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plugin-IntroRealAnalysNotes

plugin-IntroRealAnalysNotes

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Published by Aravind Kumar

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Published by: Aravind Kumar on Feb 28, 2011
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01/15/2013

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A sequence (sn) is said to lie in a set S eventually if after a certain value of n, all
the sn lie in S. Put another way, we say that sn lies in S for large n, if sn∈S for all
values of n beyond some value, say n0.
For example, the sequence

−5,−4,−3,−2,−1,0,1,2,3,...

will lie in the set (20,∞) eventually.
Let us note again: a sequence (sn) lies in a set S eventually if there is an n0∈P

such that

sn∈S

for all n∈Pwith n≥n0.
A sequence (xn) inR∗ is said to have limit L∈R∗ if for any neighborhood U
of L the sequence lies in this neighborhood eventually.

We denote this symbolically as

xn→L, as n→∞.

42

Ambar N. Sengupta

We shall see later that if a limit exists then it is unique; the limit L is denoted

lim

n→∞xn.

The notion of limit is one of the central notions in mathematics.
For example, the sequence

1,2,3,4,....

has limit ∞. For, if we take any neighborhood of ∞, say

(t,∞]

then eventually n will exceed t (by the archimidean property) and so the sequence
will stay in (t,∞] from the n-th term onwards.
The sequence

1, 1

2, 1

3, 1

4,...
has limit 0. We will look at this more carefully soon.

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