PRAVESH SCOUTING IN INDIA

Scouting movement started in India right from 1909 but it was limited to English and Anglo-Indian children only. Some Indians and English people started the troops for Indian Boys in 1913. But it was officially started by Dr.Annie Besant assisted by Dr.G.S.Arundale in 1916 through Boy Scouts association in Madras. Pandit Madan Mohan Malaviya, Pandit Hriday Nath Kunjaroo and Pandit Bahpeyi founded the Seva Samithi Scout Association Allahabad in 1917. In the year 1921 Lord & Lady Baden Powell visited the Indian Scout movement and were satisfied with the activities. However, they tried to bring together the different organizations working for the movement but they did not succeed. In 1937 Lord and Lady B.P. again visited India. The National movement for freedom was intense in those days.B.P. attended the first Indian Jamboree at Delhi from February 1-7, 1937. In his address B.P. advised the scouts to do their best to make the country happy and prosperous by their good turns.

Pt. Madan Mohan Dr. Annie Besant Pt. Hriday Nath Kunjaroo Shree Ram Bajpeyi Malaviya Scouting is a Movement, not an Organization" said Lord Baden Powell. Lord Baden Powell, the founder of the Scout Movement has emphasized the fact that Scouting is a Movement, which moves along with times and progresses and not just an Organization which generally adheres to Scout Craft only. We may generally say that the Scout craft is sevenfold. It includes : (1) Discipline, which teaches through theory as well as practice, self-discipline, obedience to scout law and sense of duty. (2) Observation of details, tracking and judging distances and heights forms the second rigid rules. The aim of this Movement is to inculcate good citizenship in the future men and women of the nation by means of what is known as Scout Craft aspect of this craft. (3) Camping cooking resourcefulness, Nature Study, cycling etc. From part of its third aspect, commonly known as woodcraft. (4) Health and endurance, which includes physical development, cleanliness, sanitation is another aspect which is indeed very important in life. (5) Chivalry including courtesy, charity, thrift and honour, courage, and cheerfulness. (6) Inculcation of patriotism and (7) Knowledge of life-saving devices is the other two aspect of this scout craft. And all these are taught to our young would-be citizens theoretically and also practically by certain tests devised for the purpose and through games. The Scout or the Guide is always playing the game. They are always expected to and always do follow the rules of the brotherhood when they are on duty or at their lessons. Young people are uncompromising idealists and they want a game, which they can play all the time and give their whole mind and Scouting provides their complete absorption and it is admittedly beneficent absorption.

Boys and girls appreciate idealism even if they do not always find expression for it. Lord Baden Powell showed how this idealism could be turned into action. He provided practical means for developing those qualities of character that the boys admire in their heroes, "men accustomed to live on their own resources, taking their lives in their hands, brave and loyal to their lives employers, chivalrous and helpful to each other, unselfish and reliable-Men, in fact, of the best type." So he showed the boy how they too could become self-reliant and how they could, by practice, lean to keep cool-headed and useful in time of sudden emergency. He pointed out that this requires training. So first aid, fire-fighting, life saving and other skills must be learnt in order to BE PREPARED. In 1896 our founder, as Colonel Baden Powell, was in Ashanti in Africa. After the conflict on entering the town was met and greeted by the African Chief. B.P. held out his right hand. The African Chief said, "No, you must shake my left hand, because only the Bravest Of The Brave Shake hands With The Left". And also the left hand is nearer to our heart so it's given as a Hearty Shake Hand.

PRATHAM SOPAN
1. Patrol flag: patrol flag is the identity of the patrol. Each patrol has the patrol flag and they different form each other. Scouts flag must be named after their patrol name. And the flag must be in the triangular shape with the shortest side = 20 and the other two sides are of equal sides=30. And you must have your patrol symbol in the middle of the flag as shown in the figure. 2. Patrol Yell: each patrol has a patrol yell. Each time they represent their patrol be their patrol name and the yell. 3. Patrol Song: each patrol has its own song. And whenever asked they should sing it. 4. Patrol Corner: patrol corner plays an important role. It's a secret place of each of the patrol where the patrol members discuss their activities. 5. Patrol Motto: Each patrol has its own motto. Like: "True Till Death", "Work Hard" Health is the most important thing in our daily life. With out good health one cannot be perfect and cannot do any thing. As we all now the proverbs: "Health is wealth " & " if health is lost then every thing is lost." To keep our health perfect we should take nice food every day and also we should spare time for physical exercises. Taking good food is not only enough, but we should also exercise our body. You can do a lot of simple exercise like going for a short walk, bending exercises, stretching exercises and many more. With these simple exercises you can keep Yourselves fit and fine. For the Head: Rub the head and face, firmly over several times with the palms and fingers of both hands. Thumb the muscles of the neck and throat. For the Chest: From upright position bend to the front, arms stretched downwards, with back of the hands together in front of the knees. Breathe out. Raise the hand gradually over the head and lean back as far as possible, drawing a deep breath through the nose as you do. Lower the arms gradually to the sides, breathing out the word "Thanks" through the mouth. Lastly, bend forward again, breathing out the last bit of breath in you, and saying the number of times you have done it in order to keep count. Repeat this exercise 12 times.

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For the Stomach: Standing upright, send out both arms, fingers extended, straight to the front, then slowly swing round to the right from the hips without moving the feet, and point the right arms as far round behind you as you can, keeping both arms level with, or a little higher than, the shoulders. Then, after a pause, swing slowly round as far as you can to the left. Breathe in when pointing to the left. "Body twisting". Breathe out when pointing to the right. Repeat six times, change the breathing to the other side and repeat six times.

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Image coming soon.

For the Trunk: This is also called the "Cone Exercise". Standing at "Attention" position, raise both hands, as high as possible over the head, and link fingers. Lean backwards, and then sway the arms very slowly round in the direction of a cone, so that the hands make a wide circle above and around the body, the body turning from the hips, and leaning over one side. Then to the front, then to the other side, and then back. After completing the circle, start in the opposite direction. Repeat six times both ways. Breathe in when leaning backward and breathe out when leaning forward.

For Lower Body and Back of Legs: Stand with feet slightly apart, touch your head with both hands and look up into the sky, leaning back as far as you can, and then bend forward and downward till your fingers touch your toes, without bending your knees. Repeat 12 times.

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Image coming soon.

For Legs, Feet and Toes: Stand in 'Attention' position, put the hands on the hips, stand on tip-toe, turn the knees outwards, and bend them slowly down to a squatting position, keeping the heels off the ground the whole time. Then gradually raise the body and come to the first position again. Repeat this 12 times. Breathe in as body rises and breathe out as the body sinks.

You Need : A piece of rope and a piece of string or chord 12 inches long. Use brightly colored string to decorate your jump rope or on a drawstring bag. 1. Make a loop with one end of the string and lay the loop along the rope with the ends of the string hanging off the end of the rope. 2. Hold string in place with your left thumb. With your right hand, wind the long end of the string tightly over the loop and around the rope. The short end will be left hanging.

3. Wind the string around the rope for at least an inch. 4. Wind firmly and closely but do not overlap. When you have wound far enough, tuck the end you have been winding through the loop. Hold it with your left hand thumb so it does not loosen. 5. Take the other end and pull slowly. The loop will disappear under the winding. Pull until the loop is halfway under the winding. Trim the ends to make a neat finish. I 6. If you whipping slips off the rope, you did not make it tight enough. Practice until it holds when you try to push it off. AMERICAN WHIPPING Make a loop in a 3-foot length of twine and place it at the end of the rope with one end of the twine pointing in the same directions as the rope end, the other pointing the opposite way. Wrap twine tightly around rope stating about ½ Inch from the rope end. Continue until a whipping is as wide as rope is thick. Pull the two ends out to either side, Cut off ends of twine near whipping.

1. Take a rope end in each hand. 2. Cross the right hand end over the left hand rope. Bend it back under, then forward and up. The ends will change hands. 3. Cross the end now in your left hand over, back, under and forward of the end now in your right hand. The short ends should lie flat beside the long pieces of rope. 4. Pull tight. Unique a square knot by holding the ropes on both sides of the knot and pushing them toward the center. Or take one end and yank it hard toward the center of the knot. Then you can slip the rope ends apart. Many Girls Scouts say this as they tie this knot: Right over left and left over right Makes the knot neat and tidy and tight! Uses This is used for tying together two ends of a rope. It is also the knot, which should be used for tying triangular bandages. It is a good knot for fastening parcels or the ropes round the rolls of bedding. Dhobis use it for typing up the ends of the their bundles. It is a flat knot, does not slip and is easily untied.

SHEET BEND Sailors call some of the ropes used on sails, "sheets". A "bend" is a way of making a loop. 1. Take the little rope or cord in your right hand and the big rope in your left hand. Tie a square knot but do not pull it tight. If you want to experiment, pull it tight and see what happens. Then tie another square knot.

