Curriculum Vitae

Craig W. Linebaugh

Chief Academic Operating Officer The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus

Personal Information

Date of birth: July! 1, 1948

Marital Status: married with three children

Citizenship: USA

Business address: Office of the Chief Academic Operating Officer

The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus 45085 University Drive, Suite 303

Ashburn, VA 20147

Business telephone: 703.726.8383 (voice) 703.726.3665 (fax)

e-mail: cline@gwu.edu

Home address: 1612 Forest Lane McLean, VA 22101

Home telephone: 703.533.0457

Education

Degree

Granting Institution

Post-doctoral Fellow Ph.D.

M.A.

B.A.

Mayo Clinic

Temple University Temple University Lebanon Valley College

Speech-Language Pathology Speech and Hearing Science Speech-Language Pathology English Literature

1975-1976 1976 1974 1970

Craig W. Linebaugh

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Academic and Administrative Positions

July 1, 2006 ~ present Chief Academic Operating Officer

The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus Ashburn, VA

The Chief Academic Operating Officer (CAOO) is the chief academic officer of The George Washington University Virginia Science and Technology Campus (VSTC). The CAOO reports directly to the University Provost and is responsible for all aspects of the educational, research, and community outreach programs of the University's l O'l-acre Science and Technology Campus in Loudoun County, VA. The CAOO leads the development and implementation of the strategic plan for the Campus and guides development of the academic facilities and instructional and research technology infrastructures .. He works with the University's deans to develop academic programs at the VSTC and to establish clusters of faculty who collaborate in the Campus' research centers and institutes. He also works with the Vice President for Research to expand the research infrastructure at the Campus and to increase research expenditures. The CAOO convenes the Virginia Campus Advisory Council and builds relationships with individuals and institutions from the corporate, state and local government, education, healthcare, and non-profit sectors of the Northern Virginia region and the Commonwealth of Virginia, forming partnerships that promote investment in the Campus. He represents GW on the Council ofIndependent Colleges in Virginia.

July 2005 ~ present NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative

April 1, 1997 ~ January 15, 2008 Associate Vice President for Academic Planning The George Washington University

The Associate Vice President for Academic Planning (AVP AP) oversaw the planning and assessment activities for a variety of aspects of the academic enterprise of the University and provided direct oversight of the University's Office of Academic Planning and Assessment. He was a principle in the development of the University's strategic plan and established the metrics by which progress toward the plan's goals and objectives is assessed. When GW affiliated with Mount Vernon College, the AVPAP led development of the curriculum offered at the campus and served as the primary academic officer in developing a campus plan. The AVPAP was responsible for the University's Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning, its Center for Academic Technologies and Instructional Technology Laboratory, the Academic Integrity Program, and the Office ofthe Registrar. The A VPAP was also responsible for academic facilities planning and renovations, including learning environments and laboratories on both the Foggy Bottom (main) and Mount Vernon campuses. The AVPAP was the University's liaison to the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and directed the University's accreditation activities. The AVPAP also developed and conducted orientations for new department chairs and faculty new to the University and promoted faculty development and recognition programs. He developed and managed the Academic Calendar.

] 994 ~ present 1996 - present 1978~1984

Chair, Department of Speech and Hearing Science, The George Washington University Professor of Speech and Hearing Science

Research Professor of Medicine

The George Washington University

Faculty Member, GWU Graduate Program in Neuroscience Faculty Member, GWU Institute for Biomedical Sciences Associate Professor of Speech and Hearing Science Associate Research Professor of Medicine

The George Washington University

1986 - 1997

1 984 - present

Craig W. Linebaugh Page 3 of 15

1976 - 1978 Assistant Professor of Speech and Hearing Science Assistant Research Professor of Medicine

The George Washington University

Leadership Accomplishments

As Chief Academic Operating Officer of the Virginia Science and Technology Campus

• Led the development and implementation of the Plan for Development of the Academic Enterprise at the Virginia Science and Technology Campus

• Facilitated establishment of the GW School of Nursing at the VSTC

• Promoted the establishment and growth of innovative (e.g., hybrid, cohort, second degree) academic programs in engineering, education, health sciences, and nursing on the Virginia Science and Technology Campus

• Oversaw the development of new research institutes in Energy Science and Technology and in High Performance Computing on the Campus

