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Bioinstrumentation
i
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Copyright ©2006 by Morgan & Claypool
All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in
any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or any other except for brief quotations
in printed reviews, without the prior permission of the publisher.
Bioinstrumentation
John D. Enderle
www.morganclaypool.com
ISBN-10: 1598291327 paperback
ISBN-13: 9781598291322 paperback
ISBN-10: 1598291335 ebook
ISBN-13: 9781598291339 ebook
DOI 10.2200/S00043ED1V01Y200608BME006
Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
SYNTHESIS LECTURES ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING
Lecture #6
Series Editor and Affiliation: John D. Enderle, University of Connecticut
1930-0328 Print
1930-0336 Electronic
First Edition
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
Portions of this manuscript were reprinted from the following book with the Permission of Elsevier, INTRODUC-
TION TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, ISBN 0122386626 2005, Chapter 8, pp403-504, Enderle et al 2
nd
edition. This permission is granted for non-exclusive world English rights only in both print and on the world wide
web.
Additional Information regarding the bestselling book, Introduction to Biomedical Engineering, 2
nd
edition 2005, by
Enderle, Blanchard and Bronzino, from Elsevier can be found on the Elsevier Homepage http://www/elsevier.com.
ii
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Bioinstrumentation
John D. Enderle
Program Director & Professor for Biomedical Engineering
University of Connecticut
SYNTHESIS LECTURES ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING #6
M
&C
Morgan
&
Claypool Publishers
iii
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ABSTRACT
This short book provides basic information about bioinstrumentation and electric circuit theory.
Many biomedical instruments use a transducer or sensor to convert a signal created by the body
into an electric signal. Our goal here is to develop expertise in electric circuit theory applied
to bioinstrumentation. We begin with a description of variables used in circuit theory, charge,
current, voltage, power and energy. Next, Kirchhoff ’s current and voltage laws are introduced,
followed by resistance, simplifications of resistive circuits and voltage and current calculations.
Circuit analysis techniques are then presented, followed by inductance and capacitance, and
solutions of circuits using the differential equation method. Finally, the operational amplifier
and time varying signals are introduced. This lecture is written for a student or researcher or
engineer who has completed the first two years of an engineering program (i.e., 3 semesters of
calculus and differential equations). A considerable effort has been made to develop the theory
in a logical manner—developing special mathematical skills as needed. At the end of the short
book is a wide selection of problems, ranging from simple to complex.
KEYWORDS
Bioinstrumentation, Circuit Theory, Introductory Biomedical Engineering, Sensors,
Transducers, Circuits, Voltage, Current
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Contents
1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
2. Basic Bioinstrumentation System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
3. Charge, Current, Voltage, Power and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.1 Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.2 Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
3.2.1 Kirchhoff ’s Current Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
3.3 Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
3.3.1 Kirchhoff ’s Voltage Law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
3.4 Power and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
3.5 Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
4. Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
4.1 Resistors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
4.2 Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
4.3 Equivalent Resistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
4.4 Series and Parallel Combinations of Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
4.4.1 Resistors in Series. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
4.4.2 Resistors in Parallel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
4.5 Voltage and Current Divider Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
4.5.1 Voltage Divider Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
4.5.2 Current Divider Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
5. Linear Network Analysis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
5.1 Node-Voltage Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
5.2 Mesh-Current Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
5.3 Linearity, Superposition and Source Transformations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
5.3.1 Linearity and Superposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
5.3.2 Equivalent Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
6. Th´ evenin’s and Norton’s Theorems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
6.1 Th´ evenin’s Theorem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
6.2 Norton’s Theorem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
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6.3 Dependent Sources and Th´ evenin and Norton Equivalent Circuits . . . . . . . . . . . 59
7. Inductors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
7.1 Power and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
8. Capacitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
8.1 Power and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
9. Inductance and Capacitance Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
10. General Approach to Solving Circuits Involving Resistors,
Capacitors and Inductors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
10.1 Discontinuities and Initial Conditions in a Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
10.2 Circuits with Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
11. Operational Amplifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
11.1 Voltage Characteristics of the Op Amp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
12. Time-Varying Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133
12.1 Phasors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
12.2 Passive Circuit Elements in the Phasor Domain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
12.3 Kirchhoff ’s Laws and Other Techniques in the Phasor Domain. . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
13. Active Analog Filters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
14. Bioinstrumentation Design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
14.1 Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
14.2 Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
13. Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
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Preface
This short book on bioinstrumentation is written for a reader who has completed the first two
years of an engineering program (i.e., three semesters of calculus and differential equations).
A considerable effort has been made to develop the theory in a logical manner—developing
special mathematical skills as needed.
I have found it best to introduce this material using simple examples followed by more
difficult ones.
At the end of the short book is a wide selection of problems, ranging from simple to
difficult, presented in the same general order as covered in the textbook.
I acknowledge and thank William Pruehsner for the technical illustrations. Portions of
this short book are from Chapter 8 of Enderle, J. D., Blanchard, S. M., and Bronzino, J. D.,
Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (Second Edition), Elsevier, Amsterdam, 2005, 1118 pages,
with Sections 1, 2 and 13 contributed by Susan Blanchard, Amanda Marley, and H. Troy Nagle.
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C H A P T E R 1
Introduction
This short book provides basic information about bioinstrumentation and electric circuit theory.
Many biomedical instruments use a transducer or sensor to convert a signal created by the body
into an electric signal. Our goal here is to develop expertise in electric circuit theory applied
to bioinstrumentation. We begin with a description of variables used in circuit theory, charge,
current, voltage, power, and energy. Next, Kirchhoff ’s current and voltage laws are introduced,
followed by resistance, simplifications of resistive circuits and voltage and current calculations.
Circuit analysis techniques are then presented, followed by inductance and capacitance, and
solutions of circuits using the differential equation method. Finally, the operational amplifier
and time-varying signals are introduced.
Before 1900, medicine had little to offer the typical citizen because its resources were
mainly the education and little black bag of the physician. The origins of the changes that
occurred within medical science are found in several developments that took place in the applied
sciences. During the early 19th century, diagnosis was based on physical examination, and
treatment was designed to heal the structural abnormality. By the late 19th century, diagnosis
was based on laboratory tests, and treatment was designed to remove the cause of the disorder.
The trend towards the use of technology accelerated throughout the 20th century. During
this period, hospitals became institutions of research and technology. Professionals in the areas
of chemistry, physics, mechanical engineering, and electrical engineering began to work in
conjunction with the medical field, and biomedical engineering became a recognized profession.
As a result, medical technology advanced more in the 20th century than it had in the rest of
history combined (Fig. 1.1).
During this period, the area of electronics had a significant impact on the development
of new medical technology. Men such as Richard Caton and Augustus Desire proved that
the human brain and heart depended upon bioelectric events. In 1903, William Einthoven
expanded on these ideas after he created the first string galvanometer. Einthoven placed two
skin sensors on a man and attached them to the ends of a silvered wire that was suspended
through holes drilled in both ends of a large permanent magnet. The suspended silvered wire
moved rhythmically as the subject’s heart beat. By projecting a tiny light beamacross the silvered
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2 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
1750
1800
1850
1900
1950
2000
1752 – Ben Franklin flew his kite in the storm.
1774 – John Walsh proved electricity
passes through humans.
1791 – Galvani published his findings
on “animal electricity.“
1800 – Volta built the first battery.
1820 – Oersted discovered electromagnetism.
Ampere measured the magnetic effect
of an electric current.
1860 – Maxwell worked out the mathematical
equations for the laws of
Electricity and magnetism.
1886 – Hertz discovered the electromagnetic wave.
1897 – Thomson discovered electrons.
1903 – Einthoven discovered the galvanometer.
1909 – Millikan measured the charge of the
electron.
1920s – Television was invented.
1935 – Amplifiers were used to record EEGs.
1948 – Transistors become readily available.
1959 – First transistor-based computer was made.
1972 – First CAT machine was made.
First microprocessor was used.
1785 – Coulomb worked out the laws
of attraction and repulsion between
electrically charged bodies.
1826 – Ohm formulated law of
electrical resistance.
1831– Faraday and Henry found
that a moving magnet would induce
an electric current in a coil of wire.
1895 – Roentgen discovered X-rays.
1904 – Fleming invented the vacuum tube.
1929 – Hans Berger recorded the first EEG.
1948 – The first large scale
computer was built.
1960 – Chardock and Greatbatch
created the first implantable pacemaker
1981 – IBM introduced the
first personal computer
FIGURE 1.1: Timeline for major inventions and discoveries that led to modern medical instrumenta-
tion.
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INTRODUCTION 3
wire, Einthoven was able to record the movement of the wire as waves on a scroll of moving
photographic paper. Thus, the invention of the string galvanometer led to the creation of the
electrocardiogram (ECG), which is routinely used today to measure and record the electrical
activity of abnormal hearts and to compare those signals to normal ones.
In 1929, Hans Berger created the first electroencephalogram (EEG), which is used to
measure and record electrical activity of the brain. In 1935, electrical amplifiers were used to
prove that the electrical activity of the cortex had a specific rhythm, and, in 1960, electrical
amplifiers were used in devices such as the first implantable pacemaker that was created by
William Chardack and Wilson Greatbatch. These are just a small sample of the many examples
in which the field of electronics has been used to significantly advance medical technology.
Many other advancements that were made in medical technology originated from re-
search in basic and applied physics. In 1895, the X-ray machine, one of the most important
technological inventions in the medical field, was created when W. K. Roentgen found that
X-rays could be used to give pictures of the internal structures of the body. Thus, the X-ray
machine was the first imaging device to be created.
Another important addition to medical technology was provided by the invention of
the computer, which allowed much faster and more complicated analyses and functions to be
performed. One of the first computer-based instruments in the field of medicine, the sequential
multiple analyzer plus computer, was used to store a vast amount of data pertaining to clinical
laboratory information. The invention of the computer made it possible for laboratory tests to
be performed and analyzed faster and more accurately.
The first large-scale computer-based medical instrument was created in 1972 when the
computerized axial tomography (CAT) machine was invented. The CAT machine created an
image that showed all of the internal structures that lie in a single plane of the body. This
new type of image made it possible to have more accurate and easier diagnosis of tumors,
hemorrhages, and other internal damage from information that was obtained noninvasively.
Telemedicine, which uses computer technology to transmit information fromone medical
site to another, is being explored to permit access to health care for patients in remote locations.
Telemedicine can be used to let a specialist in a major hospital receive information on a patient
in a rural area and send back a plan of treatment specific for that patient.
Today, there is a wide variety of medical devices and instrumentation systems. Some are
used to monitor patient conditions or acquire information for diagnostic purposes, e.g. ECG
and EEG machines, while others are used to control physiological functions, e.g. pacemakers
and ventilators. Some devices, like pacemakers, are implantable while many others are used
noninvasively. This chapter will focus on those features that are common to devices that are
used to acquire and process physiological data.
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5
C H A P T E R 2
Basic Bioinstrumentation System
The quantity, property, or condition that is measured by an instrumentation system is called the
measurand (Fig. 2.1). This can be a bioelectric signal, such as those generated by muscles or the
brain, or a chemical or mechanical signal that is converted to an electrical signal. Sensors are
used to convert physical measurands into electric outputs. The outputs from these biosensors
are analog signals, i.e. continuous signals, which are sent to the analog processing and digital
conversion block. There, the signals are amplified, filtered, conditioned, and converted to digital
form. Methods for modifying analog signals, such as amplifying and filtering an ECG signal,
are discussed later in this chapter. Once the analog signals have been digitized and converted
to a form that can be stored and processed by digital computers, many more methods of signal
conditioning can be applied.
Basic instrumentation systems also include output display devices that enable human
operators to view the signal in a format that is easy to understand. These displays may be
numerical or graphical, discrete or continuous, and permanent or temporary. Most output
display devices are intended to be observed visually, but some also provide audible output, e.g.
a beeping sound with each heart beat.
Inadditionto displaying data, many instrumentationsystems have the capability of storing
data. In some devices, the signal is stored briefly so that further processing can take place or so
that an operator can examine the data. In other cases, the signals are stored permanently so that
different signal processing schemes can be applied at a later time. Holter monitors, for example,
acquire 24 hrs of ECG data that is later processed to determine arrhythmic activity and other
important diagnostic characteristics.
With the invention of the telephone and now with the Internet, signals can be ac-
quired with a device in one location, perhaps in a patient’s home, and transmitted to an-
other device for processing and/or storage. This has made it possible, for example, to pro-
vide quick diagnostic feedback if a patient has an unusual heart rhythm while at home. It
has also allowed medical facilities in rural areas to transmit diagnostic images to tertiary care
hospitals so that specialized physicians can help general practitioners arrive at more accurate
diagnoses.
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6 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Sensor Calibration
A/D
Analog
Processing
Signal
Processing
Data
Storage
Control &
Feedback
Output
Display
Data
Transmission
FIGURE 2.1: Basic instrumentation systems using sensors to measure a signal with data acquisition,
storage and display capabilities, along with control and feedback.
Two other components play important roles in instrumentation systems. The first is the
calibration signal. A signal with known amplitude and frequency content is applied to the
instrumentation system at the sensor’s input. The calibration signal allows the components of
the system to be adjusted so that the output and input have a known, measured relationship.
Without this information, it is impossible to convert the output of an instrument system into
a meaningful representation of the measurand.
Another important component, a feedback element, is not a part of all instrumentation
systems. These devices include pacemakers and ventilators that stimulate the heart or the lungs.
Some feedback devices collect physiological data and stimulate a response, e.g. a heart beat or
breath, when needed or are part of biofeedback systems in which the patient is made aware
of a physiological measurement, e.g. blood pressure, and uses conscious control to change the
physiological response.
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7
C H A P T E R 3
Charge, Current, Voltage,
Power and Energy
3.1 CHARGE
Two kinds of charge, positive and negative, are carried by protons and electrons, respectively.
The negative charge carried by an electron, q
e
, is the smallest amount of charge that exists and
is measured in units called Coulombs (C).
q
e
= −1.602 ×10
−19
C
The symbol q(t) is used to represent charge that changes with time, and Q for constant charge.
The charge carried by a proton is the opposite of the electron.
Example 3.1. What is the charge of 3 ×10
−15
g of electrons?
Solution
Q = 3 ×10
−15
g ×
1 kg
10
3
g
×
1 electron
9.1095 ×10
−31
kg
×
−1.60219 ×10
−19
C
electron
= −5.27643 ×10
−7
C
3.2 CURRENT
Electric current, i (t), is defined as the change in the amount of charge that passes through a
given point or area in a specified time period. Current is measured in amperes (A). By definition,
one ampere equals one coulomb/second (C/s).
i (t) =
dq
dt
(3.1)
and
q(t) =
t

t
0
i (λ) dλ +q(t
0
) (3.2)
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8 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
i
i
FIGURE3.1: A simple electric circuit illustrating current flowing around a closed loop.
Current, defined by Eq. (3.1), also depends on the direction of flow as illustrated in the circuit
in Fig. 3.1.
Example 3.2. Suppose the following current is flowing in Fig. 3.1.
i (t) =

0 t < 0
3e
−100t
A t ≥ 0
Find the total charge.
Solution
Q =

−∞
idt =

0
3e
−100t
dt = −
3
100
e
−100t


t=0
= 0.03 C
Consider Fig. 3.1. Current is defined as positive if
(a) A positive charge is moving in the direction of the arrow
(b) A negative charge is moving in the opposite direction of the arrow
Since these two possibilities produce the same outcome, there is no need to be concerned as to
which is responsible for the current. In electric circuits, current is carried by electrons in metallic
conductors.
Current is typically a function of time, as given by Eq. (3.1). Consider Fig. 3.2 with the
current entering terminal 1 in the circuit on the right. In the time interval 0–1.5 s, current is
positive and enters terminal 1. In the time interval 1.5–3 s, the current is negative and enters
terminal 2 with a positive value. We typically refer to a constant current as a DC current, and
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CHARGE, CURRENT, VOLTAGE, POWERANDENERGY 9
-1.5
-1
-0.5
0
0.5
1
1.5
-1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3
t
(s)
i
(A)
Circuit
element
i
1
2
i
FIGURE 3.2: (Left) A sample current waveform. (Right) A circuit element with current entering
terminal 1 and leaving terminal 2. Passive circuit elements have two terminals with a known voltage–
current relationship. Examples of passive circuit elements include resistors, capacitors and inductors.
denote it with a capital letter such as I indicating it does not change with time. We denote a
time-varying current with a lower case letter, such as i (t),or just i .
3.2.1 Kirchhoff ’s Current Law
Current can flow only in a closed circuit, as shown in Fig. 3.1. No current is lost as it flows
around the circuit because net charge cannot accumulate within a circuit element and charge
must be conserved. Whatever current enters one terminal must leave at the other terminal.
Since charge cannot be created and must be conserved, the sum of the currents at any node,
that is, a point at which two or more circuit elements have a common connection, must equal
zero so no net charge accumulates. This principle is known as Kirchhoff ’s current law (KCL),
given as
N

n=1
i
n
(t) = 0 (3.3)
where there are N currents leaving the node. Consider the circuit in Fig. 3.3. Using Eq. (3.3)
and applying KCL for the currents leaving the node gives
−i
1
−i
2
+i
4
+i
3
= 0
The previous equation is equivalently written for the currents entering the node, as
i
1
+i
2
−i
4
−i
3
= 0
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10 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
i
1 i
2
i
3
i
4
FIGURE3.3: A node with 4 currents.
It should be clear that the application of KCL is for all currents, whether they are all leaving or
all entering the node.
In describing a circuit, we define its characteristics with the terms “node”, “branch”, “path”,
“closed path” and “mesh” as follows.
• Node: A point at which two or more circuit elements have a common connection.
• Branch: A circuit element or connected group of circuit elements. A connected group
of circuit elements usually connect nodes together.
• Path: A connected group of circuit elements in which none is repeated.
• Closed Path: A path that starts and ends at the same node.
• Mesh: A closed path that does not contain any other closed paths within it.
• Essential Node: A point at which three or more circuit elements have a common con-
nection.
• Essential Branch: A branch that connects two essential nodes.
InFig. 3.4, there are five nodes, A, B, C, DandE, whichare all essential nodes. Kirchhoff ’s
current law is applied to each of the nodes as follows.
Node A: −i
1
+i
2
−i
3
= 0
Node B: i
3
+i
4
+i
5
−i
6
= 0
Node C: i
1
−i
4
−i
8
= 0
Node D: −i
7
−i
5
+i
8
= 0
Node E: −i
2
+i
6
+i
7
= 0
Kirchhoff ’s current law is also applicable to any closed surface surrounding a part of the circuit.
It is understood that the closed surface does not intersect any of the circuit elements. Consider
the closed surface drawn with dashed lines in Fig. 3.4. Kirchhoff ’s current law applied to the
closed surface gives
−i
1
+i
4
+i
5
+i
7
= 0
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CHARGE, CURRENT, VOLTAGE, POWERANDENERGY 11
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
i
1
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
A
B
C
D
E
i
2
i
3
i
4
i
5
i
6
i
7
i
8
Closed surface
FIGURE3.4: A circuit with a closed surface.
3.3 VOLTAGE
Voltage represents the work per unit charge associated with moving a charge between two points
(A and B in Fig. 3.5), and given as
v =
dw
dq
(3.4)
The unit of measurement for voltage is the volt (V). A constant (DC) voltage source is denoted
by V while a time-varying voltage is denoted by v(t), or just v. In Fig. 3.5, the voltage, v,
between two points (A and B), is the amount of energy required to move a charge from point
A to point B.
Circuit
element
i
1
2
B
A
+
v
-
FIGURE3.5: Voltage and current convention.
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12 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
Circuit
element
+
v
3
-
-
v
4
+
+
v
5
-
+ v
1
- + v
2
-
CP1 CP2
CP3
FIGURE 3.6: Circuit illustrating Kirchhoff ’s voltage law. Closed paths are identified as CP1, CP2
and CP3.
3.3.1 Kirchhoff ’s Voltage Law
Kirchhoff ’s voltage law (KVL) states the sum of all voltages in a closed path is zero, or
N

n=1
v
n
(t) = 0 (3.5)
where there are N voltage drops assigned around the closed path, with v
n
(t) denoting the
individual voltage drops. The sign for each voltage drop in Eq. (3.5) is the first sign encountered
while moving around the closed path.
Consider the circuit in Fig. 3.6, with each circuit element assigned a voltage, v
n
, with a
given polarity, and three closed paths, CP1, CP2 and CP3. Kirchhoff ’s voltage law for each
closed path is given as
CP1: −v
3
+v
1
−v
4
= 0
CP2: v
4
+v
2
+v
5
= 0
CP3: −v
3
+v
1
+v
2
+v
5
= 0
Kirchhoff ’s laws are applied in electric circuit analysis to determine unknown voltages and
currents. Each unknown variable has its distinct equation. To solve for the unknowns using
MATLAB, we create a matrix representation of the set of equations and solve. This method is
demonstrated in many examples in this book.
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CHARGE, CURRENT, VOLTAGE, POWERANDENERGY 13
Example 3.3. Find I
1
, I
2
and I
3
for the following circuit.
Circuit
Element
Circuit
Element
I1
Circuit
Element
Circuit
Element
Circuit
Element
Circuit
Element
A
B
C
I
2
I
3
2A
3A 4A
Solution. We apply KCL first at node C, then B and finally A.
Node C: −2 + I
3
+4 = 0; I
3
= −2 A
Node B: I
2
+3 − I
3
= 0; I
2
= I
3
−3 = −5 A
Node A: −I
1
− I
2
+2 = 0; I
1
= 2 − I
2
= 7 A
3.4 POWERANDENERGY
Power is the rate of energy expenditure given as
p =
dw
dt
=
dw
dq
dq
dt
= vi (3.6)
where p is power measured in watts (W), and w is energy measured in joules ( J). Power is
usually determined by the product of voltage across a circuit element and the current through it.
By convention, we assume that a positive value for power indicates that power is being delivered
(or absorbed or consumed) by the circuit element. A negative value for power indicates that
power is being extracted or generated by the circuit element, i.e., a battery.
Figure 3.7 illustrates the four possible cases for a circuit element’s current and voltage
configuration. According to convention, if both i and v are positive, with the arrow and polarity
shown in Fig. 3.7A, energy is absorbed (either lost by heat or stored). If either the current arrow
or voltage polarity is reversed as in B and C, energy is supplied to the circuit. Note that if both
the current direction and voltage polarity are reversed together, as in D, energy is absorbed.
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14 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Circuit
element
i
1
2
+
v
-
p vi =
Circuit
element
i
1
2
+
v
-
p = −vi
Circuit
element
i
1
2
-
v
+
p = vi
Circuit
element
i
1
2
-
v
+
p = −vi
A B
C D
FIGURE3.7: Polarity references for four cases of current and voltage. Cases A and D result in positive
power being consumed by the circuit element. Cases B and C result in negative power being extracted
from the circuit element.
A passive circuit element is defined as an element whose power is always positive or zero,
which may be dissipated as heat (resistance), stored in an electric field (capacitor) or stored in
a magnetic field (inductor). We define an active circuit element as one whose power is negative
and capable of generating energy.
Energy is given by
w(t) =
t

−∞
pdt (3.7)
3.5 SOURCES
Sources are two terminal devices that provide energy to a circuit. There is no direct voltage–
current relationship for a source; when one of the two variables is given, the other cannot be
determined without knowledge of the rest of the circuit. Independent sources are devices for
which the voltage or current is given and the device maintains its value regardless of the rest of
the circuit. A device that generates a prescribed voltage at its terminals, regardless of the current
flow, is called an ideal voltage source. Figure 3.8A and B shows the general symbols for an ideal
voltage source. Figure 3.8C shows an ideal current source that delivers a prescribed current to
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CHARGE, CURRENT, VOLTAGE, POWERANDENERGY 15
V
S
+
-
V
S
I
S
A B C
FIGURE3.8: Basic symbols used for independent sources. (A) Battery. (B) Ideal voltage source. V
s
can
be a constant DC source (Battery) or a time-varying source. (C) Ideal current source I
s
.
V
S
I
S
+
-
FIGURE3.9: Basic symbols used for dependent or controlled sources. (Left) Controlled voltage source.
The voltage V
s
is a known function of some other voltage or current in the circuit. (Right) Controlled
current source. The current I
s
is a known function of some other voltage or current in the circuit.
the attached circuit. The voltage generated by an ideal current source depends on the elements
in the rest of the circuit.
Shown in Fig. 3.9 are a dependent voltage and current source. A dependent source takes
on a value equaling a known function of some other voltage or current value in the circuit. We
use a diamond-shaped symbol to represent a dependent source. Often, a dependent source is
called a controlled source. The current generated for a dependent voltage source and the voltage
for a dependent current source depend on circuit elements in the rest of the circuit. Dependent
sources are very important in electronics. Later in this chapter, we will see that the operational
amplifier uses a controlled voltage source for its operation.
Example 3.4. Find the voltage V
3
for the circuit shown in the following figure.
10V
5A
-
+
I2
+
-
5V
3A
2I
2
-
+
+
V
3
-
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16 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Solution. Current I
2
equals 5 A because it is in the same branch as the 5 A current source. The
voltage across the dependent voltage source on the right side of the circuit equals 2I
2
= 10 V.
Applying KVL around the outer closed path gives
−V
3
−5 −10 = 0
or
V
3
= −15 V
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17
C H A P T E R 4
Resistance
4.1 RESISTORS
A resistor is a circuit element that limits the flow of current through it and is denoted with
the symbol . Resistors are made of different materials and their ability to impede current
is given with a value of resistance, denoted R. Resistance is measured in Ohms (), where
1 = 1 V/A. A theoretical bare wire that connects circuit elements together has a resistance of
zero. A gap between circuit elements has a resistance of infinity. An ideal resistor follows Ohm’s
law, which describes a linear relationship between voltage and current, as shown in Fig. 4.1,
with a slope equal to the resistance.
There are two ways to write Ohm’s law, depending on the current direction and voltage
polarity. Ohm’s law is written for Fig. 4.2A as
v = i R (4.1)
and for Fig. 4.2B as
v = −i R (4.2)
In this book, we will use the convention shown in Fig. 4.2A to write the voltage drop across a
resistor. As described, the voltage across a resistor is equal to the product of the current flowing
through the element and its resistance, R. This linear relationship does not apply at very high
voltages and currents. Some electrically conducting materials have a very small range of currents
and voltages in which they exhibit linear behavior. This is true of many physiological models
as well: linearity is observed only within a range of values. Outside this range, the model is
nonlinear. We define a short circuit as shown in Fig. 4.3A with R = 0, and having a 0 V voltage
drop. We define an open circuit as shown in Fig. 4.3B with R = ∞, and having 0 A current
pass through it.
Each material has a property called resistivity (ρ) that indicates the resistance of the
material. Conductivity (σ) is the inverse of resistivity, and conductance (G) is the inverse of
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18 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
I
(A)
V
(V)
Slope = R
FIGURE4.1: Voltage–current relationship for a resistor.
A
i(t)
R
+
v(t)

B
i(t)
R
+
v(t)

FIGURE4.2: An ideal resister with resistance R in Ohms ().
i
+
v = 0 V

0 R= Ω
A. Short Circuit
+
v

R= ∞
B. Open Circuit
i = 0 A
FIGURE4.3: Short and open circuits.
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RESISTANCE 19
resistance. Conductance is measured in units called siemens (S) and has units of A/V. In terms
of conductance, Ohm’s law is written as
i = Gv (4.3)
Example 4.1. From the following circuit, find I
2
, I
3
and V
1
.
R2
R1 5 Ω
5 Ω
5A
50 V
I3
I2
+
V1

8 A
10 A
Solution. First we find I
2
by applying KCL at the node in the upper left of the circuit.
−5 + I
2
+8 = 0
and
I
2
= −3 A
Current I
3
is determined by applying KCL at the node on the right of the circuit.
10 + I
3
−8 = 0
and
I
3
= −2 A
Voltage V
1
is determined by applying KVL around the lower right closed path and using
Ohm’s law.
−V
1
−50 +5I
3
= 0
V
1
= −50 +5 ×(−2) = −60 V
4.2 POWER
The power consumed by a resistor is given by the combination of Eq. (3.6) and either Eq. (4.1)
or (4.2) as
p = vi =
v
2
R
= i
2
R (4.4)
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20 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
and given off as heat. Equation (4.4) demonstrates that regardless of the voltage polarity and
current direction, power is consumed by a resistor. Power is always positive for a resistor, which
is true for any passive element.
Example 4.2. Calculate the power in each element.
18 V 5I
1 3 Ω
I
1
Solution. We first note that the resistor on the right has 18 V across it, and therefore the
current through it, according to Ohm’s law, is
18
3
= 6 A. To find the current I
1
we apply KCL
at the upper node, giving
−I
1
−5I
1
+6 = 0
or
I
1
= 1 A
The power for each of the circuit elements is
p
18V
= −I
1
×18 = −18 W
p
5i
1
= −18 ×5I
1
= −90 W
p
3
=
18
2
3
= 108 W
In any circuit, the power supplied by the active elements always equals the power consumed.
Here, the power generated is 108 W and the power consumed is 108 W, as required.
Example 4.3. Electric safety is of paramount importance in a hospital or clinical environment.
If sufficient current is allowed to flow through the body, significant damage can occur, as
illustrated in the following figure.
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RESISTANCE 21
0.0001 0.001 0.01 0.1 1.0 10.0 100.0
Current (A)
Threshold of
perception
Let-go
current
Respiratory paralysis, Fatigue, Pain
Ventricular fibrillation
Sustained myocardial
contraction
Burns, Injury
For instance, a current of magnitude 50 mA (dashed line) is enough to cause ventricular fibril-
lation, as well as other conditions. The figure on the left shows the current distribution from a
macroshock from one arm to another (Redrawn from Enderle et al., Introduction to Biomedical
Engineering, 2000). Acrude electric circuit model of the body consisting of two arms (each with
resistance R
A
), two legs (each with resistance R
L
), body trunk (with resistance R
T
), and head
(with resistance R
H
) is shown in the following figure on the right.
+
-
VS
RT
RH
RA
RA
RL RL
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22 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Since the only elements that form a closed path that current can flow is given by the source in
series with the two arms, we reduce the body electric circuits to
RA
RA VS
I
If R
A
= 400 and V
s
= 120 V, then find I.
Solution. Using Ohm’s law, we have
I =
V
s
R
A
+ R
A
=
120
800
= 0.15 A
The current I is the current passing through the heart, and at this level it would cause ventricular
fibrillation.
4.3 EQUIVALENTRESISTANCE
It is sometimes possible to reduce complex circuits into simpler and, as we will see, equivalent
circuits. We consider two circuits equivalent if they cannot be distinguished from each other by
voltage and current measurements, that is, the two circuits behave identically. Consider the two
circuits A and B in Fig. 4.4, consisting of combinations of resistors, each stimulated by a DC
voltage V
s
. These two circuits are equivalent if I
A
= I
B
. We represent the resistance of either
circuit using Ohm’s law as
R
EQ
=
V
s
I
A
=
V
s
I
B
(4.5)
Thus, it follows that any circuit consisting of resistances can be replaced by an equivalent circuit
as shown in Fig. 4.5. In another section on a Th´ evenin equivalent circuit, we will expand this
remark to include any combination of sources and resistances.
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RESISTANCE 23
Circuit
A
VS
I
A
Circuit
B
VS
I
B
FIGURE4.4: Two circuits.
4.4 SERIES ANDPARALLEL COMBINATIONS OF RESISTANCE
4.4.1 Resistors in Series
If the same current flows from one resistor to another, the two are said to be in series. If these
two resistors are connected to a third and the same current flows through all of them, then the
three resistors are in series. In general, if the same current flows through N resistors, then the
N resistors are in series. Consider Fig. 4.6 with three resistors in series. An equivalent circuit
can be derived through KVL as
−V
s
+IR
1
+IR
2
+IR
3
= 0
or rewritten in terms of an equivalent resistance R
EQ
as
R
EQ
=
V
s
I
= R
1
+ R
2
+ R
3
Circuit
A
VS
IA
VS
IA
REQ
FIGURE4.5: Equivalent circuits.
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24 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
R1
R2
R3
VS
I
FIGURE4.6: A series circuit.
In general, if we have N resistors in series,
R
EQ
=
N

i =1
R
i
(4.6)
4.4.2 Resistors in Parallel
Two or more elements are said to be in parallel if the same voltage is across each of the resistors.
Consider the three parallel resistors as shown in Fig. 4.7. We use a shorthand notation to
represent resistors in parallel using the symbol. Thus in Fig. 4.7, R
EQ
= R
1
R
2
R
3
. An
equivalent circuit for Fig. 4.7 is derived through KCL as
−I +
V
s
R
1
+
V
s
R
2
+
V
s
R
3
= 0
V
S
R
3
R
2
R
1
I
FIGURE4.7: A parallel circuit.
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RESISTANCE 25
or rewritten in terms of an equivalent resistance R
EQ
as
R
EQ
=
V
s
I
=
1
1
R
1
+
1
R
2
+
1
R
3
In general, if we have N resistors in parallel,
R
EQ
=
1
1
R
1
+
1
R
2
+· · · +
1
R
N
(4.7)
For just two resistors in parallel, Eq. (4.7) is written as
R
EQ
= R
1
R
2
=
R
1
R
2
R
1
+ R
2
(4.8)
Example 4.4. Find R
EQ
and the power supplied by the source for the following circuit.
2 Ω
5 V 12 Ω 12 Ω 12 Ω
3 Ω
2 Ω 2 Ω
I
Solution. To solve for R
EQ
, apply from right to left the parallel and series combinations. First,
we have two 2 resistors in parallel that are in series with the 3 resistor. Next, this group
is in parallel with the three 12 resistors. Finally, this group is in series with the 2 resistor.
These combinations are shown in the following figure and calculation:
2 Ω
5 V 12 Ω 12 Ω 12 Ω
3 Ω
2 Ω 2 Ω
I
22 =1 Ω
3+1=4 Ω 121212 =4 Ω
44=2 Ω
2+2 =4 Ω
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26 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
R
EQ
= 2 +((12 12 12 ) (3 +(2 2 )))
= 2 +

1
1
12
+
1
12
+
1
12

3 +
1
1
2
+
1
2

= 2 +((4) (3 +1)) = 2 +2 = 4
Accordingly,
I =
5
R
EQ
=
5
4
= 1.25 A
and
p = 5 × I = 6.25 W
4.5 VOLTAGEANDCURRENTDIVIDERRULES
Let us nowextend the concept of equivalent resistance, R
EQ
=
V
I
, to allowus to quickly calculate
voltages in series resistor circuits and currents in parallel resistor circuits without digressing to
the fundamentals.
4.5.1 Voltage Divider Rule
The voltage divider rule allows us to easily calculate the voltage across a given resistor in a series
circuit. Consider finding V
2
in the series circuit shown in Fig. 4.8, where R
EQ
= R
1
+ R
2
.
Accordingly,
I =
V
s
R
EQ
=
V
s
R
1
+ R
2
R1
R2 VS
I
+
V2

FIGURE4.8: Voltage divider rule circuit.
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RESISTANCE 27
V
S
R
2
R
1
I
I
1
I
2
FIGURE4.9: Current divider rule circuit.
and therefore
V
2
= IR
2
= V
s
R
2
R
1
+ R
2
This same analysis can be used to find V
1
as
V
1
= V
s
R
1
R
1
+ R
2
In general, if a circuit contains N resistors in series, the voltage divider rule gives the voltage
across any one of the resistors, R
i
, as
V
i
= V
s
R
i
R
1
+ R
2
+· · · R
N
(4.9)
4.5.2 Current Divider Rule
The current divider rule allows us to easily calculate the current through any resistor in parallel
resistor circuits. Consider finding I
2
inthe parallel circuit showninFig. 4.9, where R
EQ
=
R
1
R
2
R
1
+R
2
.
Accordingly,
I
2
=
V
s
R
2
and
V
s
= I
R
1
R
2
R
1
+ R
2
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28 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
yielding after substituting V
s
I
2
= I
1
R
2
1
R
1
+
1
R
2
In general, if a circuit contains N resistors in parallel, the current divider rule gives the current
through any one of the resistors, R
i
, as
I
i
= I
1
R
i
1
R
1
+
1
R
2
· · · +
1
R
N
(4.10)
Example 4.5. For the following circuit, find I
1
.
5 A 10/3 Ω 2 Ω
1 Ω
12 Ω 12 Ω 12 Ω
I
1
Solution. We solve this circuit problem in two parts, as is evident from the redrawn circuit
that follows, by first finding I
2
and then I
1
.
5 A 10/3 Ω 2 Ω
1 Ω
12 Ω
REQ
12 Ω 12 Ω
I1
I2
To begin, first find R
EQ
, which, when placed into the circuit, reduces to three parallel resistors
from which I
2
is calculated. The equivalent resistance is found as
R
EQ
= 1 +(12 12 12) = 1 +
1
1
12
+
1
12
+
1
12
= 5
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RESISTANCE 29
Applying the current divider rule on the three parallel resistors,
10
3
2 R
EQ
, we have
I
2
= 5

1
5
3
10
+
1
2
+
1
5

= 1 A
I
2
flows through the 1 resistor, and then divides into three equal currents of
1
3
A through each
12 resistor. The current I
1
can also be found by applying the current divider rule as
I
1
= I
2

1
12
1
12
+
1
12
+
1
12

=
1
12
1
12
+
1
12
+
1
12
=
1
3
A
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30
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31
C H A P T E R 5
Linear Network Analysis
Our methods for solving circuit problems up to this point have included applying Ohm’s law
and Kirchhoff ’s laws, resistive circuit simplification, and the voltage and current divider rules.
This approach works for all circuit problems, but as the circuit complexity increases, it becomes
more difficult to solve problems. In this section, we introduce the node-voltage method and
the mesh-current method to provide a systematic and easy solution of circuit problems. The
application of the node-voltage method involves expressing the branch currents in terms of
one or more node voltages, and applying KCL at each of the nodes. The application of the
mesh-current method involves expressing the branch voltages in terms of mesh currents, and
applying KVL around each mesh. These two methods are systematic approaches that lead to a
solution that is efficient and robust, resulting in a minimum number of simultaneous equations
that saves time and effort.
In both cases, the resulting linear set of simultaneous equations is solved to determine the
unknown voltages or currents. The number of unknown voltages for the node-voltage method
or currents for the mesh-current method determines the number of equations. The number of
independent equations necessitates:
• N-1 equations involving KCLat N-1 nodes for the node-voltage method. This number
may be fewer if there are voltage sources in the circuit.
• N-1 equations involving KVL around each of the meshes in the circuit for the
mesh-current method. This number may be fewer if there are current sources in the
circuit.
As we will see, MATLAB is ideal for solving problems that involves solution of simulta-
neous equations, providing a straightforward tool that minimizes the amount of work.
5.1 NODE-VOLTAGEMETHOD
The use of node equations provides a systematic method for solving circuit analysis problems by
the application of KCL at each essential node. The node-voltage method involves the following
two steps:
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32 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
R
+
V1

+
V2

+ V −
IA
(A)
R
+
V1

+
V2

− V +
(B)
IB
FIGURE5.1: Ohm’s law written in terms of node voltages.
1. Assign each node a voltage with respect to a reference node (ground). The reference
node is usually the one with the most branches connected to it, and is denoted with the
symbol . All voltages are written with respect to the reference node.
2. Except for the reference node, we write KCL at each of the N-1 nodes.
The current through a resistor is written using Ohm’s law, with the voltage expressed as
the difference between the potential on either end of the resistor with respect to the reference
node as shown in Fig. 5.1. We express node-voltage equations as the currents leaving the node.
Two adjacent nodes give rise to the current moving to the right (like Fig. 5.1A) for one node, and
the current moving to the left (like Fig. 5.1B) for the other node. The current is written for (A)
as I
A
=
V
R
=
V
1
−V
2
R
and for (B) as I
B
=
V
R
=
V
2
−V
1
R
. It is easy to verify in (A) that V = V
1
− V
2
by applying KVL.
If one of the branches located between an essential node and the reference node contains
an independent or dependent voltage source, we do not write a node equation for this node,
because the node voltage is known. This reduces the number of independent node equations
by one and the amount of work in solving for the node voltages. In writing the node equations
for the other nodes, we write the value of the independent voltage source in those equations.
Consider Fig. 5.1 (A) and assume the voltage V
2
results from an independent voltage source
of 5 V. Since the node voltage is known, we do not write a node voltage equation for node 2
in this case. When writing the node-voltage equation for node 1, the current I
A
is written as
I
A
=
V
1
−5
R
. Ex. 5.1 further illustrates this case.
Example 5.1. Find V
1
using the node-voltage method.
1/2 Ω 1/2 Ω
1/3 Ω 1/4 Ω 5 V 3 A
+
V
1

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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 33
Solution. This circuit has two essential nodes, labeled 1 and 2 in the redrawn circuit that follows,
with the reference node and two node voltages, V
1
and V
2
, indicated. The node involving the 5 V
voltage source has a known node voltage and therefore we do not write a node equation for it.
1/2 Ω 1/2 Ω
1/3 Ω 1/4 Ω 5 V 3 A
+
V
1

+
V
2

1 2
Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives
2(V
1
−5) +3V
1
+2(V
1
− V
2
) = 0
which simplifies to
7V
1
−2V
2
= 10
Summing the currents leaving node 2 gives
2(V
2
− V
1
) +4V
2
+3 = 0
which simplifies to
−2V
1
+6V
2
= −3
The two node equations are written in matrix format as

7 −2
−2 6

V
1
V
2

=

10
−3

and solved with MATLAB as follows:
A = [7 −2; −2 6];
F = [10; −3];
V = A\F
V =
1.4211
−0.0263
Thus, V
1
= 1.4211 V.
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34 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Generally, the coefficient for the node voltage is the sumof the conductances connected to
the node. The coefficients for the other node voltages are the negative of the sumof conductances
connected between the node voltage and other node voltages. If the input consists of a set of
current sources applied at each node, then the node equations have the following form.
G
1,1
V
1
− G
1,2
V
2
−· · · − G
1,N−1
V
N−1
= I
1
−G
2,1
V
1
+ G
2,2
V
2
−· · · − G
2,N−1
V
N−1
= I
2
.
.
.
−G
N−1,1
V
1
− G
N−1,2
V
2
−· · · − G
N−1,N−1
V
N−1
= I
N
(5.1)
Equation (5.1) is put in matrix form for solution by MATLAB as






G
1,1
−G
2,1
· · · −G
1,N−1
−G
2,1
G
2,2
· · · −G
2,N−1
.
.
.
−G
N−1,1
−G
N−1,2
· · · G
N−1,N−1












V
1
V
2
.
.
.
V
N−1






=






I
1
I
2
.
.
.
I
N−1






(5.2)
Note the symmetry about the main diagonal where the off-diagonal terms are equal to each
other and negative. This is true of all circuits without dependent sources. A dependent source
destroys this symmetry. In general, if a circuit has dependent sources, the node-voltage approach
is the same as before except for an additional equation describing the relationship between the
dependent source and the node voltage. In cases involving more than one dependent source,
there is one equation for each dependent source in terms of the node voltages.
Example 5.2. For the following circuit, find V
3
using the node-voltage method.
1/2 Ω
5 A 1/3 Ω
1/4 Ω
3 A 1 Ω
1/4 Ω
2Id
I
d
+
V3

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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 35
Solution. Notice that this circuit has three essential nodes and a dependent current source.
We label the essential nodes 1, 2 and 3 in the redrawn circuit, with the reference node at the
bottom of the circuit and three node voltages V
1
, V
2
and V
3
, as indicated.
1/2 Ω
5 A 1/3 Ω
1/4 Ω
3 A 1 Ω
1/4 Ω
2I
d
Id
+
V
3

+
V
2

+
V
1

1
2 3
Note that I
d
= V
3
according to Ohm’s law. Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives
5 +2 (V
1
− V
2
) +2I
d
+4 (V
1
− V
3
) = 0
which reduces to
6V
1
−2V
2
−2V
3
= −5
Summing the currents leaving node 2 gives
−2I
d
+2 (V
2
− V
1
) +3V
2
+4 (V
2
− V
3
) = 0
which simplifies to
−2V
1
+9V
2
−6V
3
= 0
Summing the currents leaving node 3 gives
4 (V
3
− V
2
) −3 + V
3
+4 (V
3
− V
1
) = 0
reducing to
−4V
1
−4V
2
+9V
3
= 3
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36 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
The three node equations are written in matrix format as



6 −2 −2
−2 9 −6
−4 −4 9






V
1
V
2
V
3



=



−5
0
3



Notice that the systemmatrix is no longer symmetrical because of the dependent current source,
and two of the three nodes have a current source giving rise to a nonzero termon the right-hand
side of the matrix equation.
Solving with MATLAB gives
A = [6 −2 −2; −2 9 −6; −4 −4 9];
F = [−5; 0; 3];
V = A\F
V =
−1.1471
−0.5294
−0.4118
Thus V
3
= −0.4118 V.
If one of the branches has an independent or controlled voltage source located between
two essential nodes as shown in Fig. 5.2, the current through the source is not easily expressed
in terms of node voltages. In this situation, we form a supernode by combining the two nodes.
The supernode technique requires only one node equation in which the current, I
A
, is passed
through the source and written in terms of currents leaving node 2. Specifically, we replace
I
A
with I
B
+ I
C
+ I
D
in terms of node voltages. Because we have two unknowns and one
supernode equation, we write a second equation by applying KVL for the two node voltages 1
+
V1

V
Δ
+

+
V2

1
2
IA IC
ID
IB
FIGURE5.2: A dependent voltage source is located between nodes 1 and 2.
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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 37
and 2 and the source as
−V
1
− V

+ V
2
= 0
or
V

= V
1
− V
2
Example 5.3. For the following circuit, find V
3
.
2 A 1/2 Ω
1/4 Ω
1/3 Ω 1 A
1 V
1/2 Ω
1/5 Ω
+
V3

Solution. The circuit has three essential nodes, two of which are connected to an independent
voltage source and form a supernode. We label the essential nodes as 1, 2 and 3 in the redrawn
circuit, with the reference node at the bottom of the circuit and three node voltages, V
1
, V
2
and
V
3
as indicated.
2 A 1/2 Ω
1/4 Ω
1/3 Ω 1 A
1 V
1/2 Ω
1/5 Ω
+
V3

1 2 3
+
V2

+
V1

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38 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives
−2 +2V
1
+5 (V
1
− V
3
) +4 (V
1
− V
2
) = 0
Simplifying gives
11V
1
−4V
2
−5V
3
= 2
Nodes 2 and 3 are connected by an independent voltage source, so we form a supernode 2 +3.
Summing the currents leaving the supernode 2 +3 gives
4 (V
2
− V
1
) +3V
2
−1 +2V
3
+5 (V
3
− V
1
) = 0
Simplifying yields
−9V
1
+7V
2
+7V
3
= 1
The second supernode equation is KVL through the node voltages and the independent source,
giving
−V
2
+1 + V
3
= 0
or
−V
2
+ V
3
= −1
The two node and KVL equations are written in matrix format as



11 −4 −5
−9 7 7
0 −1 1






V
1
V
2
V
3



=



2
1
−1



Solving with MATLAB gives
A = [11 −4 −5; −9 7 7; 0 −1 1];
F = [2; 1; −1];
V = A\F
V =
0.4110
0.8356
−0.1644
Thus V
3
= −0.1644.
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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 39
5.2 MESH-CURRENTMETHOD
Another method for analyzing planar circuits is called the mesh-current method. A mesh is a
closed path without any other closed paths within it and a planar circuit is a circuit without any
overlapping branches. All of our problems in this book involve planar circuits. The mesh-current
method provides a systematic process for solving circuit analysis problems with the application
of KVL around each mesh. The mesh-current method involves the following two steps:
1. Define the mesh currents in the circuit. By convention, we draw the mesh currents with
a circle, arc or a surface on the inside perimeter of the mesh. Moreover, we define the
mesh-current direction for all meshes to be clockwise.
2. Write a set of mesh equations using KVL. In general, we write one equation for each
mesh. Under special circumstances, the number of mesh equations may be fewer than
the total number of meshes.
In writing the mesh equation, we move through the mesh in a clockwise direction by
writing the voltage drops in terms of mesh currents. Whenever a circuit element is shared by
two meshes, as in Fig. 5.3, the voltage drop across the resistor is
V = RI = R(I
1
− I
2
)
when writing the equation for mesh 1. When writing the mesh equation for mesh 2, the
clockwise direction gives a voltage drop according to convention as R(I
2
− I
1
), just the opposite
as in mesh 1. Moreover, according to KCL
I = I
1
− I
2
Mesh currents, as in Fig. 5.3, are not measurable with an ammeter in that they do
not equal a branch current. The current through the branch is composed of the difference
between the two mesh currents, here I = I
1
− I
2
. Even though the mesh current is not real,
it is a powerful technique that simplifies analysis of circuit problems as shown in the next
example.
R
I
+
V

I
1 I2
FIGURE5.3: Mesh currents.
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40 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Example 5.4. Find I in the following circuit.
10 V 5 V
I
2 Ω
4 Ω
3 Ω
Solution. There are two meshes in this circuit. Mesh currents are always defined in a clockwise
direction, one for each mesh, as illustrated in the redrawn circuit that follows.
10 V 5 V
I
2 Ω
4 Ω
3 Ω
I1 I2
Summing the voltage drops around mesh 1 gives
−10 +2I
1
+4 (I
1
− I
2
) = 0
which simplifies to
6I
1
−4I
2
= 10
Summing the voltage drops around mesh 2 gives
4 (I
2
− I
1
) +3I
2
+5 = 0
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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 41
which simplifies to
−4I
1
+7I
2
= −5
The two mesh equations are written in matrix form as

6 −4
−4 7

I
1
I
2

=

10
−5

Comments made in Section 5.1 on the structure and symmetry of the system matrix with
the node-voltage method also apply for the mesh-current method. We solve this problem with
MATLAB, giving
A = [6 −4; −4 7];
F = [10; −5];
I = A\F
I =
1.9231
0.3846
The current I is found from I = I
1
− I
2
= 1.9231 −0.3846 = 1.5385 A.
When one of the branches has an independent or dependent current source in the circuit, a
modification must be made to the mesh-current method. Depending on whether the current
source is on the outer perimeter or inside the circuit, as shown in Fig. 5.4, we handle both cases
as follows:
1. The current source is located on the perimeter, as in the circuit on the left in Fig. 5.4,
where the mesh current equals the branch current. In this case, we do not write a mesh
equation because the current is known. The mesh current I
1
equals the source current,
5 V
I
2 Ω
4 Ω
3 Ω
3 A
I1 I2
5 V
I
2 Ω 3 Ω
I1 I2
3 A 10 V
FIGURE5.4: (Left) A current source on the perimeter of a circuit. (Right) A current source in a branch
between two meshes.
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42 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
I
1
= 3 A. The equation for mesh 2 is found by applying KVL, giving
4 (I
2
− I
1
) +3I
2
+5 = 4 (I
2
−3) +3I
2
+5 = 0,
which gives I
2
= 1 A.
2. The current source is locatedwithinthe circuit where the meshcurrent does not equal the
branch current as shown in Fig. 5.4 (right). Since we cannot easily write the voltage drop
across the current source, we form a supermesh. A supermesh is formed by combing two
meshes together, with one equation describing both meshes. In this case, the equation
starts wit the first mesh and continues on to the second mesh, circumventing the voltage
drop across the current source. Here the supermesh equation is
−10 +2I
1
+3I
2
+5 = 0
Because there are two unknown currents, we need two independent equations. The second
equation is written using KCL for the current source and the two mesh currents. Here the KCL
equation is I
2
− I
1
= 3.
Example 5.5. Find V
0
as shown in the following circuit.
3 V
2 Ω
3 Ω
4 Ω
I
S
= 2 V
0 5 Ω
2 A
+
V
0

Solution. This circuit has four meshes, as shown in the circuit diagram that follows. Mesh
4 has a current source on the perimeter, so we do not write a mesh equation for it, but write
simply I
4
= 2 A.
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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 43
3 V
2 Ω
3 Ω I1
4 Ω
IS = 2 V0
I2 I3
5 Ω
2 A
I4
+
V
0