2. Cross the short end of the cord over the long part of the cord and stick the end of it down into loop of the rope. 3. Pull long end of cord and long end of rope to tighten. Uses This is used for tying together 2 ropes of equal or unequal thickness and for tying a rope a loop or for joining ropes to material such as staff, sails or cloth. The loops should be made in the thick rope.

1. Take one end of rope in your right hand. With left hand hold rest of rope across front of post. 2. Pass end of rope around in back of post. 3. Bring it around to front of post. Cross it over long part, making an X. Hold X with left thumb and forefinger. 4. Pass rope to the right again, wrapping it around post below first turn. 5. Push rope end under X, going from left to right so that it comes out between the two turns around post. 6. Pull short end to the right, long end to the left. As long as there is a steady pull on long end the hitch will not loosen. Practice tying the knot to the left, then tries tying it up and down on a crossbar. Untie or loosen it by pushing both ends towards the center. Uses Use it to fasten one end of a rope around a post or tree; to put up a clothesline or badminton net; to start lashing. Do not use it to hold a moving object, such as an animal, because the moving will loosen the hitch.

This is useful to the rope when you do not want a cut it or cannot get at the ends, which are fixed. Therefore when you practice making it, do not use the ends of the rope but make half hitches at any convenient distance away from each ends as shown in the diagram. This is also useful to take the strain of any weak bit or rope. It may be used in the home to shorten an electric lamp cord that is hanging too low and is often used to shorten guy-lines on tents.

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Lay long end of rope in your left hand with your right hand make a little loop in the rope just where you ant the knot to be. The loop must go over the long part of rope. Hold loop in place with your left hand and let the end hang down in front. 2. With your right hand take short end push it up through the little loop. Now you have another loop. Pull the end until this big loop is the size you want to have when you are finished. 3. Pass this end around behind long part of rope and then down through little loop again. 4. Hold long part of rope with your left hand. Hold short end and right side of the big loop with your right. Pull with both hands to lighten. Uses This knot makes a loop that will not slip and is therefore, very useful for rescue work. It is made at one end of a lifeline and thrown out over the water to a drowning man or it may be fastened round any one who has to be lowered from a height from a burning house or into a well. It can be used as a lead for a collarless dog and is especially used for tying animals. When required for lowering anyone the loop should be used as a seat. It is passed over the head and shoulder and the standing part in front of the body is grasped with both hands (though more difficult).

This knot is used for tying two wet or slippery ropes. With running end of each rope tie a over hand knot over the other. Pull the standing parts in opposite directions together.

GAMES
This knot is also used to attach a rope to a pole or a tree, when there is tension at the other end. It is safe no matter what direction the pull comes. So it is suitable for typing up a boat or an animal. Make sure that the same direction, i.e. with the short end going over the standing part first. This knot does not easily jam, since the turn round the pole takes the strain while the hitches are being completed and it is the most useful knot for towing a broken-down car.

Wide game is a term that has come into use in scouting, but few scouters understand the meaning of it or apply it. The term indicates various types of games that are played by a number exceeding one patrol over a sufficiently wide area of ground, or even water for that matter, such games can be of a fairly simple nature, such as and easy trail or treasure hunt, or of a somewhat complicated nature, involving a good deal of preparation and a large number of scouts from different troops participating. In the early days of scouting such games were more commonly known as "Field Days", a term which has a military significance but which still indicates the idea of the game very well -a day spent in the fields and woods. If a Wide game is to be successful all must understand it. Discuss the game in the Court of Honour and make sure that the patrol leaders know exactly what is expected of them. It is a good plan to take the patrol leaders over the ground on which the game is to be played. Game: 1 SPIES AMONG US: two sides start from points about 500 yards apart. Each boy is given half of a message written on a slip of paper. The object of the game is for the members of one side to meet those of the other and find some body with the missing half of their particular message. Before comparing notes, however, a sign is given to each boy to prove that he is willing to "RISK" the exchange"-RISK, because on each side there is spy. Instead of having a half message on their slips of paper they have merely the word "SPY". Thus, if after agreeing to compare the notes a boy gets caught by a SPY on the opposite side, he must give up his slip of paper to the deceiver and return to a prearranged base without giving away the name of the boy to others. The first pair to reach the batch with a message that makes sense is the winners.

THE ESSENTIALS: First Aid Manual (clearly explains how to handle basic problems Basic Bandages (assorted adhesive bandages, athletic tape, moleskin) Basic Drugs/Lotions (aspirin, antiseptic, antacid tablets) Basic First Aid Tools (tweezers, small mirror, razor blade) CPR Shield THE EXTRAS (FOR LONG TRIPS): Additional Bandages (gauze pads, ace bandages, butterfly bandages) Additional Drugs/Lotions (burn ointment, skin lotion) Additional First Aid Tools (sling, basic splint, instant ice pack)

1. Adopt for purpose of keeping clean a park or a water point or a bus-stop point or any other public spot or a building. You can choose any one of the places mentioned above and render your service for a week and maintain a copy of your daily activities. At the end of your work as your scoutmaster to present you a certificate certifying that you have rendered the cleanliness service for a week. 2. Observer for at least a month breeding places of mosquitoes and flies and look for its cleanliness.

Learn how the how, where and when the mosquitoes are born. Identify their breeding places and know how to tackle with them. Try to identify the mosquito's breed/ family to which they belong. And learn how to control the spread of diseases caused by the mosquitoes. Try to identify the symptoms if a person is affected with the mosquito born disease. And try to know about the diseases, symptoms and cure.

DWITYA SOPAN
Pratham Sopan Scout is Eligible to become a Dwitiya Sopan Scout. A Pratham Sopan Scout will work for atleast nine months to qualify for Dwitiya Sopan. A Pratham Sopan Guide is eligible to become a Dwitiya Sopan Guide. A Pratham Sopan Guide will work for atleast one year to qualify for Dwitiya Sopan.

A knot to begin the diagonal lashing - using to move logs, to improvise anchor with a heavy stone for hoisting or dragging cylindrical objects, boards etc. for drawing a bundle of sticks, poles etc.

This points of emphasis are that the knot is for taking a strain roughly parallel to the rope to which it is attached; that the first half hitch takes the strain; and that the round turn binds the knot fast and is the secret of the knot's strength. Starts with a half hitch and then take a round turn, round standing part and larger rope and finish with a half hitch on top. It is used for tying the open side of a sack. It is a non-slipping hitch for pulling round a spar or another rope.

Marlinespike or Marlinespike - Definition. A metal tool with a knobbed head and tapering to a point. Used for tightening seizing, etc., and for opening strands when splicing. The knobbed end is used for pounding. Marlinespike Hitch - A temporary hitch made with a Marlinespike, or a tent peg, etc., when extra strain is needed to heave a small rope taut, as, for example, the turns of lashings or seizing. Also used on occasion in Sheepshanks or Harvester's Hitch Make an over hand loop in the rope, form a bight in the standing part and push up through the loop, put the marline spike or spar through this. It is so named because a marlinespike, or small spar is run through the loop. How else this hitch is useful is shown by the illustration here.

A sheer lashing is used either to form 'legs' from two poles (Type 1) or to join two poles together make a longer pole (Type 2). Type 1: 1. Start with a clove hitch round one of the (not both) and twist the free end round the rope. 2. Make about ten turns round both poles; do not make these too tight otherwise you will have difficulty with the frapping turns. 3. Make two frapping turns between the poles. 4. Finish off with a clove hitch round the other pole. Type 2:

1. Place the two poles to be lashed together side by side. They should overlap by at least a quarter of their lengths; otherwise the extended length will not be firm. 2. Two lashings will be needed, both of which are made in the same way. Star with a timber hitch round both poles. 3. Wind exactly this way about three times. Pull cord tightly as you workout make it lie neatly beside earlier turns. 4. Now you are ready for "frapping". Wind the cord about three times between the two sticks to tighten.
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Tie a clove hitch to upright stick. Be sure a knot is on side of stick and long end of chord is in front of you. Place other stick across upright stick. Pass long end of chord down over cross stick and around in back of upright stick. Bring cord to front under cross stick. Then bring up and over cross stick and in back of upright. Bring down over cross stick as in beginning. Wind exactly this way about three times. Pull cord tightly as you workout make it lie neatly beside earlier turns. Now you are ready for "frapping". Wind the cord about three times between the two sticks to tighten. Pull as tight as you can. To finish, make two half hitches around one stick. Or tie the two ends together with a square knot. Trim the ends and tuck them underneath the lashing.

Uses: To make racks for towels or bathing suits, coat hangers, picture frames.

A diagonal lashing is used to secure two poles, which are likely to be pulled, or to spring, apart. 1. Commence with a timber hitch. 2. Make three turns following the directions of the timber hitch. 3. Now make three turns round the other fork. 4. Tighten the lashing with two or three frapping turns, and complete with a clove hitch on any of the poles.

Fire lighting is one of the arts you must learn as a Scout for your outdoor activities as you will find it so essential. In order to acquire the skill, you should know:
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How to choose a site; Something about the fuel; How to make fire; What precautions should be taken while using the fire, and How to put it out.