• Participated in faculty recruitment in chemistry, physics and engineering, and oversaw the renovation of laboratories that increased the number of active laboratories from 6 to 16 between 2007 and 2010

• Developed space utilization plans for all academic facilities on the campus and served as the principle academic officer in creating a master plan for future development

• Directed a comprehensive restructuring of the VSTC's learning environments including the installation of technology to enable content capture for podcasting, electronic recording and analysis of student responses, and video teleconferencing of classes between the VSTC and Foggy Bottom campus

• Oversaw construction of fourteen new technology-enhanced classrooms and seminar rooms and two new student lounges

• Expanded partnerships with other institutions of higher education in Virginia, including a unique program in Pharmacogenomics in partnership with Shenandoah University'S Bernard 1. Dunn School of Pharmacy

• Established strong relationships with the Council ofIndependent Colleges in Virginia and the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia

• Established an engaged presence for George Washington University in Northern Virginia though membership on the Board of Directors of the Loudoun County Chamber of Commerce, the CEO Cabinet ofthe Loudoun Economic Development Commission, and the Northern Virginia Technology Council

• Recruited a group ofCEOs of domestic and international corporations and executives from educational, research, and healthcare institutions to serve on a Virginia Science and Technology Campus Advisory Council

• Developed strong working relationships with elected representatives (e.g., Virginia state senators and delegates, Loudoun County Board of Supervisors) and appointed government officials from the Commonwealth of Virginia

• Collaborated with the Loudoun County Economic Development Commission in establishing the GW Teachers in Industry program that places public school teachers in internships in corporations during the summer

• Initiated a broad program of community engagement that includes art exhibits; town hall meetings with elected officials; public lectures; a Science, Technology, and Engineering Day for more than 100 public high school students; and several events with the Loudoun County Small Business Development Center and numerous businesses

• Acquired sponsorships for key VSTC initiatives (e.g., Science, Engineering, and Technology Day) and expanded service learning and internship opportunities

Craig W. Linebaugh

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• Served as the Principle Investigator on a $14 million grant proposal to construct a new research facility on the Campus [not funded]

• Led creation ofa campus brochure and e-newsletter and redesign of the VSTC web site

• Streamlined the administrative structure to enhance responsiveness to educational and research opportunities

As Associate Vice President tor Academic Planning:

• Made substantial contributions to the development and implementation of Sustaining Momentum, Maximizing Strength - The George Washington University Strategic Plan for Academic Excellence

• Transformed the University's physical and virtual learning environments to enable faculty to more tully engage students through innovative pedagogical approaches

• Established guidelines for the University's five-year academic program reviews and implemented the review process; from 1997-2006 approved all proposed academic programs and new courses

• Co-authored a Strategic Plan for Enhancing Undergraduate Retention and Graduation Rates that resulted in a 4% increase in 1 st_to_ 2nd year retention

• Served as the University liaison to the Middle States Commission on Higher Education and co-chaired the University's reaccredidation efforts in 1997-1998 and in 2007-2008

• Served on the task force that created the University's new undergraduate University Writing course and its Writing in the Disciplines program, producing the first draft of the program and developing the budget for its implementation

• Served on the University task force that examined conversion from a five course per semester to a four course per semester curriculum and prepared the faculty workload and financial analyses for such a conversion

• Served as Principle Investigator on a grant application to the Hewlett Foundation that resulted in a $150,000 curriculum development grant to create inquiry-based courses in 15 academic departments

• Participated in expansion of the University's distance education offerings, including establishment of its Online Learning Initiative (formerly Summer Distance Learning Initiative)

• Established the Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning, an Instructional Technology Laboratory, and a "teaching studio" to support faculty development and enhance teaching and learning

• Established the Office of Academic Planning and Assessment

• Established the Center for Academic Technologies and oversaw the development of the University's course management system and "Colonial Cast," OW's academic podcasting initiative

• Led the redesign of the University's teaching and learning environments that involved expansion from 5 to 160 technology-enhanced classrooms, including classrooms for innovative pedagogical approaches such a "scale up", and renovation of the Acheson Science Building on the Mount Vernon Campus

• Served as the principle academic representative in the development of campus plans for the Foggy Bottom (main) and Mount Vernon campuses for submission to the District of Columbia Zoning Commission

