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Subtle Energy: Healing and Transformation.

Subtle Energy: Healing and Transformation.

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Published by Giuseppe Rosato
Master research/thesis on the working mechanisms of the subtle body system of the chakras, nadis and prana (subtle energy) in healing and transformation. The research cross-examine these phenomena in a interdisciplinary way with a specific concentration on integrating existing knowledge on the esoteric knowledge of the chakras and its governing system. Moreover, the research attempt to bring together eastern wisdom and western knowledge on the spectrum of consciousness. Interdisciplinary lenses used are performing arts, eastern philosophy and transpersonal psychology (amongst others disciplines). Methods employed are hermeneutic phenomenology, journaling, laboratory research and critical review of relevant literature with direct exploratory research.
Master research/thesis on the working mechanisms of the subtle body system of the chakras, nadis and prana (subtle energy) in healing and transformation. The research cross-examine these phenomena in a interdisciplinary way with a specific concentration on integrating existing knowledge on the esoteric knowledge of the chakras and its governing system. Moreover, the research attempt to bring together eastern wisdom and western knowledge on the spectrum of consciousness. Interdisciplinary lenses used are performing arts, eastern philosophy and transpersonal psychology (amongst others disciplines). Methods employed are hermeneutic phenomenology, journaling, laboratory research and critical review of relevant literature with direct exploratory research.

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Published by: Giuseppe Rosato on Feb 22, 2011
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05/17/2015

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In this study, the methodological design emerged from a creative and intuitive

learning process that attempts to holistically understand the phenomenon of subtle energy

in healing. These general design criteria fit well within the broad framework of

qualitative research and naturalistic methods of inquiry. Creswell (2007) describes

qualitative research as follow:

Qualitative research is an inquiry process of understanding based on distinct

methodological traditions of inquiry that explore a social or human problem. The

researcher builds a complex, holistic picture, analyzes words, report detailed

views of informants, and conducts the study in a natural setting. (p. 249)

According to Polit and Beck (2004) ―qualitative research involves an emergent

design--a design that emerges in the field as the study unfolds‖ (p. 267). In other words,

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according to them, qualitative research admits to ―ongoing decisions reflecting what has

already been learned‖ (p. 245), which is hardly ―known or understood at the outset‖ (p.

245) of the study. Furthermore, they (2004) explain, ―qualitative researchers tend to be

creative and intuitive, putting together an array of data drawn from many sources to

arrive at a holistic understanding of phenomena‖ (p. 267). According to Polit and Beck

(2004) another important factor that is implicit in qualitative research in the naturalistic

methods of inquiry, which:

Attempt to deal with the issue of human complexity by exploring it directly.

Researchers in the naturalistic tradition emphasize the inherent complexity of

humans, their ability to shape and create their own experiences, and the idea that

truth is a composite of realities. Consequently, naturalistic investigations place a

heavy emphasis on understanding the human experience as it is lived, usually

through the careful collection and analysis of qualitative materials that are

narrative and subjective.... Naturalistic researchers tend to emphasize the

dynamic, holistic, and individual aspects of human experience and attempt to

capture those aspects in their entirety, within the context of those who are

experiencing them. (p. 16)

On the collection and analysis of data Polit and Beck (2004) affirm:

In naturalistic research, the collection of information and its analysis typically

progress concurrently; as the researcher sift though information, insights are

gained, new questions emerge, and further evidence is sought to amplify or

confirm insights. Through an inductive process, researchers integrate information

to develop a theory or description that helps explicate processes under

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observation.... Naturalistic studies result in rich, in-depth information that has the

potential to elucidate varied dimensions of a complicated phenomenon. Because

of this feature-and the relative ease with which qualitative findings can be

communicated to lay audiences--it has been argued that qualitative methods will

play a more prominent role in health care policy and development in the future.

(p. 17)

Polit and Beck (2004) acknowledge that ―findings from in-depth qualitative

research are rarely superficial, but there are several limitations of the approach‖ (p. 17)

amongst these concerns are the ―idiosyncratic nature of the conclusions‖ (p. 17) and the

―small group of people under study‖ (p. 17). However, she maintains, in response to the

many scholars who argue that quantitative research is scientifically more exact than

qualitative research, that ―qualitative studies often serve as a crucial starting point for

more controlled quantitative studies‖ (p. 17). Kuhn (1961) suggests that the two are co-

dependent and that ―large amounts of qualitative work have usually been prerequisite to

fruitful quantification in the physical sciences‖ (p. 162). Thus, I will argue here that the

above assumption that favours quantitative research over qualitative research needs to be

structurally revised. It is in this broad framework of qualitative research that I selected a

specific method that served my research purposes.

The overall purpose of my study is to understand the phenomenon of subtle

energy in healing and transformation. To this end, the study ttempts to determine the

conscientious claims of ancient and modern meditational literature and therapeutic

specialists alike, by relying whenever possible on existing quantitative measurements.

However, for reasons that span from the inability of present-day scientific technology to

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measure phenomena of a spiritual nature, to a systematic disregard by conservative

scientists of the need to investigate transpersonal phenomena, I had to rely heavily on

experiential, thus qualitative, data.

In my endeavour to scrutinize the subtle energy phenomenon under strict

scientific parameters, I considered hermeneutic phenomenology the ideal research

method to be employed. First, hermeneutic phenomenology borrows largely from

qualitative and naturalistic modes of inquiry (Giorgi, 2000). Second, the breadth of

inquiry in qualitative research ―is necessitated by phenomenological principles‖ (Giorgi,

2000, p. 62). And third, as we will see in the chapter on methodology, hermeneutic

phenomenology provides a precise method to describe, structure and interpret textual and

experiential data in an equitable scientific procedure and framework (Giorgi, 2000).

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