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Contents
Map of the book ..••••......••....••••...••••• Thanks and acknowledgements ..••••....••••....•• Introduction ....................•............ Classroom language 1 Creating things 2 Game play ..•.•••...••.•....••..... 3 Speaking ...•.•••...•.••....••..... 1The leland: Project guide .....•.....••.......• 1.1 Island poster .•••....•••••..••••••.. 1.2 Travels with my rucksack .••••...•••••.. 1.3 Desert island students .•••..•••••...•• 1.4 Robinson Crusoe ••...••••....••..... 2 Movie macula: project CUIIie ....••••...•••••.. 2.1 The audition .•..•...••...••.••...•• 2.2 The mogul game ••.....••........... 2.3 Movie magazine ..•....•.•....••..... 2.4 Shooting ......••...••.•.•.•••..••. 3 Space City: Project 3.1 Building the future ..•....•........... 3.2 The city of the future ......•......•... 3.3 Travel to Space City 3.4 Loving the alien .•••••..••.••..•..••• 4 The exhibition: Project ",Ide 4.1 Three little pictures ..•.••••...•••••.. 4.2 Make my machine ••••....••.....••.. 4.3 Opening the wardrobe ...•••........... 4.4 Catwalk ..........•....•...•..••.. 5 Blind date: Protect aul... . 5.1 Getting a date ..••.••. ' .••....•...... 5.2 The date •••...•.•••...•..•....••.. 5.3 Photo love ••.....•••...•.•••...••.• 5.4 Honeymoon ....••..•....•.....•••.. 6 Radio show: Project guide ....•....••••...••.. 6.1 ldols .......•.....•....••••...•••• 6.2 Adverts ••••...••••....••....•..... 6.3 The Harchards ....••....••.......... 6.4 Headlines ...•.....•......••...•••• 7 The restaurant: Protect 7.1 Food families .••....••.•...••...•••• 7.2 Setting up •••••...•••••...•••.••••• 7.3 Dining out ...••....•.....•••...••.. 7.4 Our restaurant 8 secret agent: Project 8.1 Equipping your agent •••••....•.....•• 8.2 Codes ••....••.•...•••...•••••...• 8.3 Interrogation .....••....••.••.....• 8.4 The base .••...••••...•••....•.... 9 A midsummer nliM'. project: Project guide 9.1 Introduction and background ..•••...••• 9.2 Audltlons ..........•.............. 9.3 Rehearsals and preparation 9.4 The performance ...............•... 4

8 9 13
15

17
19

20
22

24 26
29

30
32

36 38 41 42 44 48 52
55

56 58 60 63 65 66 68 69 72
75

aulde

76 78 80 82 86
88

85

au"

90 92
95

96 98
100

103 107
108 109 110 112

1.0 nme

capsule: PrcIIeCt CUkie .•..........•...•
Introductlon .......•..••......•..•• Decisions ...........••.........•. Filling the capsule ....•••.........•• Burial ......•...........•........

10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4

117 118 119 121 127
128

Appendix 1: Using new technology ......•..••..... Appendix 2: Using the community •...••••.......••

128

Map of the book

PROlECT

LEVEL

LANGUAGE FOCUS

SKILLS

TIME

ACTIVITY TYPE

TOPI.CS

Creating things

elementaryintermediate

simple questions, names of classroom objects simple questions, instructions for games simple questions, wiII for predictions

speaking

15 mins

game

classroom language, art

2

Game play

pre-intermediateintermediate pre-intermediateinterm.ediate

speaking, writing speaking

15-20 mlns

gap fill

classroom language, games classroom language, people

3

Speaking

15 mins

questi on na ire

1.1 Is Iand poster

elementaryintermediate

desc:ripti 0 ns, madals of ability, prepositions of position
+

spe.aking, writing

60-90 mins

making a poster Imap

travel, survival, geography, art

1.2 Travels. wi.th my rucksack
1.3 Desert island

intermediate

conditionals, modals of possibility questi on form s, past verb forms narrative tenses, articles. reference devices

speaking

45-60 mins

team game

travel, su rviva\, dese rt islan ds tra vel'..m usic, desert 'islands desert isla nds, su Nival, stories, famous people

students 1.4 Rabinson Crusoe

;pre-intermediateintermediate intermediate +

speaking

30-40 mins

discussion, ra nking activity text orderi ng activity

speaking, reading, writing

45 mlns

2.1 The audition

intermediate

+

adjectives and adverbs

speaking, pronunciation speaking

30 mlns

match ing.exe rdse, intonation game game

media, people, drama media, people, cinema, games media, people, newspapers

2.2 The mogul game

intermediateupper-intermediate intermediate +

media vQcabulal)', descriptions reported speech, adjectives, superlatives instructions, direct speech

45 rnins

2.3 Movi.e magazine

speaking, writing, reading writing, speaking, reading

60 mlns

rev.iewing movies

2.4 Shooting

intermediateupper-intermediate

&-7 hour.s

making a film

media, crime, cinema, drama

4

cities. making suggestions. quiz relationships. media.5 rnlns making a photo story relationships.. other areas as generated by students Iikes and dislikes. agreeing and disagreeing speaking. 105 mins putting on a fashion show second conditional. people. brainstorming reading. media. making a machine desoibing pictures inventi on s. . questions question forms.PROJEa LEVEL LANGUAGE FOCUS SKILLS TIME ACTrvlTY TYPE TOPICS 1. writing 45-75 mins desoibing events. relationships i i. writing 30-60 rnins roll' play. money.. will for prediction speaking 20-35 mins vocabulary matching activity. reading. people. science fashion. . the future. functional restaurant language speaking. I 5.1 Building the future pre-intermediateintermediate comparatives. people fashion. drama 3.1 Ih reI' little p ktures pre-intermediate + . relationships.. geography. speaking speaking 90-120 mins labelling a diagram. zero conditional descriptions speaking. descriptions numbers.intermed iateadvanced 5. will for prediction. the future the future. art 4. colours speaking approx. people.1 Getting a date intermediateadvanced 5. . writing speaking.3 Opening the wardrobe elementaryupper-intermediate elementaryupp er-intermed iate writing. drama food. 5 1 • . speaking. people..2 The city of the future pre-intermediate- intermediate . alien game .. 5. pronunciation approx. reading discussion and selection game travel.4 Honeymoan intermediate + speaking.2 Make my machine pre-intermediate- intermediate 4. 4. writing 2'h-3~ hrs over 3 lessons 35-4. i 40-90 mins depending on group size script writing instructions. people. !i na rrative tenses. media 30-45 mins 4.3 Travel to Space City pre-intermediate + past tenses. 100 mins 50 mins 3. a ptio nal: co ntrast and reporting verbs instructions.4 Loving the alien intermediate questions. art . reading race. buildings. . clothes. drama s . general revision 40 mins revision game the future. present continuous. art travel. 3. optional: writing speaking. hypothetical language. poster making roll' play cities.4 Catwalk .2 The date pre.3 Photo love intermediateadvanced descriptions. question forms reading. drawing pictures stories.

shoppirlg.2 Codes pre-intermediateupper-intermediate pre-intermediateupper-intermediate 45 mins cracking a code spies. people. present perfect question fo rrns. reported speech speaking. modals of possibility. complaints hypothetical language. people 8. media. decisions approx.3 Interrogation 60 mins reading a newspaper. crime. is used to / for . indirect questions. writing modals of ability. drama 6. 105 mins relationships. writing 90 mins interviews. drama 8. media. maths 8. past tenses.'l The base intermediate speaking 55 mins a game spies. drama media. drama 7. present simple.1 Equipping your agent pre-intermediateupper-intermediate speaking. research media. past continuous. present perfect. news. food. writing c. should speaking. speaking 60 mins designing a poster cars.5-40 mins food vocabulary game food. writing 60 mins making a news programme 7. famous pl!<lple. games 7. word order speaking writing reading. people. art 8. letters/alphabet. Instructio ns.1 Idols Intermediate + question form 5. crime. people.3 Dining out polite requests. spatial prepositions.1 Food lammes elementaryintermedi ate Have you got? I Do you have? some I any present simple. speaking 2.3 The Harchards intermediate direct speech speaking. fashion advertising. spies. 30 mins role play food.. games 6 . passive. recent vocabulary. famous people 6.4 Headline.s intermediate + past simple. speaking.2 Setting up pre-intermediateintermediate pre-intermediateintermediate pre-intermediate + speaking writing speaking 90 rnins making a menu food 7. past simple. present perfect present simple..PROJECT LEYEL LANGUAGE FOCUS SKILLS TIME ACTIYllY TYPE TOPICS • 6.4 Our restaurant speaking.2 Adverts intermediateupper-intermediate can (ability). reading 30 or 60 mins reading game (two versions) work. recent vocabulary question forms. pronunciation 60 rnins writing and recording short texts making a radio play 6. role play spies.

adjectives F: past simple. drama ~ ~ !!!II n. jobs c: stories. 1 • . G!(tIUIe pre-intermediate + modals of deduction. theatre. people A: geography B: the future. past tenses making suggestions A: adjectives. D.. ~ I!!I I!I III( III • l1li • !I 10. drama media. present perfect D: question forms E: narrative tenses. listening 20 mins Shakespeare quiz famous people. spatial prepositions B: the future C. II .3 Filling the capsule pre-intermediate + A. speaking 2'h-4 hours audition activities. 10..3 Rehearsalsand preparation intermediate or a mixed-ability class instructions.F:past simple.4 The performance intermediate or a mil(ed-ability class direct speech 25 mins per show periorming a Shakespeare play theatre. F: pre-intermediate + speaking A..D .. reading. holidays D: people. writing approx.E.1 Introduction and background intermediate or a mixed-ability class past simple. writing. = II . people F: famous people 10. B. people. theatre 91 Auditions intermediate or a mixed-ability class reading. speaking. stories. jobs E: stories. geography !!II iii !!I ~ !!II . C: writing C.1 Introducti on !. B.. geography history. ~ ~ . present perfect speaking 60 mins guessing game history. listening speaking. feelings. F: speaking 20-30 mins A: 45 mins B: 30 mins C: 30 mins + 15 mins per lesson after that D: 60 mlns E: 5 mins per student F: 90 rnins planning activity A: writing a description B: making predictions C: reading and writing diaries D: interviewing E:talking about photos F: making a scrapbook devising a ceremony . media. theatre 9. script reading famous people.PROJECT LEVEL LANGUAGE FOCUS SKilLS TIME ACTIVITY TYPE TOPICS 9. families. descriptions direct speech speaking.2 Decisions 10. past perfect. . F: reading C . direct speech _. stories. writing 30 mins • !!I history.. E: pre-intermediate C.4 Burial pre-intermediate + prepositions of place speaking. 10 hrs preparing for performance.. . making things !!!I 9. ceremonies.

How does it work? Imaginative Projects is divided into ten chapters. and who are looking for new and original ways of presenting and using structures. Both are valuable resources when doing these projects. projects ofter teenagers a chance to find their own voice and to do something meaningful and entertaining with the language they are learning. history and even maths (see the individual Topic area sections In the teaching notes for more detalls). and guidance is given in the teaching notes and the Map of the book as to which lexical/grammatical/skills areas it will focus on. By creating something. students use English as a tool and see how flexible and useful it can be. projects motivate. whose students are aged between eleven and seventeen. bringing in art. Project 9 A midsummer n!iht'. providing details of preparation. nme At the end of the book. are complete projects which cannot be broken down Into mini-projects. there are two appendices. Most important of all. one on using new technology In project wOfk and the other on using the community. Who is it for? The book is written for teachers of English. but otherwise follow the same format as the other chapters in the book. allowing recycling of language and themes. They provide the teacher with opportunities for cross-curricular work. These are also referred to where necessary in the teaching notes. timing and level. Choosing to do project work Why use projects? Projects offer students a way of practising their English while having fun. This allows integration with the existing syllabus. It Is divided into ten units. project and Project 10 capaul. It can be used to complement any coursebook. In short. The first eight of these are further divided into mini-projects. 9 • .project is a lesson on its own. each of which is aimed at motivating and encouraging teenage students. or to provide activities for special occasions such as the end at term or an arts and culture lesson.. Each of these projects has a Project guide at the beginning of its chapter. geography. The remaining two projects. as well as a box which gives specific information to assist in the successful completion of the project. The mini-projects combine to form more extensive projects. drama. vocabulary and fluency activities. which can be done over a period of time. Each minj.Introduction About this book What is Imaginative Projects? Imaginative Projects Is a resource book containing photocoplable materials designed for supp&ementary classroom work.

Almost all of the mini-projects in Projects 1 to 8 are designed so that they can be changed around and used in any order. there are three activities at the beginning of the book. because it shows that they are involved in the project. In either case. and these should be augmented by bringing in realia (where possible) and being willing to construct an environment in which the project can take place. where the students have to decode a text). In Project 2 Movie macula. the goal will simply be the conclusion of a smaller micro-task (e. In some of the projects. to practise these 10 • . whilst one wishing to practise fluency with upper-intermediate students could select Interrogation (8. Managing a project How can I get my students interested in doing a project? Arst. Each project has Introductory activities. A1tematlvely. For Project 3 Space City. For example.INTRO[)UCTION Which project should I use with my class? There are several ways to choose a project. What can I do when they all speak in their mother tongue? Once the project Is under way. Teenagers are always keen to decorate their own 'space' at home. it is sensible to begin with a mini-project. in Project 10 Time capsule. The simplest way is to select one that fits in with a particular topic area or language point. there is bound to be some L1 used as students get carried away with the tasks.1) from The Island. To this end. Project 8 Secret &cent. once again listed In the Map of the book. On the other hand. in others. A teacher with a pre-intermediate class wishing to do some reading for detailed information might choose The city of the future mini-project (3. If they are not using English to ask for scissors. Where there are exceptions. First find out why students are speaking in L1. it probably means that they need a short reminder of some of the basics of classroom language. that goal will be the completion of the whole project (e. students should be encouraged to take ownership of the project. bring in a clapper-board (or make one out of cardboard). for example. there are a couple of ways to prevent it becoming a habit.g. These are all listed in the Map of the book. the important thing is that the students know what the goal is. However. if you are studying vocabulary to describe the local environment. In addition. in the Classroom language section. This will make the classroom look more like a studio. students otten become so involved in a theme that they wish to follow it further: in this case it is easy to add on extra mini-projects from the same project that explore different skills.3) from Secret agent. Teenagers need to focus on a goal. get hold of pictures of aliens from old movie magazines or comics and give students a dedicated area where they can build their city up lesson by lesson. and doing the same thing at school should give them a similar sense of achievement and investment in the project. these are pointed out in the teaching notes. or pictures of film stars to stick around the walls. you could substitute or expand your coursebook exercise with the Island poster (1. the project needs to be presented in a stimulating and enthusiastic way. a project can be selected to work on a range of skills. to say things like it's your turn or to ask their partner simple questions. A certain amount of this is acceptable. Should I do the whole project or just a mini-project? This often depends on the amount of time available in the class. If time is limited.2) from Space City. the burial of the box will motivate the students).g.

you oan take 'offenders' out of the project for a short while and make them add one or two phrases to a wall poster of classroom language. This builds up over time as more and more students add to it. Inevitably. then the story and the word pass on to the person on their left. gather all the papers together. If students are being lazy when they know the classroom language well. Each activity is short and can be used before a project or in the middle Of one" If you find that the class are really over-using U for day-today things. get them to make up a chain story. If they cannot. Altematively. In groups. On other occasions. If you have chosen to use a project because it presents new vocabulary in an interesting way. Repeat this. They then have to match the pictures with the word list. lNhen you have given about five or so words. Each student draws a picture that represents that word but does not write the word. 1 Write down all the new words that students have learnt in a project on cards (or get them to do it). This can be something as simple as raising a hand. mix them up and hand them out. then the link can be made between a presentation In one lesson and the project as a free practice activity in the next. you might like to avoid the coursebook altogether (or perhaps keep those exercises for homework or revision) and use the project as the presentation and one of the following ideas for practice. If they can make a sentence. tt oan also act as a reminder to other students to use English In the classroom. If you feel it is having a negative effect on their work. maybe moving people from one group to another if the activity requires it.g. Get students to look at the grammar areas for homework so that they revise the structures before coming into the project. Write the words on the board. or ask a quick vocabulary question. the quiet moments can be used to signal a change in the tempo of the class. revising what has been studied earlier in the year. However. ask one of the groups how they are getting on.J \ f '/ (\ [l t ' i: '1 areas. Divide the students into teams of four and give them about twenty pictures each. students take out one of the cards and continue the story using the word. then it is a good idea to follow it up with a vocabulary revision exercise. They should write their word under the picture. This can be something from the existing coursebook which practises the same lexical set. On the other hand. tt is quite important to give students a reason to be quiet. they will know that they are expected to be quiet. How can I integrate a project into the curriculum? If you have chosen the project on structural criteria (e. Put the cards into a bag.. by choosing the mini-project 5. or reminding the class of how muoh time they have left. Each time you reduce the noise. or even clapping your hands. they get a point and the next person takes a different card. as well. Choose at random a word that they have learnt. What about the noise? Noise may actually be a good sign. some groups will receive their own 2 11 • . speak quietly and don't try to shout louder than them. develop a 'quiet sign'. In turn. Once students recognise this Signal.4 Honeymoon to practise 'suggestions'). as it often means that students are engaged and enjoying what they are doing. Give them the first sentence of a story. Above all. a project can be used as an endof-term session. Each time the students use a different piece of paper (so small pieces of recycled paper are ideal here).

Students then improvise the situation. easy to set up and endlessly entertaining. reacting to the other characters' comments as quickly as possible. 3 Give confident students a card at random with a recently used word on it to use In a role play. gather all the piles together. The original artist can then say whether or not the . This activity is short. Then hold each picture up in tum and read out the word by It.• pictures back. 12 " .group's guess was accurate. To complete the exercise. It doesn't really matter whether or not they are correct. dinner tables and dates. Situations which work particularly well are railway carriages. such as 'steering wheel' and 'donkey'. but this does not matter as the artists can be challenged by their coUeagues If they feel the drawing does not accurately represent the word. because the process helps fix the words in their minds. especially If the words are very diverse. Tell them that they are in an everyday situation and they have to use this word at least three times.

The remaining cards are placed face down in the centre of the tab. Alternatively. and the student who had the question mark card puts it to the bottom of the pack in the centre of the table and takes the top card for him/herself. 2 Photocopy five sets of the cards on page 14 for each group of four students in your class (so. One of the students deals the cards to the others.)( classroom Pbleet cards on page . 13 . some pencils. a pencil. seIIotape Key vocabulary 3 Skills Level 4 5 5. to the first student. If the student does not have the item they do not have to give any cards away. tanguage focus simple questions names d classroom objects In class 1.14 per" students . tube of glue. ' With the lowest levels.. some paper. rubber. I'm sorry you can't. There is one additional type of card with a large question mark on it. Hold up the objects or the Classroom object cards (from page 14) and eltcit the name of each item.Creating things Before class 1. If you have one of these cards. ' etc. 2. claJ$room obj~ (to m". you do not need to give any cards to your opponent. ~ndI. write these expressions on the board. with the correct responses . hole punch. etc.). they may win by getting a 'trick' i. I have. simply shuffle the cards and get them to play again while the rest of the class finish. I'm sorry I haven't. pen~ ruler. but must Simply say: 'No. Write the whole list on the board and check the spelling with the students. Simply put the question mark card on the table and say 'I'm sOfry.' 'Yes.' 'Yes. They do this by asking the person on their right a question: 'Can I borrow your ruler?' or 'Have you got a ruter? The student who is being asked must then give the appropriate card. some glue and some sellotape (the list on the board). some scissors. I don't understand' card. Find real examples of all the objects on the cards (stapler. a ruler. please?' Write all of these up on the board. Cut them up. please?' 'Have you got a rubber. a rubber.' or 'No. pencils. stopIer. if they have it. If one group finishes too quickly.strate mfi!illing. With stronger students.e . you can erase the words on the board before they begin playing.'Of course.' The student who asked for the card gets nothing. Each student receives eight cards. you can. The winner is the first student to get a complete set of all ten items.le. Tell the students that the aim is to get a complete 'set' of classroom materials in other words one each of the cards showing a stapler. Elicit expressions which students need when they want to borrow I use something that somebody else has got: 'Can I borrow your stap/er?' 'Have you got any pencils. This is the joker of the pack and is called the 'I'm sorry. Pair of sc:iIssors.). I don't understand.s) Materials" 6 7 8 Follow up Give each of the students a copy of page 14 and get them to label each.five of the same card (five staplers or five rubbers. 25 sets for 20 students). Give each group five sets of cards and' shuffle them together well (mix all five sets up). even if you have them. Put the students into groups of four. card with the correct name so that they have a written record of what they have been doing. a hole punch. etc.