• Served as the principle Academic Affairs representative for the design and construction of three major academic buildings that house GW's Elliott School ofInternational Affairs, School of Business, and School of Media and Public Affairs

• Coordinated renovation of approximately twenty thousand square feet of Biology, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics labs

• Oversaw implementation of the Faculty Workstation Initiative which provides all full-time faculty members with a new computer every three years

• Developed and led the University's orientations for new deans and department chairs and for faculty new to GW

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• Administered GW's competitive pedagogical development grant program and its Trachtenberg and Bender teaching award programs

As Chair, Department of Speech and Hearing Science:

• The graduate program in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology achieved a ranking of26 in the U.S. News and World Report rankings of graduate programs

• The graduate program was nationally recognized for innovative curriculum development (invited presentation to the annual meeting of the Council of Graduate Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders, Tampa, FL, 1989)

• Increased the number of tenure track faculty

• Increased the diversity of the faculty to include African-American, Hispanic, and physically-challenged faculty members

• Increased the number of inquiries and applications to the graduate program, admission selectivity, and the number of students matriculating in the program

• Increased the average GRE scores and undergraduate GPA of students entering the graduate program

• 100% of students graduating from the graduate program passed the National Examination in Speech-

Language Pathology and Audiology

• Increased external funding and research productivity of tenure track faculty

• Led the graduate program through two reaccreditations

• Oversaw efforts to accommodate faculty and students with physical and visual disabilities

Service to University Committees

University:

Board of Trustees Committee on a Science and Engineering Complex, 2008-present Strategic Planning Committee for Academic Excellence, 2002-2003

Middle States Commission of Higher Education reaccreditation, Steering Committee; co-chair, 1997-98,

2007-08

University Writing Program Task Force, 200] -2002

NCAA certification: Steering Committee, member; Academic Integrity Subcommittee, chair, 2007-2008 Response Management Group, 2002-2008

Information Technology Executive Committee, 2006-2008 Research and Instructional Technology Committee, 2006-present

Center for Innovative Teaching and Learning Advisory Committee, 2007-present Athletics Council, 2008-present

4x4 Curriculum Task force, 2005-2006

Committee to review the performance of the Executive Director of the University Writing Program (chair), 2006

Committee on Sponsored Research, 1988-1989

Appellate Review Board on Academic Dishonesty, 1995-1996

Colleges and Schools:

Dean's (Advisory) Council, Columbian College of Arts and Sciences, Chair, 1994-1996; Member, ] 992 - 1997

Interdepartmental Committee on Linguistics: Member, 1987-1997; Chair, 1991-1993

Craig W. Linebaugh Page 6 of 15

Academic Program Review Committees: Museum Studies, Chair, 1992; Forensic Sciences, 1994 Columbian School of Arts and Sciences Freshman Advising Workshop Instructor, 1991 ~ 1994

Faculty Senate:

Physical Facilities, 1997~present Educational Po licy, 1998-2008

Professional Ethics and Academic Freedom, 1997-2002 Fiscal Planning and budgeting, 1991-1997

Research, 1980~ 1984, 1988-89

Athletics and Recreation, 1977-1980, 1985-1990 (chair, 1990), 2005-present

Service to Other Universities

AI Akhawayn University (Morocco). Strategic Planning, 2004~2005; 2010 Kemerova State University (Russia). Strategic Planning, 2001

University of California, San Diego. External reviewer for Ph.D. program in Language and Communication Disorders. 1995.

University of Pittsburgh. External reviewer for Department of Communication Science and Disorders. 1993. Arizona State University. External reviewer for Ph.D. program in Speech and Hearing Neuroscience.

Honors

Special Recognition, The George Washington University Student Association for "continuing dedication

and service to the students of The George Washington University," 2002

George Washington Award (GW's highest award for outstanding service to the University), 2001 Fellow, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, 1990

Academy of Aphasia, Elected to membership, 1990

Certificate of Achievement. Johns Hopkins First National Search for Personal Computer Aids for the Handicapped, 1981

Certificate of Appreciation for Outstanding Professional Contribution, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: 1980, 1985, 1995

Service to Professional Organizations

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association:

Associate Editor for Neural Processes and Disorders, Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 1988-1990 Communication Sciences and Disorders Research Group, Speech Disorders Subcommittee, Member, 1996-

1999.