Summing the voltages around mesh 1 gives
−3 +2 (I
1
−2) +3(I
1
− I
2
) = 0
Simplifying gives
5I
1
−3I
2
= 7
Since there is a dependent current source inside the circuit, we form a supermesh for meshes 2
and 3. Summing the voltages around supermesh 2 +3 yields
3 (I
2
− I
1
) +4I
2
+5I
3
= 0
which reduces to
−3I
1
+7I
2
+5I
3
= 0
Applying KCL for the dependent current source gives
2V
0
= 2 ×3 (I
1
− I
2
) = I
3
− I
2
yielding
6I
1
−5I
2
− I
3
= 0
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44 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
The three independent equations are written in matrix format as



5 −3 0
−3 7 5
6 −5 −1






I
1
I
2
I
3



=



7
0
0



Solution using MATLAB gives
A = [5 −3 0; −3 7 5; 6 −5 −1];
F = [7; 0; 0];
I = A\F
I =
14.0000
21.0000
−21.0000
Thus,
V
0
= 3(I
1
− I
2
) = 3(14 −21) = 21 V
5.3 LINEARITY, SUPERPOSITIONANDSOURCE
TRANSFORMATIONS
5.3.1 Linearity and Superposition
If a linear system is excited by two or more independent sources, then the total response is
the sum of the separate individual responses to each input. This property is called the prin-
ciple of superposition. Specifically for circuits, the response to several independent sources is
the sum of responses to each independent source with the other independent sources dead,
where
• A dead voltage source is a short circuit
• A dead current source is an open circuit
In linear circuits with multiple independent sources, the total response is the sum of each
independent source taken one at a time. This analysis is carried out by removing all of the sources
except one, and assuming the other sources are dead. After the circuit is analyzed with the first
source, it is set equal to a dead source and the next source is applied with the remaining sources
dead. When each of the sources have been analyzed, the total response is obtained by summing
the individual responses. Note carefully that this principle holds true solely for independent
sources. Dependent sources must remain in the circuit when applying this technique, and they
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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 45
must be analyzed based on the current or voltage for which it is defined. It should be apparent
that voltages and currents in one circuit differ among circuits, and that we cannot mix and
match voltages and currents from one circuit with another.
Generally, superposition provides a simpler solution than is obtained by evaluating the
total response with all of the applied sources. This property is especially valuable when dealing
with an input consisting of a pulse or delays. These are considered in future sections.
Example 5.6. Using superposition, find V
0
as shown in the following figure.
2 Ω 3 Ω
2 A 3 A 5 Ω 10 V
+
V
0

Solution. We start by analyzing the circuit with just the 10 V source active and the two current
sources dead, as shown in the following figure.
2 Ω 3 Ω
5 Ω 10 V
+
V
0

10
The voltage divider rule easily gives the response, V
0
10
, due to the 10 V source
V
0
10
= 10

8
2 +8

= 8 V
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46 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Next consider the 2 A source active, and the other two sources dead, as shown in the following
circuit.
2 Ω 3 Ω
2 A 5 Ω
+
V
0


2
Combining the resistors in an equivalent resistance, R
EQ
= 2 (3 +5) =
2×8
2+8
= 1.6 ,
and then applying Ohm’s law gives V
0
2
= 2 ×1.6 = 3.2 V.
Finally, consider the response, V
0
3
, to the 3 A source as shown in the following figure.
2 Ω 3 Ω
3 A 5 Ω
+
V
0

3
To find V
0
3
, note that the 3 A current splits into 1.5 A through each branch (2 +3 and
5 ), and V
0
3
= −1.5 ×2 = −3 V.
The total response is given by the sum of the individual responses as
V
0
= V
0
10
+ V
0
2
+ V
0
3
= 8 +3.2 −3 = 8.2 V
This is the same result we would have found if we analyzed the original circuit directly using
the node-voltage or mesh-current method.
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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 47
Example 5.7. Find the voltage across the 5 A current source, V
5
, in the following figure using
superposition.
3 Ω
5 Ω
2 Ω 10 V
+
V
0

5 A
+
V
5

3V
0
Solution. First consider finding the response, V
0
10
, due to the 10 V source only with the 5 A
source dead as shown in the following figure. As required during the analysis, the dependent
current source is kept in the modified circuit and should not be set dead.
3 Ω
5 Ω
2 Ω 10 V
+
V
0

+
V
5

3V
0
I = 0 A
10 10
3 V
0
10
10
A
Notice that no current flows through the open circuit created by the dead current source,
and that the current flowing through the 5 resistor is 3V
0
. Therefore, applying KCL
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48 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
at node A gives
V
0
10
−10
3
+
V
0
10
2
+3V
0
10
−3V
0
10
= 0
which gives V
0
10
= 4 V. KVL gives −V
0
10
−5 ×3V
0
10
+ V
5
10
= 0, and therefore V
5
10
= 64 V.
Next consider finding the response, V
0
5
, due to the 5 Asource, with the 10 Vsource dead.
3 Ω
5 Ω
2 Ω
+
V
0


5 A
+
V
5


3V
0
B
5
5 5
I
5
First combine the two resistors in parallel (3 2 ), giving 1.2 . V
0
5
is easily calculated
by Ohm’s law as V
0
5
= 5 ×1.2 = 6 V. KCL is then applied at node B to find I
5
, giving
−3V
0
5
+ I
5
−5 = 0
With V
0
5
= 6 V, I
5
= 3 ×6 +5 = 23 A. Finally, apply KVL around the closed path
−V
0
5
−5I
5
+ V
5
5
= 0
or V
5
5
= V
0
5
+5I
5
= 6 +5 ×23 = 121 V. The total response is given by the sum of the indi-
vidual responses as
V
5
= V
5
10
+ V
5
5
= 64 +121 = 185 V
5.3.2 Equivalent Sources
We call two sources equivalent if they each produce the same voltage and current regardless of
the resistance. Consider the two circuits in Fig. 5.5. If I
s
=
V
s
R
s
as shown in the figure on the
right, then the same current and voltage are seen in resistor R
l
in either circuit as easily shown
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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 49
V
S
R
S
R1
Il
+
Vl

R1
Il
+
Vl

R
S
S
S
S
V
I
R
=
FIGURE5.5: Two equivalent circuits.
using voltage and current divider rules. For the circuit on the left, the current and voltage for
R
l
are
V
l
= V
s

R
l
R
l
+ R
s

and I
l
=
V
s
R
l
+ R
s
R1
Rs
Il
+
Vl

VS R1
Rs
Rx VS
Il
+
Vl

Rs
Rx
Il
+
Vl

R1 Rs
Il
+
Vl

R1
s
s
s
V
I
R
=
s
s
s
V
I
R
=
FIGURE5.6: Equivalent circuits. In both circuits on the left, the resistor R
x
has no effect on the circuit
and can be removed.
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50 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
For the circuit on the right with I
s
=
V
s
R
s
, the current and voltage for R
l
are
I
l
= I
s

R
s
R
l
+ R
s

=
V
s
R
l
+ R
s
and V
l
= I
l
R
l
= V
s

R
l
R
l
+ R
s

Therefore, we can replace the voltage source and R
s
in the box in Fig. 5.5 (left) with the current
source and R
s
in the box in Fig. 5.5 (right). We shall see that exchanging source plus resistor
according to Fig. 5.5 simplifies the analysis of circuits.
Consider Fig. 5.6. In the two circuits on the left, the resistor R
x
has no impact on the
voltage and current on R
l
, and as indicated, these circuits can be replaced by the two circuits
on the right by completely removing R
x
.
Example 5.8. Use source transformations to find V
0
in the following figure.
4 Ω
2 Ω
2 Ω
4 Ω
4 V
4 V
3 A
+
V
0

Solution. Our strategy in this solution involves combining resistors in series and parallel,
current sources in parallel and voltage sources in series. We first remove the 4 resistor since it
is in series with the 3 A source and has no effect on the circuit, and transform the 2 resistor
and 4 V source into a
4
2
= 2 A source in parallel with a 2 resistor as shown in the following
figure. Notice that the current direction in the transformed source is in agreement with the
polarity of the 4 V source.
2 Ω 4 Ω
4 V
3 A
+
V
0

2 A 2 Ω
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LINEARNETWORKANALYSIS 51
As shown in the next figure, combining the two parallel current sources results in a 1 A source,
and combining the two parallel resistors results in a 1 resistance.
4 Ω
4 V
+
V
0

1 Ω 1 A
Another source transformation is carried out on the current source and resistor in parallel as
shown in the next figure.
4 V
4 Ω
+
V
0

1 Ω
1 V
The two voltage sources are combined, resulting in a 5 V source. Using the voltage divider gives
V
0
= 5

4
4 +1

= 4 V
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C H A P T E R 6
Th´ evenin’s and Norton’s Theorems
Any combination of resistances, controlled sources, and independent sources with two external
terminals (A and B, denoted A,B) can be replaced by a single resistance and an independent
source, as shown in Fig. 6.1. A Th´ evenin equivalent circuit reduces the original circuit into
a voltage source in series with a resistor (upper right of Fig. 6.1). A Norton equivalent cir-
cuit reduces the original circuit into a current source in parallel with a resistor (lower right
of Fig. 6.1). These two theorems help reduce complex circuits into simpler circuits. We re-
fer to the circuit elements connected across the terminals A,B (that are not shown) as the
load. The Th´ evenin equivalent circuit and Norton equivalent circuits are equivalent to the
original circuit in that the same voltage and current are observed across any load. Usually,
the load is not included in the simplification because it is important for other analysis, such
as maximum power expended by the load. Although we focus here on sources and resistors,
these two theorems can be extended to any circuit composed of linear elements with two
terminals.
6.1 TH
´
EVENIN’S THEOREM
Th´ evenin’s Theorem states that an equivalent circuit consisting of an ideal voltage source, V
OC
,
in series with an equivalent resistance, R
EQ
, can be used to replace any circuit that consists
of independent and dependent voltage and current sources and resistors. V
OC
is equal to the
open circuit voltage across terminals A,B as shown in Fig. 6.2, and calculated using standard
techniques such as the node-voltage or mesh-current methods.
The resistor R
EQ
is the resistance seen across the terminals A,B when all sources are
dead. Recall that a dead voltage source is a short circuit and a dead current source is an open
circuit.
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V
OC
REQ
B
A
REQ I
SC
B
A
Replaced by
Independent and
dependent
sources, and
resistances
A
B
FIGURE 6.1: A general circuit consisting of independent and dependent sources can be replaced by a
voltage source (V
OC
) in series with a resistor (R
EQ
) or a current source (I
SC
) in parallel with a resistor
(R
EQ
).
Independent and
dependent
sources, and
resistances
A
B
+
V
OC

FIGURE 6.2: The open circuit voltage, V
OC
, is calculated across the terminals A,B using standard
techniques such as node-voltage or mesh-current methods.
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´
EVENIN’ S ANDNORTON’ S THEOREMS 55
Example 6.1. Find the Th´ evenin equivalent circuit with respect to terminals A,B for the
following circuit.
10 V 4 A
2 Ω
2 Ω
B
A
Solution. The solution to finding the Th´ evenin equivalent circuit is done in two parts, first
finding V
OC
and then solving for R
EQ
. The open circuit voltage, V
OC
, is easily found using the
node-voltage method as shown in the following circuit.
10 V 4 A
2 Ω
2 Ω
B
A
+
V
OC

The sum of currents leaving the node is
V
OC
−10
2
+
V
OC
2
−4 = 0
and V
OC
= 9 V.
Next, R
EQ
is found by first setting all sources dead (the current source is an open circuit
and the voltage source is a short circuit), and then finding the resistance seen from the terminals
A,B as shown in the following figure.
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56 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
2 Ω
2 Ω
B
A
REQ
From the previous circuit, it is clear that R
EQ
is equal to 1 (that is, 2 2 ). Thus, the
Th´ evenin equivalent circuit is
9 V
1 Ω
B
A

It is important to note that the circuit used in finding V
OC
is not to be used in finding R
EQ
as not all voltages and currents are relevant in the other circuit and one cannot simply mix and
match.
6.2 NORTON’S THEOREM
Norton’s Theorem states that an equivalent circuit consisting of an ideal current source, I
SC
,
in parallel with an equivalent resistance, R
EQ
, can be used to replace any circuit that consists
of independent and dependent voltage and current sources and resistors. I
SC
is equal to the
current flowing through a short between terminals A,B as shown in Fig. 6.3, and calculated
using standard techniques such as the node-voltage or mesh-current methods. The Th´ evenin
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TH
´
EVENIN’ S ANDNORTON’ S THEOREMS 57
Independent and
dependent
sources, and
resistances
A
B
ISC
FIGURE 6.3: The short circuit current, I
SC
, is calculated by placing a short across the terminals A,B,
and finding the current through the short using standard techniques such as node-voltage or mesh-current
methods.
and Norton equivalent circuits are related to each other according to
R
EQ
=
V
OC
I
SC
(6.1)
This is easily seen by shorting the terminals A,B in Fig. 6.2. The current flowing through the
short is
V
OC
I
SC
in agreement with Eq. (6.1). It should be clear that Figs. 6.2 and 6.3 are source
transformations of each other.
Example 6.2. Find the Norton equivalent circuit with respect to terminals A,Bfor the following
circuit.
10 V 4 A
2 Ω
2 Ω
B
A

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58 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Solution. This circuit is the same as Ex. 6.1, so R
EQ
= 1 . To find I
SC
we place a short
between the terminals A,B as shown in the following figure.
10 V 4 A
2 Ω
2 Ω
B
A
I
SC
Note that the 2 resistor is in parallel with the short across terminals A,B, therefore it is
removed since no current flows through it, as shown in the next figure.
10 V 4 A
2 Ω
B
A
I
SC
I
2
+ 10 V −
Note also that current I
2
equals 5 A since the 10 V source is applied directly across the 2
resistor. Applying KCL at the node denoted A, gives
0 = −I
2
−4 + I
SC
= −5 −4 + I
SC
and I
SC
= 9 A. We could have found the current I
SC
directly from the solution of Ex. 6.1 since
I
SC
=
V
OC
R
EQ
=
9
1
= 9 A
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TH
´
EVENIN’ S ANDNORTON’ S THEOREMS 59
The Norton equivalent circuit is shown in the following figure.
B
A
9 A 1 Ω

6.3 DEPENDENTSOURCES ANDTH
´
EVENINANDNORTON
EQUIVALENTCIRCUITS
If a circuit connected to terminals A,B contains dependent sources, the process for finding R
EQ
for either the Th´ evenin or Norton equivalent circuit must be modified, because the dependent
source has resistance, and this resistance cannot be calculated when setting all sources dead.
In this case we find V
OC
and I
SC
, and then calculate R
EQ
=
V
OC
I
SC
.
Example 6.3 Find the Th´ evenin equivalent circuit with respect to terminals A,B for the fol-
lowing circuit.
10 V
3 Ω
2 Ω
5 Ω
B
A
5 A
+
V
1

3V
1

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60 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Solution. Since this circuit has a dependent source, R
EQ
is found by R
EQ
=
V
OC
I
SC
. Let’s first
find V
OC
using the mesh-current method as labeled in the next figure.
10 V
3 Ω
2 Ω I
1
5 Ω
I
2
B
A
+
V
OC

5 A
I
3
+
V
1

3V1
Note that since there are two current sources on the perimeter of the circuit, I
2
= −5 A
and I
3
= 3V
1
= 3 ×2 (I
1
− I
2
) = 6I
1
+30.
Summing the voltage drops around mesh 1 gives
−10 +3I
1
+2 (I
1
− I
2
) = 0
Simplifying with I
2
= −5 A gives I
1
= 0 A. Applying KVL around mesh 2 to find V
OC
gives
2 (I
2
− I
1
) +5 (I
2
− I
3
) + V
OC
= 0
With I
1
= 0 A, I
2
= −5 A and I
3
= 30 A, gives V
OC
= 185 V.
Next, we find I
SC
using the node-voltage method as labeled in the next figure.
Summing the currents leaving node gives
V
1
−10
3
+
V
1
2
+
V
1
5
+3V
1
= 0
and V
1
=
100
121
V.
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TH
´
EVENIN’ S ANDNORTON’ S THEOREMS 61
Applying KCL at terminal A gives
10 V
3 Ω
2 Ω
5 Ω
B
A
5 A
+
V
1

3V
1
Δ
I
SC
−3V
1
−5 −
V
1
5
+ I
SC
= 0
With V
1
=
100
121
, gives I
SC
= 7.65 A. Therefore R
EQ
=
V
OC
I
SC
=
185
7.65
= 24.18 . The Th´ evenin
equivalent circuit is
B
A
24.18 Ω
185 V

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63
C H A P T E R 7
Inductors
In the previous sections, we considered circuits involving sources and resistors that are de-
scribed with algebraic equations. Any changes in the source are instantaneously observed in
the response. In this section, we examine the inductor, a passive element that relates the
voltage–current relationship with a differential equation. Circuits that contain inductors are
written in terms of derivatives and integrals. Any changes in the source with circuits that
contain inductors, i.e., a step input, have a response that is not instantaneous, but has nat-
ural response that changes exponentially and a forced response that is the same form as the
source.
An inductor is a passive element that is able to store energy in a magnetic field, and is
made by winding a coil of wire around a core that is an insulator or a ferromagnetic material. A
magnetic field is established when current flows through the coil. We use the symbol
to represent the inductor in a circuit; the unit of measure for inductance is the henry or henries
(H), where 1 H = 1 Vs/A. The relationship between voltage and current for an inductor is
given by
v = L
di
dt
(7.1)
The convention for writing the voltage drop across an inductor is similar to that of a resistor, as
shown in Fig. 7.1.
Physically, current cannot change instantaneously through an inductor since an infinite
voltage is required according to Eq. (7.1) (i.e., the derivative of current at the time of the
instantaneous change is infinity). Mathematically, a step change in current through an inductor
is possible by applying a voltage that is a Dirac delta function. For convenience, when a circuit
has just DC currents (or voltages), the inductors can be replaced by short circuits since the
voltage drop across the inductors are zero.
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64 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
L
+ v −
i
FIGURE7.1: An inductor.
Example 7.1. Find v in the following circuit.
+
v

5 A 2 H
Solution. Accordingly,
v = L
di
dt
= 2 ×
d (5)
dt
= 0
This example shows that an inductor acts like a short circuit to DC current.
Example 7.2. Find I in the following circuit, given that the source has been applied for a very
long time.
6 Ω
5 H
3 H 4 Ω
4 Ω
1 H
2 Ω
3 H 5 V
I
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INDUCTORS 65
Solution. Since the source has been applied for a very long time, only DC current flows in the
circuit and the inductors can be replaced by short circuits as shown in the following figure.
2 Ω
4 Ω 2 Ω
4 Ω
6 Ω
6 V
I
To find I, we find the total resistance seen by the source and use Ohm’s law as follows:
R
EQ
= 6 ((4 4) +(2 2)) = 2
therefore,
I =
6
2
= 3
Example 7.3. Find v in the following circuit.
0 1 2 3
t (s)
1
i (A)
+
v

2 H i
Solution. The solution to this problem is best approached by breaking it up into time intervals
consistent with the changes in input current. Clearly for t < 0 and t > 2, the current is zero
and therefore v = 0. We use Eq. (7.1) to determine the voltage in the other two intervals as
follows.
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66 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
For 0 < t < 1
In this interval, the input is i = t, and
v = L
di
dt
= 2
d(t)
dt
= 2 V
For 1 ≤ t ≤ 2
In this interval, the input is i = −(t −2) , and
v = L
di
dt
= 2
d (−(t −2))
dt
= −2 V
Equation (7.1) defines the voltage across an inductor for a given current. Suppose one is given a
voltage across an inductor and asked to find the current. We start from Eq. (7.1) by multiplying
both sides by dt, giving
v (t) dt = Ldi
Integrating both sides yields
t

t
0
v (λ) dλ = L
i (t)

i (t
0
)

or
i (t) =
1
L
t

t
0
v (λ) dλ +i (t
0
) (7.2)
For t
0
= 0, as is often the case in solving circuit problems, Eq. (7.2) reduces to
i (t) =
1
L
t

0
v (λ) dλ +i (0) (7.3)
and for t
0
= −∞, the initial current is by definition equal to zero, and therefore Eq. (7.2)
reduces to
i (t) =
1
L
t

−∞
v (λ) dλ (7.4)
The initial current in Eq. (7.2), i (t
0
), is usually defined in the same direction as i , which means
i (t
0
) is a positive quantity. If the direction of i (t
0
) is in the opposite direction of i (as will happen
when we write node equations), then i (t
0
) is negative.
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INDUCTORS 67
Example 7.4. Find i for t ≥ 0 if i (0 ) = 2 A and v(t) = 4e
−3t
u(t) in the following circuit.
2 H
i
v
Solution. From Eq. (7.2), we have
i (t) =
1
L
t

t
0
vdλ +i (t
0
) =
1
2
t

0
4e
−3λ
dλ +i (0) =
1
2
t

0
4e
−3λ
dλ +2
= 2
e
−3λ
−3

t
λ=0
+2
=
2
3

4 −e
−3t

u(t)V
7.1 POWERANDENERGY
Since the inductor is a passive element, it absorbs power according to the relationship
p = vi = Li
di
dt
(7.5)
Within the inductor, power is not consumed as heat, as happens in a resistor, but stored
as energy in the magnetic field around the coil during any period of time [t
0
, t] as
w(t) −w(t
0
) =
t

t
0
p dt = L
t

t
0
i
di
dt
dt (7.6)
= L
i (t)

i (t
0
)
i di =
1
2
L

[i (t)]
2
−[i (t
0
)]
2

where the unit of energy is joules ( J). At time equal to negative infinity, we assume that the
initial current is zero and thus the total energy is given by
w(t) =
1
2
Li
2
(7.7)
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68 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Any energy stored in the magnetic field is recoverable. If power is negative in Eq. (7.5),
energy is being extracted from the inductor. If power is positive, energy is being stored in the
inductor.
Example 7.5. Find the inductor power in the following circuit for t > 0 when i (0) = 0 A.
−2
+2
v (V)
0 1 2
t (s)
v 2 H
i
Solution. We first solve for current so that Eq. (7.5) can be applied to find the power. As
before, the solution is best approached by breaking it up into time intervals consistent with the
changes in input voltage.
For 0 < t < 1
In this interval, the input is v = 2t, and
i (t) =
1
L
t

0
v (λ) dλ +i (0) =
1
2
t

0
2λ dλ =
t
2
2
A
Power for this interval is
p = vi = 2t ×
t
2
2
= t
3
W
The current at t = 1 needed for the initial condition in the next part is
i (1) =
t
2
2

t=1
=
1
2
A
For 1 ≤ t ≤ 2
In this interval, the input is v = 2 (t −2), and
i (t) =
1
L
t

1
v (λ)dλ +i (1) =
1
2
t

1
2 (λ −2)dλ +
1
2
=
t
2
2
−2t +2 A
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INDUCTORS 69
Accordingly, power is
p = vi = 2 (t −2) ×

t
2
2
−2t +2

= t
3
−6t
2
+12t −8 W
For t > 2
Power is zero in this interval since the voltage is zero.
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C H A P T E R 8
Capacitors
Acapacitor is a device that stores energy in an electric field by charge separation when appropri-
ately polarized by a voltage. Simple capacitors consist of parallel plates of conducting material
that are separated by a gap filled with a dielectric material. Dielectric materials, that is, air, mica,
or Teflon, contain a large number of electric dipoles that become polarized in the presence of an
electric field. The charge separation caused by the polarization of the dielectric is proportional
to the external voltage and given by
q(t) = C v (t) (8.1)
where C represents the capacitance of the element. The unit of measure for capacitance is
the farad or farads (F), where 1 F = 1 C/V. We use the symbol
C
to denote a capacitor;
most capacitors are measured in terms of microfarads (1 μF = 10
−6
F) or picofarads (1 pF =
10
−12
F). Figure 8.1 illustrates a capacitor in a circuit.
Using the relationship between current and charge, Eq. (8.1) is written in a more useful
form for circuit analysis problems as
i =
dq
dt
= C
dv
dt
(8.2)
The capacitance of a capacitor is determined by the permittivity of the dielectric (ε =
8.854 ×10
−12
F/M for air) that fills the gap between the parallel plates, the size of the gap
between the plates, d, and the cross-sectional area of the plates, A, as
C =
εA
d
(8.3)
As described, the capacitor physically consists of two conducting surfaces that stores
charge, separated by a thin insulating material that has a very large resistance. In actuality,
current does not flowthrough the capacitor plates. Rather, as James Clerk Maxwell hypothesized
when he described the unified electromagnetic theory, a displacement current flows internally
between capacitor plates and this current equals the current flowing into the capacitor and out
of the capacitor. Thus KCL is maintained. It should be clear from Eq. (8.2) that dielectric
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72 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
v
C
i
FIGURE8.1: Circuit with a capacitor.
materials do not conduct DC currents; capacitors act as open circuits when DC currents are
present.
Example 8.1. Suppose v = 5 V and C = 2 F for the circuit shown in Fig. 8.1 Find i .
Solution.
i = C
dv
dt
= 2 ×
d
dt
(5) = 0
A capacitor is an open circuit to DC voltage.
Example 8.2. Find I in the following circuit given that the current source has been applied
for a very long time.
4 A 2 Ω 1 F
3 Ω
2 F
2 Ω
I
4 H
2 H
2 H
2 F
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CAPACITORS 73
Solution. Since the source has been applied for a very long time, only DC current flows in
the circuit. Furthermore the inductors can be replaced by short circuits and capacitors can be
replaced by open circuits, as shown in the following figure.
4 A 2 Ω
I
2 Ω
To find I, we use the current divider law as
I = 4 ×
1
2
1
2
+
1
2
= 2 A
Example 8.3. Find i for the following circuit.
0 1 2
1
v (V)
2 F
v
i
t (s)
Solution. For t < 0 and t > 2, v = 0 V, and therefore i = 0 in this interval. For nonzero val-
ues, the voltage waveform is described with two different functions, v = t V for 0 ≤ t ≤ 1, and
v = −(t −2) V for 1 < t ≤ 2. Equation (8.2) is used to determine the current for each interval
as follows.
For 0 < t < 1
i = C
dv
dt
= 2 ×
d
dt
(t) = 2 A
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74 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
For 1 ≤ t ≤ 2
i = C
dv
dt
= 2 ×
d
dt
(−(t −2)) = −2 A
Voltage cannot change instantaneously across a capacitor. To have a step change in voltage
across a capacitor requires that an infinite current flow through the capacitor, which is not
physically possible. Of course, this is mathematically possible using a Dirac delta function.
Equation (8.2) defines the current through a capacitor for a given voltage. Suppose one is
given a current through a capacitor and asked to find the voltage. To find the voltage, we start
from Eq. (8.2) by multiplying both sides by dt, giving
i (t) dt = C dv
Integrating both sides yields
t

t
0
i (λ) dλ = C
v(t)

v(t
0
)
dv
or
v(t) =
1
C
t

t
0
i dt +v(t
0
) (8.4)
For t
0
= 0, Eq. (8.4) reduces to
v(t) =
1
C
t

0
i dt +v(0) (8.5)
and for t
0
= −∞, Eq. (8.4) reduces to
v(t) =
1
C
t

−∞
i (λ) dλ (8.6)
The initial voltage in Eq. (8.4), v(t
0
), is usually defined with the same polarity as v, which
means v(t
0
) is a positive quantity. If the polarity of v(t
0
) is in the opposite direction of v (as will
happen when we write mesh equations), then v(t
0
)is negative.
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CAPACITORS 75
Example 8.4. Find v for the circuit that follows.
2 F
0 2
2
i
s
(A)
t (s)
i
s
+
v

Solution. The current waveform is described with three different functions: for the interval
t ≤0, for the interval 0 < t ≤ 2, and for t >2. To find the voltage, we apply Eq. (8.6) for each
interval as follows.
For t < 0
v(t) =
1
C
t

−∞
i dt =
1
2
0

−∞
0 dt = 0 V
For 0 ≤ t ≤ 2
v(t) =
1
C
t

0
i dt +v(0)
and with v(0) = 0,we have
v(t) =
1
2
t

0
λ dλ =
1
2

λ
2
2

t
0
=
t
2
4
V
The voltage at t = 2 needed for the initial condition in the next part is
v(2) =
t
2
4

t=2
= 1 V
For t > 2
v(t) =
1
C
t

2
i dt +v(2) =
1
2
t

2
0 dt +v(2) = 1 V
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76 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
8.1 POWERANDENERGY
The capacitor is a passive element that absorbs power according to the relationship
p = vi = C v
dv
dt
(8.7)
Energy is stored in the electric field during any period of time [t
0
, t] as
w(t) −w(t
0
) =
t

t
0
p dt = C
t

t
0
v
dv
dt
dt
= C
v(t)

v(t
0
)
v dv =
1
2
C([v(t)]
2
−[v (t
0
)]
2
) (8.8)
where the unit of energy is joules ( J). At time equal to negative infinity, we assume that the
initial voltage is zero and thus the total energy is given by
w(t) =
1
2
C v
2
(8.9)
Any energy stored in the electric field is recoverable. If power is negative in Eq. (8.7), energy is
being extracted from the capacitor. If power is positive, energy is being stored in the capacitor.
Example 8.5. Find the power and energy for the following circuit.
v
s
(t) =





0 V t < 0
t
2
V 0 ≤ t ≤ 1
e
−(t−1)
V t > 1
2 F v
s
i
Solution. To find the power, we first need to find the current calculated from Eq. (8.2).
i (t) = C
dv
dt
=





0 A t < 0
4 t A 0 ≤ t ≤ 1
−2e
−(t−1)
A t > 1
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CAPACITORS 77
Equation (8.7) is used to find the power as follows.
p(t) = v · i =





0 t < 0
t
2
· 4t = 4t
3
W 0 ≤ t ≤ 1
e
−(t−1)
· (−2e
−(t−1)
) = −2e
−2(t−1)
W t > 1
The energy in each interval is calculated using Eq. (8.9) as follows.
w(t) =
1
2
C v
2
=





0 t < 0
1
2
×2[t
2
]
2
= t
4
J 0 ≤ t ≤ 1
1
2
×2[e
−(t−1)
]
2
= e
−2(t−1)
J t > 1
Note that energy is being stored in the interval 0 ≤ t ≤ 1 since power is positive, and energy is
being extracted from the electric field by the source for t > 1 since power is negative.
From Eq. (8.8), we calculate the energy stored in the electric field during time interval
[0, 1] as
w(1) −w(0) =
1
2
×2(v(1)
2
−v(0)
2
) = 1 J
and the energy delivered from the electric field in the interval [1, ∞] as
w(∞) −w(1) =
1
2
×2(v (∞)
2
−v (1)
2
) = −1 J
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79
C H A P T E R 9
Inductance and Capacitance
Combinations
As with resistors, it is possible to reduce complex inductor and capacitor circuits into simpler,
equivalent circuits by combining series and parallel collections of like elements. Consider the
following circuit consisting of N inductors in series. Since the same current flows through each
inductor, the voltage drop across each inductor is v
i
= L
i
di
dt
. Applying KVLon this circuit gives
v
s
= v
1
+v
2
+· · · +v
N
= L
1
di
dt
+ L
2
di
dt
+· · · + L
N
di
dt
= (L
1
+ L
2
+· · · + L
N
)
di
dt
= L
EQ
di
dt
Thus, inductors connected in a series can be replaced by an equivalent inductance, whereby
L
EQ
= L
1
+ L
2
+· · · + L
N
(9.1)
Next, consider N inductors connected in parallel as shown in Fig. 9.1. Since the same
voltage is across each inductor, the current through each inductor is i
i
=
1
L
i
t

t
0
v
0
dt +i
i
(t
0
).
Applying KCL on the upper node of this circuit gives
i
s
=
N
¸
i =1


1
L
i
t

t
0
v
0
dt +i
i
(t
0
)


=
¸
1
L
1
+
1
L
2
+· · · +
1
L
N
¸
t

t
0
v
0
dt +
N
¸
i =1
i
i
(t
0
)
=
1
L
EQ
t

t
0
v
0
dt +i
s
(t
0
)
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80 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
+ v
1

L
1
L
2
i
+ v
2

v
s
+
vN

L
N
v
s
L
EQ
i
FIGURE9.1: (Left) N inductors in series. (Right) An equivalent circuit for inductors in series.
Thus, inductors connected in parallel can be replaced by an equivalent inductance, where-
by
L
EQ
=
1
1
L
1
+
1
L
2
+· · · +
1
L
N
(9.2)
For the case of two inductors in parallel, Eq. (9.2) reduces to
L
EQ
=
L
1
L
2
L
1
+ L
2
(9.3)
Equations (9.1) and (9.2) are similar to the results we found for resistors in series and parallel,
and the process used for simplifying resistor circuits is the same used for inductors in series and
parallel.
L1
is
+
v
0

L2 LN
+
v0

is
iN i2 i1
FIGURE9.2: (Left) N inductors in parallel. (Right) An equivalent circuit for inductors in parallel.
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INDUCTANCEANDCAPACITANCECOMBINATIONS 81
Example 9.1. Find L
EQ
for the following circuit.
1 H 4 H 2 H
2 H 4 H 6 H 6 H
LEQ
Solution. The equivalent inductance is found by forming series and parallel combinations
from right to left until it reduces to a single inductance as shown in the following figure.
1 H 4 H 2 H
2 H 4 H 6 H 6 H
L
EQ
2 +2= 4 H
4 4 = 2 H
4 +2= 6 H
6 6 6 = 2 H
1 + 2 = 3 H
If follows that
L
EQ
= 1 +(6 6 (4 +(4 (2 +2))))
= 1 +

6 6

4 +

1
1
4
+
1
4

= 1 +

1
1
6
+
1
6
+
1
6

= 1 +2 = 3 H
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82 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
C1
is
+
v
0

C2 CN CN
+
v0

FIGURE9.3: (Left) N capacitors in parallel. (Right) An equivalent circuit for capacitors in parallel.
Next, consider N capacitors connected in parallel, as shown in Fig. 9.3. Since the same voltage
is across each capacitor, the current through each inductor is i
i
= C
i
dv
0
dt
. Applying KCL on the
upper node of this circuit gives
i
s
= C
1
dv
0
dt
+C
2
dv
0
dt
+· · · +C
N
dv
0
dt
= C
EQ
dv
0
dt
Thus, capacitors connected in series can be replaced by an equivalent capacitance, whereby
C
EQ
= C
1
+C
2
+· · · +C
N
(9.4)
Next, consider N capacitors connected in series as shown in Fig. 9.4. Since the same
current flows through each capacitor, the voltage across each inductor is v
i
=
1
C
i
t

t
0
i dt +v
i
(t
0
).
Applying KVL around this circuit gives
+ v
1

C
1
C
2
i
+ v
2

vs
+
v
N

vs
i
C
N
+
v
N

C
EQ
FIGURE9.4: (Left) N capacitors in series. (Right) An equivalent circuit for capacitors in series.
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INDUCTANCEANDCAPACITANCECOMBINATIONS 83
v
s
=
N
¸
i =1


1
C
i
t

t
0
i dt +v
i
(t
0
)


=
¸
1
C
1
+
1
C
2
+· · · +
1
C
N
¸
t

t
0
i dt +
N
¸
i =1
v
i
(t
0
)
=
1
C
EQ
t

t
0
i dt +v
s
(t
0
)
Thus, capacitors connected in series can be replaced by an equivalent capacitance, whereby
C
EQ
=
1
1
C
1
+
1
C
2
+· · · +
1
C
N
(9.5)
For the case of two capacitors in series, Eq. (9.5) reduces to
C
EQ
=
C
1
C
2
C
1
+C
2
(9.6)
Equations (9.5) and (9.6) are similar to the results we found for resistors in parallel and
series, respectively. That is, we treat capacitors in parallel using the techniques for resistors in
series, and capacitors in series as resistors in parallel.
Example 9.2. Reduce the following circuit to a single capacitor and inductor.
6 F
6 F
0.5 H
3 F
3 F
3 H
2 H
2 H 2 H
Solution. The equivalent inductance is found by forming series and parallel combinations,
from right to left, of inductors and capacitors until the analysis reduces the circuit to a single
inductance and capacitance. Consider the inductors first as shown in the following figure on
the right, which results in 1.5 H. Also note that the two parallel capacitors equal 6 F.
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84 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
6 F
6 F
0.5 H
3 F
3 F
3 H
2 H
2 H 2 H
2 2 = 1 H
2 + 1 = 3 H
3 3 = 1.5 H 3 + 3 = 6 F
Next we slide the 1.5 H equivalent inductance to the left past the capacitors as shown
in the following figure. The two series inductors equal 2 H, and the three capacitors in series
(treated like resistors in parallel) equal
1
1
6
+
1
6
+
1
6
= 2 F.
6 F 6 F 6 F
1.5 H 0.5 H
6 6 6 = 2 F 0.5 + 1.5 = 2 H
The final reduced circuit is shown in the following figure.
2 F
2 H
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INDUCTANCEANDCAPACITANCECOMBINATIONS 85
The next example illustrates how to simplify a circuit and then apply the mesh-current
method to solve for unknown currents.
Example 9.3. (a) Find i (t), i
1
(t), i
2
(t) and v(t) for the following circuit for t ≥ 0 given
i
1
(0

) = 5 A and i
2
(0

) = 15 A. (b) Find the initial energy stored in the inductors. (c) Find
the energy dissipated in the resistors between t = 0 and t = ∞. (d) Find the energy trapped in
the inductors at t = ∞.
3 H 6 H 300 Ω 600 Ω 200 Ω
400 Ω
i
i
1
i
2
+
v

Solution
(a) For ease in solution, first simplify the circuit by combining the three resistors as
R
EQ
= 400 +
1
1
200
+
1
300
+
1
600
= 500
and two inductors as L
EQ
=
3×6
3+6
= 2 H as shown in the following circuit.
2 H
i
+
v

500 Ω
i
We use the mesh-current method to find v(t) as follows. Recall that the voltage drop
across an inductor is v
L
= L
di
dt
, so we have
500i +2
di
dt
= 0
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86 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
or
di
dt
+250i = 0
The previous differential equation has the characteristic equation
s +250 = 0
with root s = −250 and solution
i (t) = K
1
e
−250t
A
Note that the forced response is zero since there is no input. Because the energy stored in an
inductor cannot change instantaneously,
i
1
(0

) = i
1
(0
+
) = 5 A, i
2
(0

) = i
2
(0
+
) = 15 A and
i (0

) = i (0
+
) = i
1
(0
+
) +i
2
(0
+
) = 20 A
To determine K
1
we use i (0) = 20 = K
1
. Thus, our solution is i (t) = 20e
−250t
u(t) A. To find
i
1
(t) and i
2
(t) we find v(t) = L
EQ
di
dt
and then use i
i
(t) =
1
L
i
t

0
v dt +i
i
(0). For t ≥ 0
v (t) = 2
di
dt
= −10000e
−250t
u(t) V
and
i
1
(t) =
1
3
t

0
(−10000e
−250λ
) dλ +5 =
40
3
e
−250λ

t
λ=0
+5 =
40
3
e
−250t

40
3
+5
=
40
3
e
−250t

25
3
A
i
2
(t) =
1
6
t

0
(−10000e
−250λ
) dλ +15 =
40
6
e
−250λ

t
λ=0
+15 =
20
3
e
−250t

20
3
+
45
3
=
20
3
e
−250t
+
25
3
A
Naturally i (t) = i
1
(t) +i
2
(t) = 20e
−250t
u(t) A.
(b) From Eq. 7.7, the total initial energy stored in the inductors equals
w
L
(0) =
1
2
L
1
i
2
1
+
1
2
L
2
i
2
2
=
1
2
×3 ×5
2
+
1
2
×6 ×15
2
= 712.5 J
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INDUCTANCEANDCAPACITANCECOMBINATIONS 87
(c) The energy dissipated in the resistors equals
w
R
EQ
=

0
R
EQ
i
2
(t) dt =

0
500 ×(20e
−250t
)
2
dt
=

0
500 ×400e
−500t
dt = − 400e
−500t


0
= 400 J
(d) The energy trapped in the inductors at t = ∞equals
w
1
(∞) =
1
2
L
1
i
2
1
(∞) =
1
2
×3 ×


25
3

2
= 104.1667 J
w
2
(∞) =
1
2
L
2
i
2
2
(∞) =
1
2
×6 ×

25
3

2
= 208.333 J
Notice that energy trapped in the two inductors equals the total initial stored energy minus the
energy dissipated in the resistors. Also note that while energy is trapped in the two inductors at
t = ∞, the energy stored in the equivalent inductor, L
EQ
, is zero. Note that the initial energy
stored in the equivalent inductor is
1
2
×2 ×(20)
2
= 400 J, and that the energy dissipated in the
resistors equals the energy stored in the equivalent inductor at t = 0.
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89
C H A P T E R 1 0
AGeneral Approach to Solving
Circuits Involving Resistors,
Capacitors and Inductors
Sometimes a circuit consisting of resistors, inductors and capacitors cannot be simplified by
bringing together like elements in series and parallel combinations. Consider the circuit shown
in Fig. 10.1. In this case, the absence of parallel or series combinations of resistors, inductors
or capacitors prevents us from simplifying the circuit for ease in solution, as in Ex. 10.1. In
this section, we apply the node-voltage and mesh-current methods to write equations involving
integrals and differentials using element relationships for resistors, inductors and capacitors.
From these equations, we can solve for unknown currents and voltages of interest.
Example 10.1. Write the node equations for the following circuit for t ≥ 0 if the initial
conditions are zero.
vs(t)
C1
C2
R2
R1
L1
Solution. With the reference node at the bottom of the circuit, we have two essential nodes,
as shown in the following redrawn circuit. Recall that the node involving the voltage source is a
known voltage and that we do not write a node equation for it. When writing the node-voltage
equations, the current through a capacitor is i
c
= C ˙ v, where ˙ v is the derivative of the
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90 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
1 F
3 F 4 F
5 H
2 H
3 Ω
2 Ω
FIGURE10.1: A circuit that cannot be simplified.
voltage across the capacitor, and the current through an inductor is i
L
=
1
L
t

0
vdλ +i
L
(0),
where v is the voltage across the inductor. Since the initial conditions are zero, the term
i
L
(0) = 0.
vs(t)
C1
C2
R2
R1
L1
+
v1
− −
+
v2
2
1
Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives
C
1
( ˙ v
1
− ˙ v
s
) +
v
1
R
1
+
v
1
−v
2
R
2
= 0
which simplifies to
C
1
˙ v
1
+

1
R
1
+
1
R
2

v
1

1
R
2
v
2
= C
1
˙ v
s
Summing the currents leaving node 2 gives
v
2
−v
1
R
2
+C
2
˙ v
2
+
1
L
1
t

0
(v
2
−v
s
) dλ = 0
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 91
Typically, we eliminate integrals in the node equations by differentiating. When applied to the
previous expression, this gives
1
R
2
˙ v
2

1
R
2
˙ v
1
+C
2
¨ v
2
+
1
L
1
v
2

1
L
1
v
s
= 0
and after rearranging yields
¨ v
2
+
1
C
2
R
2
˙ v
2
+
1
C
2
L
1
v
2

1
C
2
R
2
˙ v
1
=
1
C
2
L
1
v
s
When applying the node-voltage method, we generate one equation for each essential
node. To write a single differential equation involving just one node voltage and the inputs, we
use the other node equations and substitute into the node equation of the desired node voltage.
Sometimes this involves differentiation as well as substitution. The easiest case involves a node
equation containing an undesired node voltage without its derivatives. Another method for
creating a single differential equation is to use the D operator.
Consider the node equations for Ex. 10.1, and assume that we are interested in obtaining
a single differential equation involving node voltage v
1
and its derivatives, and the input. For
ease in analysis, let us assume that the values for the circuit elements are R
1
= R
2
= 1 , C
1
=
C
2
= 1 F, and L
1
= 1 H, giving us
˙ v
1
+2v
1
−v
2
= ˙ v
s
and
¨ v
2
+ ˙ v
2
+ v
2
− ˙ v
1
= v
s
Using the first equation, we solve for v
2
, calculate ˙ v
2
and ¨ v
2
, and then substitute into the second
equation as follows.
v
2
= ˙ v
1
+2v
1
− ˙ v
s
˙ v
2
= ¨ v
1
+2 ˙ v
1
− ¨ v
s
¨ v
2
=
...
v
1
+2 ¨ v
1

...
v
s
After substituting into the second node equation, we have
...
v
1
+2 ¨ v
1

...
v
s
+ ¨ v
1
+2 ˙ v
1
− ¨ v
s
+ ˙ v
1
+2v
1
− ˙ v
s
− ˙ v
1
= v
s
and after simplifying
...
v
1
+3 ¨ v
1
+2 ˙ v
1
+2v
1
=
...
v
s
+ ¨ v
s
+ ˙ v
s
−v
s
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92 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
The Doperator also provides us the means to write the two differential equations as a single dif-
ferential equation involving only v
1
and v
s
. In terms of the D operator, the two node equations
are written as
(D+2)v
1
−v
2
= Dv
s
(D
2
+ D+1)v
2
− Dv
1
= v
s
Solving the first equation for v
2
gives v
2
= (D+2) − Dv
s
, and after substituting v
2
into the
second equation yields
(D
2
+ D+1)(D+2)v
1
− D(D
2
+ D+1)v
s
− Dv
1
= v
s
Upon simplification
(D
3
+3D
2
+2D+2)v
1
= (D
3
+ D
2
+ D+1)v
s
Returning to the differential notation, the result is
...
v
1
+3 ¨ v
1
+2 ˙ v
1
+2v
1
=
...
v
s
+ ¨ v
s
+ ˙ v
s
−v
s
which is the same expression we calculated before.
In general, the order of the differential equation relating a single output variable and
the inputs is equal to the number of energy storing elements in the circuit (capacitors and
inductors). In some circuits, the order of the differential equation is less than the number of
capacitors and inductors in the circuit. This occurs when capacitor voltages and inductor currents
are not independent, that is, there is an algebraic relationship between the capacitor, specifically
voltages and the inputs, or the inductor currents and the inputs. This occurs when capacitors
are connected directly to a voltage source or when inductors are connected directly to a current
source as shown in Fig. 10.2A and B. In Fig. 10.2A, two capacitors are connected directly to a
voltage source. KVL applied around the outer loop gives
−v(t) +v
1
(t) +v
2
(t) = 0
or
v(t) = v
1
(t) +v
2
(t)
where v
1
(t) and v
2
(t) are the voltages across the two capacitors. It should be clear that in the
previous equation, v
1
(t) and v
2
(t) are not independent, that is, there is an algebraic relationship
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 93
C1
C2
v(t)
+
v1(t)

+
v2(t)

R1
R2
i(t)
R1 R2
L1 L2
i2(t) i1(t)
C1
C2
v(t)
+
v1(t)

+
v2(t)

R1
R2
RS
i(t)
R1 R2
L1 L2
i2(t) i1(t) is(t)
Rs
A
B
C
D
FIGURE 10.2: (A), (B) Circuits described by first-order differential equations and having algebraic
relationships between the voltages and currents. (C), (D) Circuits described by second-order differential
equations, with no algebraic relationships between voltages and currents.
between the two; if v
1
(t) is known, then v
2
(t) = v(t) −v
1
(t). The same situation occurs with
two inductors connected directly to a current source as in Fig. 10.2B. KCL applied at the upper
node gives
i (t) = i
1
(t) +i
2
(t)
As before, currents i
1
(t) and i
2
(t) are not independent: there exists an algebraic relationship
between the currents. Circuits with the characteristics of Fig. 10.2A and B are rare in realistic
situations. For example, the two circuits in Fig. 10.2A and B are better described by those
in Fig. 10.2C and D since the voltage and current sources are more appropriately modeled
with a resistance within the ideal source, R
s
(called an internal resistance—a small resistance
for voltage source and a large resistance for a current source). By including an internal resis-
tance R
s
in the circuit, we no longer have any algebraic relationships among the voltages and
currents.
Notice that the circuit given in Ex. 10.1 has three energy storing elements (two capacitors
and one inductor), and the resulting differential equation is of third-order, as expected.
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94 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Example 10.2. Write the mesh-current equations for the circuit in Ex. 10.1 for t ≥ 0 if the
initial conditions are zero.
Solution. There are three meshes in this circuit, as shown in the following figure. To write the
mesh-current equations, recall that the voltage across a capacitor is v
C
=
1
C
t

0
i dλ +v
C
(0
+
),
where i is the resultant current (sum of mesh currents) through the capacitor, and the voltage
across a inductor v
L
= L
di
dt
where
di
dt
is the derivative of the resultant current through the
inductor. Since the initial conditions are zero, v
C
(0
+
) = 0.
v
s
(t)
C1
C2
R
2
R
1
L
1
i
1
i
2
i
3
Summing the voltage drops around mesh 1 gives
−v
s
+
1
C
1
t

0
(i
1
−i
3
)dλ + R
1
(i
1
−i
2
) = 0
Differentiating and rearranging the previous equation gives
R
1
di
1
dt
+
1
C
1
i
1
− R
1
di
2
dt
+
1
C
1
i
3
=
dv
s
dt
Summing the voltage drops around mesh 2 gives
R
1
(i
2
−i
1
) + R
2
(i
2
−i
3
) +
1
C
2
t

0
i
2
dλ = 0
Differentiating and rearranging the previous equation gives
(R
1
+ R
2
)
di
2
dt
+
1
C
2
i
2
− R
1
di
1
dt
− R
2
di
3
dt
= 0
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 95
Finally, summing the voltage drops around mesh 3 gives
L
1
di
3
dt
+ R
2
(i
3
−i
2
) +
1
C
1
t

0
(i
3
−i
1
)dλ = 0
Differentiating and rearranging the previous equation gives
L
1
d
2
i
3
dt
2
+ R
2
di
3
dt
+
1
C
1
i
3
− R
2
di
2
dt

1
C
1
i
1
= 0
The previous two examples involved a circuit with zero initial conditions. When circuits
involve nonzero initial conditions, our approach remains the same as before except that the
initial inductor currents are included when writing the node-voltage and the initial capacitor
voltages are included when writing the mesh-current equations.
Example10.3. Write the node equations for the following circuit for t ≥ 0 assuming the initial
conditions are i
L
1
(0) = 8 A and i
L
2
(0) = −4 A.
vs
10 Ω
1 H 2 H
1 F 2 F 3 F
1
L
i
2
L
i
Solution. With the reference node at the bottom of the circuit, we have three essential nodes
as shown in the redrawn circuit that follows.
vs
10 Ω
1 H 2 H
1 F 2 F 3 F
1
L
i
2
L
i
+
v1

+
v2

+
v3

1 2
3
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96 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives
(v
1
−v
s
)
10
+ ˙ v
1
+
t

0
(v
1
−v
2
) dλ +8 = 0
where i
L
1
(0) = 8 A.
Summing the currents leaving node 2 gives
t

0
(v
2
−v
1
)dλ −8 +2 ˙ v
2
+
1
2
t

0
(v
2
−v
3
)dλ −4 = 0
where i
L
2
(0) = −4 A. Notice that the sign for the initial inductor current is negative because the
direction is from right to left and the current is defined on the circuit diagram in the opposite
direction for the node 2 equation.
Summing the currents leaving node 3 gives
1
2
t

0
(v
3
−v
2
)dλ +4 +3 ˙ v
3
= 0
In this example, we have not simplified the node equations by differentiating to remove
the integral, which would have eliminated the initial inductor currents fromthe node-equations.
If we were to write a single differential equation involving just one node voltage and the input,
a fifth-order differential equation would result because there are five energy storing elements in
the circuit. To solve the differential equation, we would need five initial conditions, the initial
node voltage for the variable selected, as well as the first through fourth derivatives at time
zero.
10.1 DISCONTINUITIES ANDINITIAL
CONDITIONS INACIRCUIT
Discontinuities in voltage and current occur when an input such as a unit step is applied or a
switch is thrown in a circuit. As we have seen, when solving an nth order differential equation
one must know n initial conditions, typically the output variable and its (n −1) derivatives at
the time the input is applied or switch thrown. As we will see, if the inputs to a circuit are known
for all time, we can solve for initial conditions directly based on energy considerations and not
depend on being provided with them in the problem statement. Almost all of our problems
involve the input applied at time zero, so our discussion here is focused on time zero, but may
be easily extended to any time an input is applied.
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Energy cannot change instantaneously for elements that store energy. Thus, there are
no discontinuities allowed in current through an inductor or voltage across a capacitor at
any time—specifically, the value of the variable remains the same at t = 0

and t = 0
+
. In
the previous problem when we were given initial conditions for the inductors and capaci-
tors, this implied, i
L
1
(0