Site The site chosen must be away from buildings and on bare of ground, free from grass and twigs. You may choose a site under a shade to avoid being directly under the sun, but care should be taken not to be too close a trunk or old stump or under low hanging branches. Briefly, the site should be so chosen that it is away from inflammable objects, when lighting under a tree, see that there is no beehive in the tree. If the ground is wet with damp grass, lift a square sod and keep it away from the fire. Make your fire on the place from where the sod is removed. Afterwards when you no longer need the fire, remove the ash and burnt twigs and prepare the ground for putting back the sod and water on it. Thus you will avoid disfiguring any green patch for making a fire. Fuel You should acquire a fine knowledge about the trees which may make good, and quick burring fuel, By and large twigs of thorny Babul, Ber; Pines, casuarinas and the like are good for quick fire. You may collect dry and dead branches from nearby trees for fuel. But never break off green branches and mutilate a tree. Besides the green branches will give out unpleasant smoke. Some of the trees such as mango or tamarind give good quick burning wood but while burning, it gives smoke and unpleasant smell. If possible, use of these types of wood may be avoided. Building a fire If the ground is damp as a result of dew or rains, make a small platform of fresh green twigs on which the punk or tinder will be laid. The punk is made of dried leaves, bark, thorn, twigs, pinecones or anything, which could be easily ignited. Around the punk thin twigs or fragments of wood should be arranged leaning against each other forming the shape of a tope. This is known as kindling. When the punk is ignited and the kindling starts burning, thicker pieces of log may be put round the kindling. How to light a fire A fuzz or fire stick makes very good kindling. In order to make a fuzz stick you need a piece of dry wood about twelve inches in length. The stick should be held with your left hand by the pointed end and the blunt end should be rested against. Some solid object Whitt long thin strips from the pointed end to about half the way of the sticks. The art of preventing the knife from slicing the shaving completely off the stick consists in letting the knife enter more deeply towards the end of the stroke

Put it out As soon as you are through cooking, or whatever you are doing with the fire, begin to put it out. This is especially important if you are out for the day and must go away and leave the spot later. (a) Let fire die down as much as possible (b) Scatter coals, break up big pieces, knock logs apart. (c) Stir coals-and sprinkle with water - then stir again. Repeat until there are not live coals under the logs or in the middle. (d) If you have no water, put on and or dirt, and stir thoroughly. (e) When you can press your hand on the spot where the fire was, you know it is out. (f) Cover with rocks or dirt-and check carefully before you leave.

Precautions: When the fire is ablaze, you may place your utensils for boiling water or any other cooking which your patrol may like to do. While lighting the fire or cooking you should carefully tuck away the lose ends of your clothes so that they do not fall into the fire. If a spark happens to fall on your clothes and set it ablaze, you should remove the garment from your body and roll it on the ground to extinguish it. Never run about with clothes on fire as this will make the flames blaze further and spread them. Roll on the ground yourself if the clothes cannot be taken off. This will smother the flames. Fire Safety Hints
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Don't build fires when you are alone Don't "play" with fire. Use fireplaces to enclose fires. Clear ground around fireplace so that wind cannot blow a spark into leaves, grass, etc. Dig a trench in ground if it is windy or if there are no stones or logs to enclose fire; pile dirt and sod to one side and replace when through. Build small fires. Break matches in two before throwing away. Never leave a fire unattended. Have some means for fighting fire on hand - pails of water, sand, etc.

If you followed the direction indicated by one end of the needle you would come out at a spot north of Canada, about 1400 miles from the North Pole. The reason for this is that at this spot there is a powerful magnetic force. It is this force that attracts the north point of the needle and makes it point to "Magnetic North".

Various groups of stars have been given names because they seemed to make some kind of picture outline of men and animals.

Various groups of stars have been given names because they seemed to make some kind of picture outline of men and animals. The Plough or the Big Dipper is an easy to find. It is shaped something like a plough or dipper. It is the most useful star group for a Scout to know, because in the northern part of the world it shows him where north is. The Plough is also called the Great Bear. In India we call it "Saptharshi Mandal". The stars in the curve make its tail. It is the only bear I know that wears a long tail. Pole Star: The two stars in the Plough called the Pointers, tell you where the North or Pole Star is. It is the last star in the tail of the Bear. All stars and constellations move round the sky during the night, but the Pole Star remains fixed in the north. Orion: Another group of stars, or constellation, represents a man wearing a sword and belt, and is named Orion. It is easily recognized by three stars in a line, the "belt", and three smaller stars in another line, close by the "sword". Two stars to right and left below the sword are Onion's feet two more above the belt are his shoulder, and a group of three small stars between them make his head. The Zulus call Orion's belt and sword the "Ingolubu or three pigs pursued by three dogs. The masai tribe in East Africa say that the three stars in Orion's belt and three bachelors being followed by three old maids. You see, Scouts all know Orion, though under different names. The great point about Orion is that by him you can always tell which way the north or pole Star lies, and you see Orion whether you are in the south or the north part or the world. If you draw a line, by holding up your staff against the sky, from the center star of Orion's belt through the center of his head, and carry that line on through the center of his head, and carry that line on through two big stars till it comes to a third, that third star is the North or Pole Star.

Scout's Pace: There'll be times when you'll want to move faster than your usual walking speed. When and old wolf wants to hurry, it lopes. A Scout uses Scout's pace.

Scout's pace is a mixture of jogging and walking. You jog about 25 paces (double steps) at an easy dogtrot, then walk 25 paces. Then repeat. Scout's pace serves two useful purposes. One is to cover ground without being tired. The other use is to measure distances. With a bit of practice you can develop a steady rate of 1 mile in 12 minutes or 2 kilometers in 15 minutes, not varying 15 seconds either way. To learn this timing method measures a half-mile with a car's speedometer. Scouts pace the distance forward and back until the timing is exacted. Then, when you are good at Scout's pace, use it often. If you like to run, work out your own faster timing rate.

When we talk about the bearing of an object, we mean its direction. But direction in relation to what? There must be a known reference point, in the same way that the distance to a place must be measured from some known point if it is to have any meaning. There are three north points from which bearings can be measured - magnetic north, as taken with a compass when finding the magnetic bearing of an object on the ground; grid north, when ascertaining the grid bearing of an object on the map: and true north, for stating the true bearing of an object on the ground. Why take bearings? Mapmakers, surveyors, and the like, take bearings chiefly for plotting (recording on paper) the positions of objects. Map users when they take bearings, either do so to find on a map something they can see on the ground, in which case they would take a magnetic bearing and covert it to a grid bearings; or to find on the ground an object they can see on the map, when they would take a grid bearing from the map, convert it, and locate the object by compass.

Map sketching should be done in such a way as to enable some one else to find his way from your drawing.
Several methods may be used : a. You may find a map of your locality, which may be easily enlarged. To do so, draw squares on the map if grid lines are not given. Then draw squares of the required size on your paper and fill up the squares to scale. Conventional signs are already oversized and should not be enlarged. b. A rough sketch may be drawn by standing, on high ground or on a tree from where you can see all the ground to be described. Mark your position at the bottom of your paper. Then stick a pin vertically into each end of a ruler. Sight along the ruler various prominent objects, and draw the line of direction on the paper. The distances from your position are then paced out and drawn to scale. Having got the main point, you will have no difficulty in filling in the other required details. c. Fairly accurate result can be obtained from the triangulation method. First of all choose carefully a convenient "base line" in the center of the area to be covered, and have it as long as possible. Measure accurately the distance from end to end of your base line, and draw it to scale on your paper. Now, starting at one end, take several bearings of prominent features that can be seen from both ends. Although bearings are best taken with a compass, a ruler with pings fixed at both ends may be used for very rough sketch in a manner similar to the one described in b. Plot your bearings or directions on paper and repeat the process at the other end of your base line. The position of each object will be found at the intersection point of their two bearings.

Intermediate objects are plotted to scale by pacing their distance from one end of the base. Other details may be jotted down freehand within this framework.

Lift a Casualty on the shoulder by Fireman's Lift. Method of carrying a patient by two Scouts/Guides is by making two-handed seat, three-handed seat or fourhanded seat. Prepare a stretcher from a carpet and two staffs. you can also make use of the bed sheets for the improvised shelter. in case of emergency "Belts" , "Shirts" and "Ropes" can be used for making an Improvised Shelter.

A diagonal lashing is used to secure two poles, which are likely to be pulled, or to spring, apart. 1. Commence with a timber hitch. 2. Make three turns following the directions of the timber hitch. 3. Now make three turns round the other fork. 4. Tighten the lashing with two or three frapping turns, and complete with a clove hitch on any of the poles.

To measure the distance between two objects, which are un-approachable, the following method may be useful. Let AM across a river, be the distance to be measure. Stick a staff at a convenient point L. By the preceding method find out the distance LA, say 40 yards. Similarly find out the distance ML., say 60 yards. The line AL is

then converted to A' by a convenient fraction, say ½ of the total length AL. Similarly the line ML is converted to M', keeping the same fraction. Measure now the distance M 'A' says 15 yards. It follows that the distance between the points MA will be 2xM'A' or 30 yards.

