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GENERAL SPECIFICATION FOR DRYWALL PARTITIONS AND LIGHTWEIGHT INTERNAL WALLS

SECOND EDITION - June 2004

Administered by

P O Box 7861, Halfway House, 1685

ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTURAL ALUMINIUM MANUFACTURERS OF SOUTH AFRICA Trading as the AAAMSA Group Registration #: 1974/00006/08 Association Incorporated under Section 21 1ST Floor, Block 4 Construction Park 234 Alexandra Avenue Midrand 1685

P O Box 7861 HALFWAY HOUSE 1685 ! (011) 805-5002 Fax: (011) 805-5033 e-mail: aaamsa@iafrica.com additional e-mail: sagga@aaamsa.com web-site: www.aaamsa.com

2nd EDITION
This edition is totally revised and replaces the 1st Edition in its entirety. Individual sections have been expanded taking cognance of the latest manufacturing and standards/requirements in the drywall partition and lightweight internal wall industry.

INTRODUCTION
The South African Building Interior Systems Association (SABISA) currently under the aegis of AAAMSA, promotes that part of the building industry which specializes in the interior finishing, altering and/or refurbishing of buildings. Membership constitutes manufacturers and suppliers of ceiling, partition and access flooring systems as well as sub contractors who sell and install these specialised systems. This specification refers to the design, finishes, glass, glazing and installation of Drywall Partition and will enable Architects, Engineers, Quantity Surveyors, Developers and other specifiers to select and specify the appropriate materials. Having the installation done by sub contractors who are members or our Association will ensure that the installation meets with the minimum performance standards. This second edition has been completely revised to meet the latest developments in the Industry. Also attention has been given to safety glazing requirements in accordance with Part N of the National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act 1977 as amended. DISCLAIMER
Great care has been taken to ensure that the information provided is correct. No responsibility will be accepted by AAAMSA for any errors and/or omissions, which may have inadvertently occurred. All information, recommendation or advice contained in these AAAMSA General Specifications and Selection Guides is given in good faith, to the best of AAAMSA’s knowledge and based on current procedures in effect. Because actual use of AAAMSA General Specifications and Selection Guides by the user is beyond the control of AAAMSA, such use is within the exclusive responsibility of the user. AAAMSA cannot be held responsible for any loss incurred through incorrect or faulty use of this General Specifications and Selection Guides. This Guide may be reproduced in whole or in part in any form or by any means provided the reproduction or transmission acknowledges the origin and copyright date.

Copyright © AAAMSA 2004

3 For all other applications refer to SANS 10082.1.1 Load-bearing walls supporting other building elements Load-bearing walls shall have studs of the same size and at the same spacing as those recommended for exterior walls. 1. 3.1.2 consisting of aerated gypsum core bonded to durable paper liners with unprinted liner suitable for the application of all decorations.2. Moisture Resistant Plasterboard – Standard Plaster board manufactured in accordance with the latest edition of SANS 266:2003 Edition 2.4. Wall thickness of the metal studs must be such that they comply with the structural requirements of the installed drywall system and shall not be less than a nominal 0.4 TIMBER STUDS . 1. 1.3 METAL STUDS The framework of the drywall system shall be manufactured of galvanised steel as recommended by the manufacturer.2. Fire Retarded Plaster board manufactured in accordance with the latest edition of SANS 266:2003 Edition 2. The recommended flange must be a nominal width of 35mm. Where openings occur.4.2 1.2 Non-load-bearing walls which carry only their own mass Non-load-bearing walls may have 114mm x 38mm studs or 76mm x 38mm studs set with the greater dimensions perpendicular to the wall. 4.2 consisting of aerated gypsum core with suitable additions fibreglass stands and unexfoliated vermiculite bonded to durable paper liners with unprinted liner suitable for application of all decorations.3 1.4.1 PLASTER BOARD 1. . Studs SHALL be spaced at centres between 400mm and 600mm.1 Non-Asbestos Fibre Reinforced Cement Board – Medium to high density for Internal and External applications manufactured in accordance with SANS 803. Consult Annex 1 Pages 2.INTERIOR WALL FRAMING There are two types of interior walls: 1. The use thereof is prohibited by SANS 10400 Part T. 1.2 FIBRE CEMENT BOARDS 1.1.Page 1 1. and 5 for appropriate stud selection relative to partition heights.1 Standard Grade Plaster board manufactured in accordance with the latest edition of SANS 266:2003 Edition 2. 1. The material specifications of Fibre cement boards shall be in accordance with the material specifications in Annex I Page 8.45mm thickness. or 76mm x 50mm studs set with the greater dimension either parallel or perpendicular to the wall.2 1.2 consisting of aerated gypsum with special additive core bonded to durable impregnated green paper liners with unprinted liner suitable for application of all decorations. set with the greater dimensions perpendicular to the walls and capped with a continuous top plate of 38mm timber (to suit the stud size) tied into exterior walls at points of intersection. MATERIALS 1. Asbestos Fibre Cement boards are not suitable for internal building purposes. depending on the type of wall covering. loads shall be carried across the openings by headers similar to those recommended for exterior walls.

5 2.6 6. 1. The extruded section shall have a minimum wall thickness of 1. which has specialist expertise in the field of glazing as generally having the necessary experience and training to determine glazing requirements in accordance with the provisions of SANS 10137.2 4.0 4.9 1.6 3. Fixing to the metal tracks to be recommended by the manufacturer. m 4 5 6 8 10 1.2 3.2 6. 1.2 1.57 0. glass flooring.55 0. Sub contractors/glaziers are alerted to the fact that any glass installed to the exterior of buildings exceeding 10m in height requires the written approval from a Competent Person (Glazing).9 1.7 GLASS & GLAZING The moment the 3rd Edition of SANS 10400-Part N is published by the SANS the following shall apply: • • The concept of “Competent Person (Glazing)” will be introduced.0 7.8 0.95 2. toughened glass assemblies and entrances.2 9.Page 2 1. three and one edge supported glass. This applies to.0 – Page 6 Note: Aluminium door and window framing should not be used in partitions requiring a fire rating in excess of 20 minutes unless otherwise recommended by the manufacturers.2mm and shall be of such quality and strength that the section properties of the load bearing profiles meet the requirements as laid down in paragraph 2.4 9.5 METAL TRACKS All horizontal tracks at floor and ceiling level of the drywall system shall be manufactured of galvanized steel and have an overall width to be compatible to suit the vertical framework having a nominal thickness of 0.0 7.75 1.9 2. Sub contractors/glaziers may not deviate from the Tables published in SANS 10400-Part N 3rd Edition unless such deviation is authorized in writing by the competent person (glazing). Accordingly panels which incorporate a butt joint are not considered to be supported on four sides.9 0.4 0.6 ALUMINIUM EXTRUSIONS Extruded aluminium sections shall be fabricated from alloy 6063 or 6061 in temper T5 or T6 all in accordance with the latest edition of BS EN 755 . • • • • Table 1 – Dimensions for vertical glass supported in frame all round in internal walls Maximum Pane sizes in sq.78 0.2 Table 2 – Dimensions for vertical glass supported in a frame on two opposite sides in internal walls Nominal Glass Thickness (mm) Monolithic Annealed Glass Patterned Annealed & Wired Glass Laminated Annealed Safety Glass Toughened Safety Glass Note: 3 Maximum Span between support in m 4 5 6 8 10 0.25 1.95 1.1 6. in writing.3 1.5 0.2 9.1 3. The definition of a Competent Person (Glazing) as contained in the 3rd Edition of SANS 10400 Part N reads: competent person who is recognized by an institute.48 0.65 0. information regarding any glazing application not detailed in SANS 10400-Part N.0 12 2.2 Nominal Glass Thickness (mm) Monolithic Annealed Glass Patterned Annealed & Wired Glass Laminated Annealed Safety Glass Toughened Safety Glass 3 - 12 6. A glass fin is necessary to provide the support at the joint so that the pane can be considered to be supported along four sides. The Competent Person (Glazing) is registered with our Association.0 0. Sub contractors/glaziers must obtain.0 1. overhead or sloped glazing. tube and profiles” or equivalent.7 A butt joint is assumed to have no structural strength.75 2. .4 4.3 1. amongst other. glass for balustrading supported by clamps etc.45mm.“Aluminium and its alloys – extruded rod/bar.1 1.