) = i
L
1
(0
+
) and i
L
2
(0

) = i
L
2
(0
+
), and v
1
(0

) = v
1
(0
+
), v
2
(0

) =
v
2
(0
+
) and v
3
(0

) = v
3
(0
+
). With the exception of variables associated with current through
an inductor and voltage across a capacitor, other variables can have discontinuities, especially
at a time when a unit step is applied or when a switch is thrown; however, these variables must
obey KVL and KCL.
While it may not seem obvious at first, a discontinuity is allowed for the derivative of the
current through an inductor and voltage across a capacitor at t = 0

and t = 0
+
since
di
L
(0+)
dt
=
v
L
(0+)
L
and
dv
C
(0+)
dt
=
i
C
(0+)
L
as discontinuities are allowed in v
L
(0+) and i
C
(0+). Keep in mind that the derivatives in the
previous expression are evaluated at zero after differentiation, that is
di
L
(0+)
dt
=
di
L
(t)
dt

t=0
+
and
dv
C
(0+)
dt
=
dv
C
(t)
dt

t=0
+
In calculations to determine the derivatives of variables not associated with current
through an inductor and voltage across a capacitor, the derivative of a unit step input may
be needed. Here, we assume the derivative of a unit step input is zero at t = 0
+
.
The initial conditions for variables not associated with current through an inductor and
voltage across a capacitor at times of a discontinuity are determined only from the initial
conditions from variables associated with current through an inductor and voltage across a
capacitor, and any applicable sources. The analysis is done in two steps involving KCL and
KVL or using the node-voltage or mesh-current methods.
1. First, we analyze the circuit at t = 0

. Recall that when a circuit is at steady state, an
inductor acts as a short circuit and a capacitor acts as an open circuit. Thus at steady
state at t = 0

, we replace all inductors by short circuits and capacitors by open circuits
in the circuit. We then solve for the appropriate currents and voltages in the circuit
to find the currents through the inductors (actually the shorts connecting the sources
and resistors) and voltages across the capacitors (actually the open circuits among the
sources and resistors).
2. Second, we analyze the circuit at t = 0
+
. Since the inductor current cannot change in
going from t = 0

to t = 0
+
, we replace the inductors with current sources whose val-
ues are the currents at t = 0

. Moreover, since the capacitor voltage cannot change in
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98 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
going fromt = 0

to t = 0
+
, we replace the capacitors with voltage sources whose val-
ues are the voltages at t = 0

. Fromthis circuit we solve for all desired initial conditions
necessary to solve the differential equation.
Example 10.4. Find v
C
(0

), v
L
(0

), i
L
(0

), i
R
1
(0

), i
R
2
(0

), i
R
3
(0

), v
C
(0
+
), v
L
(0
+
),
i
L
(0
+
), i
R
1
(0
+
), i
R
2
(0
+
), i
R
3
(0
+
), and the derivative of each passive element’s current and
voltage at t = 0
+
for the following circuit.
400 Ω 100 Ω
10 mH 500 Ω
10 V
5u(t) V
1
R
i
3
R
i
2
R
i
5 F μ
+
vC

+
vL

i
L
i
C

Solution. For t = 0

, the capacitor is replaced by an open circuit and the inductor by a short
circuit as shown in the following circuit.
400 Ω 100 Ω
+
vC(0 )


10 V
i
L
(0 )
1
R
i
2
R
i
3
R
i
iC
+
vL

Notice v
L
(0

) = 0 V because the inductor is a short circuit. Also note that the 500 resistor
is not shown in the circuit since it is shorted out by the inductor, and so i
R
3
(0

) = 0 A. Using
the voltage divider rule, we have
v
C
(0

) = 10 ×
100
400 +100
= 2 V
and by Ohm’s law
i
L
(0

) =
10
100 +400
= 0.02 A
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 99
It follows that i
R
1
(0

) = i
R
2
(0

) = i
L
(0

) = 0.02 A. Because voltage across a capacitor and
current through an inductor are not allowed to change fromt = 0

to t = 0
+
we have v
C
(0
+
) =
v
C
(0

) = 2 V and i
L
(0

) = i
L
(0
+
) = 0.02 A.
The circuit for t = 0
+
is drawn by replacing the inductors in the original circuit with
current sources whose values equal the inductor currents at t = 0

and the capacitors with
voltage sources whose values equal the capacitor voltages at t = 0

as shown in the following
figure with nodes C and L and reference. Note also that the input is now 10 +5u(t) = 15 V.
400 Ω 100 Ω
0.02 A 500 Ω
+
vL

15 V
C L
i
C
i
L
2V
2
R
i
1
R
i
+
vC

3 R
i
To find v
L
(0
+
), we sum the currents leaving node L, yielding
v
L
−2
100
+0.02 +
v
L
500
= 0
which gives v
L
(0
+
) = 0 V. Now i
R
3
(0
+
) =
v
L
(0
+
)
500
= 0 A, i
R
2
(0
+
) = 0.02 +i
R
3
(0
+
) =
0.02 A, andi
R
1
(0
+
) =
15−2
400
= 0.0325 A.
To find i
C
(0
+
), we write KCL at node C, giving
−i
R
1
(0
+
) +i
C
(0
+
) +i
R
2
(0
+
) = 0
or
i
C
(0
+
) = i
R
1
(0
+
) −i
R
2
(0
+
) = 0.0325 −0.02 = 0.125 A
To find ˙ v
C
(0
+
), note that i
C
(0
+
) = C ˙ v
C
(0
+
) or
˙ v
C
(0
+
) =
i
C
(0
+
)
C
=
0.0125
5 ×10
−6
= 2.5 ×10
3
V/s.
Similarly,
di
L
(0
+
)
dt
=
v
L
(0
+
)
L
= 0 A/s
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100 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Next we have i
R
1
=
15−v
C
400
, and
di
R
1
(0
+
)
dt
= −
1
400
dv
C
(0
+
)
dt
= −
2.5 ×10
3
400
= −6.25 A/s
To find
di
R
3
dt
we start with KCL i
R
3
= i
R
2
−i
L
= i
R
1
−i
C
−i
L
, and
di
R
3
dt
=
di
R
1
dt

di
C
dt

di
L
dt
.
For the
di
c
dt
term we have
i
C
= i
R
1
−i
R
2
and
di
C
dt
=
di
R
1
dt

di
R
2
dt
Using Ohm’s law, the
di
R
2
dt
term is given by as
i
R
2
=
v
C
−v
L
100
and
di
R
2
dt
=
1
100
dv
C
dt

1
100
dv
L
dt
With v
L
= 500i
R
3
and
dv
L
dt
= 500
di
R
3
dt
, we have
di
R
2
dt
=
1
100
dv
C
dt

500
100
di
R
3
dt
Substituting
di
R
2
dt
into the
di
c
dt
equation gives
di
C
dt
=
di
R
1
dt

di
R
2
dt
=
di
R
1
dt

1
100
dv
C
dt
+
500
100
di
R
3
dt
Returning to the
di
R
3
dt
equation we have
di
R
3
dt
=
di
R
1
dt

di
C
dt

di
L
dt
=
di
R
1
dt

di
R
1
dt
+
1
100
dv
C
dt

500
100
di
R
3
dt

di
L
dt
Collecting the
di
R
3
dt
terms and canceling the
di
R
1
dt
terms, the previous equation reduces to
di
R
3
dt
=
1
6

1
100
dv
C
dt

di
L
dt

At t = 0
+
, we have
di
R
3
(0
+
)
dt
=
1
6

1
100
dv
C
(0
+
)
dt

di
L
(0
+
)
dt

=
1
6

2.5 ×10
3
100
−0

= 4.167 A/s
From before, we have for
di
R
2
dt
di
R
2
(0
+
)
dt
=
1
100
dv
C
(0
+
)
dt

500
100
di
R
3
(0
+
)
dt
=
2.5 ×10
3
100
−5 ×4.167 = 4.167 A/s
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 101
and for
di
c
dt
di
C
(0
+
)
dt
=
di
R
1
(0
+
)
dt

di
R
2
(0
+
)
dt
= −6.25 −4.1665 = −10.417 A/s
Finally, the derivatives of the voltages across the resistors are
dv
R
1
dt
= 400
di
R
1
dt
= 400 ×(−6.25) = −2500 V/s
dv
R
2
dt
= 100
di
R
2
dt
= 100 ×4.167 = 416.7 V/s
and
dv
R
3
dt
= 500
di
R
3
dt
= 500 ×4.167 = 2083.5 V/s
Example 10.5. Find v
C
for the circuit in Ex. 10.4 for t ≥ 0.
Solution. We use the node voltage method to solve this problemsince v
C
is one of the variables
used in the solution. Using the node-voltage method also results in two equations rather than
three equations with the mesh-current method. The initial conditions necessary to solve the
differential equation for this circuit were calculated in Ex. 10.4. Keep in mind that in Ex. 10.4,
we calculated many more initial conditions than are required in this example; here, we only need
v
C
(0
+
) and ˙ v
C
(0
+
).
For t ≥ 0, the circuit is redrawn for analysis in the following figure.
400 Ω 100 Ω
10 mH 500 Ω 5μF
+
vC

+
v
L

15 V
C L
i
C
i
L
Summing the currents leaving node C gives
v
C
−15
400
+5 ×10
−6
˙ v
C
+
v
C
−v
L
100
= 0
which simplifies to
˙ v
C
+2500v
C
−2000v
L
= 7500
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102 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Summing the currents leaving node L gives
v
L
−v
C
100
+
1
10 ×10
−3
t

0
v
L
dλ +i
L
(0
+
) +
v
L
500
= 0
which, after multiplying by 500 and differentiating, simplifies to
6 ˙ v
L
+50 ×10
3
v
L
−5 ˙ v
C
= 0
Using the D operator method, our two differential equations are written as
Dv
C
+2500v
C
−2000v
L
= 7500 or (D+2500)v
C
−2000v
L
= 7500
6Dv
L
+50 ×10
3
v
L
−5Dv
C
= 0 or (6D+50 ×10
3
)v
L
−5Dv
C
= 0
We then solve for v
L
from the first equation,
v
L
= (0.5 ×10
−3
D+1.25)v
C
−3.75
and then substitute v
L
into the second equation, giving
(6D+50 ×10
3
)v
L
−5Dv
C
= (6D+50 ×10
3
)((0.5 ×10
−3
D+1.25)v
C
−3.750) −5Dv
C
= 0
Reducing this expression yields
D
2
v
C
+10.417 ×10
3
Dv
C
+20.83 ×10
6
v
C
= 62.5 ×10
6
Returning to the time domain gives
¨ v
C
+10.417 ×10
3
˙ v
C
+20.83 ×10
6
v
C
= 62.5 ×10
6
The characteristic equation for the previous differential equation is
s
2
+10.417 ×10
3
s +20.833 ×10
6
= 0
with roots −7.718 ×10
3
and −2.7 ×10
3
and the natural solution
v
C
n
(t) = K
1
e
−7.718×10
3
t
+ K
2
e
−2.7×10
3
t
V
Next, we solve for the forced response, assuming that v
C
f
(t) = K
3
. After substituting into the
differential equation, this gives
20.833 ×10
6
K
3
= 62.5 ×10
6
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 103
or K
3
= 3. Thus, our solution is now
v
C
(t) = v
C
n
(t) +v
C
f
(t) = K
1
e
−7.718×10
3
t
+ K
2
e
−2.7×10
3
t
+3 V
We use the initial conditions to solve for K
1
and K
2
. First
v
C
(0) = 2 = K
1
+ K
2
+3
Next
˙ v
C
(t) = −7.718 ×10
3
K
1
e
−7.718×10
3
t
−2.7 ×10
3
K
2
e
−2.7×10
3
t
and at t = 0,
˙ v
C
(0) = 2.5 ×10
3
= −7.718 ×10
3
K
1
−2.7 ×10
3
K
2
Solving gives K
1
= 0.04 and K
2
= −1.04. Substituting these values into the solution gives
v
C
(t) = 0.04e
−7.718×10
3
t
−1.04e
−2.7×10
3
t
+3 V
for t ≥ 0.
Our approach remains the same for circuits with controlled sources. We analyze the circuit
for t = 0

and t = 0
+
to establish the initial conditions with the controlled source operational.
If the voltage or current used in the controlled source is zero, we replace it with an open circuit
if it is a current source and a short circuit if it is a voltage source. If a circuit has an independent
voltage or current source that is introduced at zero via a unit step function, for t = 0

we replace
the independent source by a short circuit if it is a voltage source and an open circuit if it is a
current source.
Example 10.6. Find i
L
1
for the following circuit for t ≥ 0 using the mesh-current method.
10 Ω 10 Ω
1 H
10 V
5u(t) V
x
i
20 Ω
3ix
3 H
2 mF
1
L
i

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104 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Solution. To solve this problem, we will use the mesh-current method with currents defined
in the following circuit. The steps involve:
1. Eliminate all currents except i
4
, which is i
L
1
, which gives a third-order differential
equation
2. Solve for the initial conditions
3. Solve the differential equation.
It should be clear that a third-order differential equation should describe this system, since there
are three energy storing elements.
Mesh Equations
To write the mesh-current equations, recall that the voltage across a capacitor is
v
C
=
1
C

t
0
i dλ +v
C
(0
+
), where i is the resultant current (sum of mesh currents) through
the inductor, and the voltage across a inductor v
L
= L
di
dt
where
di
dt
is the derivative of the
resultant current through the inductor. Since there is a controlled current source in the circuit,
we form a supermesh for meshes 1 and 2. Notice that mesh current i
4
= i
L
1
.
Summing the voltages around supermesh 1 +2 yields
−15 +10(i
1
−i
4
) +10(i
2
−i
4
) +
d(i
2
−i
3
)
dt
= 0
10 Ω 10 Ω
1 H 15 V
x
i
20 Ω
3i
x
3 H
2 mF
i
2
i
4
i
1
i
3
Rearranging the previous equation gives
10i
1
+
di
2
dt
+10i
2

di
3
dt
−20i
4
= 15
P1: KDD
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 105
Summing the voltage drops around mesh 3 yields
d(i
2
−i
3
)
dt
+20(i
3
−i
4
) +
1
2 ×10
−3
t

0
i
3
dλ +v
C
(0
+
) = 0
Differentiating and rearranging the previous equation reduces to

d
2
i
2
dt
2
+
d
2
i
3
dt
2
+20
di
3
dt
+500i
3
−20
di
4
dt
= 0
Summing the voltage drops around mesh 4 gives
3
di
4
dt
+20(i
4
−i
3
) +10(i
4
−i
2
) +10(i
4
−i
1
) = 0
and after rearranging, we find
−10i
1
−10i
2
−20i
3
+3
di
4
dt
+40i
4
= 0
Applying KCL for the dependent current source gives
3i
x
= i
2
−i
1
Since i
x
= 3(i
1
−i
4
), we have
4i
1
−i
2
−3i
4
= 0
At this time, we have four equations and four unknowns. The dependent current source equa-
tion, an algebraic equation, is used to eliminate i
1
from the three mesh equations, since i
1
=
1
4
(i
2
+3i
4
). Substituting i
1
into the supermesh 1 +2 equation and collecting like terms gives
di
2
dt
+
50
4
i
2

di
3
dt

50
4
i
4
= 15
The mesh 3 equation did not have an i
1
, but is written here for convenience.

d
2
i
2
dt
2
+
d
2
i
3
dt
2
+20
di
3
dt
+500i
3
−20
di
4
dt
= 0
After substituting i
1
and collecting like terms in the mesh 4 equation, we have

50
4
i
2
−20i
3
+3
di
4
dt
+
130
4
i
4
= 0
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106 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
The mesh 4 equation is used to eliminate i
3
from the other two equations. Solving for i
3
and
taking its derivatives yields
i
3
=
1
20


50
4
i
2
+3
di
4
dt
+
130
4
i
4

di
3
dt
=
1
20


50
4
di
2
dt
+3
d
2
i
4
dt
2
+
130
4
di
4
dt

d
2
i
3
dt
2
=
1
20


50
4
d
2
i
2
dt
2
+3
d
3
i
4
dt
3
+
130
4
d
2
i
4
dt
2

Substituting the
di
3
dt
term into the supermesh 1 +2 equation and simplifying gives
13
8
di
2
dt
+
50
4
i
2

3
20
d
2
i
4
dt
2

13
8
di
4
dt

50
4
i
4
= 15
Substituting i
3
,
di
3
dt
and
d
2
i
3
dt
2
into the mesh 3 equation after collecting like terms gives

13
8
d
2
i
2
dt
2

50
4
di
2
dt
−312.5i
2
+
3
20
d
3
i
4
dt
3
+
37
8
d
2
i
4
dt
2
+
350
4
di
4
dt
+812.5i
4
= 0
To eliminate i
2
, we use the D operator method on our two differential equations giving

13
8
D+
50
4

i
2
+


3
20
D
2

13
8
D−
50
4

i
4
= 15


13
8
D
2

50
4
D−312.5

i
2
+

3
20
D
3
+
37
8
D
2
+
350
4
D+812.5

i
4
= 0
To solve for i
4
, we pre-multiply the first equation by (−
13
8
D
2

50
4
D−312.5), pre-multiply the
second equation by (
13
8
D+
50
4
), and then subtract the first equation from the second equation.
This yields
(4.875D
3
+112.5D
2
+1750D+6250)i
4
= −(−
13
8
D
2

50
4
D−312.5) ×15
Returning to the time domain gives
4.875
d
3
i
4
dt
3
+112.5
d
2
i
4
dt
2
+1750
di
4
dt
+6250i
4
= 4687.5
P1: KDD
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 107
Note that the derivative terms on the right-hand side of the D operator equation are zero since
the derivative of a constant is zero. Dividing the previous differential equation by 4.875 to put
it in a more convenient form results in
d
3
i
4
dt
3
+23.1
d
2
i
4
dt
2
+359
di
4
dt
+6250i
4
= 1282.1
Initial Conditions
The next step in the solution involves finding the initial conditions for the circuit necessary to
solve the differential equation, i
L
1
(0
+
),
di
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
and
d
2
i
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
2
. As before, this involves:
1. Analyzing the circuit at t = 0

with the inductors replaced as short circuits and the
capacitor as an open circuit
2. Analyzing the circuit at t = 0
+
with inductors replaced as current sources whose values
equal the inductor currents at t = 0

and the capacitor as a voltage source whose value
equal the capacitor voltage at t = 0

.
For t = 0

, for a node-voltage solution the circuit is redrawn as shown in the following diagram.
10 Ω 10 Ω
10 V
20 Ω
3i
x
1
L
i
vC

+
2
L
i
x
i 4
x
i
+
v1


+
1
Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives
v
1
−10
10
−3

10 −v
1
10

+
v
1
10
= 0
where i
x
=
10−v
1
10
. Solving this equation yields v
1
(0

) = 8 V. Ohm’s law gives i
L
1
(0

) =
10
20
= 0.5 Aand i
x
(0

) =
10−v
1
(0

)
10
=
10−8
10
= 0.2 A. Since the capacitor is connected across the
battery, v
C
(0

) = 10 V. KCL gives the current through the other inductor as i
L
2
(0

) =
4i
x
(0

) +i
L
1
(0

) = 0.8 +0.5 = 1.3 A.
P1: KDD
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108 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
For t = 0
+
, for a node-voltage solution the circuit is redrawn as shown in the following
diagram.
10 Ω 10 Ω
15 V
20 Ω
3i
x
1
0 0 5 ( ) .
L
i A
+
=
2
0
1 3 A
( )
.
L
i
+
=
x
i
+
v
1

1 2
+
v
2

0
10 V
( )
C
v
+
=
1
L
v
+ −
iC
To find the initial conditions for the circuit at t = 0
+
, we first solve for the node-voltages
v
1
(0
+
) and v
2
(0
+
) and then solve for
di
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
and
d
2
i
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
2
. Summing the currents leaving node
1 yields
v
1
−15
10
−3

15 −v
1
10

+
v
1
−v
2
10
= 0
Simplifying the equation, yields
5v
1
−v
2
= 60
Summing the currents leaving node 2 yields
v
2
−v
1
10
+1.3 +
v
2
−10
20
= 0
Simplifying the equation, we have
−2v
1
+3v
2
= −16
Solving the two simultaneous node equations gives
v
1
(0
+
) = 12.6154 and v
2
0
+
) = 3.0769.
Recall that v
C
(0
+
) = v
C
(0

) = 10 V, i
L
1
(0
+
) = i
L
1
(0

) = 0.5 A, and i
L
2
(0
+
) = i
L
2
(0

) =
1.3 A from the analysis at t = 0

.
P1: KDD
MOBK036-10 MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:9
GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 109
Our next tasks involve finding
di
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
and
d
2
i
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
2
using the relationships v
L
= L
1
di
L
1
dt
and i
C
= C
dv
C
dt
. Thus
di
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
=
1
3
v
L
1
(0
+
)
and using KVL to find v
L
1
(0
+
) gives
−15 +v
L
1
(0
+
) +v
C
(0
+
) = 0
or
v
L
1
(0
+
) = 15 −v
C
(0
+
) = 15 −10 = 5 V
and
di
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
=
1
3
v
L
1
(0
+
) =
5
3
A
s
We also have
d
2
i
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
2
=
1
3
dv
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
, and from KVL before v
L
1
= 15 −v
C
and after differentiat-
ing
dv
L
1
dt
= 0 −
dv
C
dt
= −
dv
C
dt
. Thus
d
2
i
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
2
=
1
3
dv
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
= −
1
3
dv
C
(0
+
)
dt
. Now
i
C
(0
+
) =
v
2
(0
+
) −10
20
+i
L
1
(0
+
) =
3.0796 −10
20
+0.5 = 0.154 A
and
dv
C
(0
+
)
dt
=
1
C
i
C
(0
+
) =
1000
2
×0.154 = 77 V/s
Therefore
d
2
i
L
1
(0
+
)
dt
2
= −
1
3
dv
C
(0
+
)
dt
= −25.6667 A
2
/s.
Solving the Differential Equation
The differential equation describing the circuit is
d
3
i
4
dt
3
+23.1
d
2
i
4
dt
2
+359
di
4
dt
+6250i
4
= 1282.1
As before, the natural solution is determined first by finding the roots of characteristic equation,
s
3
+23.1s
2
+359s +6250
as s
1
= −20.4749, s
2,3
= −1.3125 ± j 17.4221. The roots give rise to the natural response
i
4
n
(t) = K
1
e
−20.4749t
+e
−1.3125t
(K
2
cos(17.4221t) + K
3
sin(17.4221t))
P1: KDD
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110 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Next we solve for the forced response to the input by assuming
i
4
f
(t) = K
4
which, when substituted into the original differential equation, yields
6250K
4
= 1281.1
giving K
4
= 0.2050. The total solution equals the natural and forced response, written as
i
4
(t) = i
4
n
(t) +i
4
f
(t)
= K
1
e
−20.4749t
+e
−1.3125t
(K
2
cos(17.4221t) + K
3
sin(17.4221t)) +0.2050
The initial conditions are used to determine the constants K
1
, K
2
and K
3
. From the solution
for i
4
(t), we have
i
4
(0) =
1
2
= K
1
+ K
2
+0.2050
To use the next initial condition, we find the derivative of the solution, giving
di
4
dt
= −20.4749K
1
e
−20.4749t
−1.3125e
−1.3125t
(K
2
cos(17.4221t) + K
3
sin(17.4221t))
+e
−1.3125t
(−17.4221K
2
sin(17.4221t) +17.4221K
3
cos(17.4221t))
We evaluate this expression at t = 0, giving
di
4
(0)
dt
=
5
3
= −20.4749K
1
−1.3125K
2
+17.4221K
3
Finally, we take the second derivative of the solution giving
d
2
i
4
dt
2
= 419.2215K
1
e
−20.4749t
+1.7227e
−1.3125t
(K
2
cos(17.4221t) + K
3
sin(17.4221t))
−1.3125e
−1.3125t
(−17.4221K
2
sin(17.4221t) +17.4221K
3
cos(17.4221t))
−1.3125e
−1.3125t
(−17.4221K
2
sin(17.4221t) +17.4221K
3
cos(17.4221t))
+e
−1.3125t
(−303.5296K
2
cos(17.4221t) −303.5296K
3
sin(17.4221t))
We evaluate this expression at t = 0, giving
d
2
i
4
(0)
dt
2
= −25.6667 = 419.2215K
1
+1.7227K
2
−2.6250 ×17.4221K
3
−303.5296K
2
= 419.2215K
1
−301.807K
2
−45.733K
3
P1: KDD
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 111
The three initial condition equations are put into matrix form for a straightforward solution as
AK = F or




1 1 0
−20.4749 −1.3125 17.4221
419.2215 −301.807 −45.733








K
1
K
2
K
3




=





0.295
5
3
−25.6667





Using MATLAB, we have
A = [1 1 0; −20.4749 −1.3125 17.4221; 419.2215 −301.807 −45.733];
F = [0.295; 5/3; −25.6667];
K = A\F
K =
0.1025
0.1925
0.2306
The complete solution is
i
L
1
(t) = i
4
(t) = 0.1025e
−20.4749t
+e
−1.3125t
(0.1925 cos(17.4221t)
+0.2306 sin(17.4221t)) +0.2050
for t ≥ 0.
10.2 CIRCUITS WITHSWITCHES
To finish this section, we consider circuits with multiple switches. In effect, each time a switch
is thrown, we solve the circuit using the techniques of this section. That is, at each switch time,
t
i
, we determine the necessary voltages and currents at t

i
and t
+
i
and solve the circuit problem,
move to the next switch time, determine the necessary voltages and currents at t

i +1
and t
+
i +1
and solve the circuit problem, and so on. For ease in solving the circuit after the first switch
time at t = 0, we replace the variable t with t −t
1
where t
1
is the switch time and use the unit
step function, and repeat this substitution at each switch time. Each time interval is separately
analyzed, with the only carry-over from one time interval to the next being the voltages across
the capacitor and currents through the inductors at the switch time. The next example illustrates
this approach.
P1: KDD
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112 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Example 10.7. Find v
C
for the following circuit for t ≥ 0.
10 Ω
0.03 F 50 Ω 2 A 40 Ω H
1
3
+
v
c

t = 1 s
t = 0
t = 4 s
Solution. There are two switches operating in this circuit, with switching times at t = 0, t =
1 and t = 4 s . We therefore break up the solution into three time intervals, 0 ≤ t < 1, 1 ≤ t <
4 and t ≥ 4 s, while realizing that we need to know the initial conditions just before and after
each switch time, and that we also need to solve for the steady-state solution for t < 0.
For t < 0
At steady state, the capacitor is replaced by an open circuit as shown in the following figure.
10 Ω
50 Ω 2 A 40 Ω
+
v
c

Using the current divider rule and Ohm’s law, we have v
C
(0

) = 40 V. Note that voltage cannot
instantaneously change across a capacitor, so v
C
(0
+
) = 40 V.
For 0 ≤ t < 1
During this interval, the switch on the left opens, leaving us with the following circuit to analyze.
40 Ω
+
v
c

0.03 F
P1: KDD
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 113
Notice the 10 resistor is eliminated since no current flows through it because it is an open
circuit. Using KCL we have
0.03 ˙ v
C
+
v
C
40
= 0
The differential equation has a root equal to −
1
1.2
and a solution in this time interval of
v
C
= v
C
(0
+
)e

t
1.2
u(t) = 40e

t
1.2
u(t) V
For 1 ≤ t < 4
When t = 1, the switch on the right closes, introducing an inductor as shown in the following
figure.
40 Ω
+
vc

0.03 F H
1
3
i
L
i
R
i
C
Applying KCL yields
0.03
dv
C
dt
+
v
C
40
+5
t

1
v
C
dλ +i
L
(1
+
) = 0
Dividing the previous equation by 0.03 and differentiating gives
¨ v
C
+
1
1.2
˙ v
C
+
5
0.03
v
C
= 0
with complex roots determined from MATLAB as −0.42 ±12.9 j . The solution consists of
the natural solution only, since the forced response is zero, and is given by
v
C
= e
−0.42(t−1)
(K
1
cos(12.9(t −1)) + K
2
sin(12.9(t −1))) (u(t −1) −u(t −4))
This solution requires two initial conditions. Recall that at t = 1, v
C
(1
+
) = v
C
(1

) and
i
L
(1
+
) = i
L
(1

). Moreover, all other voltages and currents and their derivatives change from
t = 1

to t = 1
+
s. Now using the solution for v
C
from the previous interval, we have
v
C
(1
+
) = v
C
(1

) = 40e

1
1.2
= 17.4 V
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114 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
From our solution in this interval, we have
v
C
(1
+
) = K
1
= 17.4 V
Since no current was flowing through the inductor during the interval 0 ≤ t < 1, i
L
(1
+
) =
i
L
(1

) = 0 A. Now i
R
(1
+
) =
v
C
(1
+
)
40
=
17.4
40
= 0.44 A, and accordingly
i
C
(1
+
) = −(i
L
(1
+
) +i
R
(1
+
)) = −(0 +0.44) = −0.44 A
˙ v
C
(1
+
) =
1
C
i
C
(1
+
) = −14.5 V
Now
˙ v
C
=


−0.42e
−0.42(t−1)
(K
1
cos(12.9(t −1)) + K
2
sin(12.9(t −1)))
+e
−0.42(t−1)
(−12.9K
1
sin(12.9(t −1)) +12.9K
2
cos(12.9(t −1)))


×(u (t −1) −u (t −4))
and
˙ v
C
(1
+
) = −14.5 = −0.42K
1
+12.9K
2
= −0.42 ×17.4 +12.9K
2
which gives K
2
= −0.557. Our complete solution is
v
C
= e
−0.42(t−1)
(17.4 cos(12.9(t −1)) −0.557 sin(12.9(t −1)))(u(t −1) −u(t −4)) V
For t > 4.
For the last interval, the switch on the left closes, giving us the following figure to analyze.
10 Ω
0.03 F 50 Ω 2 A 40 Ω
+
v
c

i
L
H
1
5
To ease the solution, the 2 A current source with 50 resistor is transformed into a 100 V
voltage source in series with a 50 resistor. The 50 and 10 resistors are summed together,
and the 100 V voltage source and 60 resistor are transformed into a
10
6
A current source in
parallel with a 60 resistor. The 60 and 40 resistors are combined to give a 24 resistor.
The reduced circuit is shown in the following circuit.
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 115
0.03 F 25 Ω
+
v
c

A
10
6
H
1
5
i
L
Applying KCL gives

10
6
+
v
C
24
+0.03 ˙ v
C
+5
t

1
v
C
dλ +i
L
(4
+
) = 0
Differentiating the previous equation and dividing by 0.03 yields
¨ v
C
+1.4 ˙ v
C
+166.7v
C
= 55.6
with roots determined from MatLab as −0.7 ±12.9 j . The roots are complex, which gives rise
to the natural response
v
C
= e
−0.7(t−4)
(K
1
cos(12.9(t −4)) + K
2
sin(12.9(t −4))) u(t −4)
Next, we solve for the forced response to the input by assuming y
f
(t) = K
3
. When substituted
into the differential equation describing this interval, this yields
166.7K
3
= 55.6
giving 11.1. The total solution in this interval equals the natural and forced response, written
as
v
C
= 11.1 +e
−0.7(t−4)
(K
1
cos(12.9(t −4)) + K
2
sin(12.9(t −4))) u(t −4)
Two initial conditions (v
C
(4
+
) and ˙ v
C
(4
+
)) are needed to determine the constants K
1
and K
2
.
As before, at t = 4, v
C
(4
+
) = v
C
(4

) and i
L
(4
+
) = i
L
(4

), and all other voltages and currents
andtheir derivatives change fromt = 4

to t = 4
+
s. Using the solutionfor v
C
fromthe previous
interval, we have
v
C
(4
+
) = v
C
(4

) = e
−0.42(t−1)
(17.4 cos(12.9(t −1)) −0.557 sin(12.9(t −1)))
×(u(t −1) −u(t −4))|
t=4

= e
−0.42(4−1)
(17.4 cos (12.9 (4 −1)) −0.557 sin (12.9 (4 −1)))
= 2.5 V
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116 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
From our solution in this interval, we have
v
C
(4
+
) = 11.1 + K
1
= 2.53 V
and K
1
= −8.6 V. The next initial condition, ˙ v
C
(4
+
) =
1
0.03
i
C
(4
+
), is determined from KCL

10
6
+
v
C
(4
+
)
24
+i
C
(4
+
) +i
L
(4
+
) = 0
where i
L
(4
+
) = i
L
(4

). To find i
L
(4

) we use the solution for v
C
in the previous interval and
compute
i
L
(4
+
) = i
L
(4

) = 5
4

1
v
C
dt +i
L
(1
+
) = 5
4

1
v
C
dt +0
= 5
4

1
(e
−0.42(t−1)
(17.4 cos(12.9(t −1)) −0.557 sin(12.9(t −1)))) dt
= e
−0.42(t−1)
(−0.0037 cos(12.9(t −1)) +6.74 sin(12.9(t −1)))

4
1
= 1.614 A
Now i
R
(1
+
) =
v
C
(4
+
)
24
=
2.53
24
= 0.105 A, and
i
C
(4
+
) =
10
6

v
C
(4
+
)
24
−i
L
(4
+
) =
10
6

2.53
24
−1.614 = −0.05 A
˙ v
C
(4
+
) =
1
C
i
C
(4
+
) = −1.75 V
Now
˙ v
C
=

−0.7e
−0.7(t−4)
(K
1
cos(12.9(t −4)) + K
2
sin(12.9(t −4)))
+e
−0.7(t−4)
(−12.9K
1
sin(12.9 (t −4)) +12.9K
2
cos (12.9 (t −4)))

u (t −4)
and
˙ v
C
(4
+
) = −1.75 = −0.7K
1
+12.9K
2
with K
1
= −8.6, we have K
2
= −0.6. Our solution for this interval is
v
C
= 11.1 +e
−0.7(t−4)
(−8.6 cos(12.9(t −4)) −0.6 sin(12.9(t −4))) u(t −4) V
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GENERAL APPROACHTOSOLVINGCIRCUITS 117
Summarizing, our complete solution is
v
C
=





40e

t
1.2
V 0 ≤ t < 1
e
−0.42(t−1)
(17.4 cos(12.9 (t −1)) −0.557 sin(12.9 (t −1))) V 1 ≤ t < 4
11.1 +e
−0.7(t−4)
(−8.6 cos(12.9(t −4)) −0.6 sin(12.9(t −4))) V t ≥ 4
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118
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119
C H A P T E R 1 1
Operational Amplifiers
In Section 3, we considered controlled voltage and current sources that are dependent on a
voltage or current elsewhere in a circuit. These devices were modeled as a two terminal device.
Here we consider the operational amplifier, also known as an op amp, a multi-terminal device.
An operational amplifier is an electronic device that consists of large numbers of transistors,
resistors and capacitors—to fully understand its operation requires knowledge of diodes and
transistors, topics not covered in this book. However, to appreciate howan operational amplifier
operates in a circuit involves a topic already covered, the controlled voltage source.
As the name implies, the operation amplifier is an amplifier, but when combined with
other circuit element, it integrates, differentiates, sums and subtracts. One of the first opera-
tional amplifiers approved as an eight-lead dual-in-line package (DIP) is shown in Fig. 11.1.
Differing from previous circuit elements, this device has two inputs and one output terminals.
Rather than draw the operational amplifier using Fig 11.1, the operational amplifier is drawn
with the symbols in Fig. 11.2. The input terminals are labeled the noninverting input (+)
and the inverting input (−). The power supply terminals are labeled V+ and V−, which are
frequently omitted since they do not affect the circuit behavior except in saturation condi-
tions as will be described. Most people shorten the name of the operational amplifier to the
“op amp”.
Illustrated in Fig. 11.3 is a model of the op amp focusing on the internal behavior of the
input and output terminals. The input–output relationship is
v
o
= A(v
p
−v
n
) (11.1)
Since the internal resistance is very large, we will replace it with an open circuit to simplify
analysis leaving us with the op amp model show in Fig. 11.4.
With the replacement of the internal resistance with an open circuit, the currents i
n
=
i
p
= 0 A. In addition, current i
A
, the current flowing out of the op amp, is not zero. Because i
A
is unknown, we seldom apply KCL at the output junction. In solving op amp problems, KCL
is applied at input terminals.
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120 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
NC
V+
Output
Offset null
Offset null
Inverting
input
Noninverting
input
V−
Eight
terminal
operational
amplifier
FIGURE11.1: An eight-terminal operational amplifier. The terminal NCis not connected, and the two
terminal offset nulls are used to correct imperfections (typically not connected). V
+
and V

are terminal
power to provide to the circuit. Keep in mind that a ground exists for both V
+
and V

, a ground that is
shared by other elements in the circuit. Modern operational amplifiers have ten or more terminals.
V
+
Inverting
input
Noninverting
input
V

Output
FIGURE11.2: Circuit element symbol for the operational amplifier.
R
i
p
i
n
i
A
v
n
vp
v
o
A (vp − vn)
FIGURE11.3: An internal model of the op amp. The internal resistance between the input terminals,
R, is very large exceeding 1 M. The gain of the amplifier, A, is also large exceeding 10
4
. Power supply
terminals are omitted for simplicity.
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OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 121
i
p
i
n
i
A
v
n
v
p
v
o
= A (vp − vn)
FIGURE 11.4: Idealized model of the op amp with the internal resistance, R, replaced by an open
circuit.
Example 11.1. Find v
0
for the following circuit.
R1
R
2
i
2
V
S
i
1
v
0
v
n
v
p
− − −
Solution. Using the op amp model of Fig. 11.4, we apply KCL at the inverting terminal
giving
−i
1
−i
2
= 0
since no current flows into the op amp’s input terminals. Replacing the current using Ohm’s
law gives
v
s
−v
1
R
1
+
v
o
−v
1
R
2
= 0
Multiplying by R
1
R
2
and collecting like terms, we have
R
2
v
s
= (R
1
+ R
2
) v
1
− R
1
v
o
Now v
o
= A

v
p
−v
n

and since the noninverting terminal is connected to ground, v
p
= 0 so
v
o
= −Av
n
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122 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
or
v
n
= −
v
o
A
Substituting v
n
into the KCL inverting input equation gives,
R
s
v
s
= (R
1
+ R
2
)


v
o
A

− R
1
v
o
=

R
1
+ R
2
A
+ R
1

v
o
or
v
o
=
−R
2
v
s

R
1
+
R
1
+ R
2
A

As A goes to infinity, the previous equation goes to
v
o
= −
R
2
R
1
v
s
Interestingly, with A going to infinity, v
0
remains finite due to the resistor R
2
. This happens
because a negative feedback path exists between the output and the inverting input terminal
through R
2
. This circuit is called an inverting amplifier with an overall gain of −
R
2
R
1
.
An operational amplifier with a gain of infinity is known as an ideal op amp. Because of
the infinite gain, there must be a feedback path between the output and input and we cannot
connect a voltage source directly between the inverting and noninverting input terminals. When
analyzing an ideal op amp circuit, we simplify the analysis by letting
v
n
= v
p
Consider the previous example. With v
p
= 0 means v
n
= 0. Applying KCL at the inverting
input gives

v
s
R
1
+
−v
o
R
2
= 0
or
v
o
= −
R
2
R
1
v
s
Notice how simple the analysis becomes when we assume v
n
= v
p
. Keep in mind that this
approximation is valid as long as A is very large (infinity) and a feedback is included.
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OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 123
Example 11.2. Find the overall gain for the following circuit.
R
1
R2
i
1
i
2
V
S
v
p
v
0
v
n
Solution. Assuming the op amp is ideal, we start with v
n
= v
p
. Then since the op amp’s
noninverting terminal is connected to the source, v
n
= v
p
= v
s
. Because no current flows into
the op amp, by KCL we have
i
1
+i
2
= 0
and
v
s
R
1
+
v
s
−v
o
R
2
= 0
or
v
o
=

R
1
+ R
2
R
1

v
s
The overall gain is
v
o
v
s
=
R
1
+ R
2
R
1
This circuit is a noninverting op amp circuit used to amplify the source input. Amplifiers are
used in most all clinical instrumentation from ECK, EEG, EOG, etc.
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124 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
The next example describes a summing op amp circuit.
Example 11.3. Find the overall gain for the following circuit.
R
a
R
2
R
b
V
a
V
b
vn
vp
v
0

− −
Solution. As before we start the solution with v
n
= v
p
and note that the noninverting input is
connected to ground, yielding v
n
= v
p
= 0 V. Applying KCL at the inverting input node gives

V
a
R
a

V
b
R
b

v
o
R
2
= 0
or
v
o
= −

R
2
R
a
V
a
+
R
2
R
b
V
b

We can add additional source resistor inputs, so that in general
v
o
= −

R
2
R
a
V
a
+
R
2
R
b
V
b
+· · · +
R
2
R
m
V
m

Our next op amp circuit provides an output proportional to the difference of two input
voltages. This op amp is often referred to as a differential amplifier.
Example 11.4. Find the overall gain for the following circuit.
Solution. Assuming an ideal op amp, we note no current flows into the input terminals and
that v
n
= v
p
. Apply KCL at the inverting input terminal gives
v
n
− V
a
R
1
+
v
n
−v
o
R
2
= 0
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OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 125
R2
R1
R1
i2
R2
ia
ib
V
b
V
a
v
p
vn
v0
and
(R
1
+ R
2
)v
n
− R
2
V
a
= R
1
v
o
The previous equation involves two unknowns, thus we need another equation easily found by
applying voltage divider at the noninverting input.
v
p
=
R
2
R
1
+ R
2
v
b
= v
n
Substituting this result for v
n
into the KCL equation at the inverting terminal gives
R
2
V
b
− R
2
V
a
= R
1
v
o
or
v
o
=
R
2
R
1
(V
b
− V
a
)
As shown, this op amp circuit, also known as the differential amplifier, subtracts the weighted
input signals. This amplifier is used for bipolar measurements involving ECG and EEG as the
typical recording is obtained between two bipolar input terminals. Ideally, the measurement
contains only the signal of interest uncontaminated by noise from the environment. The noise
is typically called common-mode signal. Common-mode signal comes from lighting, 60-Hz
power line signals, inadequate grounding and power supply leakage. A differential amplifier
with appropriate filtering can reduce the impact of the common-mode signal.
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126 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
The response of a differential amplifier can be decomposed into differential-mode and
common-mode components,
v
dm
= v
b
−v
a
and
v
c m
=
(v
a
+v
b
)
2
As described, the common-mode signal is the average of the input voltages. Using the two
previous equations, one can solve v
a
and v
b
in terms of v
dm
and v
c m
as
v
a
= v
c m

v
dm
2
and
v
b
= v
c m
+
v
dm
2
When substituted into the response in Exercise 44 gives
v
0
=

R
1
R
2
− R
1
R
2
R
1
(R
1
+ R
2
)

v
c m
+

R
2
(R
1
+ R
2
) + R
2
(R
1
+ R
2
)
2R
1
(R
1
+ R
2
)

v
dm
= A
c m
v
c m
+ A
dm
v
dm
Notice the term multiplying, v
c m
, A
c m
, is zero, characteristic of the ideal op amp that amplifies
only the differential-mode of the signal. Since real amplifiers are not ideal and resistors are not
truly exact, the common-mode gain is not zero. So when one designs a differential amplifier,
the goal is to keep A
c m
as small as possible and A
dm
as large as possible.
The rejection of the common-mode signal is called common-mode rejection, and the mea-
sure of how ideal the differential amplifier is called the common-mode rejection ratio, given as
CMRR = 20 log
10

A
dm
A
c m

where the larger the value of CMRR the better. Values of CMRR for a differential amplifier for
EEG, ECG, and EMG is 100–120 db.
The general approach to solving op amp circuits is to first assume that the op amp is
ideal and v
p
= v
n
. Next, we apply KCL or KVL at the two input terminals. In more complex
circuits, we continue to apply our circuit analysis tools to solve the problem as the next example
illustrates.
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OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 127
Example 11.5. Find v
0
for the following circuit.
R
2
R
2
R
2
R
1
1
v
0
v
1
V
S
v
p
v
n
Solution. With v
n
= v
p
, we apply KCL at the inverting input
v
n
−v
1
R
2
+
v
n
−v
o
R
2
= 0
and
2v
n
−v
1
−v
o
= 0
Next, we apply KVL from ground to node 1 to the noninverting input and back to ground
giving
−v
1
− V
s
+v
p
= 0
and with v
n
= v
p
we have v
n
−v
1
= V
s
.
Now, we apply KCL at node 1, noting no current flows into the noninverting input
terminal
v
1
R
1
+
v
1
−v
o
R
2
+
v
1
−v
n
R
2
= 0
Combining like terms in the previous equation gives
−R
1
v
n
+(2R
1
+ R
2
)v
1
− R
1
v
o
= 0
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128 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
With three equations and three unknowns, we first eliminate v
1
by subtracting the inverting
input KCL equation by the KVL equation giving
v
1
= v
o
−2V
s
Next, we eliminate v
n
by substituting v
1
into the inverting input KCL equation as follows
v
n
=
1
2
(v
1
+v
o
)
=
1
2
(v
o
−2V
s
+v
o
)
= v
o
− V
s
Finally, we substitute the solutions for v
1
and v
n
into the node 1 KCL equation giving
−R
1
v
n
+(2R
1
+ R
2
)v
1
− R
1
v
o
= 0
−R
1
(v
o
− V
s
) +(2R
1
+ R
2
)(v
o
−2V
s
) − R
1
v
o
= 0
After simplification, we have
v
o
=
(3R
1
+2R
2
)
R
2
V
s
The next two examples illustrate an op amp circuit that differentiates and integrates by using a
capacitor.
Example 11.6. Find v
0
for the following circuit.
V
S
C
R
i
R
+ v
C

i
C
v
0
v
p
v
n
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OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 129
Solution. With the noninverting input connected to ground, we have v
p
= 0 = v
n
. From
KVL
v
C
= V
s
and it follows that
i
C
= C
dv
C
dt
= C
dV
s
dt
Since no current flows into the op amp, i
C
= i
R
. With
i
R
=
v
n
−v
o
R
= −
v
o
R
and
i
C
= C
dV
s
dt
= i
R
= −
v
o
R
we have
v
o
= −RC
dV
s
dt
If R =
1
C
, the circuit in this example differentiates the input, v
o
= −
dV
s
dt
.
Example 11.7. Find v
0
for the following circuit.
V
S
C
i
R
+ v
C

i
C
v0
v
p
v
n
R
Solution. It follows that
v
n
= v
p
= 0
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130 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
and
i
C
= i
R
=
V
s
R
Therefore
v
C
=
1
C
t

−∞
i
C
dλ =
1
C
t

−∞
V
s
R

From KVL, we have
v
C
+v
o
= 0
and
v
o
= −
1
RC
t

−∞
V
s

With R =
1
C
, the circuit operates as an integrator
v
o
= −
t

−∞
V
s

11.1 VOLTAGECHARACTERISTICS OF THEOP AMP
In the past examples involving the op amp, we have neglected to consider the supply voltage
(shown in Fig. 11.2) and that the output voltage of an ideal op amp is constrained to operate
between the supply voltages V
+
and V

. If analysis determines v
0
is greater than V
+
, v
0
saturates at V
+
. If analysis determines v
0
is less than V

, v
0
saturates at V

. The output
voltage characteristics are shown in Fig. 11.5.
V+
V+
V−
V−
v
0
A(vp − vn)
FIGURE11.5: Voltage characteristics of an op amp.
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OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 131
Example 11.8. For the circuit shown in Ex. 11.5, let V
+
= +10 V and V

= −10 V. Graph
the output voltage characteristics of the circuit.
Solution. The solution for Ex. 11.5 is
v
o
=

3R
1
+2R
2
R
2

V
s
which saturates whenever v
0
is less than V

and greater than V
+
as shown in the following
graph.
V+
V−
v0
V
S
2
3R
1
+ 2R
2
slope is
R
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132
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133
C H A P T E R 1 2
Time-Varying Signals
An alternating current (AC) or sinusoidal source of 50 or 60 Hz is common throughout the
world as a power source supplying energy for most equipment and other devices. While most
of this chapter has focused on the transient response; when dealing with sinusoidal sources,
attention is now focused on the steady-state or forced response. In bioinstrumentation, analysis
in the steady state simplifies the design by focusing only on the steady-state response, which is
where the device actually operates. A sinusoidal voltage source is a time-varying signal given by
v
s
= V
m
cos(ωt +φ) (12.1)
where the voltage is defined by angular frequency (ω in radians/s), phase angle (φ in radians
or degrees), and peak magnitude (V
m
). The period of the sinusoid T is related to frequency
f (Hz or cycles/s) and angular frequency by
ω = 2f =
2
T
(12.2)
An important metric of a sinusoid is its rms value (square root of the mean value of the squared
function), given by
V
r ms
=

1
T
T

0
V
2
m
cos
2
(ωt +φ)dt (12.3)
which reduces to V
r ms
=
V
m

2
.
To appreciate the response to a time-varying input, v
s
= V
m
cos(ωt +φ), consider the
circuit shown in Fig. 12.1 in which the switch is closed at t = 0 and there is no initial energy
stored in the inductor.
Applying KVL to the circuit gives
L
di
dt
+iR = V
m
cos(ωt +φ)
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134 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
t = 0
v
s
R
L
i
FIGURE12.1: A RL circuit with sinusoidal input.
and after some work, the solution is
i = i
n
+i
f
=
−V
m

R
2

2
L
2
cos

φ −
ωL
R

e

R
L
t
+
V
m

R
2

2
L
2
cos

ωt +φ −
ωL
R

The first term is the natural response that goes to zero as t goes to infinity. The second term is
the forced response that has the same form as the input (i.e., a sinusoid with the same frequency
ω, but a different phase angle and maximum amplitude). If all you are interested in is the
steady-state response as in most bioinstrumentation applications, then the only unknowns are
the response amplitude and phase angle. The remainder of this section deals with techniques
involving the phasor to efficiently find these unknowns.
12.1 PHASORS
The phasor is a complex number that contains amplitude and phase angle information of a
sinusoid, and for the signal in Eq. (12.1) is expressed as
V = V
m
e
j φ
= V
m
φ (12.4)
In Eq. (12.1), by practice, the angle in the exponential is written in radians, and in the

φ
notation, in degrees. Work in the phasor domain involves the use of complex algebra in moving
between the time and phasor domain, therefore, the rectangular form of the phasor is also used,
given as
V = V
m
(cos φ + j sin φ) (12.5)
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TIME-VARYINGSIGNALS 135
12.2 PASSIVECIRCUITELEMENTS INTHEPHASORDOMAIN
To use phasors with passive circuit elements for steady-state solutions, the relationship between
voltage and current is needed for the resistor, inductor and capacitor. Assume that
i = I
m
cos(ωt +θ)
I = I
m
|θ = I
m
e
j θ
For a resistor,
v = I R = RI
m
cos(ωt +θ)
and the phasor of v is
V = RI
m
|θ = RI (12.6)
Note that there is no phase shift for the relationship between the phasor current and voltage
for a resistor.
For an inductor,
v = L
di
dt
= −ωLI
m
sin(ωt +θ) = −ωLI
m
cos(ωt +θ −90

)
and the phasor of v is
V = −ωLI
m
|θ −90

= −ωLI
m
e
j (θ−90

)
= −ωLI
m
e
j θ
e
−j 90

= −ωLI
m
e
j θ
(−j )
= j ωLI
m
e
j θ
(12.7)
= j ωLI
Note that inductor current and voltage are out of phase by 90

