436-431 MECHANICS 4

UNIT 2

MECHANICAL VIBRATION
J.M. KRODKIEWSKI 2008

THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

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MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS Copyright C 2008 by J.M. Krodkiewski

The University of Melbourne Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

CONTENTS
0.1 INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

I

MODELLING AND ANALYSIS

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1 MECHANICAL VIBRATION OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM LINEAR SYSTEMS 9 1.1 MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM . . . . 1.1.1 Physical model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.2 Mathematical model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.1.3 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2 ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 1.2.1 Free vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.2 1.2.3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 9 12 16 28 28 34 44

Forced vibration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 MECHANICAL VIBRATION OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM LINEAR SYSTEMS 66 2.1 MODELLING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 2.1.1 Physical model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 2.1.2 Mathematical model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 2.1.3 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 2.2 ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM . . . . . 93 2.2.1 General case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 2.2.2 Modal analysis - case of small damping . . . . . . . . . . 102 2.2.3 Kinetic and potential energy functions - Dissipation function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 2.2.4 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 2.3 ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 2.3.1 Balancing of rotors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 2.3.2 Dynamic absorber of vibrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 3 VIBRATION OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 162 3.1 MODELLING OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162 3.1.1 Modelling of strings, rods and shafts . . . . . . . . . . . 162 3.1.2 Modelling of beams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166

CONTENTS

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3.2 ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS . . . . . 3.2.1 Free vibration of strings, rods and shafts 3.2.2 Free vibrations of beams . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.3 Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.3 DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS 3.3.1 Rigid Elements Method. . . . . . . . . . . 3.3.2 Finite Elements Method. . . . . . . . . . . 3.4 BOUNDARY CONDITIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.5 CONDENSATION OF THE DISCREET SYSTEMS 3.5.1 Condensation of the inertia matrix. . . . 3.5.2 Condensation of the damping matrix. . . 3.5.3 Condensation of the stiffness matrix. . . 3.5.4 Condensation of the external forces. . . . 3.6 PROBLEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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168 168 174 182 214 214 217 225 226 227 228 228 228 229

II

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION

237

4 MODAL ANALYSIS OF A SYSTEM WITH 3 DEGREES OF FREEDOM 238 4.1 DESCRIPTION OF THE LABORATORY INSTALLATION . . . . . 238 4.2 MODELLING OF THE OBJECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 4.2.1 Physical model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 4.2.2 Mathematical model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 4.3 ANALYSIS OF THE MATHEMATICAL MODEL . . . . . . . . . . . 241 4.3.1 Natural frequencies and natural modes of the undamped system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 4.3.2 Equations of motion in terms of the normal coordinates - transfer functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 4.3.3 Extraction of the natural frequencies and the natural modes from the transfer functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242 4.4 EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 243 4.4.1 Acquiring of the physical model initial parameters . . 243 4.4.2 Measurements of the transfer functions . . . . . . . . . . 244 4.4.3 Identification of the physical model parameters . . . . 245 4.5 WORKSHEET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246

Part one consists of four chapters. since this knowledge is essential for a proper understanding of the following material. as a part of the second year subject Mechanics 1. This chapter forms a base for development of discretization methods presented in the next chapter In chapter four. students should study it in their own time. Each chapter is supplied with several engineering problems. for engineering applications. The presented condensation techniques allow to keep size of the discrete mathematical model on a reasonably low level. Application of the modal analysis to the case of the small structural damping results in solution of the initial problem and the forced response. Solution to the other problems should be produced by students during tutorials and in their own time. The second part. Approximation of the Continuous Systems by Discrete Models. Chapter two is devoted to modeling and analysis of these mechanical systems that can be approximated by means of the Multi-Degree-Of-Freedom models. However. The first chapter. Solution to some of them are provided. Experimental Investigation. rods. Mechanical Vibration of One-Degree-Of-Freedom Linear System. The natural frequencies and the natural modes are used for the exact solutions of the free and forced vibrations. Part two gives the theoretical background and description of the laboratory experiments. describes the laboratory work recommended for this course. is concerned with the problems of vibration associated with one-dimensional continuous systems such as string. The considerations are limited to the linear system only. where already conveyed to the students and are not to be lectured during this course. Chapter three. Modelling and Analysis. Employment of these matrices to the solution of the engineering problems is demonstrated on a number of examples. two the most important. The Rigid Element Method and the Final Element Method are explained and utilized to produce the inertia and stiffness matrices of the free-free beam. methods of approximation of the continuous systems by the discrete models are presented. One of them is devoted to the experimental determination of the natural modes and the corresponding natural frequencies of a Multi-Degree-Of-Freedom- . The Newton’s-Euler’s approach. In the general case of damping the process of looking for the natural frequencies and the system forced response is provided. Dynamic balancing of the rotating elements and the passive control of vibrations by means of the dynamic absorber of vibrations illustrate application of the theory presented to the engineering problems. The purpose of this text is to provide the students with the theoretical background and engineering applications of the theory of vibrations of mechanical systems. is devoted to this solution of these engineering problems that can be approximated by means of the linear models. It is divided into two parts. Lagrange’s equations and the influence coefficients method are utilized for the purpose of creation of the mathematical model. Vibration of Continuous Systems. and beams.1 INTRODUCTION. Part one.INTRODUCTION. shafts. 5 0. illustrates modelling and analysis of these engineering problems that can be approximated by means of the one degree of freedom system. Information included in this chapter.

. The other demonstrates the balancing techniques.INTRODUCTION. 6 System.

Part I MODELLING AND ANALYSIS 7 .

This mathematical description can be obtained by taking advantage of the known laws of physics. This part of modelling is called creation of the physical model. This part deals with study of linear vibrations of mechanical system. Therefore it is necessary to introduce many assumptions that simplify the engineering problems to such extend that the physic laws may be applied. Such a type of motion is called vibration.8 Modelling is the part of solution of an engineering problems that aims towards producing its mathematical description. One of the most frequently encounter in engineering type of motion is the oscillatory motion of a mechanical system about its equilibrium position. Process of solving of the mathematical model is called analysis and yields solution to the problem considered. . Application of the physics law to the physical model yields the wanted mathematical description that is called mathematical model. These laws can not be directly applied to the real system.

1 MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM DEFINITION: Modelling is the part of solution of an engineering problem that aims for producing its mathematical description. each point of the system performs an independent oscillatory motion.Chapter 1 MECHANICAL VIBRATION OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM LINEAR SYSTEMS DEFINITION: Any oscillatory motion of a mechanical system about its equilibrium position is called vibration. This part of modelling is called creation of the physical model. Therefore. 1.1 Physical model As an example of vibration let us consider the vertical motion of the body 1 suspended on the rod 2 shown in Fig. 1. If the body is forced out from its equilibrium position and then it is released. Therefore it is necessary to introduce many assumptions that simplify the problem to such an extend that the physic laws may by apply.1. These lows can not be directly applied to the real system. The mathematical description of the engineering problem one can obtain by taking advantage of the known lows of physics. in general. one has to introduce an infinite number of independent coordinates xi to determine uniquely its motion. Application of the physics law to the physical model yields the wanted mathematical description which is called mathematical model. i 2 1 xi t Figure 1 . 1.

For example. In a general case. its instantaneous position as a function of x is shown in Fig. only one coordinate is sufficient to determine uniquely the whole system. if one assume that the rod 2 is massless and the body 1 is rigid. If the rod is uniform. the restoring force R is a non-linear function of . In the case considered the free body diagram is shown in Fig. 2. one has to produce its free body diagram. in many cases. i xi 2 1 x t x Figure 2 Position xi of all the other points of our system depends on x. Adaptation of certain assumptions. The displacement x of the rigid body 1 can be chosen as the independent coordinate (see Fig. The following analysis will be restricted to system with one degree of freedom only. R 1 x t G Figure 3 The gravity force is denoted by G whereas the force R represents so called restoring force.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 10 DEFINITION: The number of independent coordinates one has to use to determine the position of a mechanical system is called number of degrees of freedom According to this definition each real system has an infinite number of degrees of freedom. 3. To produce the equation of the vibration of the body 1. 2). may results in reduction of this number of degrees of freedom.

The physical model that reflects all the above mention assumption is called one-degree-of-freedom linear system. 5. the non-linear relationship. . 4 can be linearized. x Figure 4 If it is possible to limit the consideration to vibration within a small vicinity of the system equilibrium position.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 11 the displacement x and the instantaneous velocity x of the body 1 (R = R(x. The future analysis will be limited to cases for which such a linearization is acceptable form the engineering point of view. 4a) and b) respectively. x) ≈ kx + cx ˙ ˙ (1.1) The first term represents the system elasticity and the second one reflects the system’s ability for dissipation of energy. Result of this part of modelling is called physical model. x)). For presentation of the physical model we use symbols shown in the Fig. Such cases usually are refer to as linear vibration and the system considered is call linear system. shown in Fig. k is called stiffness and c is called coefficient of damping. ˙ ˙ The relationship between the restoring force R and the elongation x as well as the velocity x is shown in Fig. ˙ R R a) b) 0 x 0 . R=R(x.

6. The creation of the physical model.1. has been explained in the previous section. . In this section principle of producing of the mathematical model for the one-degree-of-freedom system is shown.I rigid body of mass m and moment of inertia I (angular motion) 12 ϕ particle of of mass m m k A. second moment of area J and Young modulus E k massless spring of stifness k (angular motion) ϕ massless damper of damping coefficient c (linear motion) c c ϕ . This mathematical model can be obtained by application of the known physic lows to the adopted physical model. J. E massless spring of stifness k (linear motion) massless beam area A.2 Mathematical model To analyze motion of a system it is necessary to develop a mathematical description that approximates its dynamic behavior. massless damper of damping coefficient c (angular motion) Figure 5 1.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM x rigid block of mass m (linear motion) m m. Let us consider system shown in Fig. This mathematical description is referred to as the mathematical model.

Therefore. This increment is called restoring force. The resultant force of all static forces (in the example considered gravity force mg and interaction force due to the static elongation of spring kxs ) is equal to zero. In this chapter we are assuming that the origin of the absolute system of coordinates coincides with the centre of gravity of the body while the body stays at its equilibrium position as shown in Fig.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 13 k c x k xs m mg Figure 6 Let as assume that the system is in an equilibrium. the restoring force is opposite to the positive direction of axis x. 7) by a distance x.2) . This require introduction of the absolute system of coordinates. Hence FR = −k |x| = −kx If x < 0. there is an increment in the interaction force between the spring and the block. To develop the mathematical model we take advantage of Newton’s generalized equations. Hence FR = +k |x| = −kx Therefore the restoring force always can be represented in the equation of motion by term FR = −kx (1. If the system is out of the equilibrium position (see Fig. -k\x\=-kx k c x k xs m mg x>0 k\x\=-kx x<0 Figure 7 In our case the magnitude of the restoring force is |FR | = k |x| If x > 0. these forces do not have to be included in the Newton’s equations. 6. the restoring force has the same direction as axis x.

5) (1. This interaction ˙ force is called damping force and its absolute value is |FD | = c |x| . Hence. A very similar to the above consideration leads to conclusion that the damping force can be represented in the equation of motion by the following term ˙ FD = −cx (1. -c\x\=-cx . x>0 mg .4) . the equation of motion of the block of mass m is m¨ = −kx − cx + Fex (t) x ˙ Transformation of the above equation into the standard form yields ˙ x + 2ςωn x + ω 2 x = f (t) ¨ n where (1. 9).3) k c x m Fex (t) Figure 9 The assumption that the system is linear allows to apply the superposition rules and add these forces together with the external force Fex (t) (see Fig. . . x<0 m Figure 8 Creating the equation of motion one has to take into consideration the interaction force between the damper and the block considered (see Fig. +c\x\=-cx . 8).MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 14 k c x k xs .

is called damping factor or damping ratio f (t) .is called natural frequency of the undamped system ς . f (t) = (1. ωn = r .6) m m m ωn .is called unit external excitation The equation 1.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 15 k Fex (t) c .5 is known as the mathematical model of the linear vibration of the one-degree-of-freedom system. 2ςωn = .

. It is supported by the spring of stiffness k1 . The upper end of the spring k2 moves along the inertial axis y and its motion is governed by the following equation yA = a sin ωt were a is the amplitude of motion and ω is its angular frequency.1. Produce the equation of motion of the block.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 16 1. 10)is restricted to move along the vertical axis.3 Problems Problem 1 y A k2 m k1 c Figure 10 The block of mass m (see Fig. the spring of stiffness k2 and the damper of damping coefficient c.

8) (1. Application of the Newton’s low results in the following equation of motion ˙ m¨ = −k2 x − k1 x + k2 y − cx x Its standard form is ˙ x + 2ςω n x + ω 2 x = q sin ωt ¨ n where ω2 = n k1 + k2 m 2ςωn = c m q= k2 a m (1.9) (1.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 17 Solution y A k2 m k1 c x Figure 11 Let us introduce the inertial axis x in such a way that its origin coincides with the centre of gravity of the block 1 when the system is in its equilibrium position (see Fig.7) . 11.

. Produce the formula for the period of the vertical oscillation of the cylinder.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 18 Problem 2 r 1 2 R Figure 12 The cylinder 1 (see Fig. 12) of mass m and radius r is plunged into a liquid of density d. The cylindric container 2 has a radius R.

12) r2 x z= 2 R − r2 Introducing the above relationship into the formula 1. 13.14) The standard form of this equation of motion is x + ω2 x = 0 ¨ n µ 2 2 ¶ dg Rr = π m R2 − r 2 The period of the free oscillation of the cylinder is s s mπ (R2 − r2 ) 2 2π 2π m (R2 − r2 ) Tn = = = ωn Rr πdg Rr dg ω2 n where (1.17) .15) (1.16) (1.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 19 Solution x r V2 G z V1 x R Figure 13 Let us introduce the inertial axis x in such a way that its origin coincides with the centre of gravity of the cylinder 1 when the system is in its equilibrium position (see Fig. If the cylinder is displaced from its equilibrium position by a distance x.13) (1. the hydrostatic force acting on the cylinder is reduced by ∆H = (x + z) dgπr2 Since the volume V1 must be equal to the volume V2 we have ¡ ¢ V1 = πr2 x = V2 = π R2 − r2 z Therefore (1.10) (1.10 one can get that ¶ µ 2 2 ¶ µ Rr r2 2 x x dgπr = πdg ∆H = x + 2 R − r2 R2 − r 2 According to the Newton’s law we have m¨ = −dgπ x µ R2 r 2 R2 − r 2 ¶ x (1.11) (1.

The disk can oscillate about the vertical axis and the damping is modelled by the linear damper of a damping coefficient c. 14) is supported by an elastic shaft of diameter D and length L. The elastic properties of the shaft are determined by the shear modulus G.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 20 Problem 3 R c G D L m 1 Figure 14 The disk 1 of mass m and radius R (see Fig. Produce equation of motion of the disk .

19) 2 1 (1.18 yields ˙ I ϕ + cR2 ϕ + ¨ or ˙ ϕ + 2ςω n ϕ + ω 2 ϕ = 0 ¨ n where ω2 = n πD4 G 32LI 2ςωn = cR2 I (1.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 21 Solution R ϕ G D c L m Figure 15 Motion of the disk is governed by the generalized Newton’s equation ˙ I ϕ = −ks ϕ − cR2 ϕ ¨ where I = mR .20) (1.18) .21) πD4 G ϕ=0 32L (1.the moment of inertia of the disk 2 4 ks = T = TTL = JG = πD G the stiffness of the rod ϕ L 32L JG Introduction of the above expressions into the equation 1.

The spring of stiffness k keeps it in the horizontal position. Produce the equation of motion of the plate. The damping coefficient c reflects dissipation of energy of the system. .MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 22 Problem 4 O k l b 1 c a m Figure 16 The thin and uniform plate 1 of mass m (see Fig. 16) can rotate about the horizontal axis O.

25) .23) The moment which act on the plate due to the interaction with the spring k and the damper c is M = −kl2 ϕ − cb2 ϕ ˙ (1.26) (1.22) The moment of inertia of the plate 1 about its axis of rotation is I= mb2 6 (1. 17) is govern by the generalized Newton’s equation Iϕ = M ¨ (1.27) mb2 ϕ + kl2 ϕ + cb2 ϕ = 0 ¨ ˙ 6 (1.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 23 Solution O k l b 1 ϕ c a m Figure 17 Motion of the plate along the coordinate ϕ (see Fig.24) Hence or ϕ + 2ςω n ϕ + ω 2 ϕ = 0 ¨ ˙ n where ω2 = n 6kl2 mb2 2ςω n = 6c m (1.

. Produce the equation of motion of the system. 18)is mounted on the massless beam of length l. Its unbalance (the distance between the axis of rotation and the shaft centre of gravity) is µ. The shaft of the motor has a mass m and rotates with the angular velocity ω. the second moment of inertia of its cross-section I and the Young modulus E.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 24 Problem 5 m M E.I ωt c l µ Figure 18 The electric motor of mass M (see Fig. The damping properties of the system are modelled by the linear damping of the damping coefficient c.

MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 25 Problem 6 k d D l L Figure 19 The wheel shown in the Fig. The wheel is supported by the spring of stiffness k and the damper of the damping coefficient c. The right hand end of the damper moves along the horizontal axis y and its motion is given by the following equation y = a sin ωt Produce the equation of motion of the system 0 A c y . 19 is made of the material of a density . It can oscillate about the horizontal axis O.

. 20.MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 26 Problem 7 2 L r 1 Figure 20 The cylinder 1 of mass m is attached to the rigid and massless rod 2 to form the pendulum shown in the Fig. Produce the formula for the period of oscillation of the pendulum.

MODELLING OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 27 Problem 8 O k l b 1 a m c Figure 21 The thin and uniform plate 1 (see Fig. Produce the formula for the natural frequency of the system. 21) of mass m can rotate about the horizontal axis O. The damping coefficient c reflects dissipation of energy of the system. . The spring of stiffness k keeps it in the horizontal position.

31) n This characteristic equation has two roots λ1 = +iω n and λ2 = −iω n (1.2. the equation 1. Introduction of these initial conditions .29 yields the characteristic equation λ2 + ω 2 = 0 (1. let us assume that at the instant t = 0 the system was at the position x0 and was forced to move with the initial velocity v0 . These solutions can be obtained by means of the following procedure. The particular solution can be predicted in the form 1. Hence.29) Hence. To get an unique solution it is necessary to specify the initial position and the initial velocity of the system considered. x = eλt (1. If one assume that the damping ratio ς is equal to zero. x + ω2 x = 0 ¨ n Free vibration of an undamped system The general solution of the homogeneous equation 1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 28 1.34) The two constants Cs and Cc should be chosen to fulfill the initial conditions which reflect the way the free vibrations were initiated.1 Free vibration DEFINITION: It is said that a system performs free vibration if there are no external forces (forces that are explicitly dependent on time) acting on this system.28) The equation 1.30. in this case.32) (1.29 is a linear combination of its two particular linearly independent solutions.30 into the equation 1. the independent particular solution are x1 = sin ωn t and x2 = cos ωn t (1. the mathematical model that is analyzed in this section takes form x + 2ςωn x + ω2 x = 0 ¨ ˙ n (1. x = Cs sin ω n t + Cc cos ω n t (1. Hence.28 is classified as linear homogeneous ordinary differential equation of second order.28 governs the free motion of the undamped system.30) Introduction of the solution 1. according to the above definition. it is assumed that the resultant of all external forces f (t) is equal to zero.2 ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 1.33) Their linear combination is the wanted general solution and approximates the free vibration of the undamped system. In this section.

x0 = 1[m] v0 = 1[m/s] and ς = 0 the free motion is shown in Fig. x[m] 1 vo xo 0. in the case considered is periodic. since the sine function has a period equal to 2π. α = arctan ! (1.5 Tn Figure 22 DEFINITION: The shortest time after which parameters of motion repeat themselves is called period and the motion is called periodic motion.38) . According to this definition.5 10 20 30 40 50 t[s] -1 -1. the particular solution that represents the free vibration of the system is v0 sin ω n t + x0 cos ω n t = x = ωn = C sin(ω n t + α) (1. Cc = x0 Cs ω n = v0 (1.5 C 0 α -0.37) For ω n = 1[1/s]. we have sin(ω n (t + Tn ) + α) = sin(ωn t + α + 2π) (1.36) where C= s µ v0 ωn ¶2 Ã x0 v0 ωn (x0 )2 + . 22 The free motion.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 29 into the equation 1.35) According to 1.34.34 results in two algebraic equation that are linear with respect to the unknown constants Cs and Cc .

40) 2π ωn (1. p (1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 30 Hence.45) (1.underdamped vibration If ς < 1.40 yields the characteristic equation λ2 + 2ςωn λ + ω 2 = 0 n The characteristic equation has two roots p p −2ςω n ± (2ςωn )2 − 4ω 2 n = −ςωn ± ωn ς 2 − 1 λ1.46) (1. the period of the undamped free vibrations is Tn = Free vibration of a damped system If the damping ratio is not equal to zero. Three cases are possible Case one .47) (1.30 into 1.2 = 2 (1.44) x1 = e−ςωn t sin ωd t and x2 = e−ςωn t cos ω d t and their linear combination is x = e−ςωn t (Cs sin ω d t + Cc cos ω d t) For the following initial conditions x |t=0 = x0 the two constants Cs and Cc are Cs = Cc v0 + ςω n x0 ωd = x0 x |t=0 = v0 ˙ (1.39) (1.43) λ1. the characteristic equation has two complex conjugated roots and this case is often referred to as the underdamped vibration.2 = −ςω n ± iω n 1 − ς 2 = −ςω n ± iω d where ωd = ωn The particular solutions are p 1 − ς2 (1.41) (1. the equation of the free motion is ˙ x + 2ςωn x + ω2 x = 0 ¨ n Introduction of the equation 1.42) The particular solution depend on category of the above roots.48) .

51) DEFINITION: Natural logarithm of ratio of two displacements x(t) and x(t + Td ) that are one period apart is called logarithmic decrement of damping and will be denoted by δ. .49) where sµ C= ¶2 v0 + ςω n x0 ωd + (x0 )2 . 23In this case the motion is not periodic but the time Td (see Fig. v0 + ςω n x0 ωd = ωn (1. x0 = 1[m] v0 = 1[m/s] and ς = . α = arctan x0 ω d .48 into 1.5 -1 Td -1. 23) between every p 1 − ς2 x[m] vo xo 1 t 0.5 Figure 23 second zero-point is constant and it is called period of the dumped vibration.50) For ω n = 1[1/s].46 produces the free motion in the following form x = e−ςωn t (Cs sin ω d t + Cc cos ω d t) = Ce−ςωn t sin(ω d t + α) (1.5 Td x(t+ Td ) x(t) 0 10 20 30 40 50 t[s] -0.1 the free motion is shown in Fig.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 31 Introduction of the expressions 1.49 that Td = 2π ωd (1. It is easy to see from the expression 1.

According to the formula 1. Indeed δ = ln Ce−ςωn t sin(ω d t + α) x (t) = ln −ςωn (t+T ) = d sin(ω (t + T ) + α) x (t + Td ) Ce d d Ce−ςωn t sin(ωd t + α) 2πςω n 2πςωn = ln −ςωn t −ςωn T = ςω n Td = = √ = d sin(ω t + 2π + α) Ce e ωd ωn 1 − ς 2 d 2πς = √ (1. x0 = 1[m] v0 = 1[m/s] and ς = 1. The critical damping offers for the system the possibly faster return to its equilibrium position. .52) 1 − ς2 This formula is frequently used for the experimental determination of the damping ratio ς.44 and 1.57 produces expression for the free motion in the following form (1.59 into 1.53) 4π 2 + δ 2 The other parameter ωn that exists in the mathematical model 1.60) x = e−ςωn t (x0 + t(v0 + x0 ω n )) For ω n = 1[1/s]. the free motion is shown in Fig. 24.55) Introduction of the expressions 1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 32 It will be shown that the logaritmic decrement is constant.58) (1.critically damped vibration If ς = 1.40 can be easily identified by measuring the period of the free motion Td .2 = −ςωn The particular solutions are x1 = e−ςωn t and their linear combination is x = Cs e−ςωn t + Cc te−ςωn t For the following initial conditions x |t=0 = x0 the two constants Cs and Cc are as follow Cs = x0 Cc = v0 + x0 ωn (1.57) and x2 = te−ςωn t (1.54) ωn = √ 1 − ς2 Td 1 − ς 2 Case two .51 ωd 2π = √ (1. δ ς=p (1.59) x |t=0 = v0 ˙ (1. the characteristic equation has two real and equal one to each other roots and this case is often referred to as the critically damped vibration λ1.56) (1.

64) the two constants Cs and Cc are as follow Cs Cc √ v + ω0 + x0 (+ς + ς 2 − 1) n √ = 2 ς2 − 1 √ v − ω0 + x0 (−ς + ς 2 − 1) n √ = 2 ς2 − 1 (1.5 0 10 20 30 40 50 t[s] -0. the free motion is shown in Fig. p p λ1.62) For the following initial conditions ³ ´ √ √ 2 2 x = e−ωn t Cs eωn ς −1)t + Cc e−ωn ς −1)t x |t=0 = x0 x |t=0 = v0 ˙ (1.65) For ω n = 1[1/s]. the characteristic equation has two real roots and this case is often referred to as the overdamped vibration. 25 .61) x1 = e−ωn (ς+ and their linear combination is √ ς 2 −1)t The particular solutions are and x2 = e−ωn (ς− √ ς 2 −1)t (1.5 -1 -1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 33 x[m] vo xo 1 0.5 Figure 24 Case three .overdamped vibration If ς > 1.63) (1.2 = −ςω n ± ω n ς 2 − 1 = ωn (−ς ± ς 2 − 1) (1. x0 = 1[m] v0 = 1[m/s] and ς = 5.

5 -1 -1.69) r (1.5 Figure 25 1.68) ωn = The general solution of the homogeneous equation has been produced in the previous section and for the underdamped vibration it is xg = e−ςωn t (Cs sin ω d t + Cc cos ω d t) = Ce−ςωn t sin(ω d t + α) (1. The mathematical model. x + 2ςωn x + ω 2 x = f (t) ¨ ˙ n where k Fex (t) c .66) To produce the particular solution of the non-homogeneous equation. x = xg + xp (1.2. the initial conditions and the exciting force. let as assume that the excitation can be approximated by a harmonic function.5 0 10 20 30 40 50 t[s] -0. Such a case is referred to as the harmonic excitation. f (t) = q sin ωt (1. f (t) = (1. according to the previous consideration.70) .67) m m m The general solution of this mathematical model is a superposition of the general solution of the homogeneous equation xg and the particular solution of the nonhomogeneous equation xp . is the linear non-homogeneous differential equation of second order.2 Forced vibration In a general case motion of a vibrating system is due to both. 2ςωn = .ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 34 x[m] vo x o 1 0.

69 and 1.75 into the predicted solution 1.76) ϕ = arctan Ac 2(ςω n )ω = − arctan 2 As ωn − ω2 (1. Therefore.71 for any instant of time.71) where As and Ac are constant.71 in the following form x = Ce−ςωn t sin(ω d t + α) + A sin(ωt + ϕ) (1.77) (1.71 one can get ¢ ¡ ¢ ¡ 2 (ωn − ω2 )As − 2ςωn ωAc sin ωt+ 2ςω n ωAs + (ω 2 − ω 2 )Ac cos ωt = q sin ωt (1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 35 In the above equation q represents the amplitude of the unit excitation and ω is the excitation frequency.76 into the 1. The function 1. implementing it in equation 1.72 yields xp = As sin ωt + Ac cos ωt = A sin(ωt + ϕ) where A= or p q A2 + A2 = p s c (ω 2 − ω 2 )2 + 4(ςωn )2 ω 2 n A= q ω ω (1 − ( ωn )2 )2 + 4ς 2 ( ωn )2 q ω2 n (1.78) ω 2ς ωn ϕ = − arctan ω 1 − ( ωn )2 Introducing 1.72) (1.74) Solution of the above equations yields the expression for the constant As and Ac ¯ ¯ ¯ q −2ςω n ω ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 (ω2 − ω2 ) ¯ (ω 2 − ω 2 )q n n ¯= 2 As = ¯ 2 2 )2 + 4(ςω )2 ω 2 ¯ (ω n − ω 2 ) −2ςω n ω ¯ (ωn − ω n ¯ ¯ 2 2 ¯ ¯ 2ςω n ω (ωn − ω ) ¯ ¯ 2 ¯ (ω n − ω 2 ) q ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 2ςω n ω 0 ¯ −2(ςωn )ωq ¯= 2 Ac = ¯ 2 (1.73) n This relationship is fulfilled for any instant of time if (ω 2 − ω 2 )As − 2ςω n ωAc = q n 2ςωn ωAs + (ω2 − ω2 )Ac = 0 n (1.68 one can obtain the general solution of the equation of motion 1.70 into equation 1. Introduction of the expression 1.79) .75) 2 ¯ (ω n − ω ) −2ςω n ω ¯ (ωn − ω2 )2 + 4(ςω n )2 ω2 ¯ ¯ ¯ 2ςω n ω (ω2 − ω2 ) ¯ n Introduction of the expressions 1.72 is the particular solution if and only if it fulfils the equation 1.66 yields ˙ x + 2ςω n x + ω 2 x = q sin ωt ¨ n In this case it is easy to predict mode of the particular solution xp = As sin ωt + Ac cos ωt (1.

81) Introduction of the solution of the equations 1.82 is assembled out of two terms. yields particular solution of the non-homogeneous equation that represents the forced vibration of the system considered.4 -0. Motion represented by this term.2 0 -0. For the following initial conditions x |t=0 = x0 x |t=0 = v0 ˙ (1. Co = 1[m]. for the following numerical data ς = 0. ω = 2[1/s]. after an usually short time.6 c b a A t[s] 20 40 60 transient state of the forced vibration steady state of the forced vibration Figure 26 oscillations with frequency equal to the natural frequency of the damped system ωd .4 0. A = 0.1.81 (Co.77. It does not depend on the initial conditions and is called amplitude of the forced vibration.82 (curve b in Fig.The solution 1. ω n = 1[1/s].82) x = A sin(ωt + ϕ) (1.80) one can get the following set of the algebraic equations for determination of the parameters C and α x0 = Co sin αo + A sin ϕ v0 = −Co ςω n sin αo + Co ω d cos αo + Aω cos ϕ (1.83) This harmonic term has amplitude A determined by the formula 1. Hence. Motion approximated by the equation 1. decays to zero (curve a in Fig.82) and determines time of the transient state of the forced vibrations. due to the existing damping.82) This solution.126835[rd] is shown in Fig. 1.8 0. . αo ) to the general solution. the transient state changes into the steady state represented by the second term in equation 1. ϕ = 0.6 0.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 36 The constants C and α should be chosen to fullfil the required initial conditions.83 is usually referred to as the system forced vibration. 26 (curve c). αo = 1[rd]. x = Co e−ςωn t sin(ω d t + αo ) + A sin(ωt + ϕ) (1.2 -0. First term represents an x[m] 1 0. 1.165205[m].

Therefore. from engineering point of view play secondary role. If µ represents the static imbalance of the rotor . 28. a) m µ ω 2 sin ω t x mµ ω 2 b) x m µ ω 2 sin ω t µ ωt m M k M c R Figure 28 One of many possible excitation of vibrations is excitation caused by inertia forces produced by moving elements.83) are harmonic. The rotor of an electrical motor rotates with the constant angular velocity ω. The possibly simplest case of vibration cased by this type of excitation is shown in Fig. they can be represented by means of two vectors ’rotating’ with the same angular velocity ω (see Fig.force transmitted to foundation. Because the transient state. in the following sections the steady state forced vibration will be considered only. Therefore ϕ is called phase of the forced vibration.70) and the (steady state) forced vibration x = A sin(ωt + ϕ) (1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 37 Both. 27). Forced response due to rotating elements . the exciting force f (t) = q sin ωt (1.One x q A qsin(ω t ) Asin(ω t+ ϕ ) ϕ ωt Figure 27 can see from the above interpretation that the angular displacement ϕ is the phase between the exciting force and the displacement it causes.

86) (1.88 A The ratio m µ . The damping properties are approximated by the damping coefficient c.88) (1.89) (1. Let us model vibration of the system. This phenomenon is called phase resonance.90) or. the amplitude of the forced vibration is growing. phase of the forced vibration is equal to 90o . is called the magnification factor.77 A= q ω ω (1 − ( ωn )2 )2 + 4ς 2 ( ωn )2 m ω µ( ωn )2 M q ω2 n ω 2ς ωn ϕ = − arctan ω 1 − ( ωn )2 (1. Its magnitude and the phase ϕ as M ω a function of the ratio ωn for different damping factor ς is shown in Fig. 28b). taking into consideration 1. Taking advantage of the earlier described method of formulation the mathematical model we have M x = −kx − cx + mµω 2 sin ωt ¨ ˙ Transformation of this equation into the standard form yields ˙ x + 2ςω n x + ω 2 x = q sin ωt ¨ n where ωn = k c 2ςωn = M M Hence. Its maximum depends on the damping ratio and appears for ω > ω n .84) The motor of mass M is supported by means of a beam of the stiffness k.91) .87) mµω 2 M r q= (1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 38 and m is its mass. 29. If the frequency of m excitation tends towards infinity. the steady state forced vibration are x = A sin(ωt + ϕ) where according to 1. then the rotor produces the centrifugal force F = mµω 2 Its component along the vertical axis x is Fx = mµω2 sin ωt (1.If the frequency of excitation changes from zero to the value equal to the natural frequency ωn . The physical model of the problem described is shown in Fig. For ω = ωn . The phenomenon at which amplitude of the forced vibration is maximum is called amplitude resonance.85) (1. If the frequency of excitation A= q ω ω (1 − ( ωn )2 )2 + 4ς 2 ( ωn )2 ω 2ς ωn ϕ = − arctan ω 1 − ( ωn )2 (1. the amplitude of the forced vibration tends to M µ. regardless the damping involved.

0 ζ=1.1 ζ =0.5 ζ=1.5 ζ=1.5 0 1 ω ωn ζ=0 2 3 1 0 -45 2 3 ϕ -90 -135 -180 ζ=0.0 ζ=1.25 ζ=0.25 ζ=0.1 ζ =0.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 39 6 4 A m µ M 2 1 ζ=0 ζ=0.5 Figure 29 .

4 ω 2 n ω 3 Figure 30 is greater then the centrifugal force itself with its maximum close to frequency ωn .1 ζ =0. according to the physical model shown in Fig. Forced response due to the kinematic excitation . 28b) is √ R(t) = kx + cx = kA sin(ωt + ϕ) + cAω cos(ωt + ϕ) = A k2 + c2 ω 2 sin(ωt + ϕ + δ) ˙ (1.4ω n the force transmitted to foundation 6 ζ=0 ζ=0. 31b).25 ζ=0.vibration isolation The physical model of a system with the kinematic excitation is shown in Fig. This physical . Motion of the point B along the axis y causes vibration of the block M.5 4 R mµ ω 2 2 1 0 0 1 1.4ω n this reaction is smaller then the excitation force and tends to zero when the frequency of excitation approaches infinity. the phase tends to 180o . For ω > 1.5 ζ=1. Hence the response of the system tends to be in the anti-phase with the excitation.0 ζ=1.For the frequency of excitation ω < 1. 30. The force transmitted to the foundation R.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 40 tends to infinity.92) The amplitude of the reaction is p √ |R| = A k 2 + c2 ω2 = AM ω4 + 4ς 2 ω 2 ω 2 = n n q 2 ( ω )2 1 + 4ς ωn = mµω 2 q ω ω (1 − ( ωn )2 )2 + 4ς 2 ( ωn )2 |R| ω The amplification ratio mµω2 of the reaction as a function of the ratio ωn is shown in Fig.

according to 1. the frequency of excitation. The block of mass M stands for the body of the bus.98) (1.94) and the motion of the point B along the axis y can approximated as follows y = a sin ωt The equation of motion of the bus is M x = −kx − cx + ky + cy ¨ ˙ ˙ Introduction of 1.95 yields M x + cx + kx = ka sin ωt + caω cos ωt ¨ ˙ or ˙ x + 2ςω n x + ω 2 x = ω2 a sin ωt + 2ςω n ωa cos ωt = q sin(ωt + α) ¨ n n where q= aω 2 n r ω 1 + 4ς 2 ( )2 ωn (1.97) (1.93) Hence.39 is ω= 2πv L (1.96) (1. The stiffness k of the spring and the damping coefficient c represent the dynamic properties of the bus shock-absorbers. If the surface can be approximated by the sine-wave of the amplitude a and length L and the bus is travelling with the constant velocity v. the period of the harmonic excitation is T = L v (1. 31a).ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 41 a) b) x M y v G k L a R y B c Figure 31 model can be used to analyze vibration of a bus caused by the roughness of the surface of the road shown in Fig.95) .