b) c) d) e) f) g) .2 SAFETY GLAZING 1.). 1.5 3 3. ramp.8. to move directly towards such window. such glazing shall bear markings that shall render such glazing apparent to such person.8 SAFETY GLAZING SANS 10400 Part N prescribes the following regarding safety in glass installation: * Note! Paragraphs 1.2.8. glazing is used in any shop front or display window within 2 100 mm from the finished floor level. on normal traffic routes.2. 1.8. a window has a sill height of less than 800 mm from the floor and in the opinion of the local authority.1 TRANSPARENT GLAZING Where transparent glazing is used and is not likely to be apparent to or suspected by any person approaching it. is so placed that persons are likely.5 2 2. landing or balcony.2. a bath enclosure or shower cubicle is glazed or where glazing occurs immediately above a bath.2 a) and l) will only come into effect when SANS 0400 Part N Edition 3 is published in the latter part of 2004 or early 2005.1 The panes of all safety glazing material shall be permanently marked by the installer in such a manner that the markings are visible in individual panes after installation.2 Safety glazing material complying with the requirements of SABS 1263 shall be used where: a)* the occupancy or building classification is A3 (places of instruction).8. (Refer to table 1 of annex A of SANS 10400A:2004. glazing is used in any wall or balustrade to a stairway. E1 (place of detention).Page 3 Table 3 – Minimum Glass Fin Dimensions Fin Height in m 1. doors and sidelights form part of any entrance up to 2 100 mm from finished floor level.8. a window has a sill height of less than 500 mm from the floor and is not guarded by a barrier that prevents a person from coming into contact with the glass panel.5 4 Internal 150 x 12 150 x 12 150 x 12 175 x 15 225 x 15 275 x 15 External 150 x 15 150 x 19 175 x 19 200 x 25 275 x 25 300 x 25 Figure 1 – Detail of fin assembly 1. E2 (hospital) and E3 (other institutional (residential buildings). 1.

and glazing is used in internal partitions. a mirror is installed as a facing to a cupboard door less than 800 mm above floor level and there is no solid backing. glazing applications are sloped or are horizontal. forming escape routes in buildings.Page 4 h) i) j) k) l)* glazing is used within 1 800 mm of the pitch of a stairway or the surface of a ramp. glazing is used around areas such as swimming pools and ice rinks. within 2 100 mm of floor level. landing or balcony. .

Figure 2 — Examples of safety glazing requirements in doors and windows Figure 3 — Examples of safety glazing requirements in shop fronts and display windows Figure 4 — Examples of safety glazing requirements around staircases and landings .Page 5 Note: Figures 2 to 4 illustrate the conditions where safety-glazing materials are required in terms of 1.2 above. All repair and renovation glazing must comply with the provisions of Part N irrespective of the type of glazing used originally.8.

4 above. The drywall partitions and/or light weight internal wall system shall be constructed and installed in strict accordance with the material suppliers recommendations including (but not limited to): i) Standard plaster board (including moisture resistant plaster board) used in conjunction with 51mm metal studs may only be used in drywall partitions and/or light weight internal wall systems with heights less than 3600mm. 180 and 240 minutes. 90. .1 m at any point at a height of 1. iv) Unless otherwise specified the design allows for a door leaf thickness of 40mm.1 FIRE RATING The National Building Regulations with particular reference to SANS 10400 Part T classifies the performance of materials in respect of fire resistance in categories of 20. Ceiling & Partitioning Contractors and glaziers are no fire experts and it is therefore the onus of the client/specifiers to indicate the partitioning requirements in respect of location and degree of resistance to fire in minutes. The design of the vertical structural members of the drywall partition and/or lightweight internal wall shall be in strict accordance with the SABISA Drywall Partition and lightweight Internal Wall Selection Guide: Annex 1 Pages 2.Page 6 2.1. 4. The Architect/Engineer shall specify the partitioning requirements taking cognance of SANS 10400 Part T. Materials may differ from manufacturer to manufacturer but should a material tested in accordance with SANS 10177 have a fire resistance of say 32 minutes and a similar material from an alternative source have a fire resistance of say 36 minutes both will be classified as having 30 minutes fire resistance. and 5 in respect of plaster board and Pages 6 and 7 in respect of nonasbestos fibre reinforced cement board. and NON ASBESTOS FIBRE REINCORCED CEMENT BOARDS 9mm in case of non-asbestos fibre reinforced cement board when used in conjunction with timber studs constructed in accordance with paragraph 1. Standard plasterboard used in conjunction with minimum 63mm metal studs may be used in heights up to 4200mm ii) iii) Fire rated plasterboard must be used exclusively in drywall partitions and/or lightweight internal wall systems with heights in excess of 4200mm. 30.3m (SANS 0160).1 m x 0. When the 3rd Edition of SANS 10400-Part T is published in the latter part of 2004 or early 2005 a Competent Person will also be able to specify the fire requirements of partitioning in respect of resistance to fire.3 m above floor level or such lesser height as may be more critical. CONSTRUCTION AND INSTALLATION 2. Compliance with this Selection Guide will ensure conformance with appropriate deflection and fire rating requirements. 60. or a nominal horizontal distributed force of 500N/m at a height of 1. 3. fire rated and moisture resistant plaster board when used in conjunction with metal/timber studs.1 CONSTRUCTION The drywall partitions and/or light weight internal wall system shall be capable of withstanding a nominal horizontal concentrated force of 500N acting nominal to the wall surface over an area of 0. The minimum board thickness shall be: PLASTERBOARD 12mm in case of standard. 120. 2.

