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Subtle Energy: Healing and Transformation.

Subtle Energy: Healing and Transformation.

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Published by Giuseppe Rosato
Master research/thesis on the working mechanisms of the subtle body system of the chakras, nadis and prana (subtle energy) in healing and transformation. The research cross-examine these phenomena in a interdisciplinary way with a specific concentration on integrating existing knowledge on the esoteric knowledge of the chakras and its governing system. Moreover, the research attempt to bring together eastern wisdom and western knowledge on the spectrum of consciousness. Interdisciplinary lenses used are performing arts, eastern philosophy and transpersonal psychology (amongst others disciplines). Methods employed are hermeneutic phenomenology, journaling, laboratory research and critical review of relevant literature with direct exploratory research.
Master research/thesis on the working mechanisms of the subtle body system of the chakras, nadis and prana (subtle energy) in healing and transformation. The research cross-examine these phenomena in a interdisciplinary way with a specific concentration on integrating existing knowledge on the esoteric knowledge of the chakras and its governing system. Moreover, the research attempt to bring together eastern wisdom and western knowledge on the spectrum of consciousness. Interdisciplinary lenses used are performing arts, eastern philosophy and transpersonal psychology (amongst others disciplines). Methods employed are hermeneutic phenomenology, journaling, laboratory research and critical review of relevant literature with direct exploratory research.

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Published by: Giuseppe Rosato on Feb 22, 2011
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05/17/2015

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Determined to integrate some of the theoretical data with quantifiable data, I have

surveyed scientific studies that were able to show a relationship between spirituality,

better health and improved quality of life. Bormann and Carrico (2009) report a long list

of studies that show ―growing evidence supports the premise that spirituality is associated

with better health outcomes (Seeman et al., 2003) and improved quality of life (Aguirre,

1998; Brady et al., 1999; Paloutzian and Ellison, 1982)‖ (p. 359). Other studies reported

by Bormann and Carrico (2009) show that ―both religious and spiritually-based practices

may buffer the effects of stress‖ (p. 359). For example, studies on mantra applications

display positive findings ―associated with stress reduction .... reduced hypertension ...

improved pain management ... improved cerebral blood flow ... and EEG changes‖ (p.

359). Bormann and Carrico (2009) also point to studies, one conducted by Bernardi,

Sleight, Bandinelli, Cencetti, Fattorini, Wdowczyc-Szulc, and Lagi (2001) which ―found

that reciting the rosary prayer or yoga mantras enhanced cardiovascular rhythms and

slowed respirations in healthy adults‖ (p. 360) and another by Janowaik and Hackman

(1994), which ―found a positive association between mantra chanting and stress

reduction‖ (p. 360). Moreover, many studies surveyed show that ―meditative techniques

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are believed to reduce stress by initiating the relaxation response, a state of subjective and

physiological calm opposite to the fight or flight response‖ (Bormann and Carrico, 2009,

p. 360)

I have personally examined studies by Bormann and Carrico (2009) and Bernardi et

al. (2001) on mantra application; by Carson, J. W., Carson, K. M., Porter, Keefe, Shaw,

Miller (2007) Khalsa and Cope (2006) and Khalsa, Shorter, Cope, Wyshak, and Sklar

(2009) on yoga applications; by Singh, Kyizom, Singh, Tandon, and Madhu, (2008) and

Arambula, Peper, Kawakami and Gibney (2001) on pranayamas. All these studies

demonstrate that a certain degree of psychosomatic enhancement and/or psychological

well-being occurred in participants. Also, I have examined studies by Carter, Presti,

Callistemon, Liu, Ungerer, and Pettigrew (2005), Newberg, D‘Aquili and Rause, V.

(2001), Newberg and D‘Aquili (1999), Baijal and Narayanan (2009) on various types of

meditation. These studies were specifically aimed at measuring neurological patterns of

brain activation in participants undergoing altered states of consciousness during

meditation. The findings corroborate neurological activities in all participant meditators,

where different neurological activities correspond with different accounts on the content

of altered states of consciousness. In chapter 5, these studies will be further described and

their findings will constitute the basis for an analytic attempt to establish the significant

implications of my thesis.

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