P. 1
thesis

thesis

|Views: 2,272|Likes:
Published by Hamilton Viana

More info:

Published by: Hamilton Viana on Mar 07, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

08/21/2013

pdf

text

original

The FT‐IR spectra of starch laurate and starch stearate are shown in Figure
4.4.b. and 4.4.4.c. For comparison, a spectrum of native starch (Figure 4.4.a.) is
also included.

500

1000

1500

2000

2500

3000

3500

4000

C-O

C-O

C-O

C=O

C=O

C-H

C-H

C-H

-OH

Wavenumber (cm-1)

a. native starch

b. starch laurate

c. starch stearate

Absorbance

Figure 4.4.  FT‐IR Spectra of starch laurate (DS= 2.52, Sample 17, Table 4.1.),
starch stearate (DS= 2.96, Sample 19, Table 4.1.) and native starch

FT‐IR spectra of both starch laurate and starch stearate (Figure 4.4.b. and
4.4.c.) show characteristic bands of the carbonyl group of the fatty esters in the
1750‐1700 cm‐1 region. In addition, the C‐H stretching vibrations of the alkyl
groups of the fatty ester chain are clearly present at 2920 and 2850 cm‐1.
Characteristic peaks of the polysaccharide backbone are visible in the 1250‐900
cm‐1 region (C‐O stretching) [13]. The near absence of remaining hydroxyl

Synthesis of Higher Fatty Acid Starch Esters using Vinyl Laurate and Stearate as Reactants

79

vibrations in the range 3000‐3600 cm‐1 and at 1640 cm‐1 indicates that the DS of
the product is high, in line with the NMR data.

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->