max. mm Grade II I ±15 ±15 ±20 ±25 ±10 ±20 ±25 15 ±10 ±15 6 ±10 ±10 ±15 ±20 ±5 ±15 ±20 10 ±5 ±10 3 .2 INSTALLATION The Drywall Partitions and lightweight internal walls shall be installed in strict adherence to the material manufacturers recommendations. In any 5m (not cumulative) Verticality In any 2m In any 5m Finished surfaces PD of any point from a 2m straight-edge placed in any direction of the wall. Annex 1 contains the presumed fire resistance of hollow stud construction Drywall Partitions and Lightweight Internal Walls of metal and timber studs. up to and including 6m Over 6m Straightness. Table 4 – Fire Resistance performance of glass Glass Type Laminated safety glass having PVB/resin interlayer Laminate glass having intumescent interlayers Georgian wired glass Borosilicate and calcium silicate glass Toughened safety glass SIGU (double glazing) having PVB/resin laminated safety glass Fire Resistance in minutes 3 to 6 Up to 120 Up to 120 Up to 120 3 to 6 30 2. Specifiers are advised to elect degree of accuracy and level of finishing at time of tender in accordance with Table 5 and 6 respectively.Page 7 Specifiers are encouraged to obtain relevant SABS Certificates from the material manufacturers to confirm the product performance.2 SOUND RATING Due to the nature of manufacture and installation of plasterboard and non-asbestos fibre cement boards the sound rating for drywall partitions and lightweight internal walls may differ from site to site. Aluminium framing will not resist fire when tested in accordance with SANS 10177 in excess of 30-minutes. Specifiers are encouraged to obtain relevant Certificates from the material manufacturers to confirm the individual product performance.1. PD. When tested in accordance with SANS 10177 glazing materials may perform as stated in Table 4. max. 2. TABLE 5 – Permissible Deviations in drywall Partitions and Lightweight Internal Walls DESCRIPTION Position on plan PD of fair-faced specified side of wall from the designed position Length Up to and including 5m Over 5m. In respect of Glass refer to AAAMSA Selection Guide for Glazed Architectural Aluminium Products. up to and including 10m Over 10m Height Up to and including 3m Over 3m. Framing required for fire resistance in excess of 30-minutes must be manufactured in steel or hard wood of appropriate volume.

All joints. firm and free of dust and oil. Grade I and II are grades of accuracy defined in SANS 10155 as follows: Grade I accuracy may necessitate the use a special method.1. angles and accessories shall have two separate coats of jointing compound applied.1.. or where heavy grade wall coverings are to be applied. This level is suitable for areas which are to receive heavy or medium textured paint finishes. All joints. TABLE 6 – Selection of Surface Finishing for Drywall Partitions and Lightweight Internal Walls LEVEL 1 2 APPLICATION Temporary constructions. The surface shall be completely smooth and free of any marks and surface blemishes. This finish is suitable where moisture resistant boards are used as a substrate for tiling and may be used in garages or warehouse storage where surface appearance is not of primary importance.1.. Surface shall be free of excess jointing compound but tool marks and ridges are acceptable. (Architect to specify type (Interpon D. Vedoc or other) and colour).1 FINISHES (Final decorations) 2. A thin skim coat of plaster shall be applied to the entire surface of the drywall.. All screw heads to be spotted. All screw heads to be spotted.4 TILING All tiling shall be executed on surfaces which are true. 2. 3 4 5 2. The entire surface of the drywall shall receive a coat of oil based plaster primer before final decoration. or materials. All joints. All screw heads to be spotted. Surface shall be free of excess jointing compound but tool marks and ridges are acceptable.1 WALL COVERING Wall covering shall be .2.. This level should be used where gloss.2.2. Frequently used in plenum areas above ceilings and in areas that are generally concealed. All jointing compound shall be smooth and free of tool marks and ridges.. (Architect to specify) Wall coverings shall be of appropriate type to suit the expected traffic in the designated areas. and will require a close degree of supervision and control. semi-gloss or matt non-textured paints are specified.2 ANODIZING All anodizing shall be executed in strict adherence to the latest edition of SANS 1407. *Refer to paint manufacturers recommendation.1. DESCRIPTION No jointing or finishing at all All joints shall have the tape embedded in jointing compound. should be carefully sanded to provide a smoother surface. or both. Priming adhesive application and grouting shall all be done in strict accordance with the plasterboard and non-asbestos fibre cement manufacturers recommendations. (Architect to specify colour and anodic film thickness to a minimum of 10 microns) 2. Grade II accuracy is suitable for the major proportion of building work. It is recommended that all the areas of jointing compound receive a coat of suitable* based Plaster Primer before finishing.Page 8 Notes: ~ ~ PD – Permissible Deviation. angles and accessories shall have one coat of jointing compound applied.2. Any drywall that is subjected to critical lighting shall be finished to this level. angles and accessories shall have two separate coats of jointing compound applied.. Any specialised finishes are to be referred to manufacturers for their recommendations. 2.3 POWDER COATING All powder coating shall be executed only by applicators approved by the specified powder manufacturers and shall be strictly in conformance with the latest edition of SANS 1247. . Where lightweight vinyls are to be used all joints etc.2.

Grouting – Shall be done with a waterproof grout. It is also important to remember that during the construction phase of a building the lighting is often not fully functional and the appearance of the drywall could vary considerably once this is switched on.Page 9 Ceramic tiles can be applied to drywalls or the surface of lightweight partition systems to dado level or above. 3. Inspection of installed Partition and glass shall. and/or Vinyl/painted partition panels thereby exposing the base material. 3. Critical lighting (especially side-lighting) may reveal even minor surface imperfections.5mm. If critical lighting cannot be avoided. Tiles – Only 1st grade glazed ceramic tiles to be used. If visible when viewed from a distance of three metres under normal lighting conditions scratches in glass will not be acceptable.2.3 GLASS In laminated glass interlayer bubbles larger than 1.0 Illuminance and glare index.2 ALUMINIUM & PARTITION FINISHES Scratches on aluminium and partition finishes are defined as being a mark on the surface which penetrates the powder coated or anodised surface. long hallways. be carried out according to the following criteria: 3. Light striking the surface obliquely. . stated in abovementioned Table 8. in particular the OHS Act Safety Lux value and at a distance of 3 metres. INSPECTION Wall and ceiling areas abutting window mullions or skylights. Larger clusters or close spacing of smaller bubbles will also be disallowed. 3.5mm diameter will not be allowed.1 SCRATCHES AND BLEMISHES This inspection will be viewed under lighting conditions applicable to the area as laid down in SANS 10114-1 Table 8.0 of SANS 10114-1. 32kg/m2 (maximum) for drywall construction.1. which represents the values. Refer Annex 3. at a very slight angle. or atriums with large surface areas flooded with artificial or natural light are a few examples of critical lighting. Ceramic tiles – (by others) 12. cloakrooms and kitchens. Typical applications include shower areas. toilets. Tile adhesive – (by others) suitable thin-bed adhesive. Tiling can be carried out in any type of building either in dry areas or in areas subject to intermittent moisture conditions. greatly exaggerates surface irregularities. amongst others.5 PAINTING The painting of surfaces shall be executed in strict accordance with the paint manufacturers recommendations. bathrooms. The use of drapes and/or blinds can also be used to soften shadows. 2. In general smooth non-textured finishes highlight surface defects and textures help to hide minor imperfections. the effects can be minimized by skim coating the entire wall or by decorating the surface with medium or heavy textures (paint or vinyls).

Page 10 ANNEX 1 DRYWALL PARTITIONS AND LIGHTWEIGHT INTERNAL WALL SELECTION GUIDE .

Page 2 .Annex 1 Part 1 – Plasterboard Partition up to 3600mm in height .

Page 3 .Annex 1 Part 2a – Plasterboard Partition from 3600 to 8000mm in height .

Annex 1 Part 2b – Plasterboard Partition over 8000mm in height .Page 4 .

Page 5.Annex 1 Part 3 – Plasterboard Partition up to 4200mm in height .

Page 6 . Drywall screws spaced at ± 250mm centres All fixings according to Everite Building Products' recommendations .Annex 1 Part 4 – Fire Resistance – Non-Fibre Reinforced Cement Boards in Wall Systems Fire Rating Timber Frame Systems 600mm 30mm Galvanized Steel Stud Systems 20 minutes 4mm MD Nutec 70mm Sisalation 400 600mm 30mm 20 minutes 70mm 6mm MD Nutec Sisalation 400 600mm 27 minutes 9mm MD Nutec 64mm 65mm Drywall studs 600mm 30mm 30 minutes 9mm HD Nutec 70mm Sisalation 400 600mm 50mm 33 minutes 9mm MD Nutec 63mm 50mm Mineral wool. density: 24 kg/m3 600mm 41 minutes 12mm MD Nutec 64mm 65mm Drywall studs 600mm 60 minutes 64mm 9mm MD Nutec 65mm Drywall studs 400mm 153 minutes 7.5mm SHD Nutec Nufill from Eurotek 64mm 65mm Drywall studs Face layer joints to be taped and plastered.

Annex 1 Part 5 – Internal Walls on Galvanized Steel – (Non-Fibre Reinforced Cement Boards) 51mm Drywall Studs at 600mm centres Maximum Distance between fxings: 300mm 9mm Medium Density Non-asbestos Fibre-cement Boards Internal Walls on Timber Studs (Non-Fibre Reinforced Cement Boards) 70 x 50mm Timber Studs at 600mm centres Maximum Distance between fxings: 300mm 6mm Medium Density Non-asbestos Fibre-cement Boards External Walls on Timber Studs (Non-Fibre Reinforced Cement Boards) 70 x 50mm Timber Studs at 600mm centres Maximum Distance between fxings: 300mm 9mm Medium Density Non-asbestos Fibre-cement Boards .Page 7.

62 (3) 20.60 (1) 1. SANS 10177: Part 5 ASTM C1185 ASTM C1185 SABS Method 419 SABS Method 471 BS 5980:1980 Class % Class 1 Non-combustible 150ºC 50 97.50 (3) 7.95 (3) 1.32 (3) SANS 803:1998 SANS 803:1998 ISO 8336-1993 SANS 803:1998 ASTM C518 SAS Document 722/W 1009 ASTM C1185 ASTM C1185 ASTM C1185 ASTM C1185 SABS 685 – 1985 ASTM C1185 ASTM C1185 ASTM C1185 ASTM C1185 ASTM C1186 ASTM D1037 ASTM D1037 ASTM D1037 ASTM D1037 ASTM D1037 ASTM D1037 ASTM D1037 ASTM D1037 ASTM D1037 ASTM D1037 ASTM C120 ASTM C120 ASTM C120 ASTM C120 ASTM D143 ASTM D143 SANS 10177:Part 11.22 (3) 3.0 ± 3 or –5 ± 3 or –5 5 5 7.47 (2) 5.06 6.03 0.47 0.20 (2) 7.58 (3) 2.19 Negligible 0.60 (2) 1.24 (2) 2.00 (2) 13.61 (2) 37.40 (2) 24.30 Negligible 0.0 ± 3 or –5 ± 3 or –5 5 5 9. BS476 BS 476:Part 4.30 (2) 3.17 (3) ± 0.34 (2) 5.47 Typical Values 0.25 37.50 2.05 (3) 1 15.5 B1 No Damage - 1 Non-combustible 150ºC 50 78.88 (3) 0.02 (3) 5337 (3) 3974 (2) 6474 (3) 4681 (2) 1.40 (1) 10.26 2.18 (3) 9898 (3) 7747 (2) 11645 (3) 7903 (2) 3.00 (2) 1.05 No droplets formed 10 – 12 14.Page 8.06 0.Annex 1 Material Properties – Non-Asbestos Fibre Reinforced Cement PARAMETER Dimensions Thickness Tolerance: Up to 6mm 7.83 (2) 1.9mm 13mm and over 9mm or 12mm Length Tolerance: All lengths Width Tolerance: All widths Squareness All sizes Edge Trueness All sizes Physical Properties Minimum MCR: With Grain Minimum MCR: Across Grain Density Maximum Hygral Linear Expansion Thermal Conductivity Thermal Expansion Coefficient Moisture Movement With Grain Across Grain Moisture Content Water Absorption Permeability pH Mechanical Properties MCR: With Grain MCR: Across Grain Classification in accordance to ASTM C1186 Compressive Strength Parallel to Surface of Board MCR: With Grain MCR: Across Grain Tensile Strength Parallel to Surface of Board MCR: With Grain MCR: Across Grain Tensile Strength Perpendicular to Surface of Board Young’s Modulus (E Mod) MCR: With Grain MCR: Across Grain Block Shear Strength Other Properties Fire Properties Fire Index Non-Combustibility Continuous Temperature Frost Resistance Cycles Completed Strength Ratio Biological Resistance Rodent Resistance Termite Resistance Resistance to Bacteria (1) (2) (3) Dried till constant weight Saturated with water Equilibrium conditions UNIT HIGH DENSITY MEDIUM DENSITY TEST METHOD mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm MPa MPa q/cm3 mm/m W/mK (20-70) % % % % MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa MPa ± 0.26 (3) 2.5 ± 0.72 No droplets formed 11 – 12 4.8 ± 1.8 ± 1.54 (2) 19.5 ± 0.06 6.86 (2) 15.75 (2) 12.0mm to 12.57 (3) 11.10 (3) 1 10.12 (3) 4.11 (2) 3.92 22.5 B1 No Damage No Growth .21 (2) 24.42 (2) 2.

ANNEX 2 Voluntary Certificates Required in terms of The Construction Regulations 2003 .

8 Finishes Paint Tiles Wall Paper Other Medium Duty Heavy Duty Fire rating ……… Minutes Because the actual use of this certificate is beyond the control of AAAMSA such use is within the exclusive responsibility of the user..5mm Other……………………… 2 Boards 12mm Standard 12..5mm Fire Rated 15mm Other Manufacturer Distributor/Supplier Moisture resistant 3 Fire Rating 20min 30min 60min 120min Other Manufacturer Distributor/Supplier 4 Cavity Infill Glasswool ………kg/m 3 Manufacturer Mineral Wool ………kg/m 3 Distributor/Supplier Polyester Wool ………kg/m3 5 Level Of Finish 1 2 3 4 5 Refer table 6 General Specification of Drywall Partitions and Lightweight Walls 6 Doors Light Duty 7 Glass Refer attached Glass and Glazing Certificate #………………….... Date: ………………………………… 1 FRAME WORK Track 51mm 58mm 63. for the Partitioning work at: Project Name/Address: …………………………………………. AAAMSA cannot be held responsible for any loss incurred through the incorrect or faulty use of this Certificate. ………………………………………….. This Certifies that the materials used in the partitioning installation installed by: Contractor/Installer: Company Stamp: AAAMSA Membership #:……………………..Tel (011) 805-5002 Fax (011) 805-5033 Postal Address: P O Box 7861 Halfway House 1685 The SABISA Partitioning Certificate Issued in terms of the Construction Regulations 2003 Only valid when duly signed by party concerned Not Transferable Certificate #: C 0…. . Studs 51mm 58mm 63.5mm For and on behalf of the Contractor/Installer who by Signature hereof warrants authorization hereto Manufacturer Distributor/Supplier Other …………………….. has been installed in accordance with the requirements of SANS 10400 Part N and SANS 10137 (√ tick which is appropriate) Signed: …………………………………………….

