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64 CM Solar Powered Satellites Case Neg

64 CM Solar Powered Satellites Case Neg

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Published by Christian Jones

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Published by: Christian Jones on Mar 15, 2011
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03/28/2011

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Text: The 50 states and territorial governments should fully fund private
sector companies for the development and implementation of space based
solar power. We’ll clarify.

Observation 1 – Competition – the counterplan is non-topical and competes
through net benefits

Observation 2 – Solvency

Private sector solves the aff – it’s key to commercial space development and
international cooperation

Lawrence Roberts, Chair of NSS Policy Committee setting forth latest position paper from Policy Committee 6/10/99, “memo”
(http://www.nsschapters.org/policy-cmte/files/SPSOLARP_906.pdf)

An appropriate combination of public and private sector funding can encourage SPS development. In the near term, government
agencies such as NASA and the Department of Energy can lower the technological risk by funding technologies such as efficient solar
cells, wireless power transmission, advanced space transportation systems, and space resource utilization. Whenever feasible, existing
assets such as the International Space Station can be used. As the technologies are proven, private industry can then lead the way
toward commercial development of space. SPS research and development will thus foster international cooperation
in the
short term, while increasing the wealth of nations and protecting the Earth's environment in the longer-term. As the quality of
life on Earth improves, near-Earth space can be opened up to private citizens, while deep-space scientific missions can be made
more affordable.

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Private Sector CP Solvency

The private sector can pay for the plan

Joseph D. Rouge – Acting Director, National Security Space Office; 10-10-07; National Security Space Office;
http://www.nss.org/settlement/ssp/library/final-sbsp-interim-assessment-release-01.pdf

FINDING: The SBSP Study Group found that adequate

capital

exists

in

the

private

sector

to

finance

construction,

however

private

capital

is

unlikely

to

develop

this

concept

without

government

assistance

because

the

timeframe

of

reward

and

agree

of

risk

are

outside

the

window

of

normal

private

sector

investment.

Capital

in

the

energy

and

other

sectors

is

available

on

the

level

needed

for

such

a

large

project,

but

capital

flows

under

fairly

conservative

criteria,

and

SBSP

has

not

yet

experienced

a

suitable

demonstration,

nor

have

the

risks

been

adequately

characterized

to

make

informed

business

plan

decisions.

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Private Sector CP Solvency

Plan is ineffective without private sector – no economic viability or large-scale
production

National Security Space Office, part of a long-term government study on the feasibility of solar space power as a provider of
U.S. energy, 10-10-07, “Space-Based Solar Power As an Opportunity for Strategic Security,”
http://www.nss.org/settlement/ssp/library/final-sbsp-interim-assessment-release-01.pdf [Tandet]

The SBSP Study Group found that SBSP

systems

are

unlikely

to become

economically

competitive,

nor

produced

on

the

scale

that

is needed

to help solve global energy and environmental

problems unless

the

systems

are

manufactured,

owned,

and

operated

by

private

industry.

This

finding

is consistent

with

the

U.S.

National

Space

Policy

that advocates space commercialization.

Private sector solves SBSP – it has the creativity and motivation

National Security Space Office, part of a long-term government study on the feasibility of solar space power as a provider of
U.S. energy, 10-10-07, “Space-Based Solar Power As an Opportunity for Strategic Security,”
http://www.nss.org/settlement/ssp/library/final-sbsp-interim-assessment-release-01.pdf [Tandet]

The

private

sector

should

be

engaged

. The new

space

companies

working on reusable launch,

space stations and other technologies should

be

consulted

and

encouraged

as

well

as

the

traditional large

aerospace

companies.

Both

may have

the

vision,

creativity

and

drive

necessary

to

help

make

SBSP

happen.

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Private Sector CP Solvency

Private sector is more effective than NASA – empirically proven that they can
solve faster and cheaper

James Burk, vice president of Artemis Society International and staff writer for Mars News, 6-3-04, “What the Moon-Mars
Commission's Report Should Say...” http://www.marsnews.com/articles/20040603-
what_the_moonmars_commissions_report_should_say.html [Tandet]

For too long, NASA has stifled creativity and entrepreneurialism on the part of non-governmental efforts to pioneer
space.
In the late 1990s, many firms such as Rotary Rocket and Beal Aerospace were working on bringing SSTO/RLV
technologies to market, and NASA did everything to prevent their success. Firms like LunaCorp and TransOrbital were
talking about private lunar missions and NASA did everything to stifle them, including spreading rumors of a new NASA
moon probe
, which ultimately amounted to nothing and caused their funding opportunities to dry up.
Let the commercial sector do what it excels at, namely cutting through bureaucracy and accomplishing goals on a short
timeframe.
Instead of stifling private sector efforts, NASA should do everything they can to help them. NASA should enhance
and expand their programs to transfer technologies & methods developed internally to start-up companies.

During the Apollo days, most of the hardware and operations were conducted by private contractors. That model has
worked before and should be returned to for future projects
. Let NASA set the direction & goals, but let the private
sector implement them and create wealth & commercial opportunities from them. That is a much faster way to get into
space, and also much cheaper for the public.

Private sector should take over the space industry – government only needs to
provide initial funding

Mark Prado, founder of Permanent Inc. and head of law division thereof, ’02, “How the Government Can Help the Private Sector,”
http://www.permanent.com/ep-ghelp.htm [Tandet]

It is clear that the private sector will take over once the initial startup costs and basic infrastructure are overcome.
Government will not be the entity making products and services in space, except possibly a few products in the initial
years.
It is beyond the scope of this discussion to cite other examples of government initiated research and development (and joint
ventures with government contractors) which became purely private sector realms of high profitability, e.g.,
communications satellites, internet, various energy technologies, but business readers and government program leaders may
want to study some of those case histories.

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