December 3, 2010   

WSPA – Humane Treatment of Animals 
  Animal Cruelty  The majority of Canadians support one of the core goals of the animal protection movement, which is  to minimize and eventually eliminate all forms of animal cruelty and suffering (88%).  Women  continue to show more support for animal welfare, as they are more likely than men to support this  goal (91% vs. 84%).  Those who are likely to vote Conservative (78%) are less likely to support this  animal protection movement compared to those likely to vote Liberal (89%), NDP (95%), BQ (97%) or  Green (89%).  Those who have rarely/never hunted or fished in the past year are more likely than  those who have often/sometimes hunted or fished to support the movement (91% vs. 74%).    Virtually all Canadians (95%) agree that animal pain and suffering should be reduced as much as  possible, even in those cases in which the animals are raised to be slaughtered, and 93% would  support laws aimed at ensuring that all farm animals are at least able to lie down, turn around,  stretch their limbs and/or spread their wings.  Women are more likely than men to support this law  (95% vs. 90%).  Those likely to vote BQ (99%) are more likely than those likely to vote Liberal (94%) or  Conservative (93%) to agree that animal pain and suffering should be reduced as much as possible.   While a majority of Conservative voters would support laws aimed at ensuring all farm animals are  given enough room to lie down, turn around, and stretch their limbs and/or spread their wings (87%),  they are least likely to show support – vs. Liberals (94%), NDP (98%), BQ (96%), and Green (95%).    Canadians would support the amendments the Canadian humane societies and other animal welfare  groups are working to improve in Canada’s federal animal cruelty laws.  The majority of Canadians  would personally support amendments that:  recognize animals are sentient (87%), make laws  against cockfighting every bit as strong as those against dog fighting (87%), create new offences  making it illegal to poison, injure or kill a police dog or horse (85%) and making it a more serious  crime to brutally and viciously kill animals (84%).  Just over three‐quarters (78%) would support  removing a loophole that allows animal owners to escape prosecution for neglecting their animals  unless it can be proven the neglect was willful intent.  Almost three‐quarters (73%) of Canadians  would personally support the recognition that animals are more than property by removing animal  cruelty crimes from the Crimes Against Property section of Canada’s Criminal Code, and many would  support removing a loophole that allows animal abusers to escape prosecution by arguing the animal  died quickly (72%).     

Page 1 of 7   

 

Regionally, those in British Columbia (83%) and Alberta (82%) are more likely than the rest of Canada  to support removing a loophole that allows animal abusers to escape prosecution by arguing the  animal died quickly.    Women are more likely than men to support some of these amendments, including creating new  offences making it a more serious crime to brutally and viciously kill animals (89% vs. 79%) and  making it illegal to poison, injure or kill a police dog or horse (88% vs. 82%), and removing a loophole  that allows animal abusers to escape prosecution by arguing the animal died quickly (77% vs. 68%).     
Support for amendments Make laws against cockf ighting as strong as those against dog f ighting 87% 1% 11% 1%

Recognize that animals are sentient

87%

1% 11%

2%

New of f ence making it illegal to “poison, injure or kill” a police dog or horse New of f ence making it a more serious crime to “brutally and viciously kill” animals Removing a loophole allowing animal owners to escape prosecution f or neglecting their animals unless it can be proven the neglect was "wilf ul" in intent Recognize that animals are more than “property” by removing animal cruelty crimes f rom the Crimes Against Property section of Canada’s Criminal Code Removing a loophole allowing animal abusers to escape prosecution by arguing the animal died quickly 0% 20% Support

85%

1% 12%

2%

84%

1%

13%

2%

78%

1%

18%

4%

73%

1%

18%

8%

72%

1%

24%

2%

40% Indif f erent

60% Oppose

80% Don't know/ref used

100%

  Support for these amendments vary by vote intent:  • Make laws against cockfighting every bit as strong as those against dog fighting:  BQ (94%) vs.  Conservatives (86%)  • Recognize that animals are sentient:  NDP (90%), BQ (91%), Green (91%) vs. Conservatives  (81%)  • Creating a new offence making it a more serious crime to brutally and viciously kill animals:  Liberals (86%), NDP (88%), BQ (88%), Green (87%) vs. Conservatives (75%)  • Removing a loophole that allows animal owners to escape prosecution for neglection their  animals unless it can be proven the neglect was willful in intent:  Green (84%) vs.  Conservatives (72%) 