Napoleon Method Stand on one shore. Bend your head, chin against chest. Hold your hand to your forehead, palm down. Move hand down until the front edge of it seems to touch the opposite shore. Now make half right turn 'transferring' the distance to the point, which the edge of your hand seems to touch is the width of the river. Pace it. Napoleon would have used the brim of his hat instead of his hand. So would you if you had on a broadbrim Scout hat.

Compass Method Stand on one side of a river (B) Notice a rock exactly opposite to you on the other side of the river (A). Point the travel direction arrow of your compass at the rock. Turn the dial until the compass needle lies over the orienting arrow, north point pointing N. read the degrees (in this case 120) Add 45 (making if 165). Walk along the river point in the travel arrow toward A. When the compass is oriented, stop (C). Distance CB is the width of the river. Night Games: The fun and value to be had from night games is enormous. Many a Scout has had his fear of darkness overcome through gradual training in "Night Scouting". It may be easy to make a sketch map of a strange village in broad daylight, but try it in pitch dark and complete silence, no questions to be asked. This section allows for full use of the Scouter's imagination: - Bank Robberies, Fifth Colonists, Rockets, etc. Once again it is advisable to warn the police and other concerned parties. The police may even co-operative with you. Good training in Night Scouting can well be given in the daylight, using masks. These masks should be so made that the wearer can dimly distinguish objects, and gets some, where near night game conditions. Blindfolding should not be done. In planning night games it is always advisable to consult the weather pundits and study the state of the moon. The game that can be a success on a really dark night may be quite impossible when it is moon full, and vice versa. It is essential to go over the ground in daylight before the game is played so that the boundaries are known and understood and the area over which the game is played is reasonably familiar to most of those taking part, and especially the Patrol Leaders. Good night games are grand Scouting, but experience shows that there are few forms of Scouting that can so easily flop if the planning and previous reconnaissance leave anything to be desired. Generally speaking, a night game should be of shorter duration than an ordinary Wide Game. Forty-Five to sixty minutes is about right, but it depends a great deal on the area to be used and the number taking part. Morse Signalling in the book. Qualify for any one of the proficiency badges: 1. Cook 2. Debater 1. Propose, at least two subjects and oppose at least two others in propertyconducted debates.

2. Participate in debate, in the presence of the examiner for at least five minutes on subject under discussion having prepared the subject thoroughly, and submitted concise and orderly notes of his speech. 3. Know ordinary rules of debate, and duties and powers of the chairman. 4. Know how to chair a debate. 5. Be able to lead a discussion successfully in a group 3. Friend to animals 1. Have a general knowledge of the habits, food and all that tends to the well being of the following animals. Horse or donkey, cow or buffalo, sheep or goat, cat or dog, bull or camel and be able to recognize any form of cruelty or ill use to which they are subjected. 2. Know in respect of the above animals, usual minor ailments to which they are liable and what simple remedies may be employed. 3. Have knowledge of care of such birds, insects and reptiles as are generally kept either as pet or for domestic purposes and have kept a pet in good condition of comfort and health for at least 12 months. 4. Have an elementary knowledge of what to do in cases of accident to animals, of any laws passed for their protection and of power of police with regard to them. 5. Know address of the nearest 'Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals' where available. (SPCA.) 4. Gardener 1. Dig a piece of ground not less than 12 sq. meters, plant and grow successfully six kinds of vegetables or flowers from seeds or cuttings. In cities where digging is not possible wooden cases or pots may be used. 2. Know names of 12 plants pointed out in an ordinary garden: understand what is meant by pruning, budding, grafting and manuring and demonstrate any one of the following-pruning, budding, grafting. 3. Adopt a public park or a neighbor's courtyard and look after garden/plants for atleast two months. Note: In cities roof garden can be the alternative. 5. Handy man Be able to do ten out of the following, at least three of which (selected by the Examiner) must be demonstrated. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. Paint a door or similar object White was or distempers a wall or ceiling. Clean and adjust gas fitting and replace mantles. Replace a tap-washer and adjust a ball cock. Hang pictures and fix curtain rods. Fix, repair and adjust blinds or chicks. Take up, bet and relay a carpet. Repair furniture, upholstery or china. Sharpen knives. Glaze a window Top up and care for an accumulator. Service a hand pump. Replace a spring in a door lock. Know what immediate steps to take, in case of burst water pipe or gas leak.

15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 6. Cyclist

Make and fix a chimney. Attend to clogged sinks. Thatching a hut. Plastering wall or floor with mud or concrete. Make steps with logs of wood, leading to a tank or a stream. String a bed with webbing or string. Know how to repair tube-well pumps. Make hammock. Repair a wooden well top. Make a hay-box. Mend a bucket. Paint a pot. Handle a pressure stove. Recane a chair seat. Polish furniture, oil-stove, gas-stove. Repair broken or defective plastering. Clean and polish car, scooter or motorcycle. Repair children's toys. Repair an electric iron.

1. Sign a certificate that he owns, or has the use of, for at least six months, a bicycle or motorcycle, in good order correctly equipped with lamp, bell or horn, rear lamp and pump, and that he is able and willing to use it in the service of the country, if called upon, at anytime, in case of emergency. 2. Ride his machine satisfactorily, keep it in good running order, and, in the case of pedal cycle show that he can mount and dismount neatly by either pedal. 3. Mend a puncture, remove and replace a break and wheel, and adjust any part of his machine to the Examiner's satisfaction. 4. Know the Highway Code, traffic signals, correct time for lighting up-i.e. Time after sunset understand the system of road numbering, and be able to read a road map. 5. Repeat correctly a verbal message after a ride of at least an hour's duration. 6. Inform the examiner of the use he has made of his machine in last six months. 7. Must be able to carry a casualty on an improvised bicycle ambulance. 7. Launderer (will be updated) Scouting makes a scout independent, helpful, resourceful, thrifty etc. Thus they should take up activities like: 1. Health education for a month and teach the people about health and first aid. 2. Cleanliness - help maintain cleanliness. 3. Work for the welfare of the people. 4. Help the people out in other way. 5. Help prevent harm to and loss of public property.

6. Teach people hoe they can be resourceful and thrifty. Any of these above projects which are selected by scouts should be done on continues basis for one month regularly.

TRITYA SOPAN

You Need : A piece of rope and a piece of string or chord 12 inches long. Use brightly colored string to decorate your jump rope or on a drawstring bag. 1. Make a loop with one end of the string and lay the loop along the rope with the ends of the string hanging off the end of the rope. 2. Hold string in place with your left thumb. With your right hand, wind the long end of the string tightly over the loop and around the rope. The short end will be left hanging. 3. Wind the string around the rope for at least an inch. Wind firmly and closely but do not overlap. When you have wound far enough, tuck the end you have been winding through the loop. Hold it with your left hand thumb so it does not loosen. 4. Take the other end and pull slowly. The loop will disappear under the winding. Pull until the loop is halfway under the winding.

Trim the ends to make a neat finish. If you whipping slips off the rope, you did not make it tight enough. Practice until it holds when you try to push it off.

AMERICAN WHIPPING Make a loop in a 3-foot length of twine and place it at the end of the rope with one end of the twine pointing in the same directions as the rope end, the other pointing the opposite way. Wrap twine tightly around rope stating about ½ Inch from the rope end. Continue until a whipping is as wide as rope is thick. Pull the two ends out to either side, Cut off ends of twine near whipping.

Useful to tie in any place where it is desirable to untie quickly or for coming down a tree by a rope, where the running end is left long enough to be twitched form the ground only don't try to come down the running end by mistake!

As it suggests, think knot is essentially used for rescuing purposes. It provides two loops, one to go under the shoulders of the unconscious person, and the other under his knees. The size of the loops will obviously depend on the person to be rescued and some practice will be required to obtain at once the correct size of loops.

Man Harness Knot - Also called the Artillery Knot. A loop knot tied in the bight through which an arm can be put up to the shoulder to assist in hauling, while leaving the hands free. Formerly used on gun carriages, one end of the rope being fastened to a ring on the end of the axle.