. Because the actual use of this certificate is beyond the control of AAAMSA such use is within the exclusive responsibility of the user.. AAAMSA cannot be held responsible for any loss incurred through the incorrect or faulty use of this Certificate. This Certifies that the Glass & Glazing used in the installation of the Architectural Products installed by: Contractor/Installer: Company Stamp: AAAMSA Membership #:……………………. …………………………………………. has been installed and marked in accordance with the requirements of SANS 10137/SANS 10400 Part N (√ tick which is appropriate) Signed: ……………………………………………. .. for the Architectural Glazing Work at: Project Name/Address: …………………………………………. For and on behalf of the Contractor/Glazier who by Signature Date: ………………………………… hereof warrants authorization hereto 1 Monolithic Clear Float (√ which is appropriate) Thickness mm Manufacturer Distributor/Supplier Tinted Float Clear Patterned Glass Tinted Patterned Glass Georgian Wired Cast Georgian Wired Polished Performance Coated Glass Mirror 2 Laminated Glass (√ which is appropriate) Thickness mm (√ which is appropriate) (√ which is appropriate) Manufacturer Distributor/Supplier PVB Laminates Resin Laminates Clear Tinted Tinted Reflecting Patterned Multi-Laminated Bullet Resisting 3 Toughened Clear Tinted Patterned Surface Coated Heat Reflecting (Sealed Insulated Glass Units) 4 SIGU Description: Outer Pane Inner Pane Air Gap (√ tick which is appropriate) Thickness mm Manufacturer Distributor/Supplier Laminated Thickness mm Glass Type Manufacturer Gas filled 5 Other Yes No Details/Type 6 Glass Processing Polished Edges Unpolished Edges Arrissed Edges Details/Type (√ tick which is appropriate) Gaskets Sealant Setting Blocks Weather stripping Because the actual use of this certificate is beyond the control of AAAMSA such use is within the exclusive responsibility of the user.. AAAMSA cannot be held responsible for any loss incurred through the incorrect or faulty use of this Certificate..Tel (011) 805-5002 Fax (011) 805-5033 Postal Address: P O Box 7861 Halfway House 1685 The AAAMSA Glass & Glazing Certificate Issued in terms of the Construction Regulations 2003 Only valid when duly signed by party concerned Not Transferable Certificate #: G 0….

. No responsibility will be accepted by AAAMSA for any errors and/or omissions.ANNEX 3 ILLUMINANCE AND GLARE INDEX SABS 0114-1:1996 Great care has been taken to ensure that the information provided is correct. which may have inadvertently occurred.

In the inhabited environment. as he deems necessary. The minimum average productivity levels recommended are figures that are the result of many years of research gathered from experimentation and field trails. welfare and productivity of the workers in the environment. glare in any workplace is reduced to a level that does not impair vision. Every employer shall cause every workplace in his undertaking to be lighted in accordance with the illuminance values specified in the Schedule to these regulations. The chief inspector may. LIGHTING 1. from time to time modify the Schedule to these regulations. in terms of the Act.e. To ensure that these values are exceeded at all times. lighting on rotating machinery is such that the hazard of stroboscopic effect is eliminated. These are glare. d. . is guilty of an offence. are replaced or repaired forthwith. for any reason. dirty lenses or covers. With respect to the lighting to be provided in terms of subregulation (1). or circuit failure. and harsh shadows. both direct and reflected visual fatigue. Provided that where specialized lighting is necessary for the performance of any particular type of work. failed lamps. irrespective of whether that type of work is listed in the Schedule or not. the employers shall ensure that:a. the average illuminance at any floor level in a workplace within five metres of a task is not less than one fifth of the average illuminance on the task. by notice in the Gazette. i. 1993 : quote:” 3. the average falls below the OHS Act minimum. at any time. the employer of those employees who perform such work shall ensure that such specialized lighting is available to and is used by such employees. the following associated factors have also been found to have contributed. are the absolute minimum legal average light levels that may exist in a workplace at any time in the life of that workplace. c. b. Any factor that aids visual performance increase the probability that a person will detect a potential accident hazard and act to avoid it. higher initial levels have to be provided for as required by the service and maintenance conditions that exist on site. safe conditions are essential. If. when defective. 3.ANNEX 3 ILLUMINANCE AND GLARE INDEX SABS 0114-1:1996 CODE OF PRACTICE : INTERIOR LIGHTING PART 1 : ARTIFICIAL LIGHTING OF INTERIORS NOTES The following is an extract from the regulations to the Occupational Health and Safety Act. In many cases where illumination has been associated with accidents. 1993. The light levels listed in the OHS Act. The levels are generally accepted as being cost effective values that will ensure the comfort. The productivity levels are therefore the levels that have to be used for lighting design along with the relevant glare index. It is therefore important to design lighting installations to compensate for human limitations. Many accidents can be attributed to the adaptation state of the eye of a person when that person moves from a bright environment to a dark one and vice versa. and luminaires and lamps are kept clean and.” Unquote 2. then the employer.

e. punching. typewriter and office machinery assembly Very fine work. reinforcing. riveting. digesters. wing sections cowling. dewing Pressing Inspection Hand tailoring General work areas Mixing. av) lux 1503) 2003) 3003) 5001. grinding. stripping See Pottery and clay products Hand furnaces. etc. bagging. feeding. frame assembly. winnowing. e. electrolytic cells Controls. gauges. casting and stunning pen Bleeding area Dressing. gypsum. valves. washing tripery and skin sorting Inspection and grading By-products manufacture. stitching Cutting. sorting. pattern. small precision assembly Mixing and make-up rooms. screw fastening Maintenance and repairs (Hangars) Engine testing Rough work. blending. bulk filling. sheet aluminium layout and template work. crushing and refining. 3) 5005) 5003) 150 350 1 000 1 000 22 22 22 22 22 22 19 19 22 19 22 22 19 19 25 25 22 25 22 25 25 25 19 19 Confectionery Dairies Die sinking . machined parts. engine assembly.g. inspecting Inspection : general Dyeing Control room. evisceration. milling.) 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 22 22 22 25 22 19 19 22 22 25 28 25 28 25 22 22 22 19 22 22 22 22 22 22 25 25 25 28 22 25 25 25 22 25 28 28 25 22 22 19 22 25 19 25 25 Abattoirs Ablutions Abrasive blasting Aircraft Assembly plants Banking Blacksmith Boiler houses (industrial) Bookbinding Boot and shoe Brewing and Distilling Building and Construction Canning and Preserving Car parks (indoor) Carpet Cement Cement. dicing. burners.g. agitating. oven rooms. asbestos. 2) 500 350 1 0001) 1 0001) 1503) 2003) 2503) 400 2002 . jacquard card cutting. embossing Finishing. subassembly. mending. fringing Weaving.e. feeding. stationary or gravity crystallizers Mechanical driers Evaporators. inlaying and inspection Sorting and grading Clicking and closing: preparation operations Cutting tables and presses.g.Page 1 . bottling and canning plants Bottle inspection Industrial building plant Concrete shops General work areas Walkways and access Inspection of produce Preparation: kettle areas. mechanical cleaning. boiling chocolate Husking. etc. conveying. stitching Bottom stock preparation lasting and bottom finishing Shoe rooms General work areas Brewhouse. trimming Canned and bottled goods: retorts High speed labeling lines Can inspections Automatic process Car parking: entrance Traffic lanes Winding. stationary driers. drying. bean cleaning.3) 4002) 4003) 300 400 750 1 5002. e. assembling. pasting. inspection. hemming. and change rooms Sand or other Stock parts production Drilling. radio and telephone equipment. platform coal plant milling. blocking. filtration plants Mechanical crystallizing. inspection. 4) 2003) 400 160 250 200 1003) 100 400 500 500 1 0001) 800 1 0002) 800 800 2003) 3003) 7505) 300 200 100 50 5001) 400 200 400 400 200 150 40 2503) 4003) 5001. fat extraction.Annex 3 ILLUMINANCE AND GLARE INDEX LOCATION / INDUSTRIES TYPE OF WORK. Hand decorating. Control rooms: vertical control panel face (vertical illuminance) Control desks General work area Matching up Cutting. shredding. flat and corrugated sheets and moulded goods manufacture Pipe and pole manufacture: mixing. welding. 3) 4003) 1503) 5001. Assembly of heavy machinery Medium work. final assembly. etc. Wash-rooms.. milling. mixing. loading Vertical control panel face (vertical illuminance) Fibrizing. products and moulded goods Ceramic Cold Store. toilets. i. cutting. packing General work areas Bottle inspection Bottle filling Dispatching General Fine Hand engraving Chemical Clothing Cold stores 100 100 200 200 100 300 300 200 500 500 150 100 150 200 150 3002) 300 100 200 500 500 1503) 1503) 1503) 2003) 2003) 1002. percolators. chalk. boiling tanks. wrapping rooms Decorating and icing General work area General work areas Tempering Coal and ash handling Boiler rooms Folding. bleaching Extractors. 3) 800 500 2003) 200/4006) 300 200 GLARE RATING (MAX.3) 2003) 1503) 3003) 4003) 4002. i. nitrators. pumping. topping. 3) 4006. vehicle body assembly Fine work. setting. spinning. wrapping. TASK OR ACTIVITY OHS ACT SAFETY lux 100 150 200 300 100 – 200 100 200 300 200 200 200 100 200 500 1 000 100 200 100 75 50 75 100 200 300 500 500 500 500 500 500 100 300 300 200 150 20 5 300 200 150 200 300 25 150 200 300 400 150 200 200 150 Productivity value (min. tufting. beaming Design.g.