Page 2 of 7   

 

Recognize that animals are more than property by removing animal cruelty crimes from the  Crimes Against Property section of Canada’s Criminal Code:  NDP (81%) and Green (78%) vs.  Conservatives (66%) 

  Those who have rarely/never hunted or fished in the past year are also more likely than those who  have often/sometimes hunted or fished in the past year to support some of the amendments,  including making laws against cockfighting every bit as strong as those against dog fighting (89% vs.  79%), creating a new offence making it a more serious crime to brutally and viciously kill animals (87%  vs. 72%), recognizing that animals are more than property by removing animal cruelty crimes from  the Crimes Against Property section of Canada’s Criminal Code (75% vs. 64%), and removing a  loophole that allows animal abusers to escape prosecution by arguing the animal died quickly (75%  vs. 62%).    Before learning about current animal cruelty laws, half (49%) of Canadians indicated they think  Canada’s existing animal cruelty laws are too weak, while just over one‐third (36%) think the animal  cruelty laws are just right.  Women are more likely to think the laws are too weak (56%), while men  are more likely to think they are just right (42%).  Those likely to vote NDP (60%) or Green Party (65%)  in the next election are more likely than those who are likely to vote Liberal (44%), Conservative  (39%), or BQ (39%) to believe our current animal cruelty laws are too weak; however, those likely to  vote Liberal (45%), Conservative (47%), or BQ (55%) are more likely to think the existing laws are just  right.  Others who think Canada’s existing animal cruelty laws are too weak include:  those who live in  a city (52%), those who placed animal welfare as one of their top 3 most important issues (63%),  those who think the welfare and protection of animals raised for food is important (51%), those who  support a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare (52%), those who often or sometimes purchase  free‐run eggs (55%), and those who rarely or never go hunting/fishing (52%).    The welfare and protection of animals is important to Canadians in many situations:  • Endangered species (97%);  • Animals kept as companions or pets (94%);  • Wildlife (94%);  • Animals in zoos and aquariums (91%);  • Animals raised for food (90%);  • Animals in laboratories (86%);  • Animals in circuses and rodeos (85%); and,  • Horses and dogs used in racing (83%).     

Page 3 of 7   

 