Committee on Language, Chair, 1989-1990; Member, 1986-1988

Committee on Interprofessional Relationships with Neuropsycho logy, 1987-1990

Editorial consultant, Journal of Speech-Language-Hearing Research, 1983-1987, 1991 -present Editorial consultant, Aphasiology, 1998-present

Editorial consultant, Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 1983-1988

Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences:

President, 1990

Craig W. Linebaugh

Executive Board 1989-1992

Committee on Specialty Certification, Chair, 1992-1994 Specialty Certification Board, 1994-1998, 201O-present

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Council of Graduate Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders:

Committee on Quality Indicators in Graduate Education, 1991-1992 Committee on Specialty Certification, 1992-1993

Clinical Aphasiology Conference Conference Chair, 1990 Program Chair, 1989

Steering Committee, 1989-present

Task Force on Specialty Credentialing, Chair, 1986-1988

Department of Veterans Affairs:

Rehabilitation Research and Development Merit Review Board; Communication, Sensory and Cognitive Aids Panel; 1988-1997.

Grants Received

Establishing Functional Lexical Retrieval in Aphasia, NIH Individual Investigator Award (RO-l), 1992-1996 The Efficacy of Dynarnic External Resistance Exercise in the Treatment of Unilateral Facial Paresis, GWU Research Facilitating Fund, 1991-1992

The Effectiveness of Word and Picture Primes for Aphasic Subjects, GWU Research Facilitating Fund, 19$8-1989

Brain Electrical Activity Mapping of Visual Evoked Potentials Recorded During the Performance of Verbal and Nonverbal Tasks, GWU Research Facilitating Fund, 1986-1987

Referential Communication between Aphasic Persons and Their Families, GWU Research Facilitating Fund, 1985-1987

Interpretation of Context-Dependent Pictures by Brain-Damaged Adults, GWU Research Facilitating Fund, 1984-1985

Counseling Needs of Families of Aphasic Patients, Rehabilitation Services Administration, RT-9, 1977-1979 Efficacy of Biofeedback in the Treatment of Apraxia of Speech, GWU Research Facilitating Fund, 1977-1978

Significant Participation in Other Grants

Curriculum Development:

"The Careful Beginning ofa Big Idea." Hewlett Foundation, General Education in Research Universities. $150,000 award to develop new undergraduate courses that employ problem-based learning and emphasize use the vast resources of the metropolitan Washington, DC area. 2001-2003.

Research:

Evaluation of Deficit-Oriented Treatments for Naming Disorders in Aphasia (Principal Investigators: Julie Wambaugh, Patrick Doyle). Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation Research and Development Merit Review Board. Served as Co-Investigator, 1998-2000.

Craig W. Linebaugh

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Learning, Memory, and the Rehabilitation of Anomia (Principal Investigator: Rhonda Friedman). NIDCD. Consultant, 200 ]-2004.

Word-finding treatment for aphasia: Discourse and lexical form effects (Principal Investigators: Julie Wambaugh, Patrick Doyle). Department of Veterans Affairs, Rehabilitation Research and Development Merit Review Board. Consultant, 2001-2004.

Refereed Publications

Linebaugh, CW & Lehner, LH (1977). Cueing hierarchies and word retrieval: A therapy program. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1977 (pp. 19-31). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Linebaugh, CW (1978). Dichotic ear preference in aphasia: Another view. Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, 21, 598-600.

Linebaugh, CW & Young-Charles, HY (1978). The counseling needs of the families of aphasic patients. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1978 (pp. 304-313). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Keith, RL, Linebaugh, CW & Cox, BO (1978). Presurgical counseling needs of laryngectomees: A survey of 78 patients. Laryngoscope, 88,1660-1665.

Linebaugh, CW (1979). The dysarthrias of Shy- Drager syndrome. Journal of Speech and Hearing Disorders, 44, 55-60.