1.4ωn it is possible to arrange for the bus to have vibration smaller than the amplitude of the kinematic excitation The expression for the reaction force transmitted to the foundation is R = kx + cx − ky − cy = kA sin(ωt + ϕ) + cωA cos(ωt + ϕ) − ka sin ωt − cωa cos ωt ˙ ˙ = |R| sin(ωt + γ) (1. 1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 42 Without any harm to the generality of the considerations one can neglect the phase α and adopt the mathematical model in the following form ˙ x + 2ςω n x + ω 2 x = q sin ωt ¨ n Motion of the block along axis x is governed by the equation 1.g.99) ϕ = − arctan ω 2ς ωn ω 1 − ( ωn )2 (1.83 x = A sin(ωt + ϕ) where A= q ω ω (1 − ( ωn )2 )2 + 4ς 2 ( ωn )2 q ω2 n (1.g.100) Introduction of equation 1.102) Problem of minimizing the reaction force R (e.101) is called vibration isolation..101) ω The magnifying factor A and the phase ϕ as a function of ωn is shown in Fig.98 gives q ω a 1 + 4ς 2 ( ωn )2 A= q ω ω (1 − ( ωn )2 )2 + 4ς 2 ( ωn )2 ϕ = − arctan ω 2ς ωn ω 1 − ( ωn )2 (1.92) or the amplitude A (e. 32. . a For ω < 1.

5 0 0 1 1 0 -45 ω ωn 2 2 3 3 ϕ -90 -135 -180 ζ=0 ζ=1.1 ζ =0.5 ζ=1.25 ζ=0.0 ζ=0.5 Figure 32 .ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 43 6 4 A a 2 ζ=0 ζ=0.5 ζ =0.1 ζ=1.25 ζ=0.0 ζ=1.

3 Problems Free vibrations Problem 9 1 H 2 k c Figure 33 The carriage 1 of the lift shown in Fig. To attenuate the impact between the carriage and the basement in the case the rope 3 is broken.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 44 1. The distance between the highest and the lowest floor is H = 30m. The average mass of the carriage is m = 500kg. Calculate the stiffness k and the damping coefficient c of the shock-absorber which assure that the deceleration during the impact is smaller then 200m/s2 .2. 33 operates between floors of a building. the shock absorber 2 is to be installed. .

104) (1.106) . x H mg x k c Figure 34 Due to the gravity force the lift is falling down with the initial velocity equal to zero.103) By double side by side integrating of the above equation one can get g x = A + Bt + t2 2 Introduction of the following initial conditions ˙ x |t=0 = 0 x |t=0 = 0 yields A = 0 and B = 0 and results in the following equation of motion g x = t2 2 Hence.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 45 Solution In the worst case scenario. Equation of motion of the lift is m¨ = mg x (1. the time the lift reaches the shock-absorber is s 2H to = g Since v = x = gt ˙ (1. the lift is at the level H when the rope brakes.107) (1.105) (1.

ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 46 To analyze the motion of the lift after impact let us introduce the inertial axis y in such a way that its origin coincides with the upper end of the shock-absorber at the instant of impact (see Fig.108) vo = x |t=to = 2Hg H x y k y mg c Figure 35 uncompressed. the equation of motion after the lift has reached the shock-absorber is m¨ + cy + ky = mg y ˙ or in the standardized form ˙ y + 2ςωn y + ω2 y = g ¨ n where ωn = r (1. there exists one double root and the general solution of the homogeneous equation is yg = C1 e−ωn t + C2 te−ωn t (1.113) .Since at the instant of impact the spring k is the velocity of the lift at the time of the impact with the shock-absorber is p ˙ (1.112) ωn The best performance of the shock-absorber is expected if the damping is critical (ς = 1). In this case. 35). 2ςωn = (1.109) c k .111) m m It is easy to see that in the case considered the particular solution of the nonhomogeneous equation is g yp = 2 (1.110) (1.

m (1.115) and results in the following equation of motion µ ¶ ¶ µ g g g −ω n t y = − 2 e te−ωn t + 2 + vo − ωn ωn ωn ¶ µ ¡ ¢ ¢ g ¡ g te−ωn t = D 1 − e−ωn t + Ete−ωn t (1.118) Double differentiation of the function 1.122) This deceleration has to be smaller then the allowed deceleration aa = 200ms−2 .113 yields C1 = − g ω2 n C2 = vo − g ωn (1.114) ωn This equation has to fullfil the following initial conditions y |t=0 = 0 y |t=0 = vo ˙ Introduction of these initial conditions into the equation 1.28s−1 2 2Hg 2 2 · 30 · 10 k .117) = 1 − e−ωn t + vo − ω2 ωn n where D= g ω2 n E = vo − g ωn (1.282 · 500 = 9160N/m n (1. Hence the maximum of deceleration is ¯ ¯ amax = y |t=0 = ¯−Dω2 − 2Eωn ¯ ¨ (1.117 yields acceleration during the impact ¡ ¢ y = −Dω2 − 2Eωn e−ωn t + Eω 2 te−ωn t ¨ (1.121) amax = Dω 2 + 2Eω n = g + 2vo ω n − 2g = 2vo ω n − g n (1. one can see that the maximum of the deceleration occurs for time t = 0.125) . 2vo ωn − g < aa It follows q aa + g 200 + 10 ωn < √ = √ = 4.116) (1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 47 Therefore the general solution of the non-homogeneous equation as the sum of yp and yg is g y = C1 e−ωn t + C2 te−ωn t + 2 (1.123) (1.119) n n By inspection of the function 1.120) n g ωn both constants E and D are positive.124) Since ω n = the stiffness of the shock-absorber is k = ω 2 m = 4. Hence vo > If (1.118.

121 is fullfil.4m/s 2Hg = 2 · 30 · 10 = 24.126) Our computation can be accepted only if the inequality 1.28 (1. Indeed vo = (1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 48 and the damping coefficient c = 2ςω n m = 2 · 1 · 4.5 > = ωn 4.127) The displacement of the lift.28 · 500 = 4280Ns/m p √ g 10 = 2. its velocity and acceleration during the impact as a function of time is shown in Fig. 36 .

5 displacement y [m] 1 0.75 1 time [s] -50 a [m/s 2] -100 -150 -200 Figure 36 .5 0.75 1 time [s] 25 20 15 velocity v [m/s] 10 5 0 -5 0.25 0.5 0.25 0.5 2 1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 49 2.5 0.75 1 time [s] 50 acceleration 0 0.5 0 0 0.25 0.

37a) To a) T b) k c x W R m Figure 37 analyze the vibrations of the power winch the installation was modelled by the one degree of freedom physical model shown in Fig. . Origin of the axis x coincides with the centre of gravity of the weight m when the system rests in its equilibrium position. Calculate the parameters m. and c.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 50 Problem 10 The power winch W was mounted on the truss T as shown in Fig. k. Then the load was released allowing the installation to perform the vertical T W R L Ml Figure 38 oscillations in x direction. 38b). k. stiffness and damping coefficient are denoted by m. Record of those oscillations is presented in Fig. The winch was loaded with the weight equal to M1 = 1000kg as shown in Fig. To identify the unknown parameters m. and c. k and c respectively. 38. 39. the following experiment was carried out. In this figure the equivalent mass.

ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 51 0.003 1 2 time [s] 3 4 Figure 39 Answer m = 7000kg.002 0.003 0.002 -0. k = 3000000Nm−1 .001 x[m] 0 -0. c = 15000N sm−1 .001 -0.

41). .Assuming that the rope T W R M Figure 41 R is not extendible produce expression for the tension in the rope R before and after the block will lose contact with the floor.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 52 Problem 11 a) T b) k c x m W R Figure 40 The winch W shown in Fig. The winch is lifting the block of mass M with the constant velocity vo (see Fig. 40 is modelled as a system with one degree of freedom of mass m stiffness k and the damping coefficient c.

134) .133) Tension in the rope R after the contact of the weight with the floor is lost Without any harm to the generality of the further consideration one may assume that the time corresponding to the instant of separation is equal to 0. ts = Mg − cvo kvo (1. 0 < T 0 Mg (1. For t > 0. The tension T in the rope R varies between 0 and Mg. the instantaneous length of the rope L is L = Lo − vo t (1.131) At the instant of separation the winch will be at the position determined by the following formula Mg − cvo xs = −vo ts = − (1. the equation of motion of the winch is m¨ + cx + kx = −T x ˙ (1.128) If origin of the inertial axis x coincides with the gravity centre when the unloaded winch is at its equilibrium. 42) are as following m¨ + cx + kx = −T x ˙ M xb = T − Mg ¨ Since the rope R is not extendible. it stays motionlessly at the floor whereas the lift itself is going down with respect to the inertial axis x with the constant velocity vo .130) The equation 1.130 allows the time of separation ts to be obtained.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 53 Solution Tension in the rope R before the contact is lost In the first stage of lifting the block M. ¨ x = −vo and x = −vo t. If Mg > cvo T = cvo + kvo t f or 0 < t < ts (1.132) k If Mg < cvo then xs = ts = 0. Hence ˙ −T = c(−vo ) + k(−vo t) (1.129) In the above equation x = 0 (the winch is moving with the constant velocity vo ).135) (1. the equation of motion of the winch and the block (see Fig.130 governs motion of the winch till the tension T will reach value Mg. Therefore the equation 1.

136) m¨ + cx + kx = −T x ˙ M x = T − Mg ¨ (1.140) . 2ςωn = . A= 2 (1.137) (1. Hence q ω 2 A = q.142) n ωn ωn = r (1.141) m+M m+M m+M The particular solution of the non-homogeneous equation can be predicted as a constant magnitude A.134 yields xb = x − L = x − Lo + vo t (1.139) x + 2ςωn x + ω 2 x = q ¨ ˙ n where k Mg c . q=− (1. Taking into account that L = x − xb we have Introduction of the equation 1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 54 k c x m x T xb L T Mg Figure 42 Where Lo stands for the initial length of the rope (the lenght the rope had at the instance t = 0).137 into 1.138) The standardized form is as following Elimination of the unknown tension force allows the equation of motion of the winch to be formulated (m + M)¨ + cx + kx = −Mg x ˙ (1.

148) .143) (1. x=e −ςω n t −vo + ςωn (xs − A) ωd Cc = xs − A (1.138 T = M x + Mg ¨ (1.144) This solution has to fulfill the following initial conditions f or t = 0 x = xs x = −vo ˙ (1.147) The time history diagram of the above function is shown in Fig.146) µ ¶ −vo + ςω n (xs − A) sin ωd t + (xs − A) cos ωd t + A ωd (1.143 yields the following expressions for the constants Cs and Cc Cs = Hence.43 The tension is x xs O t A xmax Td Figure 43 determined by the equation 1.145) Introduction of these initial conditions into the solution 1.140 is x = e−ςωn t (Cs sin ωd t + Cc cos ωd t) + A where ωd = ωn p 1 − ς2 (1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 55 The general solution of the mathematical model 1.

ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 56 Double differentiation of the function 1.147 yields the wanted tension as a function of time ¡ ¢ T = Mg + Me−ςωn t Cs (ςωn )2 + 2Cc ςω n ω d − Cs ω 2 sin ω d t d ¡ ¢ (1.149) +Me−ςωn t Cc (ςω n )2 − 2Cs ςω n ωd + Cc ω 2 cos ω d t d .

Produce expression for the amplitude of the forced vibration of the motor as well as the interaction forces transmitted to the foundation at the points A and B. the second moment of inertia of its cross-section I and Young modulus E. The damping properties of the system are modelled by the linear damping of the damping coefficient c. rotates with the constant angular velocity ω and its unbalance (distance between the axis of rotation and the shaft centre of gravity) is µ. . of mass m.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 57 Forced vibration Problem 12 E. Shaft of the motor.I m M ωt c B l Figure 44 A µ The electric motor of mass M (see Fig. 44) is mounted on the massless beam of length l.

151) (1.155) represents the forced vibrations of the system. 45 results in the following differential equations of motion. In the above formula A stands for the amplitude of the forced vibrations of the motor.150) 48EI l3 (1. .ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 58 Solution E.I m M x mµω 2 ωt c B µ l A Figure 45 Application of the Newton’s approach to the system shown in Fig. k= Its standardized form is x + 2ςω n x + ω 2 x = q sin ωt ¨ ˙ n where ωn = k c 2ςω n = M m+M The particular solution of the equation 1.154) (1.152) mµω2 M r q= (1. M x = −kx − cx + mµω 2 sin ωt ¨ ˙ where k stands for the stiffness of the beam EI.153) (1.152 x = A sin (ωt + ϕ) where A= q ω ω (1 − ( ωn )2 )2 + 4ς 2 ( ωn )2 q ω2 n ω 2ς ωn ϕ = − arctan ω 1 − ( ωn )2 (1. The interaction force at the point A can be determined from equilibrium of forces acting on the beam at an arbitrarily chosen position x (see Fig 46).

5kA sin (ωt + ϕ) (1.5k x l Figure 46 0. Hence. 47) with the velocity x the force cx is required.I kx D x A 0.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 59 x E. ˙ ˙ Hence.5kx = −0. from the equilibrium of the damper one can see that the reaction at the point B is RB = −cx = −cωA sin (ωt + ϕ) ˙ .5k x The force needed to displace the point D by x is equal to kx.156) x cx x D c B cx Figure 47 To move the point D (see Fig. the reaction at the point A is RA = −0.

157) where y is the absolute displacement of the vibration object 1 and x is the absolute displacement of the seismic weight 3.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 60 Problem 13 z 5 x 3 z=x-y 4 y 2 1 Figure 48 Figure 48 presents a seismic transducer.158) derive the formula for the amplification coefficient κ of the amplitude of vibration of amplitude of z the object 1 of this transducer ( κ = amplitude of y ) as a function of the non-dimensional ω frequency ωn . Upon assuming that the object 1 performs a harmonic motion y = a sin ωt (1. Its base 2 is attached to the vibrating object 1.This transducer records the displacement z =x−y (1. . The seismic weight 3 of mass m is supported by the spring 4 of stiffness k and the damper 5 of the damping coefficient c.

76 (page 35) the particular solution of the equation 1.163) r (1.166) The amplitude of this record is q p ampz = (aA cos (α + ϕ) − a)2 + (aA sin (α + ϕ))2 = a A2 + 1 − 2A cos(α + ϕ) (1. the record of the . 48 is m¨ + cx + kx = cy + ky x ˙ ˙ Its standardize form is x + 2ςω n x + ω2 x = aqc cos ωt + aqs sin ωt ¨ ˙ n where ωn = k c c k 2ςω n = qc = ω qs = m m m m Simplification of the right side of the above equation yields x + 2ςω n x + ω 2 x = aq sin (ωt + α) ¨ ˙ n where p 2 2 q = qc + qs = ω 2 n s 4ς 2 µ ω ωn ¶2 +1 α = arctan qc ω = arctan 2ς qs ωn (1.162 is xp = aA sin(ωt + α + ϕ) where r 4ς 2 ³ ω ωn (1.If the coefficient of amplification κ is equal to one.164) A = sµ ³ ´2 ¶2 ³ ´2 ω ω 1 − ωn + 4ς 2 ωn Hence the record of the transducer is ´2 +1 ω 2ς ωn ϕ = − arctan ³ ´2 ω 1 − ωn (1.168) κ= ampy The diagram presented in Fig.159) (1.49 shows this amplification coefficient κ as a function ω of the ratio ωn .162) According to equation 1.167) Therefore.165) z = x − y = aA sin(ωt + α + ϕ) − a sin ωt = = aA cos (α + ϕ) sin ωt + aA sin (α + ϕ) cos ωt − a sin ωt = = (aA cos (α + ϕ) − a) sin ωt + aA sin (α + ϕ) cos ωt (1.161) (1. the coefficient of amplification is ampz p 2 = A + 1 − 2A cos(α + ϕ) (1.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 61 Solution The equation of motion of the system shown in Fig.160) (1.

6 5 ζ=0.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 62 amplitude of vibration (ampz ) is equal to the amplitude of vibration of the object (ampy = a). if the frequency ω of the recorded vibrations is twice greater than the natural frequency ωn of the transducer and the damping ratio ς is 0.25.1 ζ=0. as one can see from the diagram 49.25 ζ=0. It almost happends.5 4 κ 3 2 1 0 1 2 3 ω/ ω n 4 5 Figure 49 .

The motion of the lower end of the spring with respect to the absolute coordinate x can be approximated as follows x = X cos ωt where X stands for the amplitude of the oscillations of the point C and ω stands for the frequency of these oscillations. 50. Produce: 1. the differential equation of motion of the vibrating table and present it in the standard form 2. the expression for the amplitude of the forced vibrations of the table caused by the motion of the point C 3. It can be considered as a rigid body of the mass m and the moment of inertia about axis through its centre of gravity IG . It is supported with by means of the spring of the stiffness k and the damper of the damping coefficient c. the expression for the interaction force at the point A 4.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 63 Problem 14 α O A a b d c G B k C x Figure 50 The physical model of a vibrating table is shown in Fig. the expression for the driving force that has to be applied to the point C .

were joined together to form the pendulum whose physical model is depicted in Fig. 51. Answer: 17 IA = 12 mL2 + 2maH2 − 3mLa 3. At the point B it is supported by a spring of stiffness k and a damper of damping coefficient c. each of length L and mass m. The pendulum performs small oscillations α about the axis through the point A. The expression for the moment of inertia of the pendulum about the axis through the point A.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 64 Problem 15 C Y c B k a α 1 2 G A xG L L/2 L/2 Figure 51 Two uniform rods (1 and 2). The differential equation of motion of the pendulum Answer: α + 2ζω n α + ω2 α = q cos ωt ¨ ˙ n . The point C of the damper is driven along the axis Y and its motion is approximated by the following function Y = A sin ωt Produce: 1. The expression for the position xG of the center of gravity G of the pendulum Answer: xG = 3 L − a 4 2.

The driving force that must be applied to the point C to assure the assumed motion . The expression for the amplitude of the forced vibrations of the pendulum Answer: q ω2 n Aα = 2 2 ω ω 2 1−( ω ) +4ζ 2 ( ω ) n n 5.ANALYSIS OF ONE-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 2 2 65 where: 2ζω n = ca . ω 2ζ ω n D = c(Aω cos ωt − aAα cos(ωt + ϕ)) ϕ = − arctan ω 2 1−( ω ) n . ω 2 = 2mgxIG +ka q = Aωca n IA IA A 4.

1 shows part of a multi-degree-of-freedom system. the number of degrees of freedom of each real element is equal to infinity. Usually.Chapter 2 MECHANICAL VIBRATION OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM LINEAR SYSTEMS Since in the nature massless or rigid elements do not exist.1 MODELLING 2. In this chapter it will be assumed that forces produced by these massless xj mj xi k ij mi y i(t) ki ci c ij Figure 1 elements (springs and dampers) are linear functions of displacements and velocities respectively. according to the previously introduce definition.1 Physical model Fig.1. with acceptable accuracy. It follows that to determine its position with respect to the inertial space one has to introduce infinite number of coordinates. Hence. therefore each of the particle the real element is made of can moves independently. the real elements can be represented by a limited number of rigid elements connected to each other by means of massless elements representing the elastic and damping properties. These coordinates (xi . yi (t)) are motionless with respect to a global (inertial) system of coordinates . 2. to describe motion of such a system a set of local generalized coordinates is introduced. But in many vibration problems. xj . This process is called discretization and the final result of this process is called multi-degree-of-freedom system.

1. ¨ mi xi = F (2. Newton-Euler method of formulation of the mathematical model To develop the equations of motion of the system described. In the following sections a few of them are presented. For this equilibrium position all the static forces acting on individual bodies produces the resultant force equal to zero. .is the damping matrix k. and xj are independent and their number determines the number of degree of freedom of the system.1) If the system stays at its equilibrium position.is the external excitation matrix x. the force F must contains forces due to the displacement of the system from its equilibrium position only. The configuration a) shown in the figure below is achieved. Therefore. 2. the resultant of all static forces is equal zero.2 Mathematical model It will be shown in this section that the equation of motion of the multi-degree of freedom linear system has the following form m¨+cx+kx=F(t) x ˙ where m .is the displacement matrix There are many methods that allow the mathematical model to be formulated. one may utilize the Newton’s or Euler’s equations.is the stiffness matrix F .MODELLING 67 (not shown in the Fig. To figure these forces out let us move the mass mi out of its equilibrium position by the displacement xi . The coordinate yi (t) is not independent (is an explicit function of time) whereas the coordinates xi . as it was mention earlier. 1). Origin of each coordinate coincides with the centre of gravity of individual bodies when the whole system is at its equilibrium position. Since in case considered the body of mass mi performs a plane motion hence the Newton’s equations may be used.is the inertia matrix c .

Therefore they have to be taken with the sign ’-’. one can add all this forces together to obtain ¨ ˙ ˙ ˙ mi xi = −ki xi − kij xi + kij xj + ki yi (t) − ci xi − cij xi + cij xj (2.MODELLING 68 a) xi 6= 0 xj = 0 yi = 0 xi = 0 ˙ xj = 0 ˙ yi = 0 ˙ xj mj -kijxi kij cij xi mi xi -ki xi yi (t) k ci i b) xi = 0 xj 6= 0 yi = 0 xi = 0 ˙ xj = 0 ˙ yi = 0 ˙ xj xj mj cij mi yi (t) k i ci c) xi = 0 xj = 0 yi 6= 0 xi = 0 ˙ xj = 0 ˙ yi = 0 ˙ xj mj xi +kiyi yi (t) ki yi kij mi ci cij d) xi = 0 xj = 0 yi = 0 xi 6= 0 ˙ xj = 0 ˙ yi = 0 ˙ xj m j -cijxi k ij xi -ci xi yi (t) k i m i ci cij xi e) xi = 0 xj = 0 yi = 0 xi = 0 ˙ xj 6= 0 ˙ yi = 0 ˙ xj mj +cijxj k ij xi mi yi (t) k i ci xj cij f) xi = 0 xj = 0 yi = 0 xi = 0 ˙ xj = 0 ˙ yi 6= 0 ˙ xj mj xi kij mi yi (t) k i yj ci cij +kijxj kij xi +0 (2. Since the system is linear. ¨ ˙ ˙ mi xi + (ci + cij )xi − cij xj + (ki + kij )xi − kij xj = ki yi (t) (2.3) mi xi = −ki xi − kij xi ¨ +kij xj +ki yi (t) −ci xi − cij xi ˙ ˙ +cij xj ˙ After standardization we have the final form of equation of motion of the mass mi . e. Both of them must be taken with sign ’-’ because the positive displacement xi causes forces opposite to the positive direction of axis xi . Similar consideration carried out for the displacements along the axis xj (configuration b)) and axis yi ( configuration c)) results in the term +kij xj . Due to motion of the system along the coordinate xi with velocity xi two additional forces are created ˙ by the dampers ci and cij. and +ki yi (t) respectively. Up to now it has been assumed that the velocities of the system along all coordinates are equal to zero and because of this the dampers do not produce any force. and f ) allow to take these forces into account. and 0 ˙ respectively. The forces caused by motion along the axis xj (configuration e)) and axis yi ( configuration f )) results in the term +cij xj . they are −ci xi and −cij xi . As a result of these consideration we are getting set of differential equation containing as many equations as the number of degree of freedom.4) To accomplished the mathematical model. .2) Due to this displacement there are two forces ki xi and kij xi acting on the considered mass mi . one has to carry out similar consideration for each mass involved in the system. Both of them are caused by ˙ ˙ positive velocity and have sense opposite to the positive sense of axis xi . The last three configurations (d.

2.components of the absolute angular velocity of the body Iix ..7) i Gi Z O X rG i rGiZ Y Figure 2 Potential energy for the spring s of stiffness ks and uncompressed length ls (see Fig. Iiy . 2 is Vi = mi grGiZ (2.is the system kinetic energy function V . ω iz.M (2.8) Vs = ks (|rA − rB | − ls )2 2 ..MODELLING 69 Lagrange method of formulation of the mathematical model The same set of equation of motion one can get by utilization of the Lagrange’s equations d ∂ ∂ ∂V ( T) − T+ = Qm dt ∂ qm ˙ ∂qm ∂qm where T .stands for the potential energy function Qm . . .absolute velocity of the centre of gravity of the body ωix. 3) is 1 (2..5) where mi . Iiz .mass of the rigid body vi .is the generalized force along the generalized coordinate qm The kinetic energy function of the system considered is equal to sum of the kinetic energy of the individual rigid bodies the system is made of. Hence ⎡ ⎛ ⎤⎡ ⎤⎞ I ωix X 1 £ ¤ Iix 0 0 2 ⎝ mi vi + 1 ω ix ω iy ω iz ⎣ 0 Iiy 0 ⎦ ⎣ ω iy ⎦⎠ T = (2.The principal moments of inertia of the body about axes through its centre of gravity Potential energy function V for the gravity force acting on the link i shown in Fig. ω iy.6) 2 2 i=1 0 0 Iiz ω iz m = 1.

.10) In the case of the system shown in Fig.9) In a general case the damping forces should be classified as non-conservative ones and.... . . .. . . . ...qm .. the linearization process must be carried out.0)+ ˙ ˙ ˙ PM ∂f o PM ∂f o o o o o + m=1 ∂qm (q1 ... 0. . q1 .0) ∆qm ˙ (2. ... as such. .qM ....qm .qm . It must be remembered that the Lagrange’s equations yield. The following formula allows for any nonlinear multi-variable function to be linearized in vicinity of the system equilibrium o o o position q1 ...... elongation of the springs ki and kij are respectively ∆li = xi − yi ∆lij = xj − xi (2. .qM . 0. .0.qm .0.qM ) = f (q1 . Therefore.MODELLING 70 A rA Z O X Figure 3 s B rB Y Potential energy function for all conservative forces acting on the system is V = I X i=1 Vi + S X s=1 Vs (2. .. 0.qM . should be included in the generalized force Qm . . in general case.12) . 1 the kinetic energy function is 1 1 T = mi x2 + mj x2 + · · ·· ˙i ˙j 2 2 (2.... .qM o o o f (q1 .qm .. If the system takes an arbitral position that is shown in Fig.0) ∆qm + m=1 ∂ q˙m (q1 ..qM ..11) Dots in the above equation represents this part of the kinetic energy function that does not depend on the generalized coordinate xi . a non-linear mathematical model..qm . ..... before application of the developed in this chapter methods of analysis...0... . 4. .

if the potential energy due to the static deflections is not included in the function 2. produce resultant equal to zero. It should be noted that the above potential energy function represents increment of the potential energy of the springs due to the displacement of the system from its equilibrium position. dots stands for this part of the potential energy function that does not depend on the generalized coordinate xi .MODELLING 71 xj mj x i k ij mi y i (t) k i ci c ij xj k ij xi mj c ij mi xj xi ci yi y i (t) ki Figure 4 Therefore. The damping function is created by analogy to the creation of the potential energy function. the damping function is 1 1 D = ci (xi )2 + cij (xj − xi )2 + · · ·· ˙ ˙ ˙ 2 2 The Lagrange’s equation with the damping function takes form ∂ ∂V ∂D d ∂ ( T) − T+ + = Qm dt ∂ qm ˙ ∂qm ∂qm ∂ qm ˙ m = 1.13) Again. The stiffness k is replaced by the damping coefficient c and the generalized displacements are replaced by the generalized velocities. together with the gravity forces. the force produced by the dampers is included in the generalized force Qm . .13 the potential energy due to gravitation must not be included in the function 2.. But. in the considered case. a damping function (dissipation function) D is introduced into the Lagrange’s equation to produce the damping forces.. It follows that the conservative forces due to the static deflections can not be produced from this potential energy function. If the potential energy due to the static deflections is included in the function 2.15) (2.M (2. 2. very often. the potential energy function is 1 1 V = ki (xi − yi )2 + kij (xj − xi )2 + · · ·· 2 2 (2. for convenience. Hence.13 too. Hence. Therefore the above function does not include the potential energy due to the static deflection of the springs. Generally. since the lower end of the damper is motionless.13 the potential energy due to gravitation must be included in the function 2.13 either. They..14) . The function D does not represent the dissipation energy but has such a property that its partial derivative produces the damping forces.

2..MODELLING 72 Introduction of the equations 2. 5.. xi = I X j=1 δ ij Fj i = 1. .11.17) If one apply forces along all I generalized coordinates xi along which the system is allowed to move.20) . Let us assume that the masses mi and mj can move along the coordinate xi and xj respectively... the displacement along the i − th coordinate.15 yields the equation of the motion of the mass mi .16) Fj mj xj xi x ij mi Figure 5 Let us consider the flexible structure shown in Fig.19) These linear relationships can be written in the matrix form x = δF (2. Let xij be the displacement of the system along the coordinate xi caused by the force Fj . DEFINITION: The ratio δ ij = is called the influence coefficient It can be easily proved (see Maxwell’s reciprocity theorem) that for any structure δij = δ ji (2. mi xi + (ci + cij )xi − cij xj + (ki + kij )xi − kij xj = ki yi (t) ¨ ˙ ˙ The influence coefficient method (2. is. Let us apply to this system a static force Fj along the coordinate xj .14 into equation 2.. 2.13 and 2.18) xij Fj (2.I (2. according to the superposition principle.

21) (2..xJ ) the force that acts on the particle mi is fi = −Fi = − I X j=1 kij xj (2.24) Hence.23) If the system considered moves and its instantaneous position is determined by the vector x (x1 . application of the third Newton’s law to the particle i yields the equation of its motion in the following form mi xi + ¨ I X j=1 kij xj = 0 (2...25) .MODELLING 73 The inverse transformation permits to produce forces that have to act on the system along the individual coordinates if the system is at an arbitrarily chosen position x.21 is Fi = I X j=1 (2.xj . .22) kij xj (2. F = δ −1 x The inverse matrix δ −1 is called stiffness matrix and will be denoted by k... . k = δ −1 Hence according to equation 2.

1.3 Problems Problem 16 2 1 R l Figure 6 The disk 1 of radius R. . and mass m is attached to the massless beam 2 of radius r. length l and the Young modulus E as shown in Fig. 6 Develop equations of motion of this system.MODELLING 74 2.

8).MODELLING 75 Solution.forces acting on the disk due to its interaction with the beam The interaction forces Fd and Md can be expressed as a function of the displacements y and ϕy by means of the influence coefficient method. 8). the corresponding displacements y and ϕy are l2 l3 Fs Fs ϕy = (2. the corresponding displacements y and ϕy are l l2 Ms . 7 is governed by Newton’s equations m¨ = Fd y I ϕy = Md ¨ (2.27) y= 3EJ 2EJ If the beam is loaded with force Ms (see Fig. 2 Fs Ms y z ϕy l y Figure 8 If the beam is loaded with force Fs (see Fig.26) In the above mathematical model I = 1 mR2 .28) y= 2EJ EJ .moment of inertia of the disk about axis x 4 Fd . Md . Ms ϕy = (2. 2 1 R Md F d y ϕy z l Figure 7 The motion of the disk shown in Fig.

34) (2.29) (2.MODELLING 76 Hence the total displacement along coordinates y and ϕy are y = ϕy or in matrix form ∙ y ϕy ¸ l3 Fs + 3EJ l2 = Fs + 2EJ = ∙ l3 3EJ l2 2EJ l2 2EJ l EJ l2 Ms 2EJ l Ms EJ ¸∙ Fs Ms ¸ (2.35) .31) 4 The inverse transformation yields the wanted forces as function of the displacements J= ∙ Fs Ms ¸ = ∙ l3 3EJ l2 2EJ l2 2EJ l EJ where ¸−1 ∙ y ϕy ¸ = ∙ k11 k12 k21 k22 ¸∙ y ϕy ¸ (2. k= . the final mathematical model of the system considered is m¨ + kx = 0 x where m= ∙ m 0 0 I ¸ ∙ k11 k12 k21 k22 ¸ ∙ y ϕy ¸ (2.33) (2.30) π r4 (2.36) .32) Since. x= (2. according to the second Newton’s law ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ Fd Fs =− Md Ms the equation of motion takes the following form ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ y ¨ k11 k12 y m 0 =− ϕy ¨ ϕy 0 I k21 k22 Hence.

and as shown in Fig.MODELLING 77 Problem 17 G k1 l1 l2 k2 Figure 9 A rigid beam of mass m and the moments of inertia I about axis through its centre of gravity G is supported by massless springs k1 . 9. . Produce equations of motion of the system.

ϕ l1 y k1 l1 F y Figure 10 The system has two degree of freedom. the generalized Newton’s equations yield m¨ = F = −[(k11 + k2 )y + (k2 l2 − k1 l1 )ϕ] y 2 2 I ϕ = M = −[(k2 l2 − k1 l1 )y + (k1 l1 + yk2 l2 )ϕ ¨ The matrix form of the system equations of motion is m¨ + kx = 0 x where m= ∙ m 0 0 I ¸ . M G O y1 =y. k= ∙ k1 + k2 k2 l2 − k1 l1 2 2 k2 l2 − k1 l1 k1 l1 + k2 l2 ¸ . 10.37) Hence.39) (2.38) . x= ∙ y ϕ ¸ (2. Let us then introduce the two coordinates y and ϕ as shown in Fig.MODELLING 78 Solution. The force F and the moment M that act on the beam due to its motion along coordinates y and ϕ are F = = M = = −y1 k1 − y2 k2 = −(y − ϕl1 )k1 − (y + ϕl2 )k2 −[(k1 + k2 )y + (k2 l2 − k1 l1 )ϕ] +y1 k1 l1 − y2 k2 l2 = +(y − ϕl1 )k1 l1 − (y + ϕl2 )k2 l2 2 2 −[(k2 l2 − k1 l1 )y + (k1 l1 + yk2 l2 )ϕ l2 ϕ y2=y+ϕ l 2 k2 (2.40) (2.

11). 5 . can move along the horizontal slide and is supported by two springs 3 each of stiffness k. All motion is in the vertical plane. Use Lagrange’s approach to derive equations of small vibrations of the system about its equilibrium position. shown in Fig. The ball 2 of mass m2 and a radius r and the massless rod 4 form a rigid body. This body is hinged to the link 1 at the point A.MODELLING 79 Problem 18 1 A k 3 4 2 r k R Figure 11 The link 1 of a mass m1 . I = 2 m2 r2 – moment of inertia of the ball about axis through its centre of gravity.

1 1 1 2 T = T1 + T2 = m1 x2 + m2 vG + I ϕ2 ˙ ˙ 2 2 2 (2. 12.42) Hence vG = rG = i(x + Rϕ cos ϕ) + j(Rϕ sin ϕ) ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ The required squared magnitude of this velocity is 2 ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ vG = (x + Rϕ cos ϕ)2 + (Rϕ sin ϕ)2 = x2 + 2xRϕ cos ϕ + R2 ϕ2 (2. According to Fig . T = 1 1 1 m1 x2 + m2 (x2 + 2xRϕ cos ϕ + R2 ϕ2 ) + I ϕ2 ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ 2 2 2 1 1 = ˙ ˙˙ ˙ (m1 + m2 )x2 + m2 Rxϕ cos ϕ + (m2 R2 + I)ϕ2 2 2 (2.44 into Eq.46) 2 .MODELLING 80 Solution y 1 x k o k 3 2 rG r R x ϕ Figure 12 G The system has two degree of freedom and the two generalized coordinates x and ϕ are shown in Fig.41) The absolute velocity of the centre of gravity of the ball vG can be obtained by differentiation of its absolute position vector.12. 2.43) (2. The kinetic energy of the system T is equal to the sum of the kinetic energy of the link 1 T1 and the link 2 T2 . 1 V = 2 kx2 − m2 gR cos ϕ (2. this position vector is rG = i(x + R sin ϕ) + j( − R cos ϕ) (2. 2.41 yields the kinetic energy function of the system as a function of the generalized coordinates x and ϕ.44) Introduction of Eq.45) The potential energy function is due the energy stored in the springs and the energy due to gravitation.

50) (2.MODELLING 81 In the case considered. according to Eq.52) (2.55) .56) (2.47) dt ∂ ϕ ˙ ∂ϕ ∂ϕ The individual terms that appeare in the above equation are µ ¶ d d ∂T ˙ ˙ = ((m1 + m2 )x + m2 Rϕ cos ϕ) = dt ∂ x ˙ dt x ϕ ˙ = (m1 + m2 )¨ + m2 R¨ cos ϕ − m2 Rϕ2 sin ϕ ∂T =0 ∂x ∂V = 2kx ∂x d dt µ ∂T ∂ϕ ˙ ¶ = ¢ d ¡ ˙ ˙ m2 Rx cos ϕ + (m2 R2 + I)ϕ = dt ϕ x ˙˙ = (m2 R2 + I)¨ + m2 R¨ cos ϕ − m2 Rxϕ sin ϕ (2.48) (2. sinϕ ∼ ϕ.49) (2. cos ϕ ∼ 1.47. 2.51) (2. we have the following equations of motion x ϕ ˙ (m1 + m2 )¨ + m2 R¨ cos ϕ − m2 Rϕ2 sin ϕ + 2kx = 0 2 ϕ x (m2 R + I)¨ + m2 R¨ cos ϕ + m2 gR sin ϕ = 0 (2. x= ∙ x ϕ ¸ (2. ϕ2 ∼ 0.54) For small magnitudes of x and ϕ.53) ∂T = −m2 Rxϕ sin ϕ ˙˙ ∂ϕ ∂V = m2 gR sin ϕ ∂ϕ Hence.57) (2. k= ∙ 2k 0 0 m2 gR ¸ . Taking this into ˙ = = = account the linearized equations of motion are x ϕ (m1 + m2 )¨ + m2 R¨ + 2kx = 0 2 ϕ x (m2 R + I)¨ + m2 R¨ + m2 gRϕ = 0 Their matrix form is m¨ + kx = 0 x where m= ∙ m1 + m2 m2 R m2 R m2 R2 + I ¸ . the Lagrange’s equations can be adopted in the following form µ ¶ d ∂T ∂V ∂T − + = 0 dt ∂ x ˙ ∂x ∂x µ ¶ ∂T ∂V d ∂T − + = 0 (2.