There are a couple of noteworthy trends regarding the importance of the welfare and protection of  animals.  While both men and women are equally likely to see the importance in protecting  endangered species, animals kept as companions or pets, wildlife, and animals in zoos and  aquariums, women are more likely than men to think it’s important to protect animals raised for food  (93% vs. 86%), in laboratories (91% vs. 81%), in circuses and rodeos (88% vs. 82%), and horses and  dogs used in racing (86% vs. 80%).  Also, those who support the Universal Declaration on Animal  Welfare are significantly more likely to see the importance of the welfare and protection of animals in  most of these situations, including animals kept as companions or animals (95% vs. 82%), wildlife  (95% vs. 81%), animals in zoos and aquariums (92% vs. 79%), animals raised for food (92% vs. 61%),  animals in laboratories (88% vs. 61%), and animals in circuses and rodeos (86% vs. 71%).    Almost all Canadians agree that the Canadian government should support a Universal Declaration on  Animal Welfare at the United Nations (91%).  Women are more likely than men to show support (95%  vs. 88%).  While most Conservative voters would support a Universal Declaration on Animal Welfare  at the United Nations (84%), they are the least likely party to do so (vs. Liberals (92%), NDP (97%), BQ  (97%), and Green (96%)).  Also, those who have rarely/never hunted or fished in the past year are  more likely to support this Universal Declaration (93% vs. 83%).    Corporate/Social Responsibility  Fair wages (53%), employee working conditions (42%), and animal welfare (41%) are the top 3 issues  that are most important to Canadians regarding corporate social responsibility in the grocery and  restaurant sectors.  Women are more likely than men to indicate animal welfare is one of their top 3  most important issues (46% vs. 36%).  Animal welfare is also important to today’s youth – two‐thirds  (67%) of those aged 18‐24 put animal welfare in the top 3 most important issues.  Income is another  factor – those whose household income is $40k or less (50%) also see the importance.  Green party  supporters (53%) are also more likely to include animal welfare in their top 3 (vs. Liberals at 35%,  Conservatives at 36%, NDP at 44%, and BQ at 34%).  Other groups of people who are more likely to  place animal welfare as one of their top 3 issues include:  those who think the welfare and protection  of animals raised for food is important (43%), those who would support a Universal Declaration  (44%), and those who often/sometimes consume meat or dairy substitutes (45%).    Most Canadians think it’s important that they be able to buy cage‐free meat and eggs at their local  grocery store or supermarket (84%), with half (49%) indicating it’s very important.  Those likely to  vote Liberal (84%), NDP (91%), or Green (90%) are more likely than those likely to vote Conservative  (75%) to believe it’s important to be able to buy cage‐free meat and eggs at their local grocery store  or supermarket.     

Page 4 of 7   

 

Most Canadians would support Canada adopting labeling standards similar to the European Union,  which would make it mandatory that all eggs sold be labeled according to method of production  (89%).  Women are more likely than men to support these standards (91% vs. 87%).  Canadians who  rarely/never hunt or fish are more likely than those who hunt or fish at least occasionally to support  Canada adopting these labeling standards (91% vs. 82%).  Again, those likely to vote Liberal (92%), BQ  (95%), or Green (96%) are more likely than those likely to vote Conservative (82%) to support these  labeling standards.    To better ensure the humane treatment of animals, most Canadians think grocery stores should stock  more cage‐free eggs and cage‐free pork (84%).  The younger generation – those aged 18‐34 – are  more likely than their older counterparts to agree (93% vs. 81%).  Those who have rarely/never gone  hunting or fishing in the past year are more likely than those who have hunted or fished at least  occasionally to agree (86% vs. 76%). Those likely to vote Conservative are less likely to think grocery  stores should stock more cage‐free eggs and cage‐free pork (71%) vs. Liberal (87%), NDP (89%), BQ  (92%), and Green (91%).      Fewer Canadians agree that grocery stores should sell only cage‐free eggs and cage‐free pork to  better ensure the humane treatment of animals (68%).  However, women are more likely than men  to agree (73% vs. 63%).  Interestingly, those whose household income is less than $40k are more  likely than those whose household income is over $100k to agree (72% vs. 62%).  Those who  rarely/never hunt or fish continue to be more likely to agree (71% vs. 56%).  Again, Conservatives are  least likely to support this initiative (52%) vs. Liberal (64%), NDP (75%), BQ (80%), and Green (84%).      Almost three‐quarters (72%) of Canadians agree that restaurants should only use cage‐free eggs and  cage‐free pork to better ensure the humane treatment of animals.  Regionally, those in  Manitoba/Saskatchewan are least likely to agree (54%).  Women are more likely than men to agree  (78% vs. 66%).  Again, Canadians who rarely/never hunt or fish are more likely to agree (74% vs.  63%).  Conservatives continue to be least likely to show support, with 54% agreeing vs. Liberal (70%),  NDP (82%), BQ (80%), and Green (84%).   

