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Emotion Seduction and Intimacy: Alternative Perspectives on Organisation Behaviour

Emotion Seduction and Intimacy: Alternative Perspectives on Organisation Behaviour

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Published by Rory Ridley Duff
Full text of the book by Dr Rory Ridley-Duff published by Men's Hour Books in November 2007. Drawing extensively on a 3-year academic study completed in 2005, this book summarises the impact of sexual attraction and courtship on behaviour in the workplace. The print version of the book is available from www.amazon.co.uk
Full text of the book by Dr Rory Ridley-Duff published by Men's Hour Books in November 2007. Drawing extensively on a 3-year academic study completed in 2005, this book summarises the impact of sexual attraction and courtship on behaviour in the workplace. The print version of the book is available from www.amazon.co.uk

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Publish date: Dec 2007
Added to Scribd: Aug 20, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/19/2015

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To summarise, let me reiterate the import of these discoveries.
Firstly, the brain can be seen as having three bodies of
knowledge. The first is the limbic brain that controls our bodily
functions and learning processes. It is credited as the part of the
brain that controls genetically inherited unconscious behaviour.
This part of the brain is largely beyond our comprehension,
although scientists deduce its operation and function from the
way the body behaves, and can now use brain scans to observe
brain activity in real-time.
The second is the neocortex, a place where ‘knowledge’ is
acquired through language and reflection. It is better to see this
as the repository of culturally acquired knowledge, rather than
rational thought. The ‘knowledge’ in the neocortex may be

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Emotion, Seduction and Intimacy

inaccurate or accurate, mislead us or guide us towards truth. It
is our ‘common sense’, but only the sense that is common to us,
not that learned by other people.
Lastly, there is the amygdala, a place where emotional
knowledge is acquired through personal experiences and we
record the impacts on our emotional well-being. From this place,
we recall and project the likely emotional impact of different
choices to guide us towards safety and pleasure in everyday life.

Do you have a special skill such as playing the piano, juggling or
writing poetry? If not, think of learning to drive or swim. Think
back to how you felt when you started. Were you all fingers and
thumbs and did your hand not move when the leg did?
Gradually, what feels completely unnatural starts to feel natural.
Eventually, it becomes second-nature, as if the behaviour is
instinctive. Even after a gap of many years, we can still make
instant use of the skills we acquired in early life.

This process occurs repeatedly in the first few years of life -
before we are aware we are doing it. It applies to the way we
think as well as the physical skills we learn. The capacity to learn
is an instinct, but much of what we learn is culturally determined
– even if later in life it feels like “common sense” or an instinct.
Importantly, culturally acquired knowledge can be unlearnt and
relearnt. Emotions, and reactions, change as our lives develop.

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