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Delirious Prequel Intro

Delirious Prequel Intro

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Published by Daniel Palmer
“I’m sorry, but we have to let you go.”

Nobody likes being fired from a job. Even if you end up collecting unemployment or free yourself to pursue a long suppressed dream, it’s usually better to leave on your own terms. I know this from experience. I cut my professional teeth in the world of high tech start up companies. Talk about your revolving door of employment! Back in the halcyon days of the first dotcom boom, money to fund our endeavors was never a concern. But when those winds shifted (
“I’m sorry, but we have to let you go.”

Nobody likes being fired from a job. Even if you end up collecting unemployment or free yourself to pursue a long suppressed dream, it’s usually better to leave on your own terms. I know this from experience. I cut my professional teeth in the world of high tech start up companies. Talk about your revolving door of employment! Back in the halcyon days of the first dotcom boom, money to fund our endeavors was never a concern. But when those winds shifted (

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Published by: Daniel Palmer on Feb 21, 2011
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02/22/2011

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“I’m sorry, but we have to let you go.

Nobody likes being fired from a job. Even if you end up collecting unemployment or free yourself to pursue a long suppressed dream, it’s usually better to leave on your own terms. I know this from experience. I cut my professional teeth in the world of high tech start up companies. Talk about your revolving door of employment! Back in the halcyon days of the first dotcom boom, money to fund our endeavors was never a concern. But when those winds shifted (and shift they did) many an entrepreneur was left with people to pay, but no money with which to pay them. So began the era of the layoff. The downturn. Those hard luck times. Yes, I fired people. And yes, I was fired myself. But what if your company (and I’ll use you here because I think you’ll enjoy being the boss) had plenty of money in the bank? What if your business was readying to rocket past the herd and into the arms of much larger enterprise? What if this was your dream about to come true? You’d be pretty happy, I’m willing to bet. You might even be jumping for joy, slapping strangers high fives, calling home more often. Unless . . . unless your best friend, the person you trusted the most, the brains behind your fantastic, world changing invention, was a liar and a thief. This is exact predicament Charlie Giles, the protagonist of my debut thriller, DELIRIOUS, finds himself in at the start of this prequel. At first, I wasn’t sure how I felt about writing a prequel to DELIRIOUS. The prologue by itself is pretty gripping stuff—assuming you’re the sort of person whose stomach drops a bit anytime you watch the bridge scene from Saturday Night Fever. But

a reader might ask, who was the jumper in the DELIRIOUS prologue? You’ll know his name is Eddie, but you don’t know why he jumped. You’ll learn more about Eddie as the narrative unfolds, but I can also appreciate the pleasure derived from more immediate gratification. So I thought, why not tell the back story of Charlie and Eddie in a prequel? However, I soon found myself inundated with loads of information I felt compelled to impart on you, the reader. For example: what is the history of Charlie and Eddie’s relationship? What product did they invent together? What did Eddie do to betray Charlie’s trust? Why was Charlie so devastated by Eddie’s betrayal? Somehow, I managed to answer all these questions in fewer pages than I had originally thought possible. But what really moved my spirit, and got the writer juices flowing, was Eddie’s reaction to being fired. Now, if you’ve ever been fired from a job you might have done one of the following: cry, sulk, throw things, walk in circles, call your spouse, call your roommates, or maybe even go out for a drink (or two). But I’m pretty confident (I say pretty because I can’t really be certain) that there’s never been a reaction to getting canned quite like the one Eddie exhibits in this prequel. It’s also important to note that Eddie isn’t alone in his grief and suffering. Charlie is hurting as well. After all, he’s the one who fired Eddie. And if you’ve ever fired someone you know that the guilt you feel doesn’t just fade when the sun sets. It can linger inside you and fester. Haunt your nights. Burden your days. It can stay with you the way some car accident victims can years later recall minute details of their horrific crash. DELIRIOUS tells the tale of Charlie Giles, a computer whizz who grew up embarrassed by and estranged from his schizophrenic brother, only to discover that when

his life starts spiraling downward and he’s accused of murder, that his brother and trusted therapist are the only ones who believe in his innocence. But all this comes much later in the telling of the DELIRIOUS tale, after the events in San Francisco you’ll read about in the prequel and prologue. But in many ways, DELIRIOUS is Eddie’s story as well. Everyday, whether we mean to or not, we exert some sort of impact on the people in our lives. We can’t always know how our actions will affect others, or how their actions will affect us. But if firing Eddie affected us in the same way that it does Charlie throughout the course of this novel, I’d be willing to bet that we’d never fire anybody again. Ever. Well, I guess you’ll just have to read the book to confirm this claim for yourself. I hope that you do. And I sincerely hope that you enjoy the delirious ride.

-Daniel Palmer, New Hampshire 2011

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