Page 5 of 7   

 

To better ensure the humane treatment of animals… Agree Grocery stores should stock more cage-f ree eggs and cage-f ree pork 38% 46% 11% 3%2% 84%

Restaurants should only use cagef ree eggs and cage-free pork

29%

43%

20%

5% 3%

72%

Grocery stores should sell only cagefree eggs and cage-f ree pork

26%

42%

23%

6% 2%

68%

0%

20% Strongly agree Agree

40% Disagree

60% Strongly disagree

80% Don't know/ref used

100%

    Canadians take various steps to help improve the welfare of animals.  In the past year, almost half  (45%) of Canadians have at least occasionally purchased free run, free range, cage free, SPCA certified  or certified organic eggs, specifically 26% have done so often and 20% occasionally.  Regionally,  British Columbians are significantly more likely to have purchased these types of eggs at least  occasionally in the past year (59%).  Not surprisingly, those with a household income of $60k or more  are more likely than those whose income is less than $60k to purchase these types of eggs at least  occasionally (55% vs. 38%).  Those who have consumed a meat or dairy substitute at least  occasionally in the past year are also more likely to have purchased these types of eggs in the past  year (54% vs. 33%).    In the past year, just over half (55%) of Canadians have consumed a meat or dairy substitute at least  occasionally, specifically 34% have done so often and 21% sometimes.  Regionally, Quebecers are  more likely to have consumed a meat or dairy substitute often during the past year (48%), while  Albertans are more likely to have rarely consumed meat or dairy substitutes (30%), and those in  Manitoba/Saskatchewan are more likely to have never consumed a meat or dairy substitute in the  past year (47%).  Women are more likely than men to have at least sometimes consumed a meat or  dairy substitute (58% vs. 51%).  Other groups that are more likely to have consumed a meat or dairy  substitute in the past year include:  those who live in a city (59%), those who placed animal welfare as  one of their top 3 most important issues (60%), those who support the Universal Declaration (56%),  and those who purchase free‐run eggs at least sometimes (66%).   

Page 6 of 7   

 

In the past year, I have personally…

Of ten/ Sometimes 28% 9% 6% 85%

Watched wildlif e Consumed a meat substitute or a dairy substitute Purchased free run, free range, cage free, SPCA certified or certif ied organic eggs Donated to an animal group 17% 26%

57%

34%

21%

14%

29%

2%

55%

20%

15%

36%

3%

45%

24%

16%

42%

41%

Visited a zoo or aquarium

7%

22%

26%

45%

28%

Gone hunting or fishing

11%

9%

12%

68%

20%

Volunteered f or an animal group

5%

8%

10%

77%

13%

Gone to a circus with animals 1% 5% 0%

15% 20% Of ten Sometimes 40% Rarely

79% 60% Never 80% Don't know/ref used 100%

6%

  In the past year, 20% of Canadians have gone hunting or fishing often or sometimes.  Those in  Manitoba/ Saskatchewan are more likely than the rest of Canada to have done hunted or fished at  least occasionally (32%).  Men are more likely than women to have hunted/fished in the past year  (28% vs. 12%).  Those who live in rural areas (28%) and those who don’t support the Universal  Declaration (37%) are also more likely to have gone hunting or fishing at least occasionally during the  past year.  Those likely to vote Conservative (29%) are also more likely to have hunted or fished at  least occasionally in the past year (vs. Liberals (17%), NDP (17%), and Green (12%)).    If their personal choice to purchase cage‐free eggs led to the more humane treatment of farm  animals, almost three‐quarters (72%) of Canadians would be willing to pay a little more (about 20  cents) per egg.  Regionally, those in Manitoba/Saskatchewan are least likely to be willing (58%).   Women (77%) are more likely than men (66%) to be willing to pay a little more per egg.  Those who  rarely/never hunt or fish are more likely than those who hunt/fish more frequently to be willing to  pay a bit more for their eggs (75% vs. 59%).  Conservatives are least likely to be willing to pay a little  more per egg (58%) vs. Liberal (73%), NDP (80%), BQ (73%), and Green (89%).    About the survey  This study was commissioned by WSPA and conducted by Harris/Decima via telephone from October  26th to November 7th, 2010.  A total of 1,007 Canadians were surveyed.  The associated margin of  error is +/‐3.1%, 19 times out of 20.   

Page 7 of 7   

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful