlator for the current day. The Data Correlator analyzes the information from the binary files. the RNA process correlates the data with the fingerprint and vulnerability databases. using statistics gathered between 12:00AM and 11:59PM for each detection engine.9. The statistics that appear for RNA and the Data Correlator are averages for the current day. generates events. and creates the RNA network map. in kilobytes Version 4. you can also view statistics about the Data Correlator and RNA processes for the current day.User (%) CPU Usage . and then produces binary files that are processed by the Data Correlator running on the Defense Center.System (%) VmSize (KB) VmRSS (KB) Description Number of RNA events that the Data Correlator receives and processes per second Number of flows that the Data Correlator receives and processes per second Average percentage of CPU time spent on user processes for the current day Average percentage of CPU time spent on system processes for the current day Average size of memory allocated to the Data Correlator for the current day. Processes If your Sourcefire 3D System deployment includes a Defense Center managing 3D Sensors with RNA. A summary of the processes running on the system.Monitoring the System Viewing Host Statistics Chapter 14 Host Statistics (Continued) Category Disk Usage Description The percentage of the disk that is being used.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 465 . Click the arrow to view more detailed host statistics. See Monitoring System Status and Disk Space Usage on page 468 for more information. The Data Correlator Process Statistics table describes the statistics displayed for the Data Correlator process. See Viewing System Process Status on page 468 for more information. As the 3D Sensors perform data acquisition. Data Correlator Process Statistics Category Events/Sec Flows/Sec CPU Usage . decoding. and analysis.

no intrusion event information is listed on this page.System (%) VmSize (KB) VmRSS (KB) Description Average percentage of packets dropped by the RNA process for the current day Average number of megabits per second processed by the RNA process for the current day Average number of packets per second processed by the RNA process for the current day Average percentage of CPU time spent by user processes for the current day Average percentage of CPU time spent by system processes for the current day Average size of memory allocated to the RNA process for the current day.9. and the total number in the database. RNA Process Statistics Category Packets Dropped (%) Mbits/Second Packets/Second CPU Usage . you can also view the time and date of the last intrusion event. This is also the case for 3D Sensors that cannot store events locally. in kilobytes Average amount of memory used by the RNA process for the current day.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 466 . the total number of events that have occurred in the past hour and the past day. Version 4. The information in the Intrusion Event Information section of the Statistics page is based on intrusion events stored on the sensor rather than those sent to the Defense Center. If you manage your sensor so that intrusion events are not stored locally.Monitoring the System Viewing Host Statistics Chapter 14 The RNA Process Statistics table describes the statistics displayed for the RNA process.User (%) CPU Usage . in kilobytes On 3D Sensors with IPS and on Defense Centers that manage sensors with IPS.

The Defense Center version of the page is shown below. Select Operations > Monitoring > Statistics. Intrusion Event Information Statistic Last Alert Was Total Events Last Hour Total Events Last Day Total Events in Database Description The date and time that the last event occurred The total number of events that occurred in the past hour The total number of events that occurred in the past twenty-four hours The total number of events in the events database To view the Statistics page: Access: Maint/Admin 1.Monitoring the System Viewing Host Statistics Chapter 14 The Intrusion Event Information table describes the statistics displayed in the Intrusion Event Information section of the Statistics page. The Statistics page appears.9. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 467 .

Monitoring the System Monitoring System Status and Disk Space Usage Chapter 14 2. Select the sensor name from the Select Device(s) box. The Disk Usage section expands. to view disk usage information for a specific sensor: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Monitoring System Status and Disk Space Usage Requires: Any The Disk Usage section of the Statistics page provides a quick synopsis of partition status. The Disk Usage section expands. For more information. you can use the Defense Center’s web interface to view the process status for any managed sensor. Click the down arrow next to Disk Usage to expand it. you can also list statistics for managed sensors. You can monitor this page from time to time to ensure that enough disk space is available for system processes and the database. If you are managing sensors with a Defense Center. The Statistics page is updated with statistics for the devices that you selected. TIP! On the Defense Center you can also use the health monitor to monitor disk usage and alert on low disk space conditions. Click the down arrow next to Disk Usage to expand it. 2. You can use the Shift and Ctrl keys to select multiple devices at once. Version 4. Viewing System Process Status Requires: Any The Processes section of the Host Statistics page allows you to see the processes that are currently running on an appliance. To access disk usage information: Access: Maint/Admin 1. listing host statistics for each sensor you selected. On the Defense Center. From the Select Device(s) box and click Select Devices. On the Defense Center. Select Operations > Monitoring > Statistics. see Understanding Health Monitoring on page 483.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 468 . 2. The Statistics page appears. It provides general process information and specific information for each running process.9. and click Select Devices. The page reloads.

which is a value that indicates the scheduling priority of a process.9. Values range between -20 (highest priority) and 19 (lowest priority) The memory size used by the process (in kilobytes.process is runnable (on queue to run) • S .process has a positive nice value • R .Monitoring the System Viewing System Process Status Chapter 14 The Process Status table describes each column that appears in the process list. Process Status Column Pid Username Pri Nice Description The process ID number The name of the user or group running the process The process priority The nice value.process is paging • X . unless the value is followed by m. which indicates megabytes) The process state: • D . unless the value is followed by m.process is in sleep mode • T . which indicates megabytes) The amount of resident paging files in memory (in kilobytes.process has a negative nice value Time Cpu Command The amount of time (in hours:minutes:seconds) that the process has been running The percentage of CPU that the process is using The executable name of the process Size Res State To expand the process list: Access: Maint/Admin 1. The Statistics page appears. Version 4.process is in uninterruptible sleep (usually Input/Output) • N .process is being traced or stopped • W . Select Operations > Monitoring > Statistics.process is defunct • < .process is dead • Z .1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 469 .

the current system uptime. • • • • • • • • • idle usage percentage total number of kilobytes in memory total number of used kilobytes in memory total number of free kilobytes in memory total number of buffered kilobytes in memory total number of kilobytes in swap total number of used kilobytes in swap total number of free kilobytes in swap total number of cached kilobytes in swap Mem lists the following memory usage information: Swap lists the following swap usage information: IMPORTANT! For more information about the types of processes that run on the appliance. listing general process status that includes the number and types of running tasks.Monitoring the System Viewing System Process Status Chapter 14 2. select the device or devices you want to view process statistics for and click Select Devices. On the Defense Center. 3. indicating a higher priority) Nice values indicate the scheduled priority for system processes and can range between -20 (highest priority) and 19 (lowest priority). the system load average.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 470 . Version 4. the current time. Click the down arrow next to Processes.9. Cpu(s) lists the following CPU usage information: • • • user process usage percentage system process usage percentage nice usage percentage (CPU usage of processes that have a negative nice value. see Understanding Running Processes on page 471. and swap information. The process list expands. and specific information about each running process. memory. CPU.

runs in the background to provide secure web access to the appliance Manages Linux kernel event notification messages Manages the interception and logging of Linux kernel messages Manages Linux kernel swap memory keventd klogd kswapd Version 4. Understanding Running Processes There are two different types of processes that run on an appliance: daemons and executable files. and checks for working SSL and valid certificate authentication.Monitoring the System Understanding Running Processes Chapter 14 To collapse the process list: Access: Maint/Admin Click the up arrow next to Processes. The System Daemons table lists daemons that you may see on the Process Status page and provides a brief description of their functionality. They ensure that services are available and spawn processes when required. Daemons always run. This table is not an exhaustive list of all processes that may run on an appliance. and executable files are run when required. See the following sections for more information: • • Understanding System Daemons on page 471 Understanding Executables and System Utilities on page 473 Understanding System Daemons Daemons continually run on an appliance.9. System Daemons Daemon crond dhclient fpcollect httpd httpsd Description Manages the execution of scheduled commands (cron jobs) Manages dynamic host IP addressing Manages the collection of client and server fingerprints Manages the HTTP (Apache web server) process Manages the HTTPS (Apache web server with SSL) service.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 471 . The process list collapses.

between Defense Centers Listens for connections on incoming sockets and then invokes the correct executable (typically the Sourcefire message broker. only seen if Checkpoint SAM support is enabled Manages remediation responses Forwards time synchronization messages to managed sensors Provides access to the sfmb message broker process running on a remote appliance. in a high availability environment.requires RNA) sftimeserviced (Defense Center only) sfmbservice (requires IPS) Description Manages the Linux kernel update process. using an sftunnel connection to the appliance. Currently used only by health monitoring to send health events and alerts from a 3D Sensor to a Defense Center or.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 472 . sfmb) to handle the request sftroughd Version 4.Monitoring the System Understanding Running Processes Chapter 14 System Daemons (Continued) Daemon kupdated mysqld ntpd pm reportd rnareportd safe_mysqld SFDataCorrelator sfestreamer (Defense Center only) sfmgr sfreactd SFRemediateD (Defense Center only . restarts any process that fails unexpectedly Manages reports Manages RNA reports Manages safe mode operation of the database. starts required processes. which performs disk synchronization Manages Sourcefire 3D System database processes Manages the Network Time Protocol (NTP) process Manages all Sourcefire processes. restarts the database daemon if an error occurs and logs runtime information to a file Manages data transmission Manages connections to third-party client applications that use the Event Streamer Provides the RPC service for remotely managing and configuring an appliance using an sftunnel connection to the appliance Manages Check Point OPSEC integration.

Monitoring the System Understanding Running Processes Chapter 14 System Daemons (Continued) Daemon sftunnel sshd syslogd Description Provides the secure communication channel for all processes requiring communication with a remote appliance Manages the Secure Shell (SSH) process.9. runs in the background to provide SSH access to the appliance Manages the system logging (syslog) process Understanding Executables and System Utilities There are a number of executables on the system that run when executed by other processes or through user action. System Executables and Utilities Executable awk bash cat chown chsh correlator (Defense Center only requires RNA) cp df echo egrep Description Utility that executes programs written in the awk programming language GNU Bourne-Again SHell Utility that reads files and writes content to standard output Utility that changes user and group file permissions Utility that changes the default login shell Analyzes binary files created by RNA to generate events. flow data. The System Executables and Utilities table describes the executables that you may see on the Process Status page. and the network map Utility that copies files Utility that lists the amount of free space on the appliance Utility that writes content to standard output Utility that searches files and folders for specified input. supports extended set of regular expressions not supported in standard grep Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 473 .

See Configuring the Access List for Your Appliance on page 325 for more information about access configuration. Handles iptables file restoration Handles saved changes to the iptables Utility that can be used to end a session and process Utility that can be used to end all sessions and processes Public domain version of the Korn shell Utility that provides a way to access the syslog daemon from the command line Utility that prints checksums and block counts for specified files Utility that moves (renames) files Indicates database table checking and repairing Indicates a database process.Monitoring the System Understanding Running Processes Chapter 14 System Executables and Utilities (Continued) Executable find grep halt httpsdctl hwclock ifconfig iptables Description Utility that recursively searches directories for specified input Utility that searches files and directories for specified input Utility that stops the server Handles secure Apache Web processes Utility that allows access to the hardware clock Indicates the network configuration executable.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 474 . multiple instances may appear Indicates authentication certificate creation Indicates a perl process iptables-restore iptables-save kill killall ksh logger md5sum mv myisamchk mysql openssl perl Version 4.9. Ensures that the MAC address stays constant Handles access restriction based on changes made to the Access Configuration page.

heartbeat used to maintain contact between a sensor and Defense Center Indicates a message broker process. which allows users other than root to run executables Utility that displays information about the top CPU processes Utility that can be used to change the access and modification times of specified files sed sfheartbeat sfmb sfsnort (requires IPS) sh shutdown sleep smtpclient snmptrap ssh sudo top touch Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 475 . handles communication between Defense Centers and sensor. indicating that the appliance is active. Indicates that Snort is running Public domain version of the Korn shell Utility that shuts down the appliance Utility that suspends a process for a specified number of seconds Mail client that handles email transmission when email event notification functionality is enabled Forwards SNMP trap data to the SNMP trap server specified when SNMP notification functionality is enabled Indicates a Secure Shell (SSH) connection to the appliance Indicates a sudo process. then generates binary files that the Data Correlator processes to generate the network map and to populate the database with events and flow data Utility used to edit one or more text files Identifies a heartbeat broadcast. correlating acquired data with the RNA fingerprint database.9. decodes and performs session reassembly.Monitoring the System Understanding Running Processes Chapter 14 System Executables and Utilities (Continued) Executable ps RNA (requires RNA) Description Utility that writes process information to standard output Captures packets.

To view the IPS performance statistics: Access: Maint/Admin Select Operations > Monitoring > Performance > IPS.9. number of megabits per second. performance statistics for those sensors are under reported. IMPORTANT! Because of the way traffic is processed on 3Dx800 sensors.Monitoring the System Viewing IPS Performance Statistics Chapter 14 System Executables and Utilities (Continued) Executable vim wc Description Utility used to edit text files Utility that performs line. Graphs can be generated to reflect number of intrusion events per second. average number of bytes per packet.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 476 . or last month of operation. megabits per second. and byte counts on specified files Viewing IPS Performance Statistics Requires: IPS or DC/MDC + IPS The IPS performance statistics page allows you to generate graphs that depict performance statistics for IPS over a specific period of time. The IPS page appears. word. and the percent of packets uninspected by Snort. The Defense Center version of the page is shown below. These graphs can show statistics for the last hour. IPS performance statistics refer only to the data stored locally on the 3D Sensor. See the following sections for more information: • • Generating IPS Performance Statistics Graphs on page 476 Saving IPS Performance Statistics Graphs on page 478 Generating IPS Performance Statistics Graphs Requires: IPS or DC/MDC + IPS You can generate graphs that depict performance statistics for a Defense Center or a 3D Sensor with IPS based on the number of events per second. or average bytes per packet. Version 4. last week. last day.

The Defense Center version of the page is shown below.Monitoring the System Viewing IPS Performance Statistics Chapter 14 New data is accumulated for statistics graphs every five minutes. Therefore. select the detection engines whose data you want to view. It may also indicate that both segments have a drop rate of 50%. Select Operations > Monitoring > Performance > IPS. IPS Performance Statistics Graph Types Graph Type Events/Sec Mbits/Sec Avg Bytes/Packet Percent Packets Dropped Output Displays a graph that represents the number of events that are generated on the sensor per second Displays a graph that represents the number of megabits of traffic that pass through the sensor per second Displays a graph that represents the average number of bytes included in each packet This graph depicts the average percentage of uninspected packets across all detection resources (instances of Snort) assigned to the selected detection engine. If you assign two detection resources to a detection engine that has two interface sets and each interface set is connected to a different network segment. if you reload a graph quickly. Version 4.9. then an average of 50% may indicate that one segment has a 90% drop rate and the other has a 10% drop rate. select the type of graph you want to create. The graph only represents the total % drop when there is a single detection resource assigned to a selected detection engine. 2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 477 . The IPS page appears. From the Select Graph(s) list. the data may not change until the next five-minute increment occurs. To generate IPS performance statistics graphs: Access: Maint/Admin 1. From the Select Device list. 3. The IPS Performance Statistics Graph Types table lists the available graph types.

You can choose from last hour. or last month.Monitoring the System Viewing RNA Performance Statistics Chapter 14 4. you can save the graph as a graphic file for later use. last week.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 478 . Saving IPS Performance Statistics Graphs Requires: IPS or DC/MDC + IPS After you have generated an IPS performance statistics graph.9. Click Graph. Viewing RNA Performance Statistics Requires: DC + RNA The RNA Performance page allows you to generate graphs that display RNA-related performance statistics over a specific period of time. select the time range you would like to use for the graph. Graphs can be generated to display: • • • • the number of events generated by the Data Correlator per second the number of megabits analyzed by the RNA process per second average number of bytes included in each packet analyzed by the RNA process the percentage of packets dropped by RNA Version 4. To save the graph: Access: Maint/Admin Right-click on the graph and follow the instructions for your browser to save the image. From the Select Time Range list. last day. The graph appears. 5. displaying the information you specified.

last week. the data may not change until the next five-minute increment occurs.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 479 .9. To access the RNA Performance page: Access: Maint/Admin Select Operations > Monitoring > Performance > RNA. The RNA page appears. The RNA Performance Statistics Graph Types table lists the available graph types. in thousands. last day. See the following sections for more information: • • Generating RNA Performance Statistics Graphs on page 479 Saving RNA Performance Statistics Graphs on page 481 Generating RNA Performance Statistics Graphs Requires: DC + RNA You can generate graphs that display performance statistics for managed 3D Sensors with RNA. New data is accumulated for statistics graphs every five minutes.Monitoring the System Viewing RNA Performance Statistics Chapter 14 • • the number of packets. analyzed by the RNA process per second the number of established connections analyzed by the RNA process per second These graphs can show statistics for the last hour. or last month of operation. Therefore. RNA Performance Statistics Graph Types Graph Type Processed Events/Sec Output Displays a graph that represents the number of events that the Data Correlator processes per second Displays a graph that represents the number of flows that the Data Correlator processes per second Displays a graph that represents the number of events that RNA generates per second Processed Flows/Sec Generated Events/Sec Version 4. if you reload a graph quickly.

From the Select Time Range list. Depending on whether you select a detection engine or a sensor. TIP! You can select multiple graphs by holding down the Ctrl or Shift keys while clicking on the graph type. Select Operations > Monitoring > Performance > RNA. The RNA page appears. select the time range you would like to use for the graph.Monitoring the System Viewing RNA Performance Statistics Chapter 14 RNA Performance Statistics Graph Types (Continued) Graph Type Mbits/Sec Output Displays a graph that represents the number of megabits of traffic that are analyzed by the RNA process per second Displays a graph that represents the average number of bytes included in each packet analyzed by the RNA process Displays a graph that represents the percentage of packets dropped by RNA Displays a graph that represents the number of packets analyzed by the RNA process per second. in thousands Displays a graph that represents the number of established connections observed by the RNA process per second Avg Bytes/Packet Percent Packets Dropped K Packets/Sec Syn/Ack/Sec To generate RNA performance statistics graphs: Access: Maint/Admin 1. From the Select Target list. select the type of graph you want to create. Version 4. 4. From the Select Graph(s) list.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 480 . last week.9. You can choose from last hour. the managed 3D Sensors. the Select Graph(s) list adjusts to display the available graphs. last day. or the detection engines that you want to include. select the Defense Center. 2. or last month. 3.

2.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 481 . To save the graph: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Create an RNA performance statistic graph as described in Generating RNA Performance Statistics Graphs on page 479. you can save the graph as a graphic file for later use. The graph appears.Monitoring the System Viewing RNA Performance Statistics Chapter 14 5. Saving RNA Performance Statistics Graphs Requires: DC + RNA After you have generated an RNA performance statistics graph. Click Graph. each graph appears on the page. Version 4.9. displaying the information you specified. Right-click on the graph and follow the instructions for your browser to save the image. If you selected multiple graphs.

The health monitor collects health events based on the test conditions configured.Using Health Monitoring Chapter 15 Administrator Guide The health monitor provides numerous tests for determining the health of an appliance from the Defense Center. are scripts that test for criteria you specify. and apply the health policy to one or more appliances. referred to as health modules. referred to as a health policy. The tests. you can also configure email. You can create one health policy for every appliance in your system. See the following sections for more information: • • Understanding Health Monitoring on page 483 Configuring Health Policies on page 489 Version 4.9. You can also import a health policy exported from another Defense Center. or use one of the default health policies. You can also suppress messages from selected appliances by blacklisting them. SNMP or syslog alerting in response to health events. You can modify a health policy by enabling or disabling tests or by changing test settings. You can use the health monitor to create a collection of tests. Fully customizable event views allow you to quickly and easily analyze the health status events gathered by the health monitor. You can also run all tests or a specific test on demand. you can view health status information for the entire system or for a particular appliance. You can also generate troubleshooting files for an appliance if you are asked to do so by Support. These event views allow you to search and view event data and to access other information that may be related to the events you are investigating. The tests in a health policy run automatically at the interval you configure. At the Defense Center. customize a health policy for the specific appliance where you plan to apply it. and you can delete health policies that you no longer need. . Optionally.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 482 .

Version 4. From an individual appliance’s health monitor. then drill down into status details if needed. You can also search for specific health events. For example. You can set alerting thresholds to minimize the number of repeating alerts you receive. events. you can open a table view of occurrences of a specific event. The Health Monitor page provides a visual summary of the status of all appliances on your system. disk. you can set up an email alert. or you can retrieve all the health events for that appliance.Using Health Monitoring Understanding Health Monitoring Chapter 15 • • Using the Health Monitor Blacklist on page 534 Configuring Health Monitor Alerts on page 539 Understanding Health Monitoring You can use the health monitor to check the status of critical functionality across your Sourcefire 3D System deployment. You can use the health monitor to access health status information for the entire system or for a particular appliance. You can also view health events in the standard Sourcefire 3D System table view. if you want to see all the occurrences of CPU usage with a certain percentage. if you need to make sure an appliance never fails due to hardware overload. You can also configure email. Monitor the health of your entire Sourcefire 3D System through the Defense Center by applying health policies to each of the managed appliances and collecting the resulting health data at the Defense Center. so you can check status at a glance. You can then create a health alert that triggers that email alert whenever CPU. or memory usage reaches the Warning level you configure in the health policy applied to that appliance. A health alert is an association between a standard alert and a health status level. you can search for the CPU usage module and enter the percentage value.9. For example. Pie charts and status tables on the Health Monitor page visually represent the health status for monitored appliances. SNMP or syslog alerting in response to health .1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 483 . Individual appliance health monitors let you drill down into health details for a specific appliance.

For more information on health policies and the health modules you can run to test system health. For more information on assigning user privileges. only users with Admin access privileges can access system health data. Sourcefire 3D System appliances do not have health monitoring policies applied to them by default. Version 4. see Applying Health Policies on page 528. For details on applying policies. see the following topics: • • • Understanding Health Policies on page 484 Understanding Health Modules on page 485 Understanding Health Monitoring Configuration on page 489 Understanding Health Policies A health policy is a collection of health module settings you apply to an appliance to define the criteria that the Defense Center uses when checking the health of the appliance. you have to apply a health policy to that appliance.Using Health Monitoring Understanding Health Monitoring Chapter 15 Because health monitoring is an administrative activity. IMPORTANT! Except for the Defense Center. to monitor the health of a 3D Sensor with IPS. you can create a policy that monitors just the intrusion event rate and the IPS process. you choose which tests to run to determine appliance health. For more information on creating customized health policies. which also monitors CPU. and memory usage. The health monitor tracks a variety of health indicators to ensure that your Sourcefire 3D System hardware and software are working correctly. see Creating Health Policies on page 497.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 484 . and traffic status.9. see Predefined Health Policies on page 490. or you can apply the default policy. For more information on available default health policies you can apply to an appliance. see Modifying User Privileges and Options on page 306. For example. If you want to monitor the health of a managed appliance. You can also apply one of the five default health policies to each appliance. the Data Correlator process. disk. When you create health policies.

regardless of the limits set for the module. are scripts that test for the criteria you specify in a health policy. This module determines if the CPU on the sensor is overheated and alerts when the temperature exceeds temperatures configured for the module. This module checks for network cards which have restarted due to hardware failure and alerts when a reset occurs. This module checks that the CPU on the appliance is not overloaded and alerts when CPU usage exceeds the percentages configured for the module. The alert level also lowers by one level (for example. which may indicate a problem with the process. The status remains Critical until the module finds that the process is running. the module only increments the restart counter by one each time it checks. Health Modules Module Appliance Heartbeat Automatic Application Bypass Status CPU Temperature Description This module determines if an appliance heartbeat is being heard from the sensor and alerts based on the sensor heartbeat status. the module sets status according to the restart counter value and the configured limits for the module. If any restarts occur. This module determines if a detection engine has been bypassed because it did not respond within the number of seconds set in the bypass threshold. Even if multiple restarts occur between tests.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 485 . This module determines if the Data Correlator process (SFDataCorrelator) is restarting too often. The available health modules are described in the Health Modules table.9. If the module finds that the process is not running at all. also sometimes referred to as health tests. The restart counter does not count actual restarts. see Understanding System Daemons on page 471. and alerts when a bypass occurs. CPU Usage Card Reset Data Correlator Process Version 4. and alerts when the number of restarts exceeds limits configured for the module. The module checks if any restarts occurred during the period between tests. At that point. The second time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test. The first time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test. the module resets the counter to zero. but sets the module status to Critical for that test. the module adds one to the restart count.Using Health Monitoring Understanding Health Monitoring Chapter 15 Understanding Health Modules Health modules. This module only runs on 3Dx800 sensors. it increments the restart counter by one. Critical is reduced to Warning or Warning is reduced to Normal). the alert level resets to Normal. For more information on system daemons such as SFDataCorrelator.

This module only runs on 3Dx800 sensors.9. The status remains Critical until the module finds that the process is running. If the Event Stream is zero. regardless of the limits set for the module. This module only runs on 3Dx800 sensors and 3D9900 sensors. The restart counter does not count actual restarts. the module also reports on the status of hardware-related daemons. This module determines if the eStreamer process is restarting too often. and alerts when the number of restarts exceeds limits configured for the module. At that point. see Interpreting Hardware Alert Details for 3D9900 Sensors on page 560. On the 3D9900. Disk Usage This module compares disk usage on the appliance to the limits configured for the module and alerts when usage exceeds the percentages configured for the module. This module determines if hardware needs to be replaced on a 3Dx800 or 3D9900 sensor and alerts based on the hardware status. If the module finds that the process is not running at all. The second time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test. the eStreamer process may be down or the Defense Center may not be sending events. This module only runs on Defense Centers. which may indicate a problem with the process. the module adds one to the restart count. the module only increments the restart counter by one each time it checks. it increments the restart counter by one. the module sets status according to the restart counter value and the configured limits for the module. eStreamer Process Version 4.Using Health Monitoring Understanding Health Monitoring Chapter 15 Health Modules (Continued) Module Defense Center Status Description This module ensures that there are heartbeats from connected Defense Centers and alerts based on the Defense Center status. the module resets the counter to zero.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 486 . Even if multiple restarts occur between tests. The alert level also lowers by one level (for example. This module only runs on Master Defense Centers. but sets the module status to Critical for that test. The first time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test. Critical is reduced to Warning or Warning is reduced to Normal). If any restarts occur. For more information on the details reported for 3D9900 sensors. Event Stream Status This module compares the number of events per second to the limits configured for this module and alerts if the limits are exceeded. This module only runs on Master Defense Centers. The module checks if any restarts occurred during the period between tests. Fan Alarm Hardware Alarms This module determines if fans need to be replaced on the sensor and alerts based on the fan status. the alert level resets to Normal.

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Health Modules (Continued) Module Health Monitor Process Description This module monitors the status of the health monitor itself and alerts if the number of minutes since the last health event received by the Defense Center exceeds the Warning or Critical limits. This module only runs on Defense Centers. IPS Event Rate This module compares the number of intrusion events per second to the limits configured for this module and alerts if the limits are exceeded. If the IPS Event Rate is zero, the IPS process may be down or the 3D Sensor may not be sending events. Select Analysis & Reporting > Event Summary > Intrusion Event Statistics to check if events are being received from the sensor. This module determines if the IPS process (snort) has been restarting too often, which may indicate a problem with the process, and alerts when the number of restarts exceeds the limits configured for the module. The IPS process (also known as snort) is the packet decoder on a 3D Sensor with that is licensed for IPS component. If the IPS process is down or has been restarting, the IPS Event Rate results may be inaccurate. The restart counter does not indicate the number of restarts. Instead, the module checks if any restarts occurred during the period between tests. Even if multiple restarts occur between tests, the module only increments the restart counter by one each time it checks. If any restarts occur, the module adds one to the restart count. The first time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test, the module resets the counter to zero. The alert level also lowers by one level (for example, Critical is reduced to Warning or Warning is reduced to Normal). The second time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test, the alert level resets to Normal. If the module finds that the process is not running at all, it increments the restart counter by one, but sets the module status to Critical for that test, regardless of the limits set for the module. The status remains Critical until the module finds that the process is running. At that point, the module sets status according to the restart counter value and the configured limits for the module. Link State Propagation MDC Event Service Memory Usage This module determines when a link in a paired inline interface set fails and triggers the link state propagation mode. This module monitors the health of the internal eStreamer process used to transmit events to the Master Defense Center from the Defense Center. This module compares memory usage on the appliance to the limits configured for the module and alerts when usage exceeds the levels configured for the module. This module monitors the application of PEP rules to interface sets on a 3D9900. If PEP rules cannot be applied to interfaces in an interface set, the module generates an alert.

IPS Process

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Health Modules (Continued) Module Power Supply Description This module determines if power supplies on the sensor require replacement and alerts based on the power supply status. This module only runs on the Series 2 DC3000, MDC3000, 3Dx800, 3D9900, 3D3500, 3D4500, and 3D6500 appliances. This module indicates whether a specified period of time has passed since any RNA events have been detected by a sensor. This module determines if sufficient RNA host licenses remain and alerts based on the warning level configured for the module. This module determines if the RNA process (rna) is restarting too often, which may indicate a problem with the process, and alerts based on the number of restarts configured for the module. The restart counter does not count actual restarts. The module checks if any restarts occurred during the period between tests. Even if multiple restarts occur between tests, the module only increments the restart counter by one each time it checks. If any restarts occur, the module adds one to the restart count. The first time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test, the module resets the counter to zero. The alert level also lowers by one level (for example, Critical is reduced to Warning or Warning is reduced to Normal). The second time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test, the alert level resets to Normal. If the module finds that the process is not running at all, it increments the restart counter by one, but sets the module status to Critical for that test, regardless of the limits set for the module. The status remains Critical until the module finds that the process is running. At that point, the module sets status according to the restart counter value and the configured limits for the module. Time Synchronization Status Traffic Status This module tracks the synchronization of a sensor clock that obtains time using NTP with the clock on the NTP server and alerts if the difference in the clocks is more than ten seconds. This module determines if the sensor currently collects traffic and alerts based on the traffic status.

RNA Event Status RNA Host License Limit RNA Process

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Understanding Health Monitoring Configuration
There are several steps to setting up health monitoring on your Sourcefire 3D System, as indicated in the following procedure: 1. Create health policies for your appliances. You can set up specific policies for each kind of appliance you have in your Sourcefire 3D System, enabling only the appropriate tests for that appliance. TIP! If you want to quickly enable health monitoring without customizing the monitoring behavior, you can apply one of the default policies provided for that purpose. For more information on setting up health policies, see Configuring Health Policies on page 489. 2. Apply a health policy to each appliance where you want to track health status. For information on the default health policies available for immediate application, see Predefined Health Policies on page 490. 3. Optionally, configure health monitor alerts. You can set up email, syslog, or SNMP alerts that trigger when the health status level reaches a particular severity level for specific health modules. For more information on setting up health monitor alerts, see Configuring Health Monitor Alerts on page 539. After you set up health monitoring on your system, you can view the health status at any time on the Health Monitor page or the Health Table Events View. For more information about viewing system health data, see the following topics: • • • Using the Health Monitor on page 545 Using Appliance Health Monitors on page 547 Working with Health Events on page 555

Configuring Health Policies
A health policy contains configured health test criteria for several modules. You can control which health modules run against each of your appliances and configure the specific limits used in the tests run by each module. For more information on the health modules you can configure in a health policy, see Understanding Health Monitoring on page 483. You can create one health policy that can be applied to every appliance in your system, customize each health policy to the specific appliance where you plan to apply it, or use the default health policies provided for you. You can also import a health policy exported from another Defense Center.

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When you configure a health policy, you decide whether to enable each health module for that policy. You also select the criteria that control which health status each enabled module reports each time it assesses the health of a process. For more information on the default health policy, which is applied to the Defense Center and Master Defense Center automatically, see Default Health Policy on page 493. For more information, see the following topics: • • • • • Predefined Health Policies on page 490 Creating Health Policies on page 497 Applying Health Policies on page 528 Editing Health Policies on page 530 Deleting Health Policies on page 533

Predefined Health Policies
The Defense Center health monitor includes several default health policies to make it easier for you to quickly implement health monitoring for your appliances. The Default Health Policy is automatically applied to the Defense Center. To also monitor sensor health, you can push health policies to 3D Sensors. IMPORTANT! You cannot apply a health policy to RNA Software for Red Hat Linux or Crossbeam-based software sensors. For more information, see the following topics: • • • • • • • Default 3D Sensor Health Policy on page 491 Default 3Dx800 Health Policy on page 491 Suggested 3D9900 Health Policy on page 492 Default Health Policy on page 493 Default Intrusion Sensor Health Policy on page 495 Default IPS (3Dx800 only) Health Policy on page 495 Default RNA Sensor Health Policy on page 496

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Default 3D Sensor Health Policy
Use the Default 3D Sensor Health Policy to monitor health on any 3D Sensor. Enabled health modules for this policy are listed in the Enabled Health Modules: 3D Sensor Health Policy table. Enabled Health Modules: 3D Sensor Health Policy Module Automatic Application Bypass Status Data Correlator Process Disk Usage IPS Event Rate IPS Process Link State Propagation Memory Usage Power Supply RNA Process Traffic Status For more information, see... Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on page 502 Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring on page 506 Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring IPS Event Rate Monitoring on page 515 Configuring IPS Process Monitoring on page 516 Configuring Link State Propagation Monitoring on page 518 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring Power Supply Monitoring on page 522 Configuring RNA Process Monitoring on page 525 Configuring Traffic Status Monitoring on page 527

Default 3Dx800 Health Policy
Use the Default 3Dx800 Health Policy to monitor health on 3Dx800 sensors. Enabled health modules for this policy are listed in the Enabled Health Modules: Default 3Dx800 Health Policy table. Note that the Hardware Alarm module should

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be used instead of the Power Supply module to monitor power supply health on the 3Dx800 sensor models. Enabled Health Modules: Default 3Dx800 Health Policy Module Automatic Application Bypass Status CPU Temperature Disk Usage Fan Alarm Hardware Alarms IPS Event Rate IPS Process Memory Usage RNA Process Traffic Status For more information, see... Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on page 502 Configuring CPU Temperature Monitoring on page 503 Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring Fan Monitoring on page 512 Configuring Hardware Monitoring on page 513 Configuring IPS Event Rate Monitoring on page 515 Configuring IPS Process Monitoring on page 516 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring RNA Process Monitoring on page 525 Configuring Traffic Status Monitoring on page 527

Suggested 3D9900 Health Policy
The Defense Center interface does not include a default health policy specifically for 3D9900 sensors. Sourcefire recommends that you start with the default 3D Sensor policy and enable the Hardware Alarms module. If the sensor will be running RNA, enable the RNA Process module as well. Health modules that should be enabled when creating a policy for this type of sensor are listed in the Suggested Health Modules: 3D9900 Health Policy table. Note that the CPU Usage module cannot be enabled when monitoring 3D9900

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sensor models. CPU usage for a 3D9900 may reach 100% during normal sensor operation, so the data provided by the module would generate misleading events. Suggested Health Modules: 3D9900 Health Policy Module Data Correlator Process Disk Usage Hardware Alarms IPS Event Rate IPS Process Link State Propagation Memory Usage PEP Status Power Supply RNA Process Traffic Status For more information, see... Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring on page 506 Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring Hardware Monitoring on page 513 Configuring IPS Event Rate Monitoring on page 515 Configuring IPS Process Monitoring on page 516 Configuring Link State Propagation Monitoring on page 518 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring PEP Status Monitoring on page 521 Configuring Power Supply Monitoring on page 522 Configuring RNA Process Monitoring on page 525 Configuring Traffic Status Monitoring on page 527

Default Health Policy
Use the Default Health Policy to monitor health on a Defense Center. Enabled health modules for this policy are listed in the Enabled Defense Center Health Modules - Default Health Policy table. Enabled Defense Center Health Modules - Default Health Policy Module Automatic Application Bypass Status Appliance Heartbeat For more information, see... Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on page 502 Configuring Appliance Heartbeat Monitoring on page 501

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Enabled Defense Center Health Modules - Default Health Policy (Continued) Module Data Correlator Process Disk Usage Link State Propagation Memory Usage Time Synchronization Status Power Supply RNA Host License Limit For more information, see... Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring on page 506 Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring Link State Propagation Monitoring on page 518 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring Time Synchronization Monitoring on page 526 Configuring Power Supply Monitoring on page 522 Configuring RNA Host Usage Monitoring on page 524

Use the Default Health Policy to monitor health on a Master Defense Center. Enabled health modules for this policy are listed in the Enabled MDC Health Modules - Default Health Policy table. Enabled MDC Health Modules - Default Health Policy Module Data Correlator Process Defense Center Status Disk Usage eStreamer Process Event Stream Memory Usage RNA Host License Limit For more information, see... Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring on page 506 Configuring Defense Center Status on page 507 Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring eStreamer Process Monitoring on page 509 Configuring Event Stream Monitoring on page 511 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring RNA Host Usage Monitoring on page 524

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Default Intrusion Sensor Health Policy
Use the Default IPS Health Policy to monitor health on legacy Intrusion Sensors that you have not upgraded to Version 4.9.1. Enabled health modules for this policy are listed in the Enabled Health Modules: Default Intrusion Sensor Health Policy table. Enabled Health Modules: Default Intrusion Sensor Health Policy Module Automatic Application Bypass Status Data Correlator Process Disk Usage Health Monitor Process IPS Event Rate IPS Process Link State Propagation Memory Usage Power Supply Traffic Status For more information, see... Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on page 502 Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring on page 506 Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring Health Status Monitoring on page 514 Configuring IPS Event Rate Monitoring on page 515 Configuring IPS Process Monitoring on page 516 Configuring Link State Propagation Monitoring on page 518 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring Power Supply Monitoring on page 522 Configuring Traffic Status Monitoring on page 527

Default IPS (3Dx800 only) Health Policy
Use the Default IPS (3Dx800 only) Health Policy to monitor IPS health on 3Dx800 sensors. Enabled health modules for this policy are listed in the Enabled Health Modules: Default IPS (3Dx800 only) Health Policy table. Note that the Hardware

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Alarm module should be used instead of the Power Supply module to monitor power supply health on the 3Dx800 sensor models. Enabled Health Modules: Default IPS (3Dx800 only) Health Policy Module Automatic Application Bypass Status CPU Temperature Data Correlator Process Disk Usage Fan Alarm Hardware Alarms IPS Event Rate IPS Process Memory Usage Traffic Status For more information, see... Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on page 502 Configuring CPU Temperature Monitoring on page 503 Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring on page 506 Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring Fan Monitoring on page 512 Configuring Hardware Monitoring on page 513 Configuring IPS Event Rate Monitoring on page 515 Configuring IPS Process Monitoring on page 516 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring Traffic Status Monitoring on page 527

Default RNA Sensor Health Policy
Use the Default RNA Sensor Health Policy to monitor health on legacy RNA Sensors that you have not upgraded to Version 4.9.1. Enabled health modules for

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this policy are listed in the Enabled Health Modules: Default RNA Sensor Health Policy table. Enabled Health Modules: Default RNA Sensor Health Policy Module Automatic Application Bypass Status Data Correlator Process Disk Usage Link State Propagation Memory Usage Power Supply RNA Host License Limit RNA Process Traffic Status For more information, see... Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on page 502 Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring on page 506 Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring Link State Propagation Monitoring on page 518 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring Power Supply Monitoring on page 522 Configuring RNA Host Usage Monitoring on page 524 Configuring RNA Process Monitoring on page 525 Configuring Traffic Status Monitoring on page 527

Creating Health Policies
Requires: DC/MDC If you want to customize a health policy to use with your appliances, you can create a new policy. The settings in the policy initially populate with the settings from the health policy you select as a basis for the new policy. You can enable or disable modules within the policy and change the alerting criteria for each module as needed. TIP! Instead of creating a new policy, you can export a health policy from another Defense Center and then import it onto your Defense Center. You can then edit the imported policy to suit your needs before you apply it. For more information, see Importing and Exporting Objects on page 583. To create a health policy: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. The Health Monitor page appears.

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2. On the toolbar, click Health Policy. The Health Policy page appears.

3. Click Create Policy to create a new policy. The Create Health Policy page appears.

4. Select the existing policy that you want to use as the basis for the new policy from the Copy Policy drop-down list. 5. Enter a name for the policy. 6. Enter a description for the policy.

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9. Select Save to save the policy information. including a list of the modules. 8.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 7. Configure settings on each module you want to use to test the health status of your appliances. as described in the following sections: • • • • • • • • • • • • Configuring Policy Run Time Intervals on page 500 Configuring Appliance Heartbeat Monitoring on page 501 Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on page 502 Configuring CPU Temperature Monitoring on page 503 Configuring CPU Usage Monitoring on page 504 Configuring Card Reset Monitoring on page 505 Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring on page 506 Configuring Defense Center Status on page 507 Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring eStreamer Process Monitoring on page 509 Configuring Event Stream Monitoring on page 511 Configuring Fan Monitoring on page 512 Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 499 . The Health Policy Configuration page appears.

9. even if the policy that contains the module has been applied to an appliance. The maximum run time interval you can set is 99999 minutes. Version 4. To configure a policy run time interval: Access: Maint/Admin 1. see Applying Health Policies on page 528. On the Health Policy Configuration page.Policy Run Time Interval page appears. The Health Policy Configuration .Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Configuring Hardware Monitoring on page 513 Configuring Health Status Monitoring on page 514 Configuring IPS Event Rate Monitoring on page 515 Configuring IPS Process Monitoring on page 516 Configuring Link State Propagation Monitoring on page 518 Configuring MDC Event Service Monitoring on page 519 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring PEP Status Monitoring on page 521 Configuring Power Supply Monitoring on page 522 Configuring RNA Event Status Monitoring on page 523 Configuring RNA Host Usage Monitoring on page 524 Configuring RNA Process Monitoring on page 525 Configuring Time Synchronization Monitoring on page 526 Configuring Traffic Status Monitoring on page 527 IMPORTANT! Make sure you enable each module that you want to run to test the health status on each Health Policy Configuration page as you configure the settings.9. For more information on applying health policies. Click Save to save the policy. You must apply the policy to each appliance for it to take effect.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 500 . Configuring Policy Run Time Intervals Requires: DC/MDC You can control how often health tests run by modifying the Policy Run Time Interval for the health policy. select Policy Run Time Interval. WARNING! Do not set a run interval of less than five minutes. Disabled modules do not produce health status feedback.

Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. whichever comes first. if you click Cancel. enter the time in minutes that you want to elapse between automatic repetitions of the test. as an indicator that the appliance is running and communicating properly with the Defense Center.9. all changes you made will be saved.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 2. That status data feeds into the health monitor. select Appliance Heartbeat. 2. In the Run Interval (mins) field. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. The Health Policy Configuration . You must apply the health policy to the appropriate appliances if you want your settings to take effect. Configuring Appliance Heartbeat Monitoring Requires: DC Supported Platforms: Defense Center The Defense Center receives heartbeats from its managed appliances once every two minutes or every 200 events. you discard all changes. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. select the other module from the list at the left of the page.Appliance Heartbeat page appears. Use the Appliance Heartbeat health status module to track whether the Defense Center receives heartbeats from managed appliances. To configure Appliance Heartbeat health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 501 . the status classification for this module changes to Critical. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. click Cancel. click Save Policy and Exit. If the Defense Center does not detect a heartbeat from a appliance. 3. In the Health Policy Configuration page.

For more information on automatic application bypass. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. you discard all changes. In the Health Policy Configuration page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. this module generates an alert. That status data feeds into the health monitor.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 3.9. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: 3D Sensors except 3D9900 Use this module to detect when a detection engine is bypassed because it did not respond within the number of seconds configured as the bypass threshold. if you click Cancel. 2. click Save Policy and Exit. The Automatic Application Bypass Status page appears. To configure automatic application bypass monitoring status: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. select Automatic Application Bypass Status. all changes you made will be saved. see Automatic Application Bypass on page 212.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 502 . click Cancel. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. If a bypass occurs. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate appliances if you want your settings to take effect. Version 4.

Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 3. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. if you click Cancel. WARNING! Sourcefire recommends that you do not set the Critical limit higher than 65 degrees Celsius and that you do not set the Warning limit higher than 55 degrees Celsius. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 503 . In the Health Policy Configuration page. the status classification for that module changes to Critical. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. Overheating a CPU can damage the processing unit. click Cancel. Use the CPU Temperature health status module to set CPU temperature limits. By default. Configuring CPU Temperature Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: 3Dx800 The temperature of the central processing unit (CPU) on your 3Dx800 sensor provides an important barometer for the health of your sensor. select CPU Temperature. all changes you made will be saved. The Health Policy Configuration . If the CPU temperature on the monitored sensor exceeds the Critical limit. To configure CPU temperature health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. and the Critical limit must be greater than the Warning limit. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. If the CPU temperature on the monitored sensor exceeds the Warning limit. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. the Critical limit is set to 52 degrees Celsius and the Warning limit is set to 50 degrees Celsius. select the other module from the list at the left of the page.CPU Temperature page appears. the status classification for that module changes to Warning. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate 3D Sensor if you want your settings to take effect. The maximum temperature you can set for either limit is 100 degrees Celsius.9. you discard all changes. click Save Policy and Exit. That status data feeds into the health monitor.

Configuring CPU Usage Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: All except 3D9900 Excessive CPU usage can indicate that you need to upgrade your hardware or that there are processes that are not functioning correctly. That status data feeds into the health monitor. click Save Policy and Exit. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. The maximum percentage you can set for either limit is 100 percent. if you click Cancel. in Celsius. 5. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. 4. in Celsius.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 2. that should trigger a warning health status. Note that this module is not available for health policies applied to 3D9900 sensors.9. In the Warning Threshold Celsius field. enter the number of degrees. 3.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 504 . See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. the status classification for that module changes to Warning. and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit. Version 4. In the Critical Threshold Celsius field. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. If the CPU usage on the monitored appliance exceeds the Critical limit. that should trigger a critical health status. Use the CPU Usage health status module to set CPU usage limits. click Cancel. If the CPU usage on the monitored appliance exceeds the Warning limit. you discard all changes. all changes you made will be saved. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. enter the number of degrees. the status classification for that module changes to Critical.

On the Health Policy Configuration page. this module generates an alert. you discard all changes. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. That status data feeds into the health monitor. enter the percentage of CPU usage that should trigger a critical health status.9.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 To configure CPU Usage health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 505 . 4. In the Warning Threshold % field. Configuring Card Reset Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: 3D500 . You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. select Card Reset. click Save Policy and Exit. click Cancel. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done.CPU Usage page appears. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If a reset occurs. In the Health Policy Configuration page. enter the percentage of CPU usage that should trigger a warning health status. 5. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. In the Critical Threshold % field. The Card Reset Monitoring page appears.3D6500 except 3Dx800 Use the card reset monitoring health status module to track when the network card restarts because of hardware failure. Version 4. if you click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. To configure card reset monitoring: Access: Maint/Admin 1. The Health Policy Configuration . 2. all changes you made will be saved. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. select CPU Usage. 3. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate appliances if you want your settings to take effect.

Even if multiple restarts occur between tests. the module adds one to the restart count. the status classification for that module changes to Warning. If the module finds that the process is not running at all. The first time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test.9. it increments the restart counter by one. If the module checks the Data Correlator process as many times as configured in the Warning Number of restarts limit. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate Defense Center if you want your settings to take effect. if you click Cancel. If the module checks the Data Correlator process as many times as configured in the Critical Number of restarts limit. the module resets the counter to zero. click Save Policy and Exit. The restart counter does not count actual restarts. At that point. and each time one or more restarts have occurred. Version 4. The status remains Critical until the module finds that the process is running. the alert level resets to Normal. the module sets status according to the restart counter value and the configured limits for the module. but sets the module status to Critical for that test. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. regardless of the limits set for the module. Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: All The Data Correlator. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 506 . Critical is reduced to Warning or Warning is reduced to Normal). you discard all changes. manages data transmission. the status classification for that module changes to Critical. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. The second time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test. The module checks if any restarts occurred during the period between tests. the module only increments the restart counter by one each time it checks. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. That status data feeds into the health monitor. 3. If any restarts occur. and each time one or more restarts have occurred. click Cancel. Use the Data Correlator Process health status module to set limits for the number of restarts that trigger a change in the health status.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 2. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. short for the system daemon SFDataCorrelator. The alert level also lowers by one level (for example. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. all changes you made will be saved. select the other module from the list at the left of the page.

9. this module generates an alert. if you click Cancel. select Data Correlator Process.Data Correlator Process page appears. 3. Configuring Defense Center Status Requires: MDC Supported Platforms: Master Defense Center Use the Defense Center Status health status module to monitor the status of a Defense Center or Defense Centers managed by the Master Defense Center where the health policy is applied.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 The maximum number of restarts you can set for either limit is 100. On the Health Policy Configuration page. 2. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. 4. enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a warning health status. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. In the Warning Number of restarts field. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. In the Critical Number of restarts field.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 507 . If a heartbeat is not obtained from the managed Defense Center or Defense Centers. That status data feeds into the health monitor. enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a critical health status. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate appliances if you want your settings to take effect. and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit. 5. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. you discard all changes. Version 4. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. all changes you made will be saved. click Save Policy and Exit. To configure Data Correlator Process health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. The Health Policy Configuration . click Cancel.

The Defense Center Status page appears. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. If the disk usage on the monitored appliance exceeds the Critical limit. Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: All Without sufficient disk space. The maximum percentage you can set for either limit is 100 percent. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. the status classification for that module changes to Warning.9. you discard all changes. IMPORTANT! Although the disk usage module lists the /boot partition as a monitored partition. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 508 . the size of the partition is static so the module does not alert on the boot partition. the status classification for that module changes to Critical. 3. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 To configure Defense Center Status: Access: Maint/Admin 1. an appliance cannot run. click Cancel. all changes you made will be saved. Version 4. If the disk usage on the monitored appliance exceeds the Warning limit. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. if you click Cancel. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. select Defense Center Status. click Save Policy and Exit. In the Health Policy Configuration page. Use the Disk Usage health status module to set disk usage limits for the / and / volume partitions on the appliance. 2. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate Defense Center if you want your settings to take effect. That status data feeds into the health monitor. The health monitor can identify low disk space conditions on your appliances before the space runs out.

On the Health Policy Configuration page. the module only increments the restart counter by one each time it checks. allows you to stream Sourcefire 3D System intrusion and network discovery data from the Sourcefire Defense Center to an eStreamer client. enter the percentage of disk usage that should trigger a warning health status. 5. The restart counter does not count actual restarts. all changes you made will be saved. eStreamer. select Disk Usage. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. enter the percentage of disk usage that should trigger a critical health status. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. if you click Cancel. In the Critical Threshold % field. If any restarts occur. short for the Sourcefire Event Streamer. Version 4. You can set limits for the number of restarts that trigger a change in the health status. The module checks if any restarts occurred during the period between tests.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 To configure Disk Usage health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. you discard all changes. Configuring eStreamer Process Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: Defense Center Use the eStreamer Process health status module to monitor the health of the eStreamer process on the Defense Center. Even if multiple restarts occur between tests. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate appliances if you want your settings to take effect. the module adds one to the restart count. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 509 . Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing.Disk Usage page appears. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. 2. The Health Policy Configuration . 4. In the Warning Threshold % field. click Save Policy and Exit. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done.9. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. 3. click Cancel.

At that point. the status classification for that module changes to Warning. and each time one or more restarts have occurred. Version 4. 4. it increments the restart counter by one. In the Critical Number of restarts field. Critical is reduced to Warning or Warning is reduced to Normal). regardless of the limits set for the module. the module resets the counter to zero. The alert level also lowers by one level (for example. The second time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test. the alert level resets to Normal. select eStreamer Process. The Health Policy Configuration . the module sets status according to the restart counter value and the configured limits for the module.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 510 . the status classification for that module changes to Critical. but sets the module status to Critical for that test. On the Health Policy Configuration page. The maximum number of restarts you can set for either limit is 100.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 The first time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. In the Warning Number of restarts field. 3. enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a critical health status. If the module finds that the process is not running at all. enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a warning health status. and each time one or more restarts have occurred.9. To configure eStreamer Process health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. 2. and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit. If the module checks the eStreamer process as many times as configured in the Warning Number of restarts limit. That status data feeds into the health monitor. If the module checks the eStreamer process as many times as configured in the Critical Number of restarts limit.eStreamer Process page appears. The status remains Critical until the module finds that the process is running.

See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. In the Health Policy Configuration page. Version 4. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. before triggering a critical health status. you discard all changes. The minimum number of seconds is 300. select Event Stream Status. enter the maximum number of seconds to wait between events. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module.9. that causes an alert to be generated. To configure Event Stream Status health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify.Event Stream Status page appears. Configuring Event Stream Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: Master Defense Center Use the Event Stream Status module to monitor the health of the event stream process on a Defense Center by generating alerts when too many seconds elapse between events received by the Master Defense Center. That status data feeds into the health monitor.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 511 . 2. all changes you made will be saved. If the wait exceeds the number of seconds configured in the Warning Seconds since last event limit. if you click Cancel. The Health Policy Configuration . You can configure the elapsed duration between events. and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit. the status classification for that module changes to Critical. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. In the Critical Seconds since last event field. click Cancel. in seconds. 3. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. the status classification for that module changes to Warning. The maximum number of seconds you can set for either limit is 600. If the wait exceeds the Critical Seconds since last event limit. click Save Policy and Exit. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate appliances if you want your settings to take effect.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 5.

You must apply the health policy to the Master Defense Center for your settings to take effect. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. To configure Fan Alarm health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. select Fan Alarm.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 4. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. click Cancel. enter the maximum number of seconds to wait between events. click Save Policy and Exit.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 512 . In the Health Policy Configuration page. all changes you made will be saved. before triggering a warning health status. the status classification for that module changes to Critical. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. 2. 5. In the Warning Seconds since last event field. If the Fan Alarm module finds a fan that has failed.9. Configuring Fan Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: 3Dx800 Use the Fan Alarm health status module to warn of fan failure on a 3Dx800 sensor.Fan Alarm monitor page appears. The Health Policy Configuration . Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. if you click Cancel. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. Version 4. you discard all changes. That status data feeds into the health monitor. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify.

In the Health Policy Configuration page. To configure Hardware Alarm health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. click Save Policy and Exit.9. the status classification for that module changes to Critical. all changes you made will be saved. see Interpreting Hardware Alert Details for 3D9900 Sensors on page 560. The Health Policy Configuration . if you click Cancel. select Hardware Alarms.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 3.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 513 . Note that the Hardware Alarm module can be used in addition to the Power Supply module to monitor power supply health on the 3Dx800 sensor models. Version 4. click Cancel. 2. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. Configuring Hardware Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: 3Dx800. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. For more information on the hardware status conditions that can cause hardware alerts on 3D9900 sensors. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. That status data feeds into the health monitor. you discard all changes.Hardware Alarm monitor page appears. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. If the Hardware Alarm module finds a hardware component that has failed. 3D9900 Use the Hardware Alarm health status module to detect hardware failure on a 3Dx800 or 3D9900 sensor.

See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. click Cancel.com. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. the status classification for that module changes to Warning. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. For example.com). The Health Monitor Process module then reports events that indicate how many minutes have elapsed since the last event was received from dogwood.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 514 . Configuring Health Status Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: Defense Center Use the Health Monitor Process module to monitor the health of the health monitor on a Defense Center by generating alerts when too many minutes elapse between health events received from monitored appliances. You can configure the elapsed duration between events. in minutes. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. select Health Monitor Process. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. that causes an alert to be generated. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page.example. In the Health Policy Configuration page. If the wait exceeds the number of minutes configured in the Warning Minutes since last event limit.Health Monitor Process page appears. and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit.com) monitors a sensor (dogwood. That status data feeds into the health monitor. If the wait exceeds the Critical Minutes since last event limit. if a Defense Center (myrtle. enter the maximum number of minutes to wait between events. The Health Policy Configuration . all changes you made will be saved. In the Critical Minutes since last event field. before triggering a critical health status.example. if you click Cancel. To configure Health Monitor Process module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. you apply a health policy with the Health Monitor Process module enabled to myrtle.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 3.com. The minimum number of minutes is 5. Version 4. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. click Save Policy and Exit.example. The maximum number of minutes you can set for either limit is 144. you discard all changes.9.example. 2. 3. the status classification for that module changes to Critical. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module.

You must apply the health policy to the Defense Center for your settings to take effect. then calculate the limits using these formulas: • • Events per second (Critical) = Events/Sec * 2. If the event rate for the IPS process on the monitored sensor exceeds the number of events per second configured in the Events per second (Warning) limit. find the Events/Sec value on the Statistics page for your sensor (Operations > Monitoring > Statistics). 5. To determine limits for your system. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. Events per second (Critical) should be set to 50 and Events per second (Warning) should be set to 30. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 515 . You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. enter the maximum number of minutes to wait between events. For a network segment with this average rate. the event rate for a network segment averages 20 events per second. the status classification for that module changes to Critical. and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit.5 The maximum number of events you can set for either limit is 999.9. Typically. if you click Cancel. the status classification for that module changes to Warning. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. you discard all changes. click Save Policy and Exit. click Cancel. If the event rate exceeds the number of events per second configured in the Events per second (Critical) limit. before triggering a warning health status. all changes you made will be saved. That status data feeds into the health monitor. Version 4.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 4.5 Events per second (Warning) = Events/Sec *1. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. In the Warning Minutes since last event field. Configuring IPS Event Rate Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: IPS Use the IPS Event Rate health status module to set limits for the number of packets per second that trigger a change in the health status.

The first time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test. The restart counter does not count actual restarts. In the Events per second (Critical) field. click Cancel. The Health Policy Configuration . To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. 5. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. click Save Policy and Exit. If any restarts occur. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 To configure IPS Event Rate Monitor health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. select IPS Event Rate. 2. In the Health Policy Configuration page. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. the module only increments the restart counter by one each time it checks. enter the number of events per second that should trigger a critical health status. The alert level also lowers by one level (for Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 516 . You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page. In the Events per second (Warning) field. Even if multiple restarts occur between tests. The module checks if any restarts occurred during the period between tests. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. 4. all changes you made will be saved. enter the number of events per second that should trigger a warning health status. if you click Cancel. You can configure how many restarts trigger a change in the health status for the process. you discard all changes. the module adds one to the restart count.9. Configuring IPS Process Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: IPS The IPS process (also known as Snort) is the packet decoder on a 3D Sensor with the IPS component. Use the IPS Process health status module to monitor the health of the IPS process on a sensor. the module resets the counter to zero.IPS Event Rate page appears. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. 3.

3. Critical is reduced to Warning or Warning is reduced to Normal). the status classification for that module changes to Warning. regardless of the limits set for the module. The status remains Critical until the module finds that the process is running. In the Warning Number of restarts field. The second time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test. The maximum number of restarts you can set for either limit is 100. enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a critical health status.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 517 . Version 4. If the module checks the IPS process as many times as configured in the Critical Number of restarts limit. 2. it increments the restart counter by one. In the Health Policy Configuration page. 4. and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit. To configure IPS Process Monitor health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. select IPS Process. enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a warning health status. The Health Policy Configuration .IPS Process page appears. the module sets status according to the restart counter value and the configured limits for the module. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. and each time one or more restarts have occurred.9. the alert level resets to Normal. but sets the module status to Critical for that test. At that point. If the module finds that the process is not running at all.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 example. the status classification for that module changes to Critical. In the Critical Number of restarts field. If the module checks the IPS process as many times as configured in the Warning Number of restarts limit. That status data feeds into the health monitor. and each time one or more restarts have occurred.

You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page.9. 2. select Link State Propagation. click Cancel. To configure Link State Propagation health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. If a link state propagates to the paired interface. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 518 .Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 5. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information. all changes you made will be saved.Link State Propagation monitor page appears. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. click Save Policy and Exit. if you click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. you discard all changes. On the Health Policy Configuration page. the status classification for that module changes to Critical and the state reads: Module Link State Propagation: ethx_ethy is Triggered where x and y are the paired interface numbers. Configuring Link State Propagation Monitoring Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: IPS Use the Link State Propagation health status module to detect the interface link state propagation status on an inline interface pair. The Health Policy Configuration . select the other module from the list at the left of the page.

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3. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Configuring MDC Event Service Monitoring
Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: Defense Center Use the MDC health status module to monitor the health of the internal eStreamer process on the Defense Center that is used to transmit events to the Master Defense Center. You can set limits for the number of restarts that trigger a change in the health status. The restart counter does not count actual restarts. The module checks if any restarts occurred during the period between tests. Even if multiple restarts occur between tests, the module only increments the restart counter by one each time it checks. If any restarts occur, the module adds one to the restart count. The first time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test, the module resets the counter to zero. The alert level also lowers by one level (for example, Critical is reduced to Warning or Warning is reduced to Normal). The second time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test, the alert level resets to Normal. If the module finds that the process is not running at all, it increments the restart counter by one, but sets the module status to Critical for that test, regardless of the limits set for the module. The status remains Critical until the module finds that the process is running. At that point, the module sets status according to the restart counter value and the configured limits for the module. If the module checks the MDC event service as many times as configured in the Warning Number of restarts limit, and each time one or more restarts have occurred, the status classification for that module changes to Warning. If the module checks the MDC event service as many times as configured in the Critical Number of restarts limit, and each time one or more restarts have occurred, the status classification for that module changes to Critical. That status data feeds into the health monitor. The maximum number of restarts you can set for either limit is 100, and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit.

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To configure MDC Event Service health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. On the Health Policy Configuration page, select MDC Event Service. The Health Policy Configuration - MDC Event Service Process page appears.

2. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. 3. In the Critical Number of restarts field, enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a critical health status. 4. In the Warning Number of restarts field, enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a warning health status. 5. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the appropriate appliances if you want your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring
Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: All Use the Memory Usage health status module to set memory usage limits. The module calculates free memory by adding free memory and cached memory. If the memory usage on the monitored appliance exceeds the Warning limit, the status classification for that module changes to Warning. If the memory usage on the monitored appliance exceeds the Critical limit, the status classification for that module changes to Critical. That status data feeds into the health monitor. The maximum percentage you can set for either limit is 100 percent, and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit.

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To configure Memory Usage health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. On the Health Policy Configuration page, select Memory Usage. The Health Policy Configuration - Memory Usage page appears.

2. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. 3. In the Critical Threshold % field, enter the percentage of memory usage that should trigger a critical health status. 4. In the Warning Threshold % field, enter the percentage of memory usage that should trigger a warning health status. 5. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the appropriate appliances if you want your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Configuring PEP Status Monitoring
Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: 3D9900 Use the PEP Status health status module to monitor the application of PEP rules to interface sets on a 3D9900. If PEP rules cannot be applied to interfaces in an interface set, this module generates an alert. That status data feeds into the health monitor.

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To configure PEP Status health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. In the Health Policy Configuration page, select PEP Status. The Health Policy Configuration - PEP Status monitor page appears.

2. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. 3. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Configuring Power Supply Monitoring
Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: Series 2 DC3000, MDC3000, 3D9900, 3Dx800, 3D3500, 3D4500, 3D6500 Use the Power Supply health status module to detect a power supply failure on a Series 2 DC3000, MDC3000, 3Dx800, 3D9900, 3D3500, 3D4500, or 3D6500 sensor. If the Power Supply module finds a power supply that has no power, the status classification for that module changes to No Power. If the module cannot detect the presence of the power supply, the status changes to Critical Error. That status data feeds into the health monitor. You can expand the Power Supply item on the Alert Detail list in the health monitor to see specific status items for each power supply. Note that the Hardware Alarm module can be used in addition to the Power Supply module to monitor power supply health on the 3Dx800 sensor models. To configure Power Supply health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. In the Health Policy Configuration page, select Power Supply. The Health Policy Configuration - Power Supply monitor page appears.

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2. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. 3. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Configuring RNA Event Status Monitoring
Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: DC Use the RNA Event Status module to monitor the health of the RNA process on a sensor from the Defense Center by generating alerts when too many seconds elapse between RNA events received by the Defense Center. You can configure the elapsed duration between events, in seconds, that causes an alert to be generated. If the wait exceeds the number of seconds configured in the Warning Seconds since last event limit, the status classification for that module changes to Warning. If the wait exceeds the Critical Seconds since last event limit, the status classification for that module changes to Critical. That status data feeds into the health monitor. The maximum number of seconds you can set for either limit is 7200, and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit. The minimum number of seconds is 3600. Note that the RNA Health module was renamed to the RNA Event Status module in 4.9.1 and that the supported platforms changed from 3D Sensor to Defense Center in 4.9.1. To configure RNA Event Status module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. In the Health Policy Configuration page, select RNA Event Status. The Health Policy Configuration - RNA Event Status page appears.

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2. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. 3. In the Critical Seconds since last event field, enter the maximum number of seconds to wait between events, before triggering a critical health status. 4. In the Warning Seconds since last event field, enter the maximum number of seconds to wait between events, before triggering a warning health status. 5. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the Defense Center for your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Configuring RNA Host Usage Monitoring
Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: RNA Use the RNA Host License Limit health status module to set RNA Host shortage limits. If the number of remaining RNA Hosts on the monitored sensor falls below the Warning Hosts limit, the status classification for that module changes to Warning. If the number of remaining RNA Hosts on the monitored sensor falls below the Critical Hosts limit, the status classification for that module changes to Critical. That status data feeds into the health monitor. The maximum number of hosts you can set for either limit is 999, and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit. To configure RNA Host License Limit health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. In the Health Policy Configuration page, select RNA Host License Limit. The Health Policy Configuration - RNA Host License Limit page appears.

2. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing.

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3. In the Critical number Hosts field, enter the remaining number of available hosts that should trigger a critical health status. 4. In the Warning number Hosts field, enter the remaining number of available hosts that should trigger a warning health status. 5. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Configuring RNA Process Monitoring
Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: RNA Use the RNA Process health status module to set limits for the number of restarts that trigger a change in the health status. The restart counter does not count actual restarts. The module checks if any restarts occurred during the period between tests. Even if multiple restarts occur between tests, the module only increments the restart counter by one each time it checks. If any restarts occur, the module adds one to the restart count. The first time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test, the module resets the counter to zero. The alert level also lowers by one level (for example, Critical is reduced to Warning or Warning is reduced to Normal). The second time the module checks and no restarts have occurred since the last test, the alert level resets to Normal. If the module finds that the process is not running at all, it increments the restart counter by one, but sets the module status to Critical for that test, regardless of the limits set for the module. The status remains Critical until the module finds that the process is running. At that point, the module sets status according to the restart counter value and the configured limits for the module. If the module checks the RNA process as many times as configured in the Warning Number of restarts limit, and each time one or more restarts have occurred, the status classification for that module changes to Warning. If the module checks the RNA process as many times as configured in the Critical Number of restarts limit, and each time one or more restarts have occurred, the status classification for that module changes to Critical. That status data feeds into the health monitor.

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The maximum number of restarts you can set for either limit is 100, and the Critical limit must be higher than the Warning limit. To configure RNA Process health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. In the Health Policy Configuration page, select RNA Process. The Health Policy Configuration - RNA Process page appears.

2. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. 3. In the Critical Number of restarts field, enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a critical health status. 4. In the Warning Number of restarts field, enter the number of process restarts that should trigger a warning health status. 5. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Configuring Time Synchronization Monitoring
Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: Defense Center Use the Time Synchronization Status module to detect when the time on a managed sensor that uses NTP to obtain time from an NTP server differs by 10 seconds or more from the time on the server.

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To configure time synchronization monitoring settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. In the Health Policy Configuration page, select Time Synchronization Status. The Health Policy Configuration - Time Synchronization Status monitor page appears.

2. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. 3. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Configuring Traffic Status Monitoring
Requires: DC/MDC Supported Platforms: IPS, RNA Use the Traffic Status health status module to detect whether a sensor receives traffic. If the Traffic Status module determines that a sensor does not receive traffic, the status classification for that module changes to Critical. That status data feeds into the health monitor. WARNING! If you enable the Traffic Status module on a sensor where there are unused interfaces that are included in an interface set associated with a detection engine, the module interprets the idleness of the port as a traffic failure and alerts on traffic status. To prevent alerting on idle interfaces, remove those interfaces from all interface sets associated with detection engines. For more information on managing interface sets, see Editing an Interface Set on page 221.

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To configure Traffic Status health module settings: Access: Maint/Admin 1. In the Health Policy Configuration page, select Traffic Status. The Health Policy Configuration - Traffic Status monitor page appears.

2. Select On for the Enabled option to enable use of the module for health status testing. 3. You have three options: • • • To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page, click Save Policy and Exit. To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module, click Cancel. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify, select the other module from the list at the left of the page. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done, all changes you made will be saved; if you click Cancel, you discard all changes.

You must apply the health policy to the appropriate sensors if you want your settings to take effect. See Applying Health Policies on page 528 for more information.

Applying Health Policies
Requires: DC/MDC When you apply a health policy to an appliance, the health tests for all the modules you enabled in the policy automatically monitor the health of the processes and hardware on the appliance. Health tests then continue to run at the intervals you configured in the policy, collecting health data for the appliance and forwarding that data to the Defense Center. If you enable a module in a health policy and then apply the policy to an appliance that does not require that health test, the health monitor reports the status for that health module as disabled. If you apply a policy with all modules disabled to an appliance, it removes all applied health policies from the appliance so no health policy is applied. When you apply a different policy to an appliance that already has a policy applied, expect some latency in the display of new data based on the newly applied tests. IMPORTANT! Default health policies are not replicated between Defense Centers in a high availability pair. Each appliance uses the local default health policy configured for that appliance.

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You cannot apply a health policy to RNA Software for Red Hat Linux. To apply a health policy: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. The Health Monitor page appears. 2. Click Health Policy in the health monitor toolbar. The Health Policy page appears.

3. Click Apply next to the policy you want to apply. The Health Policy Apply page appears.

TIP! The status icon next to the Health Policy column ( ) indicates the current health status for the appliance. The status icon next to the System Policy column ( ) indicates the communication status between the Defense Center and the sensor. Note that you can remove the currently applied policy by clicking the remove icon ( ).

4. Check the appliances where you want to apply the health policy. 5. Click Apply to apply the policy to the selected appliances. The Health Policy page appears, with a message indicating if the application of the policy was successful. Monitoring of the appliance starts as soon as the policy is successfully applied.

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To unapply a health policy: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. The Health Monitor page appears. 2. Click Health Policy in the health monitor toolbar. The Health Policy page appears.

3. Click Apply next to the policy you want to apply. The Health Policy Apply page appears.

4. You have two options: • • Apply a health policy with all modules disabled. Click the x next to the health policy.

Under Health Policy the status of None appears.

Editing Health Policies
Requires: DC/MDC You can modify a health policy by enabling or disabling modules or by changing module settings. If you modify a policy that is already applied to an appliance, the changes do not take effect until you reapply the policy.

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and 3D6500 Version 4. except 3D9900 3Dx800 Only All except 3D9900 All All Master Defense Center All Defense Center Master Defense Center 3Dx800 3Dx800 and 3D9900 Defense Center 3D Sensors with IPS 3D Sensors with IPS 3D Sensors with IPS Master Defense Center All 3D9900 Series 2 DC3000. Health Modules Applicable to Appliances Module Appliance Heartbeat Automatic Application Bypass Status CPU Temperature CPU Usage Card Reset Data Correlator Process Defense Center Status Disk Usage eStreamer Process Event Stream Status Fan Alarm Hardware Alarms Health Monitor Process IPS Event Rate IPS Process Link State Propagation MDC Event Service Memory Usage PEP Status Power Supply Applicable Appliance Defense Center 3D Sensors. 3Dx800.9. MDC3000. 3D4500.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 531 .Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 Applicable health modules for various appliances are listed in the Health Modules Applicable to Appliances table. 3D3500.

Click Health Policy in the health monitor toolbar. The Health Policy Configuration page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 532 . Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. 4. with the Policy Run Time Interval settings selected. 2. 3. The Health Monitor page appears. Click Edit next to the policy you want to modify. Modify settings as needed. 3D Sensors with RNA To edit a health policy: Access: Maint/Admin 1. as described in the following sections: • • • • • • • • Configuring Policy Run Time Intervals on page 500 Configuring Appliance Heartbeat Monitoring on page 501 Configuring Automatic Application Bypass Monitoring on page 502 Configuring CPU Temperature Monitoring on page 503 Configuring CPU Usage Monitoring on page 504 Configuring Card Reset Monitoring on page 505 Configuring Data Correlator Process Monitoring on page 506 Configuring Defense Center Status on page 507 Version 4.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 Health Modules Applicable to Appliances (Continued) Module RNA Health RNA Host License Limit RNA Process Time Synchronization Status Traffic Status Applicable Appliance Defense Center Defense Center 3D Sensors with RNA Defense Center 3D Sensors with IPS.9. The Health Policy page appears.

Deleting Health Policies Requires: DC/MDC You can delete health policies that you no longer need. 5. If you click Save Policy and Exit when you are done. To temporarily save your changes to this module and switch to another module’s settings to modify. select the other module from the list at the left of the page. You have three options: • • • 6. In addition. the policy settings remain in effect until you apply a different policy. if you delete a health policy that is applied to a sensor. all changes you made will be saved. any health monitoring alerts in effect for the sensor remain active until you Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 533 . To return to the Health Policy page without saving any of your settings for this module. If you delete a policy that is still applied to an appliance. click Save Policy and Exit. you discard all changes. Reapply the policy to the appropriate appliances as described in Applying Health Policies on page 528.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Policies Chapter 15 • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Configuring Disk Usage Monitoring on page 508 Configuring eStreamer Process Monitoring on page 509 Configuring Event Stream Monitoring on page 511 Configuring Fan Monitoring on page 512 Configuring Hardware Monitoring on page 513 Configuring Health Status Monitoring Configuring IPS Event Rate Monitoring on page 515 Configuring IPS Process Monitoring on page 516 Configuring Link State Propagation Monitoring on page 518 Configuring MDC Event Service Monitoring on page 519 Configuring Memory Usage Monitoring on page 520 Configuring PEP Status Monitoring on page 521 Configuring Power Supply Monitoring on page 522 Configuring RNA Event Status Monitoring on page 523 Configuring RNA Host Usage Monitoring on page 524 Configuring RNA Process Monitoring on page 525 Configuring Time Synchronization Monitoring on page 526 Configuring Traffic Status Monitoring on page 527 To save your changes to this module and return to the Health Policy page.9. click Cancel. if you click Cancel.

Using Health Monitoring Using the Health Monitor Blacklist Chapter 15 deactivate the underlying associated alert. if you know that a segment of your network will be unavailable. or detection engine. The Health Monitor Appliance Status Summary lists the appliance as disabled. The Health Monitor page appears. or detection engine from the blacklist. you can temporarily disable health monitoring for a 3D Sensor on that segment to prevent the health status on the Defense Center from displaying a warning or critical state because of the lapsed connection to the 3D Sensor. A message appears. and add an appliance to the blacklist. create a health policy with all modules disabled and apply it to the appliance. You can use the health monitor blacklist feature to disable health monitoring status reporting on an appliance. For more information on creating health policies. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. For more information on applying health policies. module. Using the Health Monitor Blacklist In the course of normal network maintenance. when you run out of Version 4. Because those outages are deliberate. 2. For example. you disable appliances or make them temporarily unavailable. see Applying Health Policies on page 528. The Health Policy page appears.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 534 . health events are still generated. If you remove the appliance. To temporarily disable health events from an appliance. module. Click Delete next to the policy you want to delete. 3. For more information on deactivating alerts. see Activating and Deactivating Alerts in the Analyst Guide.9. indicating if the deletion was successful. After the setting takes effect the appliance no longer includes the appliance when calculating the overall health status. you do not want the health status from those appliances to affect the summary health status on your Defense Center or Master Defense Center. but they have a disabled status and do not affect the health status for the health monitor. When you disable health monitoring status. To delete a health policy: Access: Maint/Admin 1. TIP! To stop health monitoring for an appliance. At times it may be more practical to just blacklist an individual health monitoring module on an appliance or detection engine. go to the Blacklist configuration page. For example. the events that were generated during the blacklisting continue to show a status of disabled. see Creating Health Policies on page 497. Click Health Policy in the health monitor toolbar.

9. Health Monitor blacklist settings are system settings. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. the blacklist settings remain persistent.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 535 . You cannot blacklist intrusion agents.Using Health Monitoring Using the Health Monitor Blacklist Chapter 15 RNA host licenses on an appliance. You can also blacklist the HA peer to cause it to mark events generated by it and the sensors from which it receives health events as disabled. The Health Monitor page appears. you can blacklist the group of appliances. TIP! You can blacklist 3D Sensors only from a Defense Center. click Blacklist. On the toolbar. If you need to disable the results of a group of appliances’ health monitoring. The newly re-registered sensor remains blacklisted. 2. IMPORTANT! On a Defense Center. you can blacklist the RNA Host License Limit status messages until you install a new license with more hosts. Version 4. you can blacklist the policy. the appliances report a disabled status in the Appliance Status Summary. Therefore if you blacklist a sensor. Note that if your Defense Center is in a high availability configuration. see Using the Health Monitor on page 545. then delete it and later re-register it with the Defense Center. To blacklist an entire health policy or group of appliances: Access: Maint/Admin 1. Blacklisting Health Policies or Appliances Requires: DC/MDC If you want to set health events to disabled for all appliances with a particular health policy. For more information on expanding that view. A blacklist icon ( ) and a notation are visible once you expand the view for a blacklisted or partially blacklisted appliance. Note that on the main Health Monitor page you can distinguish between appliances that are blacklisted if you expand to view the list of appliances with a particular status by clicking the arrow in that status row. Once the blacklist settings take effect. you can blacklist a managed sensor on one HA peer and not the other. not a Master Defense Center. Make sure to remove all unused sensing interfaces from any interface sets in use by a detection engine so health monitoring alerts do not generate for those interfaces. The Blacklist page appears.

Groups on a Master Defense Center are appliances. To blacklist all appliances in a group. policy or model. To blacklist an individual appliance: Access: Maint/Admin 1.9. (On a Master Defense Center. 2. manager. (On a Master Defense Center. On the toolbar. select the manager then click Apply. Use the drop-down list on the right to sort the list by appliance group. Use the drop-down list on the right to sort the list by group.) The page refreshes. 4. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. Groups on a Defense Center are 3D Sensors. you can blacklist the appliance. The Health Monitor page appears. the appliance shows as disabled in the Health Monitor Appliance Module Summary and health events for the appliance have a status of disabled. now indicating the blacklisted state of the appliances. sort the list by group. Blacklisting an Appliance If you need to set the events and health status for an individual appliance to disabled. select the category then click Apply. or by policy. policy. model.Using Health Monitoring Using the Health Monitor Blacklist Chapter 15 3. policy or model. 3. to blacklist all appliances associated with a manager. Note that you can remove the currently applied policy by clicking the remove icon ( ).) Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 536 . The Blacklist page appears. The status icon next to the System Policy column ( ) indicates the communication status between the Defense Center and the sensor. click Blacklist.) TIP! The status icon next to the Health Policy column ( ) indicates the current health status for the appliance. sort the list by group. manager. or model. Once the blacklist settings take effect. (On a Master Defense Center. model. or policy category.

Click Edit and see Blacklisting a Health Policy Module on page 537 to blacklist individual health policy modules. only include the following modules: • • • • • • • • • Appliance Heartbeat CPU Usage Data Correlator Process Disk Usage eStreamer Process Health Monitor Process MDC Event Service Memory Usage Time Synchronization Status Version 4.9. When blacklisting modules for Defense Centers. In addition. the line for that module appears in boldface type in the Defense Center web interface. Blacklisting a Health Policy Module Requires: DC/MDC You can blacklist individual health policy modules on appliances.Using Health Monitoring Using the Health Monitor Blacklist Chapter 15 4. You may want to do this to prevent events from the module from changing the status for the appliance to warning or critical. you can blacklist that module for a specific detection engine. When any part of a module is blacklisted.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 537 . Defense Center Only Specific health policy modules operate for a Defense Center. then click Apply. if you know you are going to disable the RNA detection engine on a sensor and do not want traffic status alerts to change the status for the sensor. select and expand a category folder. Note that modules that allow you to select a specific detection engine have an arrow next to the module. For example. The page refreshes then indicates the blacklisted state of the appliances. select the box next to the appropriate appliance. To blacklist an individual appliance. the interface indicates the following information in parentheses after each module with detection engines: number of blacklisted detection engines/maximum number of detection engines. For some modules. you can blacklist the Traffic Status module for that detection engine.

see the Health Modules Applicable to Appliances table on page 531. On the toolbar.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 538 . You may miss necessary warning or critical messages if you accidentally leave a module disabled. only include the following modules: • • • • • • • CPU Usage Data Correlator Process Defense Center Status Disk Usage Event Stream Status Memory Usage Power Supply For details about applicable modules on all appliances.9.Using Health Monitoring Using the Health Monitor Blacklist Chapter 15 • • Power Supply RNA Host License Limit Master Defense Center Only Specific health policy modules operate for a Master Defense Center. the appliance shows as Part Blacklisted or All Modules Blacklisted in the Blacklist page and in the Appliance Health Monitor Module Status Summary but only in expanded views on the main Appliance Status Summary page. The Health Monitor page appears. The Blacklist page appears. To blacklist an individual health policy module: Access: Maint/Admin 1. TIP! Once the blacklist settings take effect. Make sure that you keep track of individually blacklisted modules so you can reactivate them when you need them. Version 4. 2. click Blacklist. When blacklisting modules for Master Defense Centers. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health.

Configuring Health Monitor Alerts You can set up alerts to notify you through email. 5. Click Save. then click Edit to display the list of health policy modules. then select each detection engine for which you want to blacklist the module. system log when the status changes for the modules in a health policy. The health policy modules appear. or Model. You can associate an existing alert with health event levels to cause that alert to trigger when health events of a particular level occur. Policy. Sort by Group. 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 539 . through SNMP or through the .Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Monitor Alerts Chapter 15 3. Expand the detection engine list by clicking on the arrow next to modules with detection engine lists. You have two options: • • Select each module that you want to blacklist.9. Version 4.

see Creating SNMP Alerts in the Analyst Guide. To prepare your system for alerting: Access: Admin 1. In the policy. For more information on creating email alerts. If you want to use email alerting. For more information on creating SNMP alerts. you can send a second email when the hard drive reaches the critical level. SNMP or syslog alerts you want to associate with health alerts: . 2. • • • Continue with Creating Health Monitor Alerts on page 540. you also need to set up your email relay host in your system policy and re-apply that policy. Creating Health Monitor Alerts Requires: DC/MDC When you create a health monitor alert. you create an association between a severity level. see Creating Email Alerts in the Analyst Guide. a health module. and an alert. Create a new policy or click Edit next to an existing one.9. you first need to create the underlying alert that you associate to the health alert.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Monitor Alerts Chapter 15 For example. For more information Version 4. you can automatically send an email to a system administrator when the remaining disk space reaches the warning level. click Email Notification. For more information on creating syslog alerts. see the following topics: • • • • • Preparing to Create a Health Alert on page 540 Creating Health Monitor Alerts on page 540 Interpreting Health Monitor Alerts on page 542 Editing Health Monitor Alerts on page 543 Deleting Health Monitor Alerts on page 544 Preparing to Create a Health Alert Requires: DC/MDC If you want to create a health alert. if you are concerned that your appliances may run out of hard disk space. Click Save Policy and Exit. Enter the name of the Mail Relay Host.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 540 . If the hard drive continues to fill. see Creating Syslog Alerts in the Analyst Guide. Click Apply and apply the policy to the Defense Center where you plan to create the health alert. If you plan to use email alerting: • • • • • • Select Operations > System Policy. You can use an existing alert or configure a new one specifically to report on system health. For more information. Create email.

From the Severity list. the associated alert triggers. When duplicate thresholds exist. From the Module list. Type a name for the health alert in the Health Alert Name field. press Shift + Ctrl and click the module names. the health monitor uses the threshold that generates the fewest alerts and ignores the others. Click Health Monitor Alerts in the health monitor toolbar. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. 3.294.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Monitor Alerts Chapter 15 on creating the alert. you are notified of the conflict. The Health Monitor Alerts page appears. select the severity level you want to use to trigger the alert. Version 4. The timeout value for the threshold must be between 5 and 4. select the modules for which you want the alert to apply. TIP! To select multiple modules. 2. When the severity level occurs for the selected module. 5. Note that if you create or update a threshold in a way that duplicates an existing threshold. To create health monitor alerts: Access: Admin 1.295 minutes. see Preparing to Create a Health Alert on page 540.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 541 .967 . 4.9. The Health Monitor page appears.

Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Monitor Alerts Chapter 15 6. following a Critical or Warning alert status. For more information on health modules. The health test did not run. For more information on creating alerts. 8. A message appears. The health test results met the criteria to return to a normal alert status. Version 4. which includes the health test results that triggered the alert. Interpreting Health Monitor Alerts The alerts generated by the health monitor contain the following information: • • • Severity. The health test results met the criteria to trigger a Warning alert status. which specifies the health module whose test results triggered the alert. select the alert which you want to trigger when the selected severity level is reached. From the Alert list. 7. For more information on health alert severity levels. indicating if the alert configuration was successfully saved.9. The Active Health Alerts list now includes the alert you created. Alert Severities Severity Critical Warning Normal Error Recovered Description The health test results met the criteria to trigger a Critical alert status. Module.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 542 . see the Alert Severities table. which indicates the severity level of the alert. Click Save to save the health alert. see Creating Alerts in the Analyst Guide. In the Threshold Timeout field. The health test results met the criteria to trigger a Normal alert status. see Understanding Health Modules on page 485. type the number of minutes that should elapse before each threshold period ends and the threshold count resets. Description. TIP! Click Alerts in the toolbar to open the Alerts page.

4. indicating if the alert configuration was successfully saved. The Health Monitor page appears. 5. To edit health monitor alerts: Access: Admin 1.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 543 . 3. 2. Click Save to save the modified health alert. Modify settings as needed. Click Health Monitor Alerts in the health monitor toolbar. Select the alert you want to modify in the Active Health Alerts list. health module. The Health Monitor Alerts page appears. see Creating Health Monitor Alerts on page 540.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Monitor Alerts Chapter 15 Editing Health Monitor Alerts Requires: DC/MDC You can edit existing health monitor alerts to change the severity level. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. A message appears. For more information. 6.9. Click Load to load the configured settings for the selected alert. Version 4. or alert associated with the health monitor alert.

indicating if the alert configuration was successfully deleted. IMPORTANT! Deleting a health monitor alert does not delete the associated alert. For more information on deleting alerts. To delete health monitor alerts: Access: Admin 1.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 544 . The Health Monitor Alerts page appears. Select the alert you want to delete in the Active Health Alerts list. The Health Monitor page appears. Click Health Monitor Alerts in the health monitor toolbar. 4. 3.9. see Activating and Deactivating Alerts in the Analyst Guide. 2. A message appears. Click Delete. For more information on deactivating alerts. You must deactivate or delete the underlying alert to ensure that alerting does not continue. Version 4.Using Health Monitoring Configuring Health Monitor Alerts Chapter 15 Deleting Health Monitor Alerts Requires: DC/MDC You can delete existing health monitor alerts. see Deleting Alerts in the Analyst Guide. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health.

Administrators can create and apply a health policy to an appliance. For more information on viewing the health status of your appliance. The pie chart supplies another view of the health status breakdown. see the following topics: • • • Using the Health Monitor on page 545 Using Appliance Health Monitors on page 547 Working with Health Events on page 555 Using the Health Monitor Requires: DC/MDC The Health Monitor page provides the compiled health status for all sensors managed by the Defense Center.Reviewing Health Status Chapter 16 Administrator Guide You can obtain information about the health of your Sourcefire 3D System through the Health Monitor. The Status table provides a count of the managed appliances for this Defense Center by overall health status.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 545 . indicating the percentage of appliances currently in each health status category. The Health Monitor then generates health events to indicate the current status of any aspects of appliance health that you chose to monitor. Version 4. plus the Defense Center.9.

TIP! If the arrow in the row for a status level points down. Click Health Monitor on the toolbar. the appliance list for that status shows in the lower table. the appliance list is hidden.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 546 . If the arrow points right. 2.Reviewing Health Status Using the Health Monitor Chapter 16 To use the health monitor: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted 1. The following topics provide details on the tasks you can perform from the Health Monitor page: • • • • Interpreting Health Monitor Status on page 547 Using Appliance Health Monitors on page 547 Configuring Health Policies on page 489 Configuring Health Monitor Alerts on page 539 Version 4.9. The Health Monitor page appears. Select the appropriate status in the Status column of the table or the appropriate portion of the pie chart to the list appliances with that status.

include Error. that the appliance does not have a health policy applied to it. and Disabled. or that the appliance is currently unreachable. IMPORTANT! Your browser session will not be automatically timed out while you are viewing the Health Monitor page. by severity. Indicates that an appliance is disabled or blacklisted. Indicates that warning limits have been exceeded for at least one health module on the appliance and the problem has not been corrected. including modules that were in a Critical or Warning state. Indicates that all health modules on the appliance are running within the limits configured in the health policy applied to the appliance. Critical Red Warning Yellow Normal Green Recovered Green Disabled Blue Using Appliance Health Monitors Requires: DC/MDC The Appliance health monitor provides a detailed view of the health status of an appliance. Indicates that the critical limits have been exceeded for at least one health module on the appliance and the problem has not been corrected. Health Status Indicator Status Level Error Status Icon Status Color White Description Indicates that at least one health monitoring module has failed on the appliance and has not been successfully re-run since the failure occurred. Normal. as described in the Health Status Indicator table.9. Contact your technical support representative to obtain an update to the health monitoring module. Indicates that all health modules on the appliance are running within the limits configured in the health policy applied to the appliance. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 547 . Warning. Critical.Reviewing Health Status Using Appliance Health Monitors Chapter 16 Interpreting Health Monitor Status Available status categories.

click the name of the appliance for which you want to view details in the health monitor toolbar. 2. If the arrow points right. 3. The Alert Detail list toggles the display to show or hide events. in the Module Status Summary graph. In the Appliance column of the appliance list. To show the list of appliances with a particular status. the appliance list is hidden. click the arrow in that status row. see the following sections: • • • Interpreting Appliance Health Monitor Status on page 549 Viewing Alerts by Status on page 549 Running All Modules for an Appliance on page 550 Version 4. the appliance list for that status shows in the lower table. The Health Monitor page appears.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 548 . Optionally. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. 4. TIP! If the arrow in the row for a status level points down. click the color for the event status category you want to view. For more information. The Health Monitor Appliance page appears.Reviewing Health Status Using Appliance Health Monitors Chapter 16 To view the status summary for a specific appliance: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted 1.

Critical. Indicates that the critical limits have been exceeded for the health module on the appliance and the problem has not been corrected. Normal Green Indicates that the monitored item is running within the limits configured in the health policy applied to the appliance. by severity.9.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 549 . Warning. and Disabled. Recovered Green Indicates that the health for the monitored item is back within the limits configured in the health policy applied to the appliance. Critical Red Warning Yellow Indicates that warning limits have been exceeded for the health module on the appliance and the problem has not been corrected. that the appliance does not have a health policy applied to it. include Error.Reviewing Health Status Using Appliance Health Monitors Chapter 16 • • • Running a Specific Health Module on page 551 Generating Health Module Alert Graphs on page 553 Generating Appliance Troubleshooting Files on page 554 Interpreting Appliance Health Monitor Status Available status categories. Normal. as described in the Appliance Health Status Indicator table that follows. Version 4. Contact your technical support representative to obtain an update to the health monitoring module. Disabled Blue Indicates that a module is disabled or blacklisted. Appliance Health Status Indicator Status Level Error Status Icon Status Color White Description Indicates that the health monitoring module has failed and has not been successfully re-run since the failure occurred. or that the appliance is currently unreachable. Viewing Alerts by Status Requires: DC/MDC You can show or hide categories of alerts by status.

To run all health modules for the appliance: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted 1. click the arrow in that status row. the appliance list for that status shows in the lower table. the appliance list is hidden. 2. To hide alerts by status: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted Click the status icon or the color segment in the pie chart that corresponds to the health status of the alerts you want to view.Reviewing Health Status Using Appliance Health Monitors Chapter 16 To show alerts by status: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted Click the status icon or the color segment in the pie chart that corresponds to the health status of the alerts you want to view. If the arrow points right. TIP! If the arrow in the row for a status level points down. The alerts in the Alert Detail list for that category disappear. The Health Monitor page appears. Running All Modules for an Appliance Requires: DC/MDC Health module tests run automatically at the policy run time interval you configure when you create a health policy.9. To expand the appliance list to show appliances with a particular status. However. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. you can also run all health module tests on demand to collect up-to-date health information for the appliance. Version 4. The alerts for that category appear in the Alert Detail list.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 550 .

Reviewing Health Status Using Appliance Health Monitors Chapter 16 3. Version 4. However. then refresh the page by clicking the sensor name. then the Health Monitor Appliance page refreshes. The Health Monitor Appliance page appears.9. You can also wait for the page to refresh again automatically. The status bar indicates the progress of the tests. the first refresh that automatically occurs may not reflect the data from the manually-run tests. In the Appliance column of the appliance list.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 551 . wait a few seconds. IMPORTANT! When you manually run health modules. 4. Click Run All Modules. If the value has not changed for a module that you just ran manually. click the name of the appliance for which you want to view details in the health monitor toolbar. Running a Specific Health Module Requires: DC/MDC Health module tests run automatically at the policy run time interval you configure when you create a health policy. you can also run a health module test on demand to collect up-to-date health information for that module.

In the Alert Detail row for the alert for which you want to view a list of events. the appliance list for that status shows in the lower table. the first refresh that automatically occurs may not reflect the data from the manually-run tests. The status bar indicates the progress of the test. The Health Monitor page appears. click the color for the health alert status category you want to view. Version 4. You can also wait for the page to refresh automatically again. 3.9. click the name of the appliance for which you want to view details in the health monitor toolbar. wait a few seconds. then refresh the page by clicking the sensor name. click the arrow in that status row. In the Appliance column of the appliance list. To expand the appliance list to show appliances with a particular status. TIP! If the arrow in the row for a status level points down. 2. IMPORTANT! When you manually run health modules. The Health Monitor Appliance page appears. then the Health Monitor Appliance page refreshes. click Run.Reviewing Health Status Using Appliance Health Monitors Chapter 16 To run a specific health module: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted 1. 5. If the value has not changed for a module that you just manually ran. the appliance list is hidden. If the arrow points right. In the Module Status Summary graph of the Health Monitor Appliance page. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 552 . The Alert Detail list expands to list the health alerts for the selected appliance for that status category. 4.

the appliance list is hidden. 4. 3. Version 4. The Health Monitor page appears. click the arrow in that status row. The Alert Detail list expands to list the health alerts for the selected appliance for that status category. 2. In the Module Status Summary graph of the Health Monitor Appliance page. click the name of the appliance for which you want to view details in the health monitor toolbar. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health.Reviewing Health Status Using Appliance Health Monitors Chapter 16 Generating Health Module Alert Graphs Requires: DC/MDC You can graph the results over a period of time of a particular health test for a specific appliance. In the Appliance column of the appliance list.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 553 . click the color for the health alert status category you want to view. The Health Monitor Appliance page appears. To expand the appliance list to show appliances with a particular status. the appliance list for that status shows in the lower table.9. TIP! If the arrow in the row for a status level points down. If the arrow points right. To generate a health module alert graph: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted 1.

click the arrow in that status row. To expand the appliance list to show appliances with a particular status. Sourcefire Support may ask you to generate troubleshooting files to help them diagnose the problem. the appliance list for that status shows in the lower table. TIP! If no events appear.Reviewing Health Status Using Appliance Health Monitors Chapter 16 5. 2. Version 4.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 554 . Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. click Graph. A graph appears. you may need to adjust the time range. Generating Appliance Troubleshooting Files Requires: DC/MDC In some cases. the appliance list is hidden. See Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide for more information. If the arrow points right.9. In the Alert Detail row for the alert for which you want to view a list of events. showing the status of the event over time. To generate appliance troubleshooting files: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted 1. The Health Monitor page appears. if you have a problem with your appliance. TIP! If the arrow in the row for a status level points down. The Alert Detail section below the graph lists all health alerts for the selected appliance.

Click Generate Troubleshooting Files and confirm that you want to generate the files. 7. Select Operations > Monitoring > Task Status. and can search for specific events. 8. The Task Status page appears. Many functions that you can perform on the health event view pages are constant across all event view pages. Save the files to a location on your computer. Click the folder for the file generation job entry to expand the entry. 4. The Health Monitor Appliance page appears. 6. Working with Health Events The Defense Center provides fully customizable event views that allow you to quickly and easily analyze the health status events gathered by the health monitor. In the Appliance column of the appliance list. See Understanding Health Event Views on page 556 for more information about these common procedures.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 3. 5. click the name of the appliance for which you want to view details in the health monitor toolbar. Send the generated files to technical support to assist in troubleshooting your system. Select Click to retrieve generated files.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 555 . These event views allow you to search and view event data and to easily access other information that may be related to the events you are investigating.9. Version 4. 9. you can view health events. A File Download dialog box appears. From the Operations > Monitoring > Health menu. The file generation task is added to the task status queue.

see the following topics: • • • • Viewing All Health Events on page 556 Viewing Health Events by Module and Appliance on page 557 Working with the Health Events Table View on page 559 Searching for Health Events on page 563 Viewing All Health Events Requires: DC/MDC The Table View of Health Events page provides a list of all health events on the selected appliance.9. you can more effectively configure alerting for health events. Version 4. Understanding Health Event Views The Defense Center health monitor logs health events. Viewing Health Events on page 556 describes how to access and use the Event View page. you retrieve all health events for all managed appliances. see Understanding Health Modules on page 485. which you can see on the Health Event View page. For more information about viewing and searching for health events. see Understanding Health Modules on page 485.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 See the following sections for more information about viewing events: • • • Understanding Health Event Views on page 556 describes the types of events that RNA generates. For more information. For more information on the different types of health modules that generate health events. When you access health events from the Health Monitor page on your Defense Center. If you understand what conditions each health module tests for. Searching for Health Events on page 563 describes how to search for specific events using the Event Search page.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 556 . For a description of the health modules that generated the events that you may see on this page. see the following sections: • • • Viewing Health Events on page 556 Understanding the Health Events Table on page 561 Searching for Health Events on page 563 Viewing Health Events You can view the appliance health data collected by your health monitor in several ways.

but you can then modify the time range to update the table with more recent information if needed.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 557 . For more information. To view the health events for a specific module: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted 1. TIP! You can bookmark this view to allow you to return to the page in the health events workflow containing the Health Events table of events. 2. 2. In the toolbar. To expand the appliance list to show appliances with a particular status. If the arrow points right. click Health Events. The bookmarked view retrieves events within the time range you are currently viewing. If no events appear. See Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide for more information.9. the appliance list for that status shows in the lower table. The Health Monitor page appears. Version 4. click the arrow in that status row. The Events page appears. The Health Monitor page appears. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. TIP! If the arrow in the row for a status level points down. see Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide. the appliance list is hidden. you may need to adjust the time range.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 To view all health events on all managed appliances: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted 1. containing all health events. Viewing Health Events by Module and Appliance Requires: DC/MDC You can query for events generated by a specific health module on a specific appliance. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health.

See Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide for more information. If no events appear. In the Alert Detail row for the alert for which you want to view a list of events. The Alert Detail list expands to list the health alerts for the selected appliance for that status category. 5. click Events. In the Module Status Summary graph of the Health Monitor Appliance page. click the name of the appliance for which you want to view details in the health monitor toolbar. In the Appliance column of the appliance list. containing query results for a query with the name of the appliance and the name of the selected health alert module as constraints.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 558 . If you want to view all health events for the selected appliance. expand Search Constraints and click the Module Name constraint to remove it. Version 4. 4. 6. The Health Monitor Appliance page appears. click the color for the health alert status category you want to view.9. you may need to adjust the time range. The Health Events page appears.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 3.

change what columns display in the table of events.. find more information in Navigating to Other Pages in the Workflow in the Analyst Guide. or constrain the events that appear delete health events find more information in Sorting Drill-down Workflow Pages in the Analyst Guide. select the check box next to the events you want to delete and click Delete. click View Bookmarks. from any event view. See Using Bookmarks in the Analyst Guide for more information. Health Event View Functions To. find more information in Understanding the Health Events Table on page 561. then confirm you want to delete all the events. See Generating Reports from Event Views on page 235 for more information. provide a name for the bookmark and click Save. Note that events that were generated outside the appliance's configured time window (whether global or event-specific) may appear in an event view if you constrain the event view by time. This can occur even if you configured a sliding time window for the appliance. sort the events that appear. navigate through event view pages navigate to other event tables to view associated events bookmark the current page so that you can quickly return to it navigate to the bookmark management page generate a report based on data in the table view Version 4.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 Working with the Health Events Table View Requires: DC/MDC The Health Event View Functions table describes each action you can perform from the Event View page. To delete all the events in the current constrained view. See Using Bookmarks in the Analyst Guide for more information. find more information in Navigating between Workflows in the Analyst Guide. click Bookmark This Page. find more information in Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide..9. click Report Designer.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 559 .. click Delete All.. learn more about the contents of the columns that appear in the Health event view modify the time and date range for events listed in the Health table view You can. select Analysis & Reporting > Bookmarks or.

• If NFE temperature exceeds 99 degrees Fahrenheit. click View All. NFE Platform daemon If the NFE Platform daemon goes down.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 Health Event View Functions (Continued) To. See Selecting Workflows in the Analyst Guide for more information.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 560 . hardware alarms generate in response to the events described in the Conditions Monitored for 3D9900 Sensors table. click the down arrow link on the left side of the event. click Workflows or select from the Workflows dropdown list in the toolbar. select the check box next to the rows that correspond with the events you want to view details for and then click View. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the NFE temperature. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the NFE card presence... The triggering condition can be found in the message detail for the alert.. • If NFE temperature exceeds 89 degrees Fahrenheit. click the status icon in the Status column for an event with that status. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to yellow and the message details include a reference to the NFE temperature. select another health events workflow You can. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the daemon.. NFE temperature Version 4. view the details associated with a single health event view event details for multiple health events view event details for all events in the view view all events of a particular status Interpreting Hardware Alert Details for 3D9900 Sensors For 3D9900 sensor models. Conditions Monitored for 3D9900 Sensors Condition Monitored NFE card presence Causes of Yellow or Red Error Conditions If NFE hardware is detected that is not valid for the appliance.9.

health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the daemon. If the Scmd daemon goes down. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to yellow and the message details include a reference to the daemon. You create and apply health policies to your appliances. The Health Monitor modules you choose to enable Version 4.9. If the nfm_ipfragd daemon goes down. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the daemon. which monitor a variety of aspects. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the LBIM presence. If the Ftwo daemon goes down. If the Rulesd daemon goes down. including hardware and software status. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the daemon. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the daemon. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the daemon. health status for the Hardware Alarms module changes to red and the message details include a reference to the daemon. If the Psls daemon goes down. If the NFE TCAM daemon goes down.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 561 .Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 Conditions Monitored for 3D9900 Sensors (Continued) Condition Monitored NFE Message daemon Causes of Yellow or Red Error Conditions If the NFE Message daemon goes down. If the Load-Balancing Interface Module (LBIM) switch assembly is not present or not communicating. NFE TCAM daemon LBIM presence Scmd daemon Psls daemon Ftwo daemon Rulesd (host rules) daemon nfm_ipfragd (host frag) daemon Understanding the Health Events Table You can use the Defense Center’s health monitor to determine the status of critical functionality within the Sourcefire 3D System.

You can use the asterisk (*) to create wildcard searches. Select Operations > Monitoring > Health. Green. Units The units descriptor for the result. Status Sensor The status (Critical. For example.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 562 . The name of the test. if the Defense Center generates a health event when a sensor it is monitoring is using 80 percent or more of its CPU resources. Version 4. the units is a percentage sign (%).9.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 in your health policy run various tests to determine appliance health status. the value could be a number from 80 to 100. Test Name Time Description Value To display the table view of health events: Access: Maint/Admin/ Any Analyst except Restricted 1. The Health Monitor page appears. For more information on health monitoring. if the Defense Center generates a health event whenever a sensor it is monitoring is using 80 percent or more of its CPU resources. When the health status meets criteria that you specify. For a list of health modules. Health Event Fields Field Module Name Description The name of the health module that generated the event. The timestamp for the health event. or Disabled) reported for the appliance. The appliance where the health event was reported. For example. The value (number of units) of the result obtained by the health test that generated the event. Yellow. The description of the health module that generated the event. The fields in the health events table are described in the Health Event Fields table. This is typically the same as the module name. see the Health Modules table on page 485. For example. see Monitoring the System on page 463. a health event is generated. health events generated when a process was unable to execute are labeled Unable to Execute.

save. Searching for Health Events Requires: DC/MDC You can use Event Search to search for specific network discovery events. see Working with Health Events on page 555. You can create. Value Version 4. For information on working with health events. if you specify a value of 15 and type CPU in the Units field. there are a number of options you can configure. you retrieve events where the appliance CPU was running at 15% utilization at the time the test ran. click Health Events. TIP! If you are using a custom workflow that does not include the table view of health events. On the Select Workflow page. and re-use event searches. to view events that measure CPU performance. On the toolbar. The Health Event Search Criteria table describes each search criterion you can specify. When creating new searches or modifying default searches. click Workflows. you could enter Unable to Execute to view any health events where a process was unable to execute. You can use an asterisk (*) in this field to create wildcard searches. For example. For example. For example. The table view appears. Specify the value (number of units) of the result obtained by the health test for the events you want to view. The search should retrieve applicable CPU Usage and CPU temperature events.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 2. click Health Events.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 563 . Description Specify the description of the events you want to view.9. type CPU. Health Event Search Criteria Search Field Module Name Description Specify the name of the module which generated the health events you want to view.

one is created automatically when you save the search.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 Health Event Search Criteria (Continued) Search Field Units Description Specify the units descriptor for the result obtained by the health test for the events you want to view. Normal. Valid status levels are Critical.9. Error. Appliance Specify the name of appliance. 2. See Health Event Search Criteria on page 563 for more information about the values you can enter for search criteria. You can use an asterisk (*) in this field to create wildcard searches. To run and save health event searches: Access: Any Analyst except Restricted/ Admin 1. you retrieve all events for any modules that contain text followed by a “%” sign in the Units field. if you type *% in the Units field. Enter your search criteria. 3. However. Status Specify the status for the health events that you want to view. Optionally. if you want to save the search. If you do not enter a name. and Disabled. Select Analysis & Reporting > Searches > Health Events.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 564 . The Search page appears. you retrieve all events for the Disk Usage modules. type Critical to retrieve all health events that indicate a critical status. Version 4. Warning. For example. because the Disk Usage module has a “%” label in the Units field (and no additional text). For example. if you type % in the Units field. enter a name for the search in the Name field.

Loading a Saved Search in the Analyst Guide Deleting a Saved Search in the Analyst Guide For more information about searching. see the following sections: • • Version 4. constrained by the current time range.9. Your search results appear in the default health events workflow. 5.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 565 . disable the Save As Private check box. use the Workflows menu on the toolbar. if you want to save the search so that other users can access it.Reviewing Health Status Working with Health Events Chapter 16 4. Click Save as New Search to save the search criteria. To use a different workflow. TIP! If you want to save a search as a restriction for restricted data users. leave the check box selected to save the search as private. Optionally. Otherwise. see Configuring Event View Settings on page 27. • • Click Save if you are modifying an existing search and want to save your changes. you must save it as a private search. so that you can run it at a later time. You have the following options: • Click Search to execute the search. The search is saved and associated with your user account (if you selected Save As Private). For information on specifying a different default workflow. including a custom workflow.

1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 566 . which contains system status messages.Auditing the System Chapter 17 Administrator Guide You can audit activity on your system in two ways. For more information. including auditing data. see Working with Event Reports on page 232. Audit logs are presented in a standard event view that allows you to view.9. Viewing the System Log on page 578 describes how to view the system log. The appliances that are a part of the Sourcefire 3D System generate an audit record for each user interaction with the web interface. Managing Audit Records Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor Defense Centers and 3D Sensors log read-only auditing information for user activity. The following sections provide more information about the monitoring features that the system provides: • • Managing Audit Records on page 566 describes how to view and manage system audit information. sort. TIP! Defense Centers and 3D Sensors with IPS also provide full-featured reporting features that allow you to generate reports for almost any type of data accessible in an event view. and also record system status messages in the system log. Version 4. and filter audit log messages based on any item in the audit view. You can easily delete and report on audit information.

. When the number of audit log entries exceeds 100.. find more information in Understanding the Audit Log Table on page 574. Then.000 entries. The Audit Log Actions table below describes some of the specific actions you can perform on an audit log workflow page. Version 4. You can also create a custom workflow that displays only the information that matches your specific needs.000. The predefined workflow includes a single table view of events. the appliance prunes the oldest records from the database to reduce the number to 100.000. see Creating Custom Workflows in the Analyst Guide. find more information in Navigating to Other Pages in the Workflow in the Analyst Guide.Auditing the System Managing Audit Records Chapter 17 The audit log stores a maximum of 100. For information on creating a custom workflow. you can manipulate the view depending on the information you are looking for. For more information. see the following sections: • • • • Viewing Audit Records on page 567 Suppressing Audit Records on page 570 Understanding the Audit Log Table on page 574 Searching Audit Records on page 575 Viewing Audit Records Requires: DC/MDC or 3D Sensor You can use the appliance to view a table of audit records. Audit Log Actions To. learn more about the contents of the columns in the table modify the time range used when viewing audit records You can. sort and constrain events on the current workflow page navigate within the current workflow page find more information in Sorting Table View Pages and Changing Their Layout in the Analyst Guide. find more information at Setting Event Time Constraints in the Analyst Guide.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 567 . This can occur even if you configured a sliding time window for the appliance.. Note that events that were generated outside the appliance's configured time window (whether global or event-specific) may appear in an event view if you constrain the event view by time..9.

Note that this only works on drill-down pages.1 Sourcefire 3D System Administrator Guide 568 . Version 4.. For more information.Auditing the System Managing Audit Records Chapter 17 Audit Log Actions (Continued) To. If you click a value on a drilldown page. TIP! Table views always include “Table View“ in the page name. constraining on a specific value Click a value within a row. select the checkboxes next to the events you want to view on the next workflow page. click a value within a row. TIP! Table views always include “Table View” in the page name. see Constraining Events in the Analyst Guide. For more information. Note that clicking a value within a row in a table view constrains the table view and does not drill down to the next p