TENT PITCHING The method of pitching tents various according to type, and there are often different ways of pitching the same tent. The best way is one you find easiest and quickest. It is always advisable to practice your pitching in private before going out with a new or unfamiliar tent. Three or four trial pitching and you will feel like an oldtimer. Let us suppose you have a new lightweight ridge tent with walls. Take the tent out of its bag. Note carefully how it is folded. Spread it out with the door facing the desired direction and with the four corners roughly where they are to be when pitched. Start by pegging the door flaps down where the front pole will be. Place the front of the tent exactly where you want it to face, square it and two corners down. Now square off and peg the back corners down. Next, put in the back and front main-guy pegs at nearly the tent's length away, hook the guys on and adjust slightly slack. Un-peg the door flaps and put the front and back poles in position. They will stay put while you correctly adjust the main guy lines. Lastly peg out the side guys and put the rest of the wall pegs in. Make any necessary adjustments. Poles should stand straight; side guys should be in line with seams and follow the same slope as the roof; and pegs should be at an angle of 450. If the pegs form a geometrical pattern round the tent, and the guys are equally tensioned, it will stand trim and without sag or crease. In windy weather, start by pegging the back corner down so that the canvas will be blowing away from you. IMPROVISED SHELTER

The bivouac shelter is the simplest form of tent, as well as the lightest and cheapest, and can be put to dozens of other uses. It is merely a sheet of proofed cloth, 7 to 10 feet square; with eyelets, or D-rings on sides, about 18inches apart along each side. Cloth: Any strong closely woven fabric such as cotton cambric. Nylon, terylene, lightweight plastic coated groundsheet cloth and similar fabrics normally unsuitable for tents because of condensation, make good hike-sheet. The weight should be about 3 or per square yard. The commonest cloth widths are 36, 42, 48 and 54inches. Nine yards of 35 or 42inches cloth cut into three and sewn together, or four yards of 48 or 56inches cloth cut in half and sewn together, would make a suitable size of sheet.

TREE FELLING OR LUMBERMAN'S METHOD Hold a stick upright in your outstretched hand. More backward away from the flagpole (or tree) you want to measure. Sight to the flagpole in such a way that the tip of the stick covers the top of the pole. The place where your thumb is, is its foot. Then swing the tick 90 degrees to a horizontal position. Notice the point where the tip of the stick hits the ground. Pace the distance from this point to the foot of the flagpole to get its height.

SHADOW METHOD Height of the tree = Length of the Staff x Length of Shadow of the Tree Length of the Shadow of Staff

REFLECTION METHOD Place a washbasin with muddy water on the ground between you and the tree, at a point, which you estimate to be approximately as far away from the tree as the tree is high. step back from the basin a distance equal to that from your eyes to the ground. You should now see

the top of the tree reflected in the water. If not, move basin (keeping yourself at the same distance from the washbasin) until you see the treetop reflected. The distance from the basin to the foot of the tree is the tree height.

B.P.'s METHOD Height of the tree (AX) = CX x DB BC

PENCIL METHOD Place a buddy whose height you know against the tree, or make a mark of your own height on the trunk. Step back, hold a stick or pencil up before you in your outstretched hand. With one ye closed, measure off on the stick with your thumbnail the height of your buddy. Then move the stick up to see how many times this measurement goes into the height of the tree. Multiply the height of your buddy with the number found. This gives you the height of the tree.

INCH-TO-FOOT METHOD Note the length of the staff from the ground to the point where sighting line cuts the staff in inches. The height of the tree will be same in feet.

Weight cannot be judged by size of the pack or object alone. To be able to measure weight, begin by holding the object the weight of which you know, in your hand for sometime. Keep it down; then take it up again. Try to sense the weight. With some other object of weight, say 2.50 kg. Repeat the process. Thus try to sense the weights of different objects & weights. When you feel you have acquired the ability to estimated weights. Try with objects whose weight you do not know. Then you weigh the objects and see if you have been able to judge their weights correctly.

ELECTRIC SHOCK 1. Remove the victim from the source of electricity before you touch him. Either turn off the master switch to disconnect the power, or use a nonmetal, dry object such as a stick to pull the wire or electrical source away from the victim's body. 2. If he is not breathing, begin rescue breathing immediately; a victim whose heart has stopped breathing needs CPR. 3. If the person is unconscious, but is breathing and has a heartbeat, you should place him in the recovery position and monitor his breathing and heart rate until medical help arrives Fainting can be a very frightening experience. You do not know where you are going to fall into when you faint. Frequent fainting can be a symptom of more serious conditions. Fainting (syncope) is a sudden brief loss of consciousness that may only last for a few minutes and is caused by a lack of sufficient blood and oxygen supply to the brain. It can occur with or without warning.

Causes
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Standing for a prolonged period Work or play especially during hot day. Emotional events-upset, depress, anxiety, being frightened Pain Abnormal heart rhythm Sick Signs and Symptoms Dizziness/lightheadedness Pale looking Cold and clammy skin Weak and slow pulse Weakness Nausea Sweating Collapse Loss of conscious Treatment

• • • • • •

• • •

Lie the person down with head lowered and legs elevated or place in the recovery position Keep the airway open Loosen any tight clothing Maintain enough fresh air If breathing and heartbeat stop, start cardiopulmonary resuscitation immediately, and seek medical help Reassure the person while regaining consciousness. After regaining consciousness, rest in a lying position for at least ten minutes before resuming activity. Check and treat any minor injury that the victim may have sustained during fainting Check the pulse, respiratory rate and level of conscious of the person until fully recovered. Seek for medical help if the condition of the victim not well. DO NOT GIVE THE VICTIM ANY DRINK OR FOOD UNTIL HE/SHE IS FULLY CONSCIOUS DO NOT GIVE THE VICTIM ANY ALCOHOLIC PRODUCT

Is due to the lodgment of a foreign object in the casualty's airway (trachea). In some instances, the object lodges at the epiglottis - the entry to the airway - but does not actually enter the trachea. Both cases cause initial coughing, the body's reflex action to dislodge the object. If an object is firmly lodged in the airway, coughing at least keeps it high in the trachea though may not expel it. Coughing with an object at the entrance to the airway, however, will generally cause it to be expelled. Should you encounter a person with an apparent obstruction that is COUGHING EFFECTIVELY, DO NOT SLAP him or her on the back. If the obstruction is at the entrance to the trachea, then reactions to the slaps may cause the person to inhale the object and cause complete obstruction. If a casualty initially coughs to no effect, and appears to be in increasing distress, then the object may be totally obstructing the airway.

SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS
• • • •

Absence of breathing Agitation and distress - grabbing the throat Cyanosis Eventual collapse

CARE AND TREATMENT
• • • •

Position the casualty - adults laterally, children heads down Deliver three or four firms slaps between the shoulder blades Reassess the casualty's attempts to breathe Repeat three or four firm slaps

If this fails to free the object and the casualty has collapsed, quickly roll the casualty onto his or her side, place your hands over the ribs, and deliver quick, firm thrusts. This may expel the object through the forcing of residual air from the lungs. Alternate slaps and chest thrusts

If ineffective, and the casualty is in respiratory arrest begin expired air resuscitation (EAR) immediately. EAR may be effective, as the object lodged in the airway causes muscular deformity of the trachea. Complete collapse of the casualty causes relaxation of the muscles, this allows some space around the object through which EAR can provide essential oxygen.

Conscious Victim 1.Ask the victim if he or she is choking 2.ASK IF YOU CAN HELP 3.GIVE ABDOMINAL THRUSTS -MAKE A FIST WITH ONE HAND AND WRAP THE OTHER HAND AROUND IT - PLACE THE THUMB SIDE OF FIST JUST ABOVE THE BELLY BUTTON. - GIVE QUICK UPWARD THRUSTS. 4.CONTINUE GIVING THRUSTS UNTIL: Unconscious Victim 1. Ensure victim is unconscious 2. Give 2 breaths if not breathing, check pulse 3. if breaths do not go in, position victim on his or her back -open airway by tilting head and lifting up chin -pinch nose to block airflow -give breath to victim slowly 4. if breaths do not go in, give 5 abdominal thrusts -straddle victims legs -place one of your palms just above victims belly button -press in to the abdomen with quick upward thrusts 5. Following thrusts, lift jaw and tongue , sweep mouth with your finger 6. Give 2 more slow breaths. 7. If breaths go in. check pulse, -Slide fingers from Adam's apple towards you, to the groove in the neck. -feel for a pulse. 8. if pulse is detected , check for breathing for 5 seconds and continue to monitor victim for breathing and pulse. 9.if pulse not detected, begin CPR

One way to become an efficient map reader is to start off with a 10 inch O.S. (original scale) map in an area you already know, and without being concerned about getting anywhere in particular take a leisurely look at the way the various features of the area are represented on the map. Take an extra look at anything that might have misled you had you been a stranger, such as the T-junction that looks like a fork; or the crossroads that is really a T-junction with another road some yards away, and which is clear enough when you take a closer look at the map, or the little bend in the road which cannot be shown because of the small scale of the map. Compare everything in sight-road slope with contour lines or spot heights; distances long and short between identifiable points; all conventional signs, and the rest-and at the end of it you can be sure you will already be a better map reader than you were when you started out.

Before setting out with an unfamiliar map, check the scale and the vertical interval of contours. And look the conventional signs over, because there are some variations on O.S. maps of different series. When you set out, try to visualize from the map the country between you and your destination. Picture in your mind, if you can, the route beyond your present view - what is round the corner or over the hill. With this general picture in your mind, and some idea of the mileage to cover and the time it should take you, you will be much less likely to lose your way.

The scale may be expressed: 1. In words. For instance one inch to a mile that means that one-inch on the map represents one mile on the ground. 2. As a representative fraction. In this method the scale is indicated by a fraction. A scale of 1/10,000 means that one unit on the map represents ten thousand units on the ground. 3. By a Scale line. Each division of the scale corresponds to the distance on the ground in yards, mile etc. This method is very convenient as it does not involve any mathematical calculation. Distances are found out with a pair of calipers straight away.

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Roads and Paths Railways Water Features

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Demonstrate the use of: 1. Knives: knives differ in size and shape according the type of work we use it for. Most of the common knives, which we use in daily use, are jack knife, hunting knives, and sheath knives. Jack knife can be fold so that the blades could be hide in. but the sheath knives are straight and we cannot fold it. They are carried in a leather pack or bags. 2. Axe: a hand axe is a small axe usually used in one hand. Its flat head can be used as a hammer. It is a handy tool for general use, through for heavy chopping a two handed axe is necessary. The hand axe presents most of the problems of the two handed axe and can be just as dangerous when carelessly used. 3. Pioneering projects Going for camping is an additional opportunity to get together. It gives the Scout, more time for fun and free play. Before going for a camp one has to take care of all the required material like:; 1. Permission from the concerned authority 2. Arrangements like transport, food, campground doctors etc. 3. One should see that all the necessary items are ready and With in reach. 4. One should take care of the weather too. 5. All the scouts who are attending the camp must be aware of the camp area and should follow the camp rules. Scouts will get a chance to see, know, do and: 1. Learn good manners in the out doors. 2. Scouts learn to dress for the out door activities 3. Learn to handle knife and choppers. 4. They practice the simple first aid. 5. They earn to cook simple dishes. 6. They learn about the plants and the insects. 7. They learn to use compass. 8. They will learn to build and put out the fire. 1. Undertake with another scout a cycle hike for 30kms and submit a report to the scoutmaster with in 10 days. You can take a cycle hike along with another scout. Note the date and the time you have started the hike. Take all the necessary material with you. Note all the places you have visited and the people you have talked. Please take permission of your parents before going to the hike. Choose a secure route in which the traffic is low. And intimate to the elders before starting. And do not forget to draw a rough sketch of your route, which you have traveled. If possible take some photographs and submit it along your report to your scoutmaster. And then do not forget to take a certificate for the hike. 2.A hike in foot with another scout for 10kms and submit a report. Hike on foot is similar to the hike on the cycle. But it is very much secure that the cycle hike. But it is better to go in a group for the foot hike. Follow all the steps described above for the hike.

Qualify for one of the following: 1. Civil defence 2. Pioneering 3. Community worker 4. World conservation Qualify for one of the following; 1. Citizen 2. Naturalist 3. Book bonder 4. Path finder

RAJYA PURASKAR
A Tritiya Sopan Scout is eligible to become a Rajya Puraskar. A Tritiya Sopan Scout will work for atleast six months to qualify for Rajya Puraskar. Unless a Scout completes the age of Thirteen years, he will not be eligible for receiving the Rajya Puraskar. A Tritiya Sopan Guide is eligible to become a Rajya Puraskar Guide. A Tritiya Sopan Guide will work for atleast six months to qualify for Rajya Puraskar. The knowledge of the proficiency badges, which you have acquired earlier. You should be through about the subject in those badges. Make sure that you have all your certificates signed. Also take care of the dates on the certificates. If possible take some photographs as proof for the camp. Qualify for one of the proficiency badge: Literacy Community worker Ecology Leprosy control Sanitation promoter Soil conservation Rural worker 1. Literacy 1. Organize a literacy drive for adults of village/locality. 2. Help/start a night school for adults /dropouts. 3. Teach three R's (Reading, Writing and Arithmetic) to at least ten illiterate people or help 10 children in their studies. 4. Prepare at least three posters to motivate Adult Literacy campaign. 5. Arrange an exhibition with posters etc. published by Governmental and Non-Governmental Organizations. 2. Community worker 1. Know the process of Community Development.

2. Convince at least twelve young boys of the locality and encourage them to join the movement 3. Become a liaison between Community and other resources of development i.e. Banks, Hospitals, specialists etc. 4. Help people plan for solving at least two of their needs e.g.: clean water, school building, vegetable market place etc. 5. Help in an immunization Camp in his Village/Mohalla/Slum. 3. Ecology 1. Know about the other agencies working for ecological balance. 2. Enlist co-operation of a specialist in the vicinity to educate people about this by way of discussions, audiovisuals etc. 3. Propagate against cutting trees. 4. Organise Van mahotsav in Monsoons. 5. Educate people about pollution problems in the area. 6. Work for solving any three of the following problems: (1) Soil erosion (2) Tree Cutting (3) Killing animals (4) Wastage of water or water pollution (5) Air Pollution (6) Littering 4. Leprosy control 1. Spread the word by means of audio-visuals that "Leprosy is curable" and propagates five point program of the Bharat Scouts and Guides. 2. Recognize sources that can help you in the campaign Skin Specialists, National Leprosy Eradication Program workers, volunteers etc. 3. Get checking up program in every educational Institute in the Village/Mohalla. 4. Educate community to change their attitude towards the problem. 5. Enlist co-operation of medical expert/specialist in educating people in his locality. 5. Sanitation promoter Make a survey in a given locality and help people in the following ways : 1. (a) Using clean water for drinking. (b) Demonstrate the process of filtering, boiling and storing water. (c) Demonstrate use of charcoal water filter. 2. Protecting grain from rats and other rodents. 3. Protecting cooked food from flies, mosquitoes, dirt etc. 4. Showing correct ways of disposing waste and use of compost pit. 5. Educating people about dangers of defecating in the open. 6. Erecting inexpensive and effective latrines. 7. Enthusing people belonging to at least twenty-five houses to use health salts with help of hand bills/posters prepared by himself.

6. Soil conservation 1. Understand changes, which happen on surface of the earth e.g. Erosion, Transpiration and Deposition and know its reasons. 2. Have general knowledge of problem of soil erosion, its danger; kinds, causes and methods of preventing these. 3. Study problem of soil erosion and prepare a log giving information about various programs being carried out in the country regarding soil conservation, afforestation and removal of water scarcity. Prepare a log based on his observations and experience regarding local problems of soil conservation. He should have spent three months in this study. 4. Understand importance of methods used for soil conservation such Mer Bandi, (tree plantation) or afforestation filling up the gully (Khai Patan) etc. and must have given service in any of the projects at least for 40 hours. Produce a record of service rendered. 5. With the help of his Patrol plant at least ten kuchas of manoj and look after these for three months. 6. Have general knowledge of the organization, work, and experiments of the Soil Conservation Board of his area. 7. Rural worker 1. Have detailed information of village, such as the area, population, occupation products, wells and other sources of water supply, traditions, the number of children of school age, the number of literate persons. 2. Have general knowledge of village sanitation (especially, pertaining to preventable diseases), village administration and village Panchayat. 3. Produce a record of continuous useful service (literacy, adult education, sanitation and cleanliness, farming, labour work, prohibition, games etc.) to the village extending over a period of at least six months or have worked in a recognized village camp for at least a period of fifteen days. 4. Help get at least fifty people checked for leprosy germs. 5. Help at least twenty children to get immunized. 6. Teach "Oral Re-hydration Technique" for at least six mothers. 7. Organize an eye care/dental care campaign in his village/Mohalla/Slum. 8. Teach to his neighbor's management of diarrhoea and dysentery or delousing for women. PR BADGES 5 Qualify for one of the proficiency badge:

Group A 1. Camper 2. Signaler 3. Electrician 4. Tailor 5. Dairy man 1. Camper

Group B 1. Public healthy man 2. Hospital man 3. Healthy man 4. Nutrition educator 5. Farmer

1) Know what normal requirements are in regard to a personal kit for a week's camp, persona l kit for a weekend hike or cruise: equipment and rations for a weekend patrol camp or cruise (7 boys) 2) Either know principal points to look for in selection of a Patrol or Troop campsite and describe with rough plan, how he would lay out a patrol camp with reference to tent kitchen, sanitation, etc. 3) Demonstrate that he (a) understands the use and care of an axe: (b) understands use of and can tie following knots in addition to Pratham Sopan and Dwitiya Sopan test knots, slip reef, double sheet bend, bowline on bight, and man harness knot. 4) Demonstrate how to pitch, strike, pack, and execute petty repairs to a 90 pounder and 180 pounder choldary, or make a hut of materials locally available sufficiently big for his patrol to sleep in. 5) Show that he has a satisfactory knowledge of camp cookery and understands proper methods of storing food, purification of water and how to dispose of refuse. 6) Have camped under canvas or in temporary hut constructed by him or on board ship, or boat with his Troop or patrol for not less than twelve nights and have camped out alone or with other scout for at least 3 nights not necessarily consecutively in either case. 2. Signaler 1) Send and receive by flag in Semaphore at the rate of seven words (35 letters) a minute or in Morse at the rate of five words (25 letters) a minute. 2) Send and receive at the rate of six words (30 letters) a minute by lamp or disc. 3) Send and receive at the rate of five words (25 letters) a minute by lamp or disc. Note: 90 percent must be obtained in all above tests. 4) Demonstrate that he knows a recognized procedure when sending and receiving a message. 5) Have a good knowledge of the various sings and signals given in "Scouting for Boys:. 6) Improve at least two methods of sending a message either in Morse or Semaphore at least half a mile at the rate of four words (20 letters) per minute. Note: Out door sending and receiving stations to be a minimum of 150 meters apart, Buzzer stations to be in separate rooms.