. 13. Produce equation of small vibrations of the pendulum about this equilibrium position. The pendulum is supported by four springs. in such way that its vertical position (q1 = 0 and q2 = 0) is its stable equilibrium position. each of mass m and length l. all of stiffness k.MODELLING 82 Problem 19 k q A2 k 2 l k A1 q 1 k l Figure 13 Two identical and uniform rods shown in Fig. are joined together to form an inverse double pendulum.

is fasten to the massless and flexible shaft 3.MODELLING 83 Problem 20 1 3 4 2 l3 GJ o EI R l4 Figure 14 The disk 1 of mass m1 and radius R shown in Fig. At its right hand side the particle 2 of m2 is placed. . Derive equations for analysis of small vibrations of the system. 14. The left hand end of the massless and flexible beam 4 is rigidly attached to the disk 1.

. and I3 . 15. Derive the differential equations for the torsional vibrations of the system.MODELLING 84 Problem 21 k R R k I1 l 1 J1 G 1 I2 l 2 J2 G 2 I3 Figure 15 A belt gear was modelled as shown in Fig. J. and G respectively. The shafts are assumed to be massless and their length the second moment of inertia and the shear modulus is denoted by l. The belt is modelled as the spring of a stiffness k. The disks have moments of inertia I1 . I2 .

. Derive equations for the torsional vibrations of the gear box.MODELLING 85 Problem 22 D1 D2 I1 l 1 J1 G 1 I2 l 2 J2 G 2 I3 Figure 16 In Fig. The shafts the gears are mounted on are massless. 16 the physical model of a gear box is presented.

MODELLING

86

Problem 23
X

B l l l O 2 4 6 7

C

l

l

A

α l
Y 1 5 3

Figure 17 Fig. 17 shows a mechanical system. Link 1 of the system is motionless with respect to the inertial system of coordinates XY . The links 2 and 3 are hinged to the link 1 at the point O. The links 4 and 5 join the links 2 and 3 with the collar 6. The spring 7 has a stiffness k and its uncompressed length is equal to 2l. The system has one degree of freedom and its position may be determined by one generalized coordinate α. The links 4 5 and 6 are assumed to be massless. The links 2 and 3 can be treated as thin and uniform bars each of length 2l and mass m. Derive equations of the small vibration of the system about its equilibrium position.

MODELLING

87

Problem 24
l 4 m l 4 m l 4 m l 4

T

Figure 18 Three beads, each of mass m are attached to the massless string shown in Fig. 18. The string has length l and is loaded with the tensile force T. Derive equation of motion of the beads

MODELLING

88

Problem 25

m l q
1

R q

2

Figure 19 On the massless string of length l the ball of mass m and radius R is suspended (see Fig. 19). Derive equation of motion of the system.

MODELLING

89

Problem 26

I1 i

I2

I1

i

I2

c

R

k ks1 m ks2

Figure 20 Fig. 20 presents the physical model of a winch. The shafts of the torsional stiffness ks1 and ks2 as well as the gear of ratio i are massless. To the right hand end of the shaft ks2 the rotor of the moment of inertia I2 is attached. The left hand end of the shaft ks1 is connected to the drum of the moment of inertia I1 . The rope is modelled as a massless spring of the stiffness k. At its end the block of mass m is fastened. The damper of the damping coefficient c represents the damping properties of the system. Produce the differential equation of motion of the system.

Let r1 α2 i= = (2. 21 x.63) Introducing 2.59) (2.66) (2.64) (2.61 and 2.58 into the equations 2.60) (2. ϕ1 and ϕ2 are the independant coordinates.62) (2.MODELLING 90 Solution i F c R I2 I1 i I2 r2 r1 α2 F ϕ2 ϕ α1 1 k ks1 m ks2 x Figure 21 In Fig. m¨ x ¨ I1 ϕ1 0¨ 1 α 0¨ 2 α ¨ I2 ϕ2 = = = = = −kx + Rkϕ1 +kRx − kR2 ϕ1 − cR2 ϕ1 − ks1 ϕ1 + ks1 α1 ˙ −ks1 α1 + ks1 ϕ1 + F r1 −ks2 α2 + ks2 ϕ2 − F r2 −ks2 ϕ2 + ks2 α2 0 = −ks1 α1 + ks1 ϕ1 + iF r2 0 = −ks2 iα1 + ks2 ϕ2 − F r2 Solving the above equations for α1 we have α1 = ks1 ϕ1 + iks2 ϕ2 ks1 + ks2 i2 (2.58) r2 α1 Application of the Newton’s law to the individual bodies yields equations of motion in the following form.62 one can obtain (2.61) (2. They are a function of the independent coordinates.65) . Since the gear of the gear ratio as well as the shafts of stiffness ks1 and ks2 are massless the coordinates that specify the position of the of the gear α1 and α2 are not independent.

67) Introducing 2.69) ⎤ x z = ⎣ ϕ1 ⎦ ϕ2 i ks1 ϕ1 + iks2 ϕ2 ks1 + ks2 i2 (2.58 α2 = iα1 = iks1 ϕ1 + i2 ks2 ϕ2 ks1 + ks2 i2 (2.68) iks1 ϕ1 + i2 ks2 ϕ2 ks1 + ks2 i2 ⎡ .60 and 2. 0 0 I2 i2 0 0 ⎡ k −kR 0 ⎢ −kR kR2 + ks1 ks2 i2 − ks1 ks2 i2 k = ⎣ ks1 +ks2 i2 ks1 +ks2 i2 ks1 ks2 i2 ks1 ks2 i2 0 − ks1 +ks2 i2 ks1 +ks2 i2 ⎡ ⎤ 0 0 ⎦.67 into 2.MODELLING 91 Hence. according to 2. (2.63 one can get the equations of motion in the following form m¨ = −kx + Rkϕ1 x I1 ϕ1 = +kRx − kR2 ϕ1 − cR2 ϕ1 − ks1 ϕ1 + ks1 ¨ ˙ ϕ2 = −ks2 ϕ2 + ks2 ¨ After standardization we have m¨ + c˙ + kz = 0 z z where ⎤ ⎡ 0 0 m 0 0 c = ⎣ 0 cR2 m = ⎣ 0 I1 0 ⎦ . 0 ⎤ ⎥ ⎦.66 and 2.

the expression for period of these oscillations. the equation of small oscillations of the semi-cylinder (take advantage of the Lagrange’s equations) Answer: ¡ ¡ ¢¢ 16 8 4 IG + mR2 1 + 9π2 − 3π α + mgR(1 − 3π )α = 0 ¨ ¡ 4 R ¢2 where IG = 1 mR2 − m 3 π 2 2. Produce 1.MODELLING 92 Problem 27 Z 4R 3π z C G α R O X x Figure 22 The semi-cylinder of mass m and radius R shown in Fig. The instantaneous angular position of this semi-cylinder is determined by the angular displacement α. Answer: 2π T = mgR(1− 4 ) 3π 16 8 (IG +mR2 (1+ 9π2 − 3π )) . 50 is free to roll over the horizontal plane XY without slipping.

flatter of plane wings etc. Such a situation takes place. Since the equation 2.2 ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM The analysis carried out in the previous section leads to conclusion that the mathematical model of the linear multi-degree-of -freedom system is as follows m¨ + cx + kx = F(t) x ˙ where m . for example. if the mechanical structure interacts with fluid or air (oil bearings. the second moments of area J and the shear modulus G. 2.matrix of damping k .ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 93 Problem 28 I1 l 1 J1 G1 l 2 J2 G2 l 3 J3 G3 I2 l 4 J4 G4 Figure 23 The two disks of moments of inertia I1 and I2 are join together by means of the massless shafts as is shown in Fig. Produce the differential equations of motion. The dynamic properties of the shafts are determined by their lenghts l.71) (2.2.vector of the generalized coordinates 2.70 is linear.70) .).1 General case In the general case of the multi-degree-of-freedom system the matrices c and k do not necessary have to be symmetrical. x = xg + xp The homogeneous equation m¨ + cx + kx = 0 x ˙ (2.matrix of inertia c .vector of the external excitation x. 51.72) (2.matrix of stiffness F(t). its general solution is always equal to the sum of the general solution of the homogeneous equation xg and the particular solution of the non-homogeneous equation xp .

80) The equations 2.N (2. 2..70 represents the vibrations caused by the excitation force F(t). 2.77. z = z0 ert (2.77 into Eq.79 is called eigenvalue problem and the process of searching for the corresponding vector z0 is called eigenvector problem. Let y=x ˙ (2.76) Solution of the above equation can be predicted in the form 2.77) Introduction of Eq.75 results in a set of the homogeneous algebraic equations which are linear with respect to the vector z0 ..72 yields the following set of the differential equations of first order.75) (2. The particular solution of the non-homogeneous equation 2. Introduction of Eq. It is often refered to as the forced vibrations. Therefore. [A − 1r] z0 = 0 (2. A= (2.78) The process of searching for a solution of the equation 2. x = y ˙ y = −m−1 kx − m−1 cy ˙ The above equations can be rewritten as follows z = Az ˙ where z= ∙ x y ¸ ∙ 0 1 −m−1 k −m−1 c ¸ (2.72 to so called state-space coordinates.natural frequencies.. Both of them can be easily solved by means of the commercially available computer programs. rn = hn ± iω n n = 1.80 are zn1 = ehn t (Re(z0n ) cos ωn t − Im(z0n ) sin ω n t) zn2 = ehn t (Re(z0n ) sin ω n t + Im(z0n ) cos ω n t) n = 1...73) be the vector of the generalized velocities.79) Their number N is equal to the number of degree of freedom of the system considered. |[A − 1r]| = 0 (2... 2.N (2.. Free vibrations . its general solution represents the free (natural) vibrations of the system.73 into Eq.78 have non-zero solution if and only if the characteristic determinant is equal to 0.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 94 corresponds to the case when the excitation F(t) is not present. The roots rn are usually complex and conjugated.stability of the equilibrium position To analyze the free vibrations let us transfer the homogeneous equation 2.74) . 2. The particular solutions corresponding to the complex roots 2.81) .

2 0. The roots 2.82) As one can see from the formulae 2..8 0.81.83. z = [z11 .1 1.6 z 1 z h>0 0.6 0..1 0. ...2 0 h<0 t -0.84 the imaginary part.6 0.4 1.9 1 1.80 has positive real part then the equilibrium position of the system considered is unstable.3 0.zn1 .8 T n = 2 π /ω n Figure 24 constant magnitudes C is called initial problem.6 -0. 24 for the positive and negative magnitude of hn .zN1 . this problem is difficult and goes beyond the scope of this lectures.81 is given in Fig..4 0.2 0. The equation 2.5 1.6 0. z32.82 indicates that the free motion of a multidegree-of-freedom system is a linear combination of the solutions 2.6 t T n = 2 π /ω n -0..9 1 1..3 1. zN 2 ] C (2.80 allow the stability of the system equilibrium position to be determined.80 respectively. Forced vibrations .70.4 1. z22. k k f k = Fo cos(ωt + ϕk ) + iFo sin(ωt + ϕk ) (2.3 0. z21 ..81. In the general case.8 0. If all roots rn of the equation 2. .8 0.2 1. A graphical interpretation of the solutions 2..7 0.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 95 In the above expressions Re(z0n ) and Im(z0n ) stand for the real and imaginary part of the complex and conjugated eigenvector z0n associated with the nth root of the set 2... let us introduce the complex excitation force by adding to the expression 2.5 1..83) Let us assume that the excitation force F(t) is a sum of K addends.4 0. zn2.1 1.4 0.7 0.80 have negative real parts then the equilibrium position of the system considered is stable.81 allow to formulate the general solution that approximates the system free vibrations. The system with N degree of freedom possesses N natural frequencies. If at least one root of the equation 2.85) o o .3 1. z31 .5 0.1 0.4 0.The problem of searching for the vector of the 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 -5 -10 -15 -20 0. The particular solutions 2. z12..2 -0. m¨ + cx + kx = F(t) x ˙ (2.2 1.transfer functions The response to the external excitation F(t) of a multi-degree-of-freedom system is determined by the particular solution of the mathematical model 2. the imaginary parts of roots rn represent the natural frequencies of the system and their real parts represent rate of decay of the free vibrations. For the further analysis let us assume that each of them has the following form k F k = Fo cos(ωt + ϕk ) o (2.5 0.84) To facilitate the process of looking for the particular solution of equation 2.

86 into Eq.88) . Introduction of Eq. According to Euler’s formula the complex excitation may be rewritten as Im f k F 0 k k ϕ0 ωt ω F cos( t+ ϕ 0 ) 0 k k Re k ϕ0 F k ω t F 0 k ω t Figure 25 follows k k k f k = Fo ei(ωt+ϕo ) = Fo eiϕo eiωt = fo eiωt k k (2.83 yields m¨ + cx + kx = fo eiωt x ˙ xc = aeiωt (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 96 The relationship between the complex excitation f k and the real excitation is shown in Fig. 25. 2.87 can be predicted in the complex form 2. the particular solution of Eq.88 (2.86) k Here. fo is a complex number that depends on the amplitude and phase of the external excitation. 2.87) Now. 2.

the vector of the complex excitation fo eiωt into the vector of the complex displacement xc = aeiωt . the response of the system xc due to the complex force f is xc = (Re(a) + i Im(a))(cos ωt + i sin ωt) (2. This findings are presented in Fig.91 that the amplitude of the forced vibration xk is equal to the o absolute value of the complex amplitude ak . 27. 2. according to Eq. . Example of three elements of a matrix of the transform functions are presented in Fig. xc = aeiωt = R(iω)fo eiωt (2. according to 2.94) will be denoted by R(iω) and it is called matrix of transfer functions.91.91) Response of the system x due to the real excitation F is represented by the real part of the solution 2. The first two diagrams present the real and the imaginary parts of the complex transform functions whereas the last two present its absolute value (amplitude) and phase.90. The complex matrix ¢− 1 ¡ 2 (2.93) (2. ¢ ¡ 2 (2. 2.90) Therefore. It transfers.95) −ω m + iωc + k It is easy to see that the element Rpq (iω) of the matrix of transfer functions represents the complex displacement (amplitude and phase) of the system along the coordinates xp caused by the unit excitation 1eiωt along the coordinate xq . according to 2.96) It is easy to see from 2. x = Re(a) cos ωt − Im(a) sin ωt (2. 2. 26.89) −ω m + iωc + k a = fo ¢− 1 ¡ fo a = −ω2 m + iωc + k (2.88 into Eq.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 97 Its solution is Introduction of Eq. and its phase β k is equal to the phase between the complex amplitudes ak and the vector eiωt .87 produces set of the algebraic equations which are linear with respect to the unknown vector a.88.92 is xk = xk cos(ωt + β k ) o where xk = o p Re(ak )2 + Im(ak )2 β k = arc tan Im(ak ) Re(ak ) (2.92) Motion of the system considered along the coordinate xk .

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 98 Im f F 0 k k ϕ0 k a x0 k k k β0 ωt k F cos(ω t+ ϕ 0 ) 0 k Re x0 cos( ω t+ β 0 ) k k ϕ0 k β0 k F k k ω t F 0 x0 k k x ω t Figure 26 .

0003 0.1) R(1.3) transfer function m/N (modulus) 0.2) R(1.001 0 -0.1) R(1.0015 0.004 500 1000 1500 frequency rad/s R(1.2) R(1.0001 0 -0.0001 -0.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 99 transfer functions m/N (real parts) 0.0025 0.0005 0 0 500 1000 1500 frequency rad/s R(1.003 -0.3) (phase) 1500 frequency rad/s Figure 27 .0006 0.002 0.0004 0.3) transfer functions m/N 4 2 0 -2 -4 500 1000 R(1.002 0.1) R(1.0003 500 1000 1500 frequency rad/s R(1.3) transfer function m/N (imaginary part) 0.0005 0.0002 -0.2) R(1.001 0.001 -0.2) R(1.0035 0.1) R(1.003 0.002 -0.0002 0.003 0.

Fourier transformation applied to these functions Z +∞ Fq (iω) = e−iωt Fq (t)dt −∞ Z +∞ e−iωt xp (t)dt (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 100 Experimental determination of the transfer functions Fq xq xp xp F(t) q Fq ( iω ) t Fourier R (iω ) i pq ω x( iω ) p x(t) p t x( iω ) p ___ Fq ( iω ) transformation ω ω Figure 28 In order to produce the transfer function between the coordinate xp and the coordinate xq (see Fig.98) .97) xp (iω) = −∞ yields the Fourier transforms in the frequency domain xp (iω) and Fq (iω). The amplitude of the complex functions xp (iω) and Fq (iω) q Re(xp (iω))2 + Im(xp (iω))2 |xp (iω)| = q |Fq (iω)| = Re(Fq (iω))2 + Im(Fq (iω))2 (2. 28) let us apply force Fq (t) along the coordinate xq and record it simultaneously with the system response xp (t) along the coordinate xp .

.102) Application of the above described experimental procedure to all coordinates involved in the modelling (p = 1.N ) allows to formulate the matrix of the transfer functions Rpq (iω)... the response along the coordinate xp caused by set of forces acting along coordinates N coordinates xq . ϕxp = arctan ϕF q Im(xp (iω)) Re(xp (iω)) Im(Fq (iω)) = arctan Re(Fq (iω)) (2. The corresponding phases are determined by the following formulae... according to the superposition principle.100) The above formula determines response of the system along coordinate xp caused by the harmonic excitation Fq along the coordinate xq .103) .. Rpq (iω) = xp (iω) Fq (iω) (2.N (2..101) Since the system considered is by assumption linear..N.The relationship above can be rewritten in the following matrix form x(iω) = Rpq (iω)F(iω) p = 1.. xp (iω) = Rpq (iω)Fq (iω) (2.. is q=N xp (iω) = X q=1 Rpq (iω)Fq (iω) q = 1.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 101 represents the amplitude of displacement and force respectively as a function of the frequency ω..N (2. q = 1.99) These Fourier transforms allow the transfer function Rpq (iω) to be computed..

2.109) The above characteristic equation.. 2.111) where Cn is arbitrarily chosen constant.104) Free vibration of the undamped system .105) In turn.eigenvalue and eigenvector problem If the damping is neglected the equation of the free vibrations is m¨ + kx = 0 x It is easy to see that x = X cos ωt (2.108) (2. these parameters have the physical meaning only for positive values.. the above set of equations has the non-zero solutions if and only if its characteristic determinant is equal to zero ¯ ¯ 2 ¯−ω m + k¯ = 0 (2. is solution of the Eq. ± ω N (2. (−ω2 m + k)X = 0 (2. 2. the vector Cn Xn (2.106..ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 102 2. ±ω2 . c and k are square and symmetrical.105 is fulfilled for any instant of time if the following set of the homogeneous algebraic equations is fulfilled.. Size of these matrices is N × N where N is the number of the system degree of freedom. For each of the possible natural frequencies ωn the system of equations 2.108 becomes linearly dependent and therefore has infinite number of solution Xn .2 Modal analysis . The number of different natural frequencies is therefore equal to the number of degree of freedom. it is said that the system performs free vibrations. According to the above definition the free vibrations are governed by the homogeneous set of equations m¨ + cx + kx = 0 x ˙ (2. 2. for any physical system. ±ω3 .. Indeed. has N positive roots with respect to the parameter ω2 . introduction of Eq.2. They are called natural frequencies. Its follows that if Xn is a solution of Eq. . the parameter ω can take any of the following values ±ω1 .106) is a particular solution of the equation 2.108 too.107) (−ω 2 m + k)X cos ωt = 0 and the differential equation 2.. If the vector of the external excitation F(t) is equal to zero. Hence. ± ω n .105 yields (2.case of small damping In the following analysis it will be assumed that the matrices m. .108.106 into 2. The vector Xn represents so called natural mode of vibration associated with the natural .105.110) As one can see from Eq.. They represent frequencies of the system free vibrations.

one can say that the process of determination of the particular solution xn = Xn cos ω n t (2. For example. There are four such a natural modes and four corresponding natural frequencies for this system.105 xn = N X (Sn Xn sin ω n t + Cn Xn cos ωn t) n=1 (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 103 frequency ω n . It determines the shape that the system must possess to oscillate harmonically with the frequency ω n .112) If the system is deflected according to the this vector and allowed to move with the x3n = X 3n cosω n t x X 1n X 2n X 3n X 4n t Tn Figure 29 initial velocity equal to zero. Since the solutions ?? and 2. Now.114) is a particular solution too. The problem of the determination of the natural frequencies is called eigenvalue problem and searching for the corresponding natural modes is called eigenvector problem.114 are linearly independent.105 has been accomplished. X2n . it will oscillate with the frequency ω n .115) The 2N constants Sn and Cn should be chosen to satisfy the 2N initial conditions. their linear combination forms the general solution of the equation 2.113) of the equation 2. X3n . Therefore the natural frequencies are very often referred to as eigenvalue and the natural modes as eigenvectors. X4n ]T (2. In similar manner one can prove that xn = Xn sin ω n t (2. There are N such particular solutions. 29) the vector Xn contains four numbers Xn = [X1n . if a beam with four concentrated masses is considered (see Fig. .

117) Now.120) If n = m.121) 1 1 T Xn )m( Xn ) = 1 λn λn (2.118) (2. According to 2.116) Primultiplying the first equation by XT and the second equation by XT one can get m n (2.122. since (ω 2 − ω 2 ) = 0.119) (ω 2 − ω2 )XT mXm = 0 n m n Since for n 6= m (ω2 − ω2 ) 6= 0.108. Hence.124 one can conclude that ½ ¾ 0 if n 6= m T Ξn mΞm = 1 if n = m (2. the product XT mXn does not have to be equal to n n n zero.117 by -1 and then adding them together we are getting (2.124) n Taking into account Eq’s 2.125) It is said that eigenvectors Ξn and Ξm that fulfill the above conditions are orthogonal with respect to the inertia matrix m. Each eigenvector has to fulfill the Eq. n m XT mXm = 0 for n 6= m n (2.123) The process of producing of the eigenvectors Ξn is called normalization and the eigenvector Ξn is called normalized eigenvector or normalized mode.122) is eigenvector too. Let this product be equal to λ2 n XT mXn = λ2 n n Division of the above equation by λ2 yields n ( But according to 2. primultiplying the first equation of set 2.111 1 X λn n (2. . −ω 2 mXn +kXn = 0 n −ω2 mXm +kXm = 0 m −ω 2 XT mXn +XT kXn = 0 m n m T 2 T −ω m Xn mXm +Xn kXm = 0 Since matrices m and k are symmetrical XT kXn = XT kXm m n and XT mXn = XT mXm m n (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 104 Properties of the natural modes.120 and 2. ΞT mΞn = 1 (2. 2. Let us denot it by Ξn Ξn = 1 Xn λn (2.

These deflections.. Ξ = [Ξ1 .. ⎦ 0 . 0 (2.117 yields ½ ¾ 0 if n 6= m T Ξn kΞm = (2. c =µm+κk (2.. 0 . 0 ⎥ 2 ⎥ . in turn. In such cases the matrix of damping c (see Eq..Ξn .ΞN ] where N is number of degrees of freedom (2. The structural damping is extremely difficult or simply impossible to be predicted by means of any analytical methods.104) is assumed as the following combination of the matrix of inertia m and stiffness k with the unknown coefficients µ and κ. the structural damping has to be taken into account. 0 .modal damping Motion of any real system is always associated with a dissipation of energy.126) ω 2 if n = m n It is easy to see that the developed orthogonality conditions yields ΞT mΞ = 1 ΞT kΞ = ω2 where ω 2 is a square diagonal matrix ⎡ 2 ω1 ⎢ 0 ⎢ ⎢ . Ξ2 . ⎥ ⎥ (2.. . The modal modes Ξn can be arranged in a square matrix of order N known as the modal matrix Ξ .. . cause friction between the particles the elements are made of.130) This coefficients are to be determined experimentally. . 0 . the second of the equations 2. 2. The damping caused by such an internal friction and damping due to friction of these elements against the surrounding medium is usually referred to as the structural damping. 0 ⎥ n ⎥ . ω2 . 0 ω2 .. . . . In many cases.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 105 It means that the normalized modes are orthogonal with respect to the matrix of stiffness. .. Vibrations of any mechanical structures are coupled with deflections of the elastic elements. 2 ω =⎢ ⎢ 0 ⎢ ⎣ . ω2 N Normal coordinates .127) Owning to the above orthogonality condition.129) 0 .131) . . the structural damping can be omitted. But in case of absence of such devices. ..128) containing the squared natural frequencies ω 2 n ⎤ 0 . particularly if the system considered is furnished with special devices design for dissipation of energy called dampers. . It will be shown that application of the following linear transformation x = Ξη (2.

Problem of determination of this particular solution is considered in the next section. introduction of the transformation 2.128 we are getting set of independent equations 1¨ + γ η + ω 2 η = ΞT F(t) η ˙ (2.the unit matrix ω2 and γ = (µ1+κω 2 ) . In this case the right hand side of the equation 2. n Solution of each of the above equations can be obtained independently and according to the discussion carried out in the first chapter (page 30. 2. Eq.136 takes form ⎤ ⎡ 0 ⎥ ⎢ .ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 106 to the mathematical model m¨ + cx + kx = F(t) x ˙ (2. 0 η n + 2ς n ω n η n + ω2 η n = Ξqn Fq eiωt ¨ ˙ n n = 1. . 1.132) results in its decoupling. .139) Hence .. Response to the harmonic excitation ..136 for response of the system due to the harmonic excitation along coordinate xq . Introduction of the solutions 2.133) Primultiplying both sides of the above equation by ΞT we obtain ΞT mΞ¨ + ΞT (µm+κk)Ξη + ΞT kΞη = ΞT F(t) η ˙ (2.136) The coefficients ς n = (µ+κω 2 )/2ω n are often referred to as the modal damping ratio.138) ΞT F(t) = ΞT ⎢ Fq eiωt ⎥ = Ξqn Fq eiωt n n ⎢ ⎥ ⎦ ⎣ .46) can be written as follows η n = e−ς n ωn t (Csn sin ωdn t + Ccn cos ω dn t) + η pn (2.N (2. Indeed. 2.131 yields motion of the system along the physical coordinates x.. ⎥ ⎢ (2.136..132 yields mΞ¨ + cΞη + kΞη = F(t) η ˙ (2.134) Taking advantage of the orthogonality conditions 2. 2.131 into 2. each equation of the above set has the following form η n + 2ς n ωn η n + ω2 η n = ΞT F(t) n = 1.135) n where 1 .137) p where ω dn = ω n 1 − ς 2 and η pn stands for the particular solution of the nonn homogeneous equation 2.diagonal matrices n n Hence.N ¨ ˙ n n (2.transfer functions Let us solve the Eq.137 into equation 2.

. 2. .. .147) This property allows the natural frequencies to be determined..N (2.. From the same equation it is apparent that the imaginary parts corresponding to ω ∼ ωn and measured for differ= ent q = 1.141) response along coordinate xp xp = e iωt N X ω2 n=1 n Ξpn Ξqn Fq − ω2 + 2ς n ω n ωi (2.... since the real part of the transfer function is equal to zero for ω = ω n . The phase ϕ... . 2.142) transfer function between coordinate p and the others X Ξpn Ξqn xp = iωt 2 − ω 2 + 2ς ω ωi Fq e ω n n n=1 n N q = 1.144) q = 1. They allow the natural frequencies....N..145 that the real part of the transfer function Rpq (iω) is equal to zero for the frequency equal to the natural frequency ω n ... but for the same p yield the natural modes with accuracy to the ω2 constant magnitude C = − 2ς npnn Ξ Ξnq = C Im(Rpq (iω n )) q = 1..N (2... 2.. is equal to ±90o ϕn = arctan Im (Rpq (iω n )) = ± arctan ∞ = ±90o Re (Rpq (iω n )) (2. Hence the zero-points of the real part of the transfer functions determine the system natural frequencies.... 2..143) = if ω ∼ ωn = Rpq (iω) = Fqxp = eiωt PN ³ Ξpn Ξqn (ω2 −ω2 ) n n=1 (ω 2 −ω 2 )2 +4ς 2 ω2 ω 2 n n n PN + Ξpn Ξqn (ω 2 − ω 2 ) −Ξpn Ξqn i n Rpq (iω) ∼ + = 4ς 2 ω 2 ω 2 2ς n ω n ω n n Ξpn Ξqn ((ω 2 −ω2 )−2ς n ωn ωi) n = n=1 (ω2 −ω 2 )2 +4ς 2 ω 2 ω2 n ´n n −2Ξpn Ξqn ς n ω n ωi q = 1.N (ω2 −ω 2 )2 +4ς 2 ω 2 ω2 n n n (2.N (2. 2.146) Alternatively..ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 107 Therefore ηn = Since Ξqn Fq eiωt 2 − ω 2 + 2ς ω ωi ωn n n x = Ξη n = 1.. 2. .140) (2. It can be seen from the equation 2..N (2...145) Determination of natural frequencies and modes from the transfer functions The transfer functions Rpq (iω) can be easily obtained by means of a simple experiment (see page 100). . The natural frequencies and the natural modes can be extracted from diagrams of the magnitudes and phases of the transfer function. natural modes and the modal damping to be identified...... .

.00025 0. .1) R(1.N (2.150) where Signe of the idividual elements Ξnq of the mode n is deremined by signe of the corresponding phase ϕn = ±90o An example of extracting the natural frequency and the corresponding natural mode from the transfer functions is shown in Fig. 2.3) natural mode ¯ ¯ ¯ 2ς n ω2 ¯ n¯ ¯ C=¯ Ξpn ¯ transfer functions m/N (phase) π/2 natural frequency −π/2 Figure 30 The demonstated in this chapter approach for solution of the vibration problems is referred to as modal analysis..0002 0..2) R(1.149) (2.1) R(1.00005 0 1500 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 1500 1600 1700 1800 frequency rad/s 2 1 3 R(1. . ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ Ξpn ¯ (2..ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 108 Hence Since the real part of the transfer function is equal to zero for ω = ω n .0001 0.148) Ξqn ¯ |Rpq (iω)| = ¯ ¯ 2ς n ω 2 n Ξnq = C |Rpq (iω)| q = 1. its modulus is equal to the absolute value of imaginary part..00015 0.2) R(1.3) 1600 1700 1800 frequency rad/s R(1.. 30 transfer functions m/N (modulus) 0.

155) . ⎪ ⎪ ¶ µ ⎨ ⎬ d ∂T ∂T ¨ (2.......mnn .. ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ ⎭ xN ¨ ⎫⎞⎞ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪⎟⎟ ⎪ ⎬⎟⎟ ⎟⎟ = ⎪⎟⎟ ⎪⎠⎠ ⎪ ⎪ ⎭ m1n ......... mmn ..154) − = {mn1 .. ⎪ Ã m=N ! ⎪ ⎪ ⎨ P ⎬ 1 n=N X X 1 m=N = T = xn ˙ {x1 .....154. ..152 fulfills the requirement 2.........Dissipation function In this section the kinetic energy function....1...xn .......151) Performing the matrix multiplication we are getting ⎧ Pm=N ⎫ ˙ ⎪ ⎪ m=1 m1m xm ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ .. ¶ µ d ∂T ∂T − dt ∂ xn ˙ ∂xn ⎧ Pm=N ⎧ ⎫ ⎛ ⎛ ˙ ⎪ ⎪ m=1 m1m xm ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ . according to Lagrange’s equations should be ⎧ ⎫ ⎪ x1 ⎪ ⎪ ¨ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ . c and k are symmetric and positive definite matrices.0} + {x1 .......xN }T ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ 2 (2... ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎜ ⎜ ⎨ P ⎨ ⎬ d ⎜1 ⎜ m=N ⎜ ⎜{0.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 109 2... 0......xN } ˙ = ˙ ˙ m x ˙ ⎪ m=1 nm m ⎪ ⎪ dt ⎜ 2 ⎜ ⎪ ..152) (2.......xn .xn .2.153) ˙ m x ˙ ⎪ m=1 nm m ⎪ 2 n=1 2 ⎪ .... mNn (2.xN } ˙ ˙ ˙ mnm xm (2............... ⎪ m=1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ P ⎪ ⎩ m=N ⎭ ˙ m=1 mNm xm = n=N m=N 1X X mnm xn xm ˙ ˙ 2 n=1 m=1 Let us prove that the function 2.. . . If T is the kinetic energy function... ⎪ ⎪ ⎝ ⎝ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ P ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ m=N ⎩ ⎭ mNm xm ˙ m=1 !! Ã Ãm=N m=N X X d 1 = mnm xm + ˙ mmn xm ˙ dt 2 m=1 m=1 If this function is positive definite (is always positive and is equal to zero if and only if all variables xn are equal to zero) the corresponding matrix m is called positive ˙ definite matrix......mnN } xn ⎪ dt ∂ xn ˙ ∂xn ⎪ ......... the potential energy function and the dissipation function are formulated for a linear system governed by the equation m¨ + cx + kx = F(t) x ˙ where the matrices m.....3 Kinetic and potential energy functions .... Kinetic energy function Let us consider function 1 T = xT mx x = {x1 . ..

.knn .... ....... x2 ....... 1 V = xT kx x = {x1 ...152 is the kinetic energy function if the matrix m is symmetric and positive definite......160) ... 0....ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 110 Since mnm = mmn ! ! Ã m=N Ãm=N ¶ µ d X d ∂T ∂T d 1 X − 2 = mnm xm = ˙ mnm xm ˙ dt ∂ xn ˙ ∂xn dt 2 m=1 dt m=1 ⎧ ⎪ x1 ⎪ ¨ ⎪ ⎪ m=N ⎨ ...... ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ ⎭ xN Let us prove that the function 2.. ⎪ Ã m=N ! ⎪ ⎪ ⎨ P ⎬ 1 n=N X X 1 m=N = V = xn {x1 . ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎜ ⎨ P ⎨ ⎬ ∂V 1⎜ m=N ⎜{0.. ⎧ Pm=N ⎧ ⎫ ⎛ ⎪ m=1 k1m xm ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ...xn ........158) k x ˙ ⎪ m=1 nm m ⎪ 2 n=1 2 ⎪ ... ⎪ ⎪ ⎝ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ P ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ m=N ⎩ ⎭ kNm xm m=1 ! Ãm=N m=N X X 1 = knm xm + kmn xm 2 m=1 m=1 k1n ..xN }T (2.xN } knm xm (2. m=1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ xN ¨ Potential energy function Let us consider function (2..........mnn .157) 2 Performing the matrix multiplication we are getting ⎧ Pm=N ⎫ ⎪ m=1 k1m xm ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ...159......... kmn .....mnN } xn ¨ ⎪ ⎪ .156) ⎫ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎬ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎭ Now we may conclude that the function 2. ................1....... it must be positive definite and according to Lagrange’s equations should fulfills the following relationship ⎧ ⎫ ⎪ x1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ .xN } = k x ⎪ m=1 nm m ⎪ ⎪ ∂xn 2⎜ ⎪ ..159) = {kn1 .......... ..xn .......157 fulfills the requirement 2...knN } xn ⎪ ⎪ ∂xn ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ .... kN n ⎫⎞ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪⎟ ⎪ ⎬⎟ ⎟= ⎪⎟ ⎪⎠ ⎪ ⎪ ⎭ n=N m=N 1X X knm xn xm 2 n=1 m=1 (2...xn ..0} + {x1 . ⎪ m=1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ P ⎪ ⎩ m=N ⎭ ˙ m=1 kNm xm = If V is the potential energy function... ⎪ ⎪ ⎨ ⎬ ∂V (2........... X ¨ = mnm xm = {mn1 .......

..163) It follows that if the matrix of damping is symmetrical and positive definite... .162) (2...xn ........ m=N m=N ⎨ X X ∂V 1 = 2 knm xm = knm xm = {kn1 ..... that the function 1 D = xT cx x = {x1 ... .... .knn . such a damping can be included in the Lagrange’s equation in the following way ¶ µ d ∂T ∂T ∂V ∂D − + + = Qn (2....157 is the kinetic energy function if the matrix k is symmetric and positive definite.xN }T ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ 2 fulfills the following relationship ⎧ ⎪ x1 ⎪ ˙ ⎪ ⎪ ⎨ . are not conservative and have to be included in the generalized force Qn ...164) dt ∂ xn ˙ ∂xn ∂xn ∂ xn ˙ The function D is called dissipation function...... ∂D ˙ = {cn1 ..161) Now we may conclude that the function 2.. Dissipation function It is easy to notice. in a general case.. ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ xN ˙ ⎫ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎬ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎭ (2.. having in mind the previous consideration.knN } xn ⎪ ∂xn 2 m=1 ⎪ . It must be noted that the dissipation function does not represent the dissipation energy..cnn .....ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 111 Since knm = kmn ⎧ ⎪ x1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ..cnN } xn ⎪ ∂ xn ˙ ⎪ .. The damping forces... ... m=1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ xN ⎫ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎬ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎭ (2....

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 112 2. Given are: l1 = 1m E1 = 0. the differential equations of motion 2. the steady state motion of the system due to the kinematic excitation y 4.01m f2 = 35rad/s .4 Problems Problem 29 l 1 J1 E 1 B J2 E 2 l2 2 A y k m2 l2 2 m1 c Figure 31 The point A of the system shown in Fig.2 · 1012 N/m2 J1 = 1 · 10−8 m4 m1 = 10kg l2 = 2m E2 = 0. Produce 1.165) y = A1 sin(f1 t) + A2 sin(f2 t) where A1 and A2 are amplitudes of this motion and f1 and f2 are the corresponding frequencies. . 31 moves according to the following equation (2. the exciting force at the point A required to maintain the steady state motion 5.01m f1 = 30rad/s A2 = 0. the reaction force and the reaction moment at the point B.2.2 · 1012 N/m2 J2 = 1 · 10−8 m4 m2 = 20kg k = 10000N/m c = 100Ns/m A1 = 0. the natural frequencies 3.

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 113 Solution 1. The differential equations of motion l 1 J1 E 1 B J2 E 2 l2 2 A y k m1 y m2 1 l2 2 c y2 Figure 32 Utilization of the Newton-Euler approach for modelling of the system shown in Fig. F(t) = ∙ ¸ 0 cy ˙ (2. 2. k= ∙ k + k1 −k −k k + k2 ¸ . a2 = cA2 f2 Introduction of Eq. 32 allows to develop its mathematical model.166) Its matrix form is ¸∙ ¸ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ∙ y1 ˙ y1 ¨ 0 k + k1 y1 0 −k m1 (2. 2.170 into the equation of motion 2. c= ∙ 0 0 0 c ¸ . ¨ m1 y1 = −k1 y1 − ky1 + ky2 m2 y2 = −k2 y2 − ky2 + ky1 − cy2 + cy ¨ ˙ ˙ (2.169) (2. the excitation cy is ˙ cy = cA1 f1 cos(f1 t) + cA2 f2 cos(f2 t) = a1 cos(f1 t) + a2 cos(f2 t) ˙ where a1 = cA1 f1 .167) + + = c cy ˙ −k k + k2 m2 y2 ¨ y2 ˙ y2 or shorter m¨ + cy + ky = F(t) y ˙ where m= ∙ m1 0 0 m2 ¸ .168) Taking into consideration Eq.170) (2.165.168 yields m¨ + cy + ky = F1 (t) + F2 (t) y ˙ (2.171) .

178) 0 ⎦ −5 (2. 734i (2. The real part indicates the rate of decay of the free vibrations.174) (2.177) (2.2 · 1012 · 1 · 10−8 = = 6000N/m 3 l1 13 (2.the natural frequencies To analyze the free vibrations let us transfer the homogeneous equation 2. 6741 ± 24. Free motion .0 500 ⎡ 0 0 1000 −1100 1 0 0 0 ⎤ 0 1 ⎥ ⎥ (2. 8259 ± 45. F2 (t) = 30 cos(30t) 35 cos(35t) ∙ 48E2 J2 48 · 0. 483i ω 2 = −0.175) 2. The substitution w=y ˙ results in the following set of equations z = Az ˙ where ∙ y w ¸ ∙ 0 1 −m−1 k −m−1 c ¸ 0 ⎢ 0 =⎢ ⎣ −1600. .172) The stiffness of the beam 2 at the point of attachment of the mass 2 is k2 = Hence ¸ 10 0 m= .ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 114 where F1 (t) = For the given numerical data the stiffness of the beam 1 at the point of attachment of the mass 1 is k1 = 3E1 J1 3 · 0.176) z= .173) ∙ 0 a1 cos(f1 t) ¸ .171 to the state-space coordinates.2 · 1012 · 1 · 10−8 = = 12000N/m 3 l2 23 (2. 0 20 ∙ F1 (t) = ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ 0 0 16000 −10000 c= . A= Solution of the eigenvalue problem yields the following complex roots ω 1 = −1.179) For underdamped system the imaginary part of the above roots represents the natural frequency of the damped system. F2 (t) = ∙ 0 a2 cos(f2 t) ¸ (2. k= 0 ¸ 100 ∙ −10000 22000 ¸ 0 0 .

Im z02 = ⎢ 1. 37705 . 40969 z21 = eh2 t (Re(z02 ) cos ω2 t − Im(z02 ) sin ω2 t) = ⎡ ⎛⎡ ⎤ −6. 6741t ⎜⎢ ⎣ ⎝⎣ ⎦ . 90847 −2 −5.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 115 According to 2. 40969 ⎡ ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ 1. Im z01 = ⎢ −1. 3213 × 10 = e−1. 38263 −. 4508 × 10−2 −1. 46561 ⎤ ⎞ z12 = eh1 t (Re(z01 ) sin ω 1 t + Im(z01 ) cos ω1 t) = ⎡ ⎛⎡ ⎤ −1. 7637 × 10−2 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ . 6392 × 10−2 −2 ⎢ ⎜⎢ −1. 483t⎟ ⎠ ⎦ ⎞ ⎤ ⎟ ⎥ ⎥ cos 24. 483t⎟ ⎠ ⎦ ⎞ ⎤ ⎟ ⎥ ⎥ sin 45. 9755 × 10−2 −3 ⎢ ⎜⎢ −1. 6741t (−1. 35302 −. 483t) y211 = e−0. The two last rows represents the generalized velocities along the coordinates y1 and y2 . 049 × 10−3 1. 26033 . the particular solutions are Solution of the eigenvector problem produces the following complex vectors. 6392 × 10−2 cos 24. 6741t ⎜⎢ ⎣ ⎝⎣ ⎦ . 4508 × 10−2 sin 24. 37705 . 477 × 10−3 ⎜⎢ −1. . 8259t (1. 9755 × 10−2 cos 45. 0154 × 10−2 ⎥ ⎥ sin 45. 6392 × 10−2 −2 ⎥ −2 ⎢ ⎜⎢ −1. 38263 −. 46561 z11 = eh1 t (Re(z01 ) cos ω1 t − Im(z01 ) sin ω1 t) = ⎡ ⎛⎡ ⎤ −1. 734t + ⎢ 1. 734t + 6. 38263 −. ⎡ ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ −1. 26033 . 6392 × 10−2 −1. 7637 × 10 ⎥ sin 24. 483t + 1. 8259t ⎜⎢ ⎣ ⎝⎣ ⎦ . 0154 × 10−2 ⎥ ⎥ cos 45. 9162 × 10 −. 9162 × 10 −. 4508 × 10−2 −1. 477 × 10 ⎥ (2.182) are presented in Fig 33. Example of the motion along the coordinate y1 . associated with the particular solution z11 (y111 ) and z21 (y211 ) y111 = e−1. 35302 −. 35302 −. 37705 .81. 049 × 10−3 −3 ⎥ ⎢ −1. 90847 −2 −5.180) Re z02 = ⎢ ⎣ ⎣ ⎦ ⎦ . 90847 −2 −5. 9162 × 10 −. 9755 × 10−2 −6. 40969 ⎤ ⎟ ⎥ ⎥ sin 24. 7637 × 10−2 ⎥ ⎥ cos 24.181) The two first rows in the above solutions represent displacement along the coordinates y1 and y2 respectively. 483t + ⎢ −1. 3213 × 10 ⎥ Re z01 = ⎢ ⎣ ⎣ ⎦ ⎦ . 049 × 10−3 1. 477 × 10 = e−0. 8259t ⎜⎢ ⎣ ⎝⎣ ⎦ . 9755 × 10−2 ⎢ 1. 734t) (2. 734t − ⎢ = e−0. 734t⎟ ⎠ ⎦ (2. 26033 . 049 × 10−3 sin 45. 483t − ⎢ −1. 4508 × 10−2 −2 ⎥ ⎢ −1. 3213 × 10 = e−1. 734t⎟ ⎠ ⎦ ⎞ ⎟ ⎥ ⎥ cos 45. 46561 z22 = eh2 t (Re(z02 ) sin ω 2 t + Im(z02 ) cos ω2 t) = ⎡ ⎛⎡ ⎤ −6. 0154 × 10−2 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ .

02 Figure 33 .01 0 -0.01 1 2 3 4 t[s] -0.01 1 2 3 4 t[s] -0.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 116 y111[m] 0.01 0 -0.02 y211[m] 0.

01 0.01 · sin(35 · t) y[m] (2.185) To produce the particular solution of the equation 2.183) 0. The steady state motion of the system due to the kinematic excitation According to the given data. according to the superposition rule.01 · sin(30 · t) + 0.5 t[s] -0.187) = F10 e = 30 Hence the equation of motion takes form m¨ + cy + ky = F10 eif1 t y ˙ Its particular solution is c c y1 = y10 eif1 t (2.184) where y1 is the particular solution of the equation 2.02 Figure 34 The time history diagram of this motion is given in Fig.188) (2.189) .01 0 -0.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 117 3.185 m¨ + cy + ky = F1 (t) y ˙ and y2 is the particular solution of the equation 2. motion of the point A is y = 0. which represents the forced vibration.185 let us introduce the complex excitation ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ 0 0 0 c = = eif1 t = F1 (t) = a1 eif1 t a1 a1 cos(f1 t) + ia1 sin(f1 t) ∙ ¸ 0 if1 t ei30t (2.5 1 1. 34 The particular solution y.186 m¨ + cy + ky = F2 (t) y ˙ (2.186) (2. is y = y1 + y2 (2.

7855 × 10−4 sin 35t + −1.00 112i = (2. 183 × 10−3 − 1. 1 × 10−3 cos 35t + 1.189 is ¶ µ∙ ¸ −.192) . 84 × 10−4 i The motion of the system. 183 × 10−3 − 1. 688 × 10−3 − 7. 35 and 36 respectively. 4196 × 10−4 i ¸ i35t ¶ (2.00 38 cos 30t + . as the real part of 2. 1546 × 10−3 cos 35t + 3. 41 × 10−4 sin 35t ∙ (2.00 112 sin 30t = −2.00 384 cos 30t + . 688 × 10−3 cos 30t + 7.00 11 sin 30t − 3. 84 × 10−4 sin 30t ∙ ¸ −3. 4196 × 10−4 i Hence y2 = Re e ¸ ∙ −3. 688 × 10−3 − 7. 1546 × 10−3 − 3. µ∙ −3. computed according to the equation 2.193) This resultant motion of the system along the coordinates y1 and y2 . 688 × 10−3 cos 30t + 7.00 384 − .191) = −1. 15 × 10−3 cos 35t + 3.190) −2. 4196 × 10−4 sin 35t = ¸ ∙ −. one can obtained motion due to the excitation F2 (t) c 2 y20 = (−f2 m+if2 c + k)−1 F20 = ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸¶−1 ∙ ¸ µ 10 0 0 0 16000 −10000 0 2 + 35i + = = −35 0 20 0 100 −10000 22000 35 ¸ ∙ −3. 78 × 10−4 sin 35t −2. 4196 × 10−4 sin 35t The resultant motion of the system due to both components of excitation is y = y1 + y2 ¸ −.00 112 sin 30t + = −2.00 112i i30t y1 = Re e −2. 7855 × 10−4 i −1.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 118 where c 2 y10 = (−f1 m+if1 c + k)−1 F10 = ¸¶−1 ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ µ 16000 −10000 0 0 10 0 0 2 + + 30i = = −30 −10000 22000 0 100 0 20 30 ∙ ¸ −. 6 × 10−3 cos 30t + 7. 183 × 10−3 cos 35t + 1. 8 × 10−4 sin 30t − 1. 1546 × 10−3 cos 35t + 3.00 384 − . 7855 × 10−4 i (2.193. 84 × 10−4 i ∙ ¸ −. is shown in Fig. 1546 × 10−3 − 3. 84 × 10−4 sin 30t Similarly. 183 × 10−3 cos 35t + 1.00 384 cos 30t + . 7855 × 10−4 sin 35t = −1.

01 Figure 36 .01 Figure 35 y2[m] 0.5 t[s] -0.5 t[s] -0.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 119 y1[m] 0.005 0.005 0 -0.005 0 -0.5 1 1.005 0.5 1 1.

064 sin 30t − 4.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 120 4.193 we have d FA = 100( dt (0. m2 y2 Therefore.01 · sin 30t + 0.194) . 648 cos 30t + 34. let us consider the damper c shown in Fig.38 . it is necessary to apply at the point A the following force ˙ ˙ (2. 1405 sin 35t[N] (2. If the point A moves with the velocity y and in the same time the mass m2 moves with the ˙ velocity y2 .196) Diagram of this force is presented in Fig. 1 · 10−3 cos 35t + 1. to realize this motion. 4 · 10−4 sin 35t)) = = 27. 503 cos 35t − 8. .01 · sin 35t) + d − dt (−2. according to the equation 2.183 and 2. the relative velocity of the point A with respect to the mass m2 is ˙ v = y − y2 ˙ ˙ (2. The exciting force at the point A required to maintain the steady state motion y2 c y A y Figure 37 To develop the expression for the force necessary to move the point A according to the assumed motion 2. 6 · 10−3 cos 30t + 7.195) FA = c (y − y2 ) Hence.183. 8 · 10−4 sin 30t+ −1. 37.

200) . 15×10−3 cos 35t+3. The reaction force and the reaction moment at the point B.197) where P is dependent on the instantaneous displacement y1 .00 38 cos 30t+. 15 × 10−3 cos 35t + 3.00 11 sin 30t − 3. 78×10−4 sin 35t ¡ ¢ MB =6000·1· −.193 P = k1 y1 = (2.2 · 1012 · 1 · 10−8 y1 = = 6000y1 3 l1 13 The motion along the coordinate y1 is determined by the function 2.198) y1 = −.00 38 cos 30t+. This relationship is determined by the formula 2. P l 1 J1 E 1 B MB RB y1 Figure 39 According to Fig. 39 RB = P MB = P l1 (2.173 3E1 J1 3 · 0. 78×10−4 sin 35t (2. 15×10−3 cos 35t + 3.00 11 sin 30t−3.00 38 cos 30t + .199) Hence ¡ ¢ RB =6000 −.00 11 sin 30t−3. 78 × 10−4 sin 35t (2.5 1 1.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 121 FA[N] 40 20 0 -20 -40 -60 0.5 t[s] Figure 38 5.

The equation of motion. shown in Fig.1 m r = . 42 and released with the initial velocity equal to zero.202) At the instant t = 0. 40.01 m Produce: 1.05 m k = 1000 N/m a = 0. the differential equation of motion in terms of the normal coordinates 4. m= m1 + m2 m2 R m2 R m2 R2 + I . All motion is in the vertical plane. The ball 2 of mass m2 and a radius r is hinged to the link 1 at the point A by means of the massless and rigid rod 4. For the following data: m1 = 2 kg m2 = 1 kg R = 0. x= x ϕ . in terms of the coordinates x and ϕ (see Fig. the natural frequencies of the system 2. the equation motion of the system along the coordinates x and ϕ due to the given initial conditions. can move along the horizontal slide and is supported by two springs 3 each of stiffness k. the link 1 was placed to the position shown in Fig. 41) have been formulated in page 81 to be m¨ + kx = 0 x where 2 I = m2 r2 5 (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 122 Problem 30 The link 1 of a mass m1 . the normalized natural modes 3.201) . ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ (2. k= 2k 0 0 m2 gR .

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 123 1 A k 3 4 2 r k R Figure 40 y 1 x k o k x 3 2 r R ϕ G Figure 41 y 1 a k o k x 3 2 r R Figure 42 .

205) 2 2 −. 1 · 22. 1ω2 Φ1 = 0 1 1 (2. 0913 the equations 2.0 = 0 (2. 936 −22.204) where ω stands for the natural frequency and X is the corresponding natural mode.0 0 1 · 10 · 0.0 = −10. one of the unknown can be chosen arbitrarily (e.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 124 Solution 1.936 X1 = 1 −3.207) For ω n = ω1 = 9.205.001 ¸ ¸ ∙ ∙ 1000. 1ω n −. 1 . carried out for the natural frequency ω2 = 22. (2. 1ω2 n n ¯ = .99 2 .9362 + 1000.0 · 9.0 11 1 · 0. 1ω 2 X 0 n n = (2.052 = 0. 1ωn −.991 2 .0 · 22.0 . X1 = 1) and the other may be produced from the first equation of the set 2.1 1 · 0.0 11ω n + 1.0913 These two numbers form the first mode of vibrations corresponding to the first natural frequency ω 1 .0) = 90. 936 [s−1 ] ¤ (2.0ω 2 + 1000. 1 2 + 1 1 · 0.1 (2.12 + 0.0X1 − .205 become linearly dependent. X2 = 1 Φ2 = ¡ ¢ 1 −3.0 ¯ Its roots: yield the wanted natural frequencies £ 22. the inertia matrix and the stuffiness matrix are 2 · 1 · 0.0ω2 + 1000.Similar consideration. Therefore.206) ¯ 2 2 n n ¯ −. 091 3 −9. 936.yields the second mode. 1 · 9. Hence for the given numerical data we are getting ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ −3.0 0 1000 0 = k = 0 1.208) 1 Φ1 = − 3. 0913 ω2 = 22. 091 3 ω1 = 9.001 kgm2 I = 5 ¸ ¸ ∙ ∙ 3.g.209) .0 11ωn + 1.092 + 1000.108 (page 102) one can write the following set of equations (−ω 2 m + k)X = 0 n (2. Hence the equation for the natural frequencies is. ¯∙ ¸¯ ¯ ¯ −3.0 Φ 0 This set of equations has non-zero solution if and only if its determinant is equal to zero.0 23ω4 − 14.0 −.203) = m = .0ω2 + 1000. 936 9.0X1 ω2 + 1000. The natural frequencies and the natural modes According to the given numerical data the moment of inertia of the ball.1 According to 2.0 −.

4375 × 10−2 .0 . 1 .0 11 90.121 the normalization factor is XT mXn = λ2 n n Hence λ2 1 = £ ¸∙ ¸ 3.211) (2. ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ 1 1 9. 5296 ¸ ∙ 1 0 (2. 4375 × 10−2 Ξ1 = = (2.99 −10. 1306 = 1. ΞT mΞ = ∙ ¸∙ ¸∙ ¸ 9.216) The normalized eigenvectors must be orthogonal with respect to both the inertia matrix and the stiffness matrix. Indeed.217) = 0 1 .214) 8. 68507 Ξ2 = = −7. 5296 1.991 2. 5872 −7.0 . 5872 = . 99 = 112. 1 1 1 90.215) These two vectors forms the normalized modal matrix Ξ. ¸ ¸ ∙ ∙ 1 1 . 5872 −7. 27 = 10. 1 9. 68507 −7. Normalization of the natural modes According to 2. 4375 × 10−2 . 4375 × 10−2 8.213) Division of the eigenvector X1 by the factor λ1 yields the normalized mode Ξ1 .991 (2. ¸ ∙ 9.212) (2. 5296 (2. 596 ¤ ∙ (2.99 √ λ1 = 112. 68507 3. X2 ] = ∙ 1 1 90.991 ¸ (2.99 −10. 4597 ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ 1 1 .0 11 −10. 596 90. 27 . 5872 10.99 Similar procedure allows the second normalized mode to be obtained ∙ ¸∙ ¸ £ ¤ 3.0 . 1 . one can create the modal matrix X = [X1 .ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 125 Now. 1 1 2 = 2. X2 = X1 = 90.991 . 1306 λ2 = 1 −10. 4597 −10. 1 .210) In this case the modal matrix has two eigenvectors X1 and X2 .0 11 . 68507 Ξ= 8.991 √ λ2 = 2. 5296 8.

221) Taking advantage of the orthogonality conditions. 02 0 ω2 0 (22. 091)2 ω1 0 0 = = = (2. 4375 × 10−2 8.218) 2 0 526. 091)2 0 η+ ¨ η=0 (2. ¸ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ∙ 1. 5872 −7. according to 1.220) into 2. 4375 × 10−2 .01 η 01 −1 −1 = = Ξ =Ξ 1. 5296 ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ 2 ¸ 82. These initial conditions must be formulated along the normal coordinates. 68507 −7.01142 = (2.3024 −1.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 126 and ΞT kΞ = ∙ ¸∙ ¸∙ ¸ 9. 091)2 η 1 = 0 ¨ η 2 + (22.1039 Xo a 0. 647 0 (9.3024 × 10−2 .1 . The differential equation of motion in terms of the normal coordinates Introducing the substitution 2.131 x = Ξη that in the case considered has the following form ¸ ∙ ∙ ¸ η1 X = Ξη = Ξ Φ η2 (2.36 is v01 sin ω 1 t + η 01 cos ω 1 t η1 = ω1 v02 η2 = sin ω 2 t + η 02 cos ω 2 t (2.223) The general solution of the above set of the differential equations. 935)2 or η 1 + (9. 5872 = 0 1 · 10 · 0. 935) 2 3.201 and premultiplying them from the left hand side by ΞT we are getting the differential equations of motion in terms of the normal coordinates η.142 . It can be obtained by transforming the initial conditions from the physical coordinates to the normal coordinates.224) ω2 Where η 01 and η 02 stand for the initial position whereas v01 and v02 stand for the initial velocity of the system along the normal coordinates. 935)2 η 2 = 0 ¨ (2.225) 1. (ΞT mΞ)¨ +(ΞT kΞ)η = 0 η (2. 5296 8.222) 0 1 0 (22.219) (2. the equations of motion are of the following form ¸ ∙ ∙ ¸ 1 0 (9. 68507 1000 0 9.4313 × 10−2 0 0 η 02 Φo ∙ ¸ .

091t − 9. using the relationship 2.935t Φ 8.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 127 Introduction of the above initial conditions into the equations 2.228) = 9.091t η 2 = η 02 cos ω 2 t = 1.1 -0.5 t[s] -0. 5296 ¸ ∙ 1. one has to transform the motion along the normal coordinates beck to the physical ones. 9224 × 10−3 cos 22.005 -0.5 1 1.5 1 1.01 X[m] 0.15 0.01 Figure 43 0.3024 × 10−2 cos 22.15 Φ [rad] 0.2 0.3024 × 10−2 cos 22.227) 4. 0778 × 10−3 cos 9. 8066 × 10−2 cos 9.1 0.005 0 0. 4375 × 10−2 .935t ∙ v01 v02 ¸ = ∙ 0 0 ¸ (2.5 t[s] Figure 44 . 091t + 8. we are getting ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ 9. 5872 −7.091t X = Ξη = = 1. 935t (2. 8066 × 10−2 cos 22.05 0 -0. 935t This motion is presented in Fig.01142 cos 9.224 results in motion of the system along the normal coordinates η 1 = η 01 cos ω 1 t = .219. Hence.01142 cos 9.05 -0.226) (2. 68507 . The equations of motion of the system along the coordinates x and ϕ To produce equation of motion along the physical coordinates. 43 and 44 0.

The beam 2 is massless and the Young’s modulus E and the second moment of area J determine its dynamic properties. . is supported by means of the spring of stiffness k and the damper of the damping coefficient c as shown in Fig. 45.J D 3 l Figure 45 2 The rigid beam 1 of mass M. Derive an expression for the fixing moment and the fixing force at the point D due to the exciting force F that is applied to the system at the point B.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 128 Problem 31 L A 1 F=F cosω t o B M. Its end D is fixed and the particle 3 of mass m is attached to the end C. I A k C c E. length L and the moment of inertia about its point of rotation IA .

F2 and frequencies ω1 and ω2 . The centres of gravity of these rods are denoted by G1 and G2 respectively. M= 2 2 ca∙ −kb2 k2 a2 + kb2 + m2 gs2 ¸−ca ¸ ∙ 0 ¸ Io2 ∙ ϕ1 F1 b 0 cos ω 1 t + cos ω2 t x= . the expression for the dynamic reaction at the point A. Vibrations of the system are excited by the two harmonic forces of amplitudes F1 . Answer: RA = Φ2 ak2 .ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 129 Problem 32 1 O1 s1 k1 c s2 k2 A m1 I O1 G1 G2 b m 2 I O2 O2 a 2 F cosω 1 t 1 k F cosω 2 t 2 Figure 46 The two rods. 1 and 2. Φ2 .particular solutionof equation M¨ + Cx + Kx = x ˙ cos ω 2 t −F2 b 3. IO2 .particular solutionof equation M¨ + Cx + Kx = x ˙ ∙ 0 ¸ 0 X2 . Their mass and their moment of inertia about their points of rotation are respectively m1 .the lower element of the matrix X . k1 . the differential equation of the small vibrations of the system in the matrix form Answer: M¨ + Cx + Kx¸= F ∙ x ∙ ˙ ¸ ∙ ¸ −kb2 ca2 −ca2 k1 a2 + kb2 + m1 gs1 Io1 0 . k2 and as well as the damper of the damping coefficient c. are suspended in the vertical plane as shown in Fig. F= −F2 b 0 ϕ2 2. These rods are connected to each other by means of springs of the stiffness k. IO1 . C= . Produce 1. K= . and m2 . 46. the expression for the forced vibrations of the rods Answer: X = X1 + X2 ¸ ∙ F1 b cos ω 1 t X1 .

The damping coefficient of the damper between the beam and the block is denoted by c2 and the stiffness of the supporting spring in denoted by k2 .ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 130 Problem 33 b 3 a m M G m1. The rotor of this motor rotates with the constant velocity ω. Produce 1.IA c1 C A B c2 2 m2 k1 1 ω h µ k2 D Figure 47 The rigid beam 1 (see Fig. Its mass and its moment of inertia about A are m1 and IA respectively. Its mass is equal to m and its unbalance is µ. C= . 47) is hinged at the point A and is supported at the point C by means of the spring of stiffness k1 and the damper of the damping coefficient c1 . F= cos ωt x= x 0 . It can be approximated by a particle of the mass M that is concentrated at the point G that is located by the dimensions h and a. 0 m2 −c2 a 0 k2 c2 ∙ √ ¸ ∙ ¸ α mµω 2 h2 + a2 . The motor 3 is mounted on this beam. Answer: M¨ + Cx + Kx = F x ∙ ˙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ IA + M(h2 + a2 ) 0 c1 b2 + c2 a2 −c2 a k1 b 0 M= . the differential equation of motion of the system and present it in the standard matrix form. K= . To attenuate the vibrations of the beam the block 2 of mass m2 was attached.

Produce the expression for the interaction forces at the point A and D.the angular displacement of the beam1. .the linear displacement of the block 2 2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 131 α . x .

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM

132

Problem 34

l A G k

l

F C

l D

α

B

β
k

Figure 48 Three uniform platforms each of the length l, the mass m and the moment of inertia about axis through its centre of gravity IG are hinged together to form a bridge that is shown in Fig. 48. This bridge is supported by means of two springs each of the stiffness k. This system has two degree of freedom and the two generalized coordinates are denoted by α and β. There is an excitation force F applied at the hinge C. This force can be adopted in the following form F = Fo cos ωt Produce: 1. the differential equations of motion of the system and present them in the standard form Answer: M¨ + Kx = F ¸ x ∙ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ 2 1 0 α 0 −1 2 2 3 6 ml ; K = kl ; x = ; F= M= cos ωt 2 0 1 β Fo l −1 3 6 2. the equation for the natural frequencies of the system Answer: |K − 1ω n | = 0 3. the expression for the amplitude of the forced vibrations of the system Answer: ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ 0 A −1 2 X = [−ω M + K] cos ωt = Fo l B 4. the expression for the interaction force between the spring attached to the hinge B and the ground Answer: R = Akl cos ωt

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM

133

Problem 35

1

L

m1,IA x k m k1 B c

ϕ
2

A

y

Figure 49 Figure. 49 shows the physical model of a trolley. It was modelled as a system with two degree of freedom. Its position is determined by two generalized coordinates x and ϕ. The moment of inertia of he trolley about the point A is denoted by IA and its mass by m1 . The dynamic properties of the shock-absorber are approximated by the spring of stiffness k and damper of the damping coefficient c. Mass of the wheels 2 are denoted by m and the stiffness of its tire is k1 . Motion of the trolley is excited by roughnees of the road. It causes motion of the point B according to the following function. y = A sin ωt Produce: 1. the differential equation of motion of the system 2. the equation for the natural frequencies of the system 3. the expression for the amplitudes of the steady state vibration of the system 4. the expression for the amplitude of the interaction force between the tire and suface of the road..

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM

134

Problem 36
y A c3 m3 k3 3

2 4

r m2,I2

k2 k1 m1

1

c1 B

Figure 50 In Fig. 50 the physical model of a winch is shown. The blocks 1 and 3 are rigid and their masses are respectively m1 and m3 respectively. The rigid pulley 2 has radius r, mass m2 and the moment of inertia about its axis of rotation I2 . The elastic properties of the rope 4 are modeled by two springs of stiffness k1 and k2 . The point A moves with respect to the axis y according to the following equation. y = a cos ωt Produce: 1. the differential equation of motion of the system and present it in the following matrix form. M¨ + Cx + Kx = F x ˙

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM

135

⎤ ⎤ ⎡ Answer: ⎡ 0 0 m1 c1 0 0 M = ⎣ 0 m2 + m3 0 ⎦ ; C = ⎣ 0 c3 0 ⎦ 0 I2 0⎤ 0 0 ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ 0 ⎡ −k1 −k1 r k1 x1 0 K = ⎣ −k1 k1 + k2 + k3 k1 r − k2 r ⎦ F = ⎣ ak3 ⎦ cos ωt; x = ⎣ x2 ⎦ −k1 r k1 r − k2 r (k1 + k2 ) r2 0 ϕ x1 - the linear displacement of the block 1 x2 - the linear displacement of the pulley 2 and the block 3 ϕ - the angular displacement of the pulley 2 2. the expression for the amplitudes of the forced vibrations of the system Answer: The particular solution xp of the equation M¨ + Cx + Kx = F x ˙ The first element xp1 of the matrix xp represents displacement of the block 1 3. the expression for the interaction force at point B. Answer RB = c1 xp1 ˙

and I3 are connected to each other by means of the massless shafts that the torsional stiffness are k1 . There is a torque T3 applied to the disk I3 . the differential equation of motion of the system and present it in the following matrix form. The shaft k1 is connected to the shaft k2 by means of the gear of ratio i = D1 /D2 .ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 136 Problem 37 I1 I2 I3 D2 D1 T3 k1 k2 Figure 51 k3 Figure 51 shows the physical model of a compressor. M¨ + Cx + Kx = F x ˙ 2. . I2 . It can be approximated by the following function T3 = T cos ωt Produce: 1. The disks of moment of inertia I1 . k2 and k3 respectively. the expression for the amplitudes of the forced vibrations of the system 3. the expression for the toque transmitted through the shaft k1.

In the above equations not all variables are independent.229) (2.230) D1 2 D2 0 = −k2 iϕ11 + k2 ϕ2 − F21 2 I2 ϕ2 = −(k2 + k3 )ϕ2 + k2 iϕ11 + k3 ϕ3 ¨ I3 ϕ3 = −k3 ϕ3 + k3 ϕ2 + T3 ¨ 0 = −k1 ϕ11 + k1 ϕ1 + F12 (2.232) .231) According to the third Newton’s law we have F12 = F21 (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 137 Solution ϕ2 ϕ3 ϕ22 F21 F12 T3 I1 ϕ2 ϕ22 I2 ϕ3 I3 D2 T3 D1 ϕ11 ϕ1 ϕ1 ϕ11 k1 k2 k3 Figure 52 To produce the equations of motion of the system one may split it into five rigid bodies (Newton approach) and write the following set of equations I1 ϕ1 = −k1 ϕ1 + k1 ϕ11 ¨ D1 2 D2 0 = −k2 ϕ22 + k2 ϕ2 − F21 2 I2 ϕ2 = −(k2 + k3 )ϕ2 + k2 ϕ22 + k3 ϕ3 ¨ I3 ϕ3 = −k3 ϕ3 + k3 ϕ2 + T3 ¨ 0 = −k1 ϕ11 + k1 ϕ1 + F12 where F12 F21 stand for the interaction forces between the rear D1 and D2 . ϕ22 = iϕ11 Hence the equations can be rewritten as follows I1 ϕ1 = −k1 ϕ1 + k1 ϕ11 ¨ (2.

233) D1 (−k2 iϕ11 + k2 ϕ2 ) D2 The equation 2. K = ⎣ −ke ke + k3 −k3 ⎦ .239) T cos ωt ⎡ ⎤ . x = ⎣ ϕ2 ⎦ I3 0 −k3 k3 ϕ3 ⎡ ⎤ 0 ⎦ 0 F =⎣ (2. C = 0. ϕ11 = k1 ik2 ϕ + ϕ 2 1 k1 + k2 i k1 + k2 i2 2 (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 138 Hence the second and third equation yields F12 = 2 2 (k1 ϕ11 − k1 ϕ1 ) = (−k2 iϕ11 + k2 ϕ2 ) = F21 D1 D2 k1 ϕ11 − k1 ϕ1 = (2.231 one can get ¨ I1 ϕ1 = −k1 ϕ1 + I2 ϕ2 ¨ ¨ I3 ϕ3 or µ ¶ 1 ϕ I1 (i¨ 1 ) = −ke (iϕ1 ) + ke ϕ2 i2 I2 ϕ2 = −ke ϕ2 − k3 ϕ2 + ke (iϕ1 ) + k3 ϕ3 ¨ ¨ I3 ϕ3 = −k3 ϕ3 + k3 ϕ2 + T3 ke = 2 k1 ik1 k2 ϕ1 + ϕ k1 + k2 i2 k1 + k2 i2 2 2 k1 k2 i i2 k2 = −(k2 + k3 )ϕ2 + ϕ1 + ϕ + k3 ϕ3 k1 + k2 i2 k1 + k2 i2 2 = −k3 ϕ3 + k3 ϕ2 + T3 (2.235) (2.236) k1 k2 k1 + i2 k2 The above set of equations can be now presented in the matrix form M¨ + Cx + Kx = F x ˙ where ⎡ 1 I i2 1 where (2.234) Introduction of this relationship into the first.237) (2.233 allows the angular displacement ϕ11 to be expressed in terms of the displacements ϕ1 and ϕ2 .238) M =⎣ I2 The same results one can get by means of the Lagrange’s equations ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ −ke 0 ke iϕ1 ⎦ . second and fifth equation of the set 2.

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 139 The kinetic energy function and the potential energy function of the system considered are 1 1 1 T = I1 ϕ2 + I2 ϕ2 + I3 ϕ2 ˙1 ˙2 ˙3 2 2 2 V 1 k1 (ϕ11 − ϕ1 )2 + 2 1 = k1 (ϕ11 − ϕ1 )2 + 2 = d ∂T dt ∂ ϕ1 ˙ d ∂T dt ∂ ϕ2 ˙ d ∂T dt ∂ ϕ3 ˙ ∂T ∂ϕ1 1 1 k2 (ϕ2 − ϕ22 )2 + k3 (ϕ3 − ϕ2 )2 = 2 2 1 1 k2 (ϕ2 − iϕ11 )2 + k3 (ϕ3 − ϕ2 )2 2 2 Hence = I1 ϕ1 ¨ = I2 ϕ2 ¨ = I3 ϕ3 ¨ = 0. ∂T = 0. ∂ϕ2 ∂T =0 ∂ϕ3 ¶ µ ¶ µ ∂V 1 ∂ϕ11 1 ∂ϕ11 = = − 1 + k2 2(ϕ2 − iϕ11 ) −i k1 2(ϕ11 − ϕ1 ) ∂ϕ1 2 ∂ϕ1 2 ∂ϕ1 = i2 ke ϕ1 − ike ϕ2 ¶ ¶ µ µ 1 1 1 ∂ϕ11 ∂V ∂ϕ11 + k2 2(ϕ2 − iϕ11 ) 1 − i + k3 2(ϕ3 − ϕ2 ) (−1) = k1 2(ϕ11 − ϕ1 ) = ∂ϕ2 2 ∂ϕ2 2 ∂ϕ2 2 = −ke iϕ1 + (ke + k3 )ϕ2 − ke ϕ3 ∂V 1 = k3 2(ϕ3 − ϕ2 ) (1) = ∂ϕ3 2 = −k3 ϕ2 + k3 ϕ3 The virtual work produced by the impressed forces acting on the system is δW = (0) ϕ1 + (0) ϕ2 + (T3 ) ϕ3 Introduction of the above expressions into the following Lagrange’s equations ∂T ∂V d ∂T − + = Q1 dt ∂ ϕ1 ∂ϕ1 ∂ϕ1 ˙ d ∂T ∂T ∂V − + = Q2 dt ∂ ϕ2 ∂ϕ2 ∂ϕ2 ˙ d ∂T ∂T ∂V − + = Q3 dt ∂ ϕ3 ∂ϕ3 ∂ϕ3 ˙ (2.240) .

The equivalent stiffness of the shaft assembled of the shaft k2 and k1r can be produced from the following equation ϕ1r = iϕ1 .242) 2 i i stands for so called reduced displacement.241) They are identical with the equation 2. k1r = 2 (2. I1r = 1 1 1 1 1 = + = k1 + ke k1r k2 k2 i2 It is ke = k1 k2 k1 + i2 k2 (2.239. It is easy to see that precisely the same equations possesses the system presented in Fig.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 140 yields the wanted equations of motion of the system considered ¨ I1 ϕ1 + ke ϕ1 − ike ϕ2 = 0 ¨ I2 ϕ2 + −ke iϕ1 + (ke + k3 )ϕ2 − ke ϕ3 = 0 ¨ I3 ϕ3 + −k3 ϕ2 + k3 ϕ3 = T3 or ¶ I1 (¨ 1 i) + ke (ϕ1 i) − ke ϕ2 = 0 ϕ i2 I2 ϕ2 − ke (ϕ1 i) + (ke + k3 )ϕ2 − ke ϕ3 = 0 ¨ ¨ I3 ϕ3 + −k3 ϕ2 + k3 ϕ3 = T3 µ (2.243) (2. reduced moment of inertia and reduced stiffness. 53 ϕ1r= iϕ1 I1r=I1 / i2 k1r=k1 / i D2 2 ϕ2 I2 ϕ3 I3 T3 D1 I1 ϕ1 k1 k2 k3 Figure 53 In this figure I1 k1 .244) .

53 are as follows µ ¶ I1 (¨ 1 i) + ke (ϕ1 i) − ke ϕ2 = 0 ϕ i2 I2 ϕ2 − ke (ϕ1 i) + (ke + k3 )ϕ2 − ke ϕ3 = 0 ¨ (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 141 Hence. the equations of motion of the system presented in Fig.245) ¨ I3 ϕ3 + −k3 ϕ2 + k3 ϕ3 = T3 .

Produce: 1. Vibrations of the pendulum about the horizontal axis Z are excited by the harmonic moment M applied to the body 1. the differential equation of small oscillations of the pendulum and present it in the following matrix form M¨ + Cx + Kx = F x ˙ .??. These bodies possess masses m1 and m2 and the moments of inertia about the axis through their centers of gravity (G1.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 142 Problem 38 M=Mocosωt O c1 l q1 G1 1 Y A a b c2 c k c q1 q2 k 2 B G2 X Figure 54 Two rigid bodies 1 and 2 were hinged together at the point A to form the double pendulum whose physical model is shown in Fig. G2) are I1 and I2 respectively. The system has two degrees of freedom and the generalized coordinates are denoted by q1 and q2 .

x= IG2 + m2 c2 (l + c2 ) IG2 m2 c2 ¸ ∙ q2 ¸ ∙ ¸ 2 ∙ m1 gc1 + m2 g(l + c2 ) 0 0 Mo m2 gc2 K= . ¸ ¸ ∙ Answer: ∙ IG1 + m1 c2 + IG2 + m2 (l + c2 )2 IG2 + m2 c2 (l + c2 ) q1 1 . the expression for the amplitudes of the forced vibrations of the pendulum 3. C= . F= 0 2ca2 m2 gc2 m2 gc2 + 2kb2 0 2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 143 Take advantage of Lagrange’s equations. . the expression for the interaction force between the damper and the body 1 at the point B. M= .

This assembly is free to rotate about the horizontal axis X-X and is kept in the horizontal position by means of two springs each of stiffness k v and two dampers each of the damping coefficient c v . The rotor R of the ventilator V possesses a mass m R and rotates with a constant angular velocity Ω.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 144 Problem 39 B X Gr V X R Ω α kv cv kd kv cd l cv e a b d D x Figure 55 The assembly of the ventilator V and its base B (see Fig. The differential equation of small oscillations of the system shown in Fig. 55) can be considered as a rigid body. The block D can translate along the inertial axis x only.1 and present it in the following matrix form M¨ + Cx + Kx = F x ˙ . This assembly is furnished with the dynamic absorber of vibrations. Produce: 1. This rotor is unbalanced and its centre of gravity is off from its axis of rotation by µ. the spring of stiffness k d and the damper of the damping coefficient c d . It is made of the block D of mass m d . Its centre of gravity G r is located by the distances a and b. The angular displacement α defines the instantaneous position of this assembly. Its moment of inertia about the axis X-X is I X .

M= 0 m ¸ ∙ ¸ 2cv e2 + cd l2 −cd l 2kv d2 + kd l2 −kd l C= . −c l −kd l c kd ∙ d √ ¸ ∙ ¸ d α mR µΩ2 a2 + b2 . F= cos Ωt x= x 0 2. K= . The expression for the force transmitted to foundation by the damper c v .ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 145 ¸ ∙ Answer. Ix 0 . The expression for the amplitudes of the forced vibrations of the system along the coordinates x and α 3. ∙ .

It possesses three degrees of freedom and the three independent coordinates are denoted by y2 and y3 . The differential equation of small oscillations of the and present it in the following matrix form. M¨ + Cx + Kx = F x ˙ 2. Produce: 1.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 146 Problem 40 Y 5 A Y 1 l 3 y3 y2 G1 2 α B 4 X Figure 56 The uniform rod 1 of mass m and length l shown in Fig. The expression for the amplitudes of the forced vibrations of the system. 56 is hinged at the point A to the support 5. The blocks mass is m2 and m3 respectively. . The system performs small oscillation in the vertical plane XY . The support 5 moves along the horizontal axis Y according to the following function Y = a cos ωt The lower end of the rod is connected to the blocks 2 and 3 by means of two springs 4 each of stiffness k. The expression for the driving force that must be applied to the point A in order to assure the assumed motion Y (t). 3.

ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 147 Solution Y 5 A rG1 1 l 3 y3 y2 G1 Y 2 α B 4 X Figure 57 Motion of the system is governed by the Lagrange equations. d ∂T ∂T ∂V − + = 0 dt ∂ α ∂α ˙ ∂α ∂T ∂V d ∂T − + = 0 dt ∂ y2 ∂y2 ∂y2 ˙ ∂T ∂V d ∂T − + = 0 dt ∂ y3 ∂y3 ∂y3 ˙ (2. the kinetic energy of the rod is ¶ µ 1 1 l l 2 2 ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙ T1 = m (Y + α cos α) + (− α sin α) + IG1 α2 2 2 2 2 (2.248) (2.246) To produce the kinetic energy function T associated with the the rod 1.249) . rG1 = J(Y + l l sin α) + I( cos α) 2 2 (2. let us develop the position vector of its centre of gravity G1 .247) Its first derivative provide us with the absolute velocity of the centre of gravity. l l ˙ ˙ ˙ rG1 = J(Y + α cos α) + I(− α sin α) ˙ 2 2 Hence.

255) (2. the total potential energy is 1 1 l V = Vs + Vg = k2 (y2 − Y − l sin α)2 + k3 (−y3 + Y + l sin α)2 − mg cos α (2. The free body diagrams are shown in Fig.252) .250) the total kinetic energy of the whole system is 1 ˙ 1 1 1 1 1 ˙ ˙ T = T1 +T2 +T3 = mY 2 + mlY α cos α+ ml2 α2 + IG1 α2 + m2 y2 + m3 y3 (2.251 and 2. C = 0.254 into equations 2.246 one can get the required equation in the following matrix form.251) ˙ ˙ ˙2 ˙2 2 2 8 2 2 2 The potential energy of the springs 4 is 1 1 Vs = k2 (y2 − Y − l sin α)2 + k3 (−y3 + Y + l sin α)2 2 2 The potential energy due to gravitation is l Vg = −mgrG1Y = −mg cos α 2 Hence. 58 (2.253) (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 148 Since the kinetic energy of the blocks 2 and 3 is as follows 1 T2 = m2 y2 ˙2 2 1 T3 = m3 y3 ˙2 2 (2.256) F = k2 Y k3 a y3 k3 Y ⎡ To verify the above equations of motion let us employ the Newton-Euler method for modeling of the system considered.254) 2 2 2 Introducing the expressions 2. K = ⎣ −k2 l k2 0 ⎦ M = ⎣ 0 k3 0 0 m3 −k3 l ⎤ ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ 1 ⎡ 1 ⎡ ¨ α + 2 mlaω2 − a (k2 l + k3 l) − 2 mY − (k2 l + k3 l) Y ⎦ . M¨ + Cx + Kx = F cos ωt x ˙ where ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ 1 0 mgl + k2 l2 + k3 l2 −k2 l −k3 l IG + 1 ml2 0 4 2 0 m2 0 ⎦ . x = ⎣ y2 ⎦ ⎦=⎣ ⎣ k2 a (2.

247.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 149 Y RAX 5 A RAY Y 1 l 3 G1 y3 y2 G1 2 α B R3Y 4 R3Y R2Y R2Y X Figure 58 For the rod one can produce the following two equations 1 ¨ IG α = − RAY l + 2 maG1Y = RAY + R2Y 1 1 R2Y l + R3Y l 2 2 + R3Y (2.261) (2.257 gives 1 ¨ IG α = − lmaG1Y + R2Y l + R3Y l 2 (2. It can be obtained by differentiation of the absolute velocity vector 2.258) RAY = maG1Y − R2Y − R3Y Introduction of the above expression into the first equation of 2.260) (2.262) .259) In the latest equation aG1Y stands for the component Y of the absolute acceleration of the centre of gravity G1 .257) The second equation can be used for determination of the unknown interaction force RAY . (2. l l l l ¨ ¨G1 = J(Y + α cos α − α2 sin α) + I(− α sin α − α2 cos α) r ¨ ˙ ¨ ˙ 2 2 2 2 Hence After linearization l l ¨ ¨ ˙ aG1Y = Y + α cos α − α2 sin α 2 2 l ¨ aG1Y = Y + α ¨ 2 (2.

265) (2.270) (2.272) . the governing equations are 1 1 ¨ (IG + ml2 )¨ + k2 l2 α + k3 l2 α − k2 ly2 − k3 ly3 = − lmY − k2 lY − k3 lY α 4 2 m2 y2 + k2 y2 − k2 lα = k2 Y ¨ (2. M¨ + Kx = F cos ωt x (2.271) (2.ANALYSIS OF MULTI-DEGREE-OF-FREEDOM SYSTEM 150 Introduction of 2. R3Y = k3 (y3 − Y − αl) (2.262 into 2.269) (2.263) The interaction forces between the rod and the springs are can be expressed as follows R2Y = k2 (y2 − Y − αl). It can be predicted as x = A cos ωt Introducing it into the equation of motion we have (−ω 2 M + K)A = F The wanted vector of the amplitudes of the system forced vibrations is ⎤ ⎡ Aα A =(−ω2 M + K)−1 F = ⎣ Ay2 ⎦ Ay3 (2.263 one can obtain 1 1 ¨ (IG + ml2 )¨ + k2 l2 α + k3 l2 α − k2 ly2 − k3 ly3 = − lmY − k2 lY − k3 lY α 4 2 The Newton’s law if apply to the blocks 2 and 3 yields m2 y2 = −R2Y ¨ m3 y3 = −R3Y ¨ Since the interaction forces are defined by 2.268) ¨ m3 y3 + k3 y3 + k3 lα = k3 Y They are identical with 2.264 we have ¨ m2 y2 + k2 y2 − k2 lα = k2 Y ¨ m3 y3 + k3 y3 + k3 lα = k3 Y Hence.264) Introducing them into equation 2.255.266) (2.267) The amplitudes of the forced vibration could be obtained from the particular solution of the above equation.259 results in the following equation l 1 ¨ IG α = − lm(Y + α) + R2Y l + R3Y l ¨ ¨ 2 2 (2.

3 ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 2. RAY 2. 59). They are distributed along. 1 U1 2 ω B A m1 U2 ϕ1 ωt F2 Ui1 m2 ϕ2 ωt B A Ui2 Ui x2 F1 x1 Figure 59 In a general case. due to the limited accuracy of manufacturing. line B − B.1 Balancing of rotors Let us consider a rigid rotor that rotates with an angular velocity ω about the axis A − A (see Fig. the interaction force RAY can be produced as an explicit function of time from 2.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 151 Now.258 = maG1Y − R2Y − R3Y ¶ µ l ¨ ¨ = m Y + α − k2 (y2 − Y − αl) − k3 (y3 − Y − αl) 2 µ ¶ l 2 2 = m −aω − Aα ω cos ωt + (2.273) 2 −k (A − a − Aα l) cos ωt − k3 (Ay3 − a − Aα l) cos ωt ¶ ¶ µ 2 µ y2 l 2 = m −a − Aα ω − k2 (Ay2 − a − Aα l) − k3 (Ay3 − a − Aα l) cos ωt 2 = |RAY | cos ωt ¯ ¡ ¯ ¢ l where |RAY | = ¯m −a − 2 Aα ω2 − k2 (Ay2 − a − Aα l) − k3 (Ay3 − a − Aα l)¯ is the amplitude of the interaction force. usually unknown. Each of this forces can be replaced by two forces Ui1 and Ui2 acting in . Its follows that due to rotation of this body at each cross-section i there exists the centrifugal force Ui (see Fig.3. the centres of gravity of the individual cross-sections do not have to coincide with this axis of rotation. 59).

denoted in Fig. 1 2 x1 5 3 3 x3 1 2 x2 x4 4 4 ωt x1 ϕ1 ωt ωt U 1o U1 x2 t U2o ωt ϕ2 U2 a4 a 4o β3 a 3o a3 x3 β3 β4 ωt x3 ωt Figure 60 Let us consider the rotating machine shown in Fig.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 152 two arbitrarily chosen planes. 60 by nubers 1 and 2. Hence. one can eliminate this unbalance of the rotor by means of two weights of mass m1 and m2 attached at such a position that the centrifugal forces F1 and F2 balance the resultant forces U1 and U2 . The second approach for balancing rotors is consider in this section. These two arbitrarily chosen planes. The process of searching for magnitude of the unbalance forces U1 and U2 and their phases ϕ1 and ϕ2 is called balancing. Each of them is perpendicular to the axis of rotation. therefore their resultants U1 and U2 are perpendicular to the axis of rotation too. According to the above discussion. the unbalance forces can be represented by forces U1 and U2 in two arbitrarily chosen plane. The balancing of a rotor can be performed with help of a specially design machines before it is installed or can be carried out after its installation ’in its own bearings’. 60. if the rotor of this machine can be approximated by a rigid body. are .

which is called key phasor. a4 = a4o eiβ 4 . These unbalance forces excite vibrations of this machine. This mark. creates a timing reference mark on the rotor. there are numerous practical considerations for proper selection. ϕ2 ) and the phases of the recorded displacements (β 1 . Let us arrange for these vibrations to be recorded in two arbitrarily chosen planes. are called measurement planes. For long rotors. The transducer 5. the balancing planes should be chosen as far apart as possible.274) R41 (iω) R42 (iω) a4 U2 where a3 = a3o eiβ 3 . for example. U2 = U2o eiϕ2 (2. Test (1) 3 1 2 4 µ (1) m (1) U o (1) U (1) ϕ (1) ωt x1 ϕ1 ωt U 1o U1 x2 U2o ωt ϕ2 U2 a (1) 4o a (1) 4 (1) β4 β3 (1) (1) a 3o a3 x3 (1) ωt ωt Figure 61 . ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ¸∙ a3 R31 (iω) R32 (iω) U1 = (2. these plane should offer an easy access and allow additional weights to be attached. 60 by N. In order to identify the transfer functions two additional tests are required.j (iω) would be known. Let a3 and a4 be the complex displacements measured in the measurement plasen along the coordinates x3 and x4 with help of the two transducers 3 and 4.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 153 called balancing plane.275) If the transfer functions Ri. β 2 ) to be measured. Furthermore. allows the phases of the unbalance forces (ϕ1 . shown in Fig. Although the selection of the balancing planes is arbitrary. The equation 2. this relation would allow the unknow magnitudes of the unbalance as well as their phases to be determined.96 offers the relationship between the unknown unbalance forces U1 and U2 and the measured displacements a3 and a4 . These planes. U1 = U1o eiϕ1 . marked in Fig. 60 by numbers 3 and 4.

There is the following . The amplitude of this force U (1) is (1) Uo = m(1) µ(1) ω2 (2.276) The response of the system is recorded in both measurment planes so the amplitudes (1) (1) (1) (1) a3o and a4o as well as the phases β 3 and β 4 can be obtained.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 154 An additionl trial weight of mass m(1) (see Fig 61) is attached in the balancing plane 1 at the known (with respect to the key phasor’s mark) phase ϕ(1) and the know distance µ(1) .278) (1) 3 1 2 4 µ (2) m (2) Uo (2) U (2) ϕ (2) ωt x1 ϕ1 ωt U 1o U1 x2 U2o ωt ϕ2 U2 a (2) 4o a (2) 4 (2) β4 β3 (2) (2) a 3o a3 x3 (2) ωt ωt Figure 62 An additional trial weight of mass m(2) (see Fig 62) is attached in the balancing plane 2 at the known (with respect to the key phasor’s mark) phase ϕ(2) and the know distance µ(2) . The system is now excited by both the residual unbalance forces (U1 and U2 ) and the centrifugal force produced by the trial weight U (1) . U2 = U2o eiϕ2 .279) The response of the system is recorded in both measurement planes so the amplitudes (2) (2) (2) (2) a3o and a4o as well as the phases β 3 and β 4 can be obtained.277) (1) R41 (iω) R42 (iω) U2 a4 a3 = a3o eiβ 3 . (1) U (1) = Uo eiϕ (2. # ∙ " ¸∙ ¸ (1) R31 (iω) R32 (iω) a3 U1 + U (1) = (2. (1) (1) (1) U1 = U1o eiϕ1 . The amplitude of this force U (2) is (2) Uo = m(2) µ(2) ω2 (2. The system is now excited by both the residual unbalance forces (U1 and U2 ) and the centrifugal force produced by the trial weight U (2) . There is the following relationship between the measured parameters and the transfer functions. Test (2) (1) (1) (1) a4 = a4o eiβ 4 .

285) R41 (iω) R42 (iω) U2 a4o eiβ 4 U2o eiϕ2 . 2. # ∙ " ¸∙ ¸ (2) U1 R31 (iω) R32 (iω) a3 = (2) R41 (iω) R42 (iω) U2 + U (2) a4 a3 = a3o eiβ 3 . ¸−1 ∙ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ U1 R31 (iω) R32 (iω) a3o eiβ 3 U1o eiϕ1 = = (2.277 # ∙ Ã" ¸ µ∙ ¸! ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸¶ (1) a3 R31 (iω) R32 (iω) U1 a3 U1 + U (1) − = − (1) R41 (iω) R42 (iω) a4 U2 U2 a4 a4 = a4o eiβ 4 .274 from 2. U2 = U2o eiϕ2 . if one subtracts equations 2.274 ¸−1 ∙ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ U1 R31 (iω) R32 (iω) a3 = (2. To achieve that let us subtract the equations 2. (2) (2) (2) (2.280 one can get a − a3 a eiβ 3 − a3o eiβ 3 R32 (iω) = 3 (2) = 3o (2) (2) U Uo eiϕ a − a4 a eiβ 4 − a4o eiβ 4 R42 (iω) = 4 (2) = 4o (2) (2) U Uo eiϕ (2) (2) (2) (2) (2) (2) (2.281) The formulated equations 2.274. the wanted complex imbalances U1 and U2 in the plane 1 and 2 may be computed from the equation 2.283) Now.274 from 2.280 allow the unknown transfer functions and the wanted unbalances U1 and U2 to be computed.282) Similarly. " # ∙ ¸ ∙ (1) ¸ (1) R31 (iω) R32 (iω) a3 − a3 U = (1) R41 (iω) R42 (iω) 0 a4 − a4 " # ∙ ¸ (1) a3 − a3 R31 (iω)U (1) = (1) R41 (iω)U (1) a4 − a4 a − a3 a eiβ 3 − a3o eiβ 3 R31 (iω) = 3 (1) = 3o (1) (1) U Uo eiϕ a − a4 a eiβ 4 − a4o eiβ 4 R41 (iω) = 4 (1) = 4o (1) (1) U Uo eiϕ (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (1) (2.284) R41 (iω) R42 (iω) U2 a4 where a3 and a4 represent the know response of the system without the additional weights.280) (2) (2) U (2) = Uo eiϕ (2. (2) (2) (2) U1 = U1o eiϕ1 .ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 155 relationship between the measured parameters and the transfer functions.277 and 2.

287) x1 5 3 3 x3 1 2 x2 4 x4 4 m1 r1 β1 ϕ1 U1o U1 m2 r2 β2 U2o ωt x1 ωt ωt x2 ϕ2 U2 Figure 63 . to balance the rotor. 63) β 1 = 180o + ϕ1 β 2 = 180o + ϕ2 1 2 (2. should be place at angular position (see Fig.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 156 The amplitudes U1o and U2o determine the weights m1 and m2 that should be attached in the balancing planes m1 = m2 U1 r1 ω 2 U2 = r2 ω 2 (2.286) These weights.

¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ .0001 m . 64b).mass of rotor of the ventilator K = 9000000 N/m . Vibration of this ventilator are due to the imbalance u if its rotor.291) M 100 allows the amplitude of the forced vibrations of the ventilator A to be predicted.0001 = .290) x + ω 2 x = q cos ωt ¨ n u 2 0.2 Dynamic absorber of vibrations Let us consider vibration of the ventilator shown in Fig.distance between the axis of rotation and the centre of gravity u = mr µ = 20 · . as a function of the angular speed of the rotor is shown in Fig. a) mr µ ω 2 cosω t x mr µ ω 2 b) x µ ωt mr µ ω 2 cosω t K mr M M Figure 64 Let us assume that the system has the following parameters: M = 100 kg .288) ωn = M 100 Hence.total mass of the ventilator mr = 20 kg .stiffness of the supporting beam ω = 314 rad/s the ventilator’s operating speed µ = .00 2 kgm .0000 2ω 2 ¯ ¯ q ¯=¯ ¯ ¯ (2.292) A=¯ 2 ω n − ω2 ¯ ¯ 3002 − ω 2 ¯ Its values.002 2 ω = ω = .imbalance of the rotor The natural frequency of the system is r r K 9000000 = = 300 (2.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 157 2.0000 2ω 2 q= (2.289) (2. 65 . within the range of the rotor angular speed 0 < ω < 500 the system can be approximated by system with one degree of freedom. The following mathematical model M x + Kx = mr µω2 cos ωt ¨ (2. Its physical model is shown in Fig. 64a).3.

293) . Such a solution is not acceptable. elastic element of stiffness k and damper of the damping coefficient c. results in the following mathematical model.0001 A1[m] 0 100 200 300 400 ω[ 1/s] Figure 65 As it can be seen from this diagram. One of a possible way of reducing these vibration is to furnish the ventilator with the absorber of vibration shown in fig 66 a) mr µ ω 2 cosω t x b) x µ ωt mr µ ω 2 mr µ ω 2 cosω t K mr M k y k c m m y M c Figure 66 It comprises block of mass m. M x + (K + k)x − ky + cx − cy = uω2 cosωt ¨ ˙ ˙ m¨ − kx + ky − cx + cy = 0 y ˙ ˙ (2. the ventilator develops large vibration in vicinity of its working speed ω = 314 rad/s and has to pass the critical speed during the run up. Application of the Newton’s .Euler’s method.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 158 0.

67: Remarkable results we are getting if parameters k and m of the absorber fulfill the following relationship r k = ω = 314 (2. 4649 × 106 N/m Introduction of this data into equation 2.295) uω 2 cos ωt + iuω 2 sin ωt uω e uω 2 iωt = = = e 0 0 0 Introducing notations ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ M 0 +c −c m= . 46 0. representing vibrations of the ventilator.301) . ¸ ∙ A1 = A= A2 ¯µ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ¶−1 ∙ ¸¯ ¯ ¯ 100 0 0 0 11.300 k = mω 2 = 25 · 3142 = 2.300) m To show it let us assume m = 25 kg and compute the value of the stiffness k from the formula 2.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 159 Its matrix form is ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ uω 2 cos ωt x K + k −k x ˙ +c −c x ¨ M 0 = + + y −k +k y ˙ −c +c y ¨ 0 m 0 (2.299) A = ¯(−ω2 m+iωc + k)−1 q¯ Amplitude A1 . c= . 46 2.297) ∙ K + k −k −k +k ¸ ∙ uω2 0 ¸ ∙ x y ¸ k= . q= .002 · ω2 ¯ ¯ + iω + 106 ¯ −ω2 ¯ 0 25 0 0 −2.5 −2. x= (2. 46 0 ¯ ¯ (2.298) (2. 0 m −c +c The above equations takes form m¨ + cx + kx = qeiωt x ˙ If one predicts the particular solution as x = Aeiωt (2.297 one obtains the formula for the amplitude of the forced vibration ¯ ¯ (2. as a function of the angular speed of its rotor is presented in Fig.294) To analyze the forced vibrations let us introduce the complex excitation ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ M 0 x ¨ +c −c x ˙ K + k −k x + + = 0 m y ¨ −c +c ˙ ∙ ¸ ∙y 2 iωt −k ∙ +k ¸ y ¸ (2.296) and than introduces it into the equation 2.299 and the zero damping results in the following response A1 and A2 of the system along the coordinates x and y respectively.

00004 m.0001 A1[m] 0 100 200 300 400 ω[1/s] Figure 67 One can notice that the amplitude of vibration for the working speed ω = 314 rad/s is equal to zero. If the damping tends to infinity. ∙ ¸ A1 = A2 ¸ ¸ ∙ ¸ ¸ ∙ ¶−1 ∙ ∙ µ c c 100 0 0. It can be noticed. But the ventilator still has to pass resonance in vicinity of ω = 240 rad/s. .5 −2. computed according to the formula 2.002 · ω2 11.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 160 0. 46 2. Damping coefficient lager then 5000 results in increment of the amplitude of the ventilator’s forced vibrations. that by increasing the damping coefficient c one can lower amplitude of vibrations in all region of frequency. To improve the dynamic response. The amplitude is less than 0. The best results of attenuation of vibrations can be achieved if the two local maxima are equal to each other.302) The amplitudes of the forced vibration of the ventilator for different values of the damping coefficient c.302 are collected in the Table 1. 46 0 (2. This case is shown in the last raw of the table 1. 46 2 3 6 10 + + iω 10 = −ω c c 0 25 −2. Application of the absorber of vibrations offers a safe operation in region of the angular speed 0 < ω < 500 rad/s. let us analyze the influence of the damping coefficient c. The relative motion is ceased and the system behaves like the undamped system with one degree of freedom.

0001 m = 25 k = 2.0001 m = 25 k = 2.0001 m = 25 k = 1. Table 1 0. 46 × 106 c=0 A1[m] 0 100 200 300 400 ω[1/s] 0. 46 × 106 c = 5000 A1[m] 0 0 100 200 300 400 ω[1/s ] 0. 46 × 106 c = 1000 A1[m] 0 0 100 200 300 400 ω[1/s] 0.0001 m = 25 k = 2.ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS 161 .0001 m = 25 k = 2. 46 × 106 c = 2500 A1[m] 0 0 100 200 300 400 ω[1/s] 0.75 × 106 c = 5000 A1[m] 0 0 100 200 300 400 ω[1/s] .

1 Modelling of strings.1) The free body diagram of this element is shown in Fig. t) ∂y(z. t) ∂ 2 y(z. t) that in a general case can be a function of time t and the position z. 1. ρ (z) T z ∂ y(z. 1 A(z) stands for area of cross-section of the string and (z) is its density. Motion of the string is caused by the unit vertical load f (z. In the Fig.1 MODELLING OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 3. t) +T + = −T dz + f (z.2) dm ∂t2 ∂z ∂z ∂z 2 .t) T y(z.t) z dz T A(z). According to the second Newton’s law µ ¶ ∂y(z. Let us consider element dz of the sting. Its position is determined by the coordinate z and its mass dm is dm = A(z) (z)dz (3.1. t) ∂ 2 y(z. t)dz (3. It is assumed that the tensile force T is large enough to neglect its variations due to small motion of the string around its equilibrium position.t) ∂z ∂ y(z. 1).t) + ∂ y(z.Chapter 3 VIBRATION OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 3. rods and shafts Modelling of stings f(z.t) dz ∂z ∂ z2 2 y Figure 1 Strings are elastic elements that are subjected to tensile forces (see Fig.

t)dz ∂t2 ∂z 2 (3.t) F(z. ρ (z) F(z.2 and its simplification yields A(z) (z) ∂ 2 y(z. t) − λ2 = q(z. 3. t) = f (z.t) F(z. t) − = 2 2 ∂t A(z) (z) ∂z A(z) (z) (3. t) ∂ 2 y(z. t) T f (z.6) f(z. 3.3) If one divide this equation by A(z) (z)dz it takes form ∂ 2 y(z. t) dz − T dz = f (z.t) dz ∂z z Figure 2 . t) A (3.t) dz ∂z y(z. A(z). t) ∂t2 ∂z 2 where λ2 = Modelling of rods T . A q(z.t) + ∂ F(z. t) ∂ 2 y(z.t) z F(z.4) If the string is uniform ( A and ρ are independent of z ) the equation of motion is ∂ 2 y(z.5) (3.t) + ∂ F(z.t) F(z.t) z dz dz E(z).MODELLING OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 163 Introduction of Eq. t) ∂ 2 y(z.1 into Eq.

dm ∂ 2 y(z. in a general case.7) The axial force F (z.7 one may obtain µ ¶ ∂ 2 y(z. t) −λ = q(z.MODELLING OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 164 Rods are elastic elements that are subjected to the axial forces. Let us consider the highlighted in Fig.12) where λ2 = E . t) is related to the elongation of the element by Hooke’s law F (z. Application of the second Newton’s law to the free body diagram of the element yields. t) = A(z)E(z) ∂y(z. Let as consider a rod of the cross-section A(z). t) + F (z. t)dz = −F (z. t) ∂ A(z) (z) A(z)E(z) = f (z. t) ∂F (z. t) ∂z (3. 2 element dz. Motion of the rod is excited by the axial force f (z. t) A (3.9) (3. t)dz − ∂t2 ∂z ∂z Since mass of the element is dm = A(z) (z)dz the equation of motion of the element is µ ¶ ∂ 2 y(z. t) ∂y(z.10) (3. t) ∂y(z. t) − ∂t2 ∂z ∂z If the rod is uniform ( A. are constant) one can get 2 ∂ 2 y(z. t) ∂ dm A(z)E(z) dz = f (z.8) Upon introducing the above expression into Eq. t) = f (z. t). Its instantaneous position is determined by the displacement y(z. t) + ∂t2 ∂z (3.t) dz ∂z dz = A(z)E(z) ∂y(z. t) 2 ∂ y(z. t) ∂t2 ∂z 2 (3. t) dz + f (z. 3. can be a function of position z and time t. E. t) that. Young’s modulus E(z) and the density (z).11) (3. q(z.13) .

t) dz ∂z ϕ (z. A(z). The angular position at the distance z + dz is by the total differential ∂ϕ(z.t) z dz T(z. t) ∂T (z. t) + dz + τ (z.15) . t) = −T (z.14) A A Owning to the generalized Newton’s law we can write the following equation dI ∂ 2 ϕ(z.t) dz greater. t) + T (z.t) ϕ (z.t) ϕ ϕ (z.t) + ∂ (z. the cross-section area A(z) and the second moment of area J(z).t) τ (z.t) z T(z. Due to the moment τ (z. the density (z). t) is distributed along the axis z and is a function of time t (see Fig. t). t). Let us consider the element dz of the shaft. Its moment of inertia ∂z about the axis z is Z Z 2 dI = r dA (z)dz = (z)dz r2 dA = J(z) (z)dz (3. ρ (z) ϕ (z. 3).t) dz ∂z z Figure 3 Shafts are elastic elements that are subjected to torques. Let us assume that the torque τ (z. The shaft has the shear modulus G(z).MODELLING OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 165 Modelling of shafts G(z).t) + ∂ T(z. t)dz ∂t2 ∂z (3. the shaft performs the torsional vibrations and the instantaneous angular position of the cross-section at z is ϕ(z. J(z).

3. 3. t) J(z) (z) = τ (z. t)dz dz = ∂z G(z)J(z) into Eq. The equation of motion of the beam in the z direction is dm ∂ 2 y(z.23) V (z. t) and the deflection ϕ(z. t) ∂ ∂ 2 ϕ(z. t) (3. The beam performs vibrations due to the external distributed unit load f (z. t) + dz = 0 V (z. t) −λ = q(z. cross-section A(z). t) = τ (z. t) = τ (z. t) ∂ϕ(z. t) ∂V (z. t) dz dz + M(z. ∂M(z.24) . t) 2 ∂ ϕ(z. t) (3.2 Modelling of beams Beams are elastic elements that are subjected to lateral loads (forces or moments that have their vectors perpendicular to the centre line of a beam). t) − V (z. t)dz ∂t2 ∂z (3.17) (3.19) where λ2 = G . t) dz ∂M(z. t) J (3. t) T (z. t) + 2 ∂z 2 ∂z (3. t) + V (z. t) − dz + f (z. t). the equation of motion takes form. t) − G(z)J(z) J(z) (z) ∂t2 ∂z ∂z If J(z).21) If one neglect the inertia moment associated with rotation of the element dz. The instantaneous position of the element dz is highlighted in Fig.14 and an elementary simplification the equation 3. 2 ∂ 2 ϕ(z. 4. q(z. t) ∂T (z. t) = ∂z Since mass of the element dz is dm = A(z) (z)dz (3.1. t) ∂t2 ∂z 2 (3.16 we are getting µ ¶ ∂ϕ(z. sum of the moments about the point G has to be equal to zero µ ¶ µ ¶ ∂V (z. t) = +V (z.22) Simplification of the above equation and omission of the terms of order higher then one with respect to dz. t) − M(z.15 takes form ∂ 2 ϕ(z. Let us consider a beam of the second moment of area J(z). yields the relationship between the bending moment M and the shearing force V.16) − ∂t2 ∂z If we introduce the relationship between the torque T (z.18) (3. (z) and G(z) are constant.MODELLING OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 166 After introduction of Eq. density (z) and the Young’s modulus E(z).20) 3.

t) y(z.t) + ∂ V(z. t) ∂2 A(z) (z) = f (z. t) ∂t2 ∂z 4 where λ2 = EJ . t). t) and the bending moment M(z. ∂ 2 y(z. t) (3.t)+ ∂ ∂z E(z). t) A (3.J(z). t) ∂M 2 (z.t) z f(z.t) M(z.t)dz M(z. one can get the equation of motion in the following form ∂ 2 y(z.25) ∂t2 ∂z 2 The mechanics of solids offers the following relationship between the deflection of the beam y(z.t) dz/2 z y Figure 4 and taking into account Eq.t) dz ∂z M(z. t) = E(z)J(z) If the following parameters of the beam A. t) ∂ 4 y(z.26) V(z. motion of the ∂ 2 y(z. A q(z. 3. t) ∂ 2 y(z.23. t) + λ2 = q(z. t) + 2 E(z)J(z) ∂t2 ∂z ∂z 2 M(z. t) ∂z 2 Introduction of equation 3. t) A(z) (z) + = f (z. A(z).MODELLING OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 167 f(z.28) (3. E and beam is governed by the following equation (3.25 yields µ ¶ ∂ 2 y(z. J.29) .27) are constant.ρ (z) dz (3. t) = f (z.t) G V(z.26 into equation 3.

One of them is a function of the position z and the other one is a function of time t. In this case the governing equation ∂ 2 y(z. the equation 3.natural frequencies and natural modes Let us predict the particular solution of the above equation in a form of the product of two functions. Therefore. is sum of the general solution of the homogeneous equation and the particular solution of the non-homogeneous equation. If the external excitation q(z.30) is classified as linear partial differential equation of two variables ( z and t ) with constant coefficients ( λ2 ).32 into equation 3.33) for strings for rods (3.2. t) ∂ 2 y(z.35) (3.37) (3.36) ωn λ (3. a function of two variables. The general solution.34) (3.31 yields the following ordinary differential equation −ω 2 Y (z) − λ2 Y II (z) = 0 n or Y II (z) + β 2 Y (z) = 0 n where βn = The general solution of this equation is Yn (z) = Sn sin β n z + Cn cos β n z where β n = ωn r A T r (3.30 describes the free vibration of the system due to a non-zero initial excitation determined by the initial conditions. y(z. t) − λ2 =0 (3.31) ∂t2 ∂z 2 Boundary conditions . rods and shafts are described by the same mathematical model. its analysis can be discussed simultaneously.30 ∂ 2 y(z.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 168 3. t) ∂ 2 y(z. t) − λ2 = q(z. t) = Y (z) sin ω n t (3.32) Introduction of the predicted solution 3. 3.1 Free vibration of strings. vibrations of strings. t) ∂t2 ∂z 2 (3. 3.38) β n = ωn E . t) = 0. rods and shafts The free vibrations (natural vibrations) are governed by the homogeneous equation of Eq.2 ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS As could be seen from the previous section. The strict solution can be produced only if parameters of the system considered are constant.

Some of the boundary conditions for strings. r G for shafts (3.39) .ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 169 β n = ωn The values for the parameter β n as well as the constants Sn and Cn should be chosen to fulfill the boundary conditions. rods and shafts are shown in the following table.

1 z l y string for for z = 0 Yn = 0 z = l Yn = 0 z l free-free rod for for I z = 0 F = AEYn = 0 I z = l F = AEYn = 0 z l fixed-free rod for for z = 0 Yn = 0 I z = l F = AEYn = 0 k z l fixed-elasticaly supported rod for for z = 0 Yn = 0 I z = l F = AEYn = −kYn z l fixed-fixed rod for for z = 0 Yn = 0 z = l Yn = 0 z l free-free shaft for for I z = 0 T = GJYn = 0 I z = l T = GJYn = 0 z l fixed free shaft for for z=0 z=l Yn = 0 I T = GJYn = 0 z l fixed-fixed shaft for for z=0 z=l Yn = 0 Yn = 0 .ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 170 Table 3.

If one choose arbitrarily Sn .42) = sin β n l cos β n l 0 Cn This set of equations has non-zero solutions if and only if its characteristic determinant is equal to zero. according to 3. according to the first equation of the set 3.∞ (3. A few first of them are shown in Fig. Since β n and l are always positive. ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 ¯ 1 ¯ ¯ (3.. results in a set of two homogeneous algebraic equations linear with respect to the constants Sn and Cn . 2. The above analysis allows to conclude that a continuous system possesses infinite number of the natural frequencies and infinite number of the corresponding natural modes..36..say Sn = 1..36.41 becomes linearly dependant and one of the constants can be chosen arbitrarily..∞ (3..ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 171 To demonstrate the way of the determination of the natural frequencies and the corresponding natural modes.... 5 ..44) This equation is called characteristic equation and has infinite number of solution..∞ (3. only positive roots of the above equation has the physical meaning π 2π nπ β1 = . . let us consider the fixed on both ends shaft (last row of the above Table). in the case considered is nπ Yn (z) = sin β n z = sin z n = 1. ....41. For this case the boundary conditions are for for z = 0 z = l Yn = 0 Yn = 0 (3. in this particular case we have sin β n l = 0 (3.47) l The functions Yn (z)are called eigenfunctions or natural modes and the corresponding roots ω n are called eigenvalues or natural frequencies.39 one can compute the natural frequencies to be p β n = ωn G s s G nπ G = n = 1.. .. In the case of free vibrations of the shaft. The first mode is called fundamental mode and the corresponding frequency is called fundamental natural frequency.... the natural modes determine the angular positions of the cross-section of the shaft ϕ(z).40) Introduction of this boundary conditions into the solution 3. Cn has to be equal to 0..46) ωn = β n l For each of this natural frequencies the set of equations 3.. 2..41) ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ 0 1 Sn 0 (3. β2 = . n = 1.43) ¯ sin β n l cos β n l ¯ = 0 Hence. .... . Therefore we can conclude that the predicted solution. β n = .. 0 = 0 · Sn + 1 · Cn 0 = (sin β n l)Sn + (cos β n l)Cn Its matrix form is ∙ (3. 2.45) l l l Taking advantage of equation 3.

6 0.52) .48 by Yj (z) and the equation 3.5 0 0.49) Premultiplying the equation 3.2 0.49 by Yi (z) and then integrating them side by side one can get Z l Z l 2 2 ωi Yi (z)Yj (z)dz + λ YiII (z)Yj (z)dz = 0 0 0 Z l Z l ω2 Yj (z)Yi (z)dz + λ2 YjII (z)Yi (z)dz = 0 (3.8 z 1 -0.4 0.51) j 0 0 Substraction of the second equation from the first one yields Z ³¡ ¡ 2 ¢¯l ¡ I ¢¯ ´ ¢ l 2 2 I ¯ − YJ (z)Yi (z) ¯l = 0 ωi − ωj Yi (z)Yj (z) 0 Yj (z)Yi (z)dz + λ 0 0 (3.33 −ω 2 Y (z) − λ2 Y II (z) = 0 n Hence −ω 2 Yi (z) − λ2 YiII (z) = 0 i 2 −ω j Yj (z) − λ2 YjII (z) = 0 (3.5 z l=1 -1 Figure 5 Orthogonality of the natural modes Let us consider two arbitrarily chosen natural modes Yi (z) and Yj (z).50) j 0 0 The second integrals can be integrated by parts. Both of them must fulfill the equation 3. Hence Z l Z l ³ ¯l ´ 2 2 I ¯ − λ2 ωi Yi (z)Yj (z)dz + λ Yi (z)Yj (z) 0 YiI (z)YjI (z)dz = 0 0 0 Z l Z l ³ ´ ¯l ω2 Yj (z)Yi (z)dz + λ2 YJI (z)Yi (z)¯0 − λ2 YiI (z)YjI (z)dz = 0 (3.48) (3.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 172 1 ϕ (z) 0.

.∞ (3.32 one of the particular solution of the equation 3.56) Since the equation 3. to fulfill initial conditions we need second set of linearly independent solution.58) This solution has to fulfill the initial conditions.31 can be adopted in the following form y(z. t) = Yn (z) sin ωn t n = 1. 2. yn (z. This operation results in the following two equations. 2..54) 0 The above property of the eigenfunctions is called orthogonality condition. t) = ∞ X n=1 Sn Yn (z) sin ω n t + Cn Yn (z) cos ω n t (3..31 eventually may be adopted in the following form..58 into the above initial conditions. 3. It the same manner as it was done in the previous section one may prove that the following functions form the required linearly independent set of solution. t) = Y (z) sin ω n t (3. 0) = Y0 (z) y(z.53) Hence.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 173 It is easy to show that for any boundary conditions the second expression is equal to zero ¡ I ¢¯l ¡ ¢¯l Yi (z)Yj (z) ¯0 − YJI (z)Yi (z) ¯0 = YiI (l)Yj (l)−YiI (0)Yj (0)−YJI (l)Yi (l)+YJI (0)Yi (0) = 0 (3. yn (z. y(z.57) Hence.31 is of second order with respect to time. General solution of the homogeneous equation According to 3. Y0 (z) = V0 (z) = ∞ X n=1 ∞ X n=1 Cn Yn (z) Sn ωn Yn (z) (3. The initial conditions determine the initial position Y0 (z) and the initial velocity V0 (z) of the system considered for the time t equal to zero.55) At this stage of consideration the function Y (z) is known and we are able to produce infinite number of such particular solutions. the general solution of the equation 3. t) = Yn (z) cos ωn t n = 1..60) .. ∂ y(z. 3.∞ (3. Z l Yj (z)Yi (z)dz = 0 (3..59) ∂t To produce the constant Sn and Cn let us introduce the solution 3.. 0) = V0 (z) (3.

54 the wanted constants Sn and Cn are Rl Y0 (z)Yn (z)dz Cn = 0 R l Y 2 (z)dz 0 n Rl 1 0 V0 (z)Yn (z)dz (3. the equation 3.66) .2.64) ∂t2 ∂z 4 This equation can be classified as linear partial differential equation of two variables ( z and t ) with constant coefficients ( λ2 ).65) ∂t2 ∂z 4 Boundary conditions . is sum of the general solution of the homogeneous equation and the particular solution of the non-homogeneous equation. ∂ 2 y(z. t) = Y (z) sin ω n t (3. Its order with respect to time is 2 and with respect to z is equal to 4.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 174 To determine the unknown constants Sn and Cn . t) + λ2 =0 (3. t) ∂ 4 y(z.61) 0 3. t) + λ2 = q(z.62) Sn = Rl 2 ωn Yn (z)dz 0 n=1 ∞ X n=1 0 Sn ω n Z l Yn (z)Ym (z)dz (3. y(z. a function of two variables. t) ∂ 4 y(z. The general solution.64. let us multiply the above equations by Ym (z) and then integrate them side by side Z l ∞ X Z l Y0 (z)Ym (z)dz = Cn Yn (z)Ym (z)dz 0 Z l V0 (z)Ym (z)dz = 0 For the example considered in the previous section the above formulae. t) (3. If the external excitation q(z.47.63) ¢l R ¡ ω n l sin nπ z 2 dz 0 l Taking advantage of the developed orthogonality conditions 3. The free vibrations (natural vibrations) are governed by the homogeneous equation of 3. t) = 0. according to 3.natural frequencies and natural modes Similarly to the analysis of strings and shafts. One of them is a function of the position z and the other is the function of time t.64 describes the free vibration of the beam due to a non-zero initial conditions. take form Rl Y (z) sin nπ zdz 0 0 Cn = R l ¡ ¢l2 nπ sin l z dz 0 Rl 1 0 V0 (z) sin nπ zdz Sn = (3.2 Free vibrations of beams For the uniform beam the equation of motion was derived to be ∂ 2 y(z. let us predict the solution of the above equation in the form of a product of two functions.

ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 175 Introduction of the predicted solution 3.65 yields the following ordinary differential equation −ω 2 Y (z) + λ2 Y IV (z) = 0 n or where Y IV (z) − β 4 Y (z) = 0 n β4 = n (3. 4 Y (z) 1 Y (z) 2 2 Y (z) 3 Y (z) 4 -4 -2 0 2 4 z -2 -4 Figure 6 .74) 2 2 A graphical interpretation of these functions for β n = 1 is given in Fig.73) Introduction of this solution into the equation 3.69) (3.71) (3. 6.68 yields the characteristic equation Alternatively.66 into equation 3. one can choose their combinations as the set of the independent solutions eβ n z − e−β n z eβ n z + e−β n z = sinh β n z Y2 (z) = = cosh β n z Y1 (z) = 2 2 eiβ n z − e−iβ n z eiβ n z + e−iβ n z Y3 (z) = = sin β n z Y2 (z) = = cos β n z (3.72) (3.68) (3. Y2 (z) = e−β n z Y3 (z) = eiβ n z Y1 (z) = e−iβ n z r2 = −β n r3 = iβ n r2 = −iβ n (3.70) (3.67) ω2 Aρ 2 n ω 2 = EJ n λ The standard form of its particular solution is Y (z) = erz r4 = β 4 n Its roots r1 = β n Y1 (z) = eβ n z determine the set of the linearly independent particular solution.

76) I Yn (z) = An β n cosh β n z + Bn β n sinh β n z + Cn β n cos β n z − Dn β n sin β n z (3. Cn and Dn should be chosen to fulfill boundary conditions.68.79) The boundary conditions for some cases of beams are shown in Table 3. Bn . Table 3.2 O l Y z free-free beam O l Y z for for for for for for for for for for for for for for for for z z z z z z z z z z z z z z z z =0 =0 =l =l =0 =0 =l =l =0 =0 =l =l =0 =0 =l =l M(0) = EJY II (0) = 0 V (0) = EJY III (0) = 0 M(l) = EJY II (l) = 0 V (l) = EJY III (l) = 0 Y (0) = 0 Y I (0) = 0 M(l) = EJY II (l) = 0 V (l) = EJY III (l) = 0 Y (0) = 0 M(0) = EJY II (0) = 0 Y (l) = 0 Y I (l) = 0 M(0) = EJY II (0) = 0 V (0) = EJY III (0) = −kY (0) M(l) = EJY II (l) = 0 V (l) = EJY III (l) = +kY (l) fixed-free beam O l Y z pined-fixed beam O k l Y k z elasticaly supported beam .75) Values for the parameter β n as well as for the constants An .77) II Yn (z) = An β 2 sinh β n z + Bn β 2 cosh β n z − Cn β 2 sin β n z − Dn β 2 cos β n z n n n n (3.2. as a linear combination of these particular solutions is Yn (z) = An sinh β n z + Bn cosh β n z + Cn sin β n z + Dn cos β n z (3.78) I Yn (z) = An β 3 cosh β n z + Bn β 3 sinh β n z − Cn β 3 cos β n z = Dn β 3 sin β n z n n n n (3. They involve the function Y (z) and its first three derivatives with respect to z. one has to produce four boundary conditions reflecting the conditions at both ends of the beam. Yn (z) = An sinh β n z + Bn cosh β n z + Cn sin β n z + Dn cos β n z (3.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 176 The general solution of the equation 3. Since this equation is of fourth order.

Modes corresponding to the non-zero roots can be produced according to the following procedure. This condition forms the characteristic equation ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 ¯ 1 0 −1 ¯ ¯ ¯ 1 ¯ 0 −1 0 ¯ ¯ (3. since its characteristic determinant is zero.. Since the beam considered is free-free in space. third and fourth equation we are getting ⎤⎡ ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ Bn 0 −1 0 1 ⎣ cosh β n l − sin β n l − cos β n l ⎦ ⎣ Cn ⎦ = − ⎣ sinh β n l ⎦ An sinh β n l − cos β n l sin β n l cosh β n l Dn ⎡ (3. this root is associated with the possible translation and rotation of the beam as a rigid body. Solution of this equation. (3. the characteristic equation has double root of zero magnitude.84) Introduction of the functions 3.79 into the above boundary conditions results in the following set of algebraic equations that are linear with respect to the constants An . For any root of the characteristic equation the set of equations 3. within a limited range of the parameter β n l is shown in Fig. after simplification.73 β 2 l = 7. Cn and Dn .85) .83) This characteristic equation is transcendental and therefore has infinite number of roots. takes the following form cosh β n l cos β n l − 1 = 0 (3. These two modes.... ⎡ ⎤⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ 0 β2 0 −β 2 0 An n n 3 ⎢ β3 ⎥ ⎢ Bn ⎥ ⎢ 0 ⎥ 0 −β n 0 ⎢ n ⎥⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎣ β 2 sinh β n l β 2 cosh β n l −β 2 sin β n l −β 2 cos β n l ⎦ ⎣ Cn ⎦ = ⎣ 0 ⎦ (3.. 7 The first few roots are β 0 l = 0 β 1 l = 4. it is possible to choose arbitrarily one of the constants (for example An ) and the other can be obtained from three arbitrarily chosen equations 3.81.78 and 3. becomes linearly dependant. corresponding to the zero root are shown in Fig.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 177 Let us take advantage of the boundary conditions corresponding to the freefree beam in order to determine the natural frequencies and the natural modes..81.. for for for for z z z z =0 =0 =l =l M(0) = EJY II (0) = 0 V (0) = EJY III (0) = 0 M(l) = EJY II (l) = 0 V (l) = EJY III (l) = 0 (3. If we take advantage of the second. 8a) and b).81) n n n n 0 Dn β 3 cosh β n l β 3 sinh β n l −β 3 cos β n l β 3 sin β n l n n n n As one can see from the diagram 7. Bn .82) ¯ sinh β n l cosh β n l − sin β n l − cos β n l ¯ = 0 ¯ ¯ ¯ cosh β n l sinh β n l − cos β n l sin β n l ¯ that..85 β 3 l = 11. Therefore.80) They have a non-zero solution if and only if their characteristic determinant is equal to zero.

s s EJ (β n l)2 EJ ωn = β 2 = (3.0 sinh 4.87) Hence.73 the above set of equations yields values for constants B1 .73 sin 4.73z − 1.73z (3.0177 (3.0 ⎦ cosh 4.89) n Aρ l2 Aρ Eventually.85 and β 3 l = 11 are shown in Fig.69 allows the natural frequencies to be computed. 8c).73 D1 sinh 4.0178 cosh 4.017 8 ⎣ C1 ⎦ = ⎣ cosh 4.73z + 1.90) .ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 178 20 cosh βn l cosβn l -1=0 10 β0 l 0 β1 l 5 β2 l β3 l 10 15 βn l -10 -20 Figure 7 Hence. the corresponding mode.73 1.73 − cos 4.73z + 1. In the same manner one can produce modes for all the other characteristic roots. The formula 3. for An = −1 we have ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤−1 ⎡ ⎤ Bn 0 −1 0 1 ⎣ Cn ⎦ = ⎣ cosh β n l − sin β n l − cos β n l ⎦ ⎣ sinh β n l ⎦ sinh β n l − cos β n l sin β n l cosh β n l Dn (3. taking into account the predicted solution 3. the particular solution is y(z.0177 cos 4. 8d) and e) respectively.75 is Y1 (z) = −1. 3. C1 and D1 ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤−1 ⎡ ⎤ B1 1 0 −1 0 1.73 − cos 4.0 sin 4.88) Its graphical representation is shown in Fig. Modes for β 2 l = 7.73 ⎦ = ⎣ −1.73 ⎦ ⎣ sinh 4.66.73 − sin 4.86) For the first non-zero root β 1 l = 4. according to Eq. t) = Sn Yn (z) sin ω n t (3.

6 0.2 0.8 1 c) 1 Y (z) 1 0 -1 -2 2 1 Y2 (z) 0.8 1 Figure 8 .4 z 0.6 0.6 0.2 0.4 z 0.2 0.8 1 0 -1 -2 2 1 Y0 (z) z b) 0 -1 -2 2 0.4 0.4 z 0.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 179 2 Y0 (z) 1 a) 0.2 0.4 0.8 1 z d) 0 -1 -2 0.6 0.6 0.8 1 2 1 Y3 (z) e) 0 -1 -2 0.2 0.

..73z + 1......91) where is the linearly independent particular solution too.94) (3.67 −ω 2 Y (z) + λ2 Y IV (z) = 0 n Hence −ω2 Yi (z) + λ2 YiIV (z) = 0 i −ω 2 Yj (z) + λ2 YjIV (z) = 0 j (3. It follows that the following linear combination n=∞ X Yn (z) (Sn sin ωn t + Cn cos ω n t) (3.....0 sinh 4.0177 cos 4....96) j 0 0 The second integrals can be integrated by parts... is the general solution of the equation 3..ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 180 where Yn (z) and ωn are uniquely determined and Sn is an arbitrarily chosen constant.73z (3....97) . t) = Cn Yn (z) cos ω n t (3... In the same manner we can show that the function y(z...... .65.94 by Yj (z) and the equation 3. Hence Z l Z l ³ ¯l ´ 2 2 III ¯ − λ2 −ω i Yi (z)Yj (z)dz + λ Yi (z)Yj (z) 0 YiIII (z)YjI (z)dz = 0 0 0 Z l Z l ³ ¯l ´ −ω2 Yj (z)Yi (z)dz + λ2 YJIII (z)Yi (z)¯0 − λ2 YiIII (z)YjI (z)dz = 0 j 0 0 (3.......95 by Yi (z) and then integrating them side by side one can get Z l Z l 2 2 −ω i Yi (z)Yj (z)dz + λ YiIV (z)Yj (z)dz = 0 0 0 Z l Z l −ω 2 Yj (z)Yi (z)dz + λ2 YjIV (z)Yi (z)dz = 0 (3. Both of them must fulfill the equation 3.92) n=1 Y1 (z) = −1.0 sin 4.95) Premultiplying the equation 3. Orthogonality of the natural modes Let us consider two arbitrarily chosen natural modes Yi (z) and Yj (z).73z + 1.73z − 1.93) Y2 (z) = ..0178 cosh 4.. The constants Sn and Cn should be chosen to fulfill the initial conditions......

Hence.100) depends exclusively on boundary conditions. .99) The expression ³ ³ ³ ¯l ´ 2 ³ II ¯´ ¯´ ¯´ 2 III ¯ +λ Yi (z)YjI (z)¯l +λ2 YjIII (z)Yi (z)¯l −λ2 YjII (z)YiI (z)¯l −λ Yi (z)Yj (z) 0 0 0 0 (3.98) Substraction of the second equation from the first one yields ¢Rl ¡ 2 ω i − ω 2 0 Yj (z)Yi (z)dz+ ´ j ³ ³ ¯l ¯l ´ −λ2 YiIII (z)Yj (z)¯0 + λ2 YiII (z)YjI (z)¯0 ³ ³ ¯l ´ ¯´ 2 III ¯ − λ2 YjII (z)YiI (z)¯l = 0 +λ Yj (z)Yi (z) 0 0 (3. It is easy to show that for any possible boundary conditions this expression is equal to zero.101) 0 The above property of the natural modes is called orthogonality condition and play a very important role in further development of the theory of vibrations.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 181 Let us apply the same procedure to the last integral again ³ ¯l ´ Rl −ω 2 0 Yi (z)Yj (z)dz + λ2 YiIII (z)Yj (z)¯0 + i ³ ¯l ´ Rl −λ2 YiII (z)YjI (z)¯0 + λ2 0 YiII (z)YjII (z)dz = 0 −ω j R 2 l ¯l ´ Yi (z)Yj (z)dz + λ2 YjIII (z)Yi (z)¯0 + 0 ³ ¯l ´ Rl 2 II I −λ Yj (z)Yi (z)¯0 + λ2 0 YiII (z)YjII (z)dz = 0 ³ (3. Z l Yj (z)Yi (z)dz = 0 (3.

ρ1.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 182 3. . ρ2. 9 produce equation for its natural frequencies. A1.3 Problems Problem 41 G1.2. A2. J1 G2. J2 z l1 l2 Figure 9 For the shaft shown in Fig.

34. t) ∂ 2 ϕ1 (z.109) Introduction of these solutions into the equations of motion yields. t) 2 ∂ ϕ2 (z. t) = Φ2 (z) sin ω n t (3.105) (3. t) − λ2 =0 1 ∂t2 ∂z 2 where λ2 = 1 Similarly.102) motion of the system. t) = Φ1 (z) sin ω n t ϕ2 (z.112) λ1 λ2 These two equations are coupled together by the following boundary conditions for for for for z z z z = = = = 0 l1 l1 l1 + l2 Φ1 (0) = 0 Φ1 (l1 ) = Φ2 (l1 ) G1 J1 ΦI (l1 ) = G2 J2 ΦI (l1 ) 1 2 ΦI (l1 + l2 ) = 0 2 (3.19.108) (3. t) − λ2 =0 ∂t2 ∂z 2 (3. according to 3. is governed by the following equation ∂ 2 ϕ1 (z.104) (3. according to 3.110) (3.106) where λ2 = 2 G2 2 (3.113) The first boundary condition reflects the fact that the left hand end of the shaft is fixed.103) G1 1 (3.107) Both parts of the shaft must have the same natural frequencies. one may say that within range l1 < z < l1 + l2 motion of the shaft is governed by 2 ∂ 2 ϕ2 (z.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 183 Solution For 0 < z < l1 (3.111) ωn ωn β n2 = (3. The second and the third condition represent the continuity of the angular . Therefore the particular solution of the above equations must be of the following form ϕ1 (z. ΦII (z) + β 2 Φ1 (z) = 0 1 n1 II Φ2 (z) + β 2 Φ2 (z) = 0 n2 where β n1 = (3.

117) where ⎡ (3.111are ωn ωn z + Cn1 cos z λ1 λ1 ωn ωn Φ2 (z) = Sn2 sin z + Cn2 cos z λ2 λ2 Φ1 (z) = Sn1 sin the formulated boundary conditions results in the following set of equations Cn1 = 0 Sn1 sin ωn l1 + Cn1 cos ωn l1 − Sn2 sin ωn l2 − Cn2 cos ωn l2 = 0 λ1 λ1 λ2 λ2 Sn1 G1 J1 ωn cos ωn l1 − Cn1 G1 J1 ωn sin ωn l1 + λ1 λ1 λ1 λ1 −Sn2 G2 J2 ωn cos ωn l1 + Cn2 G2 J2 ωn sin ωn l1 = 0 λ2 λ2 λ2 λ2 +Sn2 ωn cos ωn (l1 + l2 ) − Cn2 ωn sin ωn (l1 + l2 ) = 0 λ2 λ2 λ2 λ2 Its matrix for is ⎤ Sn1 ⎢ C ⎥ [A] ⎢ n1 ⎥ = 0 ⎣ Sn2 ⎦ Cn2 1 0 ωn cos λ1 l1 − sin ωn l2 λ2 −G1 J1 ωn sin ωn l1 −G2 J2 ωn cos ωn l1 λ1 λ1 λ2 λ2 ωn 0 cos ωn (l1 +l2 ) λ2 λ2 ⎡ (3.118) Solution of this equation for the roots ω n yields the wanted natural frequencies of the shaft.116) (3. This homogeneous set of equations has acteristic determinant is equal to zero.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 184 displacement and continuity of the torque. The last condition says that the torque at the free end is zero.115) (3.114) (3. Since the general solution of equation 3. ¯ ¯ 0 1 ¯ ¯ sin ωn l1 cos ωn l1 λ1 λ1 ¯ ¯ G1 J1 ωn cos ωn l1 −G1 J1 ωn sin ωn l1 λ1 λ1 λ1 λ1 ¯ ¯ 0 0 0 ⎢ sin ωn l1 λ1 [A] = ⎢ ⎣ G1 J1 ωn cos ωn l1 λ1 λ1 0 the non-zero solutions if and only if its char0 − sin ωn l2 λ2 −G2 J2 ωn cos ωn l1 λ2 λ2 ωn cos ωn (l1 +l2 ) λ2 λ2 0 − cos ωn l2 λ2 G2 J2 ωn sin ωn l1 λ2 λ2 − ωn sin ωn (l1 +l2 ) λ2 λ2 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯= 0 ¯ ¯ ¯ ⎤ 0 ⎥ − cos ωn l2 λ2 ⎥ ωn ωn G2 J2 λ2 sin λ2 l1 ⎦ − ωn sin ωn (l1 +l2 ) λ2 λ2 .110 and 3.

Compute the natural frequencies and the corresponding natural modes of this assembly. is connected to the block 2 of mass m. 10.ρ l 2 m z Figure 10 The uniform rod 1 . . shown in Fig.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 185 Problem 42 1 E.A .

t) y y(l.119. t) ∂ 2 y(z. t) − λ2 =0 ∂t2 ∂z 2 where λ2 = E (3.32) y(z. is m ∂ 2 y(l.t) ¯ m ∂t2 ¯ = −AE ∂z ¯ z=l (3. taking advantage of the relationship 3. 3. according to the Newton’s law.12.119) (3.8 ¯ ¯ ¯ ∂ 2 y(z. t) ∂t2 (3.122) This equation together with the condition corresponding to the upper end of the rod (3.t) m z Figure 11 Equation of motion of the block. t) = ¯ 0 ¯ ∂ 2 y(z. t) = 0 forms boundary conditions for the equation 3.125) . ( y(0. t) ¯ m ∂t2 ¯z=l ∂z ¯z=l y(0.t) ¯ ∂y(z. according to Eq. 11).123) (3. is ∂ 2 y(z.120) To produce the boundary conditions let us consider the block 2 with the adjusted infinitesimal element (see Fig.121) or.124) z=l Introduction of the particular solution (see Eq. t) = Y (z) sin ω n t (3. 3.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 186 Solution The equation of motion of the rod. l F(l. t) ¯ ¯ = −AE ∂y(z. t) = −F (l.

after taking advantage of 3.126.mass of the block the characteristic equation takes the following form ³ ω ´ 5059.129) or ¢ ¡ 2 mω n sin β n z − AEβ n cos β n z Sn = 0 mω 2 sin n or after simplification tan ωn AE l− =0 λ λωn m (3.128) Introduction of this solution into boundary conditions yields ½ Cn = 0 mω2 (Sn sin β n z + Cn cos β n z) − AE (Sn β n cos β n z − Cn β n sin β n z) = 0 n (3.1 × 1011 N/m2 A = 25 × 10−4 m2 ρ = 7800kg/m3 q λ = E = 5188.132) ωn ωn ωn z − AE cos z = 0 λ λ λ (3. (3. according to 3. the characteristic equation.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 187 into the equation of motion 3.130) Hence.131) For the following numerical data l = 1m E = 2.7 ωn Its solution f (ω = 0 is shown in Fig.126) The general solution of the equation 3.mass of the rod m = 20kg .133) .5kg . n with boundary conditions ½ Y (0) = 0 mω2 Y (l) − AEY I (l) = 0 n (3.126.119 and the boundary conditions 3.124 yields the ordinary differential equation Y II (z) + β 2 Y (z) = 0.127) βn = ωn λ (3. is Yn (z) = Sn sin β n z + Cn cos β n z (3.36.7m/s ρ mr = A × l × ρ = 19. is (3.0 n f (ωn ) = tan =0 − 5188. 12.

ω 2 = 17720. the system becomes of one degree of freedom and its the only one natural frequency is r r r k EA 2.135) For the first three natural frequencies the corresponding natural modes Y1 (z) = sin 4400 z 5188. 14 and 15 respectively. ω1 = 33400 s−1 (3.5 -1 Figure 12 The first three natural frequencies.137) = = = 5123s−1 m lm 20 and the corresponding mode is a straight line.7 (3.7 Y2 (z) = sin 17720 z 5188.7 (3.5 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 ωn -0.134) The corresponding natural modes. are Yn (z) = Sn sin β n z = Sn sin ωn ωn z = Sn sin z λ 5188. according to the diagram 12 are ω1 = 4400.7 Y3 (z) = sin 33400 z 5188.128.If we neglect the mass of the rod.136) are presented in Fig.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 188 1 f( ω n ) 0. according to 3.1 × 1011 × 25 × 10−4 ω1 = (3. 13. .

2 0.5 0.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 189 1 Y (z) 1 0.5 0 -0.5 0.2 0.8 1 -1 Figure 14 1 Y3 (z) 0.2 0.6 0.5 0.8 1 -1 Figure 15 .6 0.8 1 -1 Figure 13 1 Y2 (z) 0.5 0 -0.4 z 0.6 0.4 z 0.4 z 0.5 0 -0.

16 O z k l y Figure 16 .ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 190 Problem 43 Produce natural frequencies and the corresponding natural modes for the fixedelastically supported beam shown in Fig.

t) ¯ ¯ =0 M(z.142) ∂z 2 ¯z=l ¯ ¯ 2 ¯ ∂M(z. the equation of motion of the beam is ∂ 2 y(z.139) (3.140) (3. t) ¯ = ky(z. t) = Yn (z) sin ω n t (3. forms the boundary conditions associated with the right hand end ¯ ∂ 2 y(z.t)|z=l y dz z z Figure 17 conditions for the element dz which have to be fulfill for any instant of time. t)|z=l = (3. t)|z=l = E(z)J(z) (3. t) ∂ 4 y(z.144) .143) z=l ¯ ¯ 2 ∂z ∂z ∂z z=l z=l Yn (z)|z=0 = 0 ¯ I Yn (z)¯z=0 = 0 ¯ II Yn (z)¯z=l = 0 Introduction of the solution 3. At the left hand end the displacement and gradient of the beam have to be equal to zero. t) ¯ ¯ = 0 ∂z ¯z=0 (3. 17. t)| V (z.t)| z=l V(z.141) The right hand end.t)| z=l k l k y(z. y(z. is shown in Fig.65. t)|z=0 = 0 ¯ ∂y(z. t) + λ2 =0 ∂t2 ∂z 4 Its particular solution can be sought in the following form y(z.138) the above solution has to fulfill boundary conditions. t) ¯ ¯ = ∂ EJ ∂ y(z.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 191 Solution According to the equation 3.139 into the above boundary conditions yields ¯ III α Yn (z)¯z=l − Yn (z)|z=l = 0 (3. Hence. Equilibrium O M(z. with the forces acting on it.

150) sinh β n l cosh β n l − sin β n l − cos β n l ¯ ¯ 3 3 3 3 ¯ β α cosh β l β n α sinh β n l −β n α cos β n l β n α sin β n l ¯ n n ¯ ¯ ¯ − sinh β l ¯ − cosh β n l − sin β n l − cos β n l n .148) The matrix form of these equations is presented below ⎡ 0 1 0 1 ⎢ 1 0 1 0 ⎢ ⎢ sinh β n l cosh β n l − sin β n l − cos β n l ⎢ ⎣ β 3 α cosh β n l β 3 α sinh β n l −β 3 α cos β n l β 3 α sin β n l n n n n − sinh β n l − cosh β n l − sin β n l − cos β n l ⎤ ⎡ ⎡ ⎤ ⎥ An ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ Bn ⎥ ⎥⎢ ⎥ = ⎢ ⎥ ⎣ Cn ⎦ ⎣ ⎦ Dn (3. ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 1 0 1 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 1 0 1 0 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ = 0 (3. 3.146) I Yn (z) = An β n cosh β n z + Bn β n sinh β n z + Cn β n cos β n z − Dn β n sin β n z where where (see Eq. Cn and Dn . β4 = n Bn + Dn = 0 An + Cn = 0 2 2 2 An β n sinh β n l + Bn β n cosh β n l − Cn β n sin β n l − Dn β 2 cos β n l = 0 n An β 3 α cosh β n l + Bn β 3 α sinh β n l − Cn β 3 α cos β n l + Dn β 3 α sin β n l n n n n −(An sinh β n l + Bn cosh β n l + Cn sin β n l + Dn cos β n l) = 0 (3.147) ω 2 = EJ n λ Introduction of the above expressions into the boundary conditions 3.144 results in the following set of algebraic equations that is linear with respect to the constants An .69) ω2 Aρ 2 n (3.149) ⎤ 0 0 ⎥ ⎥ 0 ⎦ 0 The non-zero solution of this set of equations exists if and only if its characteristic determinant is equal to zero.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 192 EJ (3. Bn .76 to 3.79 the expressions for the natural modes Yn (z) and their derivatives are α= Yn (z) = An sinh β n z + Bn cosh β n z + Cn sin β n z + Dn cos β n z II Yn (z) = An β 2 sinh β n z + Bn β 2 cosh β n z − Cn β 2 sin β n z − Dn β 2 cos β n z n n n n III Yn (z) = An β 3 cosh β n z + Bn β 3 sinh β n z − Cn β 3 cos β n z + Dn β 3 sin β n z n n n n (3.145) k According to the equations 3.

152) .0525β 3 cosh β .ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 193 For the following data E = 2.1×10 10000 = 0.03 × 0.5×10−9 α = EJ = 2.0525β 3 cos β n n n n ¯ ¯ − sinh β n − cosh β n − sin β n 1 0 − cos β n .0525β n sinh β n −.0525β 3 sin β n n − cos β n ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ = 0 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ (3.1 × 1011 N/m2 ρ = 7800kg/m3 A = 0.942m−1 β 2 = 4.884m−1 β 3 = 7.147 β4 = n Aρ 2 ω EJ n (3.151) Solution of this equation for its roots β n is presented in Fig.18 200 100 0 2 4 6 8 β n -100 -200 Figure 18 From this diagram the first three roots are β 1 = 2.0525 k the characteristic equation takes form ¯ ¯ 0 1 0 ¯ ¯ 1 0 1 ¯ ¯ sinh β n cosh β n − sin β n ¯ 3 ¯ .01 = 0.0003m2 3 J = 0.5 × 10−9 m4 12 k = 10000N/m l = 1m 11 ×2.01 = 2.888m−1 The relationship 3.03×0.

and Cn to be computed.157) Introducing them into the first function of 3.153) For each of these roots the set of equations 3.884z − 1.883 sin 2.0 ⎦ C1 C2 C3 −.942z − .884z + 1 cos 4.0 ⎦ .154) ⎣ Cn ⎦ 0 sinh β n l cosh β n l − sin β n l − cos β n l 1 ⎡ ⎤⎡ 0 1 0 ⎣ ⎦⎣ 1 0 1 sinh β n l cosh β n l − sin β n l ⎤ ⎡ ⎡ 0 1 An ⎣ Bn ⎦ = − ⎣ 1 0 Cn sinh β n l cosh β n l ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ An 1 ⎦=⎣ Bn ⎦ + ⎣ 0 − cos β n l Cn ⎤−1 ⎡ 0 1 ⎦ ⎣ 1 0 − cos β n l − sin β n l ⎤ 0 0 ⎦ 0 ⎤ ⎦ (3.942z Y2 (z) = 1. Bn .0 cosh 2.0 ⎦ .02 1.0 sin 7.888z (3.0 (3. ⎤ ⎡ ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ An ⎡ 0 1 0 1 0 ⎥ ⎢ ⎦ ⎢ Bn ⎥ = ⎣ 0 ⎦ ⎣ 1 0 1 0 (3. ⎣ B3 ⎦ = ⎣ −1.884z − 1. ⎣ B2 ⎦ = ⎣ −1.6s−1 Aρ s β 4 EJ 2 = 357.942z + 1 cos 2. Dn = 1) and the last equation can be crossed out.883 sinh 2.3s−1 ω2 = Aρ s β 4 EJ 3 = 932.888z − 1.156) For the first three roots the numerical values of these constants are ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ ⎡ A1 . The three remaining equations allow the constants An . we are getting the corresponding natural modes Y1 (z) = .942z − 1.883 1.888z − 1.883 −1.0 sinh 7.155) (3. Hence one of the unknown constants can be chosen arbitrarily (e.149 becomes linearly dependant.146 and remembering that Dn = 1.02 sinh 4.0 cosh 4.02 sin 4.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 194 offers values for the wanted natural frequencies s β 4 EJ 1 ω1 = = 129. 19 .888z + 1 cos 7.g.884z Y3 (z) = 1.0 cosh 7.158) The graphical interpretation of these natural modes is given in Fig.0 A2 A3 ⎣ B1 ⎦ = ⎣ −1.02 −1.0s−1 ω2 = Aρ (3.

ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 195 2 1 Y1 (z) 0.6 0.2 Y2 (z) Y3 (z) 0.8 1 0 -1 -2 Figure 19 .4 z 0.

Its right hand end is supported by means of the massless and rigid beam 2 of length L that is connected to two springs each of the stiffness k. 20 is fixed. Jo 1 2 2 z k l L k Figure 20 The left hand end of the shaft 1 shown in Fig. G. Produce the equation for the natural frequencies of the shaft.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 196 Problem 44 ρ . Answer: GJo ωn 2 kL2 λ cot ωn l + 1 = 0 where λ2 = G λ ρ .

G. Jo 1 z l Figure 21 Two rigid discs 2 (see Fig. Answer: ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ βn αn ¯ ¯ ¯ β n cos β n l − αn sin β n l −β n sin β n l − αn cos β n l ¯ = 0 p Iω2 where β n = ω n G αn = GJn o . Produce the equation for the natural frequencies of the assembly. 21) are joined together by means of the shaft 1 of the length l. The moment of inertia of each disc about the axis z is I.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 197 Problem 45 2 2 ρ .

t) ¯ ¯ = 0 ∂z ¯z=0 (3. t) ¯ ¯ = E(z)J(z) ∂z 2 ¯ 2 (3. Hence.159) the above solution has to fulfill boundary conditions.160) Solution According to the equation 3. ρ z l y Figure 22 The uniform beam is supported as shown in Fig. J.160 into the above boundary conditions yields Yn (z)|z=0 ¯ I Yn (z)¯z=0 Yn (z)|z=l ¯ II Yn (z)¯z=l = = = = 0 0 0 0 (3.165) . t)|z=l = 0 M(z.161) (3. y(z. Hence.65.162) The right hand end The displacement and the bending moment has to be equal to zero. 22. t) = Yn (z) sin ω n t (3. At the left hand end the displacement and gradient of the beam have to be equal to zero. t) + λ2 =0 ∂t2 ∂z 4 Its particular solution can be sought in the following form y(z. Produce the equations for the natural frequencies of this beam Answer: p λ = EJ sinh β n l cos β n l − sin β n l cosh β n l = 0 β n = ωn λ Aρ ∂ 2 y(z. t)|z=0 = 0 ¯ ∂y(z. A. y(z. t) ∂ 4 y(z.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 198 Problem 46 l.164) Introduction of the solution 3. the equation of motion of the beam is (3.163) =0 z=l (3. t)|z=l ¯ ∂ y(z. E.

79 the expressions for the natural modes Yn (z) and their derivatives are Yn (z) = An sinh β n z + Bn cosh β n z + Cn sin β n z + Dn cos β n z I Yn (z) = An β n cosh β n z + Bn β n sinh β n z + Cn β n cos β n z − Dn β n sin β n z II Yn (z) = An β 2 sinh β n z + Bn β 2 cosh β n z − Cn β 2 sin β n z − Dn β 2 cos β n z n n n n III Yn (z) = An β 3 cosh β n z + Bn β 3 sinh β n z − Cn β 3 cos β n z + Dn β 3 sin β n z n n n n (3.169) The non-zero solution of this set of equations exists if and only if its characteristic determinant is equal to zero. β4 n Bn + Dn An + Cn An sinh β n l + Bn cosh β n l + Cn sin β n l + Dn cos β n l 2 An β n sinh β n l + Bn β 2 cosh β n l − Cn β 2 sin β n l − Dn β 2 cos β n l n n n The matrix form of these equations is presented below ⎡ ⎤⎡ 0 1 0 1 ⎢ ⎥⎢ 1 0 1 0 ⎢ ⎥⎢ ⎣ sinh β n l cosh β n l sin β n l cos β n l ⎦ ⎣ sinh β n l cosh β n l -sin β n l -cos β n l = = = = 0 0 0 0 (3.167) 2 EJ n λ Introduction of the above expressions into the boundary conditions 3. Cn and Dn . ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 1 0 1 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 1 0 1 0 ¯ ¯=0 (3.76 to 3.171) A development of the above determinant results in the following equation for the unknown parameter β n l . 3.165 results in the following set of algebraic equations that is linear with respect to the constants An .170) ¯ sinh β n l cosh β n l sin β n l cos β n l ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ sinh β l cosh β l − sin β l − cos β l ¯ n n n n β n l sinh β n l cos β n l − sin β n l cosh β n l = 0 where: (3.168) ⎡ ⎤ 0 An ⎢ 0 ⎥ Bn ⎥ = ⎢ ⎣ 0 Cn ⎦ 0 Dn ⎤ ⎥ ⎥ ⎦ (3.69) ω2 Aρ 2 ω = n = (3.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 199 According to the equations 3.166) where (see Eq. Bn .

ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 200 βn = The roots β n l of the equation 3.172) .173) r ωn λ λ= EJ Aρ (3.171 allows the natural frequences to be produced ωn = λβ 2 = λ n (β n l)2 EJ = (β l)2 l2 Aρl2 n (3.

A. 23 is supported by means of the massless spring of stiffness k. J. E. A l 2 k z Figure 23 The uniform rod 1 shown in Fig. ρ z l y Figure 24 . Produce the equation for the natural frequencies. Problem 48 l. E.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 201 Problem 47 1 ρ .

the boundary conditions for the equation (1) Answer: for z = 0 (1) Y = 0 (2) Y 00 = 0 0 for z = l (3) Y = 0 (4) Y 000 = 0 2.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 202 The uniform beam is supported as shown in Fig. the equations for the natural frequencies of this beam Answer: cosβl = 0 q EJ where β = 4 Aρω2 . 24. Produce: 1.

ρ1 λ2 = q G2 ρ2 . t) − λ2 =0 ∂t2 ∂z 2 where λ2 = G . β 1 = λ2 G ρ JO1 ρ1 Iz . G2. This assembly performs the torsional vibration about axis z. The moment of inertia of the plate about the axis z is I z . The dynamic properties of the shafts are defined by their density ρ1 and ρ2 . their shear modulus G 1 and G 2 and the second polar moment of area J O1 and J O2 respectively. The differential equation of motion of a shaft is. 25 are welded to a motionless wall.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 203 Problem 49 1 2 3 z ρ1 . JO2 Figure 25 The left hand ends of the two shafts (1 and 2) depicted in the Fig. Their right hand ends are welded to the plate 3. λ1 = q G1 . JO1 l ρ2 . ∂ 2 ϕ(z. where. β2 = JO2 ρ2 Iz .shear modulus ρ — density Answer: ωn β 1 cot λ1 l+β 2 cot ωn l = 1. G1. t) ∂ 2 ϕ(z. Produce the equation for the natural frequencies of the assembly described.

Produce the equation for the natural frequencies of the system described. At the position defined by the distance a the element 2 is attached.26 of length l. This element can be treated as a particle of mass m. density ρ and area of its cross-section A is under the constant tension T.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 204 Problem 50 m z 1 a l y T 2 Figure 26 The string 1 shown in Fig. .

178) (3.176) (3.174) (3.t) y2(z. t ) |z = a ∂z y1(z. t) = Y1n (z) sin ω n t y2n (z.175) (3.179) (3. in the region a<z<l the equation of motion is ∂ 2 y2 (z. t) − λ2 =0 ∂t2 ∂z 2 where T Aρ Solutions of the above equations are of the following form λ2 = y1n (z. t) − λ2 =0 ∂t2 ∂z 2 where λ2 = Similarly. .181) where ω n stands for the natural frequency that is common for both parts of the string.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 205 Solution ∂y2 ( z.t)|z=a T T a l T ∂y1 ( z.t) y1(z.180) (3.177) T Aρ (3. t) = Y2n (z) sin ω n t (3. t) ∂ 2 y1 (z.t)|z=a=y2(z. t ) | z =a ∂z z y Figure 27 Let the differential equation of motion of the uniform string in the region 0<z<a be ∂ 2 y1 (z. t) ∂ 2 y2 (z.

182) (3. t) |z=a ¯ ¯ ∂y1 (z.195) This set of equations possesses non-trivial solutions if and only if its characteristic determinant is equal to zero.190) z=a Introduction of the solutions 3. t) |z=0 y1n (z. They are y1n (z.181 into the equations 3.183) (3.188) (3. t) ¯ ¯ m ∂t2 ¯z=a y2n (z. t) |z=l = 0 = y2n (z. t) ¯ ¯ ¯ = −T +T ∂z ¯z=a ∂z ¯z=a = 0 (3.194) 00 (3. t) ¯ ∂y2 (z.190 into the conditions above one can get the following set of homogeneous linear equations (0) S1n + (1) C1n + (0) S2n + (0) C2n = 0 (sin β n a) S1n + (cos β n a) C1n − (sin β n a) S2n − (cos β n a) C2n = 0 (−mω 2 sin β n a + T β n cos β n a) S1n + (−mω2 sin β n a − T β n sin β n a) C1n + n n − (T β n cos β n a) S2n + (T β n sin β n a) C2n = 0 (0) S1n + (0) C1n + (sin β n l) S2n + (cos β n l) C2n = 0 (3.178 results in the following set of differential equations Y1n (z) + β 2 Y1n (z) = 0 n 00 Y2n (z) + β 2 Y2n (z) = 0 n where ω2 Aρω 2 n n = 2 T λ The general solution of these equations can be predicted as follows β2 = n Y1n (z) = S1n sin β n z + C1n cos β n z Y2n (z) = S2n sin β n z + C2n cos β n z Introduction of the solutions 3.185) Introduction of the solutions 3.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 206 These solutions must fulfil boundary conditions (z = 0.189) (3.189 and 3.181 yields Y1n (z) |z=0 = 0 Y1n (z) |z=a = Y2n (z) |z=a ¯ ¯ 0 ¯ −mω 2 Y1n (z)¯z=a = −T Y1n (z)¯ n Y2n (z) |z=l = 0 (3. ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 1 0 0 ¯ ¯ ¯ sin β n a cos β n a − sin β n a − cos β n a ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ −mω2 sin β n a + ¯=0 −mω 2 sin β n a + n n ¯ −T β n cos β n a T β n sin β n a ¯ ¯ ¯ +T β n cos β n a −T β n sin β n a ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 0 sin β n l cos β n l ¯ (3.175 and 3. z = l) and compatibility conditions at z = a.191) (3.186) (3. t) |z=a ¯ ∂ 2 y1 (z.180 into the conditions 3.193) (3.192) (3.196) ¯ 0 ¯ + T Y2n (z)¯ z=a .180 and 3.184) (3.187) (3.

ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 207 Roots β n of the above equation. with help of the relationship 3.188 allow the natural frequencies to be produced s T ωn = β n Aρ .

A1 ρ2. A2 1 l1 y 2 l2 T z Figure 28 Two strings of length l1 and l2 are loaded with tension T .ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 208 Problem 51 ρ1. Their dynamic properties are determined by the density and the area of their cross-section A. Produce the natural frequencies of the system described and the corresponding natural modes .

the above conditions can rewritten as follows y1n (z.203) These solutions must fulfil boundary conditions (z = 0.201) (3.198) where λ2 = 1 Similarly. t) |z=0 = 0 y1n (z. t) |z=l1 +l2 = 0 ¯ ∂y2 (z. Since dm stands for an infinitesimal mass of this element. t) ¯ ¯ ¯ dm = −T ∂t2 ¯ ∂z ¯ z=l1 z=l1 y2n (z.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 209 Solution Let the differential equation of motion of the uniform string in the region 0 < z < l1 be ∂ 2 y1 (z.197) (3. They are y1n (z. t) ¯ ¯ − ∂z ¯z=l1 (3. t) |z=l1 +l2 ¯ ∂y2 (z. t) |z=l1 = y2n (z. t) = Y2n (z) sin ω n t (3. t) ¯ ¯ + = 0 ∂z ¯ z=l1 ¯ ∂y1 (z.199) Solutions of the above equations are of the following form y1n (z. t) ¯ ∂y1 (z. t) − λ2 =0 ∂t2 ∂z 2 where λ2 = 2 T A2 ρ2 (3. t) − λ2 =0 ∂t2 ∂z 2 T A1 ρ1 (3. t) ¯ ¯ +T ∂z ¯z=l1 (3.200) (3. t) ∂ 2 y1 (z. t) |z=l1 = y2n (z. t) |z=0 = 0 y1n (z. t) = Y1n (z) sin ω n t y2n (z. t) |z=l1 +l2 = 0 .202) (3. t) |z=l1 +l2 ¯ ¯ ∂ 2 y1 (z.204) The third condition we are getting by application of the Newton law to the element of the string associated with z = l1 . z = l1 + l2 ) and compatibility conditions at z = l1 .205) y2n (z. in the region l1 < z < l1 + l2 the equation of motion is ∂ 2 y2 (z. t) ∂ 2 y2 (z.

201 results in the following set of differential equations Y1n (z) + β 2 Y1n (z) = 0 n1 00 Y2n (z) + β 2 Y2n (z) = 0 n2 where β2 = 1n ω2 A1 ρ1 ω 2 n n .209 and 3.203 into the equations 3.209) (3.206) (3. ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 1 0 0 ¯ ¯ ¯ sin β 1n l1 cos β 1n l1 − sin β 2n l1 − cos β 2n l1 ¯ ¯ ¯ (3.210) ¯ ¯ −Y1n (z)¯ 0 z=l1 (3.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 210 Introduction of the solutions 3.205 yields Y1n (z) |z=0 = 0 Y1n (z) |z=l1 = Y2n (z) |z=l1 ¯ 0 ¯ + Y2n (z)¯ = 0 z=l1 (3.211) Y2n (z) |z=l1 +l2 = 0 Introduction of the solutions 3. = 2 T λ1 β2 = 2n ω2 A2 ρ2 ω 2 n n = 2 T λ2 00 (3.213) ¯ β 1n cos β 1n l1 −β 1n sin β 1n l1 −β 2n cos β 2n l1 +β 2n sin β 2n l1 ¯ = 0 ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 0 sin β 2n (l1 + l2 ) cos β 2n (l1 + l2 ) ¯ Introducing 3.203 into the conditions 3. the equation can be solved for the natural frequencies of the string.214) . ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯=0 ¯ ¯ ¯ (3.208 into the above equation we haveβ 1n = ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ 0 1 sin ωn l1 cos ωn l1 λ1 λ1 ωn cos ωn l1 − ωn sin ωn l1 λ1 λ1 λ1 λ1 0 0 ωn λ2 0 0 ωn − sin λ2 l1 − cos ωn l1 λ2 − ωn cos ωn l1 + ωn sin ωn l1 λ2 λ2 λ2 λ2 sin ωn (l1 + l2 ) cos ωn (l1 + l2 ) λ2 λ2 Now.207) (3. The solution is presented for the following set of numerical data.212) This set of equations possesses non-trivial solutions if and only if its characteristic determinant is equal to zero.208) The general solution of these equations can be predicted as follows Y1n (z) = S1n sin β 1n z + C1n cos β 1n z Y2n (z) = S2n sin β 2n z + C2n cos β 2n z Introduction of the solutions 3.198 and 3.210 into the conditions above one can get the following set of homogeneous linear equations (0) S1n + (1) C1n + (0) S2n + (0) C2n = 0 (sin β 1n l1 ) S1n + (cos β 1n l1 ) C1n − (sin β 2n l1 ) S2n − (cos β 2n l1 ) C2n = 0 (β 1n cos β 1n l1 ) S1n − (β 1n sin β 1n l1 ) C1n − (β 2n cos β 2n l1 ) S2n + (β 2n sin β 2n l1 ) C2n = 0 (0) S1n + (0) C1n + (sin β 2n (l1 + l2 )) S2n + (cos β 2n (l1 + l2 )) C2n = 0 (3.

212.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 211 l1 = . They are ω 1 = 483. q q q q T 500 T λ1 = A1 ρ = 179. A2 = 1 · 10−6 m2 .5 ¡ . (. From the first equation one can see that the constant C1n must be equal to zero C1n = 0 (sin β 1n l1 ) S1n − (sin β 2n l1 ) S2n − (cos β 2n l1 ) C2n = 0 (β 1n cos β 1n l1 ) S1n − (β 2n cos β 2n l1 ) S2n + (β 2n sin β 2n l1 ) C2n = 0 (0) S1n + (sin β 2n (l1 + l2 )) S2n + (cos β 2n (l1 + l2 )) C2n = 0 (3.)ω n cos 253 (.5 1 1 cos 179 ωn − 179 sin 179 ω n −¡ 1 cos 253 ωn ¢ +¡1 sin 253 ωn ¢ ¯ 179 253 253 ¯ 1 1 0 0 sin 253. ω3 = 1437.5 . λ2 = A2 ρ = 1·105007800 = 253.m. C1n . S2n . l2 = 1.5m. 29 ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¯ ¡0 ¡1 10 5 0 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 frequency [rad/s] -5 -10 Figure 29 It allows the natural frequencies to be determined.5 ¢ ¡ . ω5 = 2344[rad/s] (3.5 ¡ . C2n can be computed from the homogeneous set of linear equations 3.5 + 1. ω 4 = 1861. 1 = 2 = 7800kg/m3 .5 sin 179 ω n ¢ cos 179 ω n ¢ − sin 253 ω n ¢ − cos 253 ω n ¢ ¯ ¯=0 ¡ .03m/s. T = 500N. ω2 = 920.215) The magnitude of the determinant as a function of the frequency ω n is presented in Fig.5 ¡ .5 ¢ .216) The so far unknown constants S1n .5 + 1.)ω n ¯ (3.217) .18m/s −6 2·10−6 7800 1 2 ¯ ¯ 0 0 ¯ ¢ ¢ ¡ . A1 = 2 · 10−6 m2 .

5 < z < 1.5 ω3 1437 = 253.026 23 1 2 = 0. β 12 = ω2 920 920 2 = 179.5) cos 1. 2.5 S22 = sin β (l1 +l2 ) = sin 3.13 β 22 = ω2 = 253.944 sin 8.03 = λ1 cos β 23 (l1 +l2 ) cos β 23 l1 −(sin β 23 l1 ) sin β (l +l ) 8.03 = 5.675·1.907·0.697z Y21 (z) = S21 sin β 21 z + 1 cos β 21 z = 3.91z for 0. 30 .13·0.026·0.697·0.899 22 for 0 < z < 0.48 S11 = (sin β 11 l1 ) (sin 2.5) cos 5.5 cos 5.675·1.5 Y12 (z) = S12 sin β 12 z = 1.91z + 1 cos 1.67z f or 0.697 β 21 = ω2 = 253.5 < z < 1.63·1.5 22 1 2 = = 1.48 sin 2.5) cos 3.5 < z < 1.15 S12 = (sin β 12 l1 ) (sin 5.67 λ2 5.907·0.5 21 1 2 = = 3.46Y11 (z) 21 for 0 < z < 0.5 S23 = sin β (l1 +l2 ) = sin 5.46 sin 1.5) β 23 = A plot of the natural modes is shown in Fig.63 λ1 λ cos β (l +l ) cos β 22 l1 −(sin β 22 l1 ) sin β 22(l 1+l 2) cos 3.773 23 Y13 (z) = S13 sin β 13 z = 0.907·1.907·1.675·0.5 sin 3.91 λ1 λ cos β (l +l ) cos β 21 l1 −(sin β 21 l1 ) sin β 21(l 1+l 2) cos 1.5 sin 1.5 = 0. 3 the constants S1n and S2n are n=1 ω 1 = 483.13z Y22 (z) = S22 sin β 22 z + 1 cos β 22 z = 0.03 = 2.675·1.18 = 5. one of them must be crossed out and one of the constant can be assumed arbitrarily.5 Y11 (z) = S11 sin β 11 z = 3.675·0.5 = 3.5 sin = (sin 8.63·1.899 sin 3.773 sin 5.63·1.67z + 1 cos 5.026z for 0 < z < 0.5 n=3 ω3 = 1437.63·0.63·1.5 = 0. β 11 = ω1 483 483 1 = 179.5−(sin 1. C2n = 1 The set of equations for determination of the remaining constants S1n and S2n is (sin β 1n l1 ) S1n − (sin β 2n l1 ) S2n = cos β 2n l1 (0) S1n + (sin β 2n (l1 + l2 )) S2n = − cos β 2n (l1 + l2 ) Hence S2n = S1n = − cos β 2n (l1 + l2 ) sin β 2n (l1 + l2 ) β (l1 +l2 ) cos β 2n l1 − (sin β 2n l1 ) cos β 2n(l1 +l2 ) sin 2n (sin β 1n l1 ) For n = 1.ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 212 Since the equations is linearly dependent for roots of its characteristic determinant.5 n=2 ω2 = 920. Hence let us crossed out the second equation and assume C2n = 1.5) − cos β 22 (l1 +l2 ) − cos 3.5 Y23 (z) = S23 sin β 23 z + 1 cos β 23 z = 0.63z f or0.18 = 3. β 13 = ω3 1437 = 179.18 = 1.63·0.5 S21 = sin β (l1 +l2 ) = sin 1.944 S13 = (sin β 13 l1 ) − cos β 23 (l1 +l2 ) − cos 5.5−(sin 3.675·1.907·1.907·1.5−(sin 5.63z + 1 cos 3.5) − cos β 21 (l1 +l2 ) − cos 1.15 sin 5.

5 -2 z [m ] Figure 30 .5 1 1 .ANALYSIS OF CONTINUOUS SYSTEMS 213 n a tu ra l m o d e s 4 3 2 1 0 0 -1 0 .

.b)........ 32c).The most popular approaches for creation of the stiffness and inertia matrices 1 2 ..... 31) associated with an arbitrary chosen number N of points..... Equivalence of both... number of segments I of constant cross-section (Fig .DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS 214 3..3 DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS The commercially available computer packages allow to produce stiffness and inertia matrix of free in space beam along coordinates yn and ϕyn (see Fig.221) li The right hand part of the segment li−1 and the left hand part of the subsequent segment li . 33d) yri = li γ ri = yields GAi (3...... the beam is divided into a sufficient...... Inertia and stiffness matrix for the free-free beam According to the Rigid Element Method........ 33c and Fig.. the equivalence of shearing deflections (yri = yei ) caused by the same shearing force Ti (Fig. These distinguished points n are called nodes...220) .. for necessary accuracy.218) Similarly.3......... the actual element (Fig.. form a section (Fig. Since: δ ri = the bending stiffness is kMi = EJi li (3. 33a) and its model (Fig..219) Mi li 2EJi and δ ei = Mi 2kMi (3... 32.... 3... N yn ϕy n Figure 31 are called Rigid Element Method and Finite Element Method. 32a))The bending and shearing properties of each segment are represented by two springs of stiffness kMi and kTi respectively (Fig..... n .... In this kTi = Ti li GAi and yei = Ti kTi (3. Each section is considered rigid and its inertia properties are represented by mass mi and moments of inertia Ii . 33b) requires equal angular deflection ( δri = δ ei ) caused by the same bending moment Mi ....1 Rigid Elements Method...

. k T i+1 ..DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS 215 l i-1 ..Ji li Mi Mi li G.Ai Ti y ri Ti Ti ye i a) c) δri δe i 2δe i k Mi Mi Mi b) Ti kT i d) Figure 33 .. a) li kT i k Mi l i-1 /2 Gi l i/ 2 mi Ii mi Ii k Mi zli z ri z l i+1 m i+1 I i +1 k Mi+1 z ri+1 b) c) k T i -1 .... li l i+1 .. k Mi-1 z d) y Figure 32 E.........

1 .i+1 . ˙ 0 Mi.i+1 Ki+1. .DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS 216 way a complete symmetry is obtained that gives simple programming for computer analysis. ..225) (3... ˙˙ . ..230) (3.i 0 . .i Ki. . +kTi−1 zli + kTi zri 2 +kMi−1 + kTi−1 zl2i + kTi zri ¸ +kTi zli+1 −kMi + kTi zli+1 zri ¸ ∙ yi yi = ϕyi .. 34.. ˙˙ .. ˙ 0 ⎡ y1 ⎢ : ⎢ ⎢ yi−1 ⎢ yb = ⎢ yi ⎢ ⎢ yi+1 ⎢ ⎣ : yN ⎤ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎦ (3.. ˙ 0 0 . 0 . ˙ 0 ⎤ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎦ . ˙ 0 0 Mi+1.227) ¸ (3. ˙˙ . . ˙ 0 0 ..i−1 0 0 . Application of the Lagrange’s equations to the physical model is shown in Fig.. ˙˙ ....1 .. 32d) results in the following equations of motion. .. ˙ 0 0 . ˙ 0 . . ˙˙ . . ˙ 0 0 0 . .. ϕyi are associated with nodes which are located at the centre of gravity of the rigid elements.226) (3.. ˙ 0 0 0 .228) ¸ (3.. ˙˙ ... ˙ Mi−1.i = 0 Ii 0 .i−1 0 ..231 is given in Fig. 0 .i = +kTi−1 zli + kTi zri ∙ −kTi Ki. ˙ 0 0 0 . ˙˙ ... .i+1 . ˙ Ki−1. ˙ 0 K1. .224) (3. ˙ Ki−1.222) ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ m=⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎣ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ k=⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎣ ⎡ Ki. ˙ 0 Ki. ˙ KN. ˙ 0 0 0 . ..i Ki+1. ˙ MN.... ˙ 0 0 .i−1 Ki.The coordinates yi . . .231) The geometrical interpretation of the vector of coordinates 3.N ⎤ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎦ (3..i−1 = ∙ +kTi−1 + kTi Ki. .i . m¨ + ky = 0 y where: ⎡ M1.i+1 = −kTi zri ∙ −kTi−1 −kTi−1 zri−1 +kTi−1 zli −kMi−1 + kTi−1 zri−1 zli N =I +1 ¸ ∙ mi 0 Mi.223) (3.229) (3. ˙˙ . .N 0 . .

DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS 217 element 1 Oi node 1 element i element N z node i yi ϕ yi node N y Figure 34 Introduction of the external forces If there is a set of forces acting on the rigid element. The i − th element is shown in Fig. Introducing notations Fs for the static forces and F(t) for the excitation forces. each of them (e. 35This equivalent set of forces along the nodal coordinates Fi Mi element i z node i yi ϕ yi Oi ai Fi y Figure 35 yi .232.3.g. m¨ + ky = Fs + F(t) y 3. In a general case these forces can be independent of time (static forces) or they can depend on time (excitation forces). the shaft is divided into a number of the uniform and flexible elements. (3.2 Finite Elements Method. the equation of motion of the free-free beam takes the following form. 36. ϕyi should be added to the mathematical model 3. Fi ) can be equivalently replaced by the force Fi applied to the node Oi and the moment Mi = ai · Fi as shown in Fig. Inertia and stiffness matrix for the free-free beam According to the Finite Elements Method.232) .

⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎤⎡ ⎡ yi1 C1 0 0 0 1 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎥⎢ ⎢ 0 ⎢ 1 3 102 1 0 ⎥ ⎢ C2 ⎥ = ⎢ ϕyi1 ⎥ (3.234) The constants of integration Cj (j = 1.234 into the above boundary conditions results in the following set of algebraic equations linear with respect to the constants Cj . The nodes are denoted by numbers 1 and 2. second moment of area about the neutral axis. Ai . 3. area of cross-section and the unit mass of the element. 4) must be chosen to fulfill the following boundary conditions ¯ ¯ dy(z) ¯ dy(z) ¯ ¯ ¯ = ϕyi1 y(z)|z=li = yi2 . 2. dz ¯z=0 dz ¯z=li The parameters yi1 and yi2 are called nodal displacements and the parameters ϕi1 and ϕi2 are called nodal rotations. ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤−1 ⎡ ⎡ 0 0 0 1 yi1 C1 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎢ C2 ⎥ ⎢ 0 ⎥ = ⎢ 1 3 102 1 0 ⎥ ⎢ ϕyi1 ⎥ = ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎣ C3 ⎦ ⎣ li l li 1 ⎦ ⎣ yi2 ⎦ ⎣ 6 2 i 1 2 C4 l li 1 0 ϕyi2 2 i ⎤ + li ϕyi1 − 2yi2 + li ϕyi2 ) ⎥ 2 2 (−3yi1 − 2li ϕyi1 + 3yi2 − li ϕyi2 ) ⎥ li ⎥ ⎦ ϕyi1 yi1 (3.DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS 218 1 z yi1 E i Ji Ai ρi yi2 ϕyi1 li y 2 ϕyi2 Figure 36 In this figure Ei . Ji . Introduction of solution 3.233) dz 4 Integration of the above equation four times yields 1 1 y(z) = C1 z 3 + C2 z 2 + C3 z + C4 6 2 (3.235) y(z)|z=0 = yi1 .236) ⎦ ⎣ C3 ⎦ ⎣ yi2 ⎦ ⎣ li l li 1 6 2 i 1 2 l li 1 0 C4 ϕyi2 2 i Its solution yields the integration constants Cj . The differential equation of the statically deflected line of the element in the plane yz is d4 y(z) Ei Ji =0 (3. and ρi stand for Young modulus. = ϕyi2 (3.237) 6 3 (2yi1 li .

H4 (see Eq. t) − ρi =0 ∂z 4 ∂t2 by its discreet representation along the nodal coordinates Ei Ji y [mi ] {¨ (t)} + [ki ] {y (t)} = 0.238 the deflected line of the finite element is assembled of terms which are linear with respect to the nodal coordinates. The matrix {y} contains the nodal coordinates. 3. The following mathematical manipulations are aimed to replace the continues mathematical model of the element considered ∂ 4 y(z. the dynamic deflection line is approximated by the static deflection line. These two matrices are going to be developed from the two following criterions: .237 into the equation of the deflected line 3. t) = {H(z)}T {y (t)} (3. 3. If the finite element performs motion with respect to the stationary system of coordinates xyz. " "µ ¶ µ ¶2 µ ¶2 µ ¶3 # µ ¶3 # z z z z z y(z) = 1 − 3 yi1 + li ϕyi1 −2 +2 + li li li li li " µ ¶ " µ ¶ µ ¶3 # µ ¶3 # 2 2 z z z z yi2 + − li ϕyi2 + 3 −2 + li li li li = {H(z)}T {y} (3. H2 . H3 . It should be noted that this assumption is acceptable only if the considered element is reasonably short.241. t) ∂ 2 y(z. it is assumed that the motion in the plane yz can be approximated by the following equation. 3.238) ⎫ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎬ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎭ where: ⎧ ³ ´2 ³ ´3 ⎪ 1 − 3 lz + 2 lz ⎪ i ⎪ ⎧ ⎫ ⎪ ∙³ ´ ⎪ ³ ´2 ³ i ´3 ¸ ⎪ ⎪ H1 ⎪ ⎪ z ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ li − 2 lz + lz ⎨ ⎬ ⎨ li i i H2 li ³ ´2 ³ ´3 = {H(z)} = ⎪ H3 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ 3 lz − 2 lz ⎩ ⎭ ⎪ ⎪ i ∙ ³i´ H4 li ⎪ ³ ´3 ¸ ⎪ 2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ − lz + lz li i i ⎧ ⎫ ⎪ yi1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎨ ⎬ ϕyi1 {y} = ⎪ yi2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ ⎭ ϕyi2 (3.242) (3.234 one may get it in the following form.240) Functions H1 .241) As one can see from the equation 3. As it can be seen from Eq.239) (3.DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS 219 After introduction of Eq. (3. y(z.239) are known as Hermite cubics or shape functions.243) In the above equations ρi stands for the unit mass of the finite element and [mi ] and [ki ] stands for the inertia and stiffness matrix respectively.

245) In the last formula mi stands for mass of the finite element.DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS 220 1. To take advantage of the second criterion let us produce expression for the . The kinetic energy of the continues physical model of the finite element is µ ¶2 Z 1 li ∂y(z. t) 1 li ∂y(z.244) It is easy to see that the last row of Eq. The potential energy of the continues physical model of the finite element must be equal to the potential energy of its discreet physical model. t) T = ρ dz 2 0 i ∂t µ ¶µ ¶ Z ∂y(z. ⎤ 2 H1 H1 H2 li H1 H3 H1 H4 li Z li 2 2 2 ⎢ H2 H1 li H2 li H2 H3 li H2 H4 li ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ dz = ρi 2 ⎣ H3 H1 H3 H2 li H3 H3 H4 li ⎦ 0 2 2 2 H4 H1 li H4 H2 li H4 H3 li H4 li ⎡ 13 ⎤ 9 13 11 l − 420 li 35 210 i 70 13 1 2 1 2 11 ⎢ l l l − 140 li ⎥ 105 i 420 i ⎥ = ρi li ⎢ 210 i 9 11 13 13 ⎣ li − 210 li ⎦ 70 420 35 13 1 2 11 1 2 − 420 li − 140 li − 210 li 105 li ⎡ 13 ⎤ 13 11 9 l − 420 li 35 210 i 70 13 1 2 1 2 ⎢ 11 l l l − 140 li ⎥ 105 i 420 i ⎥ = mi ⎢ 210 i 13 9 11 13 ⎣ l − 210 li ⎦ 70 420 i 35 13 1 2 11 1 2 − 420 li − 140 li − 210 li 105 li ⎡ mi (3.244 represents kinetic energy function of the discreet physical model along the nodal coordinates yi1 ϕyi1 yi2 ϕyi2 with the following matrix of inertia. 3. 2. The kinetic energy of the continues physical model of the finite element must be equal to the kinetic energy of its discreet physical model. t) ρ = dz 2 0 i ∂t ∂t Z ´³ ´ 1 li ³ = ˙ ρi {y (t)}T {H(z)} {H(z)}T {y (t)} dz ˙ 2 0 ∙ Z li ¸ 1 T T = {y (t)} ρi ˙ {H(z)} {H(z)} dz {y (t)} ˙ 2 0 ⎛ ⎡ ⎤ ⎞ 2 H1 H1 H2 li H1 H3 H1 H4 li Z li 2 2 2 ⎜ ⎢ H2 H1 li 1 H2 li H2 H3 li H2 H4 li ⎥ ⎟ ⎢ ⎥ dz ⎟ {y (t)} ˙ = {y (t)}T ⎜ρi ˙ 2 ⎝ ⎣ H3 H1 H3 H2 li H3 H3 H4 li ⎦ ⎠ 2 0 2 2 2 H4 H11 li H4 H2 li H4 H3 li H4 li (3.

DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS

221

potential energy function for the continues physical model of the finite element. µ 2 ¶2 Z 1 li ∂ y(z, t) V = Ei Ji dz 2 0 ∂z 2 µ 2 ¶µ 2 ¶ Z 1 li ∂ y(z, t) ∂ y(z, t) = dz Ei Ji 2 0 ∂z 2 ∂z 2 ! µ ½ 2 ¾¶ ý 2 ¾T Z d H(z) d H(z) 1 li Ei Ji {y (t)}T {y (t)} dz = 2 0 dz 2 dz 2 " ¾½ 2 ¾T # Z li ½ 2 d H(z) d H(z) 1 {y (t)}T Ei Ji dz {y (t)} = 2 dz 2 dz 2 0 ⎛ ⎡ ¡ 00 ¢2 ⎤ ⎞ 00 00 00 00 00 00 H1 H1 H2 li H1 H3 H1 H4 li Z li ⎜ ⎢ H 00 H 00 li (H 00 )2 l2 H 00 H 00 li H 00 H 00 l2 ⎥ ⎟ 1 T ⎜ i 2 2 3 2 4 i ⎥ dz ⎟ {y (t)} ⎢ 200 100 = {y (t)} ⎝Ei Ji 00 00 00 00 00 ⎣ H H 2 H3 H2 li (H3 )2 H3 H4 li ⎦ ⎠ 0 3 1 00 00 00 00 2 00 00 00 2 H4 H1 li H4 H2 li H4 H3 li (H4 )2 li (3.246) As one can see from Eq. 3.246, to fulfill the second criterion, the stiffness matrix along the nodal coordinates yi1 ϕyi1 yi2 ϕyi2 must be as follows. ⎡ ¡ 00 ¢2 H1 Z li ⎢ H 00 H 00 li ⎢ 200 100 = Ei Ji ⎣ H H 0 3 1 00 00 H4 H1 li ⎡ 12 6li 2 Ei Ji ⎢ 6li 4li ⎢ = 3 ⎣ −12 −6l li i 2 6li 2li H1 H2 li H1 H3 00 00 00 2 (H2 )2 li H2 H3 li 00 00 00 H3 H2 li (H3 )2 00 00 2 00 00 H4 H2 li H4 H3 li ⎤ −12 6li 2 −6li 2li ⎥ ⎥ 12 −6li ⎦ 2 −6li 4li
00 00 00 00

ki

⎤ 00 00 H1 H4 li 00 00 2 H2 H4 li ⎥ ⎥ dz 00 00 H3 H4 li ⎦ 00 2 (H4 )2 li (3.247)

Hence, the mathematical model of the element considered can be written as mi yi + ki yi = Ryi ¨ (3.248)

The vector Ri represents the interaction forces between the neighborhood elements. Ryi = £ Ryi1 Rϕyi1 Ryi2 Rϕyi2 ¤T (3.249)

In exactly the same manner one can create mathematical model for the next to the right hand side element of the shaft, say element j. ¨ mj yj + kj yj = Ryj (3.250)

DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS

222

where: ⎢ mj = mj ⎢ ⎣ kj ⎡
13 35 11 l 210 j 9 70 13 − 420 lj 11 l 210 j 1 2 l 105 j 13 l 420 j 1 2 − 140 lj 9 70 13 l 420 j 13 35 11 − 210 lj

12 6lj −12 6lj 2 2 ⎢ 6lj Ej Aj ⎢ 4lj −6lj 2lj ⎥ ⎥ = 3 lj ⎣ −12 −6lj 12 −6lj ⎦ 2 2 6lj 2lj −6lj 4lj £ ¤T yj = yj1 ϕyj1 yj2 ϕyj2 £ ¤T Ryi = Ryj1 Rϕyj1 Ryj2 Rϕyj2

⎤ 13 − 420 lj 1 2 − 140 lj ⎥ ⎥ 11 − 210 lj ⎦ 1 2 l 105 j ⎤

(3.251)

(3.252) (3.253)

These two equations of motion (3.248 3.250), associated with the two elements i and j, haveto fulfill the compatibility (continuity and equilibrium) conditions. These conditions allow to join those two elements to create one mathematical model representing both elements. In the case considered here, the compatibility conditions between the two elements i and j correspond to the left hand side node of the element i and the right hand side node of the element j. For these nodes the continuity conditions take form ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ yi2 yj1 yij = = (3.254) ϕyi2 ϕyj1 ϕyij and the equilibrium conditions are ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ Ryi2 Ryj1 0 + = Rϕyi2 Rϕyj1 0

(3.255)

They results in the following mathematical model of the joint elements. ¨ mij yij + kij yij = Ryij where: ⎡
13 m 35 i 11 lm 210 i i 9 m 70 i 13 − 420 li mi 11 lm 210 i i 1 2 l mi 105 i 13 lm 420 i i 1 2 − 140 li mi

(3.256)

mij

⎢ ⎢ ⎢ = ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ ⎣

0 0

0 0

⎤ 13 − 420 li mi 0 0 1 2 ⎥ − 140 li mi 0 0 ⎥ 13 11 9 13 (mi + mj ) (−li mi +lj mj ) m − 420 lj mj ⎥ 35 210 70 j ⎥ 11 1 13 1 2 2 2 (−li mi +lj mj ) 105 (li mi +lj mj ) lj mj − 140 lj mj ⎥ 210 420 ⎥ 9 11 13 13 mj lj mj mj − 210 lj mj ⎦ 70 420 35 1 2 13 1 2 11 − 420 lj mj − 140 lj mj − 210 lj mj 105 lj mj (3.257)
9 m 70 i 13 lm 420 i i

DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS

223
A 6 Eli2 i i 2 EilAi

kij

⎢ ⎢ i i i i ⎢ A A A A A A A A ⎢ −129 Ei3 i −6 Ei2 i 12( Ei3 i + Ej3 j ) 6(− Ei2 i + Ej2 j ) −12 Ej3 j 6 Ej2 j ⎢ li li li lj li lj lj lj = ⎢ E A E A E A E A A A ⎢ 6 Ei2 i 2 EilAi 6(− Eli2 i + j2 j ) 4( EilAi + jl j ) −6 j2 j 2 jl j li lj lj ⎢ i i j j i ⎢ E A E A E A E A ⎢ 0 0 −12 j3 j −6 j2 j 12 j3 j −6 j2 j lj lj lj lj ⎣ Ej Aj Ej Aj Ej Aj Ej Aj 0 0 6 l2 2 l −6 l2 4 l
j j j j

A 12 Eli3 i i A 6 Eli2 i

iA 6 El2 i i 4 EilAi

iA −12 El3 i i iA −6 El2 i

0 0

0 0

⎤ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎦

(3.258)

yij = Rij =

Repetition of the described procedure to all elements of the shaft results in the mathematical model of the shaft in the plane yz. m¨ + ky = 0 y (3.261)

£

£

yi1 ϕyi1 yij ϕyij yj2 ϕyj2

Ryi1 Rϕyi1 0 0 Ryj2 Rϕyj2

¤T

(3.259) (3.260)

¤T

The geometrical interpretation of the nodal coordinates appearing in the Eq. 3.259 is given in Fig. 37.The coordinates yi , ϕyi are associated with nodes which are located
element 1 Oi node 1 node i yi ϕyi y node N element i element N-1 z

Figure 37 at the ends of the finite elements. Introduction of the external forces Since the finite element is considered elastic, the treatment of the external forces presented in the previous section can not be applied. In this case one has to take advantage of the principle of the virtual work. It says that the virtual work produced by a force Fi (see Fig. 38) on the displacement yi is equal to the virtual work produced by a set of forces along the coordinates yi1 ϕyi1 yi2 ϕyi2 . Hence ⎧ ⎫ ⎪ yi1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎨ ⎬ ϕyi1 ∂Wi = Fi · yi (ai , t) = {Fi1 , Mi1 , Fi2 , Mi2 } (3.262) ⎪ yi2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ ⎭ ϕyi2

DISCRETE MODEL OF THE FREE-FREE BEAMS

224

ai 1 yi1

Fi Ei Ji Ai ρ i

z yi2

ϕ yi1
li y
Figure 38 But according to 3.241 ⎧ ³ ´2 ³ ´3 ⎪ 1 − 3 ai + 2 ai ⎪ li l ⎪ ∙ ⎪ ³ ´ ⎪ ³ ´2 ³ i ´3 ¸ ⎪ ⎪ ai ⎪ li − 2 ai + ai ⎨ li li li ³ ´2 ³ ´3 y(ai , t) = {H(ai )}T {y (t)} = ⎪ ⎪ 3 ai − 2 ai ⎪ li ⎪ ∙ ³ li ´ ⎪ ³ ´3 ¸ ⎪ 2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ − ai + ai l
li li i

2

ϕyi2

Hence, the vector of forces along the nodal coordinates is ⎧ ³ ´2 ³ ´3 ai ai ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ∙ 1 − 3 li + 2 li ¸ ⎧ ⎪ ³ ´ ⎫ ⎪ ³ ´2 ³ ´3 ⎪ ⎪ Fi1 ⎪ ⎪ ai ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ li − 2 ai + ai ⎨ ⎨ ⎬ li li li Mi1 ³ ´2 ³ ´3 = Fi · ⎪ Fi2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ 3 ai − 2 ai ⎩ ⎪ ⎭ li ⎪ ∙ ³ li ´ Mi2 ⎪ ³ ´3 ¸ ⎪ 2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ − ai + ai li l l
i i

Introduction of the above expression into the expression for the virtual work yields ⎧ ⎫T ³ ´2 ³ ´3 ⎪ ⎪ 1 − 3 ai + 2 ai ⎪ ⎪ li l ⎪ ∙ ⎪ ⎪ ³ ´ ⎪ ⎪ ³ ´2 ³ i ´3 ¸ ⎪ ⎧ y ⎫ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ai ai ai ⎪ li ⎪ ⎪ i1 ⎪ −2 l + l ⎨ ⎬ ⎬ ⎨ li i i ϕyi1 ³ ´2 ³ ´3 (3.264) ∂Wi = Fi · ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ yi2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ 3 ai − 2 ai ⎪ ⎭ ⎪ ⎩ li ⎪ ⎪ ∙ ³ li ´ ϕyi2 ⎪ ⎪ ³ ´3 ¸ ⎪ ⎪ 2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ ⎭ − ai + ai li l l
i i

⎫T ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎧ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ yi1 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎨ ⎬ ϕyi1 ⎪ ⎪ yi2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ ⎪ ϕyi2 ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎭

⎫ ⎪ ⎪ ⎬ ⎪ ⎪ ⎭

(3.263)

⎫ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎬ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎪ ⎭

(3.265)

This forces have to be introduced into the equation of motion 3.261 m¨ + ky = Fs + F(t) y (3.266)

where, similarly as before, Fs stands for the static forces and F(t) stands for the excitation forces.

¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ yb ¨ kbb kbr yb Fb mbb mbr + = mrb mrr yr ¨ krb krr yr Fr Partitioning of the above equations results in the following set of equations ¨ ¨ mbb yb + mbr yr + kbb yb + kbr yr = Fb mrb yb + mrr yr + krb yb + krr yr = Fr ¨ ¨ (3. 39).. ⎤ .269) yr Let us assume that the mathematical model of the beam m¨ + ky = F y is organized with respect to the above vector y of coordinates. (3. ⎢ ⎥ (3. The instantaneous position of these supports is determine with respect to the stationary system of coordinates xyz by coordinates byi (t) .272) .267) b = ⎣ byi (t) ⎦ . .271) (3.270) Let us reorganize vector of coordinates of the shaft © ªT y = ϕxN . y1 ϕy1 ..4 BOUNDARY CONDITIONS O Oi bxi byi x Bi yi Figure 39 ϕx i ϕy z i xi y in such a way that its upper part yb contains coordinates along which the shaft is rigidly supported and its lower part yr contains all the remaining coordinates ∙ ¸ yb y= (3. Let us denote by b vector of such coordinates.yN ϕyN Let us assume that the free-free beam is rigidly supported upon several supports Bi (see Fig. . . ... ⎡ .BOUNDARY CONDITIONS 225 3.268) (3..

is a known function of time. Hence the above equation can be solved.277 yields ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ mee mer ye ¨ cee cer ye ˙ kee ker ye Fe + + = (3. Hence.272 must be replaced by b. Let yr = Yr (t) (3.273) The second equation governs motion of the supported beam and can be rewritten as follows ¨ ¨ (3.CONDENSATION OF THE DISCREET SYSTEMS 226 Motion of the beam along the coordinates yb is determined by the boundary conditions 3.277) is too large to enable the necessary analysis of the mathematical model to be carried out. This solution approximate motion of the beam along the remining coordinates yr .275) be a solution of this equation.279) mre mrr yr ¨ cre crr yr ˙ kre krr yr Fr . ¨ ¨ mbb b + mbr yr + kbb b + kbr yr = Fb ¨ mrb b + mrr yr + krb b + krr yr = Fr ¨ (3.278) y= yr Partitioning of the equations 3. due to large number of the uniform sections of the element to be modeld. the vector yb in the mathematical model 3.276) In meny engineering problems. ¸ ∙ ye (3.274) mrr yr + krr yr = Fr − mrb bb − krs bb The last two terms represent the kinemetic excitation of the beam cause by motion of its supports.5 CONDENSATION OF THE DISCREET SYSTEMS (3.277 is arranged in such a way that the coordinates which are to be eliminated due to the condensation procedure ye are located in the upper part of the vector y and these which are to be retained for further consideration yr are located in its lower part. These interaction forces can be now determined. Let us assume. In this section the procedures for reducing the size of mathematical models will be developed. in a general case.267. that the equation 3. The vector Fb in the first equation of the set 3. The vector b.273 represents the forces of interaction between the moving beam and its supports. number of the final elements is large too. ¨ ¨ Fb = mbb b + mbr Yr + kbb b + kbr Yr (t) 3. It follows that the size of the matrices involved in the discreet mathematical model m¨ + cy + ky = F y ˙ (3.

286) . 3.281) (3. if the kinetic energy after condensation is to be the same.CONDENSATION OF THE DISCREET SYSTEMS 227 Hence.280) kre krr yr 0 (3.285) 2 Hence.282) (3. the inertia matrix after condensation mc must be equal to mc = hT mee h + hT mer +mre h + mrr (3.282 yields ´ 1³ ˙ ˙ ˙ ˙T ˙ ˙r ˙ [hyr ]T mee hyr + [hyr ]T mer yr + yr mre hyr +yT mrr yr ˙ T = 2 ¢ 1¡ T T = yr h mee hyr +yT hT mer yr +yT mre hyr +yT mrr yr ˙ ˙ ˙r ˙ ˙r ˙ ˙r ˙ 2 ¤ ¢ 1¡ T£ T yr h mee h + hT mer +mre h + mrr yr ˙ = ˙ (3. Potential energy of the system before and after condensation must be the same.279. One of many possibilities is to assume that the coordinates ye are obeyed to the static relationship.5. one may formulate the following criteria of condensation: 1. one have to determine the relationship between the coordinates ye and the coordinates yr . 2. According to the first criterion.280 one may obtain kee ye +ker yr = 0 Therefore the sought relationship is ye = hyr where h = −k−1 ker ee To eliminate the coordinates ye from the mathematical model 3. 3.284) 2 Introduction of 3. Virtual work done by all the external forces before and after condensation must be the same. ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ ∙ ye 0 kee ker = (3. upon partitioning equation 3. 4.1 Condensation of the inertia matrix.283) Once the relationship is established. Kinetic energy of the system before and after condensation must be the same. Dissipation function of the system before and after condensation must be the same. The kinetic energy of the system before condensation is ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¤ mee mer 1£ T ye ˙ T ye yr ˙ ˙ T = mre mrr yr ˙ 2 ¡ T ¢ 1 = ˙ ˙T ˙ ˙T ˙ ˙T ˙ ye mee ye + ye mer yr + yr mre ye + yr mrr yr ˙ (3. the kinetic energy of the system before and after condensation must be the same.

282 into the above equation yields ¡ T ¢ ¡ ¢ δW = (hyr )T Fe +yT Fr = yr hT Fe +yT Fr = yT hT Fe +Fr r r r Hence. according to 3.287) 3. Indeed. hT kee h + hT ker = (−k−1 ker )T kee (−k−1 ker ) + (−k−1 ker )T ker ee ee ee −1 T −1 T = −(−kee ker ) ker + (−kee ker ) ker = 0 Hence.295 (3. they can be transformed as following. kc = kre h + krr 3.3 Condensation of the stiffness matrix.289) It is easy to show that sum of the first two terms in the above expression is equal to zero.283.282 ye = hyc permits to produce displacement along the ’cut off’ coordinates on the base of solution of the equation 3. The virtual work performed by external forces F on the displacements y is ¸ ∙ £ T ¤ Fe T T δW = ye yr = ye Fe +yT Fr r Fr Introduction of 3.5. repetition of the above derivation leads to the following definition of the condensed damping matrix cc = hT cee h + hT cer +cre h + crr (3.4 Condensation of the external forces.293) (3. can be adopted as follows ¨ ˙ (3.296) .295) mc yc +cc yc +kc yc = Fc where yc = yr The relationship 3.2 Condensation of the damping matrix.289 kc = hT kee h + hT ker +kre h + krr (3. according to the above consideration.5.292) (3. ¡ ¢ Fc = hT Fe +Fr (3.291) (3.5.294) The condensed mathematical model.288) = 2 one can arrive to conclusion that the condensed stiffness matrix is of the form 3.290) (3. Taking advantage from definition of potential energy of the system considered ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¤ kee ker 1£ T ye T ye yr V = kre krr yr 2 ¡ T ¢ 1 T T T ye kee ye + ye ker yr + yr kre ye + yr krr yr (3. Since formula for the dissipation function is of the same form as formula for the kinetic energy.CONDENSATION OF THE DISCREET SYSTEMS 228 3.

5 × 10−9 m4 12 k = 10000N/m l = 1m 11 ×2.03 × 0. .01 = 0.5×10−9 α = EJ = 2.01 = 2. O z k l y Figure 40 The exact solution of this problem is presented in page 191 for the following data E = 2.0003m2 3 J = 0.03×0. 40.1 × 1011 N/m2 ρ = 7800kg/m3 A = 0.6 PROBLEMS Problem 52 Produce the natural frequencies and the corresponding natural modes for the fixed-elastically supported uniform beam shown in Fig.0525 k Use this data to produce the solution by means of approximation of this beam with 10 finite elements.PROBLEMS 229 3.1×10 10000 = 0.

. 41... y11 .. the equation of the beam supported by the spring is m¨ + ks y = 0 y This force should be introduced to the ⎤ ⎡ ⎡ 0 0 .PROBLEMS 230 Solution To create the mathematical model of the free-free beam.. 0 ⎥ ⎢ ϕ1 ⎥ ⎥⎢ ⎥ ..297. y ⎥ ⎢ ⎢ ⎣ ky11 ⎦ ⎣ 0 0 . . ϕ2 .. 42). ⎤⎡ ⎤ y1 .. The computed mathematical model is O y1 y2 ϕ1 ϕ2 l y Figure 41 m¨ + ky = 0........ ..... .. y11 O ϕ11 z l y -ky11 Figure 42 Therefore.. ϕ1 .299) .. y y11 z ϕ11 y = {y1 .. 0 right hand side of the equation 3....297) The influence of the spring can be represented by the force −ky11 acting along the coordinate y11 (see Fig.... .... 0 0 ....298) ⎥⎢ ⎥ ⎦ ⎣ y11 ⎦ k 0 0 0 ϕ11 (3.. 0 ... y2 .. ⎥ = ⎢ ... ⎥ = −k1 y (3. 0 ⎢ 0 ⎥ ⎢ 0 0 .. ⎥ ⎢ ⎢ m¨ + ky = − ⎢ . ⎥ ⎢ .. ϕ11 }T (3. it was divided into ten finite elements as shown in Fig...

. 0}T and R1 = {R....... ϕ1 }T = {0.303 and 3... M}T Introduction of 3.304 into 3. . ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ m11 m12 y1 ¨ ks11 ks12 y1 + =0 (3.304) (3.300) R M O y1=0 y2 y11 ϕ11 z l y Figure 43 ϕ1=0 ϕ2 -ky11 According to the boundary conditions (see Fig. ϕ2 ... k 0 ⎦ 0 0 .....PROBLEMS 231 where To introduce the boundary conditions associated with the left hand side of the beam...307) (3. 0 0 0 .305) .303) (3. ..306) (3. 0 ⎥ ⎥ . ⎥ ⎥ 0 0 .... y11 .. ...302) ⎢ ⎢ ks = k + k1 = k+ ⎢ ⎢ ⎣ ⎡ ⎤ 0 0 .301) m21 m22 y2 ¨ ks21 ks22 y2 where y1 = {y1 .301 yields ∙ ¸ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ m11 m12 0 ks11 ks12 0 R1 + = y2 ¨ y2 m21 m22 ks21 ks22 0 This equation is equivalent to two equations as follows ¨ m12 y2 + ks12 y2 = R1 ¨ m22 y2 + ks22 y2 = 0 (3.. . ϕ11 }T (3.. .. 43) y1 = {y1 ..... 0 0 (3... .... let us partition the above mathematical model in such a manner that all the coordinates involved in this boundary conditions are included in the vector y1 .. ϕ1 }T y2 = {y2 . .

306 allows the vector of the interation forces R1 to be computed.65 357.4 932. 44) and natural frequencies (second column in the Table) obtained by solving the continuous mathematical model ( see problem page 190). The equation 3.6 357. O 2 y 1 Y1(z) Y2(z) Y3(z) l k z 0 -1 0.4 z 0.5 129. It was solved for the natural modes and the natural frequencies.8 1 -2 Figure 44 Table natural frequenciesof natural frequencies of the descreet system the continuous system [1/sec] [1/sec] 129. Results of this computation is shown in Fig. This results are compare with natural modes (continuous line in Fig.3 933.6 0. 44 by boxes and in the first column of the Table below.2 0.PROBLEMS 232 The second equation 3.0 1 2 3 .307 is the equation of motion of the supported beam.

x2 . x2 . 2. x3 as shown in Fig. x = ⎢ x2 ⎥ m = ⎢ 21 ⎣ k31 k32 k33 k34 ⎦ ⎣ x3 ⎦ ⎣ m31 m32 m33 m34 ⎦ m41 m42 m43 m44 k41 k42 k43 k44 x4 (3.308) ⎡ ⎡ ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ ⎤ k11 k12 k13 m14 x1 m11 m12 m13 m14 ⎢ ⎢ ⎢ m ⎥ ⎥ m22 m23 m24 ⎥ ⎥ . k = ⎢ k21 k22 k23 k24 ⎥ . x4 is as follows m¨ + kx = 0 x (3.PROBLEMS 233 Problem 53 The mathematical model of a free-free beam shown in Fig. 46.310) .309) 1 2 3 4 x1 x2 Figure 45 x3 x4 This beam is supported upon three rigid pedestals along coordinates x1 . 1 2 3 a3 Z a2 sin ω t X Figure 46 The motion of these supports with respect to the inertial system of coordinate XZ is given by the following equations X1 = 0 X2 = a2 sin ωt X3 = a3 Derive expressions for : 1. 45 along coordinates x1 . the static deflection curve. the interaction forces between the beam and the supports (3. x3 .

312) m21 m22 x2 ¨ k21 k22 x2 R2 ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ m12 m13 m14 £ ¤ m22 m23 ⎦ .314) ⎡ ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ x1 R1 x1 = ⎣ x2 ⎦ .316) (3. m12 = ⎣ m24 ⎦ .321 is x4 = xs k44 xs = −k43 a3 (3. m22 = m44 m32 m33 m34 (3.317 yields ⎡ ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ ¨ £ ¤ x1 ¤ x1 £ ¨ m44 x4 + k44 x4 = − m41 m42 m43 ⎣ x2 ⎦ − k41 k42 k43 ⎣ x2 ⎦ (3.318) ¨ x3 ¨ x3 ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ 0 x1 ¨ ⎣ x2 ⎦ = ⎣ −a2 ω2 sin ωt ⎦ .313) ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ k14 k12 k13 ¤ £ k22 k23 ⎦ .320.323) (3. m21 = m41 m42 m43 . k22 = k44 k32 k33 k34 (3.317) where Introduction of boundary conditions 3.322) (3. m44 x4 + k44 x4 = −k43 a3 ¨ The particular solution of the equation 3. ¨ 0 x3 ¨ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ x1 0 ⎣ x2 ⎦ = ⎣ a2 sin ωt ⎦ a3 x3 ⎡ (3.308 with respect to the vector of boundary conditions 3.310 results in the following equation m¨ + kx = R x where ⎡ ∙ (3.PROBLEMS 234 Solution Partitioning of the equations 3.310 into the equation 3. R2 =0 (3.311) m11 ⎣ m21 m11 = m31 k11 ⎣ k21 k11 = k31 ⎡ or ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸∙ ¸ ∙ ¸ x1 ¨ k11 k12 x1 R1 m11 m12 + = (3. R1 = ⎣ R2 ⎦ .315) x3 R3 ¨ ¨ m11 x1 + m12 x2 + k11 x1 + k12 x2 = R1 ¨ ¨ m21 x1 + m22 x2 + k21 x1 + k22 x2 = 0 (3.319) or ¨ m44 x4 + k44 x4 = (m42 a2 ω 2 − k42 a2 ) sin ωt − k43 a3 (3. k21 = k41 k42 k43 .320) The static deflection is due to the time independent term −k43 a3 in the right hand side of the equation 3. k12 = ⎣ k24 ⎦ .321) . x2 =x4 .

These forces can computed from equation 3.328) (3.PROBLEMS 235 −k43 a3 k44 Its graphical representation is given in Fig.324) 1 2 3 a3 4 Z xs X Figure 47 The forced response due to motion of the support 2 (X2 = a2 sin ωt) is represented by the particular solution due to the time dependant term. m11 x1 + m12 x2 + k11 x1 + k12 x2 = R1 ¨ ¨ In this equation x1 stands for the given boundary conditions ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ x1 0 x1 = ⎣ x2 ⎦ = ⎣ a2 sin ωt ⎦ a3 x3 ⎡ ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ x1 ¨ 0 ¨ . xd = (m42 a2 ω 2 − k42 a2 ) −ω 2 m44 + k44 (3.325) Implementation of the solution 3.316.329) . 48 1 2 3 a3 4 xs Z X a2 sinω t Figure 48 xd sinω t This motion causes interaction forces along these coordinates along which the system is attached to the base.327) The resultant motion of the system considered is shown in Fig. x1= ⎣ x2 ⎦ = ⎣ −a2 ω 2 sin ωt ⎦ ¨ 0 x3 ¨ ⎡ (3.326) (3.326 into the equation 3. 47 xs = (3. the particular solution may be predicted as follows x4 = xd sin ωt (3. m44 x4 + k44 x4 = (m42 a2 ω 2 − k42 a2 ) sin ωt ¨ For the above equation.325 yields the wanted amplitude of the forced vibration xd .

PROBLEMS 236 and x2 represents. dt2 (3. known at this stage. motion of the system along the coordinate 4 ¨ ¨ x2 = x4 = xs + xd sin ωt x2 = x4 = d2 (xs + xd sin ωt) = −xd ω 2 sin ωt.331) 0 ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ .330) Hence. the wanted vector of interaction forces is as follows ⎤ 0 R1 = m11 ⎣ −a2 ω 2 sin ωt ⎦+k11 ⎣ a2 sin ωt ⎦+m12 (−xd ω2 sin ω)+k12 (xs +xd sin ωt) 0 a3 (3.

Part II EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION 237 .

The transducer 5 allows the acceleration of the highest block to be measured in the horizontal direction.1 1 DESCRIPTION OF THE LABORATORY INSTALLATION 2 4 5 3 6 7 8 9 10 12 Figure 1 The vibrating object 2. and 4 (see Fig. The rubber tip 8 is used . The spaces between the blocks 2 are filled in with the foam 4 in order to increase the structural damping.1) is attached to the base 1.Chapter 4 MODAL ANALYSIS OF A SYSTEM WITH 3 DEGREES OF FREEDOM 4. 3. It is furnished with the piezoelectric transducer 7 that permits the impulse of the force applied to the object to be measured. It consists of the three rectangular blocks 2 joint together by means of the two springs 3. The hammer 6 is used to induce vibrations of the object.

k2 and k3 of the springs can be analytically assessed.MODELLING OF THE OBJECT 239 to smooth and extend the impulse of force. which is considered rigid and motionless. x2 and x3 are shown in Fig.2. Hence. To this end let us consider one spring shown in Fig. Magnitudes of the stuffiness k1 .2.2) (4. Motion of the blocks is restricted to one horizontal direction only. 3 The differential equation of the deflection of the spring is EJ d2 x FH − Fz = M − Fz = 2 dz 2 (4. Both. EJ FH F dx = z − z2 + A dz 2 2 FH 2 F 3 EJx = z − z + Az + B 4 6 (4.1) Double integration results in the following equation of the bending line. the system can be approximated by three degrees of freedom physical model. according to these assumptions.3) . The three independent coordinates x1 . forms a reference system for measuring its vibrations.2 MODELLING OF THE OBJECT 4. These data allow the transfer functions to be produced and sent to the personal computer 11 for further analysis. the acceleration of the object and the impulse of the force can be simultaneously recorded and stored in the memory of the spectrum analyzer 10. 4.1 Physical model x3 k3 c3 x2 k2 c2 x1 k1 c1 m1 m2 m3 Figure 2 The base 1. The blocks 2 are assumed to be rigid and the springs 3 are by assumption massless.

MODELLING OF THE OBJECT
z x(H) M=FH/2

240

F

w EJ H x F z

t

M=FH/2

Figure 3 Taking advantage of the boundary conditions associated with the lower end of the spring, one can arrived to the following expression for the bending line. ¶ µ 1 FH 2 F 3 x= (4.4) z − z EJ 4 6 Hence, the deflection of the upper end is ¶ µ 1 1 FH 2 F 3 x(H) = H − H = F H3 EJ 4 6 12EJ Therefore the stiffness of one spring is k= where 12EJ F = x(H) H3 J= (4.6)

(4.5)

wt3 (4.7) 12 Since we deal with a set of two springs between the blocks, the stiffness ki shown in the physical model can be computed according to the following formula. ki = 24Ei Ji Hi3 (4.8)

4.2.2 Mathematical model Application of the Newton’s equations to the developed physical model results in the following set of differential equations m1 x1 + (c1 + c2 )x1 + (−c2 )x2 + (k1 + k2 )x1 + (−k2 )x2 = F1 ¨ ˙ ˙ m2 x2 + (−c2 )x1 + (c2 + c3 )x2 + (−c3 )x3 + (−k2 )x1 + (k2 + k3 )x2 + (−k3 )x3 = F2 ¨ ˙ ˙ ˙ m3 x3 + (−c3 )x2 + c3 x3 + (−k3 )x2 + k3 x3 = F3 ¨ ˙ ˙

ANALYSIS OF THE MATHEMATICAL MODEL

241

These equations can be rewritten as following m¨ + cx + kx = F x ˙ where ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ 0 0 m1 0 c1 + c2 −c2 m = ⎣ 0 m2 0 ⎦ ; c = ⎣ −c2 c2 + c3 −c3 ⎦ 0 0 m3 0 −c3 c3 ⎤ ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ ⎡ ⎡ −k2 0 k1 + k2 x1 F1 k2 + k3 −k3 ⎦ ; x = ⎣ x2 ⎦ ; F = ⎣ F2 ⎦ k = ⎣ −k2 0 −k3 k3 x3 F3 ⎡ (4.9)

(4.10)

The vector F represents the external excitation that can be applied to the system. 4.3 ANALYSIS OF THE MATHEMATICAL MODEL

4.3.1 Natural frequencies and natural modes of the undamped system. The matrix of inertia and the matrix of stiffness can be assessed from the dimensions of the object. Hence, the natural frequencies and the corresponding natural modes of the undamped system can be produced. Implementation of the particular solution x = X cos ωt into the equation of the free motion of the undamped system m¨ + kx = F x (4.12) (4.11)

Solution of the eigenvalue and eigenvector problem yields the natural frequencies and the corresponding natural modes. ±ω1 , ±ω 2 , ±ω 3 (4.14) (4.15)

results in a set of the algebraic equations that are linear with respect to the vector X. ¡ 2 ¢ −ω m + k X = 0 (4.13)

Ξ = [Ξ1 , Ξ2 , Ξ2 ]

For detailed explanation see pages 102 to 105 4.3.2 Equations of motion in terms of the normal coordinates - transfer functions If one assume that the damping matrix is of the following form c =µm+κk (4.16)

the equations of motion 4.9 can be expressed in terms of the normal coordinates η = Ξ−1 x (see section normal coordinates - modal damping page 105) η n + 2ξ n ω n η n + ω 2 η n = ΞT F(t), ¨ ˙ n n n = 1, 2, 3 (4.17)

ANALYSIS OF THE MATHEMATICAL MODEL

242

The response of the system along the coordinate xp due to the harmonic excitation Fq eiωt along the coordinate xq , according to the formula 2.142 (page 107), is xp = e
iωt N X

ω2 n=1 n

Ξpn Ξqn Fq − ω2 + 2ς n ω n ωi

(4.18)

Hence the acceleration along the coordinate xp as the second derivative with respect to time, is N X Ξpn Ξqn Fq 2 iωt (4.19) xp = −ω e ¨ 2 − ω 2 + 2ς ω ωi ω n n n=1 n It follows that the transfer function between the coordinate xp and xq , according to 2.144 is Rpq (iω) = xp xp ¨ = −ω 2 = iωt Fq e Fq eiωt ¶ N X µ Ξpn Ξqn (ω2 − ω2 ) −2Ξpn Ξqn ς n ωn ωi n 2 = −ω + (ω 2 − ω2 )2 + 4ς 2 ω 2 ω2 (ω 2 − ω 2 )2 + 4ς 2 ω 2 ω2 n n n n n n n=1

q = 1, 2, 3 (4.20)

The modal damping ratios ς 1 , ς 2 and ς 3 are unknown and are to be identified by fitting the analytical transfer functions into the experimental ones. Since the transducer 5 (Fig. 1) produces acceleration, the laboratory installation permits to obtain the acceleration to force transfer function. The theory on the experimental determination of the transfer functions is given in the section Experimental determination of the transfer functions (page 100). 4.3.3 Extraction of the natural frequencies and the natural modes from the transfer functions The problem of determination of the natural frequencies and the natural modes from the displacement - force transfer functions was explained in details in section Determination of natural frequencies and modes from the transfer functions (page 107). Let us do similar manipulation on the acceleration - force transfer function. First of all let us notice that µ ¶ Ξpn Ξqn (ω 2 − ω 2 ) −Ξpn Ξqn i n 2 if ω ∼ ωn Rpq (iω n ) ∼ −ω q = 1, 2, 3 (4.21) + = = 4ς 2 ω2 ω 2 2ς n ωn ω n n Since the real part of the transfer function is equal to zero for ω = ω n , its absolute value is equal to the absolute value of the imaginary part. ¯ ¯ ¯ Ξpn Ξqn ¯ ¯ q = 1, 2, 3 (4.22) |Rpq (iω n )| ∼ ¯ =¯ 2ς n ¯ ϕ = arctan Im(Rpq (iωn )) = arctan ∞ = ±90o Re(Rpq (iω n )) (4.23)

and phase ϕ for ω = ω n

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION

243

Hence, the frequencies ω corresponding to the phase ±90o are the wanted natural frequencies ω n . Because ς n and Ξpn are constants, magnitudes of the absolute value of the transfer functions for ω = ω n represents the modes Ξ1n , Ξ2n , Ξ3n associated with the n − th natural frequency. An example of extracting the natural frequency and the corresponding natural mode from the transfer function is shown in Fig. 4
transfer functions m/N (modulus) 0.00025 0.0002 0.00015 0.0001 0.00005 0 1500 4 3 2 1 0 -1 -2 -3 -4 1500 1600 1700 1800 R(1,1) R(1,2) R(1,3) natural frequency natural mode 1600 1700 1800 frequency rad/s R(1,1) R(1,2) R(1,3)

transfer functions m/N (phase)

π/2

−π/2

frequency rad/s 2 1

Figure 4

4.4

EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION

4.4.1 Acquiring of the physical model initial parameters The physical model is determined by the following parameters m1 , m2 m3 - masses of the blocks k1 , k2 k3 - stiffness of the springs c1 , c2 c3 - damping coefficients

.. ς 2 and ς 3 (see equation 4.. Since the transducer 5 (Fig..7 and 4.. The spectrum analyzer must show the ’waiting for trigger’ sign before the subsequent impulse is applied.595kg m3 = 0....m to be measured during the laboratory session t = .... The following set of data is required E = 0. let us adopt the following damping ratios ς 1 = 0......EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION 244 The blocks were weighted before assembly and their masses are m1 = 0.17). the laboratory installation permits the following transfer functions to be obtained. Inspection of the free vibrations of the object lead to the conclusion that the damping is much smaller then the critical one.2 Measurements of the transfer functions According to the description given in section Experimental determination of the transfer functions (page 100) to produce the transfer function Rpq (iω) you have to measure response of the system along the coordinate xp due to impulse along the coordinate xq ... R31 (iω) R32 (iω) R33 (iω) (4..595kg The formula 4. .670kg m2 = 0..... one has to observe the following.............. always place the hammer on the pad provided when it is not used 2... x2 or x3 ....m to be measured during the laboratory session H1 = . when applying the impulse to the object make sure that the impulse is not excessive Harder impact does not produce better results..24) allows the stiffness ki to be computed... 1.. These impulses should be applied to the middle of the block.25) The hammer 6 should be used to introduce the impulse. 10 measurements are to be averaged to get one transfer function......4.01 4... As the equipment used is delicate and expensive......01 ς 2 = 0..... J= Hi3 12 (4...... Hence.01 ς 2 = 0.... 1) is permanently attached to the mass m3 and the impulse can be applied along the coordinates x1 ... To obtain a reliable result.......... Alternatively the damping properties of the system can be uniquely defined by means of the three modal damping ratios ς 1 ......m to be measured during the laboratory session H2 = .. as the first approximation of the damping....m to be measured during the laboratory session H3 = ....21 × 1012 N/m2 w = ......... ξ = 1 corresponds to the critical damping...8 24EJ wt3 ki = ....m to be measured during the laboratory session The damping coefficients ci are difficult to be assessed.

27) (4. ξ 3 (4. to fit the analytical transfer functions into the experimental one. E were assessed with a sufficient accuracy. In this experiment. m2 . w.4. H3 . .3 Identification of the physical model parameters In a general case. Uncertain are t. H1 . We assume that the following parameters m1 .26) Use the parameter t to shift the natural frequencies (increment of t results in shift of the natural frequencies to the right).EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION 245 4. the identification of a physical model parameters from the transfer functions bases on a very complicated curve fitting procedures. m3 . ξ 2 . H2 . Use the parameters ξ i to align the picks of the absolute values of the transfer functions (increment in the modal damping ratio results in lowering the pick of the analytical transfer function). Work on one (say R33 (iω) transfer function only. ξ 1 . we are going to use the trial and error method.

.m of mode 2 springs damping ratio thickness of the ξ 3 = 0.01 t = ... response coordinate 3... Use the parameter t to shift the natural frequencies (increment of t results in shift of the natural frequencies to the right)...01 E = 0.m 1 1 Mass of the block length of the spring m2 = 0. Use the parameters ξ i to align the picks of the absolute values of the transfer functions (increment in the modal damping ratio results in lowering the pick of the analytical transfer function)..........m 3 3 damping ratio Young’s ξ 1 = 0.. Identification of the thickness t and the modal damping ratios ξ i You can see both the experimental and analytical transfer function R33 (iω)...... By varying t.. T.. ∗ program designed by Dr.. Initial parameters of physical model Measure the missing parameters and insert them to the table below Mass of the block length of the spring m1 = 0.... execute it and apply 10 times impulse along the coordinates 3 Choose sub-menu ’Time/Frequency domain toggle’ to see the measured transfer function Choose sub-menu ’Transfer TRF to computer’ and execute it Exit menu ’Frequency response measurements’ Choose ’Response display/plot’ to display the transfer functions 3. Chalko .. try to fit the analytical data into the experimental one. Experimental acceleration-force transfer functions R33 (iω) Choose menu ’Frequency response measurements’ Set up the spectrum analyzer by execution of the sub-menu ’Setup analyzer’ Choose sub-menu ’Perform measurement’.... Save the initial data........... 2........... Set excitation coordinate 3..21 × 1012 N/m2 of mode 1 modulus damping ratio width of the ξ 2 = 0....5 WORKSHEET 1. ξ 3 in the input data.m 2 2 Mass of the block length of the spring m1 = 0.............. ξ 1 ......595kg H2 = . ξ 2 ......01 w = .WORKSHEET 246 4.m of mode 3 springs ∗ Run program ’Prac3 ’ and choose menu ’Input data’ to enter the above data.....670kg H1 = ....595kg H3 = ......

.. Plot the analytical and the experimental transfer function R33 (iω) 4.....m of mode 3 springs Save the identified parameters..... Experimental and analytical transfer functions R31 (iω) and R32 (iω) Choose menu ’Input data’ and set the excitation coordinate to 1 and the response coordinate to 3 Repeat all steps of the section 2 Plot the transfer function R31 (iω) Choose menu ’Input data’ and set the excitation coordinate to 2 and the response coordinate to 3 Repeat all steps of the section 2 Plot the transfer function R32 (iω) 5.............m 3 3 damping ratio Young’s ξ 1 = 0.. ....670kg H1 = ....................................21 × 1012 N/m2 of mode 1 modulus damping ratio width of the ξ 2 = 0...... Natural frequencies and the corresponding natural modes Choose menu ’Mode shapes display/plot’ to produce the analytical frequencies and modes Plot the natural modes From plots of the experimental transfer functions R31 (iω)...01 w = . 2 ....... Conclusions .............595kg H3 = ......... R33 (iω) determine the natural frequencies and the natural modes Insert the experimental and analytical frequencies into the table below natural frequency analytical experimental natural frequency natural frequency 1 ............................................. ......595kg H2 = ...........WORKSHEET 247 Record the identified parameters in the following table Mass of the block length of the spring m1 = 0...............m of mode 2 springs damping ratio thickness of the ξ 3 = 0.................... ................. 6.m 1 1 Mass of the block length of the spring m2 = 0...m 2 2 Mass of the block length of the spring m1 = 0... R32 (iω)...01 E = 0.................. 3 .........01 t = ...

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