Linebaugh, CW (1979). Assessing the assessments: The adequacy of standardized tests of aphasia. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1979 (pp. 8-22). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Linebaugh, CW, Coakley, AS, Arrigan, AF & Racy, A (1979). Epileptogenic aphasia. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1979 (pp. 70-78). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Darley, FL, Helm, N, Holland, AL & Linebaugh, CW (1980). Techniques in treating mild or high level aphasic impairment. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1980 (pp. 338-345). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Linebaugh, CW & Young-Charles, BY (1981). Confidence in ratings of aphasic patients' functional communication: Spouses and speech-language pathologists. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1981 (pp. 226-233). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Myers, PS & Linebaugh, CW (1981). Comprehension of idiomatic expressions by right hemisphere damaged adults. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1981 (pp. 254-261). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Linebaugh, CW, Baird, JC, Baird, CB & Armor, RM (1982). Special considerations forthe development of microcomputer-based augmentative communication systems. In WR Berry (Ed.) Clinical Dysarthria (pp. 295-303). San Diego: College-Hill Press.

Linebaugh, CW, Kryzer, KM, Oden, SE & Myers, PS (1982). Reapportionment of communicative burden in aphasia. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1982 (pp. 4-9). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Craig W. Linebaugh

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Linebaugh, CW, Pryor, AP & Person Margulies, CL (1983). Picture descriptions by family members of aphasic patients to aphasic and nonaphasic listeners. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1983 (pp. 218-226). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Myers, PS & Linebaugh, CW (1984). The use of context-dependent pictures in aphasia rehabilitation. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1984 (pp. 145-158). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Linebaugh, CW, Person Margulies, CL & Mackisack, EL (1984). The effectiveness of comprehension-enhancing strategies employed by spouses of aphasic patients. In RH Brookshire (Ed.) Clinical Aphasiology, 1984 (pp, 188-197). Minneapolis: BRK Publishers.

Linebaugh, CW, Person Margulies, CL & Mackisack, EL (1985). Contingent queries and revisions used by aphasic individuals and their most frequent communication partners. Clinical Aphasiology, 15,229-236.

Myers, PS, Linebaugh, CW & Mackisack, EL (1985). Extracting implicit meaning: Right versus left hemisphere damage. Clinical Aphasiology, 15, 72-82.

Linebaugh, CW (J 986). Variability of error patterns on two formats of picture-to-word matching. Clinical Aphasiology, 16, 181-189.

Linebaugh, CW (1986). Specialty recognition in neurogenic speech language and cognitive disorders. Clinical Aphasiology, 16, 315-318.

Linebaugh, CW (1987). A dissociation between auditory comprehension and sentence completion: Theoretical and clinical implications. Clinical Aphasiology, 17, 166-171.

Linebaugh, CW (1989). Quantitative and qualitative comparisons ofauditory comprehension and reading in aphasia. Clinical Aphasiology, 18,421-432.

Lott, SN, Friedman, RB & Linebaugh, CW (I 994), Rationale and efficacy of a tactile-kinesthetic treatment for anomia. Aphasiology, 8,181-195.

Varholak, SE & Linebaugh, CW (1995). Comparison of active versus passive prestimulation in the treatment of anomia. Clinical Aphasiology, 23, 253-266.

Burrell, K, Linebaugh, CW, & Cozens-Hoffinan, C (1996). The effects of auditory distracters on the auditory and reading comprehension of adults with unilateral right hemisphere infarction. Clinical Aphasiology, 24, 255-270.

Linebaugh, CW (1998). Assessing treatment efficacy in acute aphasia: Paradoxes, presumptions, problems, and principles. Aphasiology, 12, 519-536.

Linebaugh, CW, (1999). Merging the models: what, why, how, and when in aphasia therapy. Clinical Aphasiology, 13, ] 43-147,

Wambaugh, JL, Doyle, P.]., Linebaugh, CW, Spencer, KA & Kalinyak·Pliszar, M (1999). Effects of deficitoriented treatments on lexical retrieval in a patient with semantic and phonological deficits. Brain and Language, 69, 446-450.

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Wambaugh, n, Linebaugh, CW, Doyle, Pl, Martinez, AL, Kalinyak-Fliszar, M & Spencer, KA (2001).

Effects of two cueing treatments on lexical retrieval in aphasic speakers with different levels of deficit. Aphasiology, 15, 933-950.

Linebaugh, CW, Shisler, RJ & Lehner, L (2005). Cueing hierarchies ans word retrieval: A therapy program.

Aphasiology, 19, 77-92.