3) 8002. covering Slipping Cutting. pouring. 3) 4003) 50 2002) 2001.8) 2 0001. 3) 400 2003) 502. storage tanks Battery and charging equipment rooms Boiler front (operating floor) Between boilers (operating floor) stairs. 3) 3502. refining.g. braiding. sizing.3) 8001. mixing rooms. bending. cleaning. tumbling. water gas plants. junction tower) Boiler house and turbine house basements Pump houses and rooms. decorating. folding and pressing Lock stitch and overlocking machines 100 100 30 100 200 50 75 150 150 250 500 250 75 400 750 250 400 400 250 500 250 400 250 150 50 100 100 200 200 100 50 75 500 100 100 100 100 100 150 200 500 150 500 100 100 100 Furniture Factories Garages Gas works Gauge and tool rooms General factory areas 250 150 50 3003) 200 400 100 100 3003) 2003) 3503) 5001) 400 100 5001) 8001) 500 500 500 4003) 500 300 400 4001. cleaning. boilers. polishing. compressor. touching Finishing (beveling. mica work Coil and armature processes: general Fine (e. rough moulding and rough core making Fine moulding and core making inspection Raw material store Finished goods store Wood-machining and assembly Rough sawing and cutting Machining. feeders. “Grey” perching Wet process Dry processes Dryers’ office Final perching Impregnating process. forming (blowing. galleries. silvering) Brilliant cutting Inspection: General Fine See Clothing General work area Stiffening. 4) 200 200 200 300 200 300 500 800 3004) 8004) 300 300 400 1 0001) 400 28 25 22 28 25 25 25 22 22 22 22 22 25 22 22 22 22 22 22 22 25 22 22 22 28 25 22 22 22 28 28 25 19 22 28 25 22 19 19 19 22 22 22 19 22 Glass processing Glove making Hat making Hazardous locations Hosiery and knitwear 200 300 4003) 500 22 22 . and exhauster houses General Canteens Cloakrooms Entrances First-aid rooms Furnace rooms. 3) 2502. screens and transformer chambers Cable tunnel.2) 300 400 600 3002) 150 100 50 1503) 1502) 1502) 1003) 150 1503) 100 3006) 400 150 500 200 300 200 200 200 200 1 000 GLARE RATING (MAX. grinding. instrument coils) Turbine halls (operating floors) Blowers. sewing Mattress making: Assembly Tape edging Tools rooms: General Benches Spray booth: Colour finishing Clear finishing Parking areas (interior) Washing and polishing. ash plant. etching. purifiers. pouncing Flanging.) 200 25 25 19 16 25 25 19 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 19 19 22 19 25 22 25 25 25 25 19 Dye works Electrical goods (manufacture) Electricity generating stations (indoor) Electricity generating stations (indoor) Engraving Explosives Forging Fire stations Foundries See laundering and dry cleaning Reception. cutting out. annealing ovens. forming.3) 3002. auxiliary generators Cable. drawing. av) lux 600 3002. final inspection Upholstery: Cloth inspection Filling. conveyors (tunner. coke screening and coke handling plants Governor. finishing. rolling) Cutting to size. 7. ironing Inspection General work area Other processes (See clothing) Refer to SABS 0108 Circular and flat knitting machines. operating platforms. universal winders. pressing. oil gas plants.Page 2 – Annex 3 LOCATION / INDUSTRIES Dry cleaning TYPE OF WORK. greasing Servicing pits Repairs Workbenches Fuel pumps Retort house. covered ways. TASK OR ACTIVITY OHS ACT SAFETY lux 500 150 150 500 1 500 150 200 400 200 100 75 50 100 150 100 75 100 100 50 200 200 100 500 150 200 150 150 150 100 500 Productivity value (min. water treatment plant Overland conveyor housing walkways Control rooms: vertical control panel face (vertical illuminance) Control desks Rear of control panels Computer room Switch houses and rooms Relay and telecommunications rooms Nuclear reactors and stream raising plants: reactor areas. meter. and precipitator highvoltage chamber Pulverizers. galleries Gas circulator bays Reactor charge/discharge face High-voltage substations Hand Machine (see Die sinking) See Chemical General Appliance rooms External apron Charging floors. shaking out. booster. sundry and assembly of components Cabinet making: Veneer sorting and preparation Veneer pressing Components store Fitting.

precision mechanisms. etc. radio and telecommunication equipment. purifier. machine houses. counting.g. ordinary automatic machines. pulp Mills. stairways. 4) 100 2) Light goods Dark goods Light Dark Inspection areas Linking or running on Rough work e. TASK OR ACTIVITY OHS ACT SAFETY lux 800 1 000 400 800 300 100 200 200 500 1 000 1 500 75 100 200 200 75 500 3 000 1 000 200 300 300 150 150 200 100 150 300 500 500 100 300 100 200 500 800 150 100 150 200 200 300 400 20 50 20 50 100 20 100 5 50 10 20 20 10 20 10 150 300 300 200 300 500 150 200 150 200 150 200 200 Productivity value (min. 4) 1 200/1 6002 . catwalks. find buffing and polishing Extra find bench and machine work. polishing General laboratories. trim shops. balance rooms Electrical and electronic instrument laboratories Calibration scales. cutting. packing and labeling Sorting stock. car assembly. ingot stripping soakingpits. loading Roller. trimming Inspection and sorting (overhauling) Paper converting process: General Associated printing Corrugated boards. 3) 7001. preparation plants. 4) 6001) 1 0001) 500 300 400 400 600 1 200/1 6002. cleaning.g. 3) 6001. spotting Vats. blast furnaces. chassis assemblies. and fan area Bulk loading/unloading areas where manual operations are performed Bulk loading/unloading areas Cooling water screens Fuel pumps Storage areas (excluding big dumps) Water clarification plant and storage tanks (operating area) Marshalling yards Main entrance and exit Transformer and reactor compounds Roads. silks and packing floors Wetting tables Preparation plants: Working areas Picking belts Winding houses Lamp rooms Weigh cabins Fan houses General assemblies. instruments Very fine work. ironing (calendering). body assembly Final inspection Upholstery Spray booths (See Paint shops and spraying booths) Abattoirs: Lairage Race Ash handling. finishing. body subassemblies. 5) 500 500 700 200 3003) 4002) 3003) 300 500 800 1 0001) 100 500 2003) 4003) 700 1 000 200 200 3003) 4003) 2003) 3005. scarfing and sewing Grading and matching Car interior Motor room Rough bench and machine work Medium bench and machine work. pressing. e. ordinary painting. cartons. 5) Machine and fitting Materials handling shops Milling (flour and maize) Mining (surface buildings) Motor vehicle Outdoor areas * 200 4001. washing. calibrated scales. slab and bloom inspection and conditioning. rough grinding. pickling and cleaning lines. e. staking. automatic processes Special batch mixing Colour matching Rubbing. mill motor rooms. medium grinding. dispatch Dry cleaning.5) 1 5001. splitting Pressing and glazing Cutting. 2. mechanical pump houses. gauging and inspection of small intricate parts Minute work Slab yards. precipitator.Page 3 – Annex 3 LOCATION / INDUSTRIES Mending: Hosiery and knitwear Examining and hand finishing: TYPE OF WORK. melting shops. 3) 300 300 200 300 3001) 2) * 25 22 19 22 22 22 25 25 25 22 25 22 22 Outdoor plants Paint Paint shops and Spraying booths Paper Paper bag and Carton box making . calendering. classifying. 3) 2. fleshing and stuffing Finishing. 3) 3003) 4001. find grinding Wrapping.g. 3) 1 0001. work areas. dipping. sheet and plate finishing. mending. tinning. containers and paper box manufacture Coating and laminating process Associated printing GLARE RATING (MAX. 3) 200 200 200 200 400 5001) 5001) * 2. 4) 1 200/1 6002 . wire and cold strip mills. outdoor car parks and internal roads High-voltage yard. galvanizing and roll shops Plate inspection Tinplate inspection and pulpits (control rooms) General work area Fine processes Minute processes Gem cutting. distribution and substations Gangways. av) lux 1 0001.g. sorting. light section. inspection. stretching. precision mechanical instruments Receiving. bulk machine work Fine head ironing. rough checking of stock parts. tanning. 3) 4001. e. etc Conveyor structures General. drying. find automatic machines. 4) 1 5001.) 19 19 19 19 19 25 22 22 19 19 19 28 28 25 22 25 19 10 19 19 19 19 25 25 25 28 28 22 22 19 25 28 25 22 22 28 25 25 25 25 28 28 28 28 25 22 22 * Iron and steel Jewellery and Watchmaking Laboratories and Test rooms Laundering and dry Cleaning Leather and tanning Lifts 100 3002) 5005) 200 8002) 4 0001. “go” and “no-go” gauges Subassemblies Fine work. cutting. medium buffing and polishing Fine bench and machine work. slabbing and large section rolling mills Mould preparation. spraying and finishing Fine painting. Medium work. spray and finishing Retouching and matching Paper And board making.

buffing. spinning. winding. spreading. quilling. raising. routing Photo-engraving: Block-making. hand and machine casting Front assembly. 2. escalators and ramps Structural steel fabrication Sugar Tailoring Textile (cotton or linen) Textile (jute) Textile (silk or synthetic) Textile (woolen) Tobacco Upholstering . labeling. firing Enameling. finishing. batch or continuous soap rooting. spinning flat. warping.Page 4 – Annex 3 LOCATION / INDUSTRIES TYPE OF WORK. cleaning. polishing Cementing Colour matching and inspection Vats and baths. carding. cutting Cigarette making: Making machines.) 28 19 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 19 22 22 25 19 Pharmaceutical and fine chemical Plastics Plating Pottery And clay products Raw metal storage Control laboratories and testing Pharmaceuticals manufacture: grinding. grabbing and blowing Blending. hackling. 3) 300 3001. kettle houses and ancillaries. cop winding Yard calender Soaking. dressing and dyeing. condensing Panning. fugitive tinting. etc. kiln rooms. find woolens Heavy woolens Burling and mending Perching: “Grey” Finals Primary manufacture: Weighing. e. folding Scribing Sheet inspection All processes. doubling (fancy). 3) 5003) 1 0001) 7502) 600 3503) 25 22 25 25 19 19 25 25 25 25 19 25 25 25 25 22 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 25 22 28 28 25 25 25 25 19 25 25 25 19 19 19 19 25 25 25 25 25 25 22 19 19 25 25 25 22 19 19 19 19 19 19 22 22 22 22 25 Refrigeration Rubber processing Sheet metal Soap manufacturing Stairs. pressing. injection Sheet fabrication: Shaping Trimming. mixing. colour matching Hand tailoring Bale breaking. slashing Warping Healding (drawing in) Weaving Inspection Preparing. dressing type. tableting. ice-making Fabric preparation creels Dipping. cabling Warping. combing (coloured). trimming glazing. moulding.g. shearing. 3) 5003) 8003) 8003) 5003) 4003) 8003) 8003) 2 0001. spinning (fine counts) Healing (drawing in) Weaving: Patterned cloths Plain “grey” cloth Cloth inspection Weaving. metering. 3) 8003) 1 0001. Jacquard carpet looms. washing. roving. conditioning. cropping Spinning. machining. capping. spinning (ordinary counts). settling. routing Colour printing: Inspection area Chilling and cold rooms. backwashing. sterilizing and washing Preparation of solutions and filling. burnishing Final buffing and polishing Grinding. evaporating. blowing. conditioning or setting of twist Spinning Winding. packing Refining: Centrifuging. brushing. 2. threshing. 3) 2501. 2. compounding calenders Tyre and tube making Curing and inspection Benchwork. gilling. soap stamping. inspection Fine chemical manufacture: Plant processing Fine chemical finishing Processing: Calendering extrusion Moulding – compression. masking Finishing. General areas Auto process Control panel face (vertical illuminance) Edible product processing and packing General General Marking off Manufacture: Crushing. stamping. filter plugmakers Catcher (inspection) Hand processes Cigarette or tobacco packing Furniture and vehicles Printing 150 300 150 200 300 300 150 200 200 300 500 100 150 150 200 300 150 200 300 150 100 200 150 100 100 200 100 100 200 500 500 100 100 150 500 500 150 500 150 100 150 300 200 200 500 500 500 100 150 300 500 500 300 200 500 500 1 000 100 500 500 500 200 300 5001) 300 4003) 400 5001) 500 400 400 500 1 0001) 2003) 2003) 5003) 4003) 4003) 300 400 5002) 300 300 200 2006) 2001) 150 200 400 2003) 200 3003) 6001) 1 0001) 3003) 3003) 3003) 8003) 8001. mixing and drying. rewinding and coning. filtering. polishing. 3) 200 5001. TASK OR ACTIVITY OHS ACT SAFETY lux 150 200 200 150 200 200 150 150 200 150 500 200 200 200 300 Productivity value (min. 3) 5003) 3503) 4003) 8003) 8003) 1 0001. punching. curing Drying. boiling. decorating Type foundries: Matrix making. winding. electroplating. slashing. 3) 300 300 240 4003) 3003) 1 0001) 4003) 6002) 400 6001) GLARE RATING (MAX. 3) 3003) 4003) 5001. etching. colouring. twisting Healding (drawing in) Weaving: Fine worsteds Medium worsteds. filter pressing. combing (white) tendering. drying Grading. blending. av) lux 200 5001. imposing stones Presses Composition room Proof reading casting Electrotyping: Block-making. moulding. drying. granulating. 3) 5003) 4001. 2. pressing. backing Moulding. sorting Printing plants: Machine composition. slubbing. carding Roving. twisting. pressing.