3. Electrician 1) Have an elementary knowledge of the terms and measurements used in electrical work. 2) Make connection in electric wiring and replace defective switches, lamps, holder, and fuse wires correctly. Know the necessary precautions, which should be observed. 3) Know construction of primary cells, electric bells, telephones, motors and dynamos. Make a simple electormagnet; a Telegraph key and use it. 4) Be able to replace the heating elements of a domestic electric iron or kettle or heater. 5) Know how to read house meters and to calculate electric consumption. 6) Know rules of safety from electricity and how to treat an electric shock. 4. Tailor 1) Cut out and sew, either by hand or machine, a Scout shirt and shorts, or equivalent garments, to fit himself. 2) Insert a patch, and darn a small hole in a neat workman like manner in either of the above two or other suitable garments. 5. Dairy man 1) Have knowledge gained by practice of the management of atleast one animal (cow/buffalo or goat) and produce a certificate from the parents (if at home) or from the owner where he worked for atleast three months. 2) Demonstrate care of dairy utensils and appliances used in the area. 3) Know milking and sterilization of milk including pasteurization. 4) Know processing of milk e.g. making curd, cheese, butter and ghee. 5) From veterinary doctor know about two types of common diseases and first-aid to be rendered to milk cattle. 6) Enthuse atleast six neighbors to improve the breed of their cattle by artificial insemination. 7) Propagate in the mohalla better formula of a balanced cattle feed in ten houses having cattle. 1. Public healthy man(APRO page-153) 1) Know modes of transmission of the following diseases; diphtheria, mumps, whooping cough, chicken pox, typhoid fever, dysentery, diarrhoea, small-pox, malaria, ringworm, scabies, plague, cholera, measures adopted by the sanitary authorities to prevent their spread and steps which should be taken by private individuals in cases of infection. Note: Bacteriological and medical details are not required. 2) Describe how to disinfect a room and its contents and how to eradicate pests such as mosquitoes, rabs, bed bugs and flies.

3) Describe mode employed in his locality of disposing garbage. 4) Educate five families in proper disposal of garbage. 5) Know about camp sanitation with reference to kitchen, latrines, washing places, drinking water and food storage. 2. Hospital man Have a general knowledge of, and demonstrate: 1) How to choose, prepare and ventilate a sick-room. 2) How to sponge, give medicine, and take a patient's temperature, pulse and respiration. 3) How to prepare food for invalids; to give fomentation, make beds and prevent bed-sores, and help the aged and infirm. 4) How to apply a roller bandage to hand, knee and foot and know materials used for dressing. 3. Healthy man 1) Know importance of the heart, lungs, skin, teeth, feet, stomach, and the organs of special sense (eyes, ears and nose) keeping in good order, and principal danger to be guided against. 2) Give general rules governing eating, drinking, breathing, sleeping, cleanliness and exercise; give evidence of these rules for at least 12 months. 3) Know value of fresh air and how to keep rooms ventilated. 4) Know dangers incurred in use of tobacco, alcohol, opium and other intoxicating drugs, danger of over straining the body and of continual use of one form of exercise. 5) Train a Patrol in simple exercises suitable for all parts of the body and give reasons for each exercise. 4. Nutrition educator 1) Understand basic principles in nutrition i.e. calories, fats, carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, minerals, know their correct proportions necessary in our regular diet and common food from which one can obtain them. 2) Recognize malnutrition and tell of its effects on human body. 3) Be able to draw up a fully balanced diet for a school going child, a mother to be and a normal adult. 4) Know the harm produced by excesses of certain types of food and drinks. 5) Educate people to discourage abuse of nonalcoholic beverages like tea, coffee and other drinks. 6) Make a nutrition survey in his village/locality and encourage people to contact doctors. 7) Prepare atleast three posters to educate people about nutrition.

5. Farmer 1) Must work on a farm for at least six months. 2) Have a practical knowledge of modern farm implements. 3) Have knowledge of improved seeds, fertilizers, manures, insecticides, sowing and harvesting. 4) Show an acquaintance with the routine seasonal work on a farm including the care of cattle or horses or sheep or pigs or poultry. 5) Be able to weed, water the plants and do after culture. 6) Know the methods of preservation of food gains. 7) Prepare a salt lick for cattle. 8) Propagate Drip-irrigation where there is scarcity of water.

RASHTRAPATI SCOUTS
CAMPING A Rajya Puraskar Scout is eligible to become a Rastrapati Scout. A Rajya Puraskar Scout will work for atleast one year, to qualify for Rashrapati Scout Working for other Proficiency Badges could be continued after Rastrapati Scout Award. Unless a Guide completes the age of thirteen years she will not be eligible for receiving the Rajya Puraskar. A Rajya Puraskar Guide is eligible to become a Rashtrapati Guide. A Rajya Puraskar Guide will work for atleast one year to qualify for Rashtrapati Guide Award. You should be, by now, well on your way in the fundamentals of safe, efficient and enjoyable, outdoor life. But camping is much more than a couple of happy days spent under a tent; it has been said that no boy who not camped out in the open can hope to become a scout in any way but name. 1.A few days in a real scout camp will teach you more than a hundred books. 2.You will hear secrets of the night and the language of the stars. 3.You will see smile of the flowers and the zest of the birds. 4.You will find the message of god written in his magnificent universe. Camp at least three nights consecutively with troop/patrol or with another scout in the open. Organize gatherings like rallies, jamborees etc, as we have discussed earlier before going for a camp you have to take care of all the major things like: 1. Travel 2. Place to stay 3. Permissions

4. Weather 5. Water supply 6. Distance 7. Communication lines and so on…

KNOW

THE USES OF

1.Handsaw: for cutting wood the right saw will do the job twice as fast as an axe. The ordinary was is clumsy and does not work too well on the kind of wood you find in the forest. You need a saw that does not get stuck in the saw cut. For overnight camping you may want to take a folding pack saw along. It is light and compact. Its blade folds in to the wooden handle for packing. For a longer-lasting camp you may prefer the traveling safety saw. This saw also folds to fit in your pack. When it is unfolded the blade is held under tension with a screw device. 2.Hammer: it is used for hammering nails, hammering pegs in the ground and for carrying out repairs. 3.Chopper: it is used for chopping wood and making small chips for burning. It can also be useful in making minced meat. 4.Wedges: Wedges are small wooden pieces, which are put in between diagonal lashing to make it tight. They are also put in between the wood, which is coming out through the eye on an axe or from the eye of a hammer to make it tight. It is a sort of packing used for jamming things.

IMPROVISED SHELTER To live comfortably in camp a Scout must know how to make a bivouac shelter for the night, or a hut if he is going to be in camp for a long time. What sort of shelter you put up depends on the country and weather. Notice the direction from which the wind generally blows, and put the back of your shelter that way, with your fire in front of it. If you are going into camp where there are plenty of trees, and you have got the right to use them, then there are several types of shelters you may make. A bivouac shelter is the simplest form of hut. Two upright stakes are driven firmly into the ground, with a ridgepole placed in position along the tops. Against this a number of poles are made to lean from the win ward side, with cross bars to support the branches, reeds, rods to twigs, or whatever is to form roofing materials. For a single man this shelter can be made quite small, about 3 ft. high in front, 3 ft. wide and 6 ft. long. You build your fire about 4 ft. in front of the shelter, and lie in it alongside

your fire. If the "shack" is for more than one man, you build it 5 ft. or 6 ft. high in front, and 6 to 7 ft. deep, so that several fellows can lie alongside each other, feet to the fire.

To be worn on both shoulders below the seam.( red cross on white ground) 1. Be able to answer questions from Dwitiya Sopan and Tritiya Sopan tests for first aid. 2. Know how to deal with major and minor bleeding. 3. Diagnose and bind a broken limb. 4. Know how to deal with choking by Heimlich Manoevoure. 5. Demonstrate mouth to mouth resuscitation. 6. Demonstrate how to improve a stretcher and apply a roller bandage. 7. Demonstrate how to send the correct message, verbal, written or by telephone. 8.demonstrate 2 methods of carrying a casualty with one First Aider and 2 more methods of carrying a casualty when there are 2 first Aiders.

