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Final Rice

Final Rice

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Published by: gregbaccay on Mar 12, 2011
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The precise origins of rice are lost to history, but experts believe the plant
probably got its start in India. Certainly, archeological evidence indicates that the

Faculty Research
April 2010

ST. PAUL UNIVERSITY DUMAGUETE

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS EDUCATION

VETERANS’ AVENUE, BANTAYAN, DUMAGUETE CITY

PAGE 5

southeast Asians were the first people to cultivate rice: artifacts imprinted with rice
grains dating back to 4,000 BC have been discovered in Korea.

Rice soon spread outward from southern Asia into China and beyond. It is
thought that the Greeks were introduced to rice when Alexander the Great brought
it home with him from his travels to India in the 4th century BC. The Moors took
rice with them when they invaded Spain, and the Spanish in turn introduced the
Italians to rice in the 1400's. From there it quickly spread through southern Europe.
While rice wasn't one of the staples the Pilgrims packed on the Mayflower, it has
been a staple crop in the United States since the late 1600's.

In the olden times, the domestication of rice triggered the rapid growth of the
Philippines pre-colonial society. Archaeological records show that rice cultivation
took place in our country around 3240 +/- 160 BC. It is slightly older in Thailand
which was dated at about 4000 BC. (Centro Escolar University, 2009).

Speaking of the Mayflower, rice is not the first thing that springs to mind
when you think of British cuisine - or even French cuisine for that matter. The
reason for this probably stems back to medieval times. Malaria was prevalent in
southern Europe in the 1500's and 1600's, and many people believed the swampy
conditions needed for rice production contributed to the spread of the disease.
Needless to say, this meant northern Europeans were less than eager to make
rice a staple in their diet.

Fortunately, the incidence of malaria had no impact on rice's status in China.
There are several references to rice in Buddhist scriptures. (The lack of similar
references to rice in either Jewish scriptures or the Bible add to the case for rice
originating in southern Asia). Today, China is one of the countries that make up
the rice bowl, an area that produces the majority of the world's rice.

Faculty Research
April 2010

ST. PAUL UNIVERSITY DUMAGUETE

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS EDUCATION

VETERANS’ AVENUE, BANTAYAN, DUMAGUETE CITY

PAGE 6

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