, that is current lags behind
voltage by 90

.
For a capacitor, define v = V
m
cos(ωt +θ) and V = V
m
|θ . Now
i = C
dv
dt
= C
d
dt
(V
m
cos(ωt +θ))
= −CV
m
ωsin(ωt +θ) = −CV
m
ωcos(ωt +θ −90

)
And the phasor for i is
I = −ωCV
m
|θ −90

= −ωCV
m
e
j θ
e
−j 90

= −ωCV
m
e
j θ
(cos(90

) − j sin(90

))
= j ωCV
m
e
j θ
= j ωC V
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136 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
200 mH
i
100 sin 500 t mV
s
v =
0.5 μF
1000 Ω
FIGURE12.2: A circuit diagram.
or
V =
1
j ωC
I =
−j
ωC
I (12.8)
Note that capacitor current and voltage are out of phase by 90

, that is voltage lags behind
current by 90

.
Equations (12.6)–(12.8) all have the form of V = ZI, where Z represents the impedance
of the circuit element and is, in general, a complex number, with units of Ohms. The impedance
for the resistor is R, the inductor, j ωL, and the capacitor,
−j
ωC
. The impedance is a complex
number andnot a phasor eventhoughit may looklike one. The imaginary part of the impendence
is called reactance.
The final part to working in the phasor domain is to transform a circuit diagram from
the time to phasor domain. For example, the circuit shown in Fig. 12.2 is transformed into
the phasor domain, shown in Fig. 12.3, by replacing each circuit element with their impedance
equivalent and sources by their phasor. For the voltage source, we have
v
s
= 100 sin 500t = 100 cos(500t −90

) mV ↔500 |−90

mV
For the capacitor, we have
0.5μF ↔
−j
ωC
= −j 4000
I
1000 Ω
500 90 mV −
4000 j −
100 j Ω
Ω
°
FIGURE12.3: Phasor and impedance equivalent circuit for Fig. 12.2.
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TIME-VARYINGSIGNALS 137
For the resistor, we have
1000 ↔1000
For the inductor, we have
200 mH ↔ j ωL = j 100
Each of the elements are replaced by their phasor and impedance equivalents as shown in
Fig. 12.3.
12.3 KIRCHHOFF’S LAWS ANDOTHERTECHNIQUES
INTHEPHASORDOMAIN
It is fortunate that all of the material presented before in this chapter involving Kirchhoff ’s
current and voltage laws, and all the other techniques apply to phasors. That is, for KVL, the
sum of phasor voltages around any closed path is zero

V
i
= 0 (12.9)
and for KCL, the sum of phasor currents leaving any node is zero

I = 0 (12.10)
Impedances in series are given by
Z = Z
1
+· · · + Z
n
(12.11)
Impedances in parallel are given by
Z =
1
1
Z
1
+· · · +
1
Z
n
(12.12)
The node-voltage method, as well as superposition, Th´ evenin equivalent circuits is applicable
in the phasor domain. The following two examples illustrate the process, with the most difficult
aspect involving complex algebra.
Example Problem12.1. For the circuit shown in Fig. 12.3, find the steady-state response i.
Solution. The impedance for the circuit is
Z = −j 4000 +1000 + j 100 = 1000 − j 3900
Using Ohm’s law,
I =
V
Z
=
0.5 |−90

1000 − j 3900
=
0.5 |−90

4026|−76

= 124|−14

μA
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138 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Returning to the time domain, the steady-state current is
i = 124 cos (500t −14

) μA
Example Problem12.2. . Find the steady-state response v using the node-voltage method for
the following circuit.
50sin10 V
s
v ω = ( ) 20 cos 10 20° A
s
i ωt = +
1
F
10
1
H
5
1 Ω
1

2
Ω
+
v

t
Solution. The first step is to transform the circuit elements into their impedances, which for
the capacitor and inductor are
1
10
F ↔
−j
ωC
= −j
1
5
H ↔ j ωL = j 2
The phasors for the two sources are:
v
s
= 50 sin ωt V ↔V
s
= 50|−90

V
i
s
= 20 cos (ωt +20

) A ↔I
s
= 20| 20

Since the two resistors retain their values, the phasor drawing of the circuit is shown in the
following figure with the ground at the lower node.
1 Ω
1

2
Ω
+
V

=50 90° V −
s
V
=20 20°
s
I
j − Ω 2 j Ω
1
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TIME-VARYINGSIGNALS 139
Writing the node-voltage equation for node 1 gives
V −50|−90

+
V
−j
+
V
j 2
+2V −20| 20

= 0
Collecting like terms, converting to rectangular form and converting to polar form gives
V

3 +
j
2

= 50|−90

+20| 20

V

3 +
j
2

= −50 j +18.8 + j 6.8 = 18.8 − j 43.2
V ×3.04| 9.5

= 47.1|−66.5

V =
47.1|−66.5

3.04|9.5

= 15.5|−76

The steady-state solution is
v = 15.6 cos (10t −76

) V
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140
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141
C H A P T E R 1 3
Active Analog Filters
This section presents several active analog filters involving the op amp. Passive analog filters
use passive circuit elements: resistors, capacitors and inductors. To improve performance in a
passive analog filter, the resistive load at the output of the filter is usually increased. By using the
op amp, fine control of the performance is achieved without increasing the load at the output of
the filter. Filters are used to modify the measured signal by removing noise. A filter is designed
in the frequency domain so that the measured signal to be retained is passed through and noise
is rejected.
Shown in Fig. 13.1 are the frequency characteristics of four filters: low-pass, high-pass,
band-pass and notch filters. The signal that is passed through the filter is indicated by the
frequency interval called the passband. The signal that is removed by the filter is indicated
by the frequency interval called the stopband. The magnitude of the filter, |H( j ω)|, is one
in the passband and zero in the stopband. The low-pass filter allows slowly changing signals
with frequency less than ω
1
pass through the filter, and eliminates any signal or noise above
ω
1
. The high-pass filter allows quickly changing signals with frequency greater than ω
2
to pass
through the filter, and eliminates any signal or noise with frequency less than ω
2
. The band-pass
filter allows signals in the frequency band greater than ω
1
and less than ω
2
to pass through the
filter, and eliminates any signal or noise outside this interval. The notch filter allows signals in
the frequency band less than ω
1
and greater than ω
2
to pass through the filter, and eliminates
any signal or noise outside this interval. The frequencies ω
1
and ω
2
are typically called cutoff
frequencies for the low-pass and high-pass filters.
In reality, any real filter cannot possibly have these ideal characteristics, but instead has
a smooth transition from the passband to the stopband, as shown, for example in Fig. 13.2;
the reason for this behavior is described in a later chapter. Further, it is sometimes conve-
nient to include both amplification and filtering in the same circuit, so the maximum of the
magnitude does not need to be one, but can be a value of M specified by the needs of the
application.
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ω
ω
1
ω
2
ω
( jω) H
( jω) H
( jω) H
( jω) H
ω
1
ω
2
ω
ω
2
ω
1
ω
Passband
Passband
Passband
Passband Passband
Stopband
Stopband
Stopband Stopband
S
t
o
p
b
a
n
d
FIGURE 13.1: Ideal magnitude–frequency response for four filters, from top to bottom: low-pass,
high-pass, band-pass and notch.
Stopband
2
M
M
Passband Stopband
(jω) H
FIGURE13.2: Arealistic magnitude–frequency response for a band-pass filter. Note that the magnitude
M does not necessarily need to be one. The passband is defined as the frequency interval when the
magnitude is greater than
M

2
.
142
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ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS 143
To determine the filter’s performance, the filter is driven by a sinusoidal input. One varies
the input over the entire spectrum of interest (at discrete frequencies) and records the output
magnitude. The critical frequencies are when |H( j ω)| =
M

2
.
Example 13.1. Using the low-pass filter in the following circuit, design the filter to have a gain
of 5 and a cutoff frequency of 500 rad/s.
Ra
Rb
C
+
v0

VS
Solution. By treating the op amp as ideal, note that the noninverting input is connected to
ground, andtherefore, the inverting input is also connectedto ground. The operationof this filter
is readily apparent for at lowfrequencies, the capacitor acts like an open circuit, reducing the cir-
cuit to an inverting amplifier that passes lowfrequency signals. At high frequencies, the capacitor
acts like a short circuit, which connects the output terminal to the inverting input and ground.
The phasor method will be used to solve this problem by first transforming the circuit
into the phasor domain as shown in the following figure.
Ra
Rb
+
V0

VS
1
j C ω
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144 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Summing the currents leaving the inverting input gives

V
s
R
a

V
0
1
j ωC

V
0
R
b
= 0
Collecting like terms and rearranging yields
−V
0

1
1
j ωC
+
1
R
b

=
V
s
R
a
After further manipulation,
V
0
V
s
= −
1
R
a


1
1
1
j ωC
+
1
R
b


= −
1
R
a

1
j ωC +
1
R
b

V
0
V
s
= −
1
R
a
C

1
j ω +
1
R
b
C

Similar to the reasoning for the characteristic equation for a differential equation, the cutoff
frequency is defined as ω
c
=
1
R
b
C
(i.e., the denominator term, j ω +
1
R
b
C
set equal to zero).
Thus, with the cutoff frequency set at ω
c
= 500 rad/s, then
1
R
b
C
= 500. The cutoff frequency
is also defined as when |H( j ω)| =
M

2
, where M= 5. The magnitude of
V
0
V
s
is given by

V
0
V
s

=
1
R
a
C

ω
2
+

1
R
b
C

2
and at the cutoff frequency, ω
c
= 500 rad/s,
5

2
=
1
R
a
C

ω
2
c
+

1
R
b
C

2
With
1
R
b
C
= 500, the magnitude is
5

2
=
1
R
a
C

ω
2
c
+

1
R
b
C

2
=
1
R
a
C

500
2
+500
2
=
1
R
a
C
500

2
which gives
R
a
C =
1
2500
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ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS 145
Since we have three unknowns and two equations (R
a
C =
1
2500
and
1
R
b
C
= 500), there are an
infinite number of solutions. Therefore, one canselect a convenient value for one of the elements,
say R
a
= 20 k, and the other two elements are determined as
C =
1
2500 × R
a
=
1
2500 ×20000
= 20 nF
and
R
b
=
1
500 ×C
=
1
500 ×20 ×10
−9
= 100 k
A plot of the magnitude versus frequency is shown in the following figure. As can be seen, the
cutoff frequency gives a value of magnitude equal to 3.53 at 100 Hz, which is the design goal.
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Frequency (rad/s)
M
a
g
n
i
t
u
d
e
Example 13.2. Using the high-pass filter in the following circuit, design the filter to have a
gain of 5 and a cutoff frequency of 100 rad/s.
Ra
Rb
C
+
v0

V
S

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146 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Solution. Since the op amp is assumed ideal, and the noninverting input is connected to
ground, therefore the inverting input is also connected to ground. The operation of this filter
is readily apparent for at low frequencies, the capacitor acts like an open circuit and so no input
voltage is seen at the noninverting input. Since there is no input, then the output is zero. At
high frequencies, the capacitor acts like a short circuit, which reduces the circuit to an inverting
amplifier that passes through high frequency signals.
As before, the phasor method will be used to solve this problem by first transforming the
circuit into the phasor domain as shown in the following figure.
R
a
R
b
+
V
0

V
S
1
jωC
Summing the currents leaving the inverting input gives

V
s
R
a
+
1
j ωC

V
0
R
b
= 0
Rearranging yields
V
0
V
s
= −
R
b
R
a
+
1
j ωC
= −
R
b
R
a
j ω
j ω +
1
R
a
C
At cutoff frequency ω
c
= 100 rad/s =
1
R
a
C
. The magnitude of
V
0
V
s
is given by

V
0
V
s

=
R
b
R
a
ω

ω
2
+

1
R
a
C

2
and at the cutoff frequency,
5

2
=
R
b
R
a
ω
c

ω
2
c
+

1
R
a
C

2
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ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS 147
With
1
R
a
C
= 100 and ω
c
= 100 rad/s, gives
5

2
=
R
b
R
a
ω
c

ω
2
c
+

1
R
a
C

2
=
R
b
R
a
1
R
a
C

100
2
+100
2
=
R
b
R
a
100
100
=
R
b

2R
a
Thus
R
b
R
a
= 5. Since we have three unknowns and two equations, one can select a convenient
value for one of the elements, say R
b
= 20 k, and the other two elements are determined as
R
a
=
R
b
5
=
20000
5
= 4 k
and
C =
1
100R
a
=
1
100 ×4000
= 2.5 μF
A plot of the magnitude versus frequency is shown in the following figure. As can be seen, the
cutoff frequency gives a value of magnitude equal to 3.53 at 500 Hz, which is the design goal.
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400
6
5
4
3
2
1
0
Frequency (rad/s)
M
a
g
n
i
t
u
d
e
The next example demonstrates the technique to create a band-pass filters (which require
two cutoff frequencies).
Example 13.3. Using the band-pass filter in the following circuit, design the filter to have a
gain of 5 and pass through frequencies from 100 to 500 rad/s.
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148 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
CH
+
v0

CL
+
vL

VS
L
a
R
L
b
R
H
b
R
H
a
R

Solution. As usual, the design of the filter is done in the phasor domain, and makes use of
work done in the previous two examples. Note the elements around the op amp on the left are
the low-pass filter circuit elements, and those on the right, the high-pass filter. In fact, when
working with op amps, filters can be cascaded together to form other filters; thus a low-pass
and high-pass filter cascaded together form a band-pass. The phasor domain circuit is given in
the next figure.
+
V0

+
VL

VS
L
a
R
L
b
R
H
b
R
H
a
R
1
L
j C ω
1
H
j C ω
As before, the noninverting input to the op amps are connected to ground, which means
that the inverting input is also connected to ground. Summing the currents leaving the inverting
input for each op amp gives

V
s
R
a
L

V
L
1
j ωC
L

V
L
R
b
L
= 0

V
L
R
a
H
+
1
j ωC
H

V
0
R
b
H
= 0
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ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS 149
Solving the first equation for V
L
gives
V
L
= −
1
R
a
L
C
L

1
j ω +
1
R
b
L
C
L

V
s
Solving the second equation for V
0
gives
V
0
= −
R
b
H
R
a
H
j ω
j ω +
1
R
a
H
C
H
V
L
Substituting V
L
into the previous equation yields
V
0
=
R
b
H
R
a
H
j ω
j ω +
1
R
a
H
C
H
×
1
R
a
L
C
L

1
j ω +
1
R
b
L
C
L

V
s
The form of the solution is simply the product of each filter. The magnitude of the filter is

V
0
V
s

=
R
b
H
R
a
H
ω

ω
2
+

1
R
a
H
C
H

2
1
R
a
L
C
L

ω
2
+

1
R
b
L
C
L

2
Since there are two cutoff frequencies, two equations evolve,
ω
c
H
=
1
R
a
H
C
H
= 100 rad/s
and
ω
c
L
=
1
R
b
L
C
L
= 500 rad/s
At the either cutoff frequency, the magnitude is
5

2
, such that at ω
c
H
= 100 rad/s
5

2
=
R
b
H
R
a
H
ω
c
H

ω
2
c
H
+

1
R
a
H
C
H

2
1
R
a
L
C
L

ω
2
C
H
+

1
R
b
L
C
L

2
=
R
b
H
R
a
H
100

100
2
+100
2
1
R
a
L
C
L

100
2
+500
2
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150 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Therefore,
500

26 =
R
b
H
R
a
H
R
a
L
C
L
The other cutoff frequency gives the same result as the previous equation. There are now
three equations (
1
R
a
H
C
H
= 100,
1
R
b
L
C
L
= 500 and 500

26 =
R
b
H
R
a
H
R
a
L
C
L
), and six unknowns.
For convenience, set R
b
L
= 100 k and R
a
H
= 100 k, which gives C
L
=
1
500R
b
L
= 20nF and
C
H
=
1
100R
a
H
= 0.1 μF. Now from 500

26 =
R
b
H
R
a
H
1
R
a
L
C
L
,
R
b
H
R
a
L
= 500

26C
L
R
a
H
= 5.099
Once again, one can specify one of the resistors, say R
a
L
= 10 k, giving R
b
H
= 50.099 k.
Aplot of the magnitude versus frequency is shown in the following figure. As can be seen,
the cutoff frequency gives a value of magnitude equal to 3.53 at 500 Hz, which is the design
goal.
3.5
4
4.5
3
1
1.5
0.5
0
2.5
2
0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400
Frequency (rad/s)
M
a
g
n
i
t
u
d
e
None of the filters in Examples 13.1–13.3 have the ideal characteristics of Fig. 13.1. To improve
the performance from the passband to stopband in a low-pass filter with a sharper transition,
one can cascade identical filters together, i.e., connect the output of the first filter to the input of
the next filter and so on. The more cascaded filters, the better the performance. The magnitude
of the overall filter is the product of the individual filter magnitudes.
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ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS 151
v
0
V
S
R2
C
2
R1
C1
V
S
R2
R
1
C
2
C
1
v
0
C
3
R3
FIGURE 13.3: (Top) Second-order Butterworth low-pass filter. (Bottom) Third-order Butterworth
low-pass filter.
While this approach is appealing for improving the performance of the filter, the overall
magnitude of the filter does not remain a constant in the passband. Better filters are available
with superior performance such as a Butterworth filter. Two Butterworth filters are shown in
Fig. 13.3. Analysis of these filters is carried out in Exercises 183 and 184.
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152
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153
C H A P T E R 1 4
Bioinstrumentation Design
Figure 14.1 described the various elements needed in a biomedical instrumentation system. The
purpose of this type of instrument is to monitor the output of a sensor or sensors and to extract
information from the signals that are produced by the sensors.
Acquiring a discrete-time signal and storing this signal in computer memory from a
continuous-time signal is accomplished with an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. The A/D
converter uniformly samples the continuous-time waveform and transforms it into a sequence
of numbers, one every t
k
seconds. The A/D converter also transforms the continuous-time wave
forminto a digital signal (i.e., the amplitude takes one of 2
n
discrete values) which are converted
into computer words and stored in computer memory. To adequately capture the continuous-
time signal, the sampling instants t
k
must be selected carefully so that information is not lost.
The minimum sampling rate is twice the highest frequency content of the signal (based on the
sampling theorem from communication theory). Realistically, we often sample at five to ten
times the highest frequency content of the signal so as to achieve better accuracy by reducing
aliasing error.
14.1 NOISE
Measurement signals are always corrupted by noise in a biomedical instrumentation system.
Interference noise occurs when unwanted signals are introduced into the system by outside
sources, e.g. power lines and transmitted radio and television electromagnetic waves. This
kind of noise is effectively reduced by careful attention to the circuit’s wiring configuration to
minimize coupling effects.
Interference noise is introduced by power lines (50 or 60 Hz), fluorescent lights, AM/FM
radio broadcasts, computer clock oscillators, laboratory equipment, cellular phones, etc. Elec-
tromagnetic energy radiating from noise sources is injected into the amplifier circuit or into
the patient by capacitive and/or inductive coupling. Even the action potentials from nerve
conduction in the patient generate noise at the sensor/amplifier interface. Filters are used to
reduce the noise and to maximize the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio at the input of the A/D
converter.
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154 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
Sensor Calibration
A/D
Analog
processing
Signal
processing
Data
storage
Control &
feedback
Output
display
Data
transmission

FIGURE 14.1: Basic instrumentation systems using sensors to measure a signal with data acquisition,
storage and display capabilities, along with control and feedback.
Low frequency noise (amplifier DC offsets, sensor drift, temperature fluctuations, etc.)
is eliminated by a high-pass filter with the cutoff frequency set above the noise frequencies
and below the biological signal frequencies. High frequency noise (nerve conduction, radio
broadcasts, computers, cellular phones, etc.) is reduced by a low-pass filter with the cutoff set
below the noise frequencies and above the frequencies of the biological signal that is being
monitored. Power-line noise is a very difficult problem in biological monitoring since the
50 or 60 Hz frequency is usually within the frequency range of the biological signal that is
being measured. Band-stop filters are commonly used to reduce power-line noise. The notch
frequency in these band-stop filters is set to the power-line frequency of 50 or 60 Hz with the
cutoff frequencies located a few Hertz to either side.
The second type of corrupting signal is called inherent noise. Inherent noise arises from
random processes that are fundamental to the operation of the circuit’s elements and, hence, is
reduced by good circuit design practice. While inherent noise can be reduced, it can never be
eliminated. Low-pass filters can be used to reduce high frequency components. However, noise
signals within the frequency range of the biosignal being amplified cannot be eliminated by this
filtering approach.
14.2 COMPUTERS
Computers consist of three basic units: the central processing unit (CPU), the arithmetic and
logic unit (ALU), and memory. The CPU directs the functioning of all other units and controls
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BIOINSTRUMENTATION DESIGN 155
the flow of information among the units during processing procedures. It is controlled by
program instructions. The ALU performs all arithmetic calculations (add, subtract, multiply,
and divide) as well as logical operations (AND, OR, NOT) that compare one set of information
to another.
Computer memory consists of read only memory (ROM) and random access memory
(RAM). ROM is permanently programmed into the integrated circuit that forms the basis of
the CPU and cannot be changed by the user. RAM stores information temporarily and can be
changed by the user. RAM is where user-generated programs, input data, and processed data
are stored.
Computers are binary devices that use the presence of an electrical signal to represent 1
and the absence of an electrical pulse to represent 0. The signals are combined in groups of
8 bits , a byte, to code information. A word is made up of 2 bytes. Most desktop computers
that are available today are 32-bit systems, which means that they can address 4.29 × 109
locations in memory. The first microcomputers were 8-bit devices that could interact with only
256 memory locations.
Programming languages relate instructions and data to a fixed array of binary bits so that
the specific arrangement has only one meaning. Letters of the alphabet and other symbols, e.g.
punctuation marks, are represented by special codes. ASCII stands for the American Standard
Code for Information Exchange. ASCII provides a common standard that allows different
types of computers to exchange information. When word processing files are saved as text files,
they are saved in ASCII format. Ordinarily, word processing files are saved in special program-
specific binary formats, but almost all data analysis programs can import and export data in
ASCII files.
The lowest level of computer languages is machine language and consists of the 0s and
1s that the computer interprets. Machine language represents the natural language of a partic-
ular computer. At the next level, assembly languages use English-like abbreviations for binary
equivalents. Programs written in assembly language can manipulate memory locations directly.
These programs run very quickly and are often used in data acquisition systems that must rapidly
acquire a large number of samples, perhaps froman array of sensors, at a very high sampling rate.
Higher level languages, e.g. FORTRAN, PERL, and C++, contain statements that
accomplish tasks that require many machine or assembly language statements. Instructions in
these languages often resemble English and contain commonly used mathematical notations.
Higher level languages are easier to learn than machine and assembly languages. Program
instructions are designed to tell computers when and how to use various hardware components
to solve specific problems. These instructions must be delivered to the CPU of a computer in
the correct sequence in order to give the desired result.
When computers are used to acquire physiological data, programming instructions tell
the computer when data acquisition should begin, howoften samples should be taken fromhow
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156 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
many sensors, how long data acquisition should continue, and where the digitized data should
be stored. The rate at which a system can acquire samples is dependent upon the speed of the
computer’s clock, e.g. 233 MHz, and the number of computer instructions that must completed
in order to take a sample. Some computers can also control the gain on the input amplifiers
so that signals can be adjusted during data acquisition. In other systems, the gain of the input
amplifiers must be manually adjusted.
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157
Exercises
1. Suppose the current flowing through the circuit element in Fig. 3.5 is
i (t) =

0 t < 0
5e
−2t
A t ≥ 0
Find q(t).
2. The charge entering the upper terminal in the circuit element in Fig. 3.5 is
3 sin(2000t) μC. (a) How much charge enters the terminal from t = 0 to t = 0.5 ms?
(b) Find i (t).
3. Let i (t) shown in the following diagram flow through the circuit element in Fig. 3.5.
With i (t) = 0 for t < 0, find the total charge at: (a) 1 s, (b) 2 s, (c) 3 s and (d) 4 s.
i(t)
(A)
2
1
−1
1 2 3 4
t
(s)
4. Let the charge entering the upper terminal in the circuit element in Fig. 3.5 be q(t) =
e
−1000t
sin(2000πt) C for t ≥ 0. Determine the current for t ≥ 0.
5. Find the power absorbed for the circuit element in Fig. 3.5 if (a) v = 10 V
and i = −2 A, (b) v = −10 V and i = −2 A, (c) v = −5 V and i = 2 A, (d) v = 10 V
and i = 3 A.
6. Findthe power absorbedfor the circuit element inFig. 3.5if (a) v = 5 V and i = −2 A,
(b) v = 5 V and i = 12 A, (c) v = −5 V and i = −5 A, (d) v = −5 V and i = 2 A.
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158 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
7. Find the power absorbed for the circuit element in Fig. 3.5 if
a.
t
2 0
t
2 0
i
(A)
v
(V)
1
2
1
1 1
(s) (s)
b.
v
(V)
i
(A)
2
1
1 2 3
t
1
1 2 3
t
0 0
(s) (s)
c.
v
(V)
1
1 2 3
t
i
(A)
2
1
1 2
t
0 0
(s)
(s)
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EXERCISES 159
d.
i
(A)
t
v
(V)
2 0
t
2 0
(s)
(s)
1 1
e.
t
2
1
1 2
i
(A)
0
v
(V)
1
1 2
t
0
(s) (s)
8. Find the total energy delivered to the circuit element in Fig. 3.5 if
v = 3e
−1000t
u(t) V
i = 5e
−1000t
u(t) A
9. The voltage and current at the terminals in Fig. 3.5 are
v = e
−500t
u(t) V
i = 2te
−500t
u(t) A
(a) Find the time when the power is at its maximum.
(b) Find the energy delivered to the circuit element at t = 0.004 s.
(c) Find the total energy delivered to the circuit element.
10. The voltage and current at the terminals in Fig. 3.5 are
v = te
−10,000t
u(t) V
i = (t +10)e
−10,000t
u(t) A
(a) Find the time when the power is at its maximum.
(b) Find the maximum power.
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160 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
(c) Find the energy delivered to the circuit at t = 1 ×10
−4
s.
(d) Find the total energy delivered to the circuit element.
11. The voltage at the terminals in Fig. 3.5 is
v =









0V
t V
2 −t V
0 V
t < 0
0 ≤ t ≤ 1
1 < t ≤ 2
t > 2
If
p =









0 W t < 0
t
2
W 0 ≤ t ≤ 1
t
2
−4t +4 W 1 < t ≤ 2
0 W t > 2
how much charge enters the terminal between t = 0 and t = 2 s?
12. For the following circuit, find: (a) I
1
, V
2
and V
3
, (b) the power absorbed and delivered.
3V
4 V
2 A
V2
2V
2V
+

+ V3 −
I1
3 A
13. For the following circuit find (a) V
1
, (b) I
2
, (c) the power absorbed and delivered.
2V1 5A 2V
4V 4V
+
V1

I2
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EXERCISES 161
14. For the following circuit find (a) V
1
, (b) the power absorbed and delivered.
3 V
3A
2A
2 V1
2 V
+ V1 −
I1 5 V
+

6 V
15. For the following circuit, find the power in each circuit element.
2 A 4 A
3 A
5 V 3 V
4 V
10 V
16. For the following circuit, find (a) I
1
and I
2
, (b) power dissipated in each resistor, (c)
show that the power dissipated equals the power generated.
2 Ω 2 Ω
6 Ω 2 Ω
2 Ω 2 Ω
I2
I1
14 V
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162 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
17. (a) Find the power dissipated in each resistor. (b) Showthat the power dissipated equals
the power generated.
5 V
2 V
5 V
1 Ω
4 Ω
3 Ω
18. Find V
R
in the following circuit.
10 V
2 VR
2 Ω
5 Ω
3 Ω
3 V
+
VR

19. Find I in the following circuit.
12 V
8 V
4 Ω
5 Ω
2 Ω
3I
I
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EXERCISES 163
20. Find I
R
in the following circuit.
4 A 2 A 3 IR 2 Ω 1 Ω
IR
21. Find I
2
in the following circuit.
3 A 3 I1
I1
I2
1
3
Ω
1
8
Ω
1
4
Ω
22. Find i
b
for the following circuit.
5 A 2Va
ib
3 Ω 6 Ω 8 Ω 2 Ω
+
Va

23. Find the equivalent resistance R
ab
for the following circuit.
4 Ω
4 Ω
2 Ω
3 Ω 4 Ω
a
b
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164 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
24. Find the equivalent resistance R
ab
for the following circuit.
a
b
7 Ω
4 Ω 2 Ω
8 Ω
4 Ω
3 Ω
3 Ω
1 Ω
2 Ω
3 Ω
25. Find the equivalent resistance R
ab
for the following circuit.
8 Ω
8 Ω
a
b
2 Ω
6 Ω 4 Ω
6 Ω
3 Ω
2 Ω
26. Find the equivalent resistance R
ab
for the following circuit.
9 Ω
a b
2 Ω 4 Ω
4 Ω 2 Ω
6 Ω
6 Ω
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EXERCISES 165
27. Find the equivalent resistance R
ab
for the following circuit.
1 Ω
3 Ω 6 Ω
4 Ω
12 Ω
12 Ω
5 Ω
4 Ω 1 Ω
a
b
28. Find the equivalent resistance R
ab
for the following circuit.
17 Ω
20 Ω
7 Ω
8 Ω
15 Ω
5 Ω
20 Ω
10 Ω
b a
29. Find I
1
for the following circuit.
2 Ω
3 Ω
4 Ω
2 Ω 5 A
I1
30. Find I
1
and V
1
for the following circuit.
2 Ω
16 Ω 80 Ω
5 Ω
3 Ω
12 Ω
20 A
+
V1

I1
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166 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
31. Find I
1
and V
1
for the following circuit.
5 Ω
15 Ω
20 Ω
60 Ω
10 A
I
1
+ V1 −
32. Find I
1
, V
1
and V
2
for the following circuit.
18 V
3 Ω
6 Ω 9 Ω
6 Ω
4.5 Ω 9 Ω
+
V1

+
V2

I1
33. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
5 Ω 2 Ω
3 Ω 3 Ω 35 V 50 V
10 Ω
+
v2

+
v1

34. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
2 A 5 A 16 Ω 10 Ω

+
v2

+
v1

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EXERCISES 167
35. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
15 V 5 A
2 Ω 3 Ω
4 Ω 5 Ω
1 Ω
+
v1

− v2 +
36. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
2 A 2 i1 16 Ω 10 Ω
2 Ω
+
v2

+
v1

i1
37. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
3 Ω
2 Ω 5 Ω 1 Ω 3 A
2 A
2Va
+
v1

+
v2

+ Va −
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168 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
38. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
+
v1

+
v2

+ Vb −
3 Ω 2 Ω
10 Ω
10 V
2 Vb
2 A
5 Ω
3 Ω
6 Ω 5 Ω 3ia
ia
39. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
10 Ω 4 A
4 V
6 Ω 3 Ω
8 Ω
8 Ω
5 Ω
4 Ω
5 V
+
v2

+
v1

40. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
5 V
2 Ω
4 Ω
5 Ω
3 Ω
10 V
+
v2

+
v1

3v1 4 V
2 Ω
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EXERCISES 169
41. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
3 Ω 5 Ω
3ia
5 A 2 Ω 2 A 20 Ω
40 Ω
10 V
+
v1

+
v2

ia
42. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
3 V
3 Ω
+
v1

+
v2

6 Ω
2v1
5 Ω
5 Ω
4 Ω
4ia
5 Ω
8 Ω 2 A
ia
43. Use the node-voltage method to determine v
1
and v
2
.
15 V 5 A
3ia
3 Ω
5 Ω
2 Ω 5 Ω
2 Ω 1 Ω
+
v1

+
v2

ia
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170 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
44. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
10 Ω
15 Ω
10 Ω 5 Ω
5 V 2 V
20 Ω
i 2 i1
45. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
5 Ω 4 Ω
20 Ω 10 Ω
3 Ω
10 V
i2
i1
46. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
5 V 3i2
10 Ω 5 Ω
2 Ω
3 Ω 5 Ω
i1 i2
47. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
2 Ω
2 V
5 Ω 3 Ω 6 Ω
4 Ω 20 Ω
3 V 2 i2 5 V
i1
i2
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EXERCISES 171
48. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
5 Ω
3 Ω 5 Ω
2 Ω
3i1
20 V
10 Ω
10 V
4 Ω 15 Ω
i2 i1
49. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
10Ω
4 Ω
20 V
10 V 2va
10 Ω
6 Ω
2 Ω 5 Ω 3 Ω
4 Ω
+
va

i1
i2
50. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
2 V
3 A
4 V
8 Ω 4 Ω
3 Ω
2 Ω 5 Ω
i1
i2
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172 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
51. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
+ va −
5 Ω 3 Ω
5 V 5 A
3 Ω
3va
3 Ω 2 Ω
2 Ω
i1 i2
52. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
6 V
2 A
10 V
4 Ω
2 Ω
3 Ω 2 Ω
3 Ω 4 Ω
5 Ω 3i1 6 Ω
5 Ω
i1
i2
53. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
2i1
2 A
5 V
5 Ω 6 Ω
10 Ω
3 Ω 4 Ω
5 Ω 1 Ω
4 Ω
2 V
2 Ω
2va
+
va

i2
i1
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EXERCISES 173
54. Use the mesh-current method to determine i
1
and i
2
.
2 Ω 3 Ω 5 Ω
5 Ω
3 Ω
6 Ω
5 Ω
2 Ω
6 Ω 4 Ω
8 Ω
2 V
3 va
5 V
5 V
10 V 3 A

va
+
i1 i2
55. Use a series of source transformations and resistor combinations to find v
o
.
+
vo

2 A 5 Ω 4 A
3 Ω
3 Ω 5 Ω
6 Ω
2 V
56. Use a series of source transformations and resistor combinations to find v
o
.
15 Ω
5 Ω
10 Ω 10 Ω 5 A 2 Ω
2 Ω 4 Ω
4 Ω
10 V
+
vo

P1: KDD
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174 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
57. Use a series of source transformations and resistor combinations to find v
o
.
+
vo

5 Ω
3 A
10 Ω
3 Ω
2 V
10 Ω 2 Ω 2 A 6 Ω
4 Ω 2 Ω
5 V
58. Use the superposition method to find v
o
.
5 V
4 Ω 3 Ω
2 Ω 2 Ω
+
v0

10 V
59. Use the superposition method to find v
o
.
3 Ω
3 Ω 4 V
0.5 Ω
2 V
3 Ω 10 A 2 Ω
+
vo

60. Use the superposition method to find v
o
.
3 A 2 Ω
3 Ω
5 Ω
4 V
0.5 Ω
2ia 3 V
2 Ω
4 Ω
+
vo

ia
3 Ω
P1: KDD
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EXERCISES 175
61. Use the superposition method to find v
o
.
5 V
2 Ω
5 Ω 3 Ω
3 Ω
5 A
2 Ω
3va
+va −
+
vo

62. Find the Th´ evenin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
5 A
a
b
5 Ω 2 Ω
3 Ω
63. Find the Th´ evenin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
5 Ω 2 Ω 10 Ω
3 Ω 35 V
a
b
50 V
64. Find the Th´ evenin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
2 Ω 3 Ω
4 Ω 15 V
a b
5 A
1 Ω
5 Ω
P1: KDD
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176 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
65. Find the Th´ evenin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
2 A 16 Ω
2 Ω
10 Ω 2i1
a
b
i1
66. Find the Th´ evenin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
a
b
3 A 2 Ω
5 A
3 Ω
5 Ω 2va
+va −
67. Find the Th´ evenin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
a
b
3ia
3 Ω 5 Ω 40 Ω
10 V 2 A 2 Ω 5 A
ia
68. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
5 V 8 Ω 10 Ω
a
b
8 Ω 6 Ω
P1: KDD
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EXERCISES 177
69. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
8 Ω 2 Ω
2 Ω
a
b
3 Ω 5 A 5 A
70. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
a b
3 Ω 8 Ω
6 Ω
2 Ω 4 Ω
2 V 2 A
71. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
5 V
3ia
3 Ω
a
b
2 Ω 2 Ω
6 Ω
ia
72. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
2 V
5 Ω
5ia
3 Ω
a
b
3 Ω
5 Ω
6 Ω 4 Ω
8 Ω
2va
+ va −
ia
P1: KDD
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178 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
73. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
10 V 6 Ω
a
b
3 Ω 5 Ω
3 V
2 Ω
5i1
i
1
74. A current pulse given by i (t) = (2 +10e
−2t
)u(t) is applied through a 10 mH inductor.
(a) Find the voltage across the inductor. (b) Sketch the current and voltage. (c) Find
the power as a function of time.
75. A current pulse given by i (t) = (5 +3 sin(2t))u(t) is applied through a 2 mH inductor.
Determine the voltage across the inductor.
76. The current pulse shown in the following figure is applied through a 5 mH inductor.
Find the voltage, power and energy.
i(t)
(A)
1
1 2 3
t
0
−1
4
(s)
77. The voltage across an L = 2.5 mH inductor is v(t) = 10 cos(1000t) mV, with i (0) =
1 mA. (a) Find i (t) for t ≥ 0. (b) Find the power and energy.
P1: KDD
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EXERCISES 179
78. The voltage across an inductor is given by the following figure. If L = 30 mH and
i (0) = 0 A, find i (t) for t ≥ 0.
v
(mv)
4
1 2 3
t
0
(s)
79. The voltage across an inductor is given by the following figure. If L = 50 mH and
i (0) = 0 A, find i (t) for t ≥ 0.
v
(mv)
1
t
(s)
1 2 0
80. The voltage across a 4 μF capacitor is v(t) = (200,000t −50,000)e
−2000t
u(t) V. Find
(a) current through the capacitor, (b) power as a function of time, (c) energy.
81. The voltage across a 0.5 μF capacitor is v(t) = (3 +5e
−2t
)u(t) V. Find the current and
power.
82. The voltage across a 1 μFcapacitor is v(t) = (5t +3 sin(2t))e
−3t
u(t) V. Findthe current
and power.
83. The current through a 5 μF capacitor is
i (t) =









0 mA t < 0 ms
5t
2
mA 0 ≤ t < 1 ms
5

2 −t
2

mA 1 <t ≤

2 ms
0 mA t >

2 ms
Find the voltage across the capacitor.
P1: KDD
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180 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
84. The current through a 10 μF capacitor is given by the following figure. If v(1) = 0 V,
find v(t) for t > 1 s.
i
(mA)
1
1 2 0
t
(ms)
3
85. The current through a 100 μF capacitor is given by the following figure. If v(0) is 0 V,
find v(t) for t ≥ 0 s.
2
t
(ms)
1 2 0
i(t)
(mA)
86. Find equivalent inductance between terminals a and b for the circuit in the following
figure.
a
b
3 H
3 H
2 H
4 H 2 H
P1: KDD
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EXERCISES 181
87. Find equivalent inductance between terminals a and b for the circuit in the following
figure.
a
b
4 H
8 H
7 H 4 H 1 H
3 H
2 H 3 H 2 H
3 H
88. Find equivalent inductance between terminals a and b for the circuit in the following
figure.
a
b
8 H
8 H
2 H 2 H
6 H
6 H
4 H
89. Find the equivalent capacitance between terminals a and b for the following circuit.
4 F 6 F
6 F
3 F 4 F
1
2
F
a
b
P1: KDD
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182 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
90. Find the equivalent capacitance between terminals a and b for the following circuit.
a b
3 F
8 F
6 F 4 F
5 F
6 F
4 F 4 F
91. Find the equivalent capacitance between terminals a and b for the following circuit.
a b
7 F
9 F
8 F
5 F
5 F 4 F
16 F
92. Reduce the following circuit to a single capacitor and inductor.
a
b
6 H
3 H
6 H
1 H
4 H
4 H
8 F
2 F
10 F
1
2
H
P1: KDD
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EXERCISES 183
93. Reduce the following circuit to a single capacitor and inductor.
a
b
6 F
4 F
5 F
18 F
6 H
3 H
1 H
4 H
1 H
94. For the following circuit, I
S
= 2(1 −e
−5t
)u(t) Aand i (0) = 2 A. (a) Find v(t) for t ≥ 0.
(b) Find i (t) for t ≥ 0.
20 H 5 H
i
+
v

( )
5
2 1 ( ) A
t
e u t


95. For the following circuit, I
S
= 5 sin 2t A and i (0) =
1
2
A. (a) Find v(t) for t ≥ 0. (b)
Find i (t) for t ≥ 0.
20 H 5 H
+
v

4 H
i
I
S
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184 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
96. For the following circuit, I
S
= 5(1 −e
−3t
) u(t) A, i
1
(0) = 1 A, and i
2
(0) = 2 A. Find
the following for t ≥ 0: (a)v
o
(t), (b)v
1
(t), (c) i
o
(t), (d) i
1
(t), (e) i
2
(t).
1 H
20 H 5 H
+
v
1

i
2
+v
0

i
1
i
0
IS
97. For the following circuit, V
S
= 3(1 −e
−5t
) u(t) V and v(0) = 2 V. Find the following
fort ≥ 0: (a)i (t), (b) v(t).
+
v

6 F
3 F
i
V
S
98. For the following circuit, V
S
= 5 cos 3t Vand v(0) = 1 V. Find the following for t ≥ 0:
(a) i (t), (b) v(t).
+
v

20 F
5 F
i
V
S
P1: KDD
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EXERCISES 185
99. For the following circuit, V
S
= 2(1 −e
−3t
) u(t) V, v
1
(0) = 3 V and v
2
(0) = 2 V. Find
the following for t ≥ 0: (a) i
1
(t), (b) v
1
(t), (c) v
2
(t), (d) i
2
(t).
5 F
18 F 2 F
+
v
2

+v
1

i
1
i
2
V
S
100. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
+
v
1

i
L
2 H
b
a
t = 0
10 Ω
3 Ω
6 V
101. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
5 Ω
4 Ω 6 Ω
10 Ω
8 A
+
v
1

4 H
i
L
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186 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
102. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
5 V
2 Ω
12 Ω 4 Ω
6 Ω
5 H
+
v
1

i
L
103. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
3 Ω
6 Ω
5 H
i
L
b
a
t = 0
8 Ω
6 Ω 10 V
+
v
1

104. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
2 H
b
a
t = 0
2 Ω
4 5 A
i
L
5 Ω 20 Ω 2 Ω
+
v
1

P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
EXERCISES 187
105. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
10 V
2 Ω
3 Ω
b
a
t = 0
4 Ω 4 H
i
L
16 Ω
+
v
1

106. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
10 V
8 Ω
8 Ω
12 Ω
5 Ω 2 H
i
L
+
v
1

107. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
20 H 5 H 16 Ω
2 Ω
3 Ω 20 V
i
L
+
v
1

P1: KDD
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188 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
108. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
, i
1
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
3 H
2 Ω
10 V 4 Ω 5i
1
12 Ω
+
v
1

i
1
i
L
109. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
, i
1
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
6 H 6 A
2i
1
5 Ω
20 Ω
4 Ω 40 Ω 10 Ω
+
v1

i
L
i
1
110. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
2 F 10 V
5 Ω
10 Ω
+
v
C

i
1
P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
EXERCISES 189
111. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
10 F
2 Ω 10 Ω
10 Ω 40 Ω 10 V 8 A
+
v
C

i
1
112. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
3 F
4 Ω
3 Ω 6 Ω
8 Ω
+
v
C

5 V
i
1
113. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
10 F
+
v
C

40 Ω 40 Ω
12 Ω
10 Ω 8 A
i
1
P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
190 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
114. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
5 F
2 Ω
12 Ω 12 Ω 4 Ω 10 V
i1
+
vC

115. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
4 F 5 Ω
i1
+
vC

153
8
Ω 8 Ω
12 Ω
5 A
116. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
4 F
8 Ω
40 Ω 20 V
i1
+
vC

4 F 10 Ω
117. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0 5 Ω
20 V 4 Ω 2i1 12 Ω
+
vC

3 F
i1
P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
EXERCISES 191
118. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
5i
1
5 Ω
20 Ω
8 Ω 12 Ω
+
v
C

3 Ω 3 F
6 Ω
15 V
i
1
119. The switch has been in position a for a very long time. At t = 0, the switch moves to
position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
10 V 3 A 3 H
5 Ω 20 Ω
+v
1

i
L
120. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
3 H
i
L
+
v
1

b
a
t = 0
12 Ω
5 V
10 V
4 Ω
8 Ω
P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
192 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
121. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
10 H 5 V 10 A 5 A 40 Ω
10 Ω 2 Ω
+
v
1

i
L
122. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
10 V
+
v
1

12 Ω
2 Ω
5 V
6 Ω
5 H
4 Ω
L
i
123. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
1
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
10 V
5 V
4 Ω
2 Ω
+
v
1

12 Ω 3 H 3i1
i1
P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
EXERCISES 193
124. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find i
L
, i
1
and v
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
6 A
4 V
4 Ω
20 Ω
5 Ω 40 Ω 10 Ω 3 H
2i
1
+
v
1

i
L
i
1
125. The switch has been position a for a very long time. At t = 0, the switch closes. Find
v
C
and i
1
for t > 0.
t = 0
5 V 3 A 2 F
5 Ω 20 Ω
5 Ω
+
vC

i1
126. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
10 V
6 Ω
+
vC

3 Ω 3 F
2 Ω
20 Ω 3 A
i1
P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
194 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
127. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
+
vC

120 V 5 A
40 Ω
10 Ω
10 F
12 Ω
i1
128. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
2 F 8 F
10 V 5 V
5 Ω 10 Ω
+
v
C

i
1
129. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch instantaneously
moves to position b. Find v
c
and i
1
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 0
3 F
10 V
+
v
C

6 Ω
4 Ω
6 F
5 Ω
6 V
i
1
P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
EXERCISES 195
130. The switches have been in positions a and c for a long time. At t = 0, switch ab
instantaneously moves to position b. At t = 0.06, switch cd instantaneously moves to
position d. Find i
1
and v
c
for t > 0.
5 A 2 Ω
b
a
t = 0
5 F
+
v
C

3 A 5 Ω
d c
t = 0.06s
5 V
4 Ω
20 F
2 Ω
i
1
131. The switches have been in positions a and c for a long time. At t = 0, switch ab
instantaneously moves to position b. At t = 0.15, switch cd instantaneously moves to
position d. Find i
1
and v
c
for t > 0.
c
d
t = 0.15
b
a
t = 0
3 A
6 Ω
4 Ω
3 F
+
v
C

10 Ω
4 V 6 V
i
1
132. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) i
s
= 3u(t) A; (b) i
s
=
1 +3u(t) A.
4 H 3 F is 5 Ω
+
vC

iL
P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
196 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
133. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) v
s
= 5u(t) V; (b) v
s
=
2 +5u(t) V.
3 H 6 F vs
+
vC

iL
5 Ω
20 Ω
134. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) i
s
= 10u(t) A; (b) i
s
=
−1 +10u(t) A.
2 H 15 F is 10 Ω
+
vC

iL
135. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) v
s
= 20u(t) V; (b) v
s
=
4 +20u(t) V.
16 H 1 F vs 4 Ω
+
vC

iL
4 Ω
136. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) i
s
= 3u(t) A; (b) i
s
=
−1 +3u(t) A.
200 H 2 F is 5 Ω
+
vC

i
L
P1: KDD
MOBK036-exe MOBK036-Enderle.cls November 1, 2006 16:12
EXERCISES 197
137. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) v
s
= 5u(t) V; (b) v
s
=
12 +5u(t) V.
360 H 10 F vs 6 Ω
+
vC

iL 6 Ω
138. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) i
s
= 5u(t) A; (b) i
s
=
5 +5u(t) A.
350 H 3 F is 5 Ω
+
vC

iL
139. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) v
s
= 3u(t) V; (b) v
s
=
2 +3u(t) V.
20 H 1 F vs 4 Ω
+
vC

iL
4 Ω
140. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) i
s
= 10u(t) A; (b) i
s
= −1 +
10u(t) A.
25 H 5 F is 1 Ω
+
vC

iL
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198 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
141. Find i
L
and v
c
for t >0 for the following circuit if: (a) v
s
= 5u(t) V; (b) v
s
=
5u(t) +3 V.
4 H
1.5 F
2 Ω
iL
+vC −
vs
142. Findi
L
andv
c
for t >0for the following circuit if: (a) i
s
= 3u(t) A; (b) i
s
= 3u(t) −1 A.
10 H
1 F
4 Ω
iL
+ vC −
is
143. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) i
s
=10u(t) A; (b) i
s
= 10u(t) +
5 A.
20 H
4 F
1 Ω
iL
+vC −
2 Ω is
144. Find i
L
, i
1
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) v
s
= 5u(t) V; (b) v
s
=
5u(t) +2 V.
12 H
12 F
iL
+vC −
8
12
4 Ω
5i1 vs
i1
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EXERCISES 199
145. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) i
s
= 6u(t) A; (b) i
s
=
3u(t) +1 A.
64 H
16 F
4 Ω
i
L
+ v
C

i
s
146. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) v
s
= 4u(t) V; (b) v
s
=
4u(t) −2 V.
25 H
4 F
5 Ω
i
L
+ v
C

v
s
147. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) v
s
= 2u(t) V; (b) v
c
=
2u(t) +2 V.
5 H
3 F
6 Ω
i
L
+ v
C

v
s
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200 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
148. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) i
s
= 2u(t) A; (b) i
s
=
2u(t) −1 A.
20 H
2 F
9 Ω
i
L
+v
C

i
s
149. Find i
L
and v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) v
s
= 5u(t) V; (b) v
s
=
5u(t) −2 V.
2 H
10 F
1 Ω
i
L
+v
C

v
s
150. For the following circuit we are given that i
L
1
(0) = 2 A, i
L
2
(0) = 5 A, v
c
1
(0) = 2 V,
v
c
2
(0) = −3 V and i
s
= 2e
−2t
u(t) A. (a) Write the node-voltage equations necessary to
solve this circuit. (b) Write the mesh-current equations necessary to solve this circuit.
(c) Use the node-voltage method to find v
b
for t > 0. (d) Use the mesh-current method
to find v
b
for t > 0.
+ v
C1 −
i
s
2 F
2 F
3 Ω
1 Ω
1
L
i
3 H
1 Ω
2 H
+

2
C
v
2
L
i
+

b
v
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EXERCISES 201
151. Find v
c
1
for t > 0 for the following circuit: (a) using the node-voltage method if v
s
=
2e
−3t
u(t) V; (b) using the mesh-current method if v
s
= 2e
−3t
u(t) V; (c) using the node-
voltage method if v
s
= 3 cos(2t) u(t) V; (d) using the mesh-current method if v
s
=
3 cos(2t) u(t) V; (e) using the node-voltage method if v
s
= 3u(t) −1 V; (f ) using the
mesh-current method if v
s
= 3u(t) −1 V.
v
s
4 F
3 F
3 H
6 Ω 3 Ω
2 Ω
+

1
C
v
152. Find i
L
1
for t > 0 for the following circuit: (a) using the node-voltage method if i
s
=
2e
−3t
u(t) A; (b) using the mesh-current method if i
s
= 2e
−3t
u(t) A; (c) using the node-
voltage method if i
s
= 3 cos(2t) u(t) A; (d) using the mesh-current method if i
s
=
3 cos(2t) u(t) A; (e) using the node-voltage method if i
s
= 2u(t) +2 A; (f ) using the
mesh-current method if i
s
= 2u(t) +2 A.
i
s
2 Ω 4 Ω
2 H
1
2
H 3 F
1
L
i
153. Find v
c
for t > 0 for the following circuit: (a) using the node-voltage method if
v
s
= 3e
−5t
u(t) V; (b) using the mesh-current method if v
s
= 3e
−5t
u(t) V; (c) using
the node-voltage method if v
s
= 3 sin(5t) u(t) V; (d) using the mesh-current method if
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202 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
v
s
= 3 sin(5t) u(t) V; (e) using the node-voltage method if v
s
= 5u(t) −2 V; (f ) using
the mesh-current method if v
s
= 5u(t) −2 V.
+

1
C
v
3 H 2 H
4 F 2 F
5 Ω
1
2
F v
s
154. Find i
L
for t > 0 for the following circuit: (a) using the node-voltage method if i
s
=
5e
−3t
u(t) A; (b) using the mesh-current method if i
s
= 5e
−3t
u(t) A; (c) using the node-
voltage method if i
s
= 2 sin(3t) u(t) A; (d) using the mesh-current method if i
s
=
2 sin(3t) u(t) A; (e) using the node-voltage method if i
s
= 2u(t) +3 A; (f ) using the
mesh-current method if i
s
= 2u(t) +3 A.
i
s 5 Ω
3 H 5 H
2 F 4 F 2 Ω
i
L
155. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch moves to position
b, then at t = 4, the switch moves back to position a. Find v
c
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 4 s
12 Ω 10 Ω
10 V
5 V
4 Ω
2 F
3 H

+
v
C

t = 0 s
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EXERCISES 203
156. The switches operate as indicated in the following circuit. Find v
c
for t > 0.
t = 0
3 Ω
10 V 3 A
4 Ω
5 Ω
3 F
+v
C

2 H
t = 1 s
10 Ω
157. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0, the switch moves to position
b, and then back to position a at t = 2 s. Find v
c
for t > 0.
b
a
t = 2 s
2 Ω
5 V
10 V
4 Ω
t = 0 s
3 H 5i
1 12 Ω
2 Ω
3 F
+
v
C

i
1
158. The switches operate as indicated in the following circuit. Find i
L
for t > 0.
t = 2 s
3 H
iL
5 F
b
a
t = 0
6 A
20 Ω
5 Ω
4 Ω
4 V
40 Ω
2i
1
i1
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204 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
159. The operational amplifier shown in the following figure is ideal. Find v
o
and i
o
.
20 kΩ v0
100 kΩ
+12 V
−12 V
i0
25 kΩ
5 kΩ
2 V
3 V

+
160. The operational amplifier shown in the following figure is ideal. Find v
o
and i
o
.
5 kΩ
v0
120 kΩ
+10 V


10 V
i0
30 kΩ
2 V
161. The operational amplifier shown in the following figure is ideal. Find v
o
and i
o
.
25 kΩ
v0
200 kΩ
+12 V


12 V
i0
50 kΩ
5 V
6 V

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EXERCISES 205
162. The operational amplifier shown in the following figure is ideal. Find v
o
.
20 kΩ
5 kΩ
20 kΩ
10 V
5 V
100 kΩ
+12 V


12 V
v0
80 kΩ
90 kΩ

163. Find the overall gain for the following circuit if the operational amplifier is ideal. Draw
a graph of v
o
versus V
s
if V
s
varies between 0 and 10 V.
v0
+12 V
−12 V
10 kΩ
20 kΩ
5 kΩ
VS
164. Find v
o
in the following circuit if the operational amplifier is ideal.
6 kΩ
3 kΩ
4 V
9 V
v0
2 kΩ
+9 V
−9 V
5 V
5 kΩ
10
3
Ω k
+

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206 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
165. Find v
o
in the following circuit if the operational amplifier is ideal.
v0
3 kΩ
+12 V
−12 V
3 V
10 V
1 kΩ
5 V
6 kΩ
+

166. Find i
o
in the following circuit if the operational amplifiers are ideal.
i0
10 kΩ
+12 V
− − 12 V
3 kΩ
4 kΩ
5 V
3 V
20 kΩ
+12 V
12 V
5 kΩ
4 V
2 kΩ
5 V
167. Find v
o
in the following circuit if the operational amplifiers are ideal.
v0
20 kΩ
+12 V
−12 V
5 kΩ
3 kΩ
8 V
5 V
1 V
3 kΩ
+12 V
−12 V
1 kΩ
3 kΩ
+

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EXERCISES 207
168. Suppose the input V
s
is given as a triangular waveformas shown in the following figure.
If there is no stored energy in the following circuit with an ideal operational amplifier,
find v
o
.
VS
2 F
1
2
Ω
+12 V
−12 V
v0
V
s
(V)
1
1 2 3
t
0
−1
4
(s)
+

169. Suppose the input V
s
is given in the following figure. If there is no stored energy in the
following circuit with an ideal operational amplifier, find v
o
.

10
1 2 3
t
0
−10
4
(s)
Vs
(V)

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208 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
VS
0 6μ . F
+12 V
−12 V
v0
1 MΩ
+

170. Suppose the input V
s
is given in the following figure. If there is no stored energy in the
following circuit with an ideal operational amplifier, find v
o
.
2
Vs
(V)
2
t
(s)
1 2 0
VS
1μF
+12 V
−12 V
v0
250 kΩ
+

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EXERCISES 209
171. Suppose the input V
s
is given in the following figure. If there is no stored energy in the
following circuit with an ideal operational amplifier, find v
o
.
V
s
(V)
0.2
t
(s)
−0.2
0.25
0.5
0.75
1
V
S
0 25μ . F
+12 V
−12 V
v
0
50 kΩ
+

172. The following circuit is operating in the sinusoidal steady state. Find the steady-state
expression for i
L
if i
s
= 30 cos 20t A.
4 H 3 F i
s 5 Ω
+
v
C

i
L
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210 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
173. The following circuit is operating in the sinusoidal steady state. Find the steady-state
expression for v
c
if v
s
= 10 sin 1000t V.
3 H 6 F v
s
+
v
C

i
L

20 Ω
174. The following circuit is operating in the sinusoidal steady state. Find the steady-state
expression for i
L
if i
s
= 5 cos 500t A.
2 H 15 F i
s 10 Ω
+
v
C

i
L
175. The following circuit is operating in the sinusoidal steady state. Find the steady-state
expression for v
c
if i
s
= 25 cos 4000t V.
16 H 1 F v
s 4 Ω
+
v
C

i
L
4 Ω
176. Design a low-pass filter with a magnitude of 10 and a cutoff frequency of 250 rad/s.
177. Design a high-pass filter with a magnitude of 20 and a cutoff frequency of 300 rad/s.
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EXERCISES 211
178. Design a band-pass filter a gain of 15 and pass through frequencies from 50 to 200
rad/s.
179. Design a low-pass filter with a magnitude of 5 and a cutoff frequency of 200 rad/s.
180. Design a high-pass filter with a magnitude of 10 and a cutoff frequency of 500 rad/s.
181. Design a band-pass filter a gain of 10 and pass through frequencies from 20 to 100
rad/s.
182. Suppose the operational amplifier in the following circuit is ideal. (The circuit is a low-
pass first-order Butterworth filter.) Find the magnitude of the output v
o
as a function
of frequency.
v
0
V
S
R
C

+
183. With an ideal operational amplifier, the following circuit is a second-order Butterworth
low-pass filter. Find the magnitude of the output v
o
as a function of frequency.
v
0
VS
R
2
C2
R
1
C1
+

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212 BIOINSTRUMENTATION
184. Athird-order Butterworth low-pass filter is shown in the following circuit with an ideal
operational amplifier. Find the magnitude of the output v
o
as a function of frequency.
VS
R2
R1
C2
C1
v0
C3
R3
+

Copyright © 2006 by Morgan & Claypool All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means—electronic, mechanical, photocopy, recording, or any other except for brief quotations in printed reviews, without the prior permission of the publisher. Bioinstrumentation John D. Enderle www.morganclaypool.com ISBN-10: 1598291327 ISBN-13: 9781598291322 ISBN-10: 1598291335 ISBN-13: 9781598291339 paperback paperback ebook ebook

DOI 10.2200/S00043ED1V01Y200608BME006 Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data SYNTHESIS LECTURES ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING Lecture #6 Series Editor and Affiliation: John D. Enderle, University of Connecticut 1930-0328 Print 1930-0336 Electronic First Edition 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Portions of this manuscript were reprinted from the following book with the Permission of Elsevier, INTRODUCTION TO BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, ISBN 0122386626 2005, Chapter 8, pp403-504, Enderle et al 2nd edition. This permission is granted for non-exclusive world English rights only in both print and on the world wide web. Additional Information regarding the bestselling book, Introduction to Biomedical Engineering, 2nd edition 2005, by Enderle, Blanchard and Bronzino, from Elsevier can be found on the Elsevier Homepage http://www/elsevier.com.

Bioinstrumentation
John D. Enderle
Program Director & Professor for Biomedical Engineering University of Connecticut

SYNTHESIS LECTURES ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING #6

M &C

Mor gan

& Cl aypool

Publishers

ABSTRACT
This short book provides basic information about bioinstrumentation and electric circuit theory. Many biomedical instruments use a transducer or sensor to convert a signal created by the body into an electric signal. Our goal here is to develop expertise in electric circuit theory applied to bioinstrumentation. We begin with a description of variables used in circuit theory, charge, current, voltage, power and energy. Next, Kirchhoff ’s current and voltage laws are introduced, followed by resistance, simplifications of resistive circuits and voltage and current calculations. Circuit analysis techniques are then presented, followed by inductance and capacitance, and solutions of circuits using the differential equation method. Finally, the operational amplifier and time varying signals are introduced. This lecture is written for a student or researcher or engineer who has completed the first two years of an engineering program (i.e., 3 semesters of calculus and differential equations). A considerable effort has been made to develop the theory in a logical manner—developing special mathematical skills as needed. At the end of the short book is a wide selection of problems, ranging from simple to complex.

KEYWORDS
Bioinstrumentation, Circuit Theory, Introductory Biomedical Engineering, Sensors, Transducers, Circuits, Voltage, Current

. . . . . . . . . . 19 4. . . . . . . . . . . 13 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Resistors in Parallel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Current. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . 24 4. . . . . .1 Resistors in Series . . . 6. . . . .5 Voltage and Current Divider Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Resistors . . . . . . . . . 23 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Sources .3 Equivalent Resistance. . . . . . . . . 26 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Node-Voltage Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 5. . . .1 Kirchhoff ’s Voltage Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 6. . . . . . 44 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Basic Bioinstrumentation System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voltage. . . . . . . . . .22 4. . . . . . . . 7 3. .3 Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Norton’s Theorem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Power and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3. . . . . . . . . . . 17 4. . . . . . . . . . . 12 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Superposition and Source Transformations . . . . . . . . .5. . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Linearity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .v Contents 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . 53 e 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Series and Parallel Combinations of Resistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Linearity and Superposition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Equivalent Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 4. . . . 26 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3.4. . .1 Voltage Divider Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3. . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5. .2 Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Power and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Kirchhoff ’s Current Law . . . . . . . . .2 Current . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 ´ Thevenin’s and Norton’s Theorems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Current Divider Rule . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Charge. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Mesh-Current Method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 4. 27 Linear Network Analysis . . . . 14 Resistance . . . . . . . . . .4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Th´ venin’s Theorem . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . 9. . . . . . . . .3 Kirchhoff ’s Laws and Other Techniques in the Phasor Domain . . . . . . . . . . .1 Phasors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 7. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 e Inductors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . . 8. . 137 Active Analog Filters .2 Circuits with Switches . . 153 14. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153 14. . . . . . . . . . . . 133 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 Exercises . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Computers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vi CONTENTS 6. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Power and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 12. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157 11. . . . .2 Passive Circuit Elements in the Phasor Domain . . . . . .1 Voltage Characteristics of the Op Amp . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Power and Energy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14. . . . . . 67 Capacitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Bioinstrumentation Design . . . . . . 130 Time-Varying Signals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Noise . . . . . . . . . . . 79 General Approach to Solving Circuits Involving Resistors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Operational Amplifiers . . . . . . . 76 Inductance and Capacitance Combinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dependent Sources and Th´ venin and Norton Equivalent Circuits . . . . 12. . . . 71 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 7. . . . . 89 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 11. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Discontinuities and Initial Conditions in a Circuit . . . . . . . . 135 12. . . . . Capacitors and Inductors . . . . . . 13. . . . . . . . . . .

. At the end of the short book is a wide selection of problems. 2005. and Bronzino. D. . M.e. ranging from simple to difficult. Elsevier. presented in the same general order as covered in the textbook. D. with Sections 1. 1118 pages. and H. Blanchard. three semesters of calculus and differential equations). A considerable effort has been made to develop the theory in a logical manner—developing special mathematical skills as needed.. I have found it best to introduce this material using simple examples followed by more difficult ones.. I acknowledge and thank William Pruehsner for the technical illustrations. S. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (Second Edition). J. J.vii Preface This short book on bioinstrumentation is written for a reader who has completed the first two years of an engineering program (i. Amanda Marley.. Troy Nagle. Amsterdam. 2 and 13 contributed by Susan Blanchard. Portions of this short book are from Chapter 8 of Enderle.

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Men such as Richard Caton and Augustus Desire proved that the human brain and heart depended upon bioelectric events. and electrical engineering began to work in conjunction with the medical field. Before 1900. physics. medical technology advanced more in the 20th century than it had in the rest of history combined (Fig. followed by resistance. During the early 19th century. During this period. and energy. Our goal here is to develop expertise in electric circuit theory applied to bioinstrumentation. Circuit analysis techniques are then presented. hospitals became institutions of research and technology. The trend towards the use of technology accelerated throughout the 20th century. Many biomedical instruments use a transducer or sensor to convert a signal created by the body into an electric signal. and treatment was designed to remove the cause of the disorder. Einthoven placed two skin sensors on a man and attached them to the ends of a silvered wire that was suspended through holes drilled in both ends of a large permanent magnet. Next. medicine had little to offer the typical citizen because its resources were mainly the education and little black bag of the physician. William Einthoven expanded on these ideas after he created the first string galvanometer. By the late 19th century. followed by inductance and capacitance. The suspended silvered wire moved rhythmically as the subject’s heart beat. Finally. The origins of the changes that occurred within medical science are found in several developments that took place in the applied sciences. diagnosis was based on laboratory tests. charge. Professionals in the areas of chemistry. During this period. the area of electronics had a significant impact on the development of new medical technology. current. the operational amplifier and time-varying signals are introduced. In 1903.1). power. By projecting a tiny light beam across the silvered . 1. and treatment was designed to heal the structural abnormality. diagnosis was based on physical examination. We begin with a description of variables used in circuit theory. and biomedical engineering became a recognized profession. voltage. simplifications of resistive circuits and voltage and current calculations.1 CHAPTER 1 Introduction This short book provides basic information about bioinstrumentation and electric circuit theory. Kirchhoff ’s current and voltage laws are introduced. and solutions of circuits using the differential equation method. mechanical engineering. As a result.

1948 – The first large scale computer was built. 1900 1897 – Thomson discovered electrons. 1935 – Amplifiers were used to record EEGs. 1959 – First transistor-based computer was made. 1800 1826 – Ohm formulated law of electrical resistance. 1785 – Coulomb worked out the laws of attraction and repulsion between electrically charged bodies.2 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 1750 1752 – Ben Franklin flew his kite in the storm. 1831– Faraday and Henry found that a moving magnet would induce an electric current in a coil of wire. . 1774 – John Walsh proved electricity passes through humans. 1981 – IBM introduced the first personal computer 2000 FIGURE 1. 1972 – First CAT machine was made. 1950 1960 – Chardock and Greatbatch created the first implantable pacemaker 1948 – Transistors become readily available. 1886 – Hertz discovered the electromagnetic wave. 1850 1860 – Maxwell worked out the mathematical equations for the laws of Electricity and magnetism.“ 1800 – Volta built the first battery. 1909 – Millikan measured the charge of the electron. 1791 – Galvani published his findings on “animal electricity. 1929 – Hans Berger recorded the first EEG. 1820 – Oersted discovered electromagnetism. 1895 – Roentgen discovered X-rays.1: Timeline for major inventions and discoveries that led to modern medical instrumentation. 1903 – Einthoven discovered the galvanometer. First microprocessor was used. 1920s – Television was invented. 1904 – Fleming invented the vacuum tube. Ampere measured the magnetic effect of an electric current.

is being explored to permit access to health care for patients in remote locations. like pacemakers. the X-ray machine. Today. Some are used to monitor patient conditions or acquire information for diagnostic purposes. in 1960. while others are used to control physiological functions. was used to store a vast amount of data pertaining to clinical laboratory information. Einthoven was able to record the movement of the wire as waves on a scroll of moving photographic paper. there is a wide variety of medical devices and instrumentation systems.g. are implantable while many others are used noninvasively. In 1935. In 1929. and other internal damage from information that was obtained noninvasively. .INTRODUCTION 3 wire. ECG and EEG machines. e. Some devices. Telemedicine can be used to let a specialist in a major hospital receive information on a patient in a rural area and send back a plan of treatment specific for that patient. the X-ray machine was the first imaging device to be created. These are just a small sample of the many examples in which the field of electronics has been used to significantly advance medical technology. Telemedicine. electrical amplifiers were used in devices such as the first implantable pacemaker that was created by William Chardack and Wilson Greatbatch. This chapter will focus on those features that are common to devices that are used to acquire and process physiological data. Another important addition to medical technology was provided by the invention of the computer. and. one of the most important technological inventions in the medical field. which allowed much faster and more complicated analyses and functions to be performed. One of the first computer-based instruments in the field of medicine. The invention of the computer made it possible for laboratory tests to be performed and analyzed faster and more accurately. K. was created when W. Hans Berger created the first electroencephalogram (EEG). e. which is used to measure and record electrical activity of the brain. This new type of image made it possible to have more accurate and easier diagnosis of tumors. pacemakers and ventilators. the sequential multiple analyzer plus computer. Thus. Roentgen found that X-rays could be used to give pictures of the internal structures of the body.g. The first large-scale computer-based medical instrument was created in 1972 when the computerized axial tomography (CAT) machine was invented. The CAT machine created an image that showed all of the internal structures that lie in a single plane of the body. which is routinely used today to measure and record the electrical activity of abnormal hearts and to compare those signals to normal ones. the invention of the string galvanometer led to the creation of the electrocardiogram (ECG). In 1895. Many other advancements that were made in medical technology originated from research in basic and applied physics. electrical amplifiers were used to prove that the electrical activity of the cortex had a specific rhythm. Thus. hemorrhages. which uses computer technology to transmit information from one medical site to another.

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In some devices. which are sent to the analog processing and digital conversion block. There. the signals are stored permanently so that different signal processing schemes can be applied at a later time. Basic instrumentation systems also include output display devices that enable human operators to view the signal in a format that is easy to understand. Once the analog signals have been digitized and converted to a form that can be stored and processed by digital computers. the signals are amplified. a beeping sound with each heart beat. filtered. for example. 2. conditioned. These displays may be numerical or graphical. property. signals can be acquired with a device in one location.e. Most output display devices are intended to be observed visually.g. are discussed later in this chapter. but some also provide audible output. The outputs from these biosensors are analog signals. discrete or continuous. or a chemical or mechanical signal that is converted to an electrical signal. and permanent or temporary. In other cases.1). perhaps in a patient’s home. the signal is stored briefly so that further processing can take place or so that an operator can examine the data. i. such as amplifying and filtering an ECG signal. e. In addition to displaying data. . continuous signals. With the invention of the telephone and now with the Internet. and converted to digital form. for example. many more methods of signal conditioning can be applied. Sensors are used to convert physical measurands into electric outputs. to provide quick diagnostic feedback if a patient has an unusual heart rhythm while at home. many instrumentation systems have the capability of storing data.5 CHAPTER 2 Basic Bioinstrumentation System The quantity. This has made it possible. acquire 24 hrs of ECG data that is later processed to determine arrhythmic activity and other important diagnostic characteristics. This can be a bioelectric signal. or condition that is measured by an instrumentation system is called the measurand (Fig. It has also allowed medical facilities in rural areas to transmit diagnostic images to tertiary care hospitals so that specialized physicians can help general practitioners arrive at more accurate diagnoses. and transmitted to another device for processing and/or storage. such as those generated by muscles or the brain. Methods for modifying analog signals. Holter monitors.

is not a part of all instrumentation systems.1: Basic instrumentation systems using sensors to measure a signal with data acquisition. and uses conscious control to change the physiological response. . Another important component. a feedback element. e. when needed or are part of biofeedback systems in which the patient is made aware of a physiological measurement.g. A signal with known amplitude and frequency content is applied to the instrumentation system at the sensor’s input. Some feedback devices collect physiological data and stimulate a response. These devices include pacemakers and ventilators that stimulate the heart or the lungs. storage and display capabilities. measured relationship. blood pressure. The first is the calibration signal. it is impossible to convert the output of an instrument system into a meaningful representation of the measurand.g. Two other components play important roles in instrumentation systems. along with control and feedback. e. Without this information.6 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Sensor Calibration Analog Processing A/D Control & Feedback Signal Processing Output Display Data Storage Data Transmission FIGURE 2. The calibration signal allows the components of the system to be adjusted so that the output and input have a known. a heart beat or breath.

Current. The negative charge carried by an electron.1) q (t) = t0 i(λ) d λ + q (t0 ) (3. Current is measured in amperes (A).60219 × 10−19 C 1 kg × × 103 g 9.2) . is the smallest amount of charge that exists and is measured in units called Coulombs (C). The charge carried by a proton is the opposite of the electron. What is the charge of 3 × 10−15 g of electrons? Solution Q = 3 × 10−15 g × 1 electron −1.1. Example 3. is defined as the change in the amount of charge that passes through a given point or area in a specified time period. By definition. Voltage. respectively.1095 × 10−31 kg electron = −5.27643 × 10−7 C 3. and Q for constant charge. q e = −1.602 × 10−19 C The symbol q (t) is used to represent charge that changes with time. Power and Energy 3. positive and negative. q e .7 CHAPTER 3 Charge.2 CURRENT Electric current. i(t). are carried by protons and electrons. i(t) = and t dq dt (3.1 CHARGE Two kinds of charge. one ampere equals one coulomb/second (C/s).

2 with the current entering terminal 1 in the circuit on the right. Solution ∞ ∞ 0 3e −100t A t<0 t≥0 Q= −∞ idt = 0 3e −100t 3 −100t e dt = − 100 ∞ t=0 = 0.2. 3.5–3 s. there is no need to be concerned as to which is responsible for the current.1). current is positive and enters terminal 1. Current. In electric circuits. (3.8 BIOINSTRUMENTATION i Circuit element Circuit element i FIGURE 3. (3. Example 3. We typically refer to a constant current as a DC current. In the time interval 0–1. Consider Fig.03 C Consider Fig. and . i(t) = Find the total charge. 3.1). 3.1. Current is defined as positive if (a) A positive charge is moving in the direction of the arrow (b) A negative charge is moving in the opposite direction of the arrow Since these two possibilities produce the same outcome.1. current is carried by electrons in metallic conductors.1: A simple electric circuit illustrating current flowing around a closed loop.5 s. In the time interval 1.1. defined by Eq. as given by Eq. Suppose the following current is flowing in Fig. 3. the current is negative and enters terminal 2 with a positive value. Current is typically a function of time. also depends on the direction of flow as illustrated in the circuit in Fig.

3.5 -0. as shown in Fig. capacitors and inductors.3) and applying KCL for the currents leaving the node gives −i1 − i2 + i4 + i3 = 0 The previous equation is equivalently written for the currents entering the node. that is.5 9 0.1 Kirchhoff ’s Current Law Current can flow only in a closed circuit. must equal zero so no net charge accumulates. VOLTAGE.CHARGE. We denote a time-varying current with a lower case letter. Passive circuit elements have two terminals with a known voltage– current relationship.5 2 2. Examples of passive circuit elements include resistors. 3.2: (Left) A sample current waveform. (Right) A circuit element with current entering terminal 1 and leaving terminal 2. Whatever current enters one terminal must leave at the other terminal. (3. Consider the circuit in Fig.3) where there are N currents leaving the node. No current is lost as it flows around the circuit because net charge cannot accumulate within a circuit element and charge must be conserved.5 0 -1 -0. denote it with a capital letter such as I indicating it does not change with time. as i1 + i2 − i4 − i3 = 0 .2. the sum of the currents at any node. a point at which two or more circuit elements have a common connection.1. 3.5 0 0. POWER AND ENERGY i (A) 1 1.or just i. CURRENT. Using Eq. given as N in (t) = 0 n=1 (3.5 t (s) 3 i 1 Circuit element -1 -1. This principle is known as Kirchhoff ’s current law (KCL). Since charge cannot be created and must be conserved.3.5 i 2 FIGURE 3.5 1 1. such as i(t).

“path”. whether they are all leaving or all entering the node. Kirchhoff ’s current law is applied to each of the nodes as follows.4. A connected group of circuit elements usually connect nodes together. 3. Path: A connected group of circuit elements in which none is repeated. • • • • • • • Node: A point at which two or more circuit elements have a common connection. we define its characteristics with the terms “node”. In Fig. Mesh: A closed path that does not contain any other closed paths within it. “branch”. Closed Path: A path that starts and ends at the same node. which are all essential nodes. 3. Branch: A circuit element or connected group of circuit elements. It should be clear that the application of KCL is for all currents. “closed path” and “mesh” as follows. D and E. In describing a circuit. Consider the closed surface drawn with dashed lines in Fig. Kirchhoff ’s current law applied to the closed surface gives −i1 + i4 + i5 + i7 = 0 .4. Essential Node: A point at which three or more circuit elements have a common connection. Essential Branch: A branch that connects two essential nodes. It is understood that the closed surface does not intersect any of the circuit elements.10 BIOINSTRUMENTATION i1 i2 i4 i3 FIGURE 3.3: A node with 4 currents. C. A. there are five nodes. Node A: −i1 + i2 − i3 = 0 Node B: i3 + i4 + i5 − i6 = 0 Node C: i1 −i4 − i8 = 0 Node D: −i7 − i5 + i8 = 0 Node E: −i2 + i6 + i7 = 0 Kirchhoff ’s current law is also applicable to any closed surface surrounding a part of the circuit. B.

A constant (DC) voltage source is denoted by V while a time-varying voltage is denoted by v(t). POWER AND ENERGY 11 Closed surface Circuit element E i7 i6 Circuit element i2 i1 A i3 Circuit element B i5 i4 Circuit element Circuit element D i8 Circuit element Circuit element C FIGURE 3. 3. . In Fig. CURRENT.5). 3. v.3 VOLTAGE Voltage represents the work per unit charge associated with moving a charge between two points (A and B in Fig. 3. and given as v= dw dq (3. between two points (A and B).4: A circuit with a closed surface.CHARGE.4) The unit of measurement for voltage is the volt (V). VOLTAGE.5: Voltage and current convention. or just v. i A + v - 1 Circuit element B 2 FIGURE 3. the voltage.5. is the amount of energy required to move a charge from point A to point B.

12

BIOINSTRUMENTATION

+ v1 CP3 CP1 + v3 Circuit element v4 + Circuit element CP2 Circuit element

+ v2 Circuit element

+ v5 -

Circuit element

FIGURE 3.6: Circuit illustrating Kirchhoff ’s voltage law. Closed paths are identified as CP1, CP2 and CP3.

3.3.1

Kirchhoff ’s Voltage Law
N

Kirchhoff ’s voltage law (KVL) states the sum of all voltages in a closed path is zero, or vn (t) = 0
n=1

(3.5)

where there are N voltage drops assigned around the closed path, with vn (t) denoting the individual voltage drops. The sign for each voltage drop in Eq. (3.5) is the first sign encountered while moving around the closed path. Consider the circuit in Fig. 3.6, with each circuit element assigned a voltage, vn , with a given polarity, and three closed paths, CP1, CP2 and CP3. Kirchhoff ’s voltage law for each closed path is given as CP1: −v3 + v1 − v4 = 0 CP2: v4 + v2 + v5 = 0 CP3: −v3 + v1 + v2 + v5 = 0 Kirchhoff ’s laws are applied in electric circuit analysis to determine unknown voltages and currents. Each unknown variable has its distinct equation. To solve for the unknowns using MATLAB, we create a matrix representation of the set of equations and solve. This method is demonstrated in many examples in this book.

CHARGE, CURRENT, VOLTAGE, POWER AND ENERGY

13

Example 3.3. Find I1 , I2 and I3 for the following circuit.
Circuit Element

2A I1 A

I2 Circuit Element 3A

B

I3 Circuit Element

C 4A

Circuit Element

Circuit Element

Circuit Element

Solution. We apply KCL first at node C, then B and finally A. Node C: −2 + I3 + 4 = 0; Node B: I2 + 3 − I3 = 0; Node A: − I1 − I2 + 2 = 0; I3 = −2 A I2 = I3 − 3 = −5 A I1 = 2 − I2 = 7 A

3.4

POWER AND ENERGY
p= dw d w dq = = vi dt dq d t (3.6)

Power is the rate of energy expenditure given as

where p is power measured in watts (W), and w is energy measured in joules ( J). Power is usually determined by the product of voltage across a circuit element and the current through it. By convention, we assume that a positive value for power indicates that power is being delivered (or absorbed or consumed) by the circuit element. A negative value for power indicates that power is being extracted or generated by the circuit element, i.e., a battery. Figure 3.7 illustrates the four possible cases for a circuit element’s current and voltage configuration. According to convention, if both i and v are positive, with the arrow and polarity shown in Fig. 3.7A, energy is absorbed (either lost by heat or stored). If either the current arrow or voltage polarity is reversed as in B and C, energy is supplied to the circuit. Note that if both the current direction and voltage polarity are reversed together, as in D, energy is absorbed.

14

BIOINSTRUMENTATION

A
i + v 1

p = vi
Circuit element

B
1 + v i

p = −vi
Circuit element

2

2

C
i v + 1

p = −vi
Circuit element

D
1 v + i

p = vi
Circuit element

2

2

FIGURE 3.7: Polarity references for four cases of current and voltage. Cases A and D result in positive power being consumed by the circuit element. Cases B and C result in negative power being extracted from the circuit element.

A passive circuit element is defined as an element whose power is always positive or zero, which may be dissipated as heat (resistance), stored in an electric field (capacitor) or stored in a magnetic field (inductor). We define an active circuit element as one whose power is negative and capable of generating energy. Energy is given by
t

w(t) =
−∞

pd t

(3.7)

3.5

SOURCES

Sources are two terminal devices that provide energy to a circuit. There is no direct voltage– current relationship for a source; when one of the two variables is given, the other cannot be determined without knowledge of the rest of the circuit. Independent sources are devices for which the voltage or current is given and the device maintains its value regardless of the rest of the circuit. A device that generates a prescribed voltage at its terminals, regardless of the current flow, is called an ideal voltage source. Figure 3.8A and B shows the general symbols for an ideal voltage source. Figure 3.8C shows an ideal current source that delivers a prescribed current to

CHARGE, CURRENT, VOLTAGE, POWER AND ENERGY

15

A
VS VS

B
+ IS

C

FIGURE 3.8: Basic symbols used for independent sources. (A) Battery. (B) Ideal voltage source. Vs can be a constant DC source (Battery) or a time-varying source. (C) Ideal current source Is .

VS

+ -

IS

FIGURE 3.9: Basic symbols used for dependent or controlled sources. (Left) Controlled voltage source. The voltage Vs is a known function of some other voltage or current in the circuit. (Right) Controlled current source. The current Is is a known function of some other voltage or current in the circuit.

the attached circuit. The voltage generated by an ideal current source depends on the elements in the rest of the circuit. Shown in Fig. 3.9 are a dependent voltage and current source. A dependent source takes on a value equaling a known function of some other voltage or current value in the circuit. We use a diamond-shaped symbol to represent a dependent source. Often, a dependent source is called a controlled source. The current generated for a dependent voltage source and the voltage for a dependent current source depend on circuit elements in the rest of the circuit. Dependent sources are very important in electronics. Later in this chapter, we will see that the operational amplifier uses a controlled voltage source for its operation. Example 3.4. Find the voltage V3 for the circuit shown in the following figure.

I2 + + V3 5V 5A + 3A + 10V 2I2

The voltage across the dependent voltage source on the right side of the circuit equals 2I2 = 10 V.16 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Solution. Current I2 equals 5 A because it is in the same branch as the 5 A current source. Applying KVL around the outer closed path gives −V3 − 5 − 10 = 0 or V3 = −15 V .

4. and having a 0 V voltage drop.3B with R = ∞.2B as v = −i R (4.1.2A to write the voltage drop across a resistor.2) (4. we will use the convention shown in Fig. Resistors are made of different materials and their ability to impede current is given with a value of resistance. depending on the current direction and voltage polarity. 4. There are two ways to write Ohm’s law. As described. We define a short circuit as shown in Fig. Resistance is measured in Ohms ( ). We define an open circuit as shown in Fig. Some electrically conducting materials have a very small range of currents and voltages in which they exhibit linear behavior.1) In this book. 4. A theoretical bare wire that connects circuit elements together has a resistance of zero. the model is nonlinear.3A with R = 0. and conductance (G) is the inverse of . 4.17 CHAPTER 4 Resistance 4. An ideal resistor follows Ohm’s law.2A as v = iR and for Fig. 4. the voltage across a resistor is equal to the product of the current flowing through the element and its resistance.1 RESISTORS A resistor is a circuit element that limits the flow of current through it and is denoted with the symbol . This linear relationship does not apply at very high voltages and currents. and having 0 A current pass through it. which describes a linear relationship between voltage and current. where 1 = 1 V/A. Ohm’s law is written for Fig. Each material has a property called resistivity (ρ) that indicates the resistance of the material. A gap between circuit elements has a resistance of infinity. with a slope equal to the resistance. This is true of many physiological models as well: linearity is observed only within a range of values. R. as shown in Fig. Conductivity (σ ) is the inverse of resistivity. denoted R. 4. Outside this range.

A i(t) + v(t) − B R R + v(t) − i(t) FIGURE 4. .2: An ideal resister with resistance R in Ohms ( ).1: Voltage–current relationship for a resistor. Open Circuit i=0A + R=0 Ω v=0V − R= ∞ v − FIGURE 4. A.3: Short and open circuits.18 BIOINSTRUMENTATION V (V) Slope = R I (A) FIGURE 4. Short Circuit i + B.

First we find I2 by applying KCL at the node in the upper left of the circuit. 10 + I3 − 8 = 0 and I3 = −2 A Voltage V1 is determined by applying KVL around the lower right closed path and using Ohm’s law.2) as p = vi = v2 = i 2R R (4.4) . −5 + I2 + 8 = 0 and I2 = −3 A Current I3 is determined by applying KCL at the node on the right of the circuit. −V1 − 50 + 5I3 = 0 V1 = −50 + 5 × (−2) = −60 V 4.1) or (4. Conductance is measured in units called siemens (S) and has units of A/V.3) 5Ω 5A R1 I2 10 A 8A + 50 V V1 − 5Ω I3 Solution. (4.1. (3. I3 and V1 . R2 (4.6) and either Eq.RESISTANCE 19 resistance.2 POWER The power consumed by a resistor is given by the combination of Eq. find I2 . In terms of conductance. From the following circuit. Ohm’s law is written as i = Gv Example 4.

Power is always positive for a resistor. If sufficient current is allowed to flow through the body. the power generated is 108 W and the power consumed is 108 W. To find the current I1 we apply KCL 3 at the upper node. . We first note that the resistor on the right has 18 V across it. Example 4. Here. Calculate the power in each element. according to Ohm’s law.4) demonstrates that regardless of the voltage polarity and current direction. giving −I1 − 5I1 + 6 = 0 or I1 = 1 A The power for each of the circuit elements is p 18V = −I1 × 18 = −18 W p 5i1 = −18 × 5I1 = −90 W p3 = 182 = 108 W 3 In any circuit. which is true for any passive element. and therefore the current through it. I1 18 V 5I1 3Ω Solution. Example 4. as required.20 BIOINSTRUMENTATION and given off as heat. is 18 = 6 A. Electric safety is of paramount importance in a hospital or clinical environment. power is consumed by a resistor. the power supplied by the active elements always equals the power consumed.2. Equation (4. significant damage can occur.3. as illustrated in the following figure.

0 10. and head (with resistance RH ) is shown in the following figure on the right. two legs (each with resistance RL ).0001 0.001 0. body trunk (with resistance RT ). RH RA RA + RL RT RL VS .01 0.0 For instance. Introduction to Biomedical Engineering. The figure on the left shows the current distribution from a macroshock from one arm to another (Redrawn from Enderle et al. Injury Sustained myocardial contraction 21 Ventricular fibrillation Respiratory paralysis. 2000).0 100..RESISTANCE Burns. A crude electric circuit model of the body consisting of two arms (each with resistance RA ). Pain Let-go current Threshold of perception 0. Fatigue.1 Current (A) 1. as well as other conditions. a current of magnitude 50 mA (dashed line) is enough to cause ventricular fibrillation.

equivalent circuits. each stimulated by a DC voltage Vs . 4. We represent the resistance of either circuit using Ohm’s law as RE Q = Vs Vs = IA IB (4. consisting of combinations of resistors. that is.3 EQUIVALENT RESISTANCE It is sometimes possible to reduce complex circuits into simpler and. We consider two circuits equivalent if they cannot be distinguished from each other by voltage and current measurements. and at this level it would cause ventricular fibrillation. These two circuits are equivalent if I A = I B . .4. as we will see.5. we reduce the body electric circuits to I RA VS RA If RA = 400 and Vs = 120 V.15 A = RA + RA 800 The current I is the current passing through the heart. Solution. then find I . we will expand this e remark to include any combination of sources and resistances. Consider the two circuits A and B in Fig. we have I= Vs 120 = 0. the two circuits behave identically.22 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Since the only elements that form a closed path that current can flow is given by the source in series with the two arms. 4. Using Ohm’s law.5) Thus. it follows that any circuit consisting of resistances can be replaced by an equivalent circuit as shown in Fig. In another section on a Th´ venin equivalent circuit. 4.

4: Two circuits.5: Equivalent circuits. If these two resistors are connected to a third and the same current flows through all of them. if the same current flows through N resistors. 4.4 4. Consider Fig.4. the two are said to be in series. An equivalent circuit can be derived through KVL as −Vs + IR1 + IR2 + IR3 = 0 or rewritten in terms of an equivalent resistance RE Q as RE Q = IA Vs = R1 + R2 + R3 I IA VS Circuit A VS REQ FIGURE 4. 4. In general.6 with three resistors in series. then the N resistors are in series. then the three resistors are in series.RESISTANCE 23 IA IB VS Circuit A VS Circuit B FIGURE 4. .1 SERIES AND PARALLEL COMBINATIONS OF RESISTANCE Resistors in Series If the same current flows from one resistor to another.

We use a shorthand notation to represent resistors in parallel using the symbol.24 BIOINSTRUMENTATION I R1 VS R2 R3 FIGURE 4.7. In general.7.7 is derived through KCL as −I + Vs Vs Vs + + =0 R1 R2 R3 I VS R1 R2 R3 FIGURE 4.2 Resistors in Parallel Two or more elements are said to be in parallel if the same voltage is across each of the resistors. An equivalent circuit for Fig. Consider the three parallel resistors as shown in Fig.4. .7: A parallel circuit. N RE Q = i=1 Ri (4. RE Q = R1 R2 R3 . 4. 4. 4.6: A series circuit.6) 4. Thus in Fig. if we have N resistors in series.

7) For just two resistors in parallel. First.4.RESISTANCE 25 or rewritten in terms of an equivalent resistance RE Q as RE Q = Vs = I 1 1 R1 + 1 R2 + 1 R3 In general. (4. this group is in series with the 2 resistor.7) is written as RE Q = R1 R2 = R1 R2 R1 + R2 3Ω (4. Eq. These combinations are shown in the following figure and calculation: I 2Ω 3Ω 5V 12 Ω 12 Ω 12 Ω 2Ω 2Ω 2 2 =1 Ω 12 12 12 =4 Ω 4 4 =2 Ω 2+2 = 4 Ω 3+1= 4 Ω . Next. this group is in parallel with the three 12 resistors. I 2Ω 5V 12 Ω 12 Ω 12 Ω 2Ω 2Ω Solution. Finally. Find RE Q and the power supplied by the source for the following circuit. RE Q = 1 R1 + 1 R2 1 + ··· + 1 RN (4.8) Example 4. apply from right to left the parallel and series combinations. To solve for RE Q . if we have N resistors in parallel. we have two 2 resistors in parallel that are in series with the 3 resistor.

where RE Q = R1 + R2 . . 4. 4.5. Accordingly.5 VOLTAGE AND CURRENT DIVIDER RULES Let us now extend the concept of equivalent resistance.8. I= Vs Vs = RE Q R1 + R2 I R1 VS R2 + V2 − FIGURE 4.8: Voltage divider rule circuit.26 BIOINSTRUMENTATION RE Q = 2 =2+ + ((12 1 1 12 12 + 1 12 12 ) 1 12 (3 1 2 + (2 1 + 1 2 2 ))) + 3+ = 2 + ((4) Accordingly. to allow us to quickly calculate I voltages in series resistor circuits and currents in parallel resistor circuits without digressing to the fundamentals.25 A RE Q 4 p = 5 × I = 6.25 W 4.1 Voltage Divider Rule The voltage divider rule allows us to easily calculate the voltage across a given resistor in a series circuit. Consider finding V2 in the series circuit shown in Fig. (3 + 1)) = 2 + 2 = 4 I= and 5 5 = = 1. RE Q = V .

9. the voltage divider rule gives the voltage across any one of the resistors. where RE Q = R11 R22 .5. as Vi = Vs Ri R1 + R2 + · · · RN (4.RESISTANCE 27 I I1 I2 V S R1 R2 FIGURE 4. +R Accordingly. I2 = and Vs = I R1 R2 R1 + R2 Vs R2 . Ri . and therefore V2 = IR2 = Vs This same analysis can be used to find V1 as V1 = Vs R1 R1 + R2 R2 R1 + R2 In general.9: Current divider rule circuit.9) 4. 4.2 Current Divider Rule The current divider rule allows us to easily calculate the current through any resistor in parallel R resistor circuits. if a circuit contains N resistors in series. Consider finding I2 in the parallel circuit shown in Fig.

reduces to three parallel resistors from which I2 is calculated.5. the current divider rule gives the current through any one of the resistors. as Ii = I 1 Ri 1 R1 + 1 R2 ··· + 1 RN (4. which. For the following circuit. when placed into the circuit. We solve this circuit problem in two parts. I2 1Ω I1 5A 10/3 Ω 2Ω 12 Ω 12 Ω 12 Ω REQ To begin. first find RE Q . as is evident from the redrawn circuit that follows. The equivalent resistance is found as RE Q = 1 + (12 12 12) = 1 + 1 1 12 + 1 12 + 1 12 =5 .28 BIOINSTRUMENTATION yielding after substituting Vs I2 = I 1 R2 1 R1 + 1 R2 In general. Ri . if a circuit contains N resistors in parallel.10) Example 4. find I1 . by first finding I2 and then I1 . 1Ω I1 5A 10/3 Ω 2Ω 12 Ω 12 Ω 12 Ω Solution.

The current I1 can also be found by applying the current divider rule as I1 = I2 1 12 + 1 12 1 12 + 1 12 = 1 12 + 1 12 1 12 + 1 12 = 1 A 3 . and then divides into three equal currents of 1 A through each 3 12 resistor. I2 = 5 1 5 3 +1 10 2 10 3 2 RE Q . we have + 1 5 = 1A I2 flows through the 1 resistor.RESISTANCE 29 Applying the current divider rule on the three parallel resistors.

.

These two methods are systematic approaches that lead to a solution that is efficient and robust. 5. As we will see. but as the circuit complexity increases. The number of independent equations necessitates: • • N-1 equations involving KCL at N-1 nodes for the node-voltage method. providing a straightforward tool that minimizes the amount of work. In this section. and applying KCL at each of the nodes. This number may be fewer if there are current sources in the circuit. it becomes more difficult to solve problems. resistive circuit simplification. and applying KVL around each mesh. we introduce the node-voltage method and the mesh-current method to provide a systematic and easy solution of circuit problems. MATLAB is ideal for solving problems that involves solution of simultaneous equations. The number of unknown voltages for the node-voltage method or currents for the mesh-current method determines the number of equations. resulting in a minimum number of simultaneous equations that saves time and effort. The application of the node-voltage method involves expressing the branch currents in terms of one or more node voltages. N-1 equations involving KVL around each of the meshes in the circuit for the mesh-current method. The node-voltage method involves the following two steps: . and the voltage and current divider rules. The application of the mesh-current method involves expressing the branch voltages in terms of mesh currents. In both cases. This approach works for all circuit problems.31 CHAPTER 5 Linear Network Analysis Our methods for solving circuit problems up to this point have included applying Ohm’s law and Kirchhoff ’s laws. This number may be fewer if there are voltage sources in the circuit.1 NODE-VOLTAGE METHOD The use of node equations provides a systematic method for solving circuit analysis problems by the application of KCL at each essential node. the resulting linear set of simultaneous equations is solved to determine the unknown voltages or currents.

In writing the node equations for the other nodes.1. 5. This reduces the number of independent node equations by one and the amount of work in solving for the node voltages. Consider Fig. It is easy to verify in (A) that V = V1 − V2 R R R R by applying KVL. with the voltage expressed as the difference between the potential on either end of the resistor with respect to the reference node as shown in Fig. 1. When writing the node-voltage equation for node 1. All voltages are written with respect to the reference node. The current through a resistor is written using Ohm’s law. because the node voltage is known.1 further illustrates this case. 5. we write the value of the independent voltage source in those equations. The reference node is usually the one with the most branches connected to it. Example 5. we do not write a node voltage equation for node 2 in this case.1. 1/2 Ω 1/2 Ω + V1 − 1/3 Ω 1/4 Ω 5V 3A . and is denoted with the symbol . 5. Assign each node a voltage with respect to a reference node (ground). Since the node voltage is known. we do not write a node equation for this node. We express node-voltage equations as the currents leaving the node. 2.32 BIOINSTRUMENTATION IA + V1 − + V − R + V2 − + V1 − −V+ R IB + V2 − (A) (B) FIGURE 5. Ex.1A) for one node.1: Ohm’s law written in terms of node voltages. Except for the reference node.1B) for the other node. Find V1 using the node-voltage method.1 (A) and assume the voltage V2 results from an independent voltage source of 5 V. the current I A is written as −5 I A = V1R . The current is written for (A) as I A = V = V1 −V2 and for (B) as I B = V = V2 −V1 . and the current moving to the left (like Fig. we write KCL at each of the N-1 nodes. 5. Two adjacent nodes give rise to the current moving to the right (like Fig. If one of the branches located between an essential node and the reference node contains an independent or dependent voltage source. 5.

−2 6]. with the reference node and two node voltages. −3].LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 33 Solution.4211 V. V1 V2 = 10 −3 . labeled 1 and 2 in the redrawn circuit that follows.4211 −0. V1 = 1. The node involving the 5 V voltage source has a known node voltage and therefore we do not write a node equation for it. V = A\F V= 1.0263 Thus. V1 and V2 . 1/2 Ω 1 + V1 − 1/2 Ω 2 + 5V 1/3 Ω V2 − 1/4 Ω 3A Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives 2(V1 − 5) + 3V1 + 2(V1 − V2 ) = 0 which simplifies to 7V1 − 2V2 = 10 Summing the currents leaving node 2 gives 2(V2 − V1 ) + 4V2 + 3 = 0 which simplifies to −2V1 + 6V2 = −3 The two node equations are written in matrix format as 7 −2 −2 6 and solved with MATLAB as follows: A = [7 − 2. indicated. This circuit has two essential nodes. F = [10.

1 −G N−1.N−1 ⎥ ⎢ V2 ⎥ ⎢ ⎢ −G 2. ⎥ ⎢ . In cases involving more than one dependent source. I N−1 Note the symmetry about the main diagonal where the off-diagonal terms are equal to each other and negative. G 1.. then the node equations have the following form.N−1 G 1. Example 5. For the following circuit. A dependent source destroys this symmetry.1 ⎥ ⎢ .1 V1 + G 2.1) I1 I2 .1 V1 − G N−1.2. In general. This is true of all circuits without dependent sources.2 ··· G N−1.N−1 VN−1 = I N Equation (5. ⎦ ⎣ .2 V2 − · · · − G 1. 1/4 Ω 2Id 1/2 Ω 1/4 Ω + Id 5A 1/3 Ω 3A V3 1Ω − . the node-voltage approach is the same as before except for an additional equation describing the relationship between the dependent source and the node voltage. ⎦ ⎣ ⎣ −G N−1.1 · · · −G 1. ⎥=⎢ ⎢ . the coefficient for the node voltage is the sum of the conductances connected to the node. . if a circuit has dependent sources.1 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎢ G 2. . The coefficients for the other node voltages are the negative of the sum of conductances connected between the node voltage and other node voltages.N−1 VN−1 ⎤ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎥ ⎦ (5.1 V1 − G 1. −G N−1.2 · · · −G 2. ⎥ ⎢ ⎢ . find V3 using the node-voltage method.2) (5. .2 V2 − · · · − G N−1.2 V2 − · · · − G 2.34 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Generally. If the input consists of a set of current sources applied at each node.N−1 VN−1 = I1 −G 2. . there is one equation for each dependent source in terms of the node voltages.N−1 VN−1 = I2 .1) is put in matrix form for solution by MATLAB as ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎡ V1 −G 2.

with the reference node at the bottom of the circuit and three node voltages V1 . Notice that this circuit has three essential nodes and a dependent current source. 1/4 Ω 2Id 1 2 + 1/4 Ω 3 + Id + 1/2 Ω 5A V1 V2 1/3 Ω 3A V3 1Ω − − − Note that Id = V3 according to Ohm’s law. 2 and 3 in the redrawn circuit. Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives 5 + 2 (V1 − V2 ) + 2Id + 4 (V1 − V3 ) = 0 which reduces to 6V1 − 2V2 − 2V3 = −5 Summing the currents leaving node 2 gives −2Id + 2 (V2 − V1 ) + 3V2 + 4 (V2 − V3 ) = 0 which simplifies to −2V1 + 9V2 − 6V3 = 0 Summing the currents leaving node 3 gives 4 (V3 − V2 ) − 3 + V3 + 4 (V3 − V1 ) = 0 reducing to −4V1 − 4V2 + 9V3 = 3 . We label the essential nodes 1.LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 35 Solution. as indicated. V2 and V3 .

V = A\F V= −1. The supernode technique requires only one node equation in which the current. Solving with MATLAB gives A = [6 −2 −2. 3]. is passed through the source and written in terms of currents leaving node 2.4118 V. 0. we replace I A with I B + IC + I D in terms of node voltages. the current through the source is not easily expressed in terms of node voltages. . we form a supernode by combining the two nodes.5294 −0. If one of the branches has an independent or controlled voltage source located between two essential nodes as shown in Fig.36 BIOINSTRUMENTATION The three node equations are written in matrix format as ⎤⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ V1 6 −2 −2 −5 ⎥⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ 9 −6⎦ ⎣V2 ⎦ = ⎣ 0⎦ ⎣−2 −4 −4 9 3 V3 Notice that the system matrix is no longer symmetrical because of the dependent current source. In this situation.4118 Thus V3 = −0.1471 −0. and two of the three nodes have a current source giving rise to a nonzero term on the right-hand side of the matrix equation. −4 −4 9]. we write a second equation by applying KVL for the two node voltages 1 VΔ IA IB + V2 IC 1 + − + V1 2 ID − − FIGURE 5. Because we have two unknowns and one supernode equation. −2 9 − 6. Specifically. F = [−5.2: A dependent voltage source is located between nodes 1 and 2.2. 5. I A .

1/5 Ω 1/4 Ω 1V + 2A 1/2 Ω 1/3 Ω 1A 1/2 Ω V3 − Solution. V1 . two of which are connected to an independent voltage source and form a supernode. The circuit has three essential nodes.3. V2 and V3 as indicated. find V3 . We label the essential nodes as 1. 1/5 Ω 1 + 1/4 Ω 2 + 1V 3 + 2A 1/2 Ω V1 1/3 Ω 1A V2 1/2 Ω V3 − − − . with the reference node at the bottom of the circuit and three node voltages. For the following circuit.LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 37 and 2 and the source as −V1 − V + V2 = 0 or V = V1 − V2 Example 5. 2 and 3 in the redrawn circuit.

38 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives −2 + 2V1 + 5 (V1 − V3 ) + 4 (V1 − V2 ) = 0 Simplifying gives 11V1 − 4V2 − 5V3 = 2 Nodes 2 and 3 are connected by an independent voltage source. V = A\F V= 0. 1. F = [2. 0 −1 1]. −9 7 7.8356 −0. giving −V2 + 1 + V3 = 0 or −V2 + V3 = −1 The two node and KVL equations are written in matrix format as ⎤ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎡ V1 2 11 −4 −5 ⎥ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎢ 7 7 ⎦ ⎣ V2 ⎦ = ⎣ 1 ⎦ ⎣ −9 −1 0 −1 1 V3 Solving with MATLAB gives A = [11 −4 −5.4110 0. −1]. so we form a supernode 2 + 3.1644.1644 Thus V3 = −0. Summing the currents leaving the supernode 2 + 3 gives 4 (V2 − V1 ) + 3V2 − 1 + 2V3 + 5 (V3 − V1 ) = 0 Simplifying yields −9V1 + 7V2 + 7V3 = 1 The second supernode equation is KVL through the node voltages and the independent source. .

Define the mesh currents in the circuit. In general.3: Mesh currents. 5. the clockwise direction gives a voltage drop according to convention as R (I2 − I1 ). here I = I1 − I2 . The mesh-current method involves the following two steps: 1. as in Fig. are not measurable with an ammeter in that they do not equal a branch current. Moreover. Moreover.2 MESH-CURRENT METHOD Another method for analyzing planar circuits is called the mesh-current method. The mesh-current method provides a systematic process for solving circuit analysis problems with the application of KVL around each mesh. just the opposite as in mesh 1. we draw the mesh currents with a circle. In writing the mesh equation. Whenever a circuit element is shared by two meshes. according to KCL I = I1 − I2 Mesh currents. we write one equation for each mesh. it is a powerful technique that simplifies analysis of circuit problems as shown in the next example. A mesh is a closed path without any other closed paths within it and a planar circuit is a circuit without any overlapping branches. I I1 R + V − I2 FIGURE 5. . When writing the mesh equation for mesh 2. By convention. the voltage drop across the resistor is V = RI = R (I1 − I2 ) when writing the equation for mesh 1. we define the mesh-current direction for all meshes to be clockwise. the number of mesh equations may be fewer than the total number of meshes. Under special circumstances. as in Fig. arc or a surface on the inside perimeter of the mesh. All of our problems in this book involve planar circuits. Write a set of mesh equations using KVL. Even though the mesh current is not real.3. we move through the mesh in a clockwise direction by writing the voltage drops in terms of mesh currents. The current through the branch is composed of the difference between the two mesh currents. 5.3.LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 39 5. 2.

There are two meshes in this circuit. 2Ω I 3Ω 10 V 4Ω 5V Solution. as illustrated in the redrawn circuit that follows. Mesh currents are always defined in a clockwise direction. 2Ω I I1 10 V 4Ω I2 5V 3Ω Summing the voltage drops around mesh 1 gives −10 + 2I1 + 4 (I1 − I2 ) = 0 which simplifies to 6I1 − 4I2 = 10 Summing the voltage drops around mesh 2 gives 4 (I2 − I1 ) + 3I2 + 5 = 0 .40 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Example 5. one for each mesh. Find I in the following circuit.4.

2Ω I1 3A I 3Ω I2 5V 10 V 2Ω I1 I 3Ω I2 5V 4Ω 3A FIGURE 5. as in the circuit on the left in Fig. 5. giving A = [6 −4. When one of the branches has an independent or dependent current source in the circuit.4. 5. (Right) A current source in a branch between two meshes. a modification must be made to the mesh-current method. we handle both cases as follows: 1. −5]. I = A\F I= 1.4. . We solve this problem with MATLAB. as shown in Fig. In this case.3846 The current I is found from I = I1 − I2 = 1.5385 A.9231 − 0.4: (Left) A current source on the perimeter of a circuit. Depending on whether the current source is on the outer perimeter or inside the circuit.9231 0.3846 = 1.1 on the structure and symmetry of the system matrix with the node-voltage method also apply for the mesh-current method. we do not write a mesh equation because the current is known. where the mesh current equals the branch current. The current source is located on the perimeter. The mesh current I1 equals the source current. −4 7].LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 41 which simplifies to −4I1 + 7I2 = −5 The two mesh equations are written in matrix form as 6 −4 −4 7 I1 10 = −5 I2 Comments made in Section 5. F = [10.

5. In this case. with one equation describing both meshes. giving 4 (I2 − I1 ) + 3I2 + 5 = 4 (I2 − 3) + 3I2 + 5 = 0. Here the supermesh equation is −10 + 2I1 + 3I2 + 5 = 0 Because there are two unknown currents. 5. but write simply I4 = 2 A. we need two independent equations. The second equation is written using KCL for the current source and the two mesh currents. Mesh 4 has a current source on the perimeter. we form a supermesh. . 2. Since we cannot easily write the voltage drop across the current source. circumventing the voltage drop across the current source. The equation for mesh 2 is found by applying KVL. so we do not write a mesh equation for it. the equation starts wit the first mesh and continues on to the second mesh. The current source is located within the circuit where the mesh current does not equal the branch current as shown in Fig. This circuit has four meshes. Here the KCL equation is I2 − I1 = 3. which gives I2 = 1 A. A supermesh is formed by combing two meshes together.42 BIOINSTRUMENTATION I1 = 3 A.4 (right). Find V0 as shown in the following circuit. 2A 2Ω + 3Ω 4Ω 3V V0 − IS = 2 V0 5Ω Solution. as shown in the circuit diagram that follows. Example 5.

LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 43 2A I4 2Ω I1 3V + 3Ω 4Ω I2 IS = 2 V0 I3 5Ω V0 − Summing the voltages around mesh 1 gives −3 + 2 (I1 − 2) + 3(I1 − I2 ) = 0 Simplifying gives 5I1 − 3I2 = 7 Since there is a dependent current source inside the circuit. Summing the voltages around supermesh 2 + 3 yields 3 (I2 − I1 ) + 4I2 + 5I3 = 0 which reduces to −3I1 + 7I2 + 5I3 = 0 Applying KCL for the dependent current source gives 2V0 = 2 × 3 (I1 − I2 ) = I3 − I2 yielding 6I1 − 5I2 − I3 = 0 . we form a supermesh for meshes 2 and 3.

then the total response is the sum of the separate individual responses to each input. −3 7 5. the total response is obtained by summing the individual responses. and assuming the other sources are dead. 0.44 BIOINSTRUMENTATION The three independent equations are written in matrix format as ⎤⎡ ⎤ ⎡ ⎤ ⎡ I1 5 −3 0 7 ⎥⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ 7 5⎦ ⎣ I2 ⎦ = ⎣0⎦ ⎣−3 6 −5 −1 0 I3 Solution using MATLAB gives A = [5 − 3 0. Note carefully that this principle holds true solely for independent sources. This property is called the principle of superposition. Dependent sources must remain in the circuit when applying this technique. When each of the sources have been analyzed.0000 Thus. This analysis is carried out by removing all of the sources except one. After the circuit is analyzed with the first source. 6 − 5 − 1]. I = A\F I= 14.1 LINEARITY.3.3 5. F = [7.0000 −21. where • • A dead voltage source is a short circuit A dead current source is an open circuit In linear circuits with multiple independent sources. 0]. V0 = 3(I1 − I2 ) = 3(14 − 21) = 21 V 5. SUPERPOSITION AND SOURCE TRANSFORMATIONS Linearity and Superposition If a linear system is excited by two or more independent sources. Specifically for circuits. and they .0000 21. the response to several independent sources is the sum of responses to each independent source with the other independent sources dead. the total response is the sum of each independent source taken one at a time. it is set equal to a dead source and the next source is applied with the remaining sources dead.

2Ω 3Ω + 10 V V010 5Ω − The voltage divider rule easily gives the response.6.LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 45 must be analyzed based on the current or voltage for which it is defined. Using superposition. Generally. as shown in the following figure. 2Ω 3Ω + 10 V V0 2A 5Ω 3A − Solution. find V0 as shown in the following figure. This property is especially valuable when dealing with an input consisting of a pulse or delays. due to the 10 V source V010 = 10 8 2+8 = 8V . It should be apparent that voltages and currents in one circuit differ among circuits. Example 5. These are considered in future sections. V010 . superposition provides a simpler solution than is obtained by evaluating the total response with all of the applied sources. and that we cannot mix and match voltages and currents from one circuit with another. We start by analyzing the circuit with just the 10 V source active and the two current sources dead.

2 − 3 = 8.5 A through each branch (2 + 3 ).6 = 3. V03 . consider the response. 2Ω 3Ω + V0 2 2A 5Ω − Combining the resistors in an equivalent resistance. Finally. and 5 . and the other two sources dead. 2+8 and then applying Ohm’s law gives V02 = 2 × 1. and V03 = −1. as shown in the following circuit.6 .5 × 2 = −3 V. The total response is given by the sum of the individual responses as V0 = V010 + V02 + V03 = 8 + 3.46 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Next consider the 2 A source active. note that the 3 A current splits into 1.2 V. 2Ω 3Ω + V0 3 5Ω 3A − To find V03 .2 V This is the same result we would have found if we analyzed the original circuit directly using the node-voltage or mesh-current method. to the 3 A source as shown in the following figure. RE Q = 2 (3 + 5) = 2×8 = 1.

the dependent current source is kept in the modified circuit and should not be set dead. V5 . applying KCL .7. Find the voltage across the 5 A current source. As required during the analysis. 3V0 10 3Ω A + I=0A 5Ω 3 V0 10 + 10 V V 10 0 2Ω V5 10 − − Notice that no current flows through the open circuit created by the dead current source. in the following figure using superposition. due to the 10 V source only with the 5 A source dead as shown in the following figure. 3V0 3Ω + 5Ω + 10 V V0 2Ω V5 5A − − Solution. Therefore. V010 . and that the current flowing through the 5 resistor is 3V0 .LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 47 Example 5. First consider finding the response.

giving −3V05 + I5 − 5 = 0 With V05 = 6 V. V05 is easily calculated by Ohm’s law as V05 = 5 × 1. V05 . due to the 5 A source.2 Equivalent Sources We call two sources equivalent if they each produce the same voltage and current regardless of the resistance. I5 = 3 × 6 + 5 = 23 A. 5. with the 10 V source dead. KCL is then applied at node B to find I5 . KVL gives −V010 − 5 × 3V010 + V510 = 0. and therefore V510 = 64 V. then the same current and voltage are seen in resistor Rl in either circuit as easily shown .5. Finally. giving 1.2 . 3V05 3Ω I5 B + + 5Ω V05 2Ω V55 5A − − First combine the two resistors in parallel (3 2 ). If Is = Vss as shown in the figure on the R right. apply KVL around the closed path −V05 − 5I5 + V55 = 0 or V55 = V05 + 5I5 = 6 + 5 × 23 = 121 V.3.48 BIOINSTRUMENTATION at node A gives V010 − 10 V010 + + 3V010 − 3V010 = 0 3 2 which gives V010 = 4 V. Consider the two circuits in Fig. The total response is given by the sum of the individual responses as V5 = V510 + V55 = 64 + 121 = 185 V 5.2 = 6 V. Next consider finding the response.

In both circuits on the left. .6: Equivalent circuits. For the circuit on the left. the current and voltage for Rl are Vl = Vs Rl Rl + Rs and Il = Vs Rl + Rs Rs Il Rs Il VS Rx R1 + Vl − VS R1 + Vl − Rx Il Il Is = Vs Rs Rs R1 + Vl − Is = V s Rs Rs R1 + Vl − FIGURE 5.LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 49 RS VS R1 Il + Vl − Il IS = V S RS RS R1 + Vl − FIGURE 5. the resistor Rx has no effect on the circuit and can be removed.5: Two equivalent circuits. using voltage and current divider rules.

current sources in parallel and voltage sources in series. 4V + 3A 2Ω 2Ω 2A 4Ω V0 − .5 (right). 5. 5. We first remove the 4 resistor since it is in series with the 3 A source and has no effect on the circuit. and as indicated. 5.8. we can replace the voltage source and Rs in the box in Fig.5 simplifies the analysis of circuits. Consider Fig. these circuits can be replaced by the two circuits on the right by completely removing Rx . 4Ω 4V + 2Ω 3A 2Ω 4V 4Ω V0 − Solution. We shall see that exchanging source plus resistor according to Fig. the current and voltage for Rl are and Vl = Il Rl = Vs Rl Rl + Rs Vs Rl + Rs Therefore. Our strategy in this solution involves combining resistors in series and parallel. and transform the 2 resistor and 4 V source into a 4 = 2 A source in parallel with a 2 resistor as shown in the following 2 figure. Notice that the current direction in the transformed source is in agreement with the polarity of the 4 V source. Use source transformations to find V0 in the following figure. Example 5.50 BIOINSTRUMENTATION For the circuit on the right with Is = Il = Is Rs Rl + Rs = Vs Rs . 5.5 (left) with the current source and Rs in the box in Fig.6. the resistor Rx has no impact on the voltage and current on Rl . In the two circuits on the left.

4V + 1A 1Ω 4Ω V0 − Another source transformation is carried out on the current source and resistor in parallel as shown in the next figure.LINEAR NETWORK ANALYSIS 51 As shown in the next figure. resulting in a 5 V source. combining the two parallel current sources results in a 1 A source. and combining the two parallel resistors results in a 1 resistance. 1Ω 4V + 1V 4Ω V0 − The two voltage sources are combined. Using the voltage divider gives V0 = 5 4 4+1 = 4V .

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these two theorems can be extended to any circuit composed of linear elements with two terminals.B) can be replaced by a single resistance and an independent source.53 CHAPTER 6 ´ Thevenin’s and Norton’s Theorems Any combination of resistances. as shown in Fig. 6. VOC . We refer to the circuit elements connected across the terminals A. The resistor RE Q is the resistance seen across the terminals A. . and independent sources with two external terminals (A and B. VOC is equal to the open circuit voltage across terminals A.1). 6. These two theorems help reduce complex circuits into simpler circuits.2.B as shown in Fig. A Norton equivalent circuit reduces the original circuit into a current source in parallel with a resistor (lower right of Fig. 6.1 ´ THEVENIN’S THEOREM Th´ venin’s Theorem states that an equivalent circuit consisting of an ideal voltage source.1). 6. 6. Usually. denoted A. controlled sources. A Th´ venin equivalent circuit reduces the original circuit into e a voltage source in series with a resistor (upper right of Fig. Recall that a dead voltage source is a short circuit and a dead current source is an open circuit. such as maximum power expended by the load. Although we focus here on sources and resistors.B when all sources are dead. e in series with an equivalent resistance. RE Q . and calculated using standard techniques such as the node-voltage or mesh-current methods.1. The Th´ venin equivalent circuit and Norton equivalent circuits are equivalent to the e original circuit in that the same voltage and current are observed across any load. the load is not included in the simplification because it is important for other analysis.B (that are not shown) as the load. can be used to replace any circuit that consists of independent and dependent voltage and current sources and resistors.

and resistances B Replaced by A B ISC REQ B FIGURE 6. VOC . A + Independent and dependent sources. is calculated across the terminals A. .1: A general circuit consisting of independent and dependent sources can be replaced by a voltage source (VOC ) in series with a resistor (RE Q ) or a current source (ISC ) in parallel with a resistor (RE Q ).B using standard techniques such as node-voltage or mesh-current methods. and resistances VOC − B FIGURE 6.54 BIOINSTRUMENTATION A REQ A VOC Independent and dependent sources.2: The open circuit voltage.

RE Q is found by first setting all sources dead (the current source is an open circuit and the voltage source is a short circuit). first e finding VOC and then solving for RE Q . VOC . The solution to finding the Th´ venin equivalent circuit is done in two parts. and then finding the resistance seen from the terminals A. The open circuit voltage.B as shown in the following figure. 2Ω A + 10 V 2Ω 4A VOC − B The sum of currents leaving the node is VOC − 10 VOC + −4=0 2 2 and VOC = 9 V. .1 Find the Th´ venin equivalent circuit with respect to terminals A. 2Ω A 10 V 2Ω 4A B Solution. is easily found using the node-voltage method as shown in the following circuit. Next.´ THEVENIN’ S AND NORTON’ S THEOREMS 55 Example 6.B for the . e following circuit.

the A 9V B It is important to note that the circuit used in finding VOC is not to be used in finding RE Q as not all voltages and currents are relevant in the other circuit and one cannot simply mix and match. ISC is equal to the current flowing through a short between terminals A.2 NORTON’S THEOREM Norton’s Theorem states that an equivalent circuit consisting of an ideal current source. ISC . The Th´ venin e . can be used to replace any circuit that consists of independent and dependent voltage and current sources and resistors. and calculated using standard techniques such as the node-voltage or mesh-current methods. 2 2 ). 6. Thus. 6.3.56 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 2Ω A 2Ω B REQ From the previous circuit. in parallel with an equivalent resistance. it is clear that RE Q is equal to 1 Th´ venin equivalent circuit is e 1Ω (that is.B as shown in Fig. RE Q .

and Norton equivalent circuits are related to each other according to RE Q = VOC ISC (6.B. It should be clear that Figs.3: The short circuit current. Example 6.1).1) This is easily seen by shorting the terminals A.´ THEVENIN’ S AND NORTON’ S THEOREMS 57 A ISC Independent and dependent sources. The current flowing through the OC short is VSC in agreement with Eq. (6.2 and 6. and resistances B FIGURE 6. is calculated by placing a short across the terminals A.B for the following circuit. 6. and finding the current through the short using standard techniques such as node-voltage or mesh-current methods.2. 6.3 are source I transformations of each other.2. Find the Norton equivalent circuit with respect to terminals A.B in Fig. 2Ω A 10 V 2Ω 4A B . ISC .

gives 0 = −I2 − 4 + ISC = −5 − 4 + ISC and ISC = 9 A. therefore it is removed since no current flows through it.58 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Solution. I2 + 10 V − A 2Ω ISC 10 V 4A B Note also that current I2 equals 5 A since the 10 V source is applied directly across the 2 resistor. 2Ω A ISC 2Ω 10 V 4A B Note that the 2 resistor is in parallel with the short across terminals A.1 since ISC = VOC 9 = =9A RE Q 1 . We could have found the current ISC directly from the solution of Ex.B as shown in the following figure. To find ISC we place a short between the terminals A. 6.B. so RE Q = 1 . as shown in the next figure. 6.1. This circuit is the same as Ex. Applying KCL at the node denoted A.

B contains dependent sources. A 9A 1Ω B 6. I Example 6. and this resistance cannot be calculated when setting all sources dead.3 Find the Th´ venin equivalent circuit with respect to terminals A. because the dependent e source has resistance. the process for finding RE Q for either the Th´ venin or Norton equivalent circuit must be modified. and then calculate RE Q = VSC . 3V1 3Ω + 2Ω 5Ω A 10 V V1 5A − B .B for the fole lowing circuit. OC In this case we find VOC and ISC .´ THEVENIN’ S AND NORTON’ S THEOREMS 59 The Norton equivalent circuit is shown in the following figure.3 ´ DEPENDENT SOURCES AND THEVENIN AND NORTON EQUIVALENT CIRCUITS If a circuit connected to terminals A.

RE Q is found by RE Q = find VOC using the mesh-current method as labeled in the next figure. Next. Summing the currents leaving node gives V1 − 10 V1 V1 + + + 3V1 = 0 3 2 5 and V1 = 100 121 V. Summing the voltage drops around mesh 1 gives −10 + 3I1 + 2 (I1 − I2 ) = 0 Simplifying with I2 = −5 A gives I1 = 0 A. gives VOC = 185 V. we find ISC using the node-voltage method as labeled in the next figure. Applying KVL around mesh 2 to find VOC gives 2 (I2 − I1 ) + 5 (I2 − I3 ) + VOC = 0 With I1 = 0 A. I2 = −5 A and I3 = 30 A.60 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Solution. 3V1 VOC . Since this circuit has a dependent source. . ISC Let’s first I3 3Ω I1 10 V + 2Ω 5Ω I2 5A A + V1 VOC − − B Note that since there are two current sources on the perimeter of the circuit. I2 = −5 A and I3 = 3V1 = 3 × 2 (I1 − I2 ) = 6I1 + 30.

´ THEVENIN’ S AND NORTON’ S THEOREMS 61 Applying KCL at terminal A gives 3V1 Δ 3Ω + 2Ω 5Ω A ISC 10 V V1 5A − B −3V1 − 5 − V1 + ISC = 0 5 VOC ISC With V1 = 100 .65 = 24. gives ISC = 7.65 A. The Th´ venin e A 185 V B .18 Ω = 185 7. Therefore RE Q = 121 equivalent circuit is 24.18 .

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In this section. i.1) (i. as shown in Fig. We use the symbol to represent the inductor in a circuit. the derivative of current at the time of the instantaneous change is infinity). Physically. . Any changes in the source with circuits that contain inductors. the inductors can be replaced by short circuits since the voltage drop across the inductors are zero. (7. 7. current cannot change instantaneously through an inductor since an infinite voltage is required according to Eq. a passive element that relates the voltage–current relationship with a differential equation. but has natural response that changes exponentially and a forced response that is the same form as the source. have a response that is not instantaneous.e. the unit of measure for inductance is the henry or henries (H). we examine the inductor. when a circuit has just DC currents (or voltages).1) The convention for writing the voltage drop across an inductor is similar to that of a resistor.. Any changes in the source are instantaneously observed in the response. The relationship between voltage and current for an inductor is given by v=L di dt (7. and is made by winding a coil of wire around a core that is an insulator or a ferromagnetic material. we considered circuits involving sources and resistors that are described with algebraic equations. An inductor is a passive element that is able to store energy in a magnetic field.63 CHAPTER 7 Inductors In the previous sections. a step input. Circuits that contain inductors are written in terms of derivatives and integrals. where 1 H = 1 V s/A.e.1. A magnetic field is established when current flows through the coil. For convenience.. Mathematically. a step change in current through an inductor is possible by applying a voltage that is a Dirac delta function.

Example 7. Find v in the following circuit.2. v=L di d (5) =2× =0 dt dt This example shows that an inductor acts like a short circuit to DC current. Example 7.64 BIOINSTRUMENTATION i + v L − FIGURE 7. Find I in the following circuit.1. 6Ω 4Ω 4Ω I 5V 2Ω 5H 3H 1H 3H . given that the source has been applied for a very long time. Accordingly.1: An inductor. 5A 2H + v − Solution.

i (A) 1 i 2H + v − 0 1 2 3 t (s) Solution.3. we find the total resistance seen by the source and use Ohm’s law as follows: RE Q = 6 therefore. Find v in the following circuit. only DC current flows in the circuit and the inductors can be replaced by short circuits as shown in the following figure.INDUCTORS 65 Solution. Since the source has been applied for a very long time. The solution to this problem is best approached by breaking it up into time intervals consistent with the changes in input current. Clearly for t < 0 and t > 2. We use Eq. .1) to determine the voltage in the other two intervals as follows. (7. the current is zero and therefore v = 0. I= 6 =3 2 ((4 4) + (2 2)) = 2 Example 7. 6Ω 4Ω 4Ω 2Ω 2Ω I 6V To find I .

4) The initial current in Eq.2) For t0 = 0. We start from Eq.2) reduces to 1 i(t) = L 0 t v (λ) d λ + i(0) (7. Eq. as is often the case in solving circuit problems. is usually defined in the same direction as i. the initial current is by definition equal to zero.1) defines the voltage across an inductor for a given current.2) reduces to 1 i(t) = L t v (λ) d λ −∞ (7. and v=L d (t) di =2 = 2V dt dt For 1 ≤ t ≤ 2 In this interval. (7. . which means i(t0 ) is a positive quantity. (7. (7. then i(t0 ) is negative. giving v=L v (t) d t = Ldi Integrating both sides yields t i(t) v (λ) d λ = L t0 i(t0 ) dα or 1 i(t) = L t v (λ) d λ + i(t0 ) t0 (7. (7.2).3) and for t0 = −∞. the input is i = t. i(t0 ). If the direction of i(t0 ) is in the opposite direction of i (as will happen when we write node equations). Suppose one is given a voltage across an inductor and asked to find the current. and di d (− (t − 2)) =2 = −2 V dt dt Equation (7.66 BIOINSTRUMENTATION For 0 < t < 1 In this interval. and therefore Eq.1) by multiplying both sides by d t. the input is i = −(t − 2) .

At time equal to negative infinity. but stored as energy in the magnetic field around the coil during any period of time [t0 . we assume that the initial current is zero and thus the total energy is given by w(t) = 1 2 Li 2 (7.1 POWER AND ENERGY p = vi = Li di dt (7. (7. From Eq.5) Since the inductor is a passive element.4. Find i for t ≥ 0 if i(0 ) = 2 A and v(t) = 4e i −3t u(t) in the following circuit. t] as t t w(t) − w (t0 ) = t0 p dt = L t0 i(t) i di dt dt (7.7) . v 2H Solution. it absorbs power according to the relationship Within the inductor. as happens in a resistor.INDUCTORS 67 Example 7.2).6) =L i(t0 ) i di = 1 L [i(t)]2 − [i(t0 )]2 2 where the unit of energy is joules ( J). we have 1 i(t) = L =2 = t t0 1 vd λ + i(t0 ) = 2 0 t 4e −3λ 1 d λ + i(0) = 2 0 t 4e −3λ d λ + 2 e −3 −3λ t λ=0 +2 2 4 − e −3t u(t)V 3 7. power is not consumed as heat.

Example 7. the input is v = 2 (t − 2). If power is negative in Eq. energy is being stored in the inductor. and 1 i(t) = L 0 t 1 v (λ) d λ + i(0) = 2 0 t 2λ d λ = t2 A 2 Power for this interval is t2 =t3 W 2 The current at t = 1 needed for the initial condition in the next part is p = vi = 2t × i(1) = t2 2 = t=1 1 A 2 For 1 ≤ t ≤ 2 In this interval. We first solve for current so that Eq. and 1 i(t) = L 1 t 1 v (λ)d λ + i(1) = 2 1 t 2 (λ − 2)d λ + 1 2 = t − 2t + 2 A 2 2 .5). (7. the solution is best approached by breaking it up into time intervals consistent with the changes in input voltage. For 0 < t < 1 In this interval. (7. If power is positive. Find the inductor power in the following circuit for t > 0 when i(0) = 0 A. v (V) i +2 v 2H 0 −2 1 2 t (s) Solution.68 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Any energy stored in the magnetic field is recoverable.5.5) can be applied to find the power. the input is v = 2t. As before. energy is being extracted from the inductor.

power is p = vi = 2 (t − 2) × t2 − 2t + 2 = t 3 − 6t 2 + 12t − 8 W 2 For t > 2 Power is zero in this interval since the voltage is zero.INDUCTORS 69 Accordingly. .

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Simple capacitors consist of parallel plates of conducting material that are separated by a gap filled with a dielectric material. (8.71 CHAPTER 8 Capacitors A capacitor is a device that stores energy in an electric field by charge separation when appropriately polarized by a voltage. Figure 8. contain a large number of electric dipoles that become polarized in the presence of an electric field. A. current does not flow through the capacitor plates.2) that dielectric . as James Clerk Maxwell hypothesized when he described the unified electromagnetic theory. mica. The unit of measure for capacitance is the farad or farads (F). separated by a thin insulating material that has a very large resistance. It should be clear from Eq. most capacitors are measured in terms of microfarads (1 μF = 10−6 F) or picofarads (1 pF = 10−12 F). (8.2) The capacitance of a capacitor is determined by the permittivity of the dielectric (ε = 8.854 × 10−12 F/M for air) that fills the gap between the parallel plates.1) is written in a more useful form for circuit analysis problems as i= dq dv =C dt dt (8. We use the symbol C to denote a capacitor. Eq. and the cross-sectional area of the plates.1 illustrates a capacitor in a circuit. Dielectric materials.1) where C represents the capacitance of the element. that is. a displacement current flows internally between capacitor plates and this current equals the current flowing into the capacitor and out of the capacitor. Using the relationship between current and charge. In actuality. where 1 F = 1 C/V. as C= εA d (8. d . the size of the gap between the plates.3) As described. air. Thus KCL is maintained. the capacitor physically consists of two conducting surfaces that stores charge. or Teflon. The charge separation caused by the polarization of the dielectric is proportional to the external voltage and given by q (t) = C v (t) (8. Rather.

Solution. capacitors act as open circuits when DC currents are present.1. 8.2. i =C dv d =2× (5) = 0 dt dt A capacitor is an open circuit to DC voltage. Example 8. Suppose v = 5 V and C = 2 F for the circuit shown in Fig.1 Find i.1: Circuit with a capacitor. materials do not conduct DC currents. Example 8.72 BIOINSTRUMENTATION i v C FIGURE 8. Find I in the following circuit given that the current source has been applied for a very long time. 2F 2H 4H 2H 2F 4A 2Ω 1F 3Ω 2Ω I .

Equation (8. Since the source has been applied for a very long time. Find i for the following circuit. v = t V for 0 ≤ t ≤ 1. as shown in the following figure. only DC current flows in the circuit. For 0 < t < 1 i =C dv d =2× (t) = 2 A dt dt . i v (V) 1 v 2F 0 1 2 t (s) Solution. v = 0 V.3. the voltage waveform is described with two different functions. and v = −(t − 2) V for 1 < t ≤ 2. For t < 0 and t > 2. I 4A 2Ω 2Ω To find I .2) is used to determine the current for each interval as follows.CAPACITORS 73 Solution. Furthermore the inductors can be replaced by short circuits and capacitors can be replaced by open circuits. we use the current divider law as I =4× 1 2 1 2 + 1 2 =2A Example 8. For nonzero values. and therefore i = 0 in this interval.

4) reduces to 1 v(t) = C 0 t t id t + v(t0 ) t0 (8. If the polarity of v(t0 ) is in the opposite direction of v (as will happen when we write mesh equations). this is mathematically possible using a Dirac delta function. giving i(t) d t = C d v Integrating both sides yields t v(t) i(λ) d λ = C t0 v(t0 ) dv or 1 v(t) = C For t0 = 0. is usually defined with the same polarity as v. Equation (8.2) by multiplying both sides by dt. . To have a step change in voltage across a capacitor requires that an infinite current flow through the capacitor. which means v(t0 ) is a positive quantity.4) id t + v(0) (8. then v(t0 )is negative. (8. Eq.74 BIOINSTRUMENTATION For 1 ≤ t ≤ 2 i =C dv d =2× (− (t − 2)) = −2 A dt dt Voltage cannot change instantaneously across a capacitor. v(t0 ). Eq. which is not physically possible.5) and for t0 = −∞.6) The initial voltage in Eq.2) defines the current through a capacitor for a given voltage. (8.4) reduces to 1 v(t) = C t i (λ) d λ −∞ (8. (8. we start from Eq. To find the voltage. Suppose one is given a current through a capacitor and asked to find the voltage. Of course.4). (8.

4.we have 1 v(t) = 2 0 t λ dλ = 1 2 λ2 2 t = 0 t2 V 4 The voltage at t = 2 needed for the initial condition in the next part is v(2) = For t > 2 1 v(t) = C 2 t t2 4 = 1V t=2 1 i d t + v(2) = 2 2 t 0 d t + v(2) = 1 V . for the interval 0 < t ≤ 2. For t < 0 1 v(t) = C For 0 ≤ t ≤ 2 1 v(t) = C 0 t t −∞ 1 i dt = 2 0 0 dt = 0 V −∞ i d t + v(0) and with v(0) = 0. (8.6) for each interval as follows. The current waveform is described with three different functions: for the interval t ≤ 0. we apply Eq. is (A) 2 + is v 2F − 0 2 t (s) Solution. and for t > 2. Find v for the circuit that follows. To find the voltage.CAPACITORS 75 Example 8.

we first need to find the current calculated from Eq. (8.76 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 8. Find the power and energy for the following circuit.7). ⎧ t<0 ⎪0 A dv ⎨ i(t) = C = 4t A 0≤t≤1 ⎪ dt ⎩ −2e −(t−1) A t > 1 . t] as t t w(t) − w (t0 ) = t0 p dt = C t0 v(t) v dv dt dt (8. ⎧ t<0 ⎪0 V ⎨ vs (t) = t 2 V 0≤t≤1 ⎪ ⎩ −(t−1) e V t>1 i vs 2F Solution. To find the power. Example 8.2). At time equal to negative infinity. we assume that the initial voltage is zero and thus the total energy is given by 1 w(t) = C v2 (8. energy is being extracted from the capacitor. If power is positive.7) The capacitor is a passive element that absorbs power according to the relationship dv dt Energy is stored in the electric field during any period of time [t0 .9) 2 Any energy stored in the electric field is recoverable. energy is being stored in the capacitor.8) =C v(t0 ) 1 v d v = C([v(t)]2 − [v (t0 )]2 ) 2 where the unit of energy is joules ( J).1 POWER AND ENERGY p = vi = C v (8. (8.5. If power is negative in Eq.

and energy is being extracted from the electric field by the source for t > 1 since power is negative. ∞] as w (∞) − w (1) = 1 × 2(v (∞)2 − v (1)2 ) = −1 J 2 . (8. we calculate the energy stored in the electric field during time interval [0. ⎧ t<0 ⎪0 ⎨ 2 3 p(t) = v · i = t · 4t = 4t W 0≤t≤1 ⎪ ⎩ −(t−1) · (−2e −(t−1) ) = −2e −2(t−1) W t > 1 e The energy in each interval is calculated using Eq. 1] as w(1) − w(0) = 1 × 2(v(1)2 − v(0)2 ) = 1 J 2 and the energy delivered from the electric field in the interval [1. (8.9) as follows. ⎧ t<0 ⎪0 ⎨ 1 w(t) = C v2 = 1 × 2[t 2 ]2 = t 4 J 0≤t≤1 ⎪2 2 ⎩1 −(t−1) 2 −2(t−1) × 2[e ] =e J t>1 2 Note that energy is being stored in the interval 0 ≤ t ≤ 1 since power is positive. From Eq.CAPACITORS 77 Equation (8.7) is used to find the power as follows.8).

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it is possible to reduce complex inductor and capacitor circuits into simpler. the current through each inductor is ii = Li v0 d t + ii (t0 ). Consider the following circuit consisting of N inductors in series. Applying KVL on this circuit gives d vs = v1 + v2 + · · · + vN di di di = L1 + L2 + · · · + L N dt dt dt di = (L1 + L2 + · · · + L N ) dt di = LEQ dt Thus. Since the same current flows through each inductor.1) Next. consider N inductors connected in parallel as shown in Fig. t0 Applying KCL on the upper node of this circuit gives ⎡ ⎤ t N 1 ⎣ v0 d t + ii (t0 )⎦ is = Li i=1 t0 1 1 1 + + ··· + = L1 L2 LN = 1 LEQ t0 t t N v0 d t + t0 i=1 ii (t0 ) v0 d t + is (t0 ) .1. 9. Since the same t 1 voltage is across each inductor. whereby L E Q = L1 + L2 + · · · + L N (9. inductors connected in a series can be replaced by an equivalent inductance. equivalent circuits by combining series and parallel collections of like elements. the voltage drop across each inductor is vi = Li dit .79 CHAPTER 9 Inductance and Capacitance Combinations As with resistors.

whereby LEQ = 1 + ··· + (9.2: (Left) N inductors in parallel. Thus. (9.1: (Left) N inductors in series. (Right) An equivalent circuit for inductors in parallel. . and the process used for simplifying resistor circuits is the same used for inductors in series and parallel.1) and (9. Eq. inductors connected in parallel can be replaced by an equivalent inductance.2) 1 L1 + 1 L2 1 LN For the case of two inductors in parallel.3) Equations (9.2) are similar to the results we found for resistors in series and parallel. + i1 i2 iN + is v0 − L1 L2 LN is v0 − FIGURE 9. (Right) An equivalent circuit for inductors in series.2) reduces to LEQ = L1 L2 L1 + L2 (9.80 BIOINSTRUMENTATION i + v1 − L1 + v2 − L2 + i vs LN vN − vs L EQ FIGURE 9.

1. 1H 4H 2H 6H 6H 4H 2H L EQ 2 +2= 4 H 4 4=2 H 4 +2 = 6 H 6 6 6=2H 1+2=3H If follows that L E Q = 1 + (6 6 (4 + (4 (2 + 2)))) =1+ 6 6 1 1 6 4+ 1 4 1 + 1 4 =1+ + 1 6 + 1 6 = 1 + 2 = 3H .INDUCTANCE AND CAPACITANCE COMBINATIONS 81 Example 9. 1H 4H 2H 6H 6H 4H 2H L EQ Solution. The equivalent inductance is found by forming series and parallel combinations from right to left until it reduces to a single inductance as shown in the following figure. Find L E Q for the following circuit.

3. the current through each inductor is ii = Ci ddvt0 . as shown in Fig. 9. 9. (Right) An equivalent circuit for capacitors in parallel.82 BIOINSTRUMENTATION + + is v0 − C1 C2 CN v0 − CN FIGURE 9. (Right) An equivalent circuit for capacitors in series. the voltage across each inductor is vi = Ci i d t + vi (t0 ).3: (Left) N capacitors in parallel. Since the same t 1 current flows through each capacitor. Next. t0 Applying KVL around this circuit gives C1 i + v1 − C2 i + v2 − + + CN vs vN vs vN − − C EQ FIGURE 9. consider N capacitors connected in parallel. consider N capacitors connected in series as shown in Fig. . capacitors connected in series can be replaced by an equivalent capacitance. Applying KCL on the upper node of this circuit gives is = C1 d v0 d v0 d v0 + C2 + · · · + CN dt dt dt d v0 dt = CEQ Thus. whereby C E Q = C1 + C2 + · · · + C N (9.4: (Left) N capacitors in series. Since the same voltage is across each capacitor.4.4) Next.

(9. of inductors and capacitors until the analysis reduces the circuit to a single inductance and capacitance. That is.⎣1 vs = Ci i=1 N ⎡ INDUCTANCE AND CAPACITANCE COMBINATIONS t ⎤ 83 i d t + vi (t0 )⎦ t0 t N 1 1 1 = + + ··· + C1 C2 CN = 1 CEQ t0 t i dt + t0 i=1 vi (t0 ) i d t + vs (t0 ) Thus. Also note that the two parallel capacitors equal 6 F. Example 9.5) and (9. and capacitors in series as resistors in parallel. Reduce the following circuit to a single capacitor and inductor.5) reduces to CEQ = C1 C2 C1 + C2 (9. Eq.5 H 2H 3F 3H 2H 2H 6F Solution.5) For the case of two capacitors in series.2.6) Equations (9. which results in 1.5 H. we treat capacitors in parallel using the techniques for resistors in series. capacitors connected in series can be replaced by an equivalent capacitance. The equivalent inductance is found by forming series and parallel combinations. whereby CEQ = 1 C1 + 1 C2 1 + ··· + 1 CN (9. respectively.6) are similar to the results we found for resistors in parallel and series. from right to left. Consider the inductors first as shown in the following figure on the right. 6F 3F 0. .

5 H 1.5 H equivalent inductance to the left past the capacitors as shown in the following figure.5 H 6F 6F 6F 0. and the three capacitors in series (treated like resistors in parallel) equal 1 + 1 + 1 = 2 F.5 + 1.5 = 2 H 6 6 6=2F The final reduced circuit is shown in the following figure. The two series inductors equal 2 H. 2H 2F .5 H Next we slide the 1. 1 6 6 6 0.5 H 6F 3F 2H 3F 3H 2H 2H 6F 2 2=1H 2+1=3H 3+3=6F 3 3 = 1.84 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 0.

(d) Find the energy trapped in the inductors at t = ∞. first simplify the circuit by combining the three resistors as RE Q = 400 + and two inductors as L E Q = 3×6 3+6 1 1 200 + 1 300 + 1 600 = 500 = 2 H as shown in the following circuit. so we have d 500i + 2 di =0 dt . (a) Find i(t). i1 (t). Recall that the voltage drop across an inductor is vL = L dit . i + 500 Ω i v 2H − We use the mesh-current method to find v(t) as follows.3. i2 (t) and v(t) for the following circuit for t ≥ 0 given i1 (0− ) = 5 A and i2 (0− ) = 15 A. i 400 Ω i1 + i2 200 Ω 300 Ω 600 Ω 3H v 6H − Solution (a) For ease in solution. (b) Find the initial energy stored in the inductors. Example 9.INDUCTANCE AND CAPACITANCE COMBINATIONS 85 The next example illustrates how to simplify a circuit and then apply the mesh-current method to solve for unknown currents. (c) Find the energy dissipated in the resistors between t = 0 and t = ∞.

i1 (0− ) = i1 (0+ ) = 5 A. 7. the total initial energy stored in the inductors equals w L (0) = 1 1 1 1 2 2 L1 i1 + L2 i2 = × 3 × 52 + × 6 × 152 = 712. i2 (0− ) = i2 (0+ ) = 15 A and i(0− ) = i(0+ ) = i1 (0+ ) + i2 (0+ ) = 20 A To determine K 1 we use i(0) = 20 = K 1 .5 J 2 2 2 2 .86 BIOINSTRUMENTATION or di + 250i = 0 dt The previous differential equation has the characteristic equation s + 250 = 0 with root s = −250 and solution i(t) = K 1 e −250t A Note that the forced response is zero since there is no input. Thus. (b) From Eq. Because the energy stored in an inductor cannot change instantaneously.7. our solution is i(t) = 20e −250t u(t) A. For t ≥ 0 d 0 v (t) = 2 and 1 i1 (t) = 3 0 t di = −10000e −250t u(t) V dt (−10000e −250λ 40 −250λ e ) dλ + 5 = 3 t λ=0 +5= 40 −250t 40 e +5 − 3 3 40 −250t 25 − e A 3 3 t 1 40 −250λ e (−10000e −250λ ) d λ + 15 = i2 (t) = 6 6 = 0 t λ=0 + 15 = 20 −250t 20 45 e + − 3 3 3 = 20 −250t 25 + e A 3 3 Naturally i(t) = i1 (t) + i2 (t) = 20e −250t u(t) A. To find t 1 i1 (t) and i2 (t) we find v(t) = L E Q dit and then use ii (t) = Li v d t + ii (0).

Also note that while energy is trapped in the two inductors at t = ∞. the energy stored in the equivalent inductor. . and that the energy dissipated in the 2 resistors equals the energy stored in the equivalent inductor at t = 0.INDUCTANCE AND CAPACITANCE COMBINATIONS 87 (c) The energy dissipated in the resistors equals ∞ ∞ w RE Q = 0 ∞ RE Q i 2 (t) d t = 0 500 × (20e −250t )2 d t ∞ 0 = 0 500 × 400e −500t d t = − 400e −500t = 400 J (d) The energy trapped in the inductors at t = ∞ equals 25 1 1 2 w1 (∞) = L1 i1 (∞) = × 3 × − 2 2 3 w2 (∞) = 1 1 2 L2 i2 (∞) = × 6 × 2 2 25 3 2 2 = 104. Note that the initial energy stored in the equivalent inductor is 1 × 2 × (20)2 = 400 J.1667 J = 208. L E Q . is zero.333 J Notice that energy trapped in the two inductors equals the total initial stored energy minus the energy dissipated in the resistors.

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Example 10. inductors or capacitors prevents us from simplifying the circuit for ease in solution. With the reference node at the bottom of the circuit.89 CHAPTER 10 A General Approach to Solving Circuits Involving Resistors. Capacitors and Inductors Sometimes a circuit consisting of resistors. inductors and capacitors.1. Recall that the node involving the voltage source is a known voltage and that we do not write a node equation for it. Write the node equations for the following circuit for t ≥ 0 if the initial conditions are zero. From these equations.1. the current through a capacitor is ic = C v. L1 C1 vs(t) R1 R2 C2 Solution. In this section. When writing the node-voltage ˙ equations. In this case. we apply the node-voltage and mesh-current methods to write equations involving integrals and differentials using element relationships for resistors. inductors and capacitors cannot be simplified by bringing together like elements in series and parallel combinations. the absence of parallel or series combinations of resistors. where v˙ is the derivative of the . we can solve for unknown currents and voltages of interest. as in Ex. 10. 10. we have two essential nodes. as shown in the following redrawn circuit. Consider the circuit shown in Fig.1.

the term i L (0) = 0.1: A circuit that cannot be simplified. 1 voltage across the capacitor. 0 where v is the voltage across the inductor.90 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 5H 1F 3Ω 2H 3F 2Ω 4F FIGURE 10. and the current through an inductor is i L = L vd λ + i L (0). t L1 1 C1 vs(t) R1 + R2 2 + v1 C2 v2 − − Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives C1 (v˙1 − v˙s ) + which simplifies to C1 v˙1 + 1 1 1 v1 − + v 2 = C1 v˙s R1 R2 R2 t v1 v1 − v2 + =0 R1 R2 Summing the currents leaving node 2 gives v2 − v1 1 + C2 v˙2 + R2 L1 (v 2 − vs ) d λ = 0 0 . Since the initial conditions are zero.

.. ..GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 91 Typically. ¨ ¨ v 2 = v 1 + 2v 1 − v s After substituting into the second node equation. and assume that we are interested in obtaining a single differential equation involving node voltage v 1 and its derivatives. . let us assume that the values for the circuit elements are R1 = R2 = 1 .. To write a single differential equation involving just one node voltage and the inputs. ¨ ¨ v 1 + 3v1 + 2v˙1 + 2v 1 = v s + vs + v˙s − vs . and then substitute into the second equation as follows. The easiest case involves a node equation containing an undesired node voltage without its derivatives. this gives 1 1 1 1 ¨ v˙2 − v˙1 + C2 v2 + v2 − vs = 0 R2 R2 L1 L1 and after rearranging yields ¨ v2 + 1 1 1 1 v˙2 + v˙1 = v2 − vs C2 R2 C 2 L1 C2 R2 C 2 L1 When applying the node-voltage method. ¨ ¨ ¨ v 1 + 2v1 − v s + v1 + 2v˙1 − vs + v˙1 + 2v 1 − v˙s − v˙1 = vs and after simplifying . Consider the node equations for Ex. v 2 = v˙1 + 2v 1 − v˙s ¨ ¨ v˙2 = v1 + 2v˙1 − vs . we have . When applied to the previous expression. we eliminate integrals in the node equations by differentiating. . Sometimes this involves differentiation as well as substitution. For ease in analysis. we use the other node equations and substitute into the node equation of the desired node voltage.. and L1 = 1 H.......1. we generate one equation for each essential node. calculate v˙2 and v2 . 10. Another method for creating a single differential equation is to use the D operator. C1 = C2 = 1 F. and the input. giving us v˙1 + 2v 1 − v 2 = v˙s and ¨ v2 + v˙2 + v 2 − v˙1 = vs ¨ Using the first equation.. we solve for v 2 .

two capacitors are connected directly to a voltage source.2A. This occurs when capacitor voltages and inductor currents are not independent..2A and B. This occurs when capacitors are connected directly to a voltage source or when inductors are connected directly to a current source as shown in Fig. In Fig. KVL applied around the outer loop gives −v(t) + v 1 (t) + v 2 (t) = 0 or v(t) = v 1 (t) + v 2 (t) where v 1 (t) and v 2 (t) are the voltages across the two capacitors. In terms of the D operator. specifically voltages and the inputs.. . the result is . there is an algebraic relationship between the capacitor. v 1 (t) and v 2 (t) are not independent. or the inductor currents and the inputs. the order of the differential equation relating a single output variable and the inputs is equal to the number of energy storing elements in the circuit (capacitors and inductors). In general. there is an algebraic relationship . 10.. It should be clear that in the previous equation.. and after substituting v 2 into the second equation yields (D 2 + D + 1)(D + 2)v 1 − D(D 2 + D + 1)vs − Dv 1 = vs Upon simplification (D 3 + 3D 2 + 2D + 2)v 1 = (D 3 + D 2 + D + 1)vs Returning to the differential notation. that is. that is.92 BIOINSTRUMENTATION The D operator also provides us the means to write the two differential equations as a single differential equation involving only v 1 and vs . In some circuits. the two node equations are written as (D + 2)v 1 − v 2 = Dvs (D 2 + D + 1)v 2 − Dv 1 = vs Solving the first equation for v 2 gives v 2 = (D + 2) − Dvs . 10. the order of the differential equation is less than the number of capacitors and inductors in the circuit. ¨ ¨ v 1 + 3v1 + 2v˙1 + 2v 1 = v s + vs + v˙s − vs which is the same expression we calculated before.

2B. and the resulting differential equation is of third-order. By including an internal resistance Rs in the circuit. (C). with no algebraic relationships between voltages and currents. (D) Circuits described by second-order differential equations.2A and B are better described by those in Fig. between the two. 10. 10. . if v 1 (t) is known. Rs (called an internal resistance—a small resistance for voltage source and a large resistance for a current source). we no longer have any algebraic relationships among the voltages and currents. Circuits with the characteristics of Fig.2: (A).1 has three energy storing elements (two capacitors and one inductor). 10. For example.GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 93 A + v1(t) − + v2(t) − B i1(t) C1 i(t) R2 C2 L1 L2 R1 i2(t) R2 R1 v (t) C RS + v1(t) − + v2(t) − D is(t) C1 i(t) R2 C2 Rs L1 L2 i1(t) R1 i2(t) R2 R1 v (t) FIGURE 10.2A and B are rare in realistic situations. the two circuits in Fig. currents i1 (t) and i2 (t) are not independent: there exists an algebraic relationship between the currents. 10. The same situation occurs with two inductors connected directly to a current source as in Fig. Notice that the circuit given in Ex. 10. (B) Circuits described by first-order differential equations and having algebraic relationships between the voltages and currents. as expected. KCL applied at the upper node gives i(t) = i1 (t) + i2 (t) As before. then v 2 (t) = v(t) − v 1 (t).2C and D since the voltage and current sources are more appropriately modeled with a resistance within the ideal source.

94 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Example 10. 10.2. There are three meshes in this circuit. Since the initial conditions are zero. To write the t 1 mesh-current equations. L1 i3 R2 R1 vs(t) i1 i2 C2 C1 Summing the voltage drops around mesh 1 gives 1 −vs + C1 t (i1 − i3 )d λ + R1 (i1 − i2 ) = 0 0 Differentiating and rearranging the previous equation gives R1 di1 di2 d vs 1 1 i1 − R1 i3 = + + dt C1 dt C1 dt Summing the voltage drops around mesh 2 gives 1 R1 (i2 − i1 ) + R2 (i2 − i3 ) + C2 t i2 d λ = 0 0 Differentiating and rearranging the previous equation gives (R1 + R2 ) 1 di1 di3 di2 + − R2 =0 i2 − R1 dt C2 dt dt . vC (0+ ) = 0. Solution. 0 where i is the resultant current (sum of mesh currents) through the capacitor. and the voltage across a inductor vL = L dd t i where dd t i is the derivative of the resultant current through the inductor. as shown in the following figure. recall that the voltage across a capacitor is vC = C i d λ + vC (0+ ). Write the mesh-current equations for the circuit in Ex.1 for t ≥ 0 if the initial conditions are zero.

Example 10. summing the voltage drops around mesh 3 gives di3 1 L1 + R2 (i3 − i2 ) + dt C1 t (i3 − i1 )d λ = 0 0 Differentiating and rearranging the previous equation gives L1 1 1 d 2 i3 di3 di2 + − + R2 i3 − R2 i1 = 0 2 dt dt C1 dt C1 The previous two examples involved a circuit with zero initial conditions.GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 95 Finally. our approach remains the same as before except that the initial inductor currents are included when writing the node-voltage and the initial capacitor voltages are included when writing the mesh-current equations. we have three essential nodes as shown in the redrawn circuit that follows. i L1 10 Ω 1H 2H i L2 vs 1F 2F 3F Solution. When circuits involve nonzero initial conditions.3. Write the node equations for the following circuit for t ≥ 0 assuming the initial conditions are i L1 (0) = 8 A and i L2 (0) = −4 A. With the reference node at the bottom of the circuit. 1 10 Ω + i L1 1H + 2 i L2 2H + 3 vs v1 1F v2 2F v3 3F − − − .

10. .1 DISCONTINUITIES AND INITIAL CONDITIONS IN A CIRCUIT Discontinuities in voltage and current occur when an input such as a unit step is applied or a switch is thrown in a circuit. Notice that the sign for the initial inductor current is negative because the direction is from right to left and the current is defined on the circuit diagram in the opposite direction for the node 2 equation. but may be easily extended to any time an input is applied. if the inputs to a circuit are known for all time. we can solve for initial conditions directly based on energy considerations and not depend on being provided with them in the problem statement. Summing the currents leaving node 3 gives 1 2 0 t (v3 − v 2 )d λ + 4 + 3v˙3 = 0 In this example. a fifth-order differential equation would result because there are five energy storing elements in the circuit. Summing the currents leaving node 2 gives t 1 (v2 − v1 )d λ − 8 + 2v˙2 + 2 0 t (v2 − v3 )d λ − 4 = 0 0 where i L2 (0) = −4 A.96 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives (v 1 − vs ) + v˙1 + 10 0 t (v 1 − v 2 ) d λ + 8 = 0 where i L1 (0) = 8 A. we have not simplified the node equations by differentiating to remove the integral. As we will see. which would have eliminated the initial inductor currents from the node-equations. as well as the first through fourth derivatives at time zero. typically the output variable and its (n − 1) derivatives at the time the input is applied or switch thrown. To solve the differential equation. we would need five initial conditions. when solving an nth order differential equation one must know n initial conditions. the initial node voltage for the variable selected. As we have seen. Almost all of our problems involve the input applied at time zero. If we were to write a single differential equation involving just one node voltage and the input. so our discussion here is focused on time zero.

Here. there are no discontinuities allowed in current through an inductor or voltage across a capacitor at any time—specifically. With the exception of variables associated with current through an inductor and voltage across a capacitor. v 2 (0− ) = v 2 (0+ ) and v3 (0− ) = v3 (0+ ). Since the inductor current cannot change in going from t = 0− to t = 0+ . The initial conditions for variables not associated with current through an inductor and voltage across a capacitor at times of a discontinuity are determined only from the initial conditions from variables associated with current through an inductor and voltage across a capacitor. we assume the derivative of a unit step input is zero at t = 0+ . we analyze the circuit at t = 0+ . since the capacitor voltage cannot change in . In the previous problem when we were given initial conditions for the inductors and capacitors. we replace all inductors by short circuits and capacitors by open circuits in the circuit. a discontinuity is allowed for the derivative of the current through an inductor and voltage across a capacitor at t = 0− and t = 0+ since vL (0+) di L (0+) = dt L and d vC (0+) iC (0+) = dt L as discontinuities are allowed in vL (0+) and iC (0+). that is di L (0+) di L (t) = dt dt and t=0+ d vC (t) d vC (0+) = dt dt t=0+ In calculations to determine the derivatives of variables not associated with current through an inductor and voltage across a capacitor. we replace the inductors with current sources whose values are the currents at t = 0− . Thus. Second. Keep in mind that the derivatives in the previous expression are evaluated at zero after differentiation. Moreover. however. the value of the variable remains the same at t = 0− and t = 0+ . While it may not seem obvious at first. The analysis is done in two steps involving KCL and KVL or using the node-voltage or mesh-current methods. We then solve for the appropriate currents and voltages in the circuit to find the currents through the inductors (actually the shorts connecting the sources and resistors) and voltages across the capacitors (actually the open circuits among the sources and resistors). other variables can have discontinuities. 2. 1. these variables must obey KVL and KCL. we analyze the circuit at t = 0− . an inductor acts as a short circuit and a capacitor acts as an open circuit. especially at a time when a unit step is applied or when a switch is thrown. this implied. Recall that when a circuit is at steady state. First. and v 1 (0− ) = v 1 (0+ ). and any applicable sources.GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 97 Energy cannot change instantaneously for elements that store energy. Thus at steady state at t = 0− . the derivative of a unit step input may be needed. i L1 (0− ) = i L1 (0+ ) and i L2 (0− ) = i L2 (0+ ).

Using the voltage divider rule. iR1 400 Ω + iR 2 iC 100 Ω + iR 3 iL(0 ) 10 V − vC (0 ) − vL − Notice vL (0− ) = 0 V because the inductor is a short circuit.98 BIOINSTRUMENTATION going from t = 0− to t = 0+ . i R1 (0− ). the capacitor is replaced by an open circuit and the inductor by a short circuit as shown in the following circuit. i R3 (0+ ). From this circuit we solve for all desired initial conditions necessary to solve the differential equation. i L (0− ). For t = 0− . i R2 (0− ). we have vC (0− ) = 10 × and by Ohm’s law i L (0− ) = 10 = 0. Also note that the 500 resistor is not shown in the circuit since it is shorted out by the inductor. i R3 (0− ). i R1 (0+ ). and so i R3 (0− ) = 0 A.02 A 100 + 400 100 = 2V 400 + 100 . Find vC (0− ). i L (0+ ).4. iR1 400 Ω + 5u(t) V vC iR2 iC 100 Ω + iR3 iL 10 mH 500 Ω 5μ F vL 10 V − − − Solution. Example 10. vL (0+ ). vC (0+ ). we replace the capacitors with voltage sources whose values are the voltages at t = 0− . i R2 (0+ ). and the derivative of each passive element’s current and voltage at t = 0+ for the following circuit. vL (0− ).

i R2 (0+ ) = 0. iR1 400 Ω + iC vC C iR 2 100 Ω L + iL iR 3 15 V 2V − 0. di L (0+ ) vL (0+ ) = = 0 A/s dt L iC (0+ ) 0.GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS − − − 99 It follows that i R1 (0 ) = i R2 (0 ) = i L (0 ) = 0.02 A. = C 5 × 10−6 + . Now i R3 (0+ ) = vL (0 ) = 0 A.125 A To find v˙C (0+ ). andi R1 (0+ ) = 15−2 = 0.02 A − vL 500 Ω To find vL (0+ ). we sum the currents leaving node L.5 × 103 V/s.0325 A.02 A.0325 − 0.0125 = 2.02 A.02 + i R3 (0+ ) = 500 0. Because voltage across a capacitor and current through an inductor are not allowed to change from t = 0− to t = 0+ we have vC (0+ ) = vC (0− ) = 2 V and i L (0− ) = i L (0+ ) = 0. we write KCL at node C. giving −i R1 (0+ ) + iC (0+ ) + i R2 (0+ ) = 0 or iC (0+ ) = i R1 (0+ ) − i R2 (0+ ) = 0.02 = 0. The circuit for t = 0+ is drawn by replacing the inductors in the original circuit with current sources whose values equal the inductor currents at t = 0− and the capacitors with voltage sources whose values equal the capacitor voltages at t = 0− as shown in the following figure with nodes C and L and reference. note that iC (0+ ) = C v˙C (0+ ) or v˙C (0+ ) = Similarly. Note also that the input is now 10 + 5u(t) = 15 V. 400 To find iC (0+ ). yielding vL vL − 2 + 0.02 + =0 100 500 which gives vL (0+ ) = 0 V.

dt dt dt dt For the dic dt term we have iC = i R1 − i R2 and diC di R1 di R2 = − dt dt dt Using Ohm’s law.167 A/s 100 At t = 0+ .100 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 15−vC .25 A/s dt 400 dt 400 To find di R3 dt we start with KCL i R3 = i R2 − i L = i R1 − iC − i L . we have for 1 d vC (0+ ) 500 di R3 (0+ ) 2. 400 Next we have i R1 = and di R1 (0+ ) 1 d vC (0+ ) 2. and di R1 diC di L di R3 = − − .5 × 103 di R2 (0+ ) = − = − 5 × 4.167 = 4.5 × 103 =− =− = −6. we have di R3 (0+ ) 1 = dt 6 1 d vC (0+ ) di L (0+ ) − 100 d t dt di R2 dt = 1 6 From before. dt we have di R2 1 d vC 500 di R3 = − dt 100 d t 100 d t Substituting di R2 dt into the dic dt equation gives diC di R1 di R2 di R1 1 d vC 500 di R3 = − = − + dt dt dt dt 100 d t 100 d t Returning to the di R3 dt equation we have di R3 di R1 diC di L di R1 di R1 1 d vC 500 di R3 di L = − − = − + − − dt dt dt dt dt dt 100 d t 100 d t dt Collecting the di R3 dt terms and canceling the di R3 1 = dt 6 di R1 dt terms.167 A/s dt 100 d t 100 d t 100 . the di R2 dt term is given by as vC − vL 100 = 500 and di R2 1 d vC 1 d vL = − dt 100 d t 100 d t i R2 = With vL = 500i R3 and d vL dt di R3 .5 × 103 − 0 = 4. the previous equation reduces to 1 d vC di L − 100 d t dt 2.

The initial conditions necessary to solve the differential equation for this circuit were calculated in Ex. We use the node voltage method to solve this problem since vC is one of the variables used in the solution. we only need vC (0+ ) and v˙C (0+ ). 10.1665 = −10. we calculated many more initial conditions than are required in this example. the circuit is redrawn for analysis in the following figure.25) = −2500 V/s dt dt d vR2 di R = 100 2 = 100 × 4.7 V/s dt dt and d vR3 di R = 500 3 = 500 × 4.4.25 − 4.GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 101 and for dic dt di R1 (0+ ) di R2 (0+ ) diC (0+ ) = − = −6. Find vC for the circuit in Ex. 10.5. Keep in mind that in Ex. the derivatives of the voltages across the resistors are d vR1 di R = 400 1 = 400 × (−6.167 = 2083.167 = 416. here.4 for t ≥ 0.4. For t ≥ 0. 10. Using the node-voltage method also results in two equations rather than three equations with the mesh-current method. Solution.5 V/s dt dt Example 10. C 400 Ω + iC 100 Ω + L iL 10 mH 500 Ω 15 V vC 5μF vL − − Summing the currents leaving node C gives vC − vL vC − 15 + 5 × 10−6 v˙C + =0 400 100 which simplifies to v˙C + 2500vC − 2000vL = 7500 .417 A/s dt dt dt Finally.

833 × 106 = 0 with roots −7.7 × 103 and the natural solution vCn (t) = K 1 e −7.5 × 106 The characteristic equation for the previous differential equation is s 2 + 10.25)vC − 3.5 × 10−3 D + 1. our two differential equations are written as DvC + 2500vC − 2000vL = 7500 or (D + 2500)vC − 2000vL = 7500 6DvL + 50 × 103 vL − 5DvC = 0 or (6D + 50 × 103 )vL − 5DvC = 0 We then solve for vL from the first equation.718×10 t + K 2 e −2.5 × 106 .83 × 106 vC = 62. we solve for the forced response. simplifies to 6v˙ L + 50 × 103 vL − 5v˙C = 0 Using the D operator method. giving (6D + 50 × 103 )vL − 5DvC = (6D + 50 × 103 )((0.75 and then substitute vL into the second equation.718 × 103 and − 2.750) − 5DvC =0 Reducing this expression yields D 2 vC + 10. vL = (0.417 × 103 v˙C + 20. assuming that vC f (t) = K 3 .102 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Summing the currents leaving node L gives vL − vC 1 + 100 10 × 10−3 t vL d λ + i L (0+ ) + 0 vL =0 500 which.7×10 t V 3 3 Next.417 × 103 s + 20.833 × 106 K 3 = 62.25)vC − 3.5 × 10−3 D + 1. After substituting into the differential equation.5 × 106 Returning to the time domain gives ¨ vC + 10.417 × 103 DvC + 20.83 × 106 vC = 62. after multiplying by 500 and differentiating. this gives 20.

If the voltage or current used in the controlled source is zero. Example 10. our solution is now vC (t) = vCn (t) + vC f (t) = K 1 e −7. Our approach remains the same for circuits with controlled sources. v˙C (0) = 2. Substituting these values into the solution gives vC (t) = 0.718×10 t + K 2 e −2. iL1 3H ix 10 Ω 5u(t) V 3ix 10 V − 1H 2 mF 10 Ω 20 Ω . for t = 0− we replace the independent source by a short circuit if it is a voltage source and an open circuit if it is a current source.6.7 × 103 K 2 e −2.718 × 103 K 1 − 2.7×10 t + 3 V 3 3 We use the initial conditions to solve for K 1 and K 2 .5 × 103 = −7.04 and K 2 = −1.7×10 t 3 3 and at t = 0. We analyze the circuit for t = 0− and t = 0+ to establish the initial conditions with the controlled source operational.GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 103 or K 3 = 3.7×10 t + 3 V 3 3 for t ≥ 0. First vC (0) = 2 = K 1 + K 2 + 3 Next v˙C (t) = −7.04. we replace it with an open circuit if it is a current source and a short circuit if it is a voltage source.718 × 103 K 1 e −7. If a circuit has an independent voltage or current source that is introduced at zero via a unit step function. Thus.7 × 103 K 2 Solving gives K 1 = 0.718×10 t − 2.04e −7.04e −2.718×10 t − 1. Find i L1 for the following circuit for t ≥ 0 using the mesh-current method.

recall that the voltage across a capacitor is 1 t vC = C 0 i d λ + vC (0+ ). It should be clear that a third-order differential equation should describe this system. we will use the mesh-current method with currents defined in the following circuit. and the voltage across a inductor vL = L dd t i where dd t i is the derivative of the resultant current through the inductor. To solve this problem. Eliminate all currents except i4 . which is i L1 . Since there is a controlled current source in the circuit. Summing the voltages around supermesh 1 + 2 yields −15 + 10(i1 − i4 ) + 10(i2 − i4 ) + d (i2 − i3 ) =0 dt 3H ix 10 Ω 10 Ω i4 20 Ω 15 V i1 3ix i2 1H i3 2 mF Rearranging the previous equation gives 10i1 + di2 di3 + 10i2 − − 20i4 = 15 dt dt . we form a supermesh for meshes 1 and 2.104 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Solution. Solve for the initial conditions 3. Notice that mesh current i4 = i L1 . Mesh Equations To write the mesh-current equations. where i is the resultant current (sum of mesh currents) through the inductor. since there are three energy storing elements. The steps involve: 1. Solve the differential equation. which gives a third-order differential equation 2.

we have − 50 di4 130 i2 − 20i3 + 3 + i4 = 0 4 dt 4 . − di3 di4 d 2 i2 d 2 i3 + 500i3 − 20 =0 + 2 + 20 2 dt dt dt dt After substituting i1 and collecting like terms in the mesh 4 equation. The dependent current source equation. we find −10i1 − 10i2 − 20i3 + 3 di4 + 40i4 = 0 dt Applying KCL for the dependent current source gives 3i x = i2 − i1 Since i x = 3(i1 − i4 ).GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 105 Summing the voltage drops around mesh 3 yields 1 d (i2 − i3 ) + 20(i3 − i4 ) + dt 2 × 10−3 t i3 d λ + vC (0+ ) = 0 0 Differentiating and rearranging the previous equation reduces to − di3 di4 d 2 i2 d 2 i3 + 500i3 − 20 =0 + 2 + 20 2 dt dt dt dt Summing the voltage drops around mesh 4 gives 3 di4 + 20(i4 − i3 ) + 10(i4 − i2 ) + 10(i4 − i1 ) = 0 dt and after rearranging. Substituting i1 into the supermesh 1 + 2 equation and collecting like terms gives 4 2 di2 50 di3 50 + i2 − − i4 = 15 dt 4 dt 4 The mesh 3 equation did not have an i1 . an algebraic equation. we have four equations and four unknowns. we have 4i1 − i2 − 3i4 = 0 At this time. but is written here for convenience. since i1 = 1 (i + 3i4 ). is used to eliminate i1 from the three mesh equations.

5).5i2 + + 812. 8 4 This yields (4. Solving for i3 and taking its derivatives yields i3 = 1 di4 130 50 − i2 + 3 + i4 20 4 dt 4 di3 1 50 di2 d 2 i4 130 di4 = − +3 2 + dt 20 4 dt dt 4 dt d 2 i3 50 d 2 i2 1 d 3 i4 130 d 2 i4 − = +3 3 + d t2 20 4 d t2 dt 4 d t2 Substituting the di3 dt term into the supermesh 1 + 2 equation and simplifying gives 13 di2 50 3 d 2 i4 13 di4 50 − + i2 − − i4 = 15 8 dt 4 20 d t 2 8 dt 4 Substituting i3 . we pre-multiply the first equation by (− 13 D 2 − 50 D − 312.5) × 15 8 4 .5 i4 = 0 20 8 4 To solve for i4 . − di3 dt and d 2 i3 d t2 into the mesh 3 equation after collecting like terms gives 13 d 2 i2 50 di2 3 d 3 i4 37 d 2 i4 350 di4 − 312. pre-multiply the 8 4 second equation by ( 13 D + 50 ).875 d 3 i4 d 2 i4 di4 + 112. and then subtract the first equation from the second equation.106 BIOINSTRUMENTATION The mesh 4 equation is used to eliminate i3 from the other two equations. we use the D operator method on our two differential equations giving 13 3 13 50 50 D+ i2 + − D 2 − D− i4 = 15 8 4 20 8 4 − 13 2 50 D − D − 312.5 2 + 1750 + 6250i4 = 4687.5D 2 + 1750D + 6250)i4 = −(− Returning to the time domain gives 4.5 i2 + 8 4 3 3 37 2 350 D + D + D + 812.875D 3 + 112.5i4 = 0 − + + 8 d t2 4 dt 20 d t 3 8 d t2 4 dt To eliminate i2 .5 3 dt dt dt 13 2 50 D − D − 312.

GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 107 Note that the derivative terms on the right-hand side of the D operator equation are zero since the derivative of a constant is zero.5 A and i x (0− ) = 10−v 1 (0 ) = 10−8 = 0. Analyzing the circuit at t = 0+ with inductors replaced as current sources whose values equal the inductor currents at t = 0− and the capacitor as a voltage source whose value equal the capacitor voltage at t = 0− .1 2 + 359 + 6250i4 = 1282. As before. iL1 ix 10 Ω + 1 4ix 10 Ω iL2 20 Ω + 10 V + v1 3ix vC − − − Summing the currents leaving node 1 gives v 1 − 10 −3 10 10 − v 1 10 + v1 =0 10 where i x = 10−v 1 . For t = 0− . Ohm’s law gives i L1 (0− ) = 10 − 10 = 0.8 + 0.875 to put it in a more convenient form results in d 3 i4 d 2 i4 di4 + 23. i L1 (0+ ).1 3 dt dt dt Initial Conditions The next step in the solution involves finding the initial conditions for the circuit necessary to di 1 (0+ ) d 2 i (0+ ) solve the differential equation. for a node-voltage solution the circuit is redrawn as shown in the following diagram. this involves: d 1. KCL gives the current through the other inductor as i L2 (0− ) = 4i x (0− ) + i L1 (0− ) = 0.5 = 1. Dividing the previous differential equation by 4. Since the capacitor is connected across the 20 10 10 battery. Solving this equation yields v 1 (0− ) = 8 V.2 A. Ld t and L1t 2 .3 A. Analyzing the circuit at t = 0− with the inductors replaced as short circuits and the capacitor as an open circuit 2. . vC (0− ) = 10 V.

0769. Summing the currents leaving node d 1 yields v 1 − 15 15 − v 1 −3 10 10 Simplifying the equation. and i L2 (0+ ) = i L2 (0− ) = 1.108 BIOINSTRUMENTATION For t = 0+ . i L1 (0+ ) = i L1 (0− ) = 0. Recall that vC (0+ ) = vC (0− ) = 10 V.6154 and v 2 0+ ) = 3. we first solve for the node-voltages di 1 (0+ ) d 2 i (0+ ) v 1 (0+ ) and v 2 (0+ ) and then solve for Ld t and L1t 2 .5 A ix 10 Ω + 15 V v1 − 3ix 1 10 Ω + v2 − iL2 (0 + ) = 1. for a node-voltage solution the circuit is redrawn as shown in the following diagram. yields 5v 1 − v 2 = 60 Summing the currents leaving node 2 yields v2 − v1 v 2 − 10 + 1.5 A. + v1 − v2 =0 10 . + vL 1 − iL1 (0 + ) = 0.3 A from the analysis at t = 0− .3 A vC (0 + ) = 10 V 2 20 Ω iC To find the initial conditions for the circuit at t = 0+ .3 + =0 10 20 Simplifying the equation. we have −2v 1 + 3v 2 = −16 Solving the two simultaneous node equations gives v 1 (0+ ) = 12.

6667 A2 /s.1s 2 + 359s + 6250 as s 1 = −20. dt 3 3 t d vC and after differentiatNow iC (0+ ) = and v 2 (0+ ) − 10 3.4221. and from KVL before vL1 = 15 − 2 3 dt + d 2 i (0+ ) d v 1 (0+ ) d vC = − ddvtC .4221t)) .154 = 77 V/s dt C 2 Therefore 1 d vC (0+ ) d 2 i L1 (0+ ) = −25. Thus di L1 (0 ) dt + and d i L1 (0 ) d t2 2 + using the relationships vL = L1 di L1 dt 1 di L1 (0+ ) = vL1 (0+ ) dt 3 and using KVL to find vL1 (0+ ) gives −15 + vL1 (0+ ) + vC (0+ ) = 0 or vL1 (0+ ) = 15 − vC (0+ ) = 15 − 10 = 5 V and di L1 (0+ ) 1 5 A = vL1 (0+ ) = dt 3 3 s We also have dv ing d L1 = 0 − t d 2 i L1 (0+ ) d v 1 (0+ ) = 1 Ld t .3125 ± j 17.3125t (K 2 cos(17.4749. Thus L1t 2 = 1 Ld t = − 1 d vCd(0 ) .1 3 dt dt dt As before.4221t) + K 3 sin(17.0796 − 10 + i L1 (0+ ) = + 0.GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 109 Our next tasks involve finding and iC = C ddvtC . The roots give rise to the natural response i4n (t) = K 1 e −20.3 = −1. the natural solution is determined first by finding the roots of characteristic equation.4749t + e −1. s 3 + 23.154 A 20 20 1 1000 d vC (0+ ) = iC (0+ ) = × 0. =− d t2 3 dt Solving the Differential Equation The differential equation describing the circuit is d 3 i4 d 2 i4 di4 + 23.1 2 + 359 + 6250i4 = 1282. s 2.5 = 0.

4749K 1 − 1.4221K 2 sin(17. From the solution for i4 (t).4221t) + K 3 sin(17.4221K 3 dt 3 Finally.3125t (K 2 cos(17.5296K 3 sin(17.1 giving K 4 = 0.807K 2 − 45.4221K 2 sin(17.3125t (−17. giving d 2 i4 (0) = −25. giving 5 di4 (0) = = −20.4221K 3 cos(17.4221t)) We evaluate this expression at t = 0. yields 6250K 4 = 1281.4221t)) d t2 − 1.4221t) + 17.4749t − 1.6667 = 419.5296K 2 d t2 = 419.4749K 1 e −20. we have i4 (0) = 1 = K 1 + K 2 + 0.4221t) + K 3 sin(17.5296K 2 cos(17. The total solution equals the natural and forced response. giving di4 = −20.4221K 3 − 303. when substituted into the original differential equation.3125t (K 2 cos(17. we take the second derivative of the solution giving d 2 i4 = 419.4221t) − 303.4221t) + 17.6250 × 17.3125t (K 2 cos(17.4749t + e −1.4221t) + K 3 sin(17.2215K 1 + 1.3125K 2 + 17.4221t)) + e −1.4221t)) We evaluate this expression at t = 0.4221t)) − 1.2050 The initial conditions are used to determine the constants K 1 .2050.7227e −1. written as i4 (t) = i4n (t) + i4 f (t) = K 1 e −20.3125e −1.3125e −1.4221t)) dt + e −1.3125e −1.4221t)) + 0.2215K 1 e −20.3125t (−17.2050 2 To use the next initial condition. K 2 and K 3 .4749t + 1.4221t) + 17.4221K 3 cos(17. we find the derivative of the solution.3125t (−17.733K 3 .7227K 2 − 2.4221K 3 cos(17.3125t (−303.2215K 1 − 301.110 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Next we solve for the forced response to the input by assuming i4 f (t) = K 4 which.4221K 2 sin(17.

1025 0.1925 0. That is. Each time interval is separately analyzed. 419.295. we solve the circuit using the techniques of this section.2 CIRCUITS WITH SWITCHES To finish this section.295 1 1 0 K1 ⎥ ⎢ ⎥⎢ ⎥ ⎢ 5 ⎥ ⎢ −20.2215 −301.4749 −1.2050 for t ≥ 0.4749 −1.2306 sin(17.4221t) + 0.1025e −20. . 10.4749t + e −1. ti .3125 17.2306 The complete solution is i L1 (t) = i4 (t) = 0. and repeat this substitution at each switch time. 5/3. K = A\F K= 0. with the only carry-over from one time interval to the next being the voltages across the capacitor and currents through the inductors at the switch time. In effect. we replace the variable t with t − t1 where t1 is the switch time and use the unit step function.4221. determine the necessary voltages and currents at ti+1 and ti+1 and solve the circuit problem. we consider circuits with multiple switches. we have A = [1 1 0.733]. − + move to the next switch time.6667].GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS 111 The three initial condition equations are put into matrix form for a straightforward solution as AK = F or ⎤ ⎡ ⎤⎡ ⎤ ⎡ 0. F = [0. at each switch time. each time a switch is thrown.3125t (0. For ease in solving the circuit after the first switch time at t = 0.4221t)) + 0.6667 Using MATLAB. −20.2215 −301.3125 17. we determine the necessary voltages and currents at ti− and ti+ and solve the circuit problem. and so on. −25.733 K3 −25.4221 ⎥ ⎢ K 2 ⎥ = ⎢ ⎥ ⎢ ⎣ ⎦⎣ ⎦ ⎣ ⎦ 3 419. The next example illustrates this approach.807 −45.1925 cos(17.807 − 45.

112

BIOINSTRUMENTATION

Example 10.7. Find vC for the following circuit for t ≥ 0.
t=0 t=4s 50 Ω 10 Ω + 2A 0.03 F vc − 40 Ω 1 H 3 t=1s

Solution. There are two switches operating in this circuit, with switching times at t = 0, t = 1 and t = 4 s . We therefore break up the solution into three time intervals, 0 ≤ t < 1, 1 ≤ t < 4 and t ≥ 4 s, while realizing that we need to know the initial conditions just before and after each switch time, and that we also need to solve for the steady-state solution for t < 0. For t < 0 At steady state, the capacitor is replaced by an open circuit as shown in the following figure.
10 Ω + 2A 50 Ω vc − 40 Ω

Using the current divider rule and Ohm’s law, we have vC (0− ) = 40 V. Note that voltage cannot instantaneously change across a capacitor, so vC (0+ ) = 40 V. For 0 ≤ t < 1 During this interval, the switch on the left opens, leaving us with the following circuit to analyze.

+ 0.03 F vc − 40 Ω

GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS

113

Notice the 10 resistor is eliminated since no current flows through it because it is an open circuit. Using KCL we have 0.03v˙C + vC =0 40

1 The differential equation has a root equal to − 1.2 and a solution in this time interval of

vC = vC (0+ )e − 1.2 u(t) = 40e − 1.2 u(t) V
t t

For 1 ≤ t < 4 When t = 1, the switch on the right closes, introducing an inductor as shown in the following figure.
iC + vc − 0.03 F 40 Ω 1 H 3 iR iL

Applying KCL yields vC d vC + +5 0.03 dt 40
1 t

vC d λ + i L (1+ ) = 0

Dividing the previous equation by 0.03 and differentiating gives ¨ vC + 1 5 v˙C + vC = 0 1.2 0.03

with complex roots determined from MATLAB as −0.42 ± 12.9 j . The solution consists of the natural solution only, since the forced response is zero, and is given by vC = e −0.42(t−1) (K 1 cos(12.9(t − 1)) + K 2 sin(12.9(t − 1))) (u(t − 1) − u(t − 4)) This solution requires two initial conditions. Recall that at t = 1, vC (1+ ) = vC (1− ) and i L (1+ ) = i L (1− ). Moreover, all other voltages and currents and their derivatives change from t = 1− to t = 1+ s. Now using the solution for vC from the previous interval, we have vC (1+ ) = vC (1− ) = 40e − 1.2 = 17.4 V
1

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From our solution in this interval, we have vC (1+ ) = K 1 = 17.4 V Since no current was flowing through the inductor during the interval 0 ≤ t < 1, i L (1+ ) = (1+ i L (1− ) = 0 A. Now i R(1+ ) = vC40 ) = 17.4 = 0.44 A, and accordingly 40 iC (1+ ) = −(i L (1+ ) + i R(1+ )) = −(0 + 0.44) = −0.44 A 1 v˙C (1+ ) = iC (1+ ) = −14.5 V C Now ⎛ v˙C = ⎝ −0.42e −0.42(t−1) (K 1 cos(12.9(t − 1)) + K 2 sin(12.9(t − 1))) + e −0.42(t−1) (−12.9K 1 sin(12.9(t − 1)) + 12.9K 2 cos(12.9(t − 1))) ⎞ ⎠

× (u (t − 1) − u (t − 4)) and v˙C (1+ ) = −14.5 = −0.42K 1 + 12.9K 2 = −0.42 × 17.4 + 12.9K 2 which gives K 2 = −0.557. Our complete solution is vC = e −0.42(t−1) (17.4 cos(12.9(t − 1)) − 0.557 sin(12.9(t − 1)))(u(t − 1) − u(t − 4)) V For t > 4. For the last interval, the switch on the left closes, giving us the following figure to analyze.
10 Ω + 2A 50 Ω vc − 0.03 F 40 Ω 1 H 5 iL

To ease the solution, the 2 A current source with 50 resistor is transformed into a 100 V voltage source in series with a 50 resistor. The 50 and 10 resistors are summed together, and the 100 V voltage source and 60 resistor are transformed into a 10 A current source in 6 parallel with a 60 resistor. The 60 and 40 resistors are combined to give a 24 resistor. The reduced circuit is shown in the following circuit.

GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS

115

iL + 10 A 6 25 Ω vc − 0.03 F 1 H 5

Applying KCL gives 10 vC − + + 0.03v˙C + 5 6 24
1 t

vC d λ + i L (4+ ) = 0

Differentiating the previous equation and dividing by 0.03 yields ¨ vC + 1.4v˙C + 166.7vC = 55.6 with roots determined from MatLab as −0.7 ± 12.9 j . The roots are complex, which gives rise to the natural response vC = e −0.7(t−4) (K 1 cos(12.9(t − 4)) + K 2 sin(12.9(t − 4))) u(t − 4) Next, we solve for the forced response to the input by assuming y f (t) = K 3 . When substituted into the differential equation describing this interval, this yields 166.7K 3 = 55.6 giving 11.1. The total solution in this interval equals the natural and forced response, written as vC = 11.1 + e −0.7(t−4) (K 1 cos(12.9(t − 4)) + K 2 sin(12.9(t − 4))) u(t − 4) Two initial conditions (vC (4+ ) and v˙C (4+ )) are needed to determine the constants K 1 and K 2 . As before, at t = 4, vC (4+ ) = vC (4− ) and i L (4+ ) = i L (4− ), and all other voltages and currents and their derivatives change from t = 4− to t = 4+ s. Using the solution for vC from the previous interval, we have vC (4+ ) = vC (4− ) = e −0.42(t−1) (17.4 cos(12.9(t − 1)) − 0.557 sin(12.9(t − 1))) × (u(t − 1) − u(t − 4))|t=4− = e −0.42(4−1) (17.4 cos (12.9 (4 − 1)) − 0.557 sin (12.9 (4 − 1))) = 2.5 V

9 (t − 4))) .7e −0. and 10 vC (4+ ) 10 2. To find i L (4− ) we use the solution for vC in the previous interval and compute 4 4 i L (4 ) = i L (4 ) = 5 1 4 + − vC d t + i L (1 ) = 5 1 + vC d t + 0 =5 1 (e −0.7(t−4) (K 1 cos(12.6 sin(12.53 24 = 0.1 + e −0.557 sin(12.75 V C iC (4+ ) = Now v˙C = and v˙C (4+ ) = −1.6 V.116 BIOINSTRUMENTATION From our solution in this interval.4 cos(12.75 = −0.42(t−1) =e (−0. Our solution for this interval is vC = 11. we have vC (4+ ) = 11.0037 cos(12.9(t − 1)))) d t −0.6 cos(12.9(t − 4)) + K 2 sin(12.9(t − 1)) − 0.9 (t − 4)) + 12.9K 2 cos (12.6.03 C is determined from KCL 10 vC (4+ ) + + iC (4+ ) + i L (4+ ) = 0 6 24 where i L (4+ ) = i L (4− ).74 sin(12.9(t − 1))) 4 1 = 1.7(t−4) (−12. v˙C (4+ ) = − 1 i (4+ ).1 + K 1 = 2.9(t − 4))) u (t − 4) + e −0.105 A.9K 1 sin(12.53 − − i L (4+ ) = − − 1. The next initial condition.53 V and K 1 = −8.42(t−1) (17.614 = −0.7(t−4) (−8. we have K 2 = −0.9(t − 4)) − 0.9K 2 with K 1 = −8.614 A Now i R(1+ ) = vC (4+ ) 24 = 2.05 A 6 24 6 24 1 v˙C (4+ ) = iC (4+ ) = −1.6.7K 1 + 12.9(t − 4))) u(t − 4) V −0.9(t − 1)) + 6. 0.

GENERAL APPROACH TO SOLVING CIRCUITS

117

Summarizing, our complete solution is ⎧ − t ⎪ 40e 1.2 V ⎨ vC = e −0.42(t−1) (17.4 cos(12.9 (t − 1)) − 0.557 sin(12.9 (t − 1))) V ⎪ ⎩ 11.1 + e −0.7(t−4) (−8.6 cos(12.9(t − 4)) − 0.6 sin(12.9(t − 4))) V 0≤t<1 1≤t<4 t≥4

119

CHAPTER 11

Operational Amplifiers
In Section 3, we considered controlled voltage and current sources that are dependent on a voltage or current elsewhere in a circuit. These devices were modeled as a two terminal device. Here we consider the operational amplifier, also known as an op amp, a multi-terminal device. An operational amplifier is an electronic device that consists of large numbers of transistors, resistors and capacitors—to fully understand its operation requires knowledge of diodes and transistors, topics not covered in this book. However, to appreciate how an operational amplifier operates in a circuit involves a topic already covered, the controlled voltage source. As the name implies, the operation amplifier is an amplifier, but when combined with other circuit element, it integrates, differentiates, sums and subtracts. One of the first operational amplifiers approved as an eight-lead dual-in-line package (DIP) is shown in Fig. 11.1. Differing from previous circuit elements, this device has two inputs and one output terminals. Rather than draw the operational amplifier using Fig 11.1, the operational amplifier is drawn with the symbols in Fig. 11.2. The input terminals are labeled the noninverting input (+) and the inverting input (−). The power supply terminals are labeled V+ and V−, which are frequently omitted since they do not affect the circuit behavior except in saturation conditions as will be described. Most people shorten the name of the operational amplifier to the “op amp”. Illustrated in Fig. 11.3 is a model of the op amp focusing on the internal behavior of the input and output terminals. The input–output relationship is vo = A (v p − vn ) (11.1)

Since the internal resistance is very large, we will replace it with an open circuit to simplify analysis leaving us with the op amp model show in Fig. 11.4. With the replacement of the internal resistance with an open circuit, the currents in = i p = 0 A. In addition, current i A , the current flowing out of the op amp, is not zero. Because i A is unknown, we seldom apply KCL at the output junction. In solving op amp problems, KCL is applied at input terminals.

120

BIOINSTRUMENTATION

Offset null Inverting input Noninverting input V− Eight terminal operational amplifier

NC V+ Output Offset null

FIGURE 11.1: An eight-terminal operational amplifier. The terminal NC is not connected, and the two terminal offset nulls are used to correct imperfections (typically not connected). V+ and V− are terminal power to provide to the circuit. Keep in mind that a ground exists for both V+ and V− , a ground that is shared by other elements in the circuit. Modern operational amplifiers have ten or more terminals.

V+ Inverting input Output Noninverting input V−

FIGURE 11.2: Circuit element symbol for the operational amplifier.

in vn A (vp − vn) R ip vp vo

iA

FIGURE 11.3: An internal model of the op amp. The internal resistance between the input terminals, R, is very large exceeding 1 M . The gain of the amplifier, A, is also large exceeding 104 . Power supply terminals are omitted for simplicity.

replaced by an open circuit.4. we have R2 vs = (R1 + R2 ) v1 − R1 vo Now vo = A v p − vn and since the noninverting terminal is connected to ground. R. iA Example 11.4: Idealized model of the op amp with the internal resistance. i2 R2 i1 R1 VS vn vp v0 − − − Solution.1. we apply KCL at the inverting terminal giving −i1 − i2 = 0 since no current flows into the op amp’s input terminals. v p = 0 so vo = −Avn . Replacing the current using Ohm’s law gives vs − v1 vo − v1 + =0 R1 R2 Multiplying by R1 R2 and collecting like terms. 11. Using the op amp model of Fig.OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 121 in vn vo= A (vp − vn) ip vp FIGURE 11. Find v0 for the following circuit.

with A going to infinity. Applying KCL at the inverting input gives − or vo = − R2 vs R1 vs −vo + =0 R1 R2 Notice how simple the analysis becomes when we assume vn = v p . Rs vs = (R1 + R2 ) − = or vo = −R2 vs R1 + R2 R1 + A R1 + R2 + R1 vo A As A goes to infinity.122 BIOINSTRUMENTATION or vn = − vo A vo − R1 vo A Substituting vn into the KCL inverting input equation gives. we simplify the analysis by letting vn = v p Consider the previous example. . With v p = 0 means vn = 0. the previous equation goes to vo = − R2 vs R1 Interestingly. R1 An operational amplifier with a gain of infinity is known as an ideal op amp. This happens because a negative feedback path exists between the output and the inverting input terminal through R2 . Keep in mind that this approximation is valid as long as A is very large (infinity) and a feedback is included. v0 remains finite due to the resistor R2 . This circuit is called an inverting amplifier with an overall gain of − R2 . Because of the infinite gain. When analyzing an ideal op amp circuit. there must be a feedback path between the output and input and we cannot connect a voltage source directly between the inverting and noninverting input terminals.

Amplifiers are used in most all clinical instrumentation from ECK. EEG. vn = v p = vs . EOG. Because no current flows into the op amp. we start with vn = v p .2. vn vp VS i1 − i2 R2 v0 R1 − − Solution. R1 + R2 vs R1 .OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 123 Example 11. Find the overall gain for the following circuit. Then since the op amp’s noninverting terminal is connected to the source. Assuming the op amp is ideal. etc. by KCL we have i1 + i2 = 0 and vs vs − vo + =0 R1 R2 or vo = The overall gain is vo R1 + R2 = vs R1 This circuit is a noninverting op amp circuit used to amplify the source input.

Example 11. Solution.3. yielding vn = v p = 0 V. so that in general vo = − R2 R2 R2 Va + Vb + · · · + Vm Ra Rb Rm Our next op amp circuit provides an output proportional to the difference of two input voltages. we note no current flows into the input terminals and that vn = v p . Ra R2 Rb Va Vb vn vp − − v0 − Solution.4. Assuming an ideal op amp. Applying KCL at the inverting input node gives − or vo = − R2 R2 Va + Vb Ra Rb Va Vb vo − − =0 Ra Rb R2 We can add additional source resistor inputs. Find the overall gain for the following circuit. Find the overall gain for the following circuit. Apply KCL at the inverting input terminal gives vn − Va vn − vo + =0 R1 R2 .124 BIOINSTRUMENTATION The next example describes a summing op amp circuit. Example 11. As before we start the solution with vn = v p and note that the noninverting input is connected to ground. This op amp is often referred to as a differential amplifier.

60-Hz power line signals. the measurement contains only the signal of interest uncontaminated by noise from the environment. This amplifier is used for bipolar measurements involving ECG and EEG as the typical recording is obtained between two bipolar input terminals. . also known as the differential amplifier. subtracts the weighted input signals. A differential amplifier with appropriate filtering can reduce the impact of the common-mode signal.OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 125 i2 R2 R1 ia ib R1 Va Vb R2 vp v0 vn and (R1 + R2 )vn − R2 Va = R1 vo The previous equation involves two unknowns. The noise is typically called common-mode signal. inadequate grounding and power supply leakage. thus we need another equation easily found by applying voltage divider at the noninverting input. Common-mode signal comes from lighting. Ideally. this op amp circuit. vp = R2 vb = vn R1 + R2 Substituting this result for vn into the KCL equation at the inverting terminal gives R2 Vb − R2 Va = R1 vo or vo = R2 (Vb − Va ) R1 As shown.

the goal is to keep Ac m as small as possible and Ad m as large as possible. Using the two previous equations. and the measure of how ideal the differential amplifier is called the common-mode rejection ratio.126 BIOINSTRUMENTATION The response of a differential amplifier can be decomposed into differential-mode and common-mode components. Ac m . is zero. vc m . one can solve va and vb in terms of vd m and vc m as va = vc m − and vb = vc m + vd m 2 vd m 2 When substituted into the response in Exercise 44 gives v0 = R1 R2 − R1 R2 vc m + R1 (R1 + R2 ) R2 (R1 + R2 ) + R2 (R1 + R2 ) vd m = Ac m vc m + Ad m vd m 2R1 (R1 + R2 ) Notice the term multiplying. . given as C MRR = 20 log10 Ad m Ac m where the larger the value of CMRR the better. Values of CMRR for a differential amplifier for EEG. we apply KCL or KVL at the two input terminals. Since real amplifiers are not ideal and resistors are not truly exact. characteristic of the ideal op amp that amplifies only the differential-mode of the signal. the common-mode gain is not zero. ECG. and EMG is 100–120 db. In more complex circuits. Next. The rejection of the common-mode signal is called common-mode rejection. The general approach to solving op amp circuits is to first assume that the op amp is ideal and v p = vn . we continue to apply our circuit analysis tools to solve the problem as the next example illustrates. the common-mode signal is the average of the input voltages. So when one designs a differential amplifier. vd m = vb − va and vc m = (va + vb ) 2 As described.

With vn = v p . we apply KCL at node 1. Find v0 for the following circuit. we apply KVL from ground to node 1 to the noninverting input and back to ground giving −v1 − Vs + v p = 0 and with vn = v p we have vn − v1 = Vs . Now.OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 127 Example 11.5. R2 vn vp R2 VS 1 R2 v1 R1 v0 Solution. noting no current flows into the noninverting input terminal v1 v1 − vo v1 − vn + + =0 R1 R2 R2 Combining like terms in the previous equation gives −R1 vn + (2R1 + R2 )v1 − R1 vo = 0 . we apply KCL at the inverting input vn − v1 vn − vo + =0 R2 R2 and 2vn − v1 − vo = 0 Next.

6. Find v 0 for the following circuit.128 BIOINSTRUMENTATION With three equations and three unknowns. we have vo = (3R1 + 2R2 ) Vs R2 The next two examples illustrate an op amp circuit that differentiates and integrates by using a capacitor. we substitute the solutions for v1 and vn into the node 1 KCL equation giving −R1 vn + (2R1 + R2 )v1 − R1 vo = 0 −R1 (vo − Vs ) + (2R1 + R2 )(vo − 2Vs ) − R1 vo = 0 After simplification. Example 11. we first eliminate v1 by subtracting the inverting input KCL equation by the KVL equation giving v1 = vo − 2Vs Next. we eliminate vn by substituting v1 into the inverting input KCL equation as follows 1 vn = (v1 + vo ) 2 1 = (vo − 2Vs + vo ) 2 = vo − Vs Finally. iR + vC − R iC C VS vn vp v0 .

vo = − ddVs . we have v p = 0 = vn . t Example 11. It follows that vn = v p = 0 . With the noninverting input connected to ground. Find v 0 for the following circuit. C vn − vo vo =− R R d Vs vo = iR = − dt R d Vs dt the circuit in this example differentiates the input.OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 129 Solution. With iR = and iC = C we have vo = −RC If R = 1 . iC = i R. From KVL vC = Vs and it follows that iC = C d Vs d vC =C dt dt Since no current flows into the op amp.7. + vC − iC iR R VS vn vp C v0 Solution.

we have vC + vo = 0 and 1 vo = − RC With R = 1 . C t t Vs R t −∞ 1 iC d λ = C −∞ Vs dλ R Vs d λ −∞ the circuit operates as an integrator t vo = − −∞ Vs d λ 11. If analysis determines v0 is less than V − . The output voltage characteristics are shown in Fig. 11. .5. If analysis determines v0 is greater than V + . v0 saturates at V + .130 BIOINSTRUMENTATION and iC = i R = Therefore 1 vC = C From KVL.1 VOLTAGE CHARACTERISTICS OF THE OP AMP In the past examples involving the op amp. 11. we have neglected to consider the supply voltage (shown in Fig.2) and that the output voltage of an ideal op amp is constrained to operate between the supply voltages V + and V − .5: Voltage characteristics of an op amp. v0 saturates at V − . v0 V+ V− V+ A(vp − vn) V− FIGURE 11.

v0 V+ slope is 3R1 + 2R2 R2 VS V− . Solution.5 is vo = 3R1 + 2R2 R2 + = +10 V and V − = −10 V.OPERATIONAL AMPLIFIERS 131 Example 11. For the circuit shown in Ex. The solution for Ex.8. 11. Graph Vs which saturates whenever v0 is less than V − and greater than V + as shown in the following graph.5. let V the output voltage characteristics of the circuit. 11.

.

phase angle (φ in radians or degrees). In bioinstrumentation. vs = Vm cos(ωt + φ). 2 To appreciate the response to a time-varying input. given by 1 T 0 V which reduces to Vr ms = √m .133 CHAPTER 12 Time-Varying Signals An alternating current (AC) or sinusoidal source of 50 or 60 Hz is common throughout the world as a power source supplying energy for most equipment and other devices. attention is now focused on the steady-state or forced response. The period of the sinusoid T is related to frequency f (Hz or cycles/s) and angular frequency by ω=2 f = 2 T (12.2) An important metric of a sinusoid is its rms value (square root of the mean value of the squared function). when dealing with sinusoidal sources. which is where the device actually operates.1) where the voltage is defined by angular frequency (ω in radians/s). analysis in the steady state simplifies the design by focusing only on the steady-state response.1 in which the switch is closed at t = 0 and there is no initial energy stored in the inductor. 12. consider the circuit shown in Fig. Applying KVL to the circuit gives T 2 Vm cos2 (ωt + φ)d t Vr ms = (12.3) L di + iR = Vm cos(ωt + φ) dt . While most of this chapter has focused on the transient response. and peak magnitude (Vm ). A sinusoidal voltage source is a time-varying signal given by vs = Vm cos(ωt + φ) (12.

The remainder of this section deals with techniques involving the phasor to efficiently find these unknowns. The second term is the forced response that has the same form as the input (i.1 PHASORS The phasor is a complex number that contains amplitude and phase angle information of a sinusoid. (12. (12.134 BIOINSTRUMENTATION t= 0 R vs i L FIGURE 12. If all you are interested in is the steady-state response as in most bioinstrumentation applications. Work in the phasor domain involves the use of complex algebra in moving between the time and phasor domain. 12.5) . the solution is i = in + i f =√ −Vm R2 + ω 2 L2 cos φ − ωL − R t Vm ωL e L +√ cos ωt + φ − 2 + ω 2 L2 R R R The first term is the natural response that goes to zero as t goes to infinity. then the only unknowns are the response amplitude and phase angle. the angle in the exponential is written in radians.1).. and after some work.1) is expressed as V = Vm e j φ = Vm φ (12. by practice. and in the φ notation. and for the signal in Eq.e. given as V = Vm (cos φ + j sin φ) (12. a sinusoid with the same frequency ω.1: A RL circuit with sinusoidal input. in degrees. but a different phase angle and maximum amplitude). therefore. the rectangular form of the phasor is also used.4) In Eq.

Assume that i = Im cos(ωt + θ ) I = Im |θ = Im e j θ For a resistor. v=L and the phasor of v is V = −ωLIm |θ − 90◦ = −ωLIm e j (θ−90 ) ◦ = −ωLIm e j θe −j 90 = −ωLIm e j θ (− j ) = j ωLIm e j θ = j ωL I ◦ di = −ωLIm sin(ωt + θ) = −ωLIm cos(ωt + θ − 90◦ ) dt (12.7) Note that inductor current and voltage are out of phase by 90◦ . v = I R = RIm cos(ωt + θ) and the phasor of v is V = RIm |θ = R I (12. inductor and capacitor.2 PASSIVE CIRCUIT ELEMENTS IN THE PHASOR DOMAIN To use phasors with passive circuit elements for steady-state solutions. For a capacitor. Now i =C d dv = C (Vm cos(ωt + θ )) dt dt = −C Vm ω sin(ωt + θ) = −C Vm ω cos(ωt + θ − 90◦ ) And the phasor for i is I = −ωC Vm |θ − 90◦ = −ωC Vm e j θe − j 90 = −ωC Vm e j θ (cos(90◦ ) − j sin(90◦ )) = j ωC Vm e j θ = j ωC V ◦ .6) Note that there is no phase shift for the relationship between the phasor current and voltage for a resistor.TIME-VARYING SIGNALS 135 12. that is current lags behind voltage by 90◦ . define v = Vm cos(ωt + θ) and V = Vm |θ . the relationship between voltage and current is needed for the resistor. For an inductor.

5μF ↔ −j = − j 4000 ωC − j 4000 Ω 500 − 90° mV 1000 Ω I j 100 Ω FIGURE 12. that is voltage lags behind current by 90◦ . the inductor. j ωL. Equations (12. the circuit shown in Fig. a complex number. The impedance is a complex number and not a phasor even though it may look like one. 12.136 BIOINSTRUMENTATION i 0.8) all have the form of V = Z I.8) Note that capacitor current and voltage are out of phase by 90◦ . we have 0. The imaginary part of the impendence is called reactance.2: A circuit diagram. 12.3. 12. by replacing each circuit element with their impedance equivalent and sources by their phasor. with units of Ohms. For the voltage source.2 is transformed into the phasor domain.5 μF vs = 100 sin 500t mV 1000 Ω 200 mH FIGURE 12. For example. in general. we have vs = 100 sin 500t = 100 cos(500t − 90◦ ) mV ↔ 500 |−90◦ mV For the capacitor. The impedance −j for the resistor is R. and the capacitor. or V= 1 −j I= I j ωC ωC (12. shown in Fig. The final part to working in the phasor domain is to transform a circuit diagram from the time to phasor domain. .3: Phasor and impedance equivalent circuit for Fig. where Z represents the impedance of the circuit element and is.6)–(12.2. ωC .

3. 12.9) (12. . with the most difficult aspect involving complex algebra. find the steady-state response i. and all the other techniques apply to phasors. 12. Th´ venin equivalent circuits is applicable e in the phasor domain. the sum of phasor currents leaving any node is zero I=0 Impedances in series are given by Z = Z1 + · · · + Zn Impedances in parallel are given by Z= 1 Z1 (12. I= V 0.5 |−90◦ = 124|−14◦ μA = = Z 1000 − j 3900 4026|−76◦ . for KVL.TIME-VARYING SIGNALS 137 For the resistor.11) 1 + ··· + 1 Zn (12. we have 200 mH ↔ j ωL = j 100 Each of the elements are replaced by their phasor and impedance equivalents as shown in Fig.5 |−90◦ 0.10) (12. we have 1000 For the inductor.3 KIRCHHOFF’S LAWS AND OTHER TECHNIQUES IN THE PHASOR DOMAIN It is fortunate that all of the material presented before in this chapter involving Kirchhoff ’s current and voltage laws. The impedance for the circuit is Z = − j 4000 + 1000 + j 100 = 1000 − j 3900 Using Ohm’s law. The following two examples illustrate the process.3. Solution.1 For the circuit shown in Fig. Example Problem 12. That is. ↔ 1000 12. as well as superposition.12) The node-voltage method. the sum of phasor voltages around any closed path is zero Vi = 0 and for KCL.

The first step is to transform the circuit elements into their impedances. 1 1Ω + V =50 − 90° V s − jΩ j2 Ω V 1 Ω 2 I s =20 20° − . the following circuit. which for the capacitor and inductor are 1 −j F↔ = −j 10 ωC 1 H ↔ j ωL = j 2 5 The phasors for the two sources are: vs = 50 sin ωt V ↔ Vs = 50|−90◦V is = 20 cos (ωt + 20◦ ) A ↔ Is = 20| 20◦ Since the two resistors retain their values. the steady-state current is i = 124 cos (500t − 14◦ ) μA Example Problem 12. 1Ω + vs = 50sin 10ω t V 1 F 10 1 H 5 v 1 Ω 2 is = 20 cos ( 10ωt + 20°) A − Solution. the phasor drawing of the circuit is shown in the following figure with the ground at the lower node.2. Find the steady-state response v using the node-voltage method for .138 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Returning to the time domain.

8 + j 6.5◦ = 15.1|−66.04| 9.TIME-VARYING SIGNALS 139 Writing the node-voltage equation for node 1 gives V − 50|−90◦ + V V + + 2V − 20| 20◦ = 0 −j j2 Collecting like terms.8 − j 43.6 cos (10t − 76◦ ) V The steady-state solution is .8 = 18.04|9.5◦ v = 15.5◦ V= 47.5|−76◦ 3.5◦ = 47. converting to rectangular form and converting to polar form gives V 3+ V 3+ j 2 j 2 = 50|−90◦ + 20| 20◦ = −50 j + 18.2 V × 3.1|−66.

.

13. and eliminates any signal or noise outside this interval. but can be a value of M specified by the needs of the application.1 are the frequency characteristics of four filters: low-pass. the resistive load at the output of the filter is usually increased. as shown. Filters are used to modify the measured signal by removing noise. In reality. for example in Fig. and eliminates any signal or noise outside this interval. and eliminates any signal or noise with frequency less than ω2 . Passive analog filters use passive circuit elements: resistors. the reason for this behavior is described in a later chapter. band-pass and notch filters. any real filter cannot possibly have these ideal characteristics.141 CHAPTER 13 Active Analog Filters This section presents several active analog filters involving the op amp. |H ( j ω)|. it is sometimes convenient to include both amplification and filtering in the same circuit. Shown in Fig. To improve performance in a passive analog filter. so the maximum of the magnitude does not need to be one. The magnitude of the filter. By using the op amp. The high-pass filter allows quickly changing signals with frequency greater than ω2 to pass through the filter. The signal that is passed through the filter is indicated by the frequency interval called the passband. The signal that is removed by the filter is indicated by the frequency interval called the stopband. The low-pass filter allows slowly changing signals with frequency less than ω1 pass through the filter. is one in the passband and zero in the stopband. but instead has a smooth transition from the passband to the stopband. . A filter is designed in the frequency domain so that the measured signal to be retained is passed through and noise is rejected. Further. fine control of the performance is achieved without increasing the load at the output of the filter. 13.2. The band-pass filter allows signals in the frequency band greater than ω1 and less than ω2 to pass through the filter. and eliminates any signal or noise above ω1 . The frequencies ω1 and ω2 are typically called cutoff frequencies for the low-pass and high-pass filters. high-pass. capacitors and inductors. The notch filter allows signals in the frequency band less than ω1 and greater than ω2 to pass through the filter.

The passband is defined as the frequency interval when the M magnitude is greater than √2 .1: Ideal magnitude–frequency response for four filters. high-pass.H ( jω) Passband Stopband ω1 H ( jω) Passband Stopband ω ω2 H ( jω) Passband Stopband ω ω1 H ( jω) Passband Stopband ω2 Stopband ω Passband ω1 ω2 ω FIGURE 13. Note that the magnitude M does not necessarily need to be one. band-pass and notch. from top to bottom: low-pass.2: A realistic magnitude–frequency response for a band-pass filter. . H ( jω) M M 2 Stopband Passband Stopband FIGURE 13.

One varies the input over the entire spectrum of interest (at discrete frequencies) and records the output M magnitude. Example 13. Using the low-pass filter in the following circuit. C Rb Ra VS + v0 − Solution.ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS 143 To determine the filter’s performance. the capacitor acts like an open circuit. which connects the output terminal to the inverting input and ground. By treating the op amp as ideal. The phasor method will be used to solve this problem by first transforming the circuit into the phasor domain as shown in the following figure. the inverting input is also connected to ground. The critical frequencies are when |H ( j ω)| = √2 . design the filter to have a gain of 5 and a cutoff frequency of 500 rad/s. The operation of this filter is readily apparent for at low frequencies. the filter is driven by a sinusoidal input. At high frequencies. note that the noninverting input is connected to ground. 1 jωC Rb Ra VS + V0 − . the capacitor acts like a short circuit. and therefore. reducing the circuit to an inverting amplifier that passes low frequency signals.1.

the cutoff frequency is defined as ωc = R1C (i. where M = 5.. j ω + R1C set equal to zero).144 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Summing the currents leaving the inverting input gives − V0 V0 Vs − 1 − =0 Ra Rb j ωC Collecting like terms and rearranging yields −V0 After further manipulation. The cutoff frequency b M is also defined as when |H ( j ω)| = √2 . V0 Vs 1 1 j ωC + 1 Rb = Vs Ra ⎛ 1 ⎝ Ra 1 Ra C 1 1 j ωC ⎞ 1 + 1 Rb =− ⎠=− 1 Ra 1 j ωC + 1 Rb V0 Vs =− 1 jω + 1 Rb C Similar to the reasoning for the characteristic equation for a differential equation. with the cutoff frequency set at ωc = 500 rad/s. then R1C = 500. the magnitude is 5 √ = 2 1 Ra C ωc2 + 1 Rb C 2 =√ = √ 500 2 5002 + 5002 1 Ra C 1 Ra C which gives Ra C = 1 2500 . b b Thus.e. the denominator term. 5 √ = 2 With 1 Rb C 1 Ra C 1 Ra C ω2 + 1 Rb C 2 ωc2 + 1 Rb C 2 = 500. The magnitude of V0 is given by Vs V0 = Vs and at the cutoff frequency. ωc = 500 rad/s.

there are an infinite number of solutions. and the other two elements are determined as C= and Rb = 1 1 = 100 k = 500 × C 500 × 20 × 10−9 1 1 = 20 nF = 2500 × Ra 2500 × 20000 A plot of the magnitude versus frequency is shown in the following figure. 6 5 4 Magnitude 3 2 1 0 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Frequency (rad/s) Example 13. Therefore. As can be seen.2.ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS 1 2500 1 Rb C 145 Since we have three unknowns and two equations (Ra C = and = 500).53 at 100 Hz. design the filter to have a gain of 5 and a cutoff frequency of 100 rad/s. say Ra = 20 k . which is the design goal. one can select a convenient value for one of the elements. Rb Ra VS C + v0 − . the cutoff frequency gives a value of magnitude equal to 3. Using the high-pass filter in the following circuit.

the capacitor acts like a short circuit. then the output is zero. Since the op amp is assumed ideal. Rb Ra VS 1 jωC + V0 − Summing the currents leaving the inverting input gives − Rearranging yields jω Rb Rb V0 =− =− 1 Vs Ra j ω + R1C Ra + j ωC a At cutoff frequency ωc = 100 rad/s = 1 . Rb 5 √ = Ra 2 ωc ωc2 + 1 Ra C 2 . the phasor method will be used to solve this problem by first transforming the circuit into the phasor domain as shown in the following figure. Since there is no input. therefore the inverting input is also connected to ground.146 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Solution. At high frequencies. and the noninverting input is connected to ground. The operation of this filter is readily apparent for at low frequencies. the capacitor acts like an open circuit and so no input voltage is seen at the noninverting input. As before. which reduces the circuit to an inverting amplifier that passes through high frequency signals. Ra C V0 Vs − =0 1 Rb Ra + j ωC The magnitude of ω ω2 + 1 Ra C 2 V0 Vs is given by V0 Rb = Vs Ra and at the cutoff frequency.

which is the design goal. 6 5 4 Magnitude 3 2 1 0 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Frequency (rad/s) The next example demonstrates the technique to create a band-pass filters (which require two cutoff frequencies). Since we have three unknowns and two equations. and the other two elements are determined as Ra = and C= 20000 Rb = = 4k 5 5 1 1 = = 2. one can select a convenient value for one of the elements. gives Rb 5 √ = Ra 2 ωc ωc2 + 1 Ra C 2 = Rb Rb 100 Rb Ra C = =√ √ Ra 1002 + 1002 Ra 100 2Ra 1 Rb Thus R a = 5.53 at 500 Hz.5 μF 100Ra 100 × 4000 A plot of the magnitude versus frequency is shown in the following figure. the cutoff frequency gives a value of magnitude equal to 3.ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS 147 With 1 Ra C = 100 and ωc = 100 rad/s. design the filter to have a gain of 5 and pass through frequencies from 100 to 500 rad/s. Example 13. say Rb = 20 k .3. . As can be seen. Using the band-pass filter in the following circuit.

148 BIOINSTRUMENTATION CL R bL Ra L VS R bH + vL − R aH CH + v0 − Solution. thus a low-pass and high-pass filter cascaded together form a band-pass. and those on the right. when working with op amps. As usual. which means that the inverting input is also connected to ground. Summing the currents leaving the inverting input for each op amp gives − − Vs VL VL − 1 − =0 Ra L Rb L j ωC L Ra H VL V0 − =0 1 Rb H + j ωC H . and makes use of work done in the previous two examples. filters can be cascaded together to form other filters. The phasor domain circuit is given in the next figure. the design of the filter is done in the phasor domain. 1 jωC L RbL Ra L VS RbH + VL − Ra H 1 jωCH + V0 − As before. In fact. the noninverting input to the op amps are connected to ground. the high-pass filter. Note the elements around the op amp on the left are the low-pass filter circuit elements.

the magnitude is 5 Rb √ = H Ra H 2 ωc H ωc2H + such that at ωc H = 100 rad/s 1 Ra L C L 1 Ra H C H 2 2 ωC H + 1 1 Rb L C L 2 100 Rb Ra L C L = H√ √ 2 + 1002 Ra H 100 1002 + 5002 . The magnitude of the filter is V0 Rb = H Vs Ra H ω ω2 + 1 Ra H C H 2 1 Ra L C L ω2 + 1 Rb L C L 2 Since there are two cutoff frequencies. ωc H = and ωc L = 1 = 500 rad/s Rb L C L 5 √ . 2 1 = 100 rad/s Ra H C H At the either cutoff frequency.ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS 149 Solving the first equation for VL gives VL = − 1 Ra L C L 1 j ω + Rb 1C L L Vs Solving the second equation for V0 gives V0 = − Rb H jω VL Ra H j ω + R 1C a H H Substituting VL into the previous equation yields V0 = jω Rb H 1 × 1 Ra H j ω + R C Ra L C L a H H 1 j ω + Rb 1C L L Vs The form of the solution is simply the product of each filter. two equations evolve.

The magnitude of the overall filter is the product of the individual filter magnitudes.1. Rb 1C L = 500 and 500 26 = Ra RaH C L ).099 k . For convenience. i. set Rb L = 100 k and Ra H = 100 k . which gives C L = √ Rb 1 C H = 100Ra = 0. To improve the performance from the passband to stopband in a low-pass filter with a sharper transition. 13. one can specify one of the resistors.1 μF. connect the output of the first filter to the input of the next filter and so on.3 have the ideal characteristics of Fig. the better the performance. A plot of the magnitude versus frequency is shown in the following figure. and six unknowns. giving Rb H = 50.5 1 0. . The more cascaded filters..5 4 3.e.5 3 Magnitude 2. There are now √ Rb three equations ( Ra 1C H = 100. which is the design goal.5 0 0 200 400 600 800 1000 1200 1400 Frequency (rad/s) None of the filters in Examples 13.099 Ra L H L Once again. say Ra L = 10 k . 4.53 at 500 Hz. Now from 500 26 = Ra H Ra 1C L . the cutoff frequency gives a value of magnitude equal to 3.5 2 1.150 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Therefore. √ 500 26 = Rb H Ra H Ra L C L The other cutoff frequency gives the same result as the previous equation. one can cascade identical filters together. As can be seen. H H L H L 1 500Rb L = 20nF and √ Rb H = 500 26C L Ra H = 5.1–13.

13.ACTIVE ANALOG FILTERS C1 151 R1 R2 VS C2 v0 C2 R2 R1 R3 V S C1 C3 v0 FIGURE 13.3: (Top) Second-order Butterworth low-pass filter.3. Two Butterworth filters are shown in Fig. Analysis of these filters is carried out in Exercises 183 and 184. . (Bottom) Third-order Butterworth low-pass filter. While this approach is appealing for improving the performance of the filter. Better filters are available with superior performance such as a Butterworth filter. the overall magnitude of the filter does not remain a constant in the passband.

.

e.153 CHAPTER 14 Bioinstrumentation Design Figure 14. computer clock oscillators. To adequately capture the continuoustime signal. power lines and transmitted radio and television electromagnetic waves. Interference noise is introduced by power lines (50 or 60 Hz). The A/D converter uniformly samples the continuous-time waveform and transforms it into a sequence of numbers. The purpose of this type of instrument is to monitor the output of a sensor or sensors and to extract information from the signals that are produced by the sensors.e. 14. The minimum sampling rate is twice the highest frequency content of the signal (based on the sampling theorem from communication theory).1 described the various elements needed in a biomedical instrumentation system. etc. one every tk seconds.. This kind of noise is effectively reduced by careful attention to the circuit’s wiring configuration to minimize coupling effects. the amplitude takes one of 2n discrete values) which are converted into computer words and stored in computer memory. Acquiring a discrete-time signal and storing this signal in computer memory from a continuous-time signal is accomplished with an analog-to-digital (A/D) converter. Filters are used to reduce the noise and to maximize the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio at the input of the A/D converter. Interference noise occurs when unwanted signals are introduced into the system by outside sources. the sampling instants tk must be selected carefully so that information is not lost. Even the action potentials from nerve conduction in the patient generate noise at the sensor/amplifier interface. fluorescent lights. . laboratory equipment.g. AM/FM radio broadcasts. cellular phones. we often sample at five to ten times the highest frequency content of the signal so as to achieve better accuracy by reducing aliasing error. Electromagnetic energy radiating from noise sources is injected into the amplifier circuit or into the patient by capacitive and/or inductive coupling. The A/D converter also transforms the continuous-time wave form into a digital signal (i.1 NOISE Measurement signals are always corrupted by noise in a biomedical instrumentation system. Realistically.

noise signals within the frequency range of the biosignal being amplified cannot be eliminated by this filtering approach. However.1: Basic instrumentation systems using sensors to measure a signal with data acquisition. computers. storage and display capabilities. High frequency noise (nerve conduction. 14. Low frequency noise (amplifier DC offsets. sensor drift.) is eliminated by a high-pass filter with the cutoff frequency set above the noise frequencies and below the biological signal frequencies. Band-stop filters are commonly used to reduce power-line noise. it can never be eliminated. etc. cellular phones.154 BIOINSTRUMENTATION Sensor Calibration Analog processing A/D Control & feedback Signal processing Output display Data storage Data transmission FIGURE 14. The notch frequency in these band-stop filters is set to the power-line frequency of 50 or 60 Hz with the cutoff frequencies located a few Hertz to either side. Inherent noise arises from random processes that are fundamental to the operation of the circuit’s elements and. etc. hence.2 COMPUTERS Computers consist of three basic units: the central processing unit (CPU). The CPU directs the functioning of all other units and controls . Low-pass filters can be used to reduce high frequency components. temperature fluctuations. the arithmetic and logic unit (ALU). The second type of corrupting signal is called inherent noise. and memory. is reduced by good circuit design practice. Power-line noise is a very difficult problem in biological monitoring since the 50 or 60 Hz frequency is usually within the frequency range of the biological signal that is being measured. radio broadcasts.) is reduced by a low-pass filter with the cutoff set below the noise frequencies and above the frequencies of the biological signal that is being monitored. While inherent noise can be reduced. along with control and feedback.

e. RAM stores information temporarily and can be changed by the user. word processing files are saved in special programspecific binary formats. These instructions must be delivered to the CPU of a computer in the correct sequence in order to give the desired result. ASCII stands for the American Standard Code for Information Exchange. OR. The signals are combined in groups of 8 bits . Computers are binary devices that use the presence of an electrical signal to represent 1 and the absence of an electrical pulse to represent 0. Programs written in assembly language can manipulate memory locations directly. Program instructions are designed to tell computers when and how to use various hardware components to solve specific problems. assembly languages use English-like abbreviations for binary equivalents.29 × 109 locations in memory. A word is made up of 2 bytes. a byte. punctuation marks. RAM is where user-generated programs. It is controlled by program instructions. and divide) as well as logical operations (AND. Higher level languages are easier to learn than machine and assembly languages. at a very high sampling rate. ROM is permanently programmed into the integrated circuit that forms the basis of the CPU and cannot be changed by the user.g. but almost all data analysis programs can import and export data in ASCII files. The lowest level of computer languages is machine language and consists of the 0s and 1s that the computer interprets. The first microcomputers were 8-bit devices that could interact with only 256 memory locations. At the next level. perhaps from an array of sensors. PERL. Ordinarily. input data.BIOINSTRUMENTATION DESIGN 155 the flow of information among the units during processing procedures. programming instructions tell the computer when data acquisition should begin. Programming languages relate instructions and data to a fixed array of binary bits so that the specific arrangement has only one meaning. These programs run very quickly and are often used in data acquisition systems that must rapidly acquire a large number of samples. ASCII provides a common standard that allows different types of computers to exchange information. Computer memory consists of read only memory (ROM) and random access memory (RAM). When computers are used to acquire physiological data. The ALU performs all arithmetic calculations (add. Instructions in these languages often resemble English and contain commonly used mathematical notations. Machine language represents the natural language of a particular computer. FORTRAN. which means that they can address 4. Most desktop computers that are available today are 32-bit systems. and processed data are stored. subtract. Letters of the alphabet and other symbols. NOT) that compare one set of information to another. how often samples should be taken from how . to code information. Higher level languages. When word processing files are saved as text files. e. they are saved in ASCII format. contain statements that accomplish tasks that require many machine or assembly language statements. are represented by special codes. and C++.g. multiply.

Some computers can also control the gain on the input amplifiers so that signals can be adjusted during data acquisition. The rate at which a system can acquire samples is dependent upon the speed of the computer’s clock. and the number of computer instructions that must completed in order to take a sample.156 BIOINSTRUMENTATION many sensors.g. . 233 MHz. and where the digitized data should be stored. the gain of the input amplifiers must be manually adjusted. how long data acquisition should continue. In other systems. e.

(b) v = 5 V and i = 12 A. 3. 3. 2.157 Exercises 1. 5. i(t) (A) 2 0 t<0 −2t 5e A t≥0 1 1 −1 2 3 4 (s) t 4.5 if (a) v = 5 V and i = −2 A. (b) v = −10 V and i = −2 A. find the total charge at: (a) 1 s. Determine the current for t ≥ 0. 6.5 is i(t) = Find q (t).5 if (a) v = 10 V and i = −2 A. Let the charge entering the upper terminal in the circuit element in Fig. The charge entering the upper terminal in the circuit element in Fig.5 be q (t) = e −1000t sin(2000πt) C for t ≥ 0. With i(t) = 0 for t < 0. (c) 3 s and (d) 4 s. (d) v = 10 V and i = 3 A. 3.5 is 3 sin(2000t) μC. (d) v = −5 V and i = 2 A. (c) v = −5 V and i = −5 A. (b) 2 s. Let i(t) shown in the following diagram flow through the circuit element in Fig. Find the power absorbed for the circuit element in Fig. .5. Suppose the current flowing through the circuit element in Fig. (a) How much charge enters the terminal from t = 0 to t = 0. 3. 3.5 ms? (b) Find i(t). 3. 3. Find the power absorbed for the circuit element in Fig. (c) v = −5 V and i = 2 A.

3. Find the power absorbed for the circuit element in Fig.158 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 7. 0 1 2 t (s) 0 1 2 t (s) i (A) 2 v (V) 1 1 b. 0 1 2 3 t (s) 0 1 2 3 t (s) i (A) 2 v (V) 1 1 c. 0 1 2 3 t (s) 0 1 2 t (s) .5 if v (V) 2 i (A) 1 1 a.

000t u(t) A (a) Find the time when the power is at its maximum. (c) Find the total energy delivered to the circuit element. . The voltage and current at the terminals in Fig. Find the total energy delivered to the circuit element in Fig.EXERCISES 159 v (V) 1 i (A) 1 0 2 d.5 if v = 3e −1000t u(t) V i = 5e −1000t u(t) A 9.5 are v = te −10. 0 1 2 t (s) 0 1 2 t (s) 8. The voltage and current at the terminals in Fig. 3.004 s.5 are v = e −500t u(t) V i = 2te −500t u(t) A (a) Find the time when the power is at its maximum. 10. t (s) 0 2 t (s) i (A) 2 v (V) 1 1 e. 3. (b) Find the energy delivered to the circuit element at t = 0. (b) Find the maximum power. 3.000t u(t) V i = (t + 10)e −10.

4V I2 4V 2V1 + V1 − 5A 2V .5 is ⎧ ⎪ 0V ⎪ ⎪ ⎨t V v= ⎪ ⎪2 − t V ⎪ ⎩ 0V If ⎧ ⎪0 W ⎪ ⎪ ⎨t 2 W p= 2 ⎪t − 4t + 4 W ⎪ ⎪ ⎩ 0W t<0 0≤t≤1 1<t≤2 t>2 t<0 0≤t≤1 1<t≤2 t>2 how much charge enters the terminal between t = 0 and t = 2 s? 12. (c) the power absorbed and delivered.160 BIOINSTRUMENTATION (c) Find the energy delivered to the circuit at t = 1 × 10−4 s. V2 and V3 . (b) the power absorbed and delivered. For the following circuit find (a) V1 . (d) Find the total energy delivered to the circuit element. 2A 3A + 2V − + V3 − 2V 3V I1 V2 4V 13. For the following circuit. 11. The voltage at the terminals in Fig. 3. (b) I2 . find: (a) I1 .

find the power in each circuit element. For the following circuit find (a) V1 . find (a) I1 and I2 . (c) show that the power dissipated equals the power generated.EXERCISES 161 14. (b) the power absorbed and delivered. 3A 5V 2A 3V 10 V 4A 4V 16. 2A + 5V − + V1 − 2 V1 3V 2V 3A I1 6V 15. (b) power dissipated in each resistor. 2Ω I1 I2 2Ω 14 V 6Ω 2Ω 2Ω 2Ω . For the following circuit. For the following circuit.

(a) Find the power dissipated in each resistor. Find I in the following circuit. (b) Show that the power dissipated equals the power generated.162 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 17. 1Ω 2V 4Ω 5V 5V 3Ω 18. Find VR in the following circuit. 2Ω 2 VR + 10 V VR 3Ω − 5Ω 3V 19. 8V I 4Ω 12 V 2Ω 5Ω 3I .

4Ω a 4Ω 3Ω 4Ω 2Ω b .EXERCISES 163 20. + ib 5A 3Ω 6Ω Va 2Va 8Ω 2Ω − 23. Find I2 in the following circuit. Find ib for the following circuit. I2 I1 1 Ω 3 1 Ω 8 1 Ω 4 3A 3 I1 22. Find I R in the following circuit. IR 4A 2Ω 2A 1Ω 3 IR 21. Find the equivalent resistance Rab for the following circuit.

8Ω a 8Ω 2Ω 2Ω 6Ω 6Ω 4Ω 3Ω b 26. 6Ω 2Ω 9Ω 4Ω a 2Ω b 4Ω 6Ω . 7Ω a 8Ω 4Ω 2Ω 4Ω 1Ω 3Ω 3Ω 2Ω b 3Ω 25. Find the equivalent resistance Rab for the following circuit. Find the equivalent resistance Rab for the following circuit. Find the equivalent resistance Rab for the following circuit.164 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 24.

EXERCISES 165 27. Find the equivalent resistance Rab for the following circuit. I1 3Ω 5A 2Ω 4Ω 2Ω 30. 12 Ω 1Ω 12 Ω 4Ω 3Ω 6Ω a 5Ω b 1Ω 4Ω 28. Find I1 for the following circuit. Find the equivalent resistance Rab for the following circuit. a 17 Ω b 10 Ω 20 Ω 20 Ω 7Ω 15 Ω 8Ω 5Ω 29. Find I1 and V1 for the following circuit. 2Ω I1 5Ω 20 A 16 Ω 80 Ω 3Ω + V1 − 12 Ω .

Find I1 and V1 for the following circuit. Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 . I1 5Ω 10 A 15 Ω 20 Ω + V1 − 60 Ω 32. Find I1 . + 2Ω + 2A v1 16 Ω v2 10 Ω 5A − − . 5Ω + 2Ω + 10 Ω 35 V v1 3Ω v2 3Ω 50 V − − 34.5 Ω 9Ω + + V1 − V2 − 33.166 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 31. 3Ω 6Ω I1 18 V 6Ω 9Ω 4. V1 and V2 for the following circuit. Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 .

2Ω + 3Ω 15 V v1 4Ω − + 5Ω 5A − v2 1Ω 36.EXERCISES 167 35. Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 . Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 . Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 . i1 + 2Ω + 2A v1 16 Ω v2 10 Ω 2 i1 − − 37. + Va 3Ω 2A − + + 3A v1 2Ω v2 5Ω 1Ω 2Va − − .

5Ω 2A + 3Ω + ia Vb 3Ω − + 2Ω 10 Ω 10 V v1 2 Vb − 6Ω v2 5Ω 3 ia − 39.168 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 38. Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 . 8Ω 4Ω + 8Ω + 4V 5V v1 5Ω v2 3Ω 10 Ω 6Ω 4A − − 40. Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 . 4Ω 3Ω + 5V + 2Ω 10 V v1 5Ω v2 2Ω 3v1 4V − − . Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 .

Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 . Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 . 5Ω ia 3Ω + 5Ω 2v1 5Ω 4Ω 4ia + 3V v1 6Ω v2 8Ω 2A − − 43. 3 ia ia + 3Ω + 5Ω 40 Ω 5A v1 2Ω v2 2A 20 Ω 10 V − − 42.EXERCISES 169 41. Use the node-voltage method to determine v1 and v2 . 5Ω ia 3Ω + 3ia + 15 V v1 2Ω v2 5Ω 5A − 2Ω 1Ω − .

170 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 44. Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 . i1 5Ω i2 3Ω 5V 3i2 2Ω 10 Ω 5Ω 47. i1 2Ω i2 20 Ω 4Ω 3V 5V 2 i2 2V 5Ω 3Ω 6Ω . Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 . Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 . i1 10 Ω i2 20 Ω 5V 15 Ω 2V 10 Ω 5Ω 45. 5Ω 3Ω 10 V i2 20 Ω i1 10 Ω 4Ω 46. Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 .

Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 .EXERCISES 171 48. 5Ω i1 3Ω 2Ω 10 V 3i 1 20 V i2 5Ω 10 Ω 4Ω 15 Ω 49. 10Ω i1 4Ω + 20 V i2 10 Ω 10 V va 4Ω 6Ω 2va − 2Ω 5Ω 3Ω 50. 3A i2 8Ω i1 4Ω 2V 3Ω 4V 2Ω 5Ω . Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 . Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 .

Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 . 2va + 1Ω i2 5Ω 3Ω 4Ω va 2Ω − i1 10 Ω 2V 4Ω 2i1 2A 5V 5Ω 6Ω . + va 2Ω − i1 5Ω i2 3Ω 3Ω 5V 5A 3va 3Ω 2Ω 52. 3Ω 4Ω 5Ω 3i1 6Ω i1 5Ω 2Ω 6V 2A 3Ω 2Ω i2 10 V 4Ω 53. Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 . Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 .172 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 51.

Use a series of source transformations and resistor combinations to find vo . Use a series of source transformations and resistor combinations to find vo . Use the mesh-current method to determine i1 and i2 . 2Ω 4Ω 5Ω + 10 V 2Ω 5A 10 Ω 10 Ω 15 Ω vo − 4Ω . i1 2Ω 3Ω i2 5Ω 2V 5Ω 3A 10 V 5Ω 6Ω − 3Ω 8Ω 3 va 5V 2Ω va 5V + 6Ω 4Ω 55. 3Ω 6Ω 2V + 2A 5Ω 4A 3Ω 5Ω vo − 56.EXERCISES 173 54.

174 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 57. 3A 4Ω 2Ω 5V 5Ω 3Ω 2Ω 2A 6Ω 10 Ω 2V − 10 Ω vo + 58. Use a series of source transformations and resistor combinations to find vo . 0. 4Ω + 3Ω 5V v0 2Ω 10 V 2Ω − 59.5 Ω 2Ω 3Ω + 5Ω 3A 2Ω 4V ia 2ia 3V 4Ω vo − .5 Ω 3Ω 2V + 4V 3Ω 3Ω vo 10 A 2Ω − 60. Use the superposition method to find vo . Use the superposition method to find vo . 3Ω 0. Use the superposition method to find vo .

Find the Th´ venin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b. Find the Th´ venin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b. + va − 2Ω 5Ω 3Ω + vo − 2Ω 5V 5A 3va 3Ω 62. e 5Ω 2Ω a 35 V 3Ω b 50 V 10 Ω 64.EXERCISES 175 61. Use the superposition method to find vo . Find the Th´ venin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b. e 3Ω a 5A 2Ω 5Ω b 63. e a b 2Ω 3Ω 15 V 4Ω 5Ω 5A 1Ω .

Find the Th´ venin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b. Find the Th´ venin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b. e + va − 3Ω 5A a 3A 2Ω 5Ω b 2va 67. e i1 2Ω a 2A 16 Ω 10 Ω 2i1 b 66. Find the Th´ venin equivalent with respect to terminals a and b. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b. e 3ia ia 3Ω 5Ω a 40 Ω 5A 2Ω 2A b 10 V 68. 8Ω 6Ω a 5V 8Ω 10 Ω b .176 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 65.

EXERCISES

177

69. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
8Ω a 5A 2Ω b 3Ω 5A 2Ω

70. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
a b

2A

2V

71. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
3Ω 3ia 6Ω a

5V

ia

b

72. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.
+

va 8Ω

ia 5Ω

5ia 5Ω a

2V 3Ω

2va

b

178

BIOINSTRUMENTATION

73. Find the Norton equivalent with respect to terminals a and b.

5i 1 a 2Ω 10 V i1 6Ω 3V b

74. A current pulse given by i(t) = (2 + 10e −2t )u(t) is applied through a 10 mH inductor. (a) Find the voltage across the inductor. (b) Sketch the current and voltage. (c) Find the power as a function of time. 75. A current pulse given by i(t) = (5 + 3 sin(2t))u(t) is applied through a 2 mH inductor. Determine the voltage across the inductor. 76. The current pulse shown in the following figure is applied through a 5 mH inductor. Find the voltage, power and energy.

i(t) (A) 1

0

1

2

3

4

t (s)

−1

77. The voltage across an L = 2.5 mH inductor is v(t) = 10 cos(1000t) mV, with i(0) = 1 mA. (a) Find i(t) for t ≥ 0. (b) Find the power and energy.

EXERCISES

179

78. The voltage across an inductor is given by the following figure. If L = 30 mH and i(0) = 0 A, find i(t) for t ≥ 0.
v
(mv) 4

0

1

2

3

t
(s)

79. The voltage across an inductor is given by the following figure. If L = 50 mH and i(0) = 0 A, find i(t) for t ≥ 0.

v
(mv) 1

0

1

2

t
(s)

80. The voltage across a 4 μF capacitor is v(t) = (200,000t − 50,000)e −2000t u(t) V. Find (a) current through the capacitor, (b) power as a function of time, (c) energy. 81. The voltage across a 0.5 μF capacitor is v(t) = (3 + 5e −2t )u(t) V. Find the current and power. 82. The voltage across a 1 μF capacitor is v(t) = (5t + 3 sin(2t))e −3t u(t) V. Find the current and power. 83. The current through a 5 μF capacitor is ⎧ ⎪0 mA t < 0 ms ⎪ ⎪ 2 ⎨5t mA 0 ≤ t < 1 ms √ i(t) = ⎪5 2 − t 2 mA 1 <t ≤ 2 ms ⎪ √ ⎪ ⎩ 0 mA t > 2 ms Find the voltage across the capacitor.

180

BIOINSTRUMENTATION

84. The current through a 10 μF capacitor is given by the following figure. If v(1) = 0 V, find v(t) for t > 1 s.
(mA) 1

i

0

1

2

3

t
(ms)

85. The current through a 100 μF capacitor is given by the following figure. If v(0) is 0 V, find v(t) for t ≥ 0 s.
i(t)
(mA) 2

0

1

2

t
(ms)

86. Find equivalent inductance between terminals a and b for the circuit in the following figure.
3H a 3H 4H 2H 2H

b

7H a 4H 1H 8H 4H 2H 3H 3H 2H b 3H 88. Find equivalent inductance between terminals a and b for the circuit in the following figure. 8H a 8H 6H 6H 4H 2H 2H b 89. 4F a 6F 1 F 2 6F b 4F 3F . Find equivalent inductance between terminals a and b for the circuit in the following figure. Find the equivalent capacitance between terminals a and b for the following circuit.EXERCISES 181 87.

Find the equivalent capacitance between terminals a and b for the following circuit. Reduce the following circuit to a single capacitor and inductor. 7F 5F 9F 4F a 5F 8F b 16 F 92. Find the equivalent capacitance between terminals a and b for the following circuit.182 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 90. 3F 8F a 5F 6F 4F 4F 4F b 6F 91. 4H a 10 F 4H 6H 1 H 2 8F 6H 1H 3H b 2F .

a 4F 3H 5F 4H 6H 18 F 1H 1H 6F b 94. For the following circuit. i 2 (1 − e−5t ) u(t ) A 20 H + v − 5H 95. (b) Find i(t) for t ≥ 0. (b) IS 20 H 5H 4H . IS = 5 sin 2t A and i(0) = Find i(t) for t ≥ 0. IS = 2(1 − e −5t )u(t) A and i(0) = 2 A. For the following circuit. (a) Find v(t) for t ≥ 0. (a) Find v(t) for t ≥ 0.EXERCISES 183 93. i + v − 1 2 A. Reduce the following circuit to a single capacitor and inductor.

(d) i1 (t). (b) v(t). (c) io (t). and i2 (0) = 2 A. (b)v1 (t). i1 (0) = 1 A. (b) v(t). For the following circuit. IS = 5(1 − e −3t ) u(t) A. (e) i2 (t). i 6F VS 3F + v − 98. For the following circuit. i 20 F VS 5F + v − . For the following circuit. i0 + v0 − 1H i1 IS 20 H + v1 − i2 5H 97. VS = 3(1 − e −5t ) u(t) V and v(0) = 2 V.184 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 96. Find the following fort ≥ 0: (a)i(t). VS = 5 cos 3t V and v(0) = 1 V. Find the following for t ≥ 0: (a)vo (t). Find the following for t ≥ 0: (a) i(t).

(c) v2 (t). the switch instantaneously moves to position b. The switch has been in position a for a long time. Find the following for t ≥ 0: (a) i1 (t).EXERCISES −3t 185 99. For the following circuit. Find i L and v1 for t > 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. At t = 0. VS = 2(1 − e ) u(t) V. The switch has been in position a for a long time. v1 (0) = 3 V and v2 (0) = 2 V. Find i L and v1 for t > 0. (b) v1 (t). (d) i2 (t). 3Ω a t=0 iL + v1 − b 6V 10 Ω 2H 101. At t = 0. a 4Ω t=0 6Ω + v1 − iL b 8A 5Ω 4H 10 Ω . + v 1− i1 5F VS 18 F + v2 − i2 2F 100.

Find i L and v1 for t > 0. iL t= 0 a 8Ω + b 10 V 6Ω 3Ω v1 6Ω 5H − 104. At t = 0. iL + a 2Ω t= 0 b 5V 12 Ω 4Ω v1 6Ω 5H − 103. Find i L and v1 for t > 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. Find i L and v1 for t > 0. The switch has been in position a for a long time. The switch has been in position a for a long time.186 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 102. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. At t = 0. At t = 0. a 2Ω t=0 iL + b 5A 2Ω 4 v1 − 2H 5Ω 20 Ω . The switch has been in position a for a long time.

a 8Ω t=0 12 Ω + v1 iL b 10 V 8Ω − 5Ω 2H 107. Find i L and v1 for t > 0. At t = 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. The switch has been in position a for a long time. a 2Ω 3Ω t=0 iL + b 10 V 4Ω 4H v1 − 16 Ω 106. a 2Ω t=0 iL + b 20 V 3Ω 20 H 5H v1 − 16 Ω . The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0. Find i L and v1 for t > 0.EXERCISES 187 105. At t = 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. The switch has been in position a for a long time. Find i L and v1 for t > 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b.

Find i L . At t = 0. The switch has been in position a for a long time. The switch has been in position a for a long time. i1 and v1 for t > 0. i1 and v1 for t > 0. Find i L . a 5Ω t=0 i1 + b 10 V 10 Ω vC − 2F . Find vc and i1 for t > 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. At t = 0. The switch has been in position a for a long time. a 2Ω t=0 iL + v1 i1 b 10 V 4Ω 5i1 − 3H 12 Ω 109.188 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 108. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. 2i1 a 20 Ω t=0 i1 iL + v1 b 6A 5Ω 4Ω 40 Ω 6H − 10 Ω 110. At t = 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b.

EXERCISES 189 111. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. At t = 0. At t = 0. The switch has been in position a for a long time. a t=0 i1 12 Ω 10 Ω + b 8A 40 Ω 40 Ω vC − 10 F . Find vc and i1 for t > 0. The switch has been in position a for a long time. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. a 2Ω 10 Ω t=0 i1 + b 10 V 8A 10 Ω 40 Ω vC − 10 F 112. a 4Ω t=0 i1 8Ω 6Ω + b 5V 3Ω vC − 3F 113.

The switch has been in position a for a long time. a 5Ω t=0 i1 + vC − b 20 V 4Ω 2i1 3F 12 Ω . At t = 0. The switch has been in position a for a long time. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. a t=0 12 Ω i1 + vC − b 5A 153 Ω 8 8Ω 5Ω 4F 116. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. At t = 0. Find vc and i1 for t > 0.190 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 114. a 8Ω t=0 i1 + vC − b 20 V 40 Ω 4F 4F 10 Ω 117. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. a 2Ω t=0 i1 + vC b 10 V 12 Ω 12 Ω 4Ω − 5F 115. At t = 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. The switch has been in position a for a long time. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0.

Find i L and v1 for t > 0. At t = 0. + v1 − t=0 a 5Ω 20 Ω iL b 10 V 3A 3H 120. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. Find i L and v1 for t > 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. The switch has been in position a for a very long time. The switch has been in position a for a long time. the switch moves to position b. 5i1 a 6Ω 20 Ω t=0 i1 + vC b 15 V 5Ω 12 Ω 8Ω 3Ω − 3F 119. At t = 0. a 12 Ω t=0 8Ω 4Ω + v1 − iL b 5V 10 V 3H .EXERCISES 191 118.

Find i L and v1 for t > 0. At t = 0. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. At t = 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. iL t=0 a 2Ω + b 5V 12 Ω 10 V 4Ω v1 6Ω 5H − 123. a 2Ω 10 Ω t=0 iL + v1 10 H − b 5V 10 A 5A 40 Ω 122. The switch has been in position a for a long time. The switch has been in position a for a long time. Find i1 and v1 for t > 0. Find i L and v1 for t > 0. a 2Ω t=0 i1 + v1 b 10 V 4Ω 3i1 − 3H 12 Ω 5V .192 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 121.

Find vC and i1 for t > 0. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0. Find i L . The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0. At t = 0. t=0 5Ω 20 Ω i1 5V 3A + vC − 2F 5Ω 126. a 2Ω t=0 i1 + vC − b 3A 20 Ω 6Ω 3Ω 3F 10 V . The switch has been position a for a very long time. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. the switch closes.EXERCISES 193 124. 2i1 a 20 Ω t=0 i1 iL + v1 b 6A 5Ω 4Ω 40 Ω 3H − 10 Ω 4V 125. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. i1 and v1 for t > 0.

the switch instantaneously moves to position b. a 6Ω t=0 b 6F 5Ω 10 V 4Ω + vC − i1 6V 3F . the switch instantaneously moves to position b. At t = 0.194 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 127. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. The switch has been in position a for a long time. the switch instantaneously moves to position b. The switch has been in position a for a long time. At t = 0. i1 t=0 a 40 Ω b 120 V 5A 10 Ω + vC − 12 Ω 10 F 128. The switch has been in position a for a long time. a 5Ω t=0 b 10 Ω 10 V + i1 8F 5V 2F vC − 129. Find vc and i1 for t > 0. At t = 0.

(b) is = 1 + 3u(t) A. switch ab instantaneously moves to position b.EXERCISES 195 130. a t=0 2Ω t = 0. At t = 0. At t = 0. The switches have been in positions a and c for a long time. switch cd instantaneously moves to position d . At t = 0. switch ab instantaneously moves to position b. iL + vC − is 5Ω 4H 3F . The switches have been in positions a and c for a long time.06s c d 20 F + vC − 4Ω b 5A 2Ω 3A 5Ω 5F i1 5V 131.06. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) is = 3u(t) A. Find i1 and vc for t > 0. Find i1 and vc for t > 0. switch cd instantaneously moves to position d . At t = 0. a t=0 10 Ω t = 0.15 d b 4Ω c 3A 4V 6V 6Ω + vC − i1 3F 132.15.

(b) vs = 2 + 5u(t) V. iL is 10 Ω 2H + vC − 15 F 135. (b) is = −1 + 3u(t) A. iL + vC − is 5Ω 200 H 2F . (b) is = −1 + 10u(t) A. 5Ω iL vs 20 Ω 3H + vC − 6F 134. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) vs = 5u(t) V.196 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 133. (b) vs = 4 + 20u(t) V. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) is = 10u(t) A. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) vs = 20u(t) V. 4Ω iL vs 4Ω 16 H + vC − 1F 136. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) is = 3u(t) A.

Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) is = 10u(t) A. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) is = 5u(t) A. (b) vs = 2 + 3u(t) V. (b) is = 5 + 5u(t) A. iL is 5Ω 350 H + vC − 3F 139. (b) is = −1 + 10u(t) A. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) vs = 3u(t) V. 6Ω iL vs 6Ω 360 H + vC − 10 F 138. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) vs = 5u(t) V.EXERCISES 197 137. iL + vC − is 1Ω 25 H 5F . (b) vs = 12 + 5u(t) V. 4Ω iL + vC − vs 4Ω 20 H 1F 140.

(b) is = 10u(t) + 5 A. + vC − 2Ω 1. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) is = 3u(t) A. i1 and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) vs = 5u(t) V.198 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 141. + vC − 8 12 vs 4Ω i1 12 F 5i1 iL 12 H . (b) vs = 5u(t) + 3 V.5 F iL vs 4H 142. + vC − 1F is 4Ω iL 10 H 143. (b) is = 3u(t) − 1 A. Find i L . Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) is = 10u(t) A. (b) vs = 5u(t) + 2 V. + vC − 1Ω 4F iL is 2Ω 20 H 144. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) vs = 5u(t) V.

(b) is = 3u(t) + 1 A. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) vs = 2u(t) V. + vC − 5Ω 4F iL vs 25 H 147. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) vs = 4u(t) V. + vC − 6Ω 3F iL vs 5H .EXERCISES 199 145. (b) vc = 2u(t) + 2 V. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) is = 6u(t) A. (b) vs = 4u(t) − 2 V. + vC − 16 F is 4Ω iL 64 H 146.

vc 2 (0) = −3 V and is = 2e −2t u(t) A. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) is = 2u(t) A. + vC − 1Ω 10 F iL vs 2H 150. (c) Use the node-voltage method to find vb for t > 0. (a) Write the node-voltage equations necessary to solve this circuit. Find i L and vc for t > 0 for the following circuit if: (a) vs = 5u(t) V. i L2 (0) = 5 A. + vC 1 − 1Ω + 2F iL1 + iL2 2F 2H 3H is 3Ω vb vC2 − 1Ω − . (b) vs = 5u(t) − 2 V.200 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 148. + vC − 2F is 9Ω iL 20 H 149. For the following circuit we are given that i L1 (0) = 2 A. vc 1 (0) = 2 V. (d) Use the mesh-current method to find vb for t > 0. (b) Write the mesh-current equations necessary to solve this circuit. (b) is = 2u(t) − 1 A.

(d) using the mesh-current method if vs = 3 cos(2t) u(t) V. (b) using the mesh-current method if is = 2e −3t u(t) A. (e) using the node-voltage method if is = 2u(t) + 2 A. (c) using the nodevoltage method if vs = 3 cos(2t) u(t) V. (e) using the node-voltage method if vs = 3u(t) − 1 V. (f ) using the mesh-current method if is = 2u(t) + 2 A. iL1 2H 2Ω 1 H 2 4Ω is 3F 153. (f ) using the mesh-current method if vs = 3u(t) − 1 V.EXERCISES 201 151. Find i L1 for t > 0 for the following circuit: (a) using the node-voltage method if is = 2e −3t u(t) A. Find vc for t > 0 for the following circuit: (a) using the node-voltage method if vs = 3e −5t u(t) V. (b) using the mesh-current method if vs = 3e −5t u(t) V. (c) using the nodevoltage method if is = 3 cos(2t) u(t) A. (d) using the mesh-current method if is = 3 cos(2t) u(t) A. 3H 4F 2Ω vs 6Ω 3Ω + vC1 − 3F 152. (b) using the mesh-current method if vs = 2e −3t u(t) V. (c) using the node-voltage method if vs = 3 sin(5t) u(t) V. Find vc 1 for t > 0 for the following circuit: (a) using the node-voltage method if vs = 2e −3t u(t) V. (d) using the mesh-current method if .

the switch moves to position b. (c) using the nodevoltage method if is = 2 sin(3t) u(t) A. The switch has been in position a for a long time. 5Ω + vC1 − 3H 2H vs 1 F 2 4F 2F 154. then at t = 4. 12 Ω a t= 0s 10 Ω t= 4s 3H b 4Ω + vC − 5V 2F 3Ω 10 V . (d) using the mesh-current method if is = 2 sin(3t) u(t) A. (f ) using the mesh-current method if vs = 5u(t) − 2 V. At t = 0. Find i L for t > 0 for the following circuit: (a) using the node-voltage method if is = 5e −3t u(t) A. (b) using the mesh-current method if is = 5e −3t u(t) A. (f ) using the mesh-current method if is = 2u(t) + 3 A. the switch moves back to position a. (e) using the node-voltage method if vs = 5u(t) − 2 V. iL 3H 5H is 5Ω 2F 4F 2Ω 155. (e) using the node-voltage method if is = 2u(t) + 3 A.202 BIOINSTRUMENTATION vs = 3 sin(5t) u(t) V. Find vc for t > 0.

Find vc for t > 0. The switches operate as indicated in the following circuit. 2Ω a t=0s t=2s i1 2Ω b 4Ω 12 Ω + vC − 10 V 5i1 3H 3F 5V 158. and then back to position a at t = 2 s.EXERCISES 203 156. the switch moves to position b. 5Ω 3Ω t=0 4Ω 3F + vC − t = 1s 10 V 3A 10 Ω 2H 157. The switches operate as indicated in the following circuit. 20 Ω 2i1 a t=0 i1 iL t=2s b 5Ω 4Ω 40 Ω 6A 3H 5F 4V . Find i L for t > 0. At t = 0. Find vc for t > 0. The switch has been in position a for a long time.

The operational amplifier shown in the following figure is ideal. 200 kΩ +12 V i0 + −12 V 5V 6V 25 kΩ v0 50 kΩ − . Find vo and io . The operational amplifier shown in the following figure is ideal. The operational amplifier shown in the following figure is ideal.204 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 159. Find vo and io . Find vo and io . 100 kΩ +12 V i0 + 25 kΩ 5 kΩ 2V 3V −12 V 20 kΩ v0 − 160. 120 kΩ +10 V i0 + −10 V 2V 5 kΩ v0 30 kΩ − 161.

+12 V + −12 V VS 10 kΩ v0 5 kΩ − 20 kΩ 164. Find vo . Find the overall gain for the following circuit if the operational amplifier is ideal. 90 kΩ 100 kΩ +12 V + 5 kΩ 10 V 5V −12 V 20 kΩ v0 80 kΩ 20 kΩ − 163.EXERCISES 205 162. Draw a graph of vo versus Vs if Vs varies between 0 and 10 V. Find vo in the following circuit if the operational amplifier is ideal. 5 kΩ 2 kΩ +9 V 10 kΩ 3 5V 4V 9V 3 kΩ + 6 kΩ −9 V v0 − . The operational amplifier shown in the following figure is ideal.

Find vo in the following circuit if the operational amplifier is ideal. 20 kΩ 1 kΩ 5 kΩ +12 V 3 kΩ 3 kΩ 8V 5V −12 V 1V +12 V + −12 V 3 kΩ v0 − . 1 kΩ 3 kΩ +12 V 6 kΩ 10 V 3V 5V −12 V v0 + − 166. Find io in the following circuit if the operational amplifiers are ideal. Find vo in the following circuit if the operational amplifiers are ideal. 10 kΩ +12 V 20 kΩ +12 V 3 kΩ i0 5 kΩ 2 kΩ 4 kΩ 5V 3V −12 V − 12 V 5V 4V 167.206 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 165.

find vo . Suppose the input Vs is given in the following figure. Vs 10 (V) 0 1 2 3 4 t (s) −10 . If there is no stored energy in the following circuit with an ideal operational amplifier. If there is no stored energy in the following circuit with an ideal operational amplifier. Suppose the input Vs is given as a triangular waveform as shown in the following figure. 1 Ω 2 2F +12 V + −12 V VS v0 − Vs (V) 1 0 1 2 3 4 t (s) −1 169. find vo .EXERCISES 207 168.

If there is no stored energy in the following circuit with an ideal operational amplifier.6μ F +12 V + −12 V VS v0 − 170. Suppose the input Vs is given in the following figure. Vs (V) 2 0 1 2 t (s) 2 1μF 250 kΩ +12 V + −12 V VS v0 − . find vo .208 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 1 MΩ 0.

The following circuit is operating in the sinusoidal steady state.25μ F 50 kΩ +12 V + −12 V VS v0 − 172.2 0.EXERCISES 209 171. find vo .25 −0.75 1 t (s) 0. Find the steady-state expression for i L if is = 30 cos 20t A. iL + vC − is 5Ω 4H 3F . Suppose the input Vs is given in the following figure.2 0.5 0. Vs (V) 0. If there is no stored energy in the following circuit with an ideal operational amplifier.

Design a low-pass filter with a magnitude of 10 and a cutoff frequency of 250 rad/s. 5Ω iL + vC − vs 20 Ω 3H 6F 174. Find the steady-state expression for vc if vs = 10 sin 1000t V. . iL + vC − is 10 Ω 2H 15 F 175. The following circuit is operating in the sinusoidal steady state. Find the steady-state expression for i L if is = 5 cos 500t A. Find the steady-state expression for vc if is = 25 cos 4000t V. 4Ω iL + vC − vs 4Ω 16 H 1F 176. Design a high-pass filter with a magnitude of 20 and a cutoff frequency of 300 rad/s. The following circuit is operating in the sinusoidal steady state. The following circuit is operating in the sinusoidal steady state.210 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 173. 177.

Design a low-pass filter with a magnitude of 5 and a cutoff frequency of 200 rad/s.) Find the magnitude of the output vo as a function of frequency. C1 R1 R2 + VS C2 v0 − . 181.EXERCISES 211 178. Suppose the operational amplifier in the following circuit is ideal. (The circuit is a lowpass first-order Butterworth filter. 179. 182. Find the magnitude of the output vo as a function of frequency. Design a high-pass filter with a magnitude of 10 and a cutoff frequency of 500 rad/s. R + VS C v0 − 183. Design a band-pass filter a gain of 15 and pass through frequencies from 50 to 200 rad/s. the following circuit is a second-order Butterworth low-pass filter. With an ideal operational amplifier. 180. Design a band-pass filter a gain of 10 and pass through frequencies from 20 to 100 rad/s.

C2 R2 R1 R3 + VS C1 C3 v0 − . Find the magnitude of the output vo as a function of frequency. A third-order Butterworth low-pass filter is shown in the following circuit with an ideal operational amplifier.212 BIOINSTRUMENTATION 184.

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