. ...-------......--------------_ ' OBJECT'CA:RDS . I . ......_ _ _ -- ' --_..... .---'1111!--~ ................. __ _ __ __ .. _ _ _ __ _ .o __-_ _.... " " .----------------------------....... . . ...__ .. '__ i .- ----=-.--............... ------.... ........ " ... _ ... __ _ -_ _-_ .--._------_ _ ..... _ .. _ -_. ... I I .... . ._ __ . 1 ..... --_ . _ _-._-._ ' _- ' " _- _ .. . . ..... __ _ _.-............. . . _ __ ... . _ _ ""' __ 1/ _ . -... ."" __ __ ....... _-_ . I ~ --------._j-_ ._ _ ....----------------------~-------------_:._ ' _ __ __ _ __ _ '_ .. " .. .....- __ ._ _... .... ------.._-_ ..0 ' ..._ __ __ _ ' . ..---..__ _........_-_ ....-__ _ -_. __ __ __ _ ...L .......----------- ~~ ----.. ' __ .. _ _' __ __ _ _ __ __ . . __ __ _ __ .. . '.......-. ._-------------------. __ .4_ .. ----... .. "'" __ . ... .... _--------_ _-_ _-_ -_.Creating things CLASSROOM . -_ ..

please? 4 What colour am 17 5 Where do I start? 6 It's your turn.I I Classroom language r Game play Before c. These are the missing from Playing by the rules (page 16): Can I have the dice. games In class 1 Write the followlng phrases on the board. tum Key vocabulary 2 Skills speaking WF'itlng S Check that the students understand the meaning of all the sentences. What colour am I? Where do I start? What are the rules? How do r win? pieces of dialogue Language focus sImple questions instructions for games boord. up on a poster so that it I:S In a future lesson. Finally. get them to write the phrases always visible to the whole class.&e16 per student Follow up 1 If students 2 f. get them to compare their answers with other students'answers. please? It's your turn. as revision. take the compJeted comic strlp. Answers 1 What are the rules? 2 How do I win? 3 Can I have the dice. elicit the correct answers as a whole group. dice.lass Photocopy page 16 for each student in your class. Once the students have filled in the dialogue. 15 .0.inish quickly. roll. counter. Topic area classroom language. Then ask them to work in pairs and put the sentences into the appropriate places in the comic strip on page 16. Level pre-intermediatelneermedlaee Time 15-20 minutes Materials 1 x !><. cut it up and get the students to put the pictures back into the correct order. with all the dialogue but without the letters a .

• . It Is too difficult for you .sslng words. BY THE RULES No.l:lassroom language 2 Game play PLAYING RUin the ml.

why not become a teacher? 25-SO Sometimes you are a good student and sometimes you are a bad one. tell the class to remember where they were standing in the line. the students then .roJe' riJlunteet 2 3 4 play. Now they nave to give their partner a score using the chart below which can be written on the board or read out. the class can compare their results as a whole (in a fun way. ISm1n~s 3 (a) 0 4 5 6 7 8 6 (a) 7 (a) 2 (a) 10 (a) 7 (a) 5 lb. about how well they work together.:~~. In fact.Skills speaking 5 Level pre--intelillediateintermediate (b) 10 (b) 5 Time . filling in the What your partner answers column on the questionnaire as they do so. Once everybody has finished. 50-80 You are an excellent student and everybody win love working with you.b) 0 (b) 10 (b) 0 (c) 0 (c) 0 (c) 10 (c) 0 (c) 10 (c) 0 (c) 0 (c) 10 Materials Ix page 18 pel'" student Now ten the students what their scores mean. 17 • . . Once everybody has finished.) 2 (b) 10 (b) 5 {. They read through the questions and put the answers that they think their partner will give in the column that says What you think your partner will answer. You do not work well with other people. .>'~. Once the line is complete (and there may be some debate about this). . not taking it too seriously) and see how close the ranking exercise (Step 1) was compared to the final results. . Ask them to arrange themselves in a line starting with the people who think that they are 'good to work with' and going down to the people who think that they are 'not good to work with'. You are the type of student who does something wrong and then laughs.interview their partners and find out what they would really say. and then to return to their seats. Put the students in pairs and ask them to look at the questionnaire. 1 S The patrs can now compare what they thought their partner would be like with what their partner is really like.B for predictions Tell the students that they are going to think.- Speaking Before class Photocopy page 18 for each student. Scores 1 (a) 0 2 (a) 10 key 'IOCabularJ qutStionnaire. :. Some people will really like working with you and some people won't. you are so good . In class 1 Language focus simple questions w. 0-25 You are a very lazy student.

...".' let your partners do the work and pretend you understand.. I don't agree.. ..ou: choose the one you want.....•. Do you: invent a new name for them.... You think that the actlvl.. I don'{ understand. . . .partn. ask everybody else what they want to do.... . . .. ..... . .. . . . ..... ... . Do). Do you: do it quickly so that you can finish .' la..'.. refuse to do anything. .........' 'I'll make notes. please?' Your teacher tells you to <:hoose charaoters In a role play... Do you say: 'You make notes... . . ... . .. . ... Do you: ignore them..2 .. ... 3 What your partner answers .. ..y you are doing Is boring. ..... 4 4 5 6 . The teacher asks for a volunteer... .Classroom language 3 Speaking I I ] I I 1 a b c 2 a b e 3 You don't know your . .s pronunciatIon. c 7 8.... You cannot understand your partner'. .... 8 • . ... 8 ...... sometimes volunteer. 5 6 7 ' .. '.. Do you: always Volunteer.. a b c 4 b e 8 a b c a b e •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••• ANSWERS: What you think your partner will answer 1 2.. never volunteer.t. You dls~gree with your partner... . . Do you: say 'Sorry.1 ..' say 'No.. ..er's name. ... .'. ..'. •..... not talk to them.. think about your girl/boy friend. .. say 'sorry?' say 'I'm sorry. not do it and think about your favourite pop star.. .. .. .. .. ·7 ..lIgh. .. ..".•• 3 . .. that's wrong... could you repeat that. ' .. tell the teacher that it is not interesting and ask if you can do something else . ..'..". . Do you: say 'Sorry. . . ask him/her what their name Is.' 'Who wants to make notes?' You don't understand what your teacher has told you to do. .....". 5 a b e 6 a b Your teacher tells you to make notes :Inyour group.......

--. this project can be spread out over a long period of time as the links are primarily thematic and can. therefore.PROJECT GUIDE LEVEL:Elementary-Intermediate + USING THlS PROJECT: This project is about Islands. 3 plus 20 any 26 PAGE NUMBER 22 • .1 was not done 6 plus • popular songs 6 plus 24 photocopying • optional: finding • photocopying • cutting up CLASS SIZE \..3). In terms of timing.::~ It begins with students Inventing the world of their PC' ~ crMtInI an their own (1."""'¥_..1). or even setting up island communities with rules and structures that they have to persuade other students to obey.. before studying the most famous castaway of all. followed by a survlvaHype gam...4).. There are plenty of ways of extending this project: keeping 'castaway diaries' in which students record their (Imagined) struggles to survive. Robinson Crusoe (1.. The parts order.. although they are presented here in a suggested logica Q((:ter:.. 1.2 speaking • writing Travels WIth • speaking 1.4 Dli rucllSlcll • speaking • speaking n SKILLS • • reading • writing 45-60 minutes TIME PREPARATION 60-90 minutes • finding magazine pictures • photooopying 30-40 minutes 45 minutes • photocopying • producing an island map if 1. making messages In bottles that they can send to other students / classes.Stu(lI8n!ts_IH:e. be integrated at appropriate points of a syllabus without relying on students having done the previous sections.tI!tmJlMted~_ Imagine themselves really stranded with only a CD player for company (1..

ee ·13" 0. . so you should set a strict time limit..... the students stick them around the map of the island and draw lines to connect the texts to the map. Useful words include: desert. as well as some information about what you can see and do there. "tOWn.. Tell the students to fill in the map with their own plan of the area. sea. vil/. stream. Now tell the students to paste their maps into the centre of a piece of A3 card. Language focus descriptions modals of abilitY prepo$itions of position In class 1 2 Make sure that students know the language used in creating things (see page 13). Photocopy one page 21 for each group of three students in the class.) 20 '. ruins.0. They should decide on specific icons to represent different terrain and complete the key with those icons. the students choose pictures from magazines and glue these under (or above) each paragraph as illustrations of what can be seen at each place of interest. sea.. mountein. etc. vilfage. meadow. maps.. ~.. meadow.to make the posters more attractive.. Finally.) Skills speaking writing. a beautiful mountain range.. plain. a city. The island ~: Island poster Before class 1 Topic area travel. In addition. ruins. plain. survival. On a separate sheet of paper they write a short paragraph describing each area. It also allows more precise descriptions and vocabulary activation. jungle.). although it can mean that students spend too long on the picture selection and notenougJ1 on the writing. wood. ~. 2 Find old magazines with pictures of landscapes I seascapes that students can cut up. Each group selects five areas of their map they feel are of special interest (e..~~. some old! ruins. Get the students into groups of three and hand out copies of page 21 (one per group).9Q minutes Variation The pictures can be found before the text is written to provide additional inspiration. etc. etc. including different terrain types. Key vocabulary geographical words (desert Jungle.rzlnfil$ with lots of pictures of places I: x page 21 per 3 students sheets of A3 card sciss~~ pens glue (s . st:l'eam j mountain. When the paragraphs are completed and checked.. . etc. Materials old mag. e 5 Level elementar)4 intermedIate 7 S Time 6(). they can use terrain types that are not included in the key and add the symbols themselves in the blank space next to one of the ~ signs.- 3 4 filresr. l!IOO<t. forest. town. Brainstorm all of the types of terrain that the group can think of and write them on the board (pictures from magazines or maps can be used as prompts here).g. city. actiVity on creating things.rextra··· .age.

Island poster :MAP OF THE ISLAND = ocean "" ruins = river 1W = forest = lake = mountains From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge UniversityPress 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 21 .

or Simply declare that any group with. You can decide the winner based on the best method of escape. you can tell them. 9 Each group is then given 15 minutes to deal with three basic problems: (i) Where are they going. shuffle the Rucksack charts and hand them out again (making certain that no group receives their own back) .i. 8 Fortunately. Write the three problems on the board or an OHT for the students to refer to. show them a clip of James Cameron's Titanic to. on what they discussed Level intermediate + Time 45-60 minutes 5 Onoe everybody is comfortable. 2. tell them that disaster has struck! There has been an explosion in the engine room and the ship is sinking. 12 The students report back on their ideas for escape.) groups. and that they have won first prize in a school competition cruise. This should be quite a brief part of the activity. it once per four students In class 1 Make sure that students 2 Explain to the students know language for speaking activities (see pages 17-18).lsland Language focus condJtionals modalsof possibility poster. that they accidentally pick up the wrong bag. (Alternatively. 23 per 4 students Give each group a copy of the Rucksack chart on page 23 and tell them that they have five minutes to fill it in with the things that they want to take with them.~ I The island Travels with my rucksack Before class 1 Photocopy page 23 once per four students have not done i. 2 . 3 If students photocopy have done l. . Ask them to report to their new in Step 3. e Materials I x page.) There is only time for them to retrieve one rucksack's worth of supplies per group. They can feel the heat of the flames and smell burning. Skins speakIng (See p~eI7.. get them in the mood. Photocopy this once per map of an island for them using the outline tour students. Give each group a map of the island (see Before class Steps 2 and 3). they are all strong swimmers and manage to make it to safety on a nearby island . Then. Sitting on the deck. survival. Topic area travel. to set up their base . settlement (some geographical words from I.1 The groups then suggest ways in which they might be able to attract attention or build a ship to get off the Island.and why? (ii) What are they goJng to eat? (iii) How are they going to defend themselves against predators? Remember they can only use things that grow naturally or the supplies in their rucksacks. with everybody trying to escape from the ship. Rucksack charts and then tell the students that the 7 Collect the completed I x island map per 4 students confusion is so great.i.eyvacabulary rucksack. a reasonable escape plan manages to get away . are going to be sent on a round·the·world K. islands 2 If students poster.. Try to involve a'll the senses.lsland in your class. Allow the other groups to challenge 1. deser:t. you will need to draw a quick sketch on page 2i. what do you hear? What can you smell? Does the air have any taste? 4 Now put the students colleagues into different etc. them if their solutions are not practical. 10 The groups report back on what rucksack contents they ended up with and how they used the objects to solve their problems. I) 3 Put them into groups of three or four and get them to imagine all of the things that they might see on the trip. then choose one of their maps and in your class.

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PHOI0COPIABLE

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Desert island students
Before class
1 Photocopy one page 25 for each student and ten extra. The day before you want the students to do this activity, give them a copy of the blank Top ten desert island songs sheet (page 25) and for homework ask them to fill it in with the name of their ten favourite songs and the artists who perform them. Optional: Gather together a collection of currently popular songs (or ask the students to bring In a few of their favourites).

Topic area
- ,traWl, music. desert islands, food (see
Variation)

2

3

Language foc·us
question forms

past verb forms

In class
1 Make sure that students know classroom language for speaking activities (see page 17). Terlthe students that they are going to be marooned on a desert island for six weeks. They are only allowed to take with them ten songs and one item of food. In pairs, they have to compare their lists and then come up with a combined list of ten songs. Give them a limit of about ten minutes to do this. When the pairs have completed this task, put them with another pair and get them to make a new list of ten songs. (They will have twenty to start with, but it is likely that some of these will be on both lists, and so this will not take very long.) The process is repeated (i.e. each four combines with another four, then eights with eights, etc.) until the whore class is together, or, in the case of a very large class. there are only two groups. The students are then put into ten groups (or fewer with small classes). Each group is given one song, which everybody in that group needs to know, so the groups should be based on that criterion. They must then decide what the song makes them think of -it may be a memory, a smell, an event, anything. If they cannot think of anything, they can Invent something. Each group should take an A4 piece of paper and record everybody's experiences in two or three sentences to make a 'Memory sheet' which can go on the wall next to the top ten songs as a part of the project. Meanwhile, playas many of the students' songs as possible (if you have brought them in, see Before class Step 3) to help create the atmosphere. 2 3 4

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Level
pre-Intermediate-intermediate

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Time
homework preparation:
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if additional activities are used: up to 2 hours

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This activity can be done with food rather than music for younger students. or TV programmes if you have a class who are not particularly musical.

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Students can make their own version of Desert Island Discs, a British radio programme, in which the host interviews famous people about the eight CDs they would like to have when stranded on a desert island. The guest explains why the CDs are important. In class this can be done in groups, with a 'host' asking several other students about one CD each. Help groups prepare a suitable list of questions, and monitor answers, which need not be true. If nossible, record the programme including the music as appropriate. This also ties in nicely with the Radio show (6, page 75).

24

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PHOTOCOPIABLE

25

. l1""G.. They should look at dates. famous peop. fence. exercise to introduce Tim. 8"..K reference devices Key vocabulary mutineer. Their task is to put the cards in order. They stlck or place cards on the correct square of the chronology chart. Divide the students into equal-sized groups and give each group a shuffled set of the cards on page 27 and the chronology chart on page 28. 28 per 1 students optional: class readers optfolJ. mutiny. . food and companionship. 12=1. If necessary..le 2: Photocopy one page 27 per three students (or per pair if the class is small) and cut the cards up. 9""F. SOLUTION 1:=:E.iJ: glue.. This activity can be done as a stand-alone writing /grammar or practise the use of reference devices. Photocopy one page 28 per three students (again. castaWay.. 7=L. footprii1t.e 45 minutes Follow up 1 2 Students read a graded reader of Robinson Crusoe and write their own diary entry for the castaway. but It needs very careful monitoring to make certain that the cards really can be sequenced.. use drawings or act out the words. native. tenses. after that. 2::oJ.piiate.ge. One group can read each story and compare the way in which each survivor /group of survivors dealt with the problems of shelter. (to encourage students to use graded readers) Each group reads another reader and makes a set of cards for that book. Language focus narrattve tenses articles In class 1 Ask the students what they know (if anything) about Robinson Crusoe. 5:=:M. 13". and words such as later. Give the solution if there is disagreement. . cannibaL cave. The story was inspired by the experience of Alexander Selkirk. (He was the hero of a nove! by Daniel Defoe written in the early 18th century.. beginning in 1632 with the earliest card. Materials I x page 17 per 3 students lx pa. stories. This exercise has huge potential in that it really gets them to look at linkers and reference devices. 2 3 shipwreck. 6::=C. They shuffle their cards and exchange sets with other groups who must arrange them correctly.H.The island Robinson Crusoe Before class 1 Topic area 1 dese-rt .. '51' ndssurvi' )"O!.) Check that they understand the key words for this exercise. r 3 26 . like the ones on page 27. (for an advanced group or a literature course) The story of Robinson Crusoe can be used as a basis of comparison with other castaway stories. 3". one per pair if the class is smal!). They can present their work oratly or in writing.D.Ia_'~ .-. such as Lucy Irvine's Castaway or William Golding's Lord of the Flies.. The groups compare notes and report back.8.bones Skills speaking reading 4 writing Level intermediate . a castaway from 1704-1709. lO"'A. Robinson Crusoe was on his island for nearly 30 years. 4-".

I found a cave to live in and cut down trees to make a home to protect myself. From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge Universi~ Press 2. there was a problem . I felt very unhappy because of my mistake. but I became one when I was 27.. He started to learn English and I gave him a name: Friday. I was I!I A few months later. ready to be eaten.. I felt stupid. Cannibals had been on my island. I made my fence much stronger. He was very grateful and took us both back to England. 1 dIscovered that I had built it too far from the sea. lal Ten months later.. Nothing happened until a few years later when I saw five boats of cannibals arriving with two prisoners . When I woke up. We lived together for many years after that. I watched the sea every day for two or three months in case they returned. .. . ~.ufflethem. I decided to make a boat . I saw another sign: a boat and some human bones .However. My father did not want me to become a sailor. I saw a footprint in the sand. We rescued him and helped him defeat the mutmeers. CRUSOE CARDS .000 PH010COPIABLE 27 • .. I was alone on a desert island. born in 1632.. ~ I saved one of them. When I was 55. I began to explore the island for the first time. II We had been at sea for twelve days when there was a terrible storm and everybody else on the ship was killed.. . ~.! The captain had been taken prisoner by his crew.Robinson Crusoe ROBINSON Cut the fo'llowlng cards out and sl1. one day. I was terrified by the idea that other people might be on my island.. My name is Robinson Crusoe. After looking around the island.but. I had recovered from my disappointment when. an English ship arrived at our island . after four months' work.