stairs General work areas Gymnasia Manual exchange rooms (on desk) Main distribution frame rooms in automatic exchanges Battery rooms Foyers Auditoria (other than during performances) Corridors. chancel. stairs Reception areas (desks). e. stacks (on vertical surfaces) Reading tables Manual training Offices Staff rooms. general offices.) 25 19 28 28 28 25 Warehouses and bulk storing Welding and Small material. TASK OR ACTIVITY OHS ACT SAFETY lux 150 200 75 20 150 200 Soldering Fine soldering and spot welding. fine sanding and finishing PUBLIC BUILDINGS. stock rooms General work areas General Badminton Table tennis: Club Championship Spectators Gymnasia Boxing: Amateur Professional General Displays Paintings Entrance halls and reception areas Conference rooms. e. ETC. toilets and change rooms Foyers Auditoria (other than during performances) Platforms Stairs and corridors Booking offices Counters (See also Offices) General work areas Body of church Pulpit and lectern areas. sea) 75 150 5 10 100 200 200 500 300 500 200 500 500 200 300 5001. typing and filing Computer and business machine operation Drawing offices All areas Safety-light dark rooms Circulation Counters Sorting of mail Assembly halls: General When used for examination Platforms Class and lecture rooms Chalk boards (on vertical surfaces) Embroidery and sewing rooms Art rooms Laboratories Libraries: Shelves. planning. radio set assembly Very find soldering and spot welding. rail. veneering. SCHOOLS. av) lux 200 300 100 50 2502) 3502) GLARE RATING (MAX. sorting. packing and dispatch Issue counters Loading bays.g. cooperage Fine bench and machine work. domestic hardware Woodworking and Sawmilling Ablutions Assembly and Concert halls Banks Churches Cinemas Courtrooms Libraries Multipurpose recreation halls See a sports lighting guide Museums and art Galleries 2005) Speciality guidance necessary 100 300 500 500 200 500 500 750 16 Offices Passages and lobbies Photographic Post Offices 22 19 19 16 22 22 22 25 19 16 19 19 19 19 19 19 22 19 22 25 28 25 16 25 25 25 25 22 22 22 25 Schools and Colleges Telephone Exchanges Theatres Transport terminals (air. common rooms Dormitories Corridors. reading room (newspapers and magazines. brazing and spot welding. bus. instruments. sizing. large material Inactive storage and automatic stores Gas and arc welding Medium soldering.) reading tables Binding Cataloging. Wash-rooms. racks. e. choir Altar. stairs Foyers Auditoria (other than during performances) Booking area Seating Court Shelves (stacks) (on vertical surfaces) Carrels. platforms and dispatch 500 1 500 150 200 200 100 100 200 300 200 150 100 200 100 300 100 300 200 100 800 1 5008) 2503) 3003) 5003) 1503) 100 100 2005) 150 300 500 500 150 2002) 2005) 200 200 150 100 100 300 200 500 300 500 500 300 300 500 22 19 25 25 22 25 22 25 19 19 19 19 19 22 22 25 22 25 22 25 22 19 22 22 22 Productivity value (min.g. rough sanding Medium machine and bench work.Page 5 – Annex 3 LOCATION / INDUSTRIES TYPE OF WORK. OFFICES.g. bluing. communion table Vestries Projection room Corridors. printed circuits Rough sawing and bench work. 2) 5001) 500 400 300 4002) See appropriate trade or a sport lighting code 300 100 100 100 150 300 See a sport lighting code 100 3002) 200 300 100 1505) 150 100 100 150 300 500 150 .customs and immigration halls. lounges Check-in counters Circulation.

5) 150 100 2001. hospitals and clinics Reception and waiting rooms Wards: General Beds Operating theatres: General Tables Laboratories Radiology Casualty and outpatient departments Stairs. 5) 200 300 1). 2) 200 200 150 200 3) Surgeries. TASK OR ACTIVITY OHS ACT SAFETY lux 100 100 100 200 100 100 150 150 50 100 100 100 Productivity value (min. etc Optical aids should be used where necessary. which may have inadvertently occurred. Writing rooms (tables) Corridors Stairs Billiard Rooms: General Tables Card rooms Laundries Kitchens Goods and passenger lifts Cloakrooms and toilets Bathrooms Self-service counters General work areas General work areas Stairs and corridors Stockrooms General General Special attention required in respect of colour rendering. 9. 2. Care should be taken to screen all bright luminaires and areas from view of patients in bed. moisture. With dimmer control in continuously attended areas. No responsibility will be accepted by AAAMSA for any errors and/or omissions. 5. etc. hospitals and clinics Surgeries Homes Hotels and Restaurants Shops and stores Stairs. 10. 3) 100 15011) 10011) 300 300 3001. 5) 5001) 5005) 2001) 150 10 4001) 400 200 150 5002) 4001) 2). 11. 8. Charts should be illuminated to have uniform brightness over whole area. Waiting rooms Consulting rooms General examination Dental chairs Laboratories Corridors and stairs Sight testing (acuity): Wall charts and near vision types Kitchens Bathrooms Stairs Workshops Garages Sewing. 2. corrosive or flammable substances. vibration. 5) 4001) 1. Special lighting should be used where necessary. 7. Supplementary local lighting might be required. 3. bed heads. Care should be taken to minimize reflected glare. corridors (in-patient areas) At night time Dispensaries Other rooms: With specific visual tasks Without specific visual tasks GLARE RATING (MAX. 4. 5) 4001) 150 50010) 200 10011) 100 4002) 200 600 500 2002. darning Study and reading Other rooms Entrance halls Reception and accounts Dining and bars Lounges Bedrooms: General Dressing tables. av) lux 150 1009) 2001.Page 6 – Annex 3 LOCATION / INDUSTRIES TYPE OF WORK. escalators and ramps Storage 1. . Protected equipment to meet special conditions such as the presence of dust. 11) 3002) 100 150 200 5) 3002) 300 5002. Supplementary local lighting should be provided at mirrors Great care has been taken to ensure that the information provided is correct. 6.) 19 13 19 10 19 19 19 22 19 19 19 19 19 22 19 22 22 25 28 22 22 25 19 22 25 22 19 19 22 22 22 22 25 25 22 22 22 22 25 22 25 Surgeries. Illumination on underside of vehicle.

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