PROFICIENCY BADGES 6 Qualify for one of the proficiency badge: 1.Camper 2. Secretary 3. Rural worker 4. Electronics 5. Fire man 6. Forester 7. Journalist 8. Leprosy control 1.Camper 1) Know what normal requirements are in regard to a personal kit for a week's camp, personal kit for a weekend hike or cruise: equipment and rations for a weekend patrol camp or cruise (7 boys).

2) Either know principal points to look for in selection of a Patrol or Troop campsite and describe with rough plan, how he would lay out a patrol camp with reference to tent kitchen, sanitation, etc. OR

Know how to select an anchorage mooring or berth for a rowing or sailing vessel, a sea going vessel. 3) Demonstrate that he (a) understands the use and care of an axe: (b) understands use of and can tie following knots in addition to Pratham Sopan and Dwitiya Sopan test knots, slip reef, double sheet bend, bowline on bight, and man harness knot. 4) Demonstrate how to pitch, strike, pack, and execute petty repairs to a 90 pounder and 180 pounder choldary, or make a hut of materials locally available sufficiently big for his patrol to sleep in. 5) Show that he has a satisfactory knowledge of camp cookery and understands proper methods of storing food, purification of water and how to dispose of refuse. 6) Have camped under canvas or in temporary hut constructed by him or on board ship, or boat with his Troop or Patrol for not less than twelve rights and have camped out alone or with other scout for at least 3 nights not necessarily consecutively in either case. 2. Secretary 1) Show a general knowledge of the administration of the Bharat Scouts and Guides at Group and District levels. Know terms of reference of Court-of-Honour, Patrol-in-Council. 2) In presence of the examiner either, write with a good, legible hand, (two hundred and fifty words) of prose. OR Type hundred words with not more than five mistakes, and show how to clean the machine and replace ribbon. 3) Show an understanding of Committee procedure including ability to prepare an agenda and take minutes. 4) Have a general knowledge of the financial structure of a Scout Group. Prepare simple Receipt and Payment account for a Troop or Patrol: know how a personal Bank Account operates. 5) Write a letter on a subject chosen by the Examiner, draft a wording for an invitation card addressed to members or public in connection with a Group, Troop or Patrol event. 6) Prepare a press release on subject of a Group event or write an article for a Scout magazine reporting a Troop, Group or District event. 7) Carry out the duties of secretary to his patrol, Court-of-Honour or some other committee not necessarily concerned with Scouting for a period of three months to the satisfaction of his Scoutmaster or the Chairman of the Committee concerned. 3. Rural worker 1) Have detailed information of village, such as the area, population, occupation products, wells and other sources of water supply, traditions, the number of children of school age, the number of literate persons.

2) Have general knowledge of village sanitation (especially, pertaining to preventable diseases), village administration and village Panchayat. 3) Produce a record of continuous useful service (literacy, adult education, sanitation and cleanliness, farming, labour work, prohibition, games etc.) to the village extending over a period of at least six months or have worked in a recognized village labour camp for at least a period of fifteen days. 4) Help get at least fifty people checked for leprosy germs. 5) Help at least twenty children to get immunized. 6) Teach "Oral Re-hydration Technique" for at least six mothers. 7) Organize an eye care/dental care campaign in his village/Mohalla/Slum. 8) Teach to his neighbors management of diarrhoea and dysentery or delousing for women. 4. Electronics 1) Explain the basic electronic theory. 2) Know functions and types of resistors, capacitors, rectifiers, diodes, transistors and integrated circuits. 3) Demonstrate the correct way to solder and up solder and fit components to a printed circuit board. 4) Be able to read and label a simple circuit diagram. 5) Have knowledge of electronic testing equipments. 6) Using kit, assemble a simple electronic apparatus. 5. Fire man Know: (1) The danger of inflammable household articles such as oil lamps, spirit stoves, flannelette, festival decorations, cotton, wool, celluloid, and of the focusing of the sun's rays. 2) How to trace an escape of gas and know the danger of faulty electric insulation. 3) First step to take on an outbreak of fire, methods of calling the Fire Brigade and Ambulance, position of nearest alarms to home and headquarters and what to do pending arrival. 4) How to use two common types of extinguishers, buckets and bucket-chains. 5) How to deal with following types of fires, clothes, petrol and spirit, chimney, motor car, curtain, electric hearth, grass and rick fires. 6) Use of scrum to keep back crowd, carrying of the injured, improvising, ropes, chairman knot, lowering by lines, jumping sheet, crawling through smoke. How to drag insensible persons, prevent panic and rescue cattle. 7) If possible use of hose, hydrants, escape chutes wherever specialized instructions are available. In the case of village Scouts the test which do not apply should be ignored, with permission of the D.C. 6. Forester

1) Basic concept of forest, its extent in India and importance of the forest in present contest. 2) Know from practical observations how to rear seedling including preparation of soil nursery beds, polybags, etc. and time of transplant and right season for thinning and felling. 3) Know, generally, how a tree lives and produces, how to deal with wounds, and have a knowledge of agencies which cause them. 4) Have knowledge of growth and development of twelve different species of trees in the locality, and be able to recognize them at a distance, at any season of year, as well as by the bark, leaf, flower and fruit and know their chief respective uses in fuel, fodder, fruit, medicine, timber and other uses. 5) Have a knowledge of forest fire, its causes and remedy. 6) Maintenance of raised plantation from beginning to one year. 7) Basic knowledge of social forestry, farm forestry, Road side plantation, avenue plantation and knowledge of ten species used in social forestry work. 8) Practical knowledge of erosion, its causes and measures to check soil erosion. 7. Journalist 1) Have served on editorial staff of a paper or magazine for at least six months. 2) Produce a report written by himself of Troop activities; and one of the following incidents-lecture or address, open air fete, garden party or rally. 3) Produce a cutting of a published article or report written by him. 4) Understand what is meant by "make up" and produce a dummy for the printer, representing one issue of an eight-page-magazine, circular, catalogue, or report. 5) Understand the point system of types and know names and six common typefaces. 6) Understand printer's correction signs. 7) Must be able to correct proof of a printed matter. 8. Leprosy control 1) Spread the word by means of audio-visuals that "Leprosy is curable" and propagate five point program of the Bharat Scouts and Guides. 2) Recognize sources that can help you in the campaign Skin Specialists, National Leprosy Eradication Program workers, volunteers etc. 3) Get checking up program in every educational Institute in the Village/Mohalla. 4) Educate community to change their attitude towards the problem. 5) Enlist cooperation of medical expert/specialist in educating people in his locality. COMMUNITY PROJECT

Participate in a service project to a community for not less than 36 hours spread over a period of at least 2 months and must work at least one day in a week. Prepare a dairy for work done and submit to the court-of-honor week after week Scouting makes a scout independent, helpful, resourceful, thrifty etc. Thus they should take up activities like: 1. Health education for a month and teach the people about health and first aid. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Cleanliness - help maintain cleanliness. Work for the welfare of the people. Help the people out in other way. Help prevent harm to and loss of public property. Teach people hoe they can be resourceful and thrifty.

Any of these above projects that are selected by scouts should be done on a continuous basis for one month regularly.

NIGHT HIKE 1. Under take a night hike for 10kms along with another scout and submit report to the scoutmaster with in 10 days. Hike on foot is similar to the hike on the cycle. But it is very much secure that the cycle hike. But it is better to go in a group for the foot hike. Follow all the steps described above for the hike. 2. Under take a cycle hike for 50kms along with another scout and submit report to the scoutmaster with in 10 days. Undertake a cycle hike for 50kms. Or a hike on foot for 15kms, and report. The Cycle-camper Apart from the packing and carrying of kit and equipment, cycle camping is basically the same as any other form of lightweight camping. If, as the hike-camper may think, the cyclist is at a disadvantage having to keep to the roads he makes up for it by being able to travel faster and farther, and in not being dependent on the nearness of shops when the chooses, a camp site.

COMMUNITY PROJECT Participate in a service project to a community for not less than 36 hours spread over a period of at least 2 months and must work at least one day in a week. Prepare a dairy for work done and submit to the court-of-honor week after week Scouting makes a scout independent, helpful, resourceful, thrifty etc. Thus they should take up activities like: 1. Health education for a month and teach the people about health and first aid. 2. Cleanliness - help maintain cleanliness. 3. Work for the welfare of the people. 4. Help the people out in other way. 5. Help prevent harm to and loss of public property. 6. Teach people hoe they can be resourceful and thrifty. Any of these above projects that are selected by scouts should be done on a continuous basis for one month regularly.

BADGE INSTRUCTER 1.Work as a badge instructor of a pack or a troop in vicinity. Badge instructor: Packs and troops always have problems for people to act as badge instructors. Scout s that are interested in particular fields like pioneering, cooking, athletics etc can act as a badge instructor for the troops or packs in the vicinity. And you have to maintain a logbook for the badge instructor and that must be signed by all the scouts whom you have acted as instructor. 2. Teach games for younger children for 15 days. You have to teach games for younger children who are in your neighboring houses for at least 15 days. And take a certificate for you work and photographs if possible as proof. And you have to serve as a Rajya Puraskar scout for a year.

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