4 Robinson Crusoe ROBI.NSON CRUSOE CHRONOLOGY CHART Put the cards In the correct.The.. 9 3 10 4 11 5 12 6 13 -1687 7 I . 1-163. place.2.2 B . island 1. .

1 game SKILLS • • speaking pronunciation • speaking • • • speaking writing reading 2A I aOUI. Before beginning this project..1).4). Try to create an image ofa rich man or woman. . 2. it should be noted that this project is best undertaken by a wellmotivated group of students used to working autonomously.. They then meet some movie (film) making in a game (2.. who runs a film studio. wonderful car and demanding personality. with a gold watch.-tQ>. thick coat. used more in the US than in Britain. it may be necessary to tell the students what a mogul is.2 Themal.ing • • reading TIME PREPARATION 30 minutes • • • photocopying cutting enlarging 45 minutes • • photocopying cutting 60 minutes • • • finding old movie magazines/pictures photoeopylng cutting 6-7 hours • arrange/borrow video camera and cassette photocopying • CLASS SIZE 2 plus (ldeaJly with 10) 4 plus 3 plus 6 plus (ideally with a larger class) PAGE NUMBER 30 32 36 38 • .!ItI ./ LEVEL:Intermediate--upper-intermediate USINGTHIS PROJECT: This project introduces stuqer.JtnOI!~"8I'1d4.2) and practise vocabulary will be used in completing the largest ~ of the projec:\a make their own film (2. • writing speak. The last part of the project especially requires a considerable degree of responsibility and enthusiasm.PROJECT GUIDE . In addition. through an audition (2. Also explain that movie is another word for film.-.

Level intennedlate + Time 30 minutes Materials I x cut up adjective pictures and adJective words on page 31 per pair I x text on page 3 I per student optional: tape recorder and . slow.sette 10 Students work in pairs. saying every line in the manner of the adverb. The students can then use the tape as listening practice to identify different adverbs. a man walking sadly along Key vocabulary adjectives: ong~ happy. Variation 1 The students can choose the if own adverbs to use in acting out the dialogue. pictures or mimes): a sad man. etc. happily and (omantically). Now write this sentence on the board: You have the most beautiful eyes I have ever seen. 8 Students work in pairs. 30 . record yourself and other members of staff doing the dialogue in various different ways. people. 11 The pairs then go away and work on the dialogue. Each student says it to their partner in the manner of the various adverbs. 3 Now.g. Say it a few times for your students in each case so that they can mimic the intonation. 7 Write a list of all the adverbs on the board. romantic.) and getting the students to call out the adverb that they think is appropriate. he audition Before class Topic area 1 Photocopy and cut up one set of adjective picture cards and one set of adjective word cards from page 31 per pair. The first group to match all pictures and words correctly wins. 9 Tell the class that they are going to be auditioning for a part in the next big Hollywood movie.g. drama Language focus adjectives and adverbs In class 1 Put the students into pairs and give each pair a set of adjective cards. I I I media. 8 The first group to finish accurately (spellings included) wins. Don't let them look at the cards until you are ready. terrifying and the adverbs formed from these words a street. 12 Each pair comes back and presents the dialogue. arrogant. get the class to make the adverbs which come from these adjectives.unc~atiol'l 4 Students make the rest of the adjectives into adverbs and write them on a piece of paper.'I . 2 Photocopy (and possibly enlarge) one script from the audition section of page 31 per student. Start with an easy one . happily.romantically or happilyand then move on to the more difficult ones. Their classmates try to guess what the adverb was. Check that students understand the meaning by miming actions in a particular manner (e. Demonstrate what you mean by writing sad and sadly on the board along with sample sentences (and ideally. 2 For a shy class. Give each student a copy of the audition dialogue and give each person an adverb (a different one for A and 8). quick. sadly. Skills speaking pron. 2 When you say 'Go'they have to try to match the adjective with the picture as quickly as possible. S Go around and help with the spelling where necessary (e. sad. not just words from Step 4.

A: You cannot be serious! What about me? B: I don't love you. A: B: A: B: But why? Because when I look at you I can only see sadness.1 Th. A: Oh dear! B: I must tell you a secret. A: Tell me! TeU me! B: I love your brother/sister. 8. But when J look at you I can only see happiness.Movie moguls 2.: I look at you and I can only see sadness.ppiness. I know! From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 31 • .8 audition ADJECTIVE CARDS: PICTURES AD:JECTIVECARDS: WORDS HAPPY SAD ANGRY ROMANTIC SLOW QUICK ARROGANT TERRIFYING THE AUDnION: A: I look at you and I can only see ha.

SCREENING:(a). (ii) Each player takes five actors from the ACTORCARD box to begin with. musicol. in a film. (vi) The winner is the first mogul to get 25 actors. TO EDIT =' to cut the film up and' put it back into the correct order.up cards on page . (Iv) If you land on a square that says MOGUL CARD. Explain to the students that they are in charge of a big film studio.. blod<buster.you can always get the students to cut up the actor cards themselves to save preparation time. Photocopy and cut up one set of cards on page 34 per four students.Check the answer with the other people in your group. ery famous actors v are called STARS. a MAKE·UPPERSONputs on alt the actors' lipstick.: a SPECIALEFFECTSPERSONmakes all the explosions. directOr. PRODUCER:(a). vocabulary descriptions In other words. put it back at the bottom of the pack. Either explain the rules. Photocopy and cut up three sets of cards on page 35 per four students. screening. TO SHOOT. or give each group a copy of the rules. in fact. In class 1 2 Make sure all students are farnlilar with the classroom language connected with game play (see Page 15). (Hi) Each player puts their counter on the square that says STARTHERE and throws the dice. Key vocabulary camera.. (v) When you have finished with the mogul card. Move the number of spaces on the dice. people. If you got the answer wrong. Julia Roberts.elnema. edit film types (e. cGmeroman. RULES (i) Each player throws the dice.shoot..t up cards on page 35 per4 students dioe MOGUL CARD ANSWERS BLOCKBUSTER:(b). one set of mogul cards (page 34) and three sets of actor cards (page 35) . etc. etc. Place the actor cards face up in the ACTORCARD box. below. Shuffle the mogul cards and place them face down on each board in the MOGUL CARD box. scissors counters 32 . If you do not all agree then check with your teacher. the person who films a movie is called the CAMERAMAN/WOMAN.dlareupper-Intermediate Tim.) 3 4 5 Skins speaking Level interm. as well).r 4 students 3 x cu. make-ut>. moguls.ion.. one set of mogul cards and three sets of actor cards. locm. warofQbe •. HIT: (b). and they are very rich. seT. face-paint. you can take one actor from the actor pile.A MOVIE =' to film a movie. They now want to make a new film.m The mogul game Before class 1 Photocopy one page 33 per four students (you may like to enlarge it.the actors are Brad Pitt. but to do that they must get 25 actors.They are. You must answer the question or follow the instructions on the card .. hit. prodUCfU.. aaIon fiIm~etc. · star.) (See page 15 for extra activity on game "lay. Arnold Schwarzenegger.the person who tells actors what to do is called the DIRECTOR. Whoopi Goldberg.e. then take one of the mogul cards. Topic area media. for each group of four you should have one board (page 33).e 4S minutes Materials I x beard-en page 33 per4studenu '·cut. games 2 3 Language focus media. Divide the class into small groups (about four per group) and give each group a copy of the board. If you got the answer right..g. you have to put an actor back into the pile. spaceships. The player with the highest number starts.the place where actors get their clothes is called the WARDROBEOEPARTMENT.·4 pe.

Movie moguls 2.2 The mogul game MOGUL GAME BOARD From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 33 .

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A BLOCKBUSTER Is la]. a bad film (b) a very successful film or (cJan important A HIT (In the film wor1djls (a) scrnethlngpalnfut (b) a successful film (c) an unsuccessful film.

CA.RDS
A PRODUCER is the person who (a) controls all the finances of the film or (b) tells actors what to do. A SCREENING is (a) a special showing of the movie (b) part of a cinema or (c) the actors' seats.

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HollywoOd calls. Take one actor.

Hollywood calls. Take one actor.

HOI.lywood calls. Take one actor.

Hollywood calls. Take one actor.

The person who films a movie is called, the

The person Who tells the actors what to do Is called the~ _

The place Where actors get
their clothes Is called tile

Very famous actors are called _

Tell us fcurtnlngs that you would find in a etnerna and what you do witll them.

Talk about the worst fllm you neve ever seen for one' minute.

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Would you like to be a famous actor/actress? Tet! us why/Why not.

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Who

Is

Name two movies tills actress has

been in.

Name two movies this actor nss been in.

What does a MAKE~UP PERSON do?

WIlat does a SPECIAL EFFECTS PERSON do?

What does tile phrase TO SHOOT A MOVIE mean?

What does the verb TO EDIT mean, In films?'

Give

three reasons why you like your favourite film.

Name three types of film (e,g. setenee fiction).

Tell the group who your favourite actor/actress Is and why.

Wt1at was the last film that
you saw? Tell us three things you liked or disliked about It.

Name three films made In your country.

Every year actors get a special award called an Oscar. Who would you give an Oscar to, and wily?

Tell the group two reasons why you like/don't like westerns.

lell the group two reasons
Why you like/don't IIk.e science fiction movies.

Draw ,a picture on the board of a film you like - without spes.kingl TtI.e rest of the grOlJP must guess the name of the film. If theycen't, you must miss a turn.

Draw a picture on the board of a film you like - without speaking) The rest .of the group must guess the nam.e ofthe film. l'fthey can't, you must miss a turn.

Mime [he title of a film yeu like - without speaking. The rest of the group must guess the name of the fUm. If they can't, you must miss a tum.

Mime tile title of a film you like - without speaking. Tne rest of the group must guess the name of the film. If they can't, you must miss a.tum.

34

From Imaginative

Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000

Movie moguls

2.2 The mogul game

ACTOR

CARDS

From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks

@

cambridge University Press 2000

PHOTOCOPIABLE

35

I
I

Movie magazine
Before class
Topic area
medJa,peopl.e.· newspapers
1 conect some old magazines with pictures of famous movie stars and/or scenes from movies that are currently popular. 2 Photocopy and cut up one set of review cards on page 37 per three students. 3 Photocopy the suggestions card from page 37 for each pair in your class.

Language; focus
repoi"tedspe:ech adjectives- (wo.ntktful,. terrible, :eU:.) superlatives (see follow~ up acttvtty)

In class
1 Make sure students know language for speaking activities (see Page 17). 2 Divide the class into groups of three (or pairs, in smaller classes). 3 Give each student one of the review cards that you have cut up from page 37. Tell them to read it but not to show it to their partner. Tell them that they need to remember as much as possible about their card. 4 Once each student has finished, collect in the review cards and get them to summarise the review that they read in their own words to their partners. 5 Next read out the five numbered Questions from page 37. Each group starts with three points. After each question, any student who knows the answer stands up. Choose the quickest. If the answer is right, their group gets a point. If it ts wrong, they lose one. The group whose representative stood up second may then try to answer the question. The group with the most points wins. 6 Now tell the students that they are going to write reviews of their favourite films for a magazine. ln a large.class, it is better to produce two or even three magazines with half (or a third) of the class working on each one. 7 Divide the Class into pairs and give each pair a copy of the suggestions card. Brainstorm (as a class) all the recent films that they have seen at the cinema, on TV or on video. Wr1teabout 20 names on the board. 8 Each pair then chooses a fi.lm they have both seen and writes a review of it using the review cards as models and the questions on the suggestions card as prompts.

Key vocabulary
blOCkbustet; hit; producer; saeenln& director. wa~robe. stars. m~p. special effects. to .shaot,.to edit scierlre1ktJotJ.Oction •. Oscar (see. 2.2)
also review.llMewe~ location

Plat.

Skills
speaking (See page 17.)
writing reading

Level
intermediate

+

Time
60 mim.rtes

Materials
I xWt up r,ev;iewcards on page 17per3

9 The first pair to finish can then start compiling a film magazine. They take a sheet of A3 paper (or more than one in a large group) and fold it in half to form an A4 magazine. Then they stick the reviews onto the paper, leaving a space next to each review for a picture. The pairs who finish second and third can join in. Students may word process their reviews and the editors cut and paste them using a computer. 10 Each group then looks through the movie magazines and selects an appropriate picture to put next to their review. 11 The rest of the class look through their magazines and select a picture they like. These are all put together and cut and pasted to form a collage for the cover. 12 Photocopy the magazine for each student and put one copy up on the wall.

students
I x cut up suggestl.ons card on pag~ 37 .peropair scissors gI!ue A3 paper old mapzines with pictures of movie stars

Follow up
You can extend this activity by having a centre spread 'Interview with a Star' in which students write an Interview with a famous actor/actress. (See 6.1 for advice on this.) The magazine could also include a 'Class Osears' section in which the class lists prizes for their own 'Best Actress', etc., to practise superlatives.

36

3 Movie magazine TITANIC Titanic is a famous film because of Its stars. and will definitely be a hit for writer/director George luoas. the action and special effects are exciting. for its special very good. from the first moments in the helicopter to the final peaceful moments on the beach. The acting is superb. Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet and its director. especially in the big fight scene.Movie moguls 2. Although it won many Oscars in 1998. I was very disappointed by the film. However. It will certainly be a hit this summer. It was shot very well by Cameron. but the story was very poor.Renard. there is lots of running around exotic locations (Bilbao) and more familiar ones (the Millennium Dome). Like all Bond films. The Phantom Menace This is a great scienoe fiotion film.were they good? Were there many locations? Do you think it will be a hit or not? QUESTIONS 1 Which film 2 WhicM film 3 Which film 4 Which two 5 Which two ANSWERS did the reviewer like the music in? was shot near the sea? ended with a big fight? films did the reviewers really like? films featured a lot of running about? 1 Titanic 2 3 4 5 James Bond Star Wars Star Wars and James Bond Titanic and James Bond From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 37 . The plot quickly became repetitive with diCaprlo and Winslet running up and down corridors again and again and again. and the special effects were spectacular. I did like the music (by James Horner) and thought that the wardrobe department created some wonderful costumes. Although the story is very simple. possibly even the biggest Bond b1ockbuster ever. I found • JAMES BOND: The World is Not Enough This is a very exciting film. STAR WARS I: . what a funny creature!) young Jake lloyd as Obi·Wan Kenobi. However. The film has been shot • wonderfully and edited together so that every scene is very short and very entertaining. make-up and special effects . What a great moviel Go and see It! SUGGESTIONS CARD Some questions to help you write your reviews Which actors/actresses did you like? Wny/why not? Did you think the movie had a good story? What about the wardrobe. the makeup was excellent) I reaHy believed that there were aliens living on other planets. and Robert Carlyle plays a tremendous villain . (And I loved JarJar Binks. although they were them a little bit disappointing. especially as Anakln and Ewan MacGregor This Is a film that is well-known effects and. James Cameron. Pierce Brosnan (as Bond for the third time) is wonderful.

Help them with linking words. cinema. These are then put into sequence and connected. if morgue. a murder. Time 90 minutes 60-90 minutes 60 minutes approx. because time needed wi. technical matters. If you are working in England you will also need to make allowances for the weatherl Lanpage focus instructions Before class 1 Find a video camera and make sure you know how it works.l/ depend on the number of students you have and how able they are to work unsupervised. 6 Once the students have the ideas.. Also reserve it in advance for the lessons required. (He is the murderer. drama The times given are very approximate. relationships. lawyer. 7 S Scene breakdown: Divide the. such as teaching the students to use the camera. defence. Photocopy and cut up one set of character cards on page 40 per group. etc. She can be the evil scientist. erline. Z The people who do not want to act are given other roJes ~ one of them will be the director. 2 hours tesson 5 30-50 mlnut..: Explain to the students that they are going to make a movie and then ask for volunteers to be actors. They read the summary of the plot and agree together where the scene breaks occur. Note If you choose this method. such as then. Each group can consist of as many students as you like. Get the students to fill in the gaps. in addttlon. Z direct speech camero. until there is a list of about seven or eight good ideas. aaion~cut if doing the version on page-40. zoom. but twelve is a good maximum. IoaItion.actors choose the characters that they are going to play. one will bein charge of props. one (or more) the cameraman/woman necessary. Then give them time to 'flesh out' their character by making notes about his/her llfe. This is essentially getting them to think about where logical or paragraph breaks might occur. small or walk-on parts (but these will be given other jobs too).by the group choosing appropriate characters. can take a variable amount of time. etc.:judge.) The character cards are meant as introductions only. scene. This can be done in one of two ways.in more self-motivated groups .. prosecution. They decide jf they want big. victim! Key vocabulary 3 In class 1 Lesson 1 The characters. however . 38 . meanwhile. the g victim knew the murderer's wife. miss out Steps 6 and 7. The best summary is then chosen (by you) for the film. and telling their partner about it.Movie moguls Shooting A note on timing Topic areas media. Write all of these on the board untIl there are enough ideas.ylevel) 4 The. This can also be done in two ways: (a) The students brainstorm a series of events and coincidences (e . The group then leaves out the ideas that don't work. one the wardrobe person. Students fill in the names on their character cards. (b) Use the story idea from photocoptable page 40. . they work in small groups to write a one-page summary from the notes on the board. At this stage they may drop or modify some id'eas. Photocopy one story card on page 40 for each group. class up into four or five groups. or .. and can be set for homework.s Lesson' Lesson 2 Lesson 3 Lesson 4 S The story: The students construct the story. they went to school together). repair Skills writing speaking reading Level lnterrnedate-upperintermediate (but can be adapted to an. occupation. either by using the character cards on photocopiable page 40. 3 and.

regularly checking the other groups' work to find out the latest information and to check that all the stories fit together. it really doesn't matter. The director should help organise this. 12 Lesson 3 Once the script is ready. If the film doesn't look like a great Hollywood blockbuster. (Being videoed in a foreign language is very challenging. 13 Meanwhile. The students each have £5. 15 Before watching the video (Step 16) you may try putting some of the mistakes together as a grammar auction.000 and they have to 'bid' for the correct sentences only. etc.) 16 Lesson 5 The students watch the video and make comments. and let more than one have a go.ing necessary for the set. checked and photocopied. the clarity of speech and the fun. Be careful to comment as well on how good their performances were. it is wise to keep to a strict time limit and make certain that students keep more or less to the prepared storyline. (In a grammar auction you choose a collection of ten sentences. draw anyth. The students are going to write the script of the scene you have allocated them.) 2 Write a critical review of the film for a film magazine (see 2.Shooting (continued) 9 Lesson 2 Having agreed the places where scene breaks occur. 3 A strong group could write the 'novel' adaptation. 39 . You should work with students on pronunciation and intonation. the actors can begin working on rehearsals. some not. students brainstorm the difference between film and book (such as the depth of character and the fact that you see inside the characters' minds) and then each group writes a chapter (pOSSiblyon the computer if you have one) trying to concentrate on internal thoughts / descriptions. now assign a particular scene to each group. The class then goes through the incorrect sentences and corrects them. One student in each group should be nominated as the researcher. One person should act as cameraperson in each scene. 14 Lesson 4 (and possibly 5 as well) Go out and film the whole thing. etc. Give people with smaller parts the opportunity.find them. search for locations. some correct. the students with smalter parts can prepare the props . For this actiVity. The group with the most correct sentences at the end of the game wins. I x cut up charade)" cards on page 4Q per group l x story card on page 40 per student video camera video cassette TV 10 The writing stage requires a high degree of organisation as things which happen in the first scene will affect later scenes. However. Always remember the key things are the pronunciation. 11 Between Lessons 2 and 3 Photocopy the script for everyone. Follow up 1 Give some pronunciation correction using the video to show the errors they made.3). The story may be modified as they work.

hat he is going to lunch. where he meets the bike repair man.. the Detective Inspector. They are leaving when they hear a strange sound.a policeman who hates her/his boss. the jury give their verdict: the bike repair man is guilty.eckl The Inspector tak.rtician who tell. Movie moguls 2. H. You are _ an old woman who lives near the bike repair shop. The bike repairman and the victim go outside to talk.s them th. (The lawyers interview the witnesses again. and they tell him about the s.and he has . The as. He is executed. but he says that he doesn't know anything.ne. He buys the repair man a drink.4 Shooting CHARACTER CARDS You are _ the bike repair man. Then.) Finally. in court. You are _ the very fashionabl.ecompares the fingerprint with the.. The bike repair man returns and says t.e son/daughter of the old woman. You are the judge.they are the same! The criminal is arrested in a struggle . . STORY CARD One day the bike repair man is repairing a bike for the old woman. You are -' the executioner. Whenhe has 9o.ney apeak to the old woman and the son/daughter. the Inspector looks at the glass and sees that there is a fingerprint on it. You are _ the Detective Inspector of the local pollee. The assistant to the bike repair man repairs the bike and gives it to the old womanand her fashionable son/daughter. Suddenly. You are not very clever. but when they search they find nothing . You are _ the assistant in the bike repair shop.es a copy of the fingerprint and goes to a local pub.. You 8re _ the prosecution lawyer.. You are the victim _ You are _ you work in the morgue.found a fingerprint on the dead person's n. You have a bicycle shop in _ street. I . The Inspector and his assistant arrive and they start to question everybody. He calls the police. th.sistant investigates the back room of the shop and finds the dead body of the victim. _ You are _ the defence lawyer. They go to the morgue and speak.secution cases. the victim appears and starts to talk loudly to the bike repair man about some secret business arrangement.hatthe mortician gave him . they ask the bike repair map what happened.repair man drinks and leaves .. Next day.trange sound.. First of all. to the mo.e judge listens to the defence and pro. The . t.at the victim was strangled . You are .. one t..

mnlO At the beginning of each part of the project explain to the students how what they are doing links in to the previous part. CLASS SIZE PAGE NUMBER 6 plus 42 6 plus 44 8 plus 48 6 plus 52 • . etc.Pre-Intermedlate-i ntermediate USING THIS PROJECT: This is a narrative project and the story foundation of Space City (3. Now. to buttd up a story.how do you imagine people travel to Space City?' This Is followed by brainstorming their Ideas.rd about initial impressions of the aliens and the final day about the battle against them. In addition.2)..ty.4). the problem Is getting there . you can ask the students to write up an account every day of what happened to them in Space City: the first day would be a description of the ci.:. . for Air<l. e. hdUre SKILLS • speak.g..II. explain that they are the travel agents organising space trips. scissors. it is important to do 'the V'vl"""'''..4 TIME PREPARATION 20-35 • • minutes 100 minutes • photocopying folding 50 minutes • • • photocopying cutting folding 40 minutes • • • photocopying cutting (optional: making question cards) photocopying cutting • • finding glue. Then.. we built Space City.2): 'Yesterday. In order to get students involved In the story. followed by the students tr<lI.ing • • • TIll cltJ aldie speaking reading writing • • • speaking reading (optional: writing) 3....2 levI. perlod of time and to have a designated area of the room to display the Get them to Imagine what jobs they might do.glbe Illen • • speaking pronunciation 3. or where they might live..ind~ Then.. they meet hostile aliens and they have to defeat them (3.the second might talk about the journey.PROJECT GUIDE J eC y LEVEl. (for 3. the th..

Space City 3.1 Building the future BUIL.INDMILL MOSQUE PYRAMID CHURCH TOWER From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wlcks © Cambridge Universfty Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 43 .DING PICTURES NAME CARDS BLOCK OF FLATS CASTLE PALACE SKYSCRAPER HOUSE TEMPLE COnAGE W.

one the western. star disco.1) fitr. etc. spaceports. hover train driving school. 60 minutes Variation For older groups. Language focus tenses will for prediction descriptions past In class 1 Hand out folded copies of the Space City brochure (pages 46 and 47). and runs back to their group who write down the answer. (OOlkeeper buiJdI"B vocabulary (see 3. zero gravity.Space City he city of the future Before class 1 2 Photocopy. while other members of the group write a short text under each one. all the parts can be stuck together to make one large wall map of the whole city. etc.g. The runners then take back the question and get another one. One student from each group runs to the teacher. tablet. Give the students a few minutes to look at it and then ask them the questions on page 45. It is often easier if the text is written on paper. The winning group finishes first with the most correct answers.. Students brainstorm places that might be in Space City. collects a question (from page 45) on a strip of paper.). zoo. checked and then glued onto the master display afterwards.) 44 . this approach might not be suitable. They then add the places mentioned in the text to their list. These pages can either be copied back-to-hack Of glued together and folded along the 'fold here' lines to make authentic rooking brochures. They can design a map of the city instead. They change roles regularly so that everybody does at least some writing. in addition to those In the brochure (e. Students can write and attach paragraphs about features of interest. Photocopy one each of pages 46 and 47 per student. man's greatest achievement. If one group does the eastern side. On the card they draw pictures of the imaginary places. Tell the students that after replying to the advert in the brochure. crater. zero gravity swimming pool. space library. etc. 2 3 Skills reading speaking writing 4 5 Level 6 TIme reading: 40 mjnutes poster: approx. stlflcer. lunar zoo. Make sure that students are familiar with the language connected with creating things in the classroom (see page 13). enlarge and cut up one set of the questions on page 45. they have been hired by Dr Deerson to make a display about Space City. showing all the major roadways. atmosphere. Once completed the card is mounted on the wall and the students can show the other groups around their version of the City. r x page 45 en~ and cut up I x pag. and ~7 per student glue Materials card for displays scisson coloured pens (See"age 13 for extra activity on treating thtngs. Each group presents it on coloured card. This can be done as a reading race. Next the students begin designing their display. Key Yocabulary space ~It.

.....-. _.-. . city ofth . 5 That there was no oxygen..-..-_..' __...-..s-:. _._ . __ _..-..._ .. ---.'. They invented a special tablet.-.--.-._ --.. ~~ ~ .--..--.-._._!.- When was Space City opened? ....-.-.-...-_... .._..-_.-... 'overcome' = solve 45 . 7 'oversee' = supervise. John and John 'overcame' the atmosphere problem._.-.... ._ --'..UESTIONS . ...--. .-..-. ..----6 ---~-_ ..:?r:.~ - --~--._ _ .-.._...__ ~ BROCHURE .~-.-. ~-.-._ -...--.... .-._...-....-.. he went into orbit. .....-..--.-.. _.__ .----__ .--- -.-.--...._-7 In the brochure it says that Dr Oeerson 'has overseen' the whole project and that John..-.. c d Mario Marisco was the champion striker last year..-.._..-.-.--. From Imaginative Projects . . 4 2065..--'.-._....._- Look at these sentences and correct any mistakes: a Space City has been open for more than ten years..--.-..-.. . 2 A Lua Lua because it is a 'small furry animal'.. b There are more visitors to Dlsneywortd than to Space City..-.----.--.~' ..._. 1 2 . 5 What problem did John.--.__ .-----.-.~. .'_..---... .-_.-..__ .... John and John solve? How? ...----._..-.--.• future ~~:.--.-. ..-. ..-_ -.' __._.__ . 6 a Space City has been open for ten years.. -._. b There are more visitors to Space CIty than to Oisneyworld._..--.--._.--..-. __ Q.----.. .---.'..-. Mariojumped so . not Mario..._....-~ _ ----.-..._ --.---.__.2 Th.--. ... _ What did Dr Deerson do? Look at the picture under the paragraph 'Why is it so popular?' What do you think this picture is of? Why? What happened to Miguel Kickaballabout? .-. ._.--.__ -'.. d Miguel jumped.-.Space City 3..--. What do you think those words mean? ._..-.-.._.-. ._ ._ ---'._._ --. .-_..--.~._.. ._.__ ..:.--. ..._ .._.--_... .--.-. .--._.by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PH10TOCOPIABLE __ !r- .'-_.high that he left the atmosphere and hasn't returned since that day.. _ 3 4 --~-- -. . _ . .--._._ ..--.._. 3 He jumped: so high..-.-.__ ~--...-. ._._ .. -_. c Mario Marisco was the champion goalkeeper this year.. _ -._ Answers: 1 He had the idea for Space City.

2 The city of the future -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- fold here -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- fold here .Space City 3.

each member of Starr's Star Shuttles is dealing with a different set of customers). then use 6C as wei!. (It is always a good idea to check with the travel agent before sending a group of students. as well. bankrupt Sldlls spe. B Tony's Time Trekkers. 3 Group A reads page 49 and B reads page 50 (their respective holiday brochures).k1ng (See page 17 for extra activity. If you have an even number in your class. 8 Each group of holiday seekers must visit both travel agents at least once. 5 Group C prepares the questions they will ask the travel agents. GQna4 dust. Key vocabulary names of the planets and objects in soJar system~ cabin. Set 6 (6A. with their own reasons for a space age holiday. though. compulsory. Topic area travel. drama 2 Photocopy and fold one page 50 per three students. to separate the travel agents so that. thIs time as themselves.) 48 . sur(. which gives this activity a writing element as well. Monitor their decisions. the maximum amount they are allowed to discount is 10%.Travel to Space City Before class 1 Photocopy and fold one page 49 per three students. 4 Students in Group C receive the role cards from page 50. 4 Youmay rearrange the classroom into three distinct areas for the shops and the clients. each group of customers announces and justifies their decision about their holiday destination. or. Students can be sent out to the local travel agents to see how they compare with one another. However. that their aim is to make as much money as possible.SO per 3 studen"ti Ix page 51 cut 14P Variation Students can make their own brochure up with their own planets and destinations (including Space City). the future. Language focus numbers money question forms In class 1 Make sure that students are familiar with language connected with speaking activities (see page 17). 3 Photocopy and cut up one page 51. for example. in a larger class. surfboard. It should be made clear to them. 68 and 6e) are for the problem of odd-numbered classes. Follow up 1 2 Students can do a follow-up activity in which they visit the travel agents again. 2 Divide the class into three groups: A Starr's Star Shuttles.the price? The service? The dates? 11 The travel agents report back on how much money they made.) reading writing if variation Is done Level Time 50 minutes Materials Ix page -49 per 3 students Ix-pa. Big discounts = small profitsl 10 In the end. sUrface. cruise. me and C the rest of the class who are customers looking for holidays. g The travel agents are allowed to make discounts. If you have an odd number. 7 Each group visits a different travel agent as soon as they are free (you may need to limit the amount of time any group can spend with the travel agent. 6 The role play then begins with each travel agent trying to sell as many holidays as possible while the customers try to get the best bargain. the information they will need from them and how much they are willing or able to spend on their holidays (based on the information on their cards). hunting. You can then tell the students which of the companies made a profit and which went bankrupt. use cards 6A and 68. They are going on holiday with a partner and the role cards are subdivided into pairs. but can revisit them if they need to. Make certain that they explain all the offers they were given and what it was that made them choose .

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You don't care how much it costs but you really want to do sometlling exciting. 28 You want to go somewhere with your girlfriend/boyfriend that is romantic and quiet.ER C. vou want to earn some money. but they want to do different things. You want something connected with sport. 'exciting' holiday. -.) 1. They have five weeks' summer holiday and you want to spend as much time as possible away from Earth. 6. etc.I I l 1A Youwant an adventurous holiday with your family. 48 You want to goon holiday with your friend. but they want different things. You. but you cannot really afford anything too expensive.ARDS . 2A Youwant something romantic and quiet. Venus.. SA You want to go somewhere with your two friends. i SA You want something that will be good for your chlldren. but your mother and father want to take you on holiday somewhere. . Your dream holiday is to take along cruise around the solar system in a shuttle. but you can only have three weeks off work. 3B Vou have five weeks' summer holiday and you want to stay on Earth with your friends.I You want to go somewhere with your two friends. you don't even like travelling on a bus because you think it goes too quickly. You are not worried about how much it costs. This year you want to go somewhere quiet so that you can relax and read your books.. 4A You hate travelling in shuttles because it makes you feel sick.you've been to Mars.want to go on an adventurous holiday with your family. (2500 Credits is your rnaxlrnum. You want her/him to stay with you for all six weeks. but you know that your husband/wife is very worried about money. In fact. se You want to go somewhere with your two friends.You want to see famous historical monuments. but they want different tllings . Vou have six weeks' holiday. Saturn. Fromimaginative Projects by Matt Wicks© Cambridge University Press2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 51 • . SA You are very rich and have done everything 5B Every year your partner takes you on an .Travel to Space City / CUSTOM. .

aliens get alien rockets) from photocoplable page 53. they receive another rocket (either from you or from a pile In the centre of the table). Materials 2 x.iation (Seepage IS for extra 3 activityen pme p~ay. §lI1les Lov"ng the alien Before class 1 2 Photocopy and cut up page 53 twice (or four times for a large class). Write the followi.) Each group receives five appropriate rockets (i. This is done by wilini'ng this game. Tell th. They draw a picture of an imagined alien. dice 2 x page 53 photocopied and cut up. the other group wins. If they answer correctly.i.) 4 Level intermediate 5 to 6 ~ilyadaptable any level) (bUt Time 40 minutes 1/3: Question card 2/4: Word card 5/6: Task card 7 The first group rolls the dice. without looking at the original. If they get the answer wrong or do not complete the task well. The other group then selects a card from the appropriate pile (made up of the cards from page 54).e..the humans and the aliens .. The first group to get 20 rockets wins. The only way to save millions of llves is for the 'brave defenders . Space City m Topic area the future. They then describe the alien to the. To make this game work really well. Divide the class into two groups .. This helps set the mood. as indicated in the chart.ir partner. aliens. 9 Variation Younger students may enjoy designing their own aliens before doing this activity.e students that a group of aliens has decided to attack Space City ~ mankind's first city in space. (In really large classes you may need to set up two groups of each. The teacher keeps the remaining rockets to hand out later (see Step 6). Both groups roll the dice once.. or perform weH. Or.1 2 Make sure that students are familiar with language connected with game pIay (see page 15). they lose a rocket.. I x page 54 photocopied and cut up double the amounts abpe for a large class a . Photocopy and cut up page 54 once (or twice for a large class). if one group loses all their rockets. Next they compare versions. The group that rolled the dice must then answer the question or perform the task on the card. it is a good idea to write a few of your own cards to add to the piles so that students are revising structures or texis which you have recently covered. 52 . who has to draw it. The group with the highest numbers starts. 3 Languag~ focus questions general revisicm In class .e. half the students ~ to defeat the aliens (the other hatr). especially if the pictures are pinned up around the room.ng chart on the board: DICE ROLLS: Key vocabulary depends on revisicm qUeftiol\s Skills speaking pronunc.

N ALIEN ALIEN .• ALIEN ALIEN ALIEN PHOTOCOPIABLE ALIEN 53 From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 .4 Loving the alien HUMA.IEN .IIIEI III.N CARDS ALIEN CA.EN ALIEN AlII.RDS AI.Space City 3.11I EN AI.IEN ALIEN' ALIEN .

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2) and the fashion displays (4. In each case there is an a the students are both creators and spectators.1). students produce a guide book which visitors read as they go round the exhibition. if you do ole pr the finale should be opening the entire spectacle to an outside audienoe and getting them to look at the exhibits: the pictures (4. 105 minutes • • finding old clothes finding fashion pictures in magazines finding art materials photocopying • enlargingup cutting • CLASS SIZE 2 plus 4-. enlarging cutting up optional: finding different styles of music c.3/4.4).2 MakBDlI SKIUS • • speaking writing • • writing speaking minutes 4. Those involved show other students around the exhibition.PROJECT GUIDE t eex LEVEL: Elementary-upper-intermedlate II • • USING THIS PROJECT: In this project students make four separate can be compiled into one large exhibition. Alternatively.10 (more than 10 if you have a large space) 58 6 plus 6 plus (ideally 10 plus) PAGE NUMBER 56 60 63 • . 4. the machines (4. tell the stories behind the pictures or explain the machine.4 Catwalk • speaking • speaking DlIChlD8 TIME PREPARATION 45-75 minutes • • getting pens and paper optional: photocopying 90-120 • • 30-45 minutes • • • • photocopying. However.

Make sure that they do not show their pictures to any other students (you may need to send some of them into a different room).' Follow up The student who looked at the pictures (Step 7) then has to write a short text about the correct story to put under the pictures (like the notices under paintings in galleries). Language focus narrative tenses optiona~ cO. Simply enlarge the pictures. The students tell the rest of the class their imagined stories for the pictures.. a. Once the students bave guessed most of the tale. cut them up and memorise the story. Draw this story as three pictures (like a cartoon strip) on the board / OHP.point to the parts of the picture which are most important and make certain that they know what the item is called.if. 'I thought that Jenny went to a market. 4 Time 4S minutes (speaking only) 5 8 7. For example. but she told me that she went to a beach. collect all the pictures and hang them around the room in a random order. answer. art 2 3 Think of a funny story that has happened to you at some point in your liJe (or invent one.ore. Ask them to imagine what might happen in this place / with this thing. but including the corrections that the student who drew the story made. give them a few clues . people.5 minutes (with writing option) (although it may be m. When they have finished. tell it to them and use the pictures to show them how the pictures are related to the story. youl1ave. If they are finding it difficult.very lar:ge class) 7 Materials . Once all of the groups of pictures are together. it doesn't really matter).ntnl5tand reporting verbs (see Variation) In class 1 Ask the students to look at your pictures and see if they can guess what happened In your story. 8 Variation For hlgher"level work on contrast In writing and reporting verbs: the student who looked at the picture (in Step 7) must write a text telling the story as he/she originally thought of it. They can ask you as many questions as they want and you should. They cannot touch or talk about their own pictures. tell them to find the groups of three which they think belong together and to put them all together in one place on the wall.. assign one student to each group of pictures (not their own). The exhibition hree little pictures Before class 1 Topic: area stories. but try not to give away too much information at anyone time.. They have to look at the pictures and work out what the story behind them is. Key yocabulary depends OM the stories 2 Skills $p~king writing S Level pre--Incetmedlate .. paper pens to draw with optionar: I x picture cards on ~e 57 enlar8ei~dcut up . The student who originally drew each picture then corrects as necessary. In other words. Students walk around and rearrange the exhibition until it makes sense. 56 • . If they haven't guessed. and to draw a sequence of pictures to illustrate the event. Tell them that the quality of drawing really doesn't matter. Alternatlvely use the pictures and story from photocopiable page 57. Now give each student three pieces of paper and ask them to think of something that happened to them (or to make something up).

FromImaginative Projects by Matt Wicks© Cambridge University Press2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 57 . and more stairs. a beautiful and very romantic city. looking at the sun going down. finally.. Until.. We tried banging on the door. Unfortunatel. Finally.the sunset. and discovered that the door was locked! We were trappedl PICTURE 3: We didn't know what to do. but it didn't workl We even tried turning the lights on and off to attract attention from outside. He recognised her and chased us away.y. my girlfriend started to feel cold and we decided to go back inside.. One day in the middle of summer. Carefully we went down the stairs . and more stairs . my girlfriend was Italian and had gone to school with the angry man's son.. WesmHed and pretended that we didn't speak any Italian at all.. but it didn't workl We tried shouting. we got to the bottom . We climbed and climbed and climbed until we got to the top and then just stood there.. I took my girlfriend to a huge tower because we Wanted to watch. Everywhere was dark and we became a little nervous. a VERYangry man came and opened the door..PICTURE 1: I used to nve in Rome. PICTURE 2: After a while. We stayed there for over an hour because it was so beautiful and peaceful.

Instead of making the machines (Steps 9-10) they Can create 'blueprints' of them in technical detail using rulers. etc. sticks.. ('First.. 11ft... . 10 Their task is to make the machine described on their piece of paper.. ..--... This includes old boxes. pairs of scissors. .. . and how it does it. Cut the answers to the text off before handing out the worksheets... 3 Once they have completed the text and labelled the diagram... --- - ..... . leVer. -. 58 - - . .. bottles .. you can set up an exhibition corner of strange inventions.. . press and lift mean (these can easily be demonstrated or mimed by you or members of the class while others identify them). 2 Check that you have enough tubes of glue. -. magazines.... etc.. They will also need glue or sellotape and perhaps some paint.. button. wheel In class 1 Make sure that students are familiar with classroom language connected with making and doing (see page 13). etc. paper newspaper .. egg boxes..The exhibition Make my Before class Topic area invontions. If you have older students. 6 Elicit some ideas for things that they hate doing and for which they would like to have a machine (things such as tying your shoelaces. they need to know what push.. The designers of each machine can then look at the finished product and see if they think it will perform the function that it is supposed to._... Lanpage focus instructjons zerQ conditional Key vocabulary press. - --._. They can invent machines to do anything....).~. A green light comes on'. pul/.... each pair should write a short text of their own describing what their machine does. pul... heir. . 7 Using the text on photocopiable page 59 as a model.. but they should make certain that all the buttons. collect in all the papers. It does not have to be perfect..... Warn them that somebody is going to have to make their machine out of toilet rolls and cardboard so that they shouldn't be too ambitious. old pieces of card. plastic bottles. are in place more or less as described. 9 Hand the papers out again to other students along with the materials to make the machines ...... . toliettollI' elastic l> ds glue scissors optional: paint and any other art materials that are easy to get (See page 13 for extra activity. toilet rolls. etc...... achine . SkiDs writing ...... They should work through it. protractors and compasses. 2 Put the students into pairs and give each student a copy of page 59. 3 Photocopy one machine worksheet on page 59 for each student. speaking level pre-intermediateIntennedlate Time 90-120 mlns Materials I x machine woricsheet on page 59 photocopied per student old boxes. etc.. . push. rolls of sellotape..) They should not draw anything at this point. tell them the answer: it is designed to teach people In three minutes all the English they need to pass their exams! S Now tell the students that they are going to design their own machines."-.old packets. This can also be a useful way of practising numbers and measurements..) -~ Variation This activity works well with younger students. each pair has to guess what the machine does. In addition..... .-........ . .. . S When they have finished. filling in the missing words.... push button number one. It is a good idea to get the students to bring in some bits and pieces as well. .. . .. 1 Gather together a selection of materials that students can use to make things in the class. tidying your room. . etc. 4 After everybody has guessed. then get them to draw their ideas for machines... levers.. ..... 11 When each group has completed the task. . science. for your class..

etc. and pull lever three. you pull __ .__ . When the big wheel_. two and the machine begins to work. and _._ FromImaginative Projects by Matt Wicks© Cambridge University Press2000 Answers to text First. You put your head in the helmet and press button three.The exhibition 4. . When the big wheel turns. Then you push lever one and the big wheel turns. you press __ one to start it. the __ also moves and this makes the little wheel turn. You put your head in the helmet and press button three . k_ ~ Now label the diagram to show the buttons.HIN. The little __ sends energy to the helmet. using these words: button lever pull push lifts belt wheel turns How my machine works First. To increase the power. The little wheel sends energy to the helmet. _ the helmet off. To increase the power. 59 .. When you pull lever three. helmet. . the helmet lifts off. .. . press button two.E WORKSHEET Fill in the information about my machine below. Finally. lever three.. PHOTOCOPIABLE . When you pull lever three. . press button two. levers._. Finally.2 Make my machine' MAC. you press button one to start it. . the belt also moves and this makes the little wheel turn.. . Then yo~ __ lever one and the big wheel turns. you pull lever two and the machine begins to work.

Students must not write anything down during this game. elicit what types of design it is possible to have on clothes (e. I am wearing a striped dress and blue spotted shoes even if in fact you are wearing a blue skirt and black shoes. etc. they run to the picture and write the word on the paper with an arrow pointing to the correct place. you can start calling out the words from the appropriate list. One person in the group starts this part of the exercise by describing two things from an imaginary outfit they are 'wearing'. When everybody has seen atl of the pictures.) You can adapt this list to suit the available music or particular cults in your country. In a large class. checks. Call them out in any order you choose. Read the next word when aUthe groups are silent and ready. e. bring in some music and see if they can match the type of music with the picture (e. Goth and Raver. you should continue reading until a" the groups have finished. For a higher-level class. write a list of the names of the various 'cults' on the board and see if they can match them with the pictures/music. When they are ready. they may suggest corrections. and I am wearing some checked trousers and a pink striped shirt.).? What type of fashions are popular in your local area? This can lead to some interesting multi-cultural discussion work in mixed nationality classes. In a weaker class. you will also need to bring in different types of music to illustrate the cults that are on the cards.. etc. (They are. it wor:ks better when followed up 9 Follow up The cards for the higher-level students are all based on various fashion 'cults'. they call out Rnished' and bring the picture to you. their picture should be positioned a short distance away from them. enlarge and cut up page 61. spots. by 4. when you can begin again. etc. Put the students into pairs and tell each pair that one picture 'belongs' to them. it will need to be modelled by the teacher. When they think they have finished. you will need to photocopy. clothes. Language focus descriptions In class 1 2 Stick the enlarged cards from page 61 or page 62 around the room.ials I x page 61 enlarged 8 and cut up (lower levels) t x page 62 enlarged and cut up (higher 'evels) optional: differtmt styles' of muslc (higher level~) Note This exercise is de~ed~fo be done with 'nct. If an item has been incorrectly labelled. Breakdancer. you are going to do the follow-up activity.). Write these on the board and illustrate them where possible by pointing to clothing round the class.g. Sldlls s~kfng Level elemehtary-preintermediate (using page 61) lntermedlate-upperintennediate 3 4 (using 5 page 62) Time 30 min! -4S mins for higherlevels If doing follow-up activity e 7 Mate . If students think that someone has made an error. photocopy. 'The Beatles' goes with Hippie'. If a picture of that word (for example.g.The exhibition Opening the wardrobe Before class 1 Topic area fa$hlon. Explain that you are going to say a word. stripes. help the group who labelled it to correct the error. Draw an example on the board.g. Make sure that each student is quite clear which picture is theirs. enlarge and cut up page 62.. in order of appearance on page 62: Hippie. Punk.g. However.4. The game continues until somebody forgets something. they sit in silence. 60 . peopl~ 21f If you have a lower-level group. Now pass all the pictures around so that other groups can see them. This activity can be followed up by a comparison with their own teenage experiences . skirt) is in their picture. e. Once groups have written their word. you will need two groups. Leslie is wearing a striped dress and blue spotted shoes. If you can. The first group to label all the clothes on their picture correctly wins. Ideally.are there any similar movements based on music? What do they wear. Each example sentence should include at least one colour and one pattern.. The next person repeats what the previous one said. lthoughIt a can be done alone. Also. and continues . Skinhead.

3 Opening the wardrobe LOWER"LEVEL FASHION CARDS I I ~------------------------------------------------------_-_-----------------------------------From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 Lower-level groups PHOTOCOPIABLE Read these words to your students in any order: jeans jacket earrings hat belt high-heetedshoes waistcoat tie flat shoes umbrella collar glasses trousers skirt shorts suit coat T-shirt necklace trainers 61 .The exhibition 4.

----FrorTrim~iects Higher-level groups by_Matt-W~tvm1V~SlrtOOO '4".3 Opening the wardrobe HIGHER-LEVEL FASHION CARDS '~--------------------------------------------------------------------------:-------------.The exhibition 4..''''9 fffi ' Read these words to your students in any order: leggings T-shirt trousers earrings gloves headband tracksuit bracelets boots jeans braces leather jacket belt tattoo mini skirt tights hood sandals trainers 62 ..11..

language can be pretaught by using 4. It depends very much on the interests of the students. materials and colours. The fact that they are all trying to work together to agree on one design rather than on any different 'fashionable' designs will generally bring people into the activity. 9 At the same time. of the. also speclflc Words telatln. Keyvo cab·· see 4. media I 2 For lesson . Students look at the recording for errors of pronunciation or vocabulary. If they are in an English-speaking country. suitable for the summer.3 .: Opening the wardrobe to pre-teach vocabulary. Variation Some older groups.. the commentator describes what each person is wearing (including the colour and maybe the material for a higher level). Topic area f. Luigia is wearing a yellow dress.lshion. (This could be done as 'homework. You can also suggest ways in designed for use with 4. the' fashIon dj$play Note This exercise Is 10 If possible. They draw up a list of the clothes that must bring in for the next lesson's fashion show.3.3. which the description could be extended.. Anybody who doesn't bring their own clothes will still be able to participate. elementary·upper-Intermediate & Once they have thought about these things. encourage them to speak to shop owners. a lot.The exhibition Catwalk Before class 1 Gather together pictures and magazines of recent fashions.g to the. The purpose is to have fun and! exaggerate rather than to be too serious. elethes students britlgin Skills speaking 3 4 Put the students into groups of five or six. the show should be recorded or videoed.e. Although It can be done separately.. from 7 Lesson 2 Make a 'catwalk' the classroom. In this case. 63 . You could send the students out to local shops to look in the windows and see what is most popular .see note be'low) L£sson Z: 60 minutes S The students must leave this lesson with a clear idea of the clothes that they need to bring in for the next lesson.u_. peqpl. special occasions.) present contlnUOU$ colours "12PV . What colours will be popular? Wil. Tell them that they are going to create their own fash.1big hats be worn? What about ties for men? Skirt lengths? Leyel. Tile uniform can be a simple school one. might feel this activity is too young for them. it is a good idea to bring in some clothes yourself. Try to elicit types of clothes. As always.ion show. patterns.n I ~~S minutes (but . if you enter into the spirit of it. otherwise more selfconscious members of the class may not want to join in. one person is chosen as the commentator and the rest as the models .Lesso. using pictures from magazines to help generate ideas. Language focus desa-ipdons In class 1 Do 4. 8 The students catwalk. each present their fashion show with the models walking around the by pushing tables back. or move your desk and use the front of magatil"les old clothes optional: video -camera and cassette or photo camera optlonak muslc fo. Get them to think about what is going to be fashionable in the future.3.. Encourage them to be inventive. 2 Lesson 1 Ask students to describe what is fashionable this year. could become Luigia is wearing a fantastic yellow dress. They should bring either clothes that are kept for or embarrassing things that they now hate to wear. especially with a lot of boys. a military one or a futuristic one. students are much more likely to follow. each student Time . Materials fashion pictures..2. Make a list. get the students to imagine that they are joining some sort of organisation that requires a uniform.

.=i." ."" - .... r~ . "r"..4 Catwalk Some students on the catwalk In Portugal 64 .. The' exhibition I 1" ~ ~~ . 4.....

4).PROJECT GUIDE dat LEVEL: Pre-intermedlate-advanced USING THIS PROJE.1.2 Ho nmaan • • speaking writing • • speaking reading minutes 35-45 5A • • speaking • writing TIME 30 or 60 minutes 20 minutes per pair who 'perform' organising classroom 2~3* hours over 3 lessons PREPARATION • • photocopying cutting up • • photocopying getting cameras and films photocopying • cutting up • CLASS SIZE 8 plus 6 plus 4 plus (ideally with 6-14) 4 plus PAGE NUMBER 66 68 69 72 • . Time limits are also important .time for answering questions should be limited in 5.2).each section of this project contains alternative ideas for using the materials. and finally the honeymoon (5.3 should be carefully organised and controlled as well. It is important to remember that. some aspects of this project (notably the photo story. As with 'Movie moguls'.3) require an autonomous group capable of working Independently and wlth minimal supervision.3). For this reason. Thematically.CT: This project tells the story of a relatlonshl getting a date (5. teenagers generally get quite Involved in this project. However. and the amount of time students have to take photos in 5. follows through with the actual date (5. 5. TiledatI SKILLS • speaking 5.in certaIn cultures these ideas may be inappropriate. fun as these activities are.1). there is a linguistic element to each one which must be kept in focus. the story (5.

From those answers she selects her date. .. Instead of using tne questions on page 67.. One group asks the questions and the other answers. The three elected males must answer the questions as fully as they can... people Language focus secondcohdftional In class 1 Explain to your students that they are going to find 'dates' for themselves. In this case. dl"iama.. seelng$Omeone.. I Skills speaking 3 i Level Intermedlate-. The process is then repeated with three female students answering questions and one male asking them. 'What would you do if you were asked to play football for your couritry?' etc.. focusing on the use of would to indicate a hypothetical situation. !!' I: 8 Variation If this exercise is culturally inappropriate for your group. You may need to intervene occasionaily but that can be done in the character of a compere.rlong verslon opti.. The female asks three questions and the males answer them.. Or for speed. I! ..I . This is done by one female selecting from a choice of three males whose identities are kept secret. All the contestants give themselves tak. Now the male and female students have to be separated into different rooms (or at least send one group into the corridor fora little while). These names will be used by the compete (either the teacher or a confident student) during the 'show'. 66 . Students can also disguise their voices..onal: some sOrt ·of classroom divider 1 . . running between them repeating questions and answers so as to preserve the secret identities. I . the losing team is the first team that 'cannot think of an answer to their opponents' questions.. divide the class into two halves.-Keep groups in separate rooms with the noncontesting students acting as 'messengers'. Once the questions and answers have all been completed the female students gather around and help the contestant select the male they think would be the most suitable date for her.e names because their identities must be kept secret. medla. the students can write their own would questions using any situations they choose. . I Getting a date Before class 1 I I . The female students are then given five question cards which their elected contestant reads out.advanced Time short version: 30 mlns long version: 60 mlns 4 5 . use the prepared cards on page 67 . Then. i Topic area relationships. I! I! blank cards fo. 'Payattention to accuracy at this point. ~ . Write some of their answers on the board. Think about (and possibly arrange) how the classroom will be set up for the actual 'competition' part of the lesson. I Key yocabulary date. They follow the model you have provided.. . bully 2 •.. !! • Materials page pens I x cut up cards on 67 for short 6 version . ff students don't know each other well: Erect a barrier between the two groups to conceal identities. Hand out blank.. Write 'If we were on holiday together and I wanted to visit a place that you hated. i i hypothetiC3llan~ quesdons . . The males choose three 'contestants' and the females choose one 'contestant'. 2 If you are doing the shorter version of this activity (see Step 4) then photocopy and cut up the cards on page 67. If students know each other we/I. Elicit some sample answers from the students. The process is then repeated with a male choosing from three females. . collect them in and mix them up. what would you do?' on the board.Blind date . cards for your students and ask them to write two or three questions that they would like to ask a potential partner.

•If I wanted to gb . 'would you rather go somewhere romantIc or som... be and why? If you discovered that my brother was bunylng blher studen!t. but you hated them? I love animal.. very expensive rfitauracnt.s at sctfool. What would you do? What would you do If we were ba.01 esIgner Jeans d £450 and asked you to buy them forme? ·.r game would you be? I like .ch other for six months and thana beautiful/handsome movie star suddenly Invited you to a party? I like eXpeJI$lve clothes.lr ·. what would you do? If It. I:f you were a-computer game.to the cinema and Bee a.olng to the cinema .Gettings date BLIND DATE QUE. was our first date together.1 hadforeotten my wanet / purse and all my money / credit cards? What would)'ou dolt I bought you a vet)' expensive pair of trousers for your birthday.vlng dinner In a very expensive restaurant and I reaUsed that . Suddenly I felt very sick.tt of animal would you. If you were an anlmaJ" what so.or From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PH010COPIABLE 67 .ewhere fun? Why? Imagine that we were hav.. What would you do If' we were walking past a shop one day and I saw a fantastic ..what type of compute.lng dinner 1" . film that you hated.wQuld you teU me about It or not? Why? What would you do If we had been seeing ea.STIONS I love computer games .

this activity may not be appropriate. Write on the board. edit it and rewrite it. . divtde the Class so that there are equal numbers of people behind each dater.89·- --. nice to see you..fO out together as required by the sCript writers Skins speaking w.page. 10 To finish the exercise. as well as a completed written piece of work which has had input from everybody. so having real food. or important things in a restaurant such as ordering food. writing lines of dialogue and passing them to the daters in sequence. 7 The students (in the groups behind the daters) then take over. Laftguage focus "qu. The table should have two seats. 11 The students can then take the script that they have written. make sure the focus stays mainly on the two people at the table. direct the students to conclude the date somehow.g. put it together. 9 Once the activity starts to slow down (usually after about 10--. 12 The exercise should then be repeated with another couple or the other winners of the 'Getting a date' section. In this case. This will give them a script that they can use for pronunciation and speaking work.Blind date @)Thedate Before class 1 Cut up several pieces of paper into strips (about a quarter of a page in size).e$tIonfonn$ functlonal restaurant In class 1 Get the students to set the classroom up as a restaurant. langlJage (See also 7. people. smiling.3'. 3 If you have a large class. It will take some time. A: Hi. The more detail the better. and direct them towards romantic phrases and questions for the waiter. the two daters should read through the completed script once again from start to finish to give a sense of the whole piece . you can replace the two daters by two friends.) Key vocabularY dot~. drama 2 Bring in some food and cups for drinks. laughlng. You can add suggestions. However. nice to see you .r:ela_tlonships. 68 . 4 Now divide the rest of the class so that half of them are sitting behind person A and half behind person B.1) or choose two volunteers and explain that they are on a date. In a large class.15 minutes). S This continues as long as it is sustainable. and a tablecloth would be perfect. S Tell A and B that they can only do what they are told to do.coughing. etc. but is well worth the result. 2 Either use the two winners of the 'Getting a date' exercise (5. not forgetting directions such as eating.. 6 You will need to give an example. then you will need to bring in tablecloths and can aliso make menus up from the template on page 89. they are worried about their exams) and follow through Steps 4-9 above. If the script requires a third person to become the waiter for a short while. (eats) B then says 'Heuo' and eats something. Set up a situation (e. darkened lights. by the people sitting behind them. then get a volunteer to do tt. 3 If you wish to create the atmosphere of a candle-lit restaurant. Behind each seat the rest of the chairs should be equally divided (making two teams on opposite sides of the room).'-- Variation In certain cultures or with younger age groups. they are planning to rob a bank. set up two or three different pairs of daters. Toplc~areas ftlod.' Then write B: Hello.riting Level pl"e~lntermedlate- advanced Time 20 minutes per :pair who "perform' - Materials pens strips of paper food optIonal: menu made up from template on . they are arguing. A must then say 'Hi. or say what they are told to say.to .

S Tell students to bring in appropriate clothes for the next lesson. Encourage them to stick to their plan in general. but allow for improvisation in details. They can use the speech balloons on page 71 for this. V()Cabulary will vary from group to group. love Before class This activity is based on the photo love stories traditionally found in teenage magazines. Materials pens I x page 70 and page 71 per 6 students Variation In cultures where such a relationship is inappropriate. Suggest they work out what they want to say in rough. The plan 2.1 Lesson 3 Get the students to mount the developed pictures on card in order and SkiDs speaking writing Level intermediate-edvanced n Lesson I: 45 minutes e Lesson 2: 60-120 minutes Allow time to get the photos developed. Capture. paper I x camera and film per grolJP card (for mounting display) and glue 69 . first. Lesson 3: 45 minutes then to add the dialogue. etc. 1. S Elicit ideas of where they could photograph the two pictures and add the location to the 'Where are we going to take the photo?' section of the first two boxes. Tell them that they are going to plan and make their own photo story. It could be a bank raid with the pictures showing: 1. ¥s. Bring in some of your own. 9 Lesson 2 Send the students out in costume to take the photographs. Show an example If you can. too.art Language focus instructions In class 1 Lesson 1 Establish what photo stories are. Don't forget to give it a suitable (funny) title. to talce a a Point to the first heading (1. focus pronunciation and ~ of !photograph pholtDgtopher. and generally works better if done as humorously as possible. change the story. Key~ulary photo story. to ploy a character. picture. 12 Finally. You could buy a teenage magazine with a photo story in it to show the students. This should be described in three to four sentences and written in the first two boxes on the planning sheet. Give each group a copy of the planning sheet (pages 70-71). (See the note about tlrnlng. the groups discuss details: who is going to play which character? What are they going to wear? Each group should make a cast and costume list to add to the planning sheet. Approaching the bank 3. 2 Divide the class into groups of six or seven (fewer if your class is smail). media. (Theycan use the 'First meeting' that everybody has thought of together or they can invent a new one. from a teenage magazine. Elicit situations two people of the OPPositesex might meet in and make a list.) 7 Once they have the framework of the story. First meeting) and write it on the board. 6 Now send students off in their groups to make up a story following the five headings on the planning sheet. choose one of these situations and get everyone to think of what might happen at this meeting.Blind date OJ Photo Topic areas relationships. The robbery 4. The pursuit and 5. add in any explanatory phrases / notes under the photographs that they (or you) think necessary. There is always someone who forgets. pe6ple. 4 As a group. to dress up os caT(leras: lens.) 10 Get the film developed.

I Photo love Plctwe1 What happens? Picture 2 What happens? Where are we going to take the photos? Where are we going to take the photos? Picture 3 What happens? Picture 4 What happens? Where are we going to take the photos? Where are we going to take the photos? Picture 5 What happens? Picture 6 What happens? Where are we going to take the photos? Where are we going to take the photos? .

Blind date 5.cks© CambriClge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 71 • .3 Photolova Picture 7 What happens? Picture 8 What happens? Where are we gOing to take the photos? Where are we going to take the photos? Picture 9 What happens? PI.cture 10 What happens? Where are we going to take the photos? Where are we going to take the photos? From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wi.

Once they have reached an agreement everybody can report back. to camp. 2 3 Language focus likes and dislikes making sugg~stlons agreeing and disagreeing Key vocabulary ho~ymoon. When the students have spoken about all 16 possibilities. but try to make sure that all cards are used at least once. give them a couple of minutes in their original pairs to see if they would like to change their choice (because they now have 16 rather than ten holidays to choose from). which promotes even more discussion. inappropriate. give 1#>. instructor. dolpf1in. sc. Explain to the students that they are Put them in pairs. You should go through each card individually. They will need to think about how long each trip is for.) 72 . r- -. what the climate is like and whether or not they both have something to do. 4 5 snowbo/( sledge.) The pairs have to read the cards and decide which honeymoon they woul:d like to go on together. hammock.'. Time 3S-'45 minutes Materials I x cut up set of cards on page 73 and page 74 per pair Follow up Students can make up their own cards with their own ideal honeymoon on it. list the destinations on the board. As they speak. (It doesn't matter which ten. comel Give each group ten of the 16 cards on photocopiable pages 73 and 74. Skills speaking (See page 17 for extra activity. then use the Variation going to choose their honeymoon destination.) reading B 7 Level Intermediate + Variation If romance is not appropriate for your class for cultural or age reasons. Topic area travel. getting one pair to explain to the rest what type of holiday it was. If it ls impossible or such an exercise is culturally below. then the activity can still be done with the students choosing the holiday that they prefer rather than the honeymoon. sur(. whether or not they chose it and why (or why not). there is no need to restrict the group to pairs .they can work in threes or fours. try to mix the genders up.orplon. In this case. man. relationships In class 1 Check that the students are familiar with the classroom language connected with speaking activities (see page 17). As far as possible to have a reasonable boy-girl match. (Keep a copy to use with subsequent groups.nd date Honeymoon Before class Photooopy and cut up one set of cards on pages 73 and 74 for each pair.!~_i. where it is. Elicit the word honeymoon and some suggestions of where people might go on their honeymoons.

. touch the days! You aeroplanes whole of Asia in Your feet won't ground for seven will see birds and very close up! \ A week for twain MEXICOI Ride horses.that is right: one week. The of a lifetime. we stop at three What a fantastic opportunity . camping. WOW! You can have snowball fights.Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 73 • . Most days. Meet t---~~. Learn how cowboys really live. Only you and your partner.. make snowmen and women . The temperature is minus 25 degrees . Rome. From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University.even in the Take your friends and go shoppingl Yes.. Three weeks visiting museums and monuments around the world ... Climb Mont Blanc.. Three weeks on an island with nothing to do except sunbathe all day and drink cold drinks as you relaxin your hammock. with no gu. just SHOPPING! All you have to do is arrive (with lots of money).Egypt. Can you reach the top in a week? Or will you give up halfway up" Discover history.4 Honeymoon HONEYMOON CARDS Travel the a balloon. Camp out every night. some skis and a rope. use a sledge. adventure Two weeks in Iceland.:~ ~ -~ ~ scorpions and snakes.Blind date 5.just one map. Greece and Russla.ide .iI. cooking outside and swimming with a DOLPHIN every day . Ten days in New Zealand. We'll drive you in a bus from shopping mall to shopping mall. China.

.. lnstructton. SKI SEASON.:. sand" sand. Spend a fort" night in SWitz. Spend a week at our special lake and you can try a [at of new Spend ten days in Japan learning about sushi. ' ~:. travelling in North Africa. A romantic weekend for two on the canals of Venice. VENICE.'~Blinctl dale.' s.kiing or snowboarding in some of the most beautiful mountains in the world. Two weeks at the Cannes Film Festival: see aU the movies and have dinner with the stars. I • . lots of ·beautiful peoote. WATERSPORTS. Lots offootbaU. skis and weather all provided.d...oon HONEYMOON CLUB FRED 14-24. _~_:_4_ Honeym.erlan.. Enjoy CARDS Three weeks on a camel lz-. sake. a week on the beach in Greece with people of your } own age.. You" your camel. the guide and sand. Parties every night . What a perfect holiday. . sumo and the traditional Japanese way of life.

The structure of the finished product can vary.some can be doing 'Idols' while 'ethers are on.PROJECl GUIDE adios I:. In addition. be advertising breaks (6. each student should be able to get their own copy to take home with them to show the success of the project. the activity incorporated here as a doing the same activity doing 'Adverts' . that you will want to include every single episode. In addition.. Remember that not all the students have to be simultaneously . Throughout the whole broadcast there will._-.:.on • • speaking writing 6.. however. and so 'Desert Island students' (1. so it is better to select the very best.3) can be recorded onto the master tape in episodes..1) which can be set up / introduced by a DJ (a confident student or the teacher) .~".4)..EVEL:I ntermediate-upper-interroediate USIN.2). It will also make students feel more Hke radio presenters... Ideally.2 IdVlns SKilLS • speaking • writing TIME 90 minutes • • speaking pronunciati. It is unlikely. followed by Interviews (6 ...The Harehards (6. to personalise each student'S tape by recording their version of the Hareharos onto it.3. fitted in between the Interviews. 100 minutes ever 2 lessens _ photocopying PREPARATION _ finding pictures of famous people • CLASSSIZE photocepylng _ finding adverts and trademarks • photocopying • • making a recording photocopying 2 plus 4 plus 5 plus 2 plus 82 PAGE NUMBER 76 78 80 • . but one suggested order would be starting off with the news (6. Clearly. or If you have a lot of time.. page 24) could easily be fun extra. of course.G THISPROJEtT: The best way to do this proJeC\ i-.:.. try to to find a good tape recorder with a plug-in microphone so that the sound quality 15 high. activities as described and then tape them all onto a ~~~ listen to at the end as one single radio broadcast. 6.4 1I1111UBIS • speaking _ writing 60 minutes 60 minutes c. different students' versions of the Harchards will have to be used.

Put the students into groups of three or four and get them to tell each other who their idols are. Students A read the questions and Students B answer from the information compiled in Step 5. and vice versa. rehearse and tape again. Long version: Students B fill in ohotocopiable page 77 using research. explain that these people are 'idols' . either dictating them or writing them on the board. Topic area media. Time 90 minutes. (Help them with ideas if necessary . You or the student ask the class how much they heard or understood after playing the radio show. In the interview. In either case. S The answers Now put the students into pairs for the interview. page 77 will provide the basis for the answers that the idol gives. and why. As each interview is played back to the whole class.football players. Try to eliclt the names of as many as possible and what they are famous for. In order to do this. film stars. famous ~Ie fashion Z Language focus question "forms past tenses present perfect In class 1 Ask the students to walk around the class looking at the pictures. Collect pictures of famous people from various jobs (great leaders. Ask the students if they can guess what all these people have in common.) The questions Tell the class that they are going to interview their idols. This can include magazines. There are two ways of doing this: Short version: Students B fill in photocopiable page 77 with a mixture of information that Students A tell them about their idol. the rest of the students have to listen for the answers to the three questions. This is best given as homework. Level Intermediate + Student B will play the role of Student A's idol. etc. they will need to write the questions that they would like to ask.Radio show Idols Before class 1 Photocopy one page 77 for each student. • 7 8 9 Students rehearse their interview.hero Skills speaking writing 4 prepare for this. but do not say anything about them.) and pin them around the classroom. + homework (See StepS. This part of the activity should be done individually. In order to 2 3 Key YOcabulary idoI. encyclopaedias and the Internet. pop stars. film stars. they need to do some preparation. If they cannot guess. Each student gives the rest of the class three of the questions that he/she asked his/her idol. or 90 minutes. etc. singers. The interview is taped and students then change roles.heroes whom people look up to.. scientists.) MatedaJs pictures of famous people I x ~e per stUdent tape recorder tape optional: microphone n 76 .

Radio show 6. science.g. films.1 Idols IDOL INFORMATION PAGE PUT A PICTURE OF YOUR IDOL HERE Name: Place of birth: Is this person still alive7 When did they die? _ _ _ __ Date of birth: _ What is this person famous for (e. sport)? Details: I admire this person because: From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE _ 77 . music.

10 class 1 Show the students the adverts with the trademark/name guess what the advert was for and comment 2 hidden.Radio show m Adverts Before class 1 Collect a series of popular advertisements (pic-tures or videos) that you think your Topic area advertising. What makes a good advert: action? Colour? Speed? Beautiful people? etc. Language focus present simple can (ability) should . and (c) creating a jingle. Ask the students to think about how they can communicate all of this without Key vocabulary jingle Skills speaking pronunciation 3 pictures. t. or Level interm¢<iiaceupper-intenn. They should complete each point and check with you before moving on to the next step.te 5 Time 60 minutes get them to think of their own products. They have to on whether or not they liked it. 4 Put the students into groups of four and tell each group that they are going to make a radio advert.edla. They can include sound effects (as long as they can make them). If you feel confident. how to make an effective radio advert. Materials pictures or: recordings of adverts 7 I x page 79 cut up tape. As a whole group. drama 2 3 students will recognise.e. In total this will take about 40 minutes. media. using the opportunity to work on intonation and on individual sound pronunciation (which often arises oL11of the jingles). record the example advert on page 79 onto a tape. give them a card from photocopiable page 79. Draw their attention to tnings such as changing intonation. Photocopy and cut up page 79. FinaUy. you can correct general errors. sound effects and repetition of the brand name. Once the students have the idea. Write a list of good and bad points on the board. choose the adverts (from Step 1) which the class liked and ask them why. The advert must last no longer than 30 seconds. recorder 8 tape optional: microphone 78 . B There are three steps to their 'advert': (a) working out the script (b) 'finding' the sound effects. Give them an example of the sort of thing you want them to do (there is one at the top of pnotocoolable page 79). Go around each group as they are working. using dynamic intonation to attract your customers' attention. the adverts are recorded and then played back to the whole group. At this point. jingles (you will need to explain what these are) and exciting intonation.

NARRATOR: Why? OTHERS: Well. ..~ We love Brian's beans. NARRATOR: What sort of beans do you like? OTHERS. PETER'S . then you cook them (sound effect).lorryl9 very safeI . SALLY'S SLIPPERY SLUG Give thls as a present to your ENEMY. and they taste GREAAMT. rtdoes your homewo. From Imaginative Projects by Matt WiCks © Cambridge Universrty Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 79 .POPPING POP Drink this drink and you will become a pop THOMAS' TINY TANK A real tank that fits In your pocket. when you open them (sound effect).rk fur you. ...VI .. CAR. s A whole OIe81 in NARRATOR: Do you like beans? OTHERS: Yes.. we love beans . NA.OL'S CRAZY CAR It talks to you while you drive.RRATOR: Yes? OTHERS: They're very very cheap.eaball.And. HARRY'S HOMEWORK MACHINE TERRV'STIME SHIP Tmvelba. Dna bean! SAMMY'S FITNESS SWEETS Have one sweet a day and youwlU always be healthy.If you drive Into anything It bounces back IIk. (sound effect) .I'IU. they smell so good (sound effect). ROBERT'S RUBBER LORRY This ..ck Into history. star. JINGLE: Buy Brian's Brilliant Beans The most brilliant beans you can buy.

/ Language focus direct speech soap opera. each group has three pages of script: photocopiable page 81. In order to do that. · II · • ~ Topic areas media. Monitor. another group's second page and their own third page. They should then record the whole thing. This time. Check students understand what a 'soap opera' is. 8 Each group writes their text. 10 At the end of the activity. top Key vocabulary Skills speaking writing Level Intermedlate 3 Ask for volunteers to read the script aloud to the class. Thus. Read it aloud. Ask the groups to write the final episode of the soap opera. In class 1 Lesson 1 Hand out the copies of page 81. they have to write another page of script. relationships. 11 Students can listen to the alternative versions and see how their own second pages were completed by their colleagues. people. 7 The groups cast the characters and practise reading their text. focusing on changing stress and intonation as well as a more general comprehension of what is happening. Variation For a pre-intermediate group. S Divide the class into groups of four or five and tell them that they are going to record the next episode of the soap opera. They have to write a page of script which satisfactorily concludes the story. it is enough to record page 81 two or three different times.)lmaimd/ /d30:d3/ /ld3U:li . 80 . and get the students to read it through to themselves. 4 Check that the students all understand who the characters are and what Is happening.. The characters: Bob Susan Jemima George Julia of the characters to make certain that everybody can pronounce Pronunciation /bob/ / Isu:zan/ /d3". 2 Drill the names them. You could draw a chart on the board showing all of the relationships in pictorial form. providing suggestions and correction where needed. group 8's to group C and so on. 8 Each group records themselves. . group A's script goes to group B. taking into account the error correction given in Step 8. continuing the story. 9 Lesson 2 (but can be adapted for preIntermediate.Radio show m The Harchards Before class Photocopy page 81 once for each student. drama . pointing out the contractions as you go through.. see Variation) Time Lesson I: 60 minutes Lesson 2: 4S minutes Materials rape recorder tape I x page 81 per student . they have to continue from a different group's script. •. These tapes can then be used for error correction.

Radio show 6. my handsome hero. SUSAN: HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HA HAl To be continued From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 81 • .3 The Harchards THE Episode 1 HARCHARDS: a soap opera SCENE ONE [SOUND EFFECT: Rain <Make this by recording metal»] BOB: SUSAN: BOB: SUSAN: BOB: SUSAN: BOB: SUSAN: BOB: SUSAN: BOB: water (from a tap) falling on something Hello. our plan is working. Bob.my terrible husband has found out that I love you and not him.my husband -loves you. poor Mr George. Susan. Your husband. And now. George. and then the police'll put George in prison. is angry because Bob . Mr George. have some coffee. Bob. What happened? George has found out our secret. No! Yes! Oh. JEMIMA: Don't cry. GEORGE: JEMIMA: But I have to Mr George. here I am. And George is angry JULIA: Good. Jemima. JEMIMA: Here. George11 kill Bob. [SOUND EFFECT: Coffee being poured into a cup] JEMIMA: And put the gun down. Bang! Bang! Bangl Bang! Bang! Bangl Ob. my sweetheartl It was terrible. I'll get Bob's money and ou'll get George's money. JEMIMA: It's true and when I've finished my coffee I'm going to shoot GEORGE: him.. JULIA: How is Bob? SUSAN: He is afraid. he is coming here to kill you! To kill rue? Oh no! What can I do? What can I do? SCENE TWO (SOUND EFFECT: A door slamming. How are you? Oh Bob! Bob my darlingl I'm so happy to see you.Tve been your ecretary for ten ears and I've never seen you so angry! My wife loves another man. You see there's a secret I must tell you . my one true Iovel George . Julia. She loves Bob the cleaner: GEORGE: I can't believe it. loudly] JEMIMA: Mr George! Mr George! What's the matter? GEORGE: Grrrrrrrrrr. Yes. That is awful. Why? What happened? Oh Bob! Bob.. SCENE-THREE [SOUND EFFECT: A car arriving < Make this by saying 'Brrrrrmmmm' into the microphone»] JUUA: Susan! Susan! Are you there? SUSAN: Yes.

com). and If any group is finding it really difficult to come up with anything.uk) or CNN (www. (For more details see www.bbc. Give the students five minutes to produce a list of the main points that they will include in their news story.this part of the exercise is simply to sensitise them to headlines. (If you are not in an English-speaking country. correspondent. Put them into pairs and give each pair a copy of one of the headlines on photocopiable page 83. In other words.real.• Radio show • · • • Headlines Before class 1 Photocopy and cut up page 83. It is not necessary (or possible) to go into great detail . Journalist.com) 2 8. anchor 2 3 Skills speaking wrftjng 4 Level interrnedlate S + 6 Time 60 minutes Materials I x cut up headlines on pag_e83 tape recorder tape it should be Quite short (two minutes is the absolute maximum).) Now ask them if they know anything about the stories that the headlines refer to. 7 8 Once they have written the script and rehearsed it. then give them a different headline. microphone 9 Variation 1 For younger groups. Each group now writes one question about their story for the others to answer as they listen. optional. which has news on the hour. use the BBC World Service.g. but that they can use correspondents and reporters on site. Go around the groups and get the general outline of their stories. simply write three or four imaginary and fun headings on the board (possibly based on films e. Once you have done this. You could do Step 2 with newspaper headlines or using the Internet . In this case.co. CNN also has streaming video which is updated every half hour for the most technologically advanced classes.sites such as BBC (news.2 • . These questions can range from the simple (How many people watched the race?) to the complex (What did our reporter suggest were the main problems with the concert?) depending upon the level. tell the students that they are going to make their own news stories. each segment can be recorded onto tape. James Bond in Rome) and ask them what they think the story behind them might be. reporter. Some of them may need a little prompting. Tell them that reporte-d speech Key vocabulary heodllries. and the other can be 'phoning in' a special report from the scene of the action. famous people 2 Language focus past simple present perfect In class 1 Ask the students to listen to the headUnes and write them down. They do not need to write sentences at this stage just simple notes. one of them can be the anchor in the studio.cnn. news. Once they have the basic story. Students listen and answer their colleagues' questions. Record the headlines from an English language news programmes.) TQpic area media. They will need to hear the headlines several times before getting them accurately. Then proceed from Step 3. get each group to write their script. (If you have a particularly young group see the variation below. talking about real headlines might not be appropriate.

4 Headlines NEW TEENAGE POLItE tREATED MADON·AFOR PSID NT? SPECIAL CONFERENCE IN MADRID NEW FOOD DRUG DEVELOPE'D: NO NEED TO EAT ANY MORE! - From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks @Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 83 • .Radio show 6.

~ . • • • . . • ' • ' . .. II II D • " II ...4 Headlines .. .. .. • ... • . '•. ... ~ e e . .... • • . • .... GOVERNMENT WANTS ALL TEENAGERS TO WEAR UNIFORMS • c NEW MOVIE -H'UGE SUCCESS s •g .. ... ..t at eoncert .. -. • . . • · • • We saw houses f from the sky .I Radio show 6..

a cooking competition or an international fpod party cooked b¥ the students. It is a great opportunity to tie a proJect In withext:ra-curricular activities such as a trip to a·local restaurant to see how It works. especially thi"Mtliilliliil IIi~U of for 7.2 and 7. numbers on tables. a visiting speaker such as a lOCal chef.4) can be done in two ways .3.2 lim •• SKILLS • speaking • • TIME 25-40 • • • minutes speaking writing approx.!'. if possible.as a long or short activity. The final exercise (7. to create the atmosphere a real (. 1.3 have been done beeeuse students will have become involved In their restaurant and will want to see what happens to It. It to bring in snacks and menus.PROJECT GUIDE r LEVEL: Elementary-intermediate USING THIS PROJECT: This project Is based around the idea own restaurant.hole project. 30 minutes • speaking • • speaking reading 90 minutes • • collect logos photocopying 30 or 60 minutes • • photocopying cutting PREPARATION photocopying cutting finding examples of food • preparing classroom (menus. This project can be done over a few days.2 it is the oulmlnation of the w. snacks) • • photocopying cutting CLASS SIZE PAGE NUMBER 4 plus 86 3 plus 88 7-16 90 4 plus 92 ". .it and 7. • l. In addition. or spaced out over several weeks. Because 7.§taJJrant. the longer version works better if 7.

I

The restaurant


Food families
Before class
1 Photocopy and cut up one set of cards and rules on page 87 per four students. Possibly bring in some real vegetables, etc. to help explain difficult items.

Topic area
food. shoppJng. games

2

Language foe'us
Have you got ... 7 (Do you have .. .lIn American English) any (aJternatJve Step 6.: alan vs. some/any)

In class
1 2 3 Make certain all the students are familiar with the language necessary for game play (see page 15). Hold up the four 'people' cards from page 87 and make certaIn that students know what the four jobs are (greengrocer, butcher, fishmonger and off-licence owner). Divide the class into groups of four and give each four a 'pack' of the cards from page 87, including the people cards and the food cards, but not the blank cards. Ask them to match the type of food with the person who sells it. If there are insufficient students to maKe complete sets of four, have one or two smaller groups. Put the stronger students into this group as the task will be harder with fewer people. When the groups have all finished mixing and rnatchtng, get feedback from the students and write on the board the lists of which food goes with which person. Now hand out the four blank cards from page 87_ Each member of each group draws an additional card for one of the. shops (i.e. one person draws something extra from the greengrocer, One from the butcher, etc.). In each case, make certain that they check with you before they begin drawing. Have some spare blank cards ready just in case. With stronger groups, simply hand out the people cards and get them to make up five different food cards themselves to match each person instead of giving them the prepared ones,
Note The cards show plural items so that all questions use the structure Have you got any .. _ except for the Questions about people. However, if you decide to

Key VOcabulary
shops: bcttcher, greengrocer. aff..ncence. fishmonger food: carrots, au~, tomoto_eS, onions,. pod<. beef, chicken, lamb, wine.
soft drinks, ml~fOl wuter,

4

5

a

beer. cod, salmon, -oc;tt1pus,
prawns and many others
as dictated

by the: class

rules: deo/er, face down

Skills
speaking (See page IS fOr excra activity on game play.)

prepare your own cards this might be a good opportunity to revise singular/plural and countable/uncountable rules if the students draw a mixture of Singular and plural items. 7 8 9 Once each group has finished ask them to swap their cards with another group and then to shuffle all the cards (hand-made and from this book) thoroughly. Hand out the rules box from the next page. At the end, gather together all of the hand-made cards and hold them up, making sure that all the students can identify them and putting a written record of what they are on the board.

Level
elementaryInterm.ediate

Time
25 minutes (:40 minuteS If you do the a1tematJve in Seep 6)

Variation
In countries where mention of alcohol is inappropriate, change the off-licence to supermarket and make cards for bread and rice. If pork or beef are unacceptable, choose e.g. duck or a local speciality.

Materials
I x set of cards on pageS7 per" ~dents

86 •

The restaurant

1.1 Food families

FAMILY

CARDS

the Greengrocer

Mr Grizzle

Mr. Baybon the Butcher

Mr FlUtt the Fishmonger

OfNlcence owner

Mrs Amblka the

minerai water

FOODFAMILIES RULES The aim of the game Is to complete one family. This means one set of cards which are connected. The person who Is collecting the grocer must get the grocer and the five food cards that go with him. One person should be the dealer (the person who gives out the cards). The dealer ~ves each person five cards, placing them face down on the table. Organise your cards In your hand Into families (I.e. the butcher with pork, beef, etc.). Everybody looks at their cards and decides which family they are going to collect. Choose the family that you have most cards from. The person on the dealer's right starts. He/She asks one other person (tt doesn't matter who) the question Have you got ... 1 (e.g. If you are collecting the grocer family, you might ask Have you got any potatoes? or Have you got Mr Grizzle the Greengrocer?) The person must answer YesI have or No I haven't. If they have, then they must give the card to the person who asked. After this or If the person has not got the card, the next person asks a question.
If you have g1venaway all of your cards, then you can stili ask other people for their cards.

When you think you have all the cards In a family, put them on the table. If you have got a whole family, you are the wlnnerl If you have not, you must leave the game and give one card to each of the other players.
From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000

.

PHOTOCOPIABLE

87

'The'_Lrestaurant . "'.-"),

Setting up
Before class
1
2

Collect a handful of well-known logos from magazines and products (e.g, the McDonald's 'M', the Shell shell, or the Nike logo, etc.), PhOtocopy page 89 once per four students.

LanftHe focus
pre,sent simple

In class
1 Make sure that students are familiar with language connected with creating things (see Page 15).

Key VOcabulary
food I

languqe (e.g., smoking/non;;

restaurant

:2
3

Show your students the logos and ask them to name the company that the symbol represents. Put your students into groups of four or five. Tell them that they are going to open a restaurant and they need a name and a logo for it that people will remember. The name can be anything from a combination of their own names {the Joaroko, for example Joao and Hiroko) to the name of their favourite football team / TV show, etc. (the Manchester United Bar?). The logo that they create will be used throughout this activity (and throughout the whole project, if they do the foHowing sections) ..It should be simple but fun, Give them about 20 minutes to choose their name and design the logo. This stage is important because it helps them to believe in the company that they are creating. Having completed their logo, each group now brainstorms the sort of food that they will serve. It should be a combination of foods from each country represented in the group. In a monolingual class, they can use food that they have heard of from different countries, or traditional dishes from different regions of th.e.irown. In certain cultures it will be necessary to pre-teach the ,idea of courses. Give a time limit of about 20 minutes for the brainstorming. Once they have a list of food that they are go.ingto sell, the students fill in the menu (photocopiable page 89), including the logo and the price, and a short description of what each meal is (e.g, FISH AND CHIPS - an English meal made from fr.ied potatoes and fish). Explain that one pound equals one hundred pence, and compare the value of a pound with the value of the local currency. In addition, point out that we put the E sign before the numerals rather than after (i.e. £1.45, not 1.45£). Not all the students will be able to write on the menu at the same time, so the other students can make an A4 poster advertising the 'GRANDOPENING' of the restaurant. This should include the logo, a few drawings and little captions about the type of food offered, e.g, EXCELLENT VALUERSH AND CHIPS. Students will rotate between Steps 6 and 7 until both are completed. When everything has been finished, put together some tables and chairs and set up a 'restaurant', with the posters around the wall and the menus on each table (along with some crisps and drinks if you are feeling generous). Each group can now visit the others' restaurants and see what they have on offer. They should check with the people who designed the menus if they don't understand what a dish is, and then choose their favourite dish from the other groups' restaurants.

smcikin£fried;boIIed, grlJfeit souce~marinated. dressJn.f;-Jieht, ,dJip,s.:,side

dish, salad, etc.~ courses:
(see S~ S)
4

SkIlls
speaking writint
5

Level
S

.Time
90 minutes

Materials
famous 19&05.

I.x page 89 per"
,studellt$

7

pens

er '~WQ,rd
8

processor (* pap 13 for extra
activ~) paper:' forpaster:s

9

Variation
In schools with computers, students can make a menu on screen. This gives students a change of environment and activity which stops the project becoming too classroorn-bound.

88

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Student A has a card which says Oh no. drama 1 Prepare the classroom as a restaurant with menus (from local restaurants or from 7. makes sense when said either e before or after theirs).speJk.irtg (See page 17 fOr extra. Ifyou have an odd number of students in your class. the line which. Give them about ten minutes in their pairs to work . get willing students to act their 'miniscenes' to the rest of the group. Tell the students to keep doing their mini-scenes until the manager or waiter visits them.Ionger food and dril1k (snacks) menus (orlglnaJor made. 6 The exceptions to this are the students who get the first two cards (with Wand M in place of a number). take one out of the group for a moment.it out. 10 The manager and waiter obey the commands on their cards and each story develops a little bit further. . 10 minutes depending on I~el. 7 If you have an odd number and have taken a student out at Step .lowing them to make use of requests and complaints and also to create the busy atmosphere of a real restaurant. The student who gets You promised me more money. page 89). I have forgotten my wallet. 9 Now give the waiter and the manager their respective cards from photocopiable page 91. 4 Optional You might also like to make (or get the students to make) paper bow ties.ainto the students that they are all in a restaurant and that their two (or three) lines represent the beginning of a conversation. Have you got any money? with the number 6 at the end.. What does thIS mean? Wh.At the same time they listen to try and find out who thelr partner is in the sequence (i. sorry I haven't. Could l. each table will require a number card (1-fl. For example.. Excuse me. and with snacks (crisps. W will become the waiter.. "lower level might take less time while a higher level can keep going. Level pl'\&-intel"mediateintermediate Time c.1 don't think so.2 Setting up. for example)./ease. now put him/her with group 5 and give him/her the line No. 3 Photocopy and cut up one set of waiter and manager cards on page 91. and to devise small scenes beginning with the two lines. 2 Photocopy. lanpage focu~s polite requests complaints Key vocabulary phrases .. ln addition.The restaurant Dining: out Before class ~~c~a food.ith speaking activities (see page 17).g. 2 Hand out the customer cards that you have cut up from page 91.) Each person starts calling out the line of dialogue on their card (. Finally.have some . what they are talking about and what happens next. from pageS9) I x~9lcutup large numberc:ards for tables 90 .2. al. Draw the shape of a bow tie on black paper. the one with M is the manager. They must not show anybody their card. . They now have to think about who these people are. e. and then they go and sit at table 6. 11 As a final piece of feedback ask one member of each pair to describe exactly what happened when tne manager or waiter approached them. make two holes and then thread string through it so that they can tie it round their necks. and then to interact with them. He walks around ealingit out until he finds his partner (Student 8 with No.. B Expl.ot would you recommend? Where are th<:fDiletsl Can I have the bifl.. a Skills . cut it out. cut up and hand out the customer cards on page 91 (enough for One each). p..). .. S When they have found their partner they sit down at their table (shown by the number at the end of the first card in each pair). if they have one). higfJch~r.ignoringthe number.to fire somebody In class 1 Make sure that students are familiar with language connected w.ndquestlons used if! restaurants. 4 They must not stop calling out their line until they have found their partner.activity.

3 - WAITER a Waiter The people on TABLE TWO have beencomplainlng about the cold food. I wanted to teU you yesterday but .) There are no high chairs for babies in this restaurant. Have you got any money? No. Tell them that they ordered chicken salad. I am afraid that I'm in love with another girl. and that you do not serve hot chicken in this restaurant.. Another girl? So that's where you were yesterday. You are io a hurry for them to leave because there are twenty people waiting for a table. e 0 I Yes.. CARDS ] brought you to this restaurant to give you some bad news Dh nol 0. Sorry. (You do not like children. Go and ask him why he is sad. Perhaps the waiter can get us a high chair.. Maybe then I will give you more money! We asked for a non-srnoklng table. i Manager Take the bill to the people on TABLE SIX.· I is thatthe man over there? 1 think so. This chicken is cold. That man is smoking] I'm not going to ask him to. c Waiter f Manager Tell the people at TABLE THREE that their baby is too loud. Dh no! I have forgotten my wallet. h Manager Fire the WAITER for making so many mistakes. stop.The restaurant - 7. Go to TABLE F1VE and tell the customers that the chef has left and so the only food that they will be able to have is chicken salad or an omelette. CUSTOMER . Go to TABLE SEVEN and give them a key. From Inlaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 91 . You prornlsed me more money! You must work harder. and d MANAGER Waiter CARDS g Manager Go to TABLE SEVEN and tell them that they left their umbrella at the restaurant when they came for dinner last Wednesday. Tell them that they left it in the restaurant last night. So is mine! I told you that we shouldn't have brought t!'le baby.. Some of the other people at tables near them are complaining about the noise. b Waiter You recognise your brother who is sitting at TABLE FOUR looking very unhappy. I haven't. e Manager Go to TABLE ONE and politely ask the people there to be quiet.

But Christmas is not good. sometimes by a dice roll. Youwill then put that card back into the appropriate pile and give groups the next card that they ask for. rolls the dice and asks you for the appropriate card. the students decide on the name of their restaurant and whether it IS in the city or the countryside. Card number 1 says: Your first year is a success. Key vocabulary food words (See 7. The longer one takes one hour and the shorter one half an hour. c) Allow the decision-making process to continue until each group has worked out their total profit (but no more than 15-20 minutes). the number of opening hours and average cost of meals will already have been worked out for the menu and they can use these figures.1. The winning group is not the first group to finish.. Give each group a copy of card number 1 from page 94 and a dice. Emphasise at this stage that each group has to keep a running total as most cards will instruct them to either add or subtract quantities of money depending on their fortune (e. If not. They work through it. Both versions Photocopy and cut up one set of the cards on page 94 per four students.The restaurant . If they have done section 7. The advantage of the longer version is that it provides a very real context for the students to work. Go to Step 3. S B 92 .) Go to Step 3. staft overfleods In class 1 Long version a) Put the students in groups of four (or two in smaller classes) and hand out a copy of page 93 to each group. burn. Long version Photocopy page 93 once per four students. Youget an extra £4. 2 Short version Put the students in groups of four (or pairs in smaller classes). pror. You then tell each group that they make a profit of £7. protection money.000. food. This will be the slgnltlcant figure for the game that follows. In this version. 1. (Page 93 is therefore unnecessary. Note You may wish to help and/or allow calculators at this stage to speed things up. they simply make them up. 6: ask for card (15). students that they are now going to follow the progress of their restaurant over several years.000 in the above example). Roll a dice to see how bad. Perhaps choose one member of each group to be the accountant. loss~ ~diture. modals of possibility. poison. flood.t. Each card links to another. The mathematics is much less important than the decision-making process and students anxious to make a lot of money by having lots of tables should note that this means they need more staff. based on what is reasonable. Both versions Explain to the.g. +£4.Our·restaurant Before class 1 wane. but the group with the most money. in. 93 per:: -J students 3 4 short version: I x page 92 cut up per ~ SbJden1:$- dice opdonat. sock. and therefore gives them a greater stake in the game. Skills speaking readmg Level ne Materials long version: I xpag. The shorter one is simpler and there are not so many numbers to worry about.1 income. 4. making decisions and filling in the gaps at each point.2 (page 88). math! Topic areas ~ 2 3 Language focUs hypothedcallanguage . b) When it comes to the 'Outgoings' section.2.000 per year. 3: ask for card (5). 5. Once the turn has finished each card has to be returned to you. decisions Choose one of the two versions of this activity. more often by the student being given two or three options. some of the figures are already filled in. therefore. Each group. and you may wish to set a minimum wage for the group to use in the wages section.

000 £3...•...~--- £'-'--- £. INCOME NUMBER OF HOURS OPEN PER WEEK: NUMBER OF TABLES: ..uran.city) RENT If your restaurant is in the country.000 per year per year per year year per table FOOD TO BE COOKED..... (you must have one for every 6 tables) TOTAL WAGES PER YEAR: (The wages per week x number of staff x 52) OVERHEADS: (lighting & electri.....000 £4.....: ANNUAL EXPENDITURE: Rent+Overheads+Food+ Total Wages per Year £700 per £'-------- PROm Annual income ..---£2.---- EXPENDITURE WAGES PER WEEK (for each person): NUMBER OF STAFF........ If your restaurant is ina town: £.2 £...•.Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 93 • ..---- £.... To work out your weekly income: (number of tables x 2 x average cost of meals) x (number of hours open per week) ANNUAL INCOME: Your weekly income x 5..•....t RESTAU RANT FI N A'N C ES (long version only) RESTAURANT NAME LOCATION (City or countryside) .. AVERAGECOST OF MEALS: WEEKLY INCOME: Each table has 1 mea/every two hours with two people..annual expenditure From ..Our resta.. .

• The re"staurant 1.rrestaurant Restaurant Choice Cards • .4 Ou.

pictures.4).4 TIME PREPARATION 60 minutes • • photocopying cutting up 60 rnmutes • • photocopying cutting up 55 minutes • • • photocopying cutting up optional: writing cards appropriate for your group CLASS S1ZE PAGE NUMBER 4 plus 2 plus 6 plus 4 plus 103 96 98 100 • . an international terrorist who is hiding in his base in Brazil. When they arrive there. then they are sent to investigate the disappearance of fellow Copter. even toys that teenagers had when they were younger. They must get Into the base to rescue Moira (8.2) which directs them to Dr in Cambridge.1). First they prepare their cars with gadgets (8. because of the narrative thrust of this project. Generally speaking.I J PROJECT GUIDE r ~Secr lEVEL: Pr&intermediate-upper-intermedlate age USING THIS PROJECT: This is a narrative project in become secret agents.3) and they must interrogate a number of local witnesses. This leads them to the information that Moira Copter has been kidnapped by the Rooster. The project provides all sorts of opportunities for bringing in films.2 CadiS SKILLS • • speaking writing • speaking • writing 45 minutes • • photocopying cutting up • • reading speaking The base • speaking 8. it is better done over a short period of time so that students are involved in the story without letting it continue too long. Dr Drakken has been murdered (8. 8. with which to create a sense of the world of a secret agent. They receive a coded message (8.

You could write a couple more sentences that students have a clear written record.t. Windscreen. on the board so • · · • · • Level p. bu"et proof. in the position of 'Q' in the James Bond films. spies. they could use a photograph advert and simply glue it onto their paper.king writing S Write a sample sentence on the board using the structure is used to / for. 96 . They are.re-intermedi~ upper-intermediate a Time 60 minutes Remind your students that they are secret agents and tell them that another secret agent . and that they have been approached by the EIA (English Intelligence Agency) to rescue her. Band C on page 97 per student. motorbike. people. Once they have decided on five or six things that they are going to include. (See page 13.. etc. this can be done as a whole-class activity if the picture of the car is enlarged and two or three copies are pinned up around the room.. 11 Finally.kiUs spe. if you do not wish the students to photos of cars. of a car from an student pens paper card (t 'mount 10 Now they have to imagine what gadgets are going to be added to their car: pictureS) (See lTage 13 for extra aCtIvity onc~ting things.) 8 Write the following parts on the board: headlights. If they really can't draw.has been kidnapped. Materials I cut up x page 97 per 9 Put the students in pairs or threes. Draw their attention to the use of the structure of is used to / for and encourage them to use it where possible. art 2 Gather cards. their car will be fitted with all the latest gadgets. ask them to explain what certain !!! • S. (e. This exercise can be repeated or extended for other equipment for those who finish too quickly: the agent's briefcase. or if you prefer. each group should present the results of their work to the rest of the group. They can model their drawings on a real car or an imaginary one. paper and glue. Give them some paper and pens to draw a car with.Equipp·ng your agent Before class 1 Photocopy and cut up each one of sections A. helicopter.An oil slick from the exhaust pipe? You can offer non-violent suggestions. The students to glue / pin on. draw (Step 11) then you will need to find substitute Language focus' spatial prepositions In class 1 Make sure that your students are familiar for the exercise. odd. 7 The class report back. they can then label their diagram as in the example in section C of photocopiable page 97. hand out copies of section A of photocopiable 97 and tell your students that they are secret agents and this is their car. such as heavily scented flowers bursting from the boot in order to confuse the enemy. are then given the section Key vocabulary gadget. having to explain to their colleagues what modifications they have made and how each one will work. windscreen wipers.Moira Copter .g. have completed the diagram..) optional: clip from James Bond film machine guns from the lights. perhaps? . gun. machine guns words on cards on page 97 8 cards which they race 4 Once the students parts are used for.) with the appropriate classroom language 2 To pre-teach car vocabulary. effectively. Ask the students to make sentences in pairs explaining what each of these parts of the car is used for. Topic areas cars. pens. Alternatively. The indicators are used to show where we are going. 3 Give them copies of the labels from section B and ask them to fit these labels to the appropriate part of the car. In order to do that. In addition.. Now they are ready for the mission . steering wheel and seats. page present simple modals of ability passive is used to/for .

hboard wiper steering wheel pedals roof seats wing mirrors door headligh.ginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 97 l .I Secret agent 8..r agent THE Section A AGENT'S CAR Section body wheel B bonnet boot exhaust pipe number plate das.s. From Imr.1 Equipping you.ts Indicator windscreen windscreen Section C The windscreen Is bullet proof. used to fire 8. The headlights ale The wheels are used to cut other cars' wheel. The bonnet Is electflfled.cld at other cars. machine guns.

Code answers: CODE = real A=Q B=r C=s D=v E=w F=x G=i H=j I=k J=m K=n L=o M=p N=I O=h P=a Q=b R=c S=f T=U U=y V=z W=t X=d Y=e Z=g 98 . car. c) The message in section C reads: Moira is a prisoner of the rooster. 2 3 Key vocabulary sharks. (I will never payl would be written G EGNN KYDYB MPUl) Having finished they should give their coded message to another pair to check and decode.' Bs should get: 'leave the money in a briefcase at ten o'clock tomorrow.Secret agent . they explain the problem: Moira Copter (a colleague) has been kidnapped and they have to pay a ransom. With a weaker class. bonnet. • II · · • Language focus lettersJalphabet recent vocabulary In class 1 Divide the class into pairs. windscreen.-. the words are: dashboard. mirror. Now the students write a short reply to the criminals in code (using the code from Step 4). a) Tell the students that their commander has just sent them further instructions. it is in a different code: the RV code system (Recent Vocabulary). ransom. those on the right to the real alphabet. This code is based on transport vocabulary (as in 8. brake.. Doctor Drakken in Cambridge knows where his secret base Is.1 (See Step 7.' Put together. exhaust. one student receives the A part of photocopiable page 99 and one the 8 part. They can work out the letters that are missing by comparing words and sharing the information that they each have. lights. -. • II Topic areas spies. This time. however. Students then read their answers back to you. indicator. The code is simply written with recent vocabulary in the middle of each word... The students should be able to decipher their respective coded messages using the information in the CODE BOX. In each pair.. . A students should have: 'I will feed Moira Copter to the sharks if you do not give me ten million pounds.) Give about ten minutes to decode the messages. Therefore. you may write the list of recent vocabulary on the board. seat. so that HAPCARPY HAPPY+ CAR. e) Encourage the students to treat the exercise like a word search in order to solve the mystery. roof. briefcase. to break CJ code optional: car vocabulary from 8. This should take about five minutes. people 2 Photocopy and cut up one set of section A page 99 for half the students in your class and one set of section B on the same page for the other half. c) The text actually reads as follows: MODASH BOAR DIRAISUGHTSAPRWI NDSCREEN ISONEROM IRROR FTHEXHAUSTE ROOSSEATTERDOCTBONNETORDRABOOTKKENIINDICATORNCAMBSEATBELRIDGEKN OCARWSWH EWHEELREHB RAKEIS BASElROOFS.. . (Note that the letters on the left side of the CODE BOX refer to the coded alphabet.. Reply in code.) Tell them that they are secret agents and that they received these messages from their headquarters this morning . -. Codes Before class 1 II. . Optional Skills speaking writing 4 Level pre-lntermedlare S 6 7 upper~intermedfate Time 45 minutes Materials I x section A page 99 per pair I x section B page 99 per paIr I x section C page 99 per student pe~s . If you do Step 7. boot. = b) Give the students the message in section C of page 99. wheel. but the message could easily be rewritten with something more relevant to your group. . . photocopy and cut up one set of section C on page 99 for each student.1 on page 96). seat belt.they must be decoded quickly. Tell me in code where you wi" leave it..

. _.U GKRlXY .(... _.-. .---. GEGNN SYYX J RLMWYB _GBP Gs NypDyWOY JLKYUGK wt WOY COPBIC u'Txl JGN:GLK P QBG YSRPCY WylLRNlRI PW KLw ZGDY IY WYK MlTKlC.-.__ . ~ - .. SECTION C THIS IS AN URGENT MESSAGE FROM THE COMMANDER TO AGENT ENGLISH 1: 1l'10DAS HBOARD IRl\I SLI GHT'SAPRWIND ( (SCREEN I SONERO~tRRORFTH..__ ----- _.... _.~~. CoC..._ . .__ .. _.~~HAU S1 t!'EROOS SEATTERDOCTBONNETORDRAJ )!300TKKENIINDtCATO. WYNN JYGKRLXY EOYEY uLTEGNN NYpDVGw._ .. M=p Y=e L= Z= -~ ~~.~--...lC.-----.-..HBRAKE I S BAS-E!-I ROCfFS~/ From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 99 .-~._ .f T= Q= P= CODE = real G=i E=w B=rU=y X=d D=v K=n..ClCl Ci Co Coc.C.--.-._ .-.BYM.C.. WlJLBBLE. ... Help your partner break the code.C.CoCo ClC. .2 Codes CODEPAGE SECTION A SECTION B Help your partner break the code...NCAM13Q~_A'T( (~ELTRIDGEKNOCARWSWH~WHEELRE) .--.R._. CODE ==real N=/ Y=e R=c W==t C=s I )=m O=h I==k S=. .._ ---.Secret agent 8.~ (lCiCiCrC..-..

which means that the Rooster sent more than one thug to Cambridge. so the witnesses who are waiting to be interviewed should stay in their groups. preparing their stories. . 4 Divide the class up into witnesses and interrogators.. . !f they are right. . and the rest witnesses. Whatever happens. 9 The interrogators compare notes and see if they can come up with a solution.. goOf. thug. .. suspec:t. Check that they know the meanings of all the words on the role cards on photocopiable page 102.. interrogate. Cut off the question section. addkt. Language focus.. which is passed around. pngetprints. each interrogator will have fewer witnesses..nterrogation Before class 1 Photocopy one page 101 per student. This time. once all questions have been completed. . Topic areas sples.. read their role cards and make certain that they agree on their various alibis (wherever possible).alibi wit1Jes£. Each interrogator takes one or more witnesses. the interrogators' team wins. bring the two groups together and re-divide them.Pnd out J Skills reading s~ldng .. To control this. you will need a minimum of two interrogators and four witnesses.. mad. Approximately one third of the class should be interrogators.. !f you have more than ten students. If not. Le~el pre-Intermediate- uwer-mtermedia:te Thne 60 minutes (but see also Step 9) Materials I x page 101 per student~ r x c ~ p page· 102 per class (with addition~. 2. for four witnesses use cards 1. In a small class the two interrogators deal with half the class each. . U Finally. Start the interrogations..2 page 44. If you have fewer than ten witnesses start at number 1 and use the cards consecutively (i. . as a whole-class activity.. Interrogations work best if witnesses don't hear each other. They should go to one side. . the interrogators accuse one of the witnesses of being the murderer.. In a larger class.. people. such as a pencil case. have an object. question forms I inclirect questions simple past past cQntlnuouspres~nt perfect In class 1 Hand out a copy of the newspaper story from page 101 to each student. . Give the students about fifteen minutes tor this part of the activity.30 last night?)..". . 5 The interrogators think of questions to ask the witnesses.e.) 3 Now tell your class that they are secret agents who are going to try and find out who murdered Dr Drakken and what happened to Moira Copter.~me. 3 and 4). then the witnesses win. 100 . crime. (For details of how to do a reading race see 3.. .. Only the interrogator holding the object may speak. Encouragethem to phrase the questions correctly differentiating between the present perfect (How long have you known X?) and the past continuous (What were you doing at 7. meanwhi!e. They must not show their cards to the interrogators. 8 The witnesses. • . card lOs if required) item for passIng 'around (Step 13) . then copy card 10 several times.. drama 2 Photocopy and cut up the cards on page 102. give out extra copies of card 10 (the 'Thug'). Key vocabulary . any interrogator may cross-question any witness. agitated. 2 Divide the class into groups of three or four and get them to do a reading race using the questions from page 101 to check that they have understood the text.. They must pass it on regularly to other interrogators.. .. 7 When the students have completed their preparation. 8 Once the interrogations have been completed (after about ten minutes) the class returns to the original groups. 10 Then. the interrogators go to one side of the room and the witnesses to the other. Each student should have one card. while the witnesses recount their experiences to each other to make certain they have not contradicted each other's stories. If you need more than ten witnesses. . k)dnQP..

He had been shot six times. watching Titanic II with Lucinda.' ---_. However. Police are also speaking to Professor Hell Copter who was supposed to have a meeting with Dr Drakken at 7.m. Dr Drakken was investigating the disappearance of Moira Copter.--_. he was investigating a kidnapping. Moira. the body of Dr Francis Drakken was found in London Road.30 about his missing daughter. Marcus Perolius. at about 7p. The outlook for the next two weeks is rain every day. 3 4 THE WEATHER There will be rain from the north heading towards the south. Police think that the Rooster .m. He had three children and had been working with his assistant..FORMATION PAGE NEW ENGLISH TIl\t1ES Volume 1 Issue 123 08 November 2012 £3 INSIDE THIS ISSUE Dr Drakken Your stars New films New football rules All schools to close MadonlHl Interview Financial Reports 2 2 2 rich and beautiful daughter of Professor Hell Copter. There is some confusion about where some witnesses were at the time of the murder. but promises that if he ever sees Marcus Perolius or Tony again he will ki.? From Imaginative Projects by Matt Wicks © Cambridge University Press 2000 PHOTOCOPIABLE 101 • .. Cambridge. Police have several witnesses to interrogate about the murder. At the time of his death.3 .a famous international criminal . but there were no fmgerprints on it. the -«----------------------------------------------------------_.. for many years.Perollus when the murder was committed? 7 Who was watching TitanIc In 8 Who was supposed to meet Dr Drakken at 7.Secret agent B. whose factory she was working at when she was ktdnapped six days ago . Dr Drakken was born in 1956 in Oxford. Last night. Lucinda's husband says that he was playing golf at the time of the murder.30 p. with some snow at the weekend. The gun used to kill Dr Drakken was found in the River Cam near the city centre.and his gang might have been involved in the murder. Lucinda Lovealot. a man called Tony says that he was at the cinema. Marcus Perolius claims that he was in the Eagle Restaurant with his girlfriend. Dr Francis Drakken was a famous engineer working for the Engljsh Intelligence Agency.-------_ --_.llthem both. In southern areas there will be more rain .Interrogation NEWSPAPER I:N._ -----------_ . QUESTIONS 1 Who was killed? 2 Who did Dr Francis Drakken work for? 3 Who Is Moira Copter? 4 What has happened to Moira Copter? 5 Who Is the Rooster? 6 Where was Marcus ..

during the film Titanic /I.m. 3 You are Bob Dicap. some information Moira. last night you were playing golf with your friends. but you cannot remember seeing lovealot or Perollus. 4 You are a wai~er at the Eagle restaurant. You are Dr Drakken's assistant.had' kidnapped Moira Copter and' taken her to his headquarters In Brazil.000.30 you saw Marcus hurrying back to his factory. By the time you arrived he was already dead! very well. about your mtssingdaugh- 9 You work at the cinema and you cannot see 10 You are a thug and you work for the Rooster.your real boss . 8. Marcus Perollus.000 if you lie and say that you saw her and her boyfriend Marcus Psrolius in the restaurant last night. Marcus asked you to tell a lie and say that you were both in the Eagle restaurant. 8 Your name is Tony and you are mad . • . Normally.. You believe that you went to the cinema with her last night (although you did notl). Last night.30 p. On the night of the murder you were selling drugs In the city centre. You murdered Dr Drakken because he discovered that the Rooster . !5 You are a business colleague of Marcus Perolius. and you are a very jealous man. but last night he was very agitated. ter. he stops and talks to you.ll Dr Drakken because he had found out too much information about your boss . you thought you saw yOUJbrother Tony with a woman. last night was very busy. an international criminal.. Last night you went to ki.3 Interrogation -- - ROLE 1 CARDS FOR 2 WITN.• ( ·Secret agent . You have been in love with Lucinda Lovealot for many years . the owner of the Eagle restaurant.. You are a drug addict.. He said thaths had 8 You are Lucinda Lovealot's husband. Loveatot has said that she will give you £1. last night at 6. You were supposed to have a meeting with Dr Drakken last night at 7.ESSES You are lucinda lovealot. 7 You are Professor Heli Copter. You are Marcus Perolius' girlfriend..but you were too late .

has been kidnapped and taken to Brazil by the international criminal known as the Rooster. The highest scorer begins. they must create the traps for the other group. If you are on square 13. Give each student a copy of the ten cut up cards (from page 105).rd order Key vocabu. Twam Stick.Pme play.erread out or photocopy the RULESBOX below. e. You must land. two As against two 8s). You cannot pass over a trap square. The students then make up their own anagram in groups.) (The other instructions on the card.. areas: 1 2 Photocopy page 104 once per four students. They play in fours (i. Before they begin playing. (Toteach this. corridor 3 depends on the cards' used In the game (see Step 4) (Seepage 15 for additional act.) Instructions recent wcabulary wo. To free her and win the game you must throw exactly the right number. for example. keeping their words secret from the other group. A and B. The last square (40) contains Moira Copter. (rlme.Matt Wicks. When the traps are all ready.) Divide the class into two groups. Show them the game board (page 104) and explain that they have to get from start to finish and avoid the traps on the way.games Language fCicus qU'listion forms In class 1 2 Ensure that the students know the language for game play (see page 15. Moira Copter. re-divide the class. Each student in the group needs to keep a record of the traps. then you have to try the trap again until you get it right. If you are on number 36 you must throw a 4.ivityon .e. Photocopy and cut up one set of cards on page 105 per student. mime .e. This stage could be done as homework to reduce the amount of class time needed.traps) 25 minutes (playing the pme) Materials I x page HH per 4: students I X cut up page I OS per swdent stopwatch/watch I dice· per '" students counters 103 . Tell them that they are secret agents and that a colleague of theirs. however. putting two As with two 8s. Now change the order of the letters to make an anagram. Ask a student to read the first card aloud. Demonstrate what happens when a student lands on a Trap square (i. shortcut. and you throw a 4. Maria could be Airam.lary trap.) Time 30 minutes (making the . for example. When you land on a trap square then the other side wiU read you a card telling you what to do. Eith. you can only move two spaces because you must stop at the trap. becomes.The base Before class 'yopic. Both teams roll the dice. Think of three words that you have learnt recently. the opposing team reads out the 'during the game' section of the appropriate Trap cardj. get them to make anagrams of their own names . RULES Each team puts a counter (acoin or a small object) on square i. spies. (If you are on number 38 you must throw a 2.) 4 5 = Skins speaking 6 Level lntermedlaee (using the cards in this book) any level (if you adapt the trap cards) 7 S Each group should then make up the three anagrams for trap one. etc. on it. When the other group lands on this trap they have 2 minutes to work out what the 3 words are are only used during the actual game. You can move the number of spaces you roll. If you answer the question on the trap square correctly then you can move again next turn. They do the same for the other traps / cards. Roll the dice again. They have to rescue herby getting into the Rooster's headquarters. The students are now ready to play.. If not.g.. Explain that each card corresponds to one trap on the map. RABBIT BARTIB.

.. Go forward 3. . . s? REMEMBERI STOP AT THE . •. . . .. & THE JUNGLE Go back 2. Miss a turn. .. ... . -... 10 Guard sleeping.. . '.7... .. ~ 39 TRAP TEN 40 MISSION SUCCESSFUL What took you so long? . .27 • 29 TRAP SEVEN 33 THE ELEVATOR EXPLODES... 37 TRAP NINE 38 32 TRAP EIGHT 31 30 DARK TUNNEL Miss a turn... 36 GUARDS ATIACK YOU.. Go back to square 1. Go back 7 spac~~ ~ANG\ turn. ] THE 1 THE SEA .... . .. . .. .17 19 TRAP FIVE TRAP SIX 28 DARK TUNNEL Miss a turn.- 2 THE SEA Go forward one space. .. 13 RECEPTION 14 RECEPTION 15 TRAP FOUR Go forward 1.. 10 11 TRAP THREE 12.Secret agent 8.. Sssshl s? 11"· UII 22 ALARM! 9 THE ROAD TO THE HEADQUARTERS 7 TRAP TWO ... Go back 4 spaces. WEAPONS ROOM 24 EXPLOSION! Go back to the 2& WEAPONS ROOM 28 SECRET DOOR Go forward 3. .. §&. •.. ...4 The base . •. 21 CORRIDOR Go back 3.. .. I 20 CORRIDOR Go back 1 . .. s?~a 18 DINING ROOM ~. BASE BOARD 3 TRAP ONE 4 YOU SEE A SHORTCUT... TRAP.

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