Linebaugh, CW, Kryzer, KM, Oden, SE & Myers, PS (2006). Reapportionment of communicative burden in aphasia: A study of narrative interactions. Aphasiology, 20, 84-96.

Invited Contributions and Chapters

Linebaugh, CW (1983). Flaccid dysarthria. In WR Perkins (Ed.) Current therapy of communication disorders:

Dysarthria and apraxia (pp. 59-68). New York: Thieme-Stratton,

Linebaugh, CW (1983). Mild aphasia. In AL Holland (Ed.) Language disorders in adults (pp. 113-132). San Diego: College-Hill Press.

Linebaugh, CW (1983). Anomie aphasia. In WR Perkins (Ed.) Current therapy of communication disorders:

Language handicaps in adults (pp. 35-44). New York: Thieme-Stratton.

Linebaugh, CWand Wolfe, VE (1983). Relationships between articulation rate, intelligibility and naturalness in spastic and ataxic speakers. In MR McNeil, JC Rosenbek & AR Aronson (Eds.).The dysarthrias:

Physiology, aCQustics, linguisti~s and management (pp, ] 97-206). San Diego: CollegeHiI1 Press.

Linebaugh, CW and Mills, RH (1985). Computer applications in the clinical management of neurogenic communication disorders. In JK Darby (Ed.) Speech and language evaluation in neurology: Adult Disorders (pp. 429-450). Orlando, FL: Grune & Stratton.

Linebaugh, CW (1989). The education of speech-language pathologists: An agenda for change. In JM Pettit, TP Marquardt & DN Ripich (Eds.) Proceedings of the tenth annual conference on graduate education (pp. 73-80). Council of Graduate Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Linebaugh, CW (1991). Lexical retrieval problems: Anomia. In LL LaPointe (Ed). Aphasia and related neurogenic language disorders (pp. 96-112). New York: Thieme Medical Publishers.

Bernthal, J, Linebaugh, CW, Mendal, M & Wall, L (1992). Quality indicators for self study and program improvement. In JW Folkins, M Mendel & 1 Barber Watson (Eds) In Proceedings of the thirteenth annual conference on graduate education (pp. 56-70). Council of Graduate Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Linebaugh, CW (1995). Expanding scope of practice in speech-language pathology: How are we responding?

In IE Bernthal, E McNiece, D Nash & D Sorenson (Eds) In Proceedings of the annual conference on graduate education (pp, ] 09-1] 6). Council of Graduate Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders.

Linebaugh, CW (1996). Lexical retrieval problems: Anomia. In LL LaPointe (Ed). Aphasia and related neurogenic language disorders (2nd edition). New York: Thieme Medical Publishers.

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Submitted Papers and Poster Sessions

Linebaugh, CW (1976). Dysarthrias of Shy-Drager syndrome. American Speech-language-Hearing Association. Houston, TX.

Keith, RL, Linebaugh, CW & Cox, BG (1976) Pre-laryngectomy counseling. American Speech-language-Hearing Association. Houston, TX.

Linebaugh, CW (1977). Graphic word completion by aphasic adults. American Speech-language-Hearing Association. Chicago, IL.

Myers, PS & Linebaugh, CW (1980). The perception of contextually conveyed relationships by right hemisphere damaged patients. American Speech-language-Hearing Association. Detroit, MI.

Linebaugh, CW (1980). Treating high level or mild aphasia: Lexical focus task. Clinical Aphasiology Conference. Bar Harbor, ME.

Linebaugh, CW & Florance, CL (1980). American Speech-Language Hearing Association. Detroit, MI.

Linebaugh, CW, Kessler, H. & Myers, PS (1982). American Speech Language-Hearing Association. Toronto, Canada.

Linebaugh, CW, Person Margulies, CL & Pryor, AP (1983). Talking to aphasic listeners: Changes made by family members. American Speech-Language Hearing Association. Cincinnati, OB.

Linebaugh, CW & Person Margulies, CL (1984). Augmentative communication systems: Implications of portability for positioning. Clinical Dysarthria Conference. Tucson, AZ.

Linebaugh, CW (1984). Comparison of two task formats for reading comprehension in aphasia. American Speech-language-Hearing Association. San Francisco, CA.

Myers, PS, Linebaugh, CW & Mackisack,EL (1985). Categorizing inferential pictures by theme: Left versus right hemisphere. Clinical Aphasiology Conference. Ashland, OR.

Linebaugh, CW (1985). Communicative interaction with aphasic adults: Recent findings and applications.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Washington, DC.

Roman, ME, Reynolds, we, Linebaugh, CW & Willis, CL (1985). Tactile graphics for the blind in speech-language pathology. American Speech Language-Hearing Association. Washington, DC.

Linebaugh, CW (1986). Picture-to-word matching: Response field composition and error patterns. American Speech-language-Hearing Association. Detroit, 1986.

Linebaugh, CW & Cole, P (1987). Clinical aphasiology and specialty credentialing. Clinical Aphasiology Conference. Lake of the Ozarks, MO.

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Linebaugh, CW, Rao, PR, Aronson, AE & Wilcox, MJ (1987). Quality assurance/professional autonomy:

Specialty credentialing and the clinical Ph.D. American Speech-language-Hearing Association. New Orleans, LA.

Linebaugh, CW, Holland, AL, Duffy, JR, LaPointe, LL & Minifie, FD (1988). Clinical practice in neurogenic communicative disorders: Achieving competence. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Boston, 1988.

Linebaugh, CW (1989). Anomie aphasia with phonological alexia: A case report. Speech and Hearing Association of Virginia. Mcl.ean, VA.

Linebaugh, CW (1989). Anomie aphasia with phonologic alexia: A case with functional implications.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. St. Louis, MO.

Linebaugh, CW (1990). " ... a chaos inside." Clinical Aphasiology Conference. Santa Fe, NM.

Parnell, E, Linebaugh, CW & Person, CL (1990). Effects of nipple flow rate on infants' feeding efficiency.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Seattle, WA.

Linebaugh, CW (1991). Speech-language pathology in the 21st century: Evolution and genetic engineering.

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Atlanta, GA.

Lott, SN, Friedman, RB & Linebaugh, CW (1992). Rationale and efficacy of a tactile-kinesthetic treatment for alexia. Academy of Aphasia. Toronto, Canada.

Linebaugh, CW (1992). Specialization in speech-language pathology: Implications for education. American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. San Antonio, TX.

Linebaugh, CW (1995). Basic neuroscience and behavioral intervention for aphasia: Implications and Speculations. Clinical Aphasiology Conference. Sunriver, OR.

Linebaugh, CW, Baron, C. & Pieper, D. (1995). Variability of naming responses: A model-based assessment.

American Speech-Language Hearing Association. Orlando, FL.

Linebaugh, CW, Baron, C. & Flynn, J. (1996). Treatment ofanomia: A combined prestimulation-cueing hierarchy approach. American Speech Language-Hearing Association. Seattle, WA.

Wambaugh, JW, Linebaugh, CW, Doyle, PJ, Martinez, A, Kalinyak-Fliszer, M. & Spencer, K. (2000).

Effects of two treatments on lexical retrieval in aphasic speakers with different levels of deficit. Clinical Aphasiology Conference. Waikoloa Beach, HA

Invited Presentations

A transformational view of phonetic substitution errors. Washington Aphasia Study Group. Washington, DC, 1976.

Cueing hierarchies and aphasia rehabilitation. District of Columbia Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Washington, DC, 1977.

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The clinical management of dysarthria. Philadelphia Aphasia Study Group. Philadelphia, PA, 1977.

Differential diagnosis of dysarthria. Maryland Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Pikesville, MD, 1979.

Dysarthria: Differential diagnosis and treatment. Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association.

Hershey, PA, 1979.

Neurological bases of speech production. Mayo Clinic Symposium on Motor Speech Disorders. Rochester, MN 1980.

Family intervention in aphasia rehabilitation. Ohio Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Dayton, OH, 1980.

Special considerations for the geriatric aphasic. Wright State University. Dayton, 011, 1980.

The geriatric dysarthric: Special problems, possible solutions. Wright State University. Dayton, OH, 1980.

Differential signs of motor system involvement. Medical College of Virginia. Richmond, VA, 1980.

Counseling needs of the families ofaphasic clients. Adaptation to Stroke: A Family Centered Approach.

American Heart Association. Washington, DC 1980.

Counseling the families of aphasic patients. Maryland Rehabilitation Center. Baltimore, MD, 1981.

Communicative disorders. Medical Care for the Aged in the '80s. Division of Geriatric Medicine, The George Washington University Medical Center. Washington, DC, 1981.

Family intervention in aphasia rehabilitation. District of Columbia Speech Language-Hearing Association.

Washington, DC 1981.

An holistic approach to dysarthria rehabilitation. Illinois Speech-Language Hearing Association. Chicago, IL, 1982.

Adequacy and applicability of current diagnostic and treatment methods in aphasia. University of Cincinnati Medical Center. Cincinnati, OH, 1982.

Speech motor control. Toronto Western Hospital. Toronto, Canada, 1982.

Communicative interaction analysis and intervention. American Speech Language-Hearing Association Aphasia Mini-Institute. Rockville, MD, 1982.

Neurological bases of speech and language processing. Philadelphia Aphasia Study Group. Philadelphia, PA 1983.

Communicative interaction in left and right brain-damaged adults. Speech and Hearing Association of Virginia.

Charlottesville, VA, 1983.

Communicative interaction in aphasic adults. New York State Speech Language-Hearing Association.

Ellenville, NY, 1983.

Craig W. Linebaugh Page 14 of 15

Patient and family counseling in aphasia and right hemisphere communicative impairments. Martinsburg Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Martinsburg, WV, 1983

Computer applications in aphasia rehabilitation. Current Trends and Issues in Treatment of Adult Neurologic Disorders. The Hearing and Speech Agency of Metropolitan Baltimore. Baltimore, MD, 1984.

Communicative Interaction in Language-Impaired Children and Adults (with Cheryl L. Person). Chadoke Hospital. Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, 1984.

Communicative interaction in left and right brain-damaged adults. Hofstra University. Hempstead, NY, 1984.

Dysarthria rehabilitation: An integrated approach. Tennessee Speech Language-Hearing Association. Nashville, TN,1984.

Alternative modes of communication for stroke patients. American Heart Association, North Carolina Affiliate.

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Communicative interaction in aphasic adults. Pennsylvania Speech-Language Hearing Association. Pittsburgh, PA, 1984.

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Diagnosis and intervention of pragmatic disorders in children and adults (with Diane Paul Brown). District of Columbia Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Washington, DC 1988.

Lexical access: Evaluation and treatment. New York State Speech-Language Hearing Association. Kiamesha Lake, NY, 1989.

Graduate education in speech-language pathology: An agenda for change. Council of Graduate Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Tampa, FL, 1989.

Diagnosis and treatment of mild aphasia (with Paul R. Rao). Maryland Speech Language-Hearing Association.

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Craig w. Linebaugh

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Treatment of mild aphasia. Aphasia practice in the 90s. National Rehabilitation Hospital. Washington, DC, 1990.

Strategies for enhancing communication. Stroke Awareness Seminar. American Heart Association.

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Lexical retrieval in aphasia. Arkansas Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Hot Springs, AR, 1991.

Respiration in normal and dysarthric adults. Maryland Speech-Language Hearing Association. Frederick, MD 1992 ..

Treatment intensity and generalization. National Rehabilitation Hospital Stroke Symposium. Washington, DC 1993.

Neurological bases of speech and language: Acquired speech and language disorders in adults (with Alan Reubens and Robert T. Wertz). American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Teleseminar. 1994.

Outcome measures in graduate education in communication sciences and disorders. Council of Graduate Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Scottsdale, AZ, 1994.

Interactive perspectives on functional communication. New Jersey Speech Language-Hearing Association.

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Neurolinguistics and neurorehabilitation: Merging the models. National Rehabilitation Hospital Stroke Recovery Conference. Rockville, MD, 1994.

Innovative curriculum models in speech-language pathology. Council of Graduate Programs in Communication Sciences and Disorders. Sarasota, FL, 1995.

Rehabilitation and the recovering brain. Magee Rehabilitation Annual Stroke Conference. Philadelphia, PA, 1995.

Treatment of lexical retrieval in aphasia: Re-establishing the connection. National Rehabilitation Hospital Stroke Conference. Washington, DC, 1996.

Aphasia rehabilitation: Resource allocation perspectives on functional communication. East Carolina University. Greenville, NC, 1996.

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