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Curriculum Implementation Overcoming Resistance to Change ppt

Curriculum Implementation Overcoming Resistance to Change ppt

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Published by: Joras Joy Yu Gregorio-Antojado on Mar 16, 2011
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Curriculum Implementation

By: JORAS JOY G. ANTOJADO

LEARNING OUTCOMES
Explain what is curriculum implementation Describe Lewin·s change model Differentiate between the types of curriculum change Explain why people resist change Suggest ways of overcoming resistance to change List the role and responsibilities of individuals involved in the implementation of a curriculum

What is Curriculum Implementation? IMPLEMENTATION IS AN INTERACTION BETWEEN THOSE WHO HAVE CREATED THE PROGRAMME AND THOSE WHO ARE CHARGED TO DELIVER IT. .

actions and attitudes of people . -implementation involves changes in the knowledge. -implementation requires educators to shift from the current programme which they are familiar with to the new or modified programme. 1998.According to Ornstein and Hunkins.

.-implementation can be seen as a process of professional development and growth involving ongoing interactions. -implementation is a process of clarification whereby individuals and groups come to understand and practice a change in attitudes and behaviours. often involving using new resources. feedback and assistance.

it is useful to organise implementation into manageable events and to set achievable goals. teachers educators.-implementation involves change which requires effort and will produce a certain amount of anxiety and to minimize these. and where risk-taking is encouraged. -implementation requires a supportive atmosphere in which there is trust and open communication between administrators. .

CURRICULUM IMPLEMENTATION AS A CHANGE PROCESS Implementation is the carrying out of something or the practical application of a method. . procedure or desired purpose.

BEFORE AFTER .

BEFORE AFTER .

Types of Curriculum Change .

the substituting of a new textbook for an old one.Types of Curriculum Change ‡ Substitution: One element may be substituted for another already present. For example. .

.Types of Curriculum Change ‡ Alteration: This occurs when a change is introduced into existing material in the hope that it will appear minor and thus be readily adopted.

Types of Curriculum Change ‡ Perturbations: These are changes that are disruptive but teachers adjust to them within a fairly short time. For example. . the assistant principal changes the timetable or schedule to allow for longer teaching time.

or involving the local community in deciding what is to be taught. the introduction of an integrated curriculum requiring team teaching. For example.Types of Curriculum Change ‡ Restructuring: These are changes that lead to a modification of the whole school system. .

then the value orientations or fundamental philosophies of the school changes. if the new teachers who join the school place more emphasis on personal growth of students than academic performance. . For example.Types of Curriculum Change ‡ Value Orientation: These are shifts in the fundamental value orientations of school personnel.

. But. the categories are general enough to help you plan change and arrange resources to bring about the change.It should be realised that a particular curriculum change may not exactly fit according to the five categories given. you should be aware that change is not synonymous with improvement and you might decide that change should not be undertaken. However.

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.The following are the main reasons why people resist change (Harvey. 1990. 1999. People resist because they do not understand they simply do not follow what is being introduced. They do not understand where they are going. 1966). I. Lippitt. They are not clear as to what is required of them. Woldring.

Unfortunately. Woldring. most curriculum reform efforts are initiated from the outside which may be at the national. Lippitt. 1990. 1966). People resist because of lack of ownership Individuals will not accept change if they consider it coming from outside or imposed on them. . state or district level. II.The following are the main reasons why people resist change (Harvey. 1999.

. III. 1990. People resist if they do not have the competencies to cope with the changes It is natural for persons to resist if they do not have the knowledge and skills to cope with the changes. the training period has been greatly reduced and teachers are not adequately equipped. Lippitt. Woldring. 1999. There is the likelihood that the implementation of the new curriculum has been rushed or due to budgetary constraints.The following are the main reasons why people resist change (Harvey. 1966). Nobody wants to be told that they are incompetent.

Woldring. IV. . People resist if there is a lack of incentives or benefits If teachers are unconvinced that the new programme will make things better for students (in terms of learning) or themselves (such as greater recognition. Lippitt. respect or reward). they are likely to resist the suggested change. 1990. 1966). 1999.The following are the main reasons why people resist change (Harvey.

Focusing their energy on change activities. People resist if they do not have the time to engage with the change Teachers find it difficult having to juggle between bringing about change handling their current responsibilities. 1999. 1966). may run the risk of neglecting their current responsibilities. Woldring. . V. 1990.The following are the main reasons why people resist change (Harvey. Lippitt.

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THE EVOLUTION